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Sample records for augmented t-cell immunity

  1. Augmentation of Antitumor Immunity by Human and Mouse CAR T Cells Secreting IL-18

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    Biliang Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of transgenically encoded human and mouse IL-18 on T cell proliferation and its application in boosting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are presented. Robust enhancement of proliferation of IL-18-secreting human T cells occurred in a xenograft model, and this was dependent on TCR and IL-18R signaling. IL-18 augmented IFN-γ secretion and proliferation of T cells activated by the endogenous TCR. TCR-deficient, human IL-18-expressing CD19 CAR T cells exhibited enhanced proliferation and antitumor activity in the xenograft model. Antigen-propelled activation of cytokine helper ensemble (APACHE CAR T cells displayed inducible expression of IL-18 and enhanced antitumor immunity. In an intact mouse tumor model, CD19-IL-18 CAR T cells induced deeper B cell aplasia, significantly enhanced CAR T cell proliferation, and effectively augmented antitumor effects in mice with B16F10 melanoma. These findings point to a strategy to develop universal CAR T cells for patients with solid tumors.

  2. Artesunate enhances γδ T-cell-mediated antitumor activity through augmenting γδ T-cell function and reversing immune escape of HepG2 cells.

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    Qian, Peng; Zhang, Yong-Wen; Zhou, Zhong-Hai; Liu, Jun-Quan; Yue, Su-Yang; Guo, Xiang-Li; Sun, Lei-Qing; Lv, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2018-02-06

    To explore the effect and mechanism of artesunate on γδ T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses against hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG2) in vitro. Human γδ T cells or HepG2 were respectively treated with artesunate, subjected to co-culture as appropriate, and the following assays were subsequently conducted: CCK8 to examine cell viability; LDH release assay to detect the killing effect of γδ T cells on HepG2 cells; flow cytometry to examine the expression of perforin (PFP) and granzyme B (GraB) of γδ T cells; ELISA to evaluate the levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 in the collected supernatant of HepG2 cells pretreated with artesunate; and Western blot analysis to examine Fas, FasL, STAT3, p-STAT3 expression of HepG2 cells induced by artesunate.  Results: The results showed that the cytotoxicity effect of γδ T cells pretreated with artesunate on HepG2 cells was augmented via elevating the expression of GraB in γδ T cells. Furthermore, treatment with artesunate reversed the inhibition of HepG2 cells on γδ T cells by reducing the secretion of TGF-β1 in HepG2 cells supernatant and enhanced the antitumor effect of γδ T cells against HepG2 cells through increasing the expression of Fas on HepG2 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of STAT3 signaling protein. Artesunate has several mechanisms for augmenting the antitumor immune responses mediated by γδ T cells. These results suggested artesunate may be an efficacious agent in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Fusion of a viral antigen to invariant chain leads to augmented T-cell immunity and improved protection in gene-gun DNA-vaccinated mice

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    Grujic, Mirjana; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    against lethal peripheral challenge. The current study questioned whether the same strategy, i.e. linkage of GP to an Ii chain, could be applied to a naked DNA vaccine. Following gene-gun immunization with the linked construct (DNA-IiGP), GP-specific CD4(+) T cells could not be detected by flow cytometry...... with the unlinked construct. In contrast, substantial protection against peripheral challenge was not observed. Additional experiments with T-cell subset-depleted or perforin-deficient mice revealed that virus control in vaccinated mice depends critically on cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Finally, priming with the naked...

  4. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

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    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  5. T cell metabolism and the immune response.

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    Verbist, Katherine C; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2012-12-01

    As T cells respond to pathogens, they must transition from a quiescent, naïve state, to a rapidly proliferating, active effector state, and back again to a quiescent state as they develop into memory cells. Such transitions place unique metabolic demands on the differentiating cells. T cells meet these demands by altering their metabolic profiles, which are, in turn, regulated by distinct signaling cascades and transcriptional programs. Here, we examine the metabolic profiles of T cells during an acute immune response and discuss the signal and transcriptional regulators of these metabolic changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulatory T Cell Immunity in Atherosclerosis

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    Hilman Zulkifli Amin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving innate and adaptive immunity process. Effector T cell (Teff responses promote atherosclerotic disease, whereas regulatory T cells (Tregs have been shown to play a protective role against atherosclerosis by down-regulating inflammatory responses which include multiple mechanisms. Compelling experimental data suggest that shifting the Treg/Teff balance toward Tregs may be a possible therapeutic approach for atherosclerotic disease, although the role of Tregs in human atherosclerotic disease has not been fully elucidated. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the roles of Tregs and Teffs in experimental atherosclerosis, as well as human coronary artery disease.

  7. T Cell Metabolic Fitness in Anti-Tumor Immunity

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    Siska, Peter J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    T cell metabolism plays a central role to support and shape immune responses and may play a key role in anti-tumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through PD-1, to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory...

  8. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  9. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

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    Anabelle Visperas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  10. The role of T cell immunity in HIV-1 infection.

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    Munier, C Mee Ling; Kelleher, Anthony D; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2013-08-01

    The interplay between the T cell immune response and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 largely determines the outcome of infection. Typically, the virus overcomes the immune defences leading to a gradual decline in function that permits the development of disease. In recent years, a concerted effort in comparing T cell responses between 'controllers' and 'progressors' is beginning to identify the T cell subsets and factors that affect disease progression related to the effector functions of both CD4 and CD8 T cells. These efforts are providing opportunities for development of novel therapies and vaccines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

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    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  12. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2013-01-01

    peptides induced normal peptide immunity i.e. the specific T cell reactivity in the Elispot culture was strictly dependent on exposure to the immunizing peptide ex vivo. However, immunization with two of the peptides, a VSV- and a Mycobacterium-derived peptide, resulted in IFNγ spot formation without...... peptide in the Elispot culture. Immunization with a mixture of the VSV-peptide and a "normal" peptide also resulted in IFNγ spot formation without addition of peptide to the assay culture. Peptide-tetramer staining of CD8(+) T cells from mice immunized with a mixture of VSV-peptide and "normal" peptide...

  13. IL-33 in T Cell Differentiation, Function, and Immune Homeostasis.

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    Peine, Michael; Marek, Roman M; Löhning, Max

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a role for the alarmin interleukin (IL)-33 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation and function, and have also revealed important distinctions. The IL-33 receptor ST2 is constitutively and abundantly expressed on T-helper-2 (Th2) and GATA-3(+) regulatory T cells in a GATA-3- and STAT5-dependent manner. Upon activation, Th1 and cytotoxic T cells express ST2 transiently, driven by T-bet and/or STAT4. We review these findings here, and critically examine evidence indicating that IL-33 enhances the differentiation and functionality of various T cell subsets through positive feedback loops involving lineage-specifying transcription factors. In this context, we discuss how quantitative and qualitative differences in ST2 expression between effector and GATA-3(+) regulatory T cells may contribute to immune homeostasis, and outline important areas of future inquiry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondria: A master regulator in macrophage and T cell immunity.

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    Liu, Pu-Ste; Ho, Ping-Chih

    2017-11-14

    Orchestrating biological activities of immune cells through metabolic reprogramming reveals a new approach to harnessing immune responses. Increasing evidence reveals that the mitochondrion is a central regulator for modulating metabolic reprogramming and controlling immune cell activation and functions. In addition to supporting bioenergetic demands, the mitochondrion serves as a signaling platform through the generation of reactive oxygen species and metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle to modulate signaling cascades controlling immune cell activation and immune responses. Herein, we discuss the mechanisms through which the mitochondrion acts as a master regulator to fine-tune immune responses elicited by macrophages and T cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Structural and functional correlates of enhanced antiviral immunity generated by heteroclitic CD8 T cell epitopes.

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    Trujillo, Jonathan A; Gras, Stephanie; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Croft, Nathan P; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Rossjohn, Jamie; Purcell, Anthony W; Perlman, Stanley

    2014-06-01

    Peptides that bind poorly to MHC class I molecules often elicit low-functional avidity T cell responses. Peptide modification by altering the anchor residue facilitates increased binding affinity and may elicit T cells with increased functional avidity toward the native epitope ("heteroclitic"). This augmented MHC binding is likely to increase the half-life and surface density of the heteroclitic complex, but precisely how this enhanced T cell response occurs in vivo is not known. Furthermore, the ideal heteroclitic epitope will elicit T cell responses that completely cross-react with the native epitope, maximizing protection and minimizing undesirable off-target effects. Such epitopes have been difficult to identify. In this study, using mice infected with a murine coronavirus that encodes epitopes that elicit high (S510, CSLWNGPHL)- and low (S598, RCQIFANI)-functional avidity responses, we show that increased expression of peptide S598 but not S510 generated T cells with enhanced functional avidity. Thus, immune responses can be augmented toward T cell epitopes with low functional avidity by increasing Ag density. We also identified a heteroclitic epitope (RCVIFANI) that elicited a T cell response with nearly complete cross-reactivity with native epitope and demonstrated increased MHC/peptide abundance compared with native S598. Structural and thermal melt analyses indicated that the Q600V substitution enhanced stability of the peptide/MHC complex without greatly altering the antigenic surface, resulting in highly cross-reactive T cell responses. Our data highlight that increased peptide/MHC complex display contributes to heteroclitic epitope efficacy and describe parameters for maximizing immune responses that cross-react with the native epitope. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

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    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  17. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

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    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  18. Robust Anti-viral Immunity Requires Multiple Distinct T Cell-Dendritic Cell Interactions.

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    Eickhoff, Sarah; Brewitz, Anna; Gerner, Michael Y; Klauschen, Frederick; Komander, Karl; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Garbi, Natalio; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Germain, Ronald Nathan; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang

    2015-09-10

    Host defense against viruses and intracellular parasites depends on effector CD8(+) T cells, whose optimal clonal expansion, differentiation, and memory properties require signals from CD4(+) T cells. Here, we addressed the role of dendritic cell (DC) subsets in initial activation of the two T cell types and their co-operation. Surprisingly, initial priming of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was spatially segregated within the lymph node and occurred on different DCs with temporally distinct patterns of antigen presentation via MHCI versus MHCII molecules. DCs that co-present antigen via both MHC molecules were detected at a later stage; these XCR1(+) DCs are the critical platform involved in CD4(+) T cell augmentation of CD8(+) T cell responses. These findings delineate the complex choreography of cellular interactions underlying effective cell-mediated anti-viral responses, with implications for basic DC subset biology, as well as for translational application to the development of vaccines that evoke optimal T cell immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Foetal immune programming: hormones, cytokines, microbes and regulatory T cells.

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    Hsu, Peter; Nanan, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental cues play important roles in shaping the immune system. The first environment that the developing foetal immune system encounters is the uterus. Although physically the mother and the foetus are separated by the placental membranes, various factors such as hormones and cytokines may provide "environmental cues" to the foetal immune system. Additionally, increasing evidence suggests that prenatal maternal environmental factors, particularly microbial exposure, might significantly influence the foetal immune system, affecting long-term outcomes, a concept termed foetal immune programming. Here we discuss the potential mediators of foetal immune programming, focusing on the role of pregnancy-related hormones, cytokines and regulatory T cells, which play a critical role in immune tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The interplay of sequence conservation and T cell immune recognition

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    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Sette, Alessandro; Greenbaum, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Predicting which peptides can elicit a T cell response (i.e. are immunogenic) is of great importance for many immunological studies. While it is clear that MHC binding is a necessary requirement for peptide immunogenicity, other variables exist that are incompletely understood. In this study we...... the Immune Epitope Database with their conservation in the human microbiome. Indeed, we did see a lower immunogenicity for conserved peptides conserved. While many aspects how this conservation comparison is done require further optimization, this is a first step towards a better understanding T cell...

  1. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells.

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    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-24

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy.

  2. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

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    Jerod A Skyberg

    Full Text Available γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/- mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-, and GMCSF(-/- mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/- mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  3. Delineation of canine parvovirus T cell epitopes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T cell clones from immunized dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.C.M. Poelen (Martien); R.H. Meloen; J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThree synthetic peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of VP2 of canine parvovirus (CPV) which were recently shown to represent three distinct T cell epitopes for BALB/c mice could prime BALB/c mice for a CPV-specific proliferative T cell response upon immunization. Proliferative

  4. Immunization strategies against pulmonary tuberculosis: considerations of T cell geography.

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    Horvath, Carly N; Xing, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health concern with an astounding 9 million new cases and 2 million deaths per year. This leading infectious cause of death remains highly prevalent with one third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) despite routine vaccination against TB in endemic areas. The only approved TB vaccine is the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), which provides protection against childhood miliary tuberculosis and has been administered intradermally in humans for almost a century. While effective in preventing disseminated forms of TB, the BCG has variable efficacy in providing protection against pulmonary TB. Therefore, the BCG has been unable to control the instance of adult pulmonary TB which constitutes the global disease burden. Despite the fact that mechanisms underlying the lack of pulmonary protection provided by the BCG remain poorly understood, it remains the "Gold Standard" for vaccine-mediated protection against M.tb and will continue to be used for the foreseeable future. Therefore, continued effort has been placed on understanding the mechanisms behind the failure of BCG to provide sufficient protection against M.tb in the lung and to design new vaccines to be used in conjunction with the BCG as boost strategies to install protective immunity at the site of infection. Growing evidence supports that the route of immunization dictates the geographical location of TB-reactive T cells, and it is this distribution which predicts the protective outcome of such vaccine-elicited immunity. Such vaccines that are able to localize TB-reactive T cells to the lung and airway mucosa are thought to fill the "immunological gap" in the lung that is required for enhanced protection against M.tb infection. This chapter focuses on the critical importance of T cell geography when designing new immunization strategies against pulmonary TB.

  5. Airway CD8(+) T cells induced by pulmonary DNA immunization mediate protective anti-viral immunity.

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    Bivas-Benita, M; Gillard, G O; Bar, L; White, K A; Webby, R J; Hovav, A-H; Letvin, N L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for protection against a number of respiratory pathogens must induce T-cell populations in both the pulmonary airways and peripheral lymphoid organs. In this study, we show that pulmonary immunization using plasmid DNA formulated with the polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI-DNA) induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in the airways that persisted long after antigen local clearance. The persistence of the cells was not mediated by local lymphocyte proliferation or persistent antigen presentation within the lung or airways. These vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells effectively mediated protective immunity against respiratory challenges with vaccinia virus and influenza virus. Moreover, this protection was not dependent upon the recruitment of T cells from peripheral sites. These findings demonstrate that pulmonary immunization with PEI-DNA is an efficient approach for inducing robust pulmonary CD8(+) T-cell populations that are effective at protecting against respiratory pathogens.

  6. A20 Curtails Primary but Augments Secondary CD8(+) T Cell Responses in Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

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    Just, Sissy; Nishanth, Gopala; Buchbinder, Jörn H; Wang, Xu; Naumann, Michael; Lavrik, Inna; Schlüter, Dirk

    2016-12-22

    The ubiquitin-modifying enzyme A20, an important negative feedback regulator of NF-κB, impairs the expansion of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells but augments the proliferation of autoimmune CD4(+) T cells. To study the T cell-specific function of A20 in bacterial infection, we infected T cell-specific A20 knockout (CD4-Cre A20(fl/fl)) and control mice with Listeria monocytogenes. A20-deficient pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells expanded stronger resulting in improved pathogen control at day 7 p.i. Imaging flow cytometry revealed that A20-deficient Listeria-specific CD8(+) T cells underwent increased apoptosis and necroptosis resulting in reduced numbers of memory CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, the primary CD4(+) T cell response was A20-independent. Upon secondary infection, the increase and function of pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as pathogen control were significantly impaired in CD4-Cre A20(fl/fl) mice. In vitro, apoptosis and necroptosis of Listeria-specific A20-deficient CD8(+) T cells were strongly induced as demonstrated by increased caspase-3/7 activity, RIPK1/RIPK3 complex formation and more morphologically apoptotic and necroptotic CD8(+) T cells. In vitro, A20 limited CD95L and TNF-induced caspase3/7 activation. In conclusion, T cell-specific A20 limited the expansion but reduced apoptosis and necroptosis of Listeria-specific CD8(+) T cells, resulting in an impaired pathogen control in primary but improved clearance in secondary infection.

  7. Augmenting Anti-Tumor T Cell Responses to Mimotope Vaccination by Boosting with Native Tumor Antigens

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    Buhrman, Jonathan D.; Jordan, Kimberly R.; U’Ren, Lance; Sprague, Jonathan; Kemmler, Charles B.; Slansky, Jill E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination with antigens expressed by tumors is one strategy for stimulating enhanced T cell responses against tumors. However, these peptide vaccines rarely result in efficient expansion of tumor-specific T cells or responses that protect against tumor growth. Mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, elicit increased numbers of T cells that cross-react with the native tumor antigen, resulting in potent anti-tumor responses. Unfortunately, mimotopes may also elicit cells that do not cross-react or have low affinity for tumor antigen. We previously showed that one such mimotope of the dominant MHC class I tumor antigen of a mouse colon carcinoma cell-line stimulates a tumor-specific T cell clone and elicits antigen-specific cells in vivo, yet protects poorly against tumor growth. We hypothesized that boosting the mimotope vaccine with the native tumor antigen would focus the T cell response elicited by the mimotope towards high affinity, tumor-specific T cells. We show that priming T cells with the mimotope, followed by a native tumor-antigen boost improves tumor immunity, compared to T cells elicited by the same prime with a mimotope boost. Our data suggest that the improved tumor immunity results from the expansion of mimotope-elicited tumor-specific T cells that have increased avidity for the tumor antigen. The enhanced T cells are phenotypically distinct and enriched for T cell receptors previously correlated with improved anti-tumor immunity. These results suggest that incorporation of native antigen into clinical mimotope vaccine regimens may improve the efficacy of anti-tumor T cell responses. PMID:23161490

  8. Interferon-Beta Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Patients Improves the Responsiveness of T Cells for Immune Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

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    Bettina Trinschek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by imbalanced immune regulatory networks, and MS patient-derived T effector cells are inefficiently suppressed through regulatory T cells (Treg, a phenomenon known as Treg resistance. In the current study we investigated T cell function in MS patients before and after interferon-beta therapy. We compared cytokine profile, responsiveness for Treg-mediated suppression ex vivo and evaluated reactivity of T cells in vivo using a humanized mouse model. We found that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of therapy-naive MS patients were resistant to Treg-mediated suppression. Treg resistance is associated with an augmented IL-6 production, enhanced IL-6 receptor expression, and increased PKB/c-Akt phosphorylation. These parameters as well as responsiveness of T cells to Treg-mediated suppression were restored after interferon-beta therapy of MS patients. Following transfer into immunodeficient mice, MS T cells induced a lethal graft versus host disease (GvHD and in contrast to T cells of healthy volunteers, this aggressive T cell response could not be controlled by Treg, but was abolished by anti-IL-6 receptor antibodies. However, magnitude and lethality of GvHD induced by MS T cells was significantly decreased after interferon-beta therapy and the reaction was prevented by Treg activation in vivo. Our data reveals that interferon-beta therapy improves the immunoregulation of autoaggressive T effector cells in MS patients by changing the IL-6 signal transduction pathway, thus restoring their sensitivity to Treg-mediated suppression.

  9. Regulatory T cells in γ irradiation-induced immune suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh I McFarland

    Full Text Available Sublethal total body γ irradiation (TBI of mammals causes generalized immunosuppression, in part by induction of lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we provide evidence that a part of this immune suppression may be attributable to dysfunction of immune regulation. We investigated the effects of sublethal TBI on T cell memory responses to gain insight into the potential for loss of vaccine immunity following such exposure. We show that in mice primed to an MHC class I alloantigen, the accelerated graft rejection T memory response is specifically lost several weeks following TBI, whereas identically treated naïve mice at the same time point had completely recovered normal rejection kinetics. Depletion in vivo with anti-CD4 or anti-CD25 showed that the mechanism involved cells consistent with a regulatory T cell (T reg phenotype. The loss of the T memory response following TBI was associated with a relative increase of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ expressing T regs, as compared to the CD8+ T effector cells requisite for skin graft rejection. The radiation-induced T memory suppression was shown to be antigen-specific in that a third party ipsilateral graft rejected with normal kinetics. Remarkably, following the eventual rejection of the first MHC class I disparate skin graft, the suppressive environment was maintained, with markedly prolonged survival of a second identical allograft. These findings have potential importance as regards the immunologic status of T memory responses in victims of ionizing radiation exposure and apoptosis-inducing therapies.

  10. Immune modulatory effect of thalidomide on T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B S; Kim, J Y; Lee, J G; Cho, Y; Huh, K H; Kim, M S; Kim, Y S

    2015-04-01

    Thalidomide was originally used to alleviate morning sickness in pregnant women, but was banned due to severe adverse effects. Since the discovery of its anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties, it has regained research interest. However, its mechanism of action is still unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of thalidomide on effector T (Teff) and regulatory T (Treg) cells in splenocytes of mice. Splenic CD4(+), CD44(low), and CD62L(high) T lymphocytes (Tnaives) isolated from C57BL/6 mice were cultured for T-cell proliferation and Treg conversion. For T-cell proliferation, naive T cells (Tnaives) were cultured for 72 hours with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling method was used. For Treg conversion, Tnaives were cultured for 72 hours with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Naïve T cells were plated at 1.5 × 10(5) cells on 96-well plates with 0, 1, 10, 50, or 100 μmol/L thalidomide. All samples were analyzed by flow cytometry after staining with CFSE, APC-conjugated anti-mouse CD4, and FITC-conjugated anti-mouse FoxP3. Thalidomide significantly decreased the proliferation of CD4(+) Teffs in a dose-dependent manner (P thalidomide treatment, although the increase was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that thalidomide may have an immune modulatory effect by selectively suppressing CD4(+) Teff proliferation. Further studies will be needed to elucidate the underlying signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid and sustained CD4(+) T-cell-independent immunity from adenovirus-encoded vaccine antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Bartholdy, Christina; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2007-01-01

    Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein to that e......Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein...... to that elicited with an adenovirus-encoded minimal epitope covalently linked to beta(2)-microglobulin. We demonstrate that the beta(2)-microglobulin-linked epitope induced an accelerated and augmented CD8(+) T-cell response. Furthermore, the immunity conferred by vaccination with beta(2)-microglobulin...... in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help were sustained in the long term and able to expand and control a secondary challenge with LCMV. Our results demonstrate that modifications to the antigen used in adenovirus vaccines may be used to improve the induced T-cell response. Such a strategy for CD4(+) T...

  12. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  13. Protection against HIV-disease progression: From immune activation to T-cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.B.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection undermines the immune system by causing a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells. Eventually, the weakened immune system is no longer able to offer resistance to opportunistic infections and the HIV-infected individual will develop AIDS. Even after 30 years of intensive research on HIV, there is

  14. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  15. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  16. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin E Kara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H1/T(H2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  17. Antigen Display, T-Cell Activation, and Immune Evasion during Acute and Chronic Ehrlichiosis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Chatterjee, Madhumouli; Hogle, Kathryn; McLaughlin, Maura; MacNamara, Katherine; Racine, Rachael; Winslow, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    How spatial and temporal changes in major histocompatibility complex/peptide antigen presentation to CD4 T cells regulate CD4 T-cell responses during intracellular bacterial infections is relatively unexplored. We have shown that immunization with an ehrlichial outer membrane protein, OMP-19, protects mice against fatal ehrlichial challenge infection, and we identified a CD4 T-cell epitope (IAb/OMP-19107-122) that elicited CD4 T cells following either immunization or infection. Here, we have ...

  18. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  19. Decline of T cell-related immune functions in cancer patients and an attempt to restore them through infusion of activated autologous T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Utsuyama, Masanori; Ishikawa, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Yuko; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Fujii, Yuzo; Nariuchi, Hideo; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scoring system that can combine several immunological parameters and express the immune status of individuals as a simple numeral. T cell immune score was obtained by using 5T cell-related parameters: number of T cells, ratio of CD4(+)T cells to CD8(+)T cells, number of naïve T cells, ratio of naïve T cells to memory T cells, and T cell proliferative index (TCPI). TCPI was calculated by using number of T cells and their proliferative activity. We assessed T cell immune score in 103 patients with colorectal cancer and 51 healthy age-matched controls. The results were as follows: (1) T cell-immune score of patients in stages I-IV before surgery was significantly decreased as compared with controls. (2) The number of regulatory T cells in patients in stages I-IV gradually increased with disease progression. (3) T cell immune score was strongly suppressed after surgery, but were recovered to the initial level within a month. (4) Furthermore, restoration of immunological function was attempted in cancer patients by infusion of activated autologous T cells. The effectiveness was confirmed by an increase of TCPI in many cancer patients.

  20. Regulatory T Cells in Post-stroke Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesz, Arthur; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    The secondary neuroinflammatory response has come into focus of experimental stroke research. Immunological mechanisms after acute stroke are being investigated in the hope to identify novel and druggable pathways that contribute to secondary infarct growth after stroke. Among a variety of neuroimmunological events after acute brain ischemia, including microglial activation, brain leukocyte invasion, and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors, lymphocytes have been identified as the key leukocyte subpopulation driving the neuroinflammatory response and contributing to stroke outcome. Several studies have shown that pro-inflammatory lymphocyte subpopulations worsen stroke outcome and that inhibiting their invasion to the injured brain is neuroprotective. In contrast to the effector functions of pro-inflammatory lymphocytes, regulatory T cells (Treg) are critically involved in maintaining immune homeostasis and have been characterized as disease-limiting protective cells in several inflammatory conditions, particularly in primary inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). However, due to the complex function of regulatory cells in immune homeostasis and disease, divergent findings have been described for the role of Treg in stroke models. Emerging evidence suggests that this discrepancy arises from potentially differing functions of Treg depending on the predominant site of action within the neurovascular unit and the surrounding inflammatory milieu. This article will provide a comprehensive review of current findings on Treg in brain ischemia models and discuss potential reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  1. Co-delivery of PLGA encapsulated invariant NKT cell agonist with antigenic protein induce strong T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolen, Y.; Kreutz, M.; Gileadi, U.; Tel, J.; Vasaturo, A.; Dinther, E.A.W. van; Hout-Kuijer, M.A. van; Cerundolo, V.; Figdor, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor immunity can be enhanced by the coordinated release and delivery of antigens and immune-stimulating agents to antigen-presenting cells via biodegradable vaccine carriers. So far, encapsulation of TLR ligands and tumor-associated antigens augmented cytotoxic T cell (CTLs) responses. Here,

  2. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Samuel M; Carpenter, Stephen M; Booty, Matthew G; Barber, Daniel L; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-12-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease--the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Complementing T-cell Function: An Inhibitory Role of the Complement System in T-cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiyi; McKenzie, Jodi A; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    New data from Wang and colleagues show that complement C3 suppresses the function of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating T cells by inhibiting IL10 production, and targeting the complement receptors C3aR and C5aR enhances the antitumor activity of immune checkpoint blockade. Their results not only define a new role of complement receptors as T-cell coinhibitory receptors, but also are useful in the development of novel strategies to improve the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Discov; 6(9); 953-5. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Wang et al., p. 1022. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 blockade augments the T-cell response primed by attenuated Listeria monocytogenes resulting in more rapid clearance of virulent bacterial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jared H; Johanns, Tanner M; Ertelt, James M; Lai, Joseph C; Way, Sing Sing

    2009-09-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) uniformly suppresses antigen-specific T cells during chronic infection with bacterial, parasitic or viral pathogens. However, the importance of CTLA-4 in controlling the T-cell response during acute infection or after priming with live attenuated vaccine vectors has not been well characterized. Since strategies aimed at blocking CTLA-4 are being actively developed to therapeutically augment T-cell-mediated immunity, the effects of CTLA-4 blockade on T-cell activation during these conditions need to be more clearly defined. We have examined the role of CTLA-4 in a prime-challenge model of acute bacterial infection using both attenuated and virulent strains of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Although Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells are the predominant CTLA-4-expressing cell type in naïve mice, antigen-specific Foxp3(-) CD4(+) cells upregulate CTLA-4 expression after primary L. monocytogenes infection. Blockade of CTLA-4 results in increased numbers of L. monocytogenes-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after primary infection with attenuated L. monocytogenes, and confers more rapid bacterial clearance after secondary challenge with virulent L. monocytogenes. Accordingly, CTLA-4 plays an important suppressive role in T-cell priming and protective immunity in a prime-challenge model of acute bacterial infection.

  5. Engineering antitumor immunity by T-cell adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Stanley R

    2007-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells has been used successfully to treat experimental tumors in animal models and viral infections in humans, but harnessing the exquisite specificity and potency of T cells to treat human malignancy has proven challenging. The efforts to use T cells to treat patients with cancer have often been informative in identifying limitations that must be overcome to improve therapeutic efficacy, and a clearer picture of the requirements for successful adoptive T-cell transfer is gradually emerging. Indolent and a subset of aggressive B-cell lymphomas in humans have been shown to be susceptible to eradication by T cells in clinical settings where highly immunogenic minor histocompatibility or viral antigens are presented by tumor cells. In this article, we will review how recent advances in our understanding of the properties of antigen-specific T cells that facilitate their long-term persistence in vivo and reversion to the memory pool after in vitro culture, combined with approaches to molecularly engineer T cells with receptors that target molecules expressed by B-cell lymphoma, are providing opportunities to broaden the application of T-cell therapy and improve its efficacy for this disease.

  6. T-cell mediated immunity in Wegener's granulomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Wayel Habib

    2008-01-01

    Although the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) are not completely understood, considerable evidence support the concepts that activated T-cells play an important role in disease expression. It is, however, not clear which subsets of T-cells are involved in the

  7. Discovering naturally processed antigenic determinants that confer protective T cell immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Spencer, Charles T; Conant, Stephanie B

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (TCD8) confer protective immunity against many infectious diseases, suggesting that microbial TCD8 determinants are promising vaccine targets. Nevertheless, current T cell antigen identification approaches do not discern which epitopes drive protective immunity during active infectio...

  8. Tissue reservoirs of antiviral T cell immunity in persistent human CMV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Claire L.; Thome, Joseph J.C.; Igarashi, Suzu

    2017-01-01

    T cell responses to viruses are initiated and maintained in tissue sites; however, knowledge of human antiviral T cells is largely derived from blood. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) persists in most humans, requires T cell immunity to control, yet tissue immune responses remain undefined. Here, we investigated human CMV-specific T cells, virus persistence and CMV-associated T cell homeostasis in blood, lymphoid, mucosal and secretory tissues of 44 CMV seropositive and 28 seronegative donors. CMV-specific T cells were maintained in distinct distribution patterns, highest in blood, bone marrow (BM), or lymph nodes (LN), with the frequency and function in blood distinct from tissues. CMV genomes were detected predominantly in lung and also in spleen, BM, blood and LN. High frequencies of activated CMV-specific T cells were found in blood and BM samples with low virus detection, whereas in lung, CMV-specific T cells were present along with detectable virus. In LNs, CMV-specific T cells exhibited quiescent phenotypes independent of virus. Overall, T cell differentiation was enhanced in sites of viral persistence with age. Together, our results suggest tissue T cell reservoirs for CMV control shaped by both viral and tissue-intrinsic factors, with global effects on homeostasis of tissue T cells over the lifespan. PMID:28130404

  9. Persistence and Adaptation in Immunity: T Cells Balance the Extent and Thoroughness of Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Matthew Fricke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective search strategies have evolved in many biological systems, including the immune system. T cells are key effectors of the immune response, required for clearance of pathogenic infection. T cell activation requires that T cells encounter antigen-bearing dendritic cells within lymph nodes, thus, T cell search patterns within lymph nodes may be a crucial determinant of how quickly a T cell immune response can be initiated. Previous work suggests that T cell motion in the lymph node is similar to a Brownian random walk, however, no detailed analysis has definitively shown whether T cell movement is consistent with Brownian motion. Here, we provide a precise description of T cell motility in lymph nodes and a computational model that demonstrates how motility impacts T cell search efficiency. We find that both Brownian and Lévy walks fail to capture the complexity of T cell motion. Instead, T cell movement is better described as a correlated random walk with a heavy-tailed distribution of step lengths. Using computer simulations, we identify three distinct factors that contribute to increasing T cell search efficiency: 1 a lognormal distribution of step lengths, 2 motion that is directionally persistent over short time scales, and 3 heterogeneity in movement patterns. Furthermore, we show that T cells move differently in specific frequently visited locations that we call "hotspots" within lymph nodes, suggesting that T cells change their movement in response to the lymph node environment. Our results show that like foraging animals, T cells adapt to environmental cues, suggesting that adaption is a fundamental feature of biological search.

  10. The CD28-related molecule ICOS is required for effective T cell-dependent immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, A J; Lehar, S; Lloyd, C; Tian, J; Delaney, T; Manning, S; Nguyen, T; Burwell, T; Schneider, H; Gonzalo, J A; Gosselin, M; Owen, L R; Rudd, C E; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C

    2000-07-01

    While CD28 is critical for expansion of naive T cells, recent evidence suggests that the activation of effector T cells is largely independent of CD28/B7. We suggest that ICOS, the third member of the CD28/CTLA-4 family, plays an important role in production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IFNgamma from recently activated T cells and contributes to T cell-dependent B help in vivo. Inhibition of ICOS attenuates lung mucosal inflammation induced by Th2 but not Th1 effector populations. Our data indicate a critical function for the third member of the CD28 family in T cell-dependent immune responses.

  11. T cell mediated cerebral hemorrhages and microhemorrhages during passive Aβ immunization in APPPS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Calignon Alix

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ, the peptide that accumulates in the form of senile plaques and in the cerebrovasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes a dramatic immune response that prevents plaque formation and clears accumulated Aβ in transgenic mice. In a clinical trial of Aβ immunization, some patients developed meningoencephalitis and hemorrhages. Neuropathological investigations of patients who died after the trial showed clearance of amyloid pathology, but also a powerful immune response involving activated T cells probably underlying the negative effects of the immunization. Results To define the impact of T cells on this inflammatory response we used passive immunization and adoptive transfer to separate the effect of IgG and T cell mediated effects on microhemorrhage in APPPS1 transgenic mice. Neither anti Aβ IgG nor adoptively transferred T cells, alone, led to increased cerebrovascular damage. However, the combination of adoptively transferred T cells and passive immunization led to massive cerebrovascular bleeding that ranged from multiple microhemorrhages in the parenchyma to large hematomas. Conclusions Our results indicate that vaccination can lead to Aβ and T cell induced cerebral micro-hemorrhages and acute hematomas, which are greatly exacerbated by T cell mediated activity.

  12. LOCAL IMMUNITY BY TISSUE-RESIDENT CD8+ MEMORY T CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eGebhardt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infection primes a CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response that gives rise to a long-lived population of circulating memory cells able to provide protection against systemic reinfection. Despite this, effective CD8+ T cell surveillance of barrier tissues such as skin and mucosa typically wanes with time, resulting in limited T cell-mediated protection in these peripheral tissues. However, recent evidence suggests that a specialized subset of CD103+ memory T cells can permanently lodge and persist in peripheral tissues, and that these cells can compensate for the loss of peripheral immune surveillance by circulating memory T cells. Here, we review evolving concepts regarding the generation and long-term persistence of these tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM in epithelial and neuronal tissues. We further discuss the role of TRM cells in local infection control and their contribution to localized immune phenomena, in both mice and humans.

  13. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase specific, cytotoxic T cells as immune regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Svane, Inge Marie

    2011-01-01

    , this caused an increase in the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha while decreasing the IL-10 production. Finally, the addition of IDO-inducing agents (ie, the TLR9 ligand cytosine-phosphate- guanosine, soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4......Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme that is implicated in suppressing T-cell immunity in normal and pathologic settings. Here, we describe that spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO exists not only in patients with cancer but also in healthy persons. We...... show that the presence of such IDO-specific CD8(+) T cells boosted T-cell immunity against viral or tumor-associated antigens by eliminating IDO+ suppressive cells. This had profound effects on the balance between interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells. Furthermore...

  14. The essential role of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in regulating T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dashan

    2018-02-12

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the critical role of GPCR signaling in T cell immunity. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets in current pharmaceutical industry, and represent the largest and most versatile family of cell surface communicating molecules. GPCRs can be activated by a diverse array of ligands including neurotransmitters, chemokines as well as sensory stimuli. Therefore, GPCRs are involved in many key cellular and physiological processes, such as sense of light, taste and smell, neurotransmission, metabolism, endocrine and exocrine secretion. In recent years, GPCRs have been found to play an important role in immune system. T cell is an important type of immune cell, which plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. A variety of GPCRs and their signaling mediators (RGS proteins, GRKs and β-arrestin) have been found to express in T cells and involved T cell-mediated immunity. We will summarize the role of GPCR signaling and their regulatory molecules in T cell activation, homeostasis and function in this article. GPCR signaling plays an important role in T cell activation, homeostasis and function. GPCR signaling is critical in regulating T cell immunity.

  15. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  16. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development. PMID:26038429

  17. A novel subset of helper T cells promotes immune responses by secreting GM-CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Roberts, A I; Liu, C; Ren, G; Xu, G; Zhang, L; Devadas, S; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Helper T cells are crucial for maintaining proper immune responses. Yet, they have an undefined relationship with one of the most potent immune stimulatory cytokines, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). By depleting major cytokines during the differentiation of CD4+ T cells in vitro, we derived cells that were found to produce large amounts of GM-CSF, but little of the cytokines produced by other helper T subsets. By their secretion of GM-CSF, this novel subset of helper T cells (which we have termed ThGM cells) promoted the production of cytokines by other T-cell subtypes, including type 1 helper T cell (Th1), type 2 helper T cell (Th2), type 1 cytotoxic T cell (Tc1), type 2 cytotoxic T cell (Tc2), and naive T cells, as evidenced by the fact that antibody neutralization of GM-CSF abolished this effect. ThGM cells were found to be highly prone to activation-induced cell death (AICD). Inhibitors of TRAIL or granzymes could not block AICD in ThGM cells, whereas inhibition of FasL/Fas interaction partially rescued ThGM cells from AICD. Thus, ThGM cells are a novel subpopulation of T helper cells that produce abundant GM-CSF, exhibit exquisite susceptibility to apoptosis, and therefore play a pivotal role in the regulation of the early stages of immune responses. PMID:24076588

  18. Combination of nanoparticle-based therapeutic vaccination and transient ablation of regulatory T cells enhances anti-viral immunity during chronic retroviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuschke, Torben; Rotan, Olga; Bayer, Wibke; Sokolova, Viktoriya; Hansen, Wiebke; Sparwasser, Tim; Dittmer, Ulf; Epple, Matthias; Buer, Jan; Westendorf, Astrid M

    2016-04-14

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to limit anti-viral immunity during chronic retroviral infection and to restrict vaccine-induced T cell responses. The objective of the study was to assess whether a combinational therapy of nanoparticle-based therapeutic vaccination and concomitant transient ablation of Tregs augments anti-viral immunity and improves virus control in chronically retrovirus-infected mice. Therefore, chronically Friend retrovirus (FV)-infected mice were immunized with calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles functionalized with TLR9 ligand CpG and CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cell epitope peptides (GagL85-93 or Env gp70123-141) of FV. In addition, Tregs were ablated during the immunization process. Reactivation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector T cells was analysed and the viral loads were determined. Therapeutic vaccination of chronically FV-infected mice with functionalized CaP nanoparticles transiently reactivated cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and significantly reduced the viral loads. Transient ablation of Tregs during nanoparticle-based therapeutic vaccination strongly enhanced anti-viral immunity and further decreased viral burden. Our data illustrate a crucial role for CD4(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs in the suppression of anti-viral T cell responses during therapeutic vaccination against chronic retroviral infection. Thus, the combination of transient Treg ablation and therapeutic nanoparticle-based vaccination confers robust and sustained anti-viral immunity.

  19. Vaginal immunization to elicit primary T-cell activation and dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pettini

    Full Text Available Primary T-cell activation at mucosal sites is of utmost importance for the development of vaccination strategies. T-cell priming after vaginal immunization, with ovalbumin and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant as model vaccine formulation, was studied in vivo in hormone-synchronized mice and compared to the one induced by the nasal route. Twenty-four hours after both vaginal or nasal immunization, antigen-loaded dendritic cells were detected within the respective draining lymph nodes. Vaginal immunization elicited a strong recruitment of antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells into draining lymph nodes that was more rapid than the one observed following nasal immunization. T-cell clonal expansion was first detected in iliac lymph nodes, draining the genital tract, and proliferated T cells disseminated towards distal lymph nodes and spleen similarly to what observed following nasal immunization. T cells were indeed activated by the antigen encounter and acquired homing molecules essential to disseminate towards distal lymphoid organs as confirmed by the modulation of CD45RB, CD69, CD44 and CD62L marker expression. A multi-type Galton Watson branching process, previously used for in vitro analysis of T-cell proliferation, was applied to model in vivo CFSE proliferation data in draining lymph nodes 57 hours following immunization, in order to calculate the probabilistic decision of a cell to enter in division, rest in quiescence or migrate/die. The modelling analysis indicated that the probability of a cell to proliferate was higher following vaginal than nasal immunization. All together these data show that vaginal immunization, despite the absence of an organized mucosal associated inductive site in the genital tract, is very efficient in priming antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells and inducing their dissemination from draining lymph nodes towards distal lymphoid organs.

  20. Adenosine Selectively Depletes Alloreactive T Cells to Prevent GVHD While Conserving Immunity to Viruses and Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Greg D; Amarnath, Shoba; Muranski, Pawel; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin J; Chinnassamy, Dhanalakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Selective depletion (SD) of alloreactive T cells from allogeneic hematopoeitic stem cell transplants to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) without compromising immune reconstitution and antitumor responses remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate a novel SD strategy whereby alloreacting T cells are efficiently deleted ex vivo with adenosine. SD was achieved in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched cocultures by multiple exposures to 2 mmol/l adenosine over 7 days. Adenosine depleted greater than to 90% of alloproliferating T cells in mismatched, haploidentical, and matched sibling pairs while conserving response to third-party antigens. Alloreactive CD4 and CD8 T cells were targeted for depletion while NK and B cells were preserved. Our novel approach also preserved nonalloreactive naive, central, and effector memory T-cell subsets, Tregs, and notably preserved T-cell responses against DNA viruses that contribute to transplant related mortality after allogeneic hematopoeitic stem cell transplants. Additionally, T cells recognizing leukemia-associated antigens were efficiently generated in vitro from the cell product post-SD. This study is the first to demonstrate that adenosine depletion of alloactivated T cells maintains a complete immune cell profile and recall viral responses. Expansion of tumor antigen-specific subsets postdepletion opens the possibility of generating T-cell products capable of graft-versus-tumor responses without causing GVHD.

  1. Aire Enforces Immune Tolerance by Directing Autoreactive T Cells into the Regulatory T Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Lee, Victoria; Nishi, Saki; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-05-17

    The promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens in the thymus, driven in part by autoimmune regulator (Aire), is critical for the protection of peripheral tissues from autoimmune attack. Aire-dependent processes are thought to promote both clonal deletion and the development of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, suggesting that autoimmunity associated with Aire deficiency results from two failed tolerance mechanisms. Here, examination of autoimmune lesions in Aire(-/-) mice revealed an unexpected third possibility. We found that the predominant conventional T cell clonotypes infiltrating target lesions express antigen receptors that were preferentially expressed by Foxp3(+) Treg cells in Aire(+/+) mice. Thus, Aire enforces immune tolerance by ensuring that distinct autoreactive T cell specificities differentiate into the Treg cell lineage; dysregulation of this process results in the diversion of Treg cell-biased clonotypes into pathogenic conventional T cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RAGE Expression in Human T Cells: A Link between Environmental Factors and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akirav, Eitan M.; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Garyu, Justin; Henegariu, Octavian; Clynes, Raphael; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Herold, Kevan C.

    2012-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a scavenger ligand that binds glycated endproducts as well as molecules released during cell death such as S100b and HMGB1. RAGE is expressed on antigen presenting cells where it may participate in activation of innate immune responses but its role in adaptive human immune responses has not been described. We have found that RAGE is expressed intracellularly in human T cells following TCR activation but constitutively on T cells from patients with diabetes. The levels of RAGE on T cells from patients with diabetes are not related to the level of glucose control. It co-localizes to the endosomes. Its expression increases in activated T cells from healthy control subjects but bystander cells also express RAGE after stimulation of the antigen specific T cells. RAGE ligands enhance RAGE expression. In patients with T1D, the level of RAGE expression decreases with T cell activation. RAGE+ T cells express higher levels of IL-17A, CD107a, and IL-5 than RAGE− cells from the same individual with T1D. Our studies have identified the expression of RAGE on adaptive immune cells and a role for this receptor and its ligands in modulating human immune responses. PMID:22509345

  3. HCV genotype-3a T cell immunity: specificity, function and impact of therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Isla S; von Delft, Annette; Brown, Anthony; Hibbert, Linda; Collier, Jane D; Foster, Graham R; Rahman, Monira; Christian, Annabel; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype-3a infection is now the dominant strain in South Asia and the UK. Characteristic features include a favourable response to therapy; the reasons for this are unknown but may include distinct genotype-3a-specific T cell immunity. In contrast to genotype-1 infection, T cell immunity to this subtype is poorly defined. Objectives The aims of the study were to (1) define the frequency, specificity and cross-reactivity of T cell immunity across the whole viral genome in genotype-3a infection and (2) assess the impact of interferon (IFN)-α/ribavirin on T cell immunity. Design T cell responses in chronic and resolved HCV genotype-3a were analysed in comparison with genotype-1 infection (total n=85) using specific peptide panels in IFN-γ ELISpot assays. T cell responses were followed longitudinally in a subset of genotype-3a infected patients receiving therapy. Responses were further defined by CD4 and CD8 subset analysis, sequencing of autologous virus and cross-reactivity of genotype-3a with genotype-1a/-1b antigens. Results CD8 T cell responses commonly targeted the non-structural (NS) proteins in chronic genotype-3a infection whereas in genotype-1 infection CD4 responses targeting HCV core predominated (p=0.0183). Resolved infection was associated with CD4 T cells targeting NS proteins. Paradoxically, a sustained response to therapy was associated with a brisk decline in virus-specific and total lymphocyte counts that recovered after treatment. Conclusion HCV genotype-3a exhibits a distinct T cell specificity with implications for vaccine design. However, our data do not support the theory that genotype-3a viral clearance with therapy is associated with an enhanced antiviral T cell response. Paradoxically, a reduction in these responses may serve as a biomarker of IFN responsiveness. PMID:22337948

  4. T cell costimulatory molecules in anti-viral immunity: Potential role in immunotherapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Tania H; Bertram, Edward M; Bukczynski, Jacob; Wen, Tao

    2003-07-01

    T lymphocyte activation is required to eliminate or control intracellular viruses. The activation of T cells requires both an antigen specific signal, involving the recognition of a peptide/major histocompatibility protein complex by the T cell receptor, as well as additional costimulatory signals. In chronic viral diseases, T cell responses, although present, are unable to eliminate the infection. By providing antigens and costimulatory molecules together, investigators may be able to increase and broaden the immune response, resulting in better immunological control or even elimination of the infection. Recent progress in understanding the function of costimulatory molecules suggests that different costimulatory molecules are involved in initial immune responses than are involved in recall responses. These new developments have important implications for therapeutic vaccine design. In this review the authors discuss the function of T cell costimulatory molecules in immune system activation and their potential for enhancing the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines.

  5. Adaptive Immunity in Schizophrenia: Functional Implications of T Cells in the Etiology, Course and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monojit

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and highly complex neurodevelopmental disorder with an unknown etiopathology. Recently, immunopathogenesis has emerged as one of the most compelling etiological models of schizophrenia. Over the past few years considerable research has been devoted to the role of innate immune responses in schizophrenia. The findings of such studies have helped to conceptualize schizophrenia as a chronic low-grade inflammatory disorder. Although the contribution of adaptive immune responses has also been emphasized, however, the precise role of T cells in the underlying neurobiological pathways of schizophrenia is yet to be ascertained comprehensively. T cells have the ability to infiltrate brain and mediate neuro-immune cross-talk. Conversely, the central nervous system and the neurotransmitters are capable of regulating the immune system. Neurotransmitter like dopamine, implicated widely in schizophrenia risk and progression can modulate the proliferation, trafficking and functions of T cells. Within brain, T cells activate microglia, induce production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as reactive oxygen species and subsequently lead to neuroinflammation. Importantly, such processes contribute to neuronal injury/death and are gradually being implicated as mediators of neuroprogressive changes in schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs, commonly used to treat schizophrenia are also known to affect adaptive immune system; interfere with the differentiation and functions of T cells. This understanding suggests a pivotal role of T cells in the etiology, course and treatment of schizophrenia and forms the basis of this review.

  6. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Côme

    Full Text Available The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects.

  7. Antigen display, T-cell activation, and immune evasion during acute and chronic ehrlichiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Chatterjee, Madhumouli; Hogle, Kathryn; McLaughlin, Maura; MacNamara, Katherine; Racine, Rachael; Winslow, Gary M

    2009-10-01

    How spatial and temporal changes in major histocompatibility complex/peptide antigen presentation to CD4 T cells regulate CD4 T-cell responses during intracellular bacterial infections is relatively unexplored. We have shown that immunization with an ehrlichial outer membrane protein, OMP-19, protects mice against fatal ehrlichial challenge infection, and we identified a CD4 T-cell epitope (IA(b)/OMP-19(107-122)) that elicited CD4 T cells following either immunization or infection. Here, we have used an IA(b)/OMP-19(107-122)-specific T-cell line to monitor antigen display ex vivo during acute and chronic infection with Ehrlichia muris, a bacterium that establishes persistent infection in C57BL/6 mice. The display of IA(b)/OMP-19(107-122) by host antigen-presenting cells was detected by measuring intracellular gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production by the T-cell line. After intravenous infection, antigen presentation was detected in the spleen, peritoneal exudate cells, and lymph nodes, although the kinetics of antigen display differed among the tissues. Antigen presentation and bacterial colonization were closely linked in each anatomical location, and there was a direct relationship between antigen display and CD4 T-cell effector function. Spleen and lymph node dendritic cells (DCs) were efficient presenters of IA(b)/OMP-19(107-122), demonstrating that DCs play an important role in ehrlichial infection and immunity. Chronic infection and antigen presentation occurred within the peritoneal cavity, even in the presence of highly activated CD4 T cells. These data indicated that the ehrlichiae maintain chronic infection not by inhibiting antigen presentation or T-cell activation but, in part, by avoiding signals mediated by activated T cells.

  8. Virus-specific T cells as correlate of (cross-)protective immunity against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburg, Arwen F; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; de Vries, Rory D

    2015-01-15

    Since inactivated influenza vaccines mainly confer protective immunity by inducing strain-specific antibodies to the viral hemagglutinin, these vaccines only afford protection against infection with antigenically matching influenza virus strains. Due to the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the inevitable future emergence of pandemic influenza viruses, there is considerable interest in the development of influenza vaccines that induce broader protective immunity. It has long been recognized that influenza virus-specific CD8(+) T cells directed to epitopes located in the relatively conserved internal proteins can cross-react with various subtypes of influenza A virus. This implies that these CD8(+) T cells, induced by prior influenza virus infections or vaccinations, could afford heterosubtypic immunity. Furthermore, influenza virus-specific CD4(+) T cells have been shown to be important in protection from infection, either via direct cytotoxic effects or indirectly by providing help to B cells and CD8(+) T cells. In the present paper, we review the induction of virus-specific T cell responses by influenza virus infection and the role of virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in viral clearance and conferring protection from subsequent infections with homologous or heterologous influenza virus strains. Furthermore, we discuss vector-based vaccination strategies that aim at the induction of a cross-reactive virus-specific T cell response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells...... significant differences between the two strains. Expression of VLA-1 was also found to be redundant regarding the ability of effector T cells to eliminate virus from internal organs of i.v. infected mice. Using delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assays to evaluate subdermal CD8(+) T......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection....

  11. The T-Cell Immune Response against Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Rebecca C; Mletzko, Salvinia; Gotch, Frances M

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the aetiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), the most frequently arising malignancy in individuals with untreated HIV/AIDS. There are several lines of evidence to indicate that Kaposi's sarcoma oncogenesis is associated with loss of T-cell-mediated control of KSHV-infected cells. KSHV can establish life-long asymptomatic infection in immune-competent individuals. However, when T-cell immune control declines, for example, through AIDS or treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, both the prevalence of KSHV infection and the incidence of KS in KSHV carriers dramatically increase. Moreover, a dramatic and spontaneous improvement in KS is frequently seen when immunity is restored, for example, through antiretroviral therapy or the cessation of iatrogenic drugs. In this paper we describe the current state of knowledge on the T-cell immune responses against KSHV.

  12. The T-Cell Immune Response against Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Robey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the aetiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, the most frequently arising malignancy in individuals with untreated HIV/AIDS. There are several lines of evidence to indicate that Kaposi's sarcoma oncogenesis is associated with loss of T-cell-mediated control of KSHV-infected cells. KSHV can establish life-long asymptomatic infection in immune-competent individuals. However, when T-cell immune control declines, for example, through AIDS or treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, both the prevalence of KSHV infection and the incidence of KS in KSHV carriers dramatically increase. Moreover, a dramatic and spontaneous improvement in KS is frequently seen when immunity is restored, for example, through antiretroviral therapy or the cessation of iatrogenic drugs. In this paper we describe the current state of knowledge on the T-cell immune responses against KSHV.

  13. Current understanding of HIV-1 and T-cell adaptive immunity: progress to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Teena; Bhatnagar, Santwana; Gupta, Dablu L; Rao, D N

    2014-08-01

    The cellular immune response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has different components originating from both the adaptive and innate immune systems. HIV cleverly utilizes the host machinery to survive by its intricate nature of interaction with the host immune system. HIV evades the host immune system at innate ad adaptive, allows the pathogen to replicate and transmit from one host to another. Researchers have shown that HIV has multipronged effects especially on the adaptive immunity, with CD4(+) cells being the worst effect T-cell populations. Various analyses have revealed that, the exposure to HIV results in clonal expansion and excessive activation of the immune system. Also, an abnormal process of differentiation has been observed suggestive of an alteration and blocks in the maturation of various T-cell subsets. Additionally, HIV has shown to accelerate immunosenescence and exhaustion of the overtly activated T-cells. Apart from causing phenotypic changes, HIV has adverse effects on the functional aspect of the immune system, with evidences implicating it in the loss of the capacity of T-cells to secrete various antiviral cytokines and chemokines. However, there continues to be many aspects of the immune- pathogenesis of HIV that are still unknown and thus required further research in order to convert the malaise of HIV into a manageable epidemic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary CCR2+CD4+T cells are immune regulatory and attenuate lung fibrosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milger, Katrin; Yu, Yingyan; Brudy, Eva; Irmler, Martin; Skapenko, Alla; Mayinger, Michael; Lehmann, Mareike; Beckers, Johannes; Reichenberger, Frank; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne

    2017-11-01

    Animal models have suggested that CCR2-dependent signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, but global blockade of CCL2 failed to improve the clinical course of patients with lung fibrosis. However, as levels of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells in paediatric lung fibrosis had previously been found to be increased, correlating with clinical symptoms, we hypothesised that distinct CCR2 + cell populations might either increase or decrease disease pathogenesis depending on their subtype. To investigate the role of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells in experimental lung fibrosis and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other fibrosis. Pulmonary CCR2 + CD4 + T cells were analysed using flow cytometry and mRNA profiling, followed by in silico pathway analysis, in vitro assays and adoptive transfer experiments. Frequencies of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells were increased in experimental fibrosis-specifically the CD62L - CD44 + effector memory T cell phenotype, displaying a distinct chemokine receptor profile. mRNA profiling of isolated CCR2 + CD4 + T cells from fibrotic lungs suggested immune regulatory functions, a finding that was confirmed in vitro using suppressor assays. Importantly, adoptive transfer of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells attenuated fibrosis development. The results were partly corroborated in patients with lung fibrosis, by showing higher percentages of Foxp3 + CD25 + cells within bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CCR2 + CD4 + T cells as compared with CCR2 - CD4 + T cells. Pulmonary CCR2 + CD4 + T cells are immunosuppressive, and could attenuate lung inflammation and fibrosis. Therapeutic strategies completely abrogating CCR2-dependent signalling will therefore also eliminate cell populations with protective roles in fibrotic lung disease. This emphasises the need for a detailed understanding of the functions of immune cell subsets in fibrotic lung disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  15. γδ T Cells Shape Pre-Immune Peripheral B Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A.; Detanico, Thiago O.; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Casper, Tamara L.; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Carding, Simon R.; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J.; Cambier, John C.; O’Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum antibody levels in non-immunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4+ and Vγ6+ γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/−), we observed expanded Vγ1+ cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/− mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of antibody-producing cells, and serum levels of antibodies, IL-4 and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain, and their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of pre-immune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  16. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  17. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  18. Evasion of T cell immunity by Epstein-Barr virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.

    2011-01-01

    Immune evasion strategies are thought to contribute essentially to the life cycle of persistent viruses by delaying the elimination of the infected cell long enough to enable the virus to replicate. Exemplary in this context are the herpesviruses, large DNA viruses that are carried as a persistent

  19. Immune homeostasis enforced by co-localized effector and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiduo; Gerner, Michael Y; Van Panhuys, Nicholas; Levine, Andrew G; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Germain, Ronald N

    2015-12-10

    FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) prevent autoimmunity by limiting the effector activity of T cells that have escaped thymic negative selection or peripheral inactivation. Despite the information available about molecular factors mediating the suppressive function of Treg cells, the relevant cellular events in intact tissues remain largely unexplored, and whether Treg cells prevent activation of self-specific T cells or primarily limit damage from such cells has not been determined. Here we use multiplex, quantitative imaging in mice to show that, within secondary lymphoid tissues, highly suppressive Treg cells expressing phosphorylated STAT5 exist in discrete clusters with rare IL-2-positive T cells that are activated by self-antigens. This local IL-2 induction of STAT5 phosphorylation in Treg cells is part of a feedback circuit that limits further autoimmune responses. Inducible ablation of T cell receptor expression by Treg cells reduces their regulatory capacity and disrupts their localization in clusters, resulting in uncontrolled effector T cell responses. Our data thus reveal that autoreactive T cells are activated to cytokine production on a regular basis, with physically co-clustering T cell receptor-stimulated Treg cells responding in a negative feedback manner to suppress incipient autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis.

  20. CD47 in the tumor microenvironment limits cooperation between antitumor T-cell immunity and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pantoja, David R; Terabe, Masaki; Ghosh, Arunima; Ridnour, Lisa A; DeGraff, William G; Wink, David A; Berzofsky, Jay A; Roberts, David D

    2014-12-01

    Although significant advances in radiotherapy have increased its effectiveness in many cancer settings, general strategies to widen the therapeutic window between normal tissue toxicity and malignant tumor destruction would still offer great value. CD47 blockade has been found to confer radioprotection to normal tissues while enhancing tumor radiosensitivity. Here, we report that CD47 blockade directly enhances tumor immunosurveillance by CD8(+) T cells. Combining CD47 blockade with irradiation did not affect fibrosarcoma growth in T cell-deficient mice, whereas adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells restored combinatorial efficacy. Furthermore, ablation of CD8(+) T cells abolished radiotherapeutic response in immunocompetent syngeneic hosts. CD47 blockade in either target cells or effector cells was sufficient to enhance antigen-dependent CD8(+) CTL-mediated tumor cell killing in vitro. In CD47-deficient syngeneic hosts, engrafted B16 melanomas were 50% more sensitive to irradiation, establishing that CD47 expression in the microenvironment was sufficient to limit tumor radiosensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in a CD47-deficient microenvironment, with an associated increase in T cell-dependent intratumoral expression of granzyme B. Correspondingly, an inverse correlation between CD8(+) T-cell infiltration and CD47 expression was observed in human melanomas. Our findings establish that blocking CD47 in the context of radiotherapy enhances antitumor immunity by directly stimulating CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, with the potential to increase curative responses. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. CD8+ T cells provide immune protection against murine disseminated endotheliotropic Orientia tsutsugamushi infection.

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    Guang Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus, caused by a Gram-negative obligately intracellular coccobacillus, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is a long neglected but important tropical disease. Orientia tsutsugamushi causes illness in one million people each year, and 1 billion people are at risk. Without appropriate diagnosis and treatment, the disease can cause severe multiorgan failure with a case fatality rate of 7-15%. The current gaps in knowledge of immunity include the unknown mechanisms of host immunity to O. tsutsugamushi. Using an intravenous (i.v. disseminated infection mouse model, we observed that more CD8+ T cells than CD4+ T cells were present in the spleen of infected mice at 12 dpi. We also determined that Treg cells and the proportion of T cells producing IL-10 were significantly increased from 6 dpi, which correlated with the onset of illness, body weight loss, and increased bacterial loads. We further studied CD8-/-, MHC I-/- and wild type control (WT C57BL/6J mice to determine the importance of CD8+ T cells and MHC I molecules. After infection with an ordinarily sub-lethal dose of O. tsutsugamushi, all CD8-/- and MHC I-/- mice were moribund between 12 and 15 dpi, whereas all WT mice survived. Bacterial loads in the lung, kidney, liver and spleen of CD8-/- and MHC I-/- mice were significantly greater than those in WT mice. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ and granzyme B mRNA levels in the liver of CD8-/- and MHC I-/- mice were significantly greater than in WT mice. In addition, more severe histopathologic lesions were observed in CD8-/- mice. Finally, adoptive transfer confirmed a major role of immune CD8+ T cells as well as a less effective contribution by immune CD8 T cell-depleted splenocytes in protection against O. tsutsugamushi infection. These studies demonstrated the critical importance of CD8+ T cells in the host immune response during O. tsutsugamushi infection.

  2. A lipidated peptide of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resuscitates the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine by evoking memory T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pradeep K; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Zeng, Weiguang; Nadeem, Sajid; Maurya, Sudeep K; Pahari, Susanta; Janmeja, Ashok K; Jackson, David C; Agrewala, Javed N

    2017-10-06

    The current BCG vaccine induces only short-term protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), suggesting its failure to generate long-lasting memory T cells. Previously, we have demonstrated that a self-adjuvanting peptide of Mtb (L91), successfully generated enduring memory Th1 cells. Consequently, we investigated if L91 was able to recuperate BCG potency in perpetuating the generation of memory T cells and protection against Mtb infected mice. In the present study, we evaluated the potency of a self adjuvanting Mtb peptide vaccine L91 in invigorating BCG immune response against Mtb in mice. Female BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG. Later, they were boosted twice with L91 or an antigenically irrelevant lipidated influenza virus hemagglutinin peptide (LH). Further, PBMCs obtained from BCG vaccinated healthy subjects were cultured in vitro with L91. T cell responses were determined by surface markers and intracellular cytokine staining. Secretion of cytokines was estimated in the culture supernatants (SNs) by ELISA. Compared to the BCG-vaccinated controls, L91 booster significantly enhanced the percentage of memory Th1 cells and Th17 cells and reduced the mycobacterial burden in BCG primed and L91-boosted (BCG-L91) group, even after 229 days of BCG vaccination. Further, substantial augmentation in the central (CD44 hi CD62L hi CD127 hi ) and effector memory (CD44 hi CD62L lo CD127 lo ) CD4 T cells was detected. Furthermore, greater frequency of polyfunctional Th1 cells (IFN-γ + TNF-α + ) and Th17 cells (IFN-γ + IL-17A + ) was observed. Importantly, BCG-L91 successfully prevented CD4 T cells from exhaustion by decreasing the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3. Additionally, augmentation in the frequency of Th1 cells, Th17 cells and memory CD4 T cells was observed in the PBMCs of the BCG-vaccinated healthy individuals following in vitro stimulation with L91. Our study demonstrated that L91 robustly reinvigorate BCG potency to invoke enduring protection against

  3. Human T-cell immunity against the emerging and re-emerging viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Zhang, Hangjie; Liu, Kefang; Gao, George F; Liu, William J

    2017-11-29

    Over the past decade, we have seen an alarming number of high-profile outbreaks of newly emerging and re-emerging viruses. Recent outbreaks of avian influenza viruses, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, Zika virus and Ebola virus present great threats to global health. Considering the pivotal role of host T-cell immunity in the alleviation of symptoms and the clearance of viruses in patients, there are three issues to be primarily concerned about T-cell immunity when a new virus emerges: first, does the population possess pre-existing T-cells against the new virus through previous infections of genetically relevant viruses; second, does a proper immune response arise in the patients to provide protection through an immunopathogenic effect; lastly, how long can the virus-specific immune memory persist. Herein, we summarize the current updates on the characteristics of human T-cell immunological responses against recently emerged or re-emerged viruses, and emphasize the necessity for timely investigation on the T-cell features of these viral diseases, which may provide beneficial recommendations for clinical diagnosis and vaccine development.

  4. Signatures of T cells as correlates of immunity to Francisella tularensis.

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    Kjell Eneslätt

    Full Text Available Tularemia or vaccination with the live vaccine strain (LVS of Francisella tularensis confers long-lived cell-mediated immunity. We hypothesized that this immunity depends on polyfunctional memory T cells, i.e., CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cells with the capability to simultaneously express several functional markers. Multiparametric flow cytometry, measurement of secreted cytokines, and analysis of lymphocyte proliferation were used to characterize in vitro recall responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to killed F. tularensis antigens from the LVS or Schu S4 strains. PBMC responses were compared between individuals who had contracted tularemia, had been vaccinated, or had not been exposed to F. tularensis (naïve. Significant differences were detected between either of the immune donor groups and naïve individuals for secreted levels of IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIP-1β. Expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, and CD107a by CD4(+CD45RO(+ or CD8(+CD45RO(+ T cells correlated to antigen concentrations. In particular, IFN-γ and MIP-1β strongly discriminated between immune and naïve individuals. Only one cytokine, IL-6, discriminated between the two groups of immune individuals. Notably, IL-2- or TNF-α-secretion was low. Our results identify functional signatures of T cells that may serve as correlates of immunity and protection against F. tularensis.

  5. Intravaginal immunization with HPV vectors induces tissue-resident CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuburu, Nicolas; Graham, Barney S; Buck, Christopher B; Kines, Rhonda C; Pang, Yuk-Ying S; Day, Patricia M; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2012-12-01

    The induction of persistent intraepithelial CD8+ T cell responses may be key to the development of vaccines against mucosally transmitted pathogens, particularly for sexually transmitted diseases. Here we investigated CD8+ T cell responses in the female mouse cervicovaginal mucosa after intravaginal immunization with human papillomavirus vectors (HPV pseudoviruses) that transiently expressed a model antigen, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) M/M2, in cervicovaginal keratinocytes. An HPV intravaginal prime/boost with different HPV serotypes induced 10-fold more cervicovaginal antigen-specific CD8+ T cells than priming alone. Antigen-specific T cell numbers decreased only 2-fold after 6 months. Most genital antigen-specific CD8+ T cells were intra- or subepithelial, expressed αE-integrin CD103, produced IFN-γ and TNF-α, and displayed in vivo cytotoxicity. Using a sphingosine-1-phosphate analog (FTY720), we found that the primed CD8+ T cells proliferated in the cervicovaginal mucosa upon HPV intravaginal boost. Intravaginal HPV prime/boost reduced cervicovaginal viral titers 1,000-fold after intravaginal challenge with vaccinia virus expressing the CD8 epitope M2. In contrast, intramuscular prime/boost with an adenovirus type 5 vector induced a higher level of systemic CD8+ T cells but failed to induce intraepithelial CD103+CD8+ T cells or protect against recombinant vaccinia vaginal challenge. Thus, HPV vectors are attractive gene-delivery platforms for inducing durable intraepithelial cervicovaginal CD8+ T cell responses by promoting local proliferation and retention of primed antigen-specific CD8+ T cells.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Salmonella vaccine bacteria to boost human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T

    2014-07-15

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long-lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA(-) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as did the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags.

  7. Regression of atherosclerosis with anti-CD3 antibody via augmenting a regulatory T-cell response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Tomoya; Sasaki, Naoto; Kasahara, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Yodoi, Keiko; Takeda, Masafumi; Nakajima, Kenji; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Although recent animal studies have investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the process of atherosclerosis regression, it remains unknown whether adaptive immune responses including T cells are involved in this process. We investigated the role of T cells in atherosclerosis regression. LDL receptor-deficient mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 8 weeks to form atherosclerotic lesions and were then changed to a standard diet, and atherosclerosis was assessed 4 weeks later. Just before changing the diet, the mice received an iv injection of anti-CD3 antibody (CD3-Ab) or control immunoglobulin G for 5 consecutive days. CD3-Ab treatment regressed atherosclerosis and decreased the accumulation of macrophages and CD4(+) T cells in the plaques. CD3-Ab treatment also dramatically reduced CD4(+) T cells and increased the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of Tregs by anti-CD25 antibody injection abolished the regression of atherosclerosis seen in CD3-Ab-treated mice, indicating the essential role for Tregs in this process. CD3-Ab treatment induced rapid regression of established atherosclerosis via reducing CD4(+) T cells and increasing the proportion of Tregs. These findings suggest that therapeutic intervention for T-cell-mediated immune responses may represent a novel strategy to induce atherosclerosis regression in combination with lipid-lowering therapy.

  8. Tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1) enforces quiescence of naive T cells to promote immune homeostasis and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Neale, Geoffrey; Green, Douglas R.; He, Weifeng; Chi, Hongbo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate T cell quiescence are poorly understood. We report that tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1) establishes a quiescence program in naive T cells by controlling cell size, cell cycle entry, and responses to T cell receptor stimulation. Loss of quiescence predisposed Tsc1-deficient T cells to apoptosis that resulted in loss of conventional T cells and invariant natural killer T cells. Loss of Tsc1 function dampened in vivo immune responses to bacterial infection. Tsc1-deficient T cells exhibited increased mTORC1 but diminished mTORC2 activities, with mTORC1 activation essential for the disruption of immune homeostasis. Therefore, Tsc1-dependent control of mTOR is crucial in establishing naive T cell quiescence to facilitate adaptive immune function. PMID:21765414

  9. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B

    2017-04-11

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus.

  10. Innate instruction of CD4+ T cell immunity in respiratory bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunk, Gerhard; Oxenius, Annette

    2012-07-15

    The innate immune system recognizes invading microbes via conserved pattern recognition receptors and uses inflammatory signals to concert adaptive defense mechanisms. However, microbial and host parameters involved in CD4 T cell priming and direction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 differentiation in the context of infections with complex pathogens in vivo are incompletely understood. In this study, we used Legionella pneumophila, which triggers membrane-bound and cytosolic pattern recognition receptors, to study the innate instruction of adaptive immunity. Upon airway infection, T cells were primed exclusively in the lung-draining lymph nodes and differentiated into Th1/Th17 effector cells upon arrival in the lung. Although engagement of membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors was sufficient for initial T cell activation and proliferation, cytosolic pattern recognition was required for effector T cell differentiation. In the absence of cytoplasmic pattern recognition, MyD88 was key for T cell priming, whereas, in its presence, MyD88-mediated signals were crucial for Th17 differentiation. Specifically, cytosolic sensing of Legionella-derived flagellin, inflammasome activation, and IL-1 signaling contributed to Th17 development. In the absence of TLR signaling, a simultaneous Th1/Th2 response developed that was independent of the inflammasome-IL-1 axis. Collectively, these data illustrate the important role for various pattern recognition receptors triggered by complex pathogens and how they each instruct specific differentiation programs in responding CD4 T cells.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells form nonclassical and potent immune synapses driving rapid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, A J; Cross, R S; Watson, K A; Liao, Y; Shi, W; Prince, H M; Beavis, P A; Trapani, J A; Kershaw, M H; Ritchie, D S; Darcy, P K; Neeson, P J; Jenkins, M R

    2018-02-12

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells are effective serial killers with a faster off-rate from dying tumor cells than CAR-T cells binding target cells through their T cell receptor (TCR). Here we explored the functional consequences of CAR-mediated signaling using a dual-specific CAR-T cell, where the same cell was triggered via TCR (tcrCTL) or CAR (carCTL). The carCTL immune synapse lacked distinct LFA-1 adhesion rings and was less reliant on LFA to form stable conjugates with target cells. carCTL receptors associated with the synapse were found to be disrupted and formed a convoluted multifocal pattern of Lck microclusters. Both proximal and distal receptor signaling pathways were induced more rapidly and subsequently decreased more rapidly in carCTL than in tcrCTL. The functional consequence of this rapid signaling in carCTL cells included faster lytic granule recruitment to the immune synapse, correlating with faster detachment of the CTL from the target cell. This study provides a mechanism for how CAR-T cells can debulk large tumor burden quickly and may contribute to further refinement of CAR design for enhancing the quality of signaling and programming of the T cell. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  12. PSTPIP1 controls immune synapse stability in human T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, W J M; Grobarova, V; Leleux, J; Jongeneel, C H; van Gijn, M; van Montfrans, J M; Boes, M

    2018-02-09

    PSTPIP1 is a cytosolic adaptor protein involved with T-cell activation, differentiation, and migration. Upon cognate T-cell contact, PSTPIP1 is recruited to surface-expressed CD2, where it regulates f-actin remodeling. An immune synapse (IS) is thereby rapidly formed, consisting of TCR clusters surrounded by a ring of adhesion molecules including CD2. From genetic screening of primary immunodeficiency patients, we identified two mutations in PSTPIP1, R228C and T274M which we further characterized in primary patient T-cells. F-actin dynamics were assessed in patient and healthy control primary T-cells by use of FACS. HEK293T and Jurkat cells were transfected with R228C, T274M and WT PSTPIP1 in order to visualize f-actin in immune synapse formation. CD2-PSTPIP1 association was quantified through immunoprecipitation assays. The patients presented with immunodeficiency without signs of auto-inflammation. The R228C patient had expansion of mostly naive phenotype T-cells and few memory T-cells; the T274M patient had 75% reduction in CD4 T-cells that were predominantly of memory subset.We observed f-actin polymerization defects in both PSTPIP1 patient T-cells, most notably T274M. Capping of CD2-containing membrane microdomains was disrupted. Analysis of IS formation using Jurkat T-cell transfectants revealed a reduction in f-actin accumulation at the IS, again especially in T274M PSTPIP1 cells. Patient T274M T-cells migrated spontaneously at increased speed as assessed in a 3D collagen matrix, while TCR crosslinking induced a significantly diminished calcium flux. We propose that PSTPIP1 T-cell differentiation defects are caused by defective control of f-actin polymerization. A pre-activated polymerized f-actin status, as seen in PSTPIP1-T274M T-cells, appears particularly damaging. PSTPIP1 controls IS formation and cell adhesion, through its function as orchestrator of the f-actin cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Induction of regulatory T cells by intravenous immunoglobulin: a bridge between adaptive and innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Nathan Kaufman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available IVIg is a polyclonal IgG preparation with potent immunomodulatory properties. The mode of action of IVIg has been investigated in multiple disease states, with various mechanisms described to account for its benefits. Recent data indicates that IVIg increases both the number and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells, a subpopulation of T cells that are essential for immune homeostasis. IVIg alters dendritic cell function, cytokine and chemokine networks, and T lymphocytes, leading to development of regulatory T cells. The ability of IVIg to influence Treg induction has been shown both in animal models and in human diseases. In this review, we discuss data on the potential mechanisms contributing to the interaction between IVIg and the regulatory T cell compartment.

  14. Liver restores immune homeostasis after local inflammation despite the presence of autoreactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie Béland

    Full Text Available The liver must keep equilibrium between immune tolerance and immunity in order to protect itself from pathogens while maintaining tolerance to food antigens. An imbalance between these two states could result in an inflammatory liver disease. The aims of this study were to identify factors responsible for a break of tolerance and characterize the subsequent restoration of liver immune homeostasis. A pro-inflammatory environment was created in the liver by the co-administration of TLR ligands CpG and Poly(I:C in presence or absence of activated liver-specific autoreactive CD8(+ T cells. Regardless of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells, mice injected with CpG and Poly(I:C showed elevated serum ALT levels and a transient liver inflammation. Both CpG/Poly(I:C and autoreactive CD8(+T cells induced expression of TLR9 and INF-γ by the liver, and an up-regulation of homing and adhesion molecules CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL16, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Transferred CFSE-labeled autoreactive CD8(+ T cells, in presence of TLR3 and 9 ligands, were recruited by the liver and spleen and proliferated. This population then contracted by apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Up-regulation of FasL and PD-L1 in the liver was observed. In conclusion, TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune system results in a pro-inflammatory environment that promotes the recruitment of lymphocytes resulting in bystander hepatitis. Despite this pro-inflammatory environment, the presence of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells is not sufficient to sustain an autoimmune response against the liver and immune homeostasis is rapidly restored through the apoptosis of T cells.

  15. Liver restores immune homeostasis after local inflammation despite the presence of autoreactive T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Kathie; Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The liver must keep equilibrium between immune tolerance and immunity in order to protect itself from pathogens while maintaining tolerance to food antigens. An imbalance between these two states could result in an inflammatory liver disease. The aims of this study were to identify factors responsible for a break of tolerance and characterize the subsequent restoration of liver immune homeostasis. A pro-inflammatory environment was created in the liver by the co-administration of TLR ligands CpG and Poly(I:C) in presence or absence of activated liver-specific autoreactive CD8(+) T cells. Regardless of autoreactive CD8(+) T cells, mice injected with CpG and Poly(I:C) showed elevated serum ALT levels and a transient liver inflammation. Both CpG/Poly(I:C) and autoreactive CD8(+)T cells induced expression of TLR9 and INF-γ by the liver, and an up-regulation of homing and adhesion molecules CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL16, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Transferred CFSE-labeled autoreactive CD8(+) T cells, in presence of TLR3 and 9 ligands, were recruited by the liver and spleen and proliferated. This population then contracted by apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Up-regulation of FasL and PD-L1 in the liver was observed. In conclusion, TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune system results in a pro-inflammatory environment that promotes the recruitment of lymphocytes resulting in bystander hepatitis. Despite this pro-inflammatory environment, the presence of autoreactive CD8(+) T cells is not sufficient to sustain an autoimmune response against the liver and immune homeostasis is rapidly restored through the apoptosis of T cells.

  16. Regulatory T-Cell Augmentation or Interleukin-17 Inhibition Prevents Calcineurin Inhibitor-Induced Hypertension in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L; Pakanati, Abhinandan R; Hernandez, Marcos; Young, Kristina J; Bounds, Kelsey R; Mitchell, Brett M

    2017-07-01

    The immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus alter T-cell subsets and can cause hypertension, vascular dysfunction, and renal toxicity. We and others have reported that cyclosporine A and tacrolimus decrease anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells and increase proinflammatory interleukin-17-producing T cells; therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of these effects using noncellular therapies would prevent the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and renal glomerular injury induced by calcineurin inhibitor therapy. Daily treatment of mice with cyclosporine A or tacrolimus for 1 week significantly decreased CD4 + /FoxP3 + regulatory T cells in the spleen and lymph nodes, as well as induced hypertension, vascular injury and dysfunction, and glomerular mesangial expansion in mice. Daily cotreatment with all-trans retinoic acid reported to increase regulatory T cells and decrease interleukin-17-producing T cells, prevented all of the detrimental effects of cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. All-trans retinoic acid also increased regulatory T cells and prevented the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular injury in genetically modified mice that phenocopy calcineurin inhibitor-treated mice (FKBP12-Tie2 knockout). Treatment with an interleukin-17-neutralizing antibody also increased regulatory T-cell levels and prevented the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular injury in cyclosporine A-treated and tacrolimus-treated mice and FKBP12-Tie2 knockout mice, whereas an isotype control had no effect. Augmenting regulatory T cells and inhibiting interleukin-17 signaling using noncellular therapies prevents the cardiovascular and renal toxicity of calcineurin inhibitors in mice. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus strain heterogeneity impairs human T-cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirac, Ana; Stützle, Simon; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Adhikary, Dinesh; Moosmann, Andreas; Körber, Nina; Bauer, Tanja; Witter, Klaus; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Behrends, Uta; Mautner, Josef

    2018-01-27

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes lifelong infections in > 90% of the human population. Although contained as asymptomatic infection by the immune system in most individuals, EBV is associated with the pathogenesis of approximately 1.5% of all cancers in humans. Some of these EBV-associated tumors have been successfully treated by the infusion of virus-specific T-cell lines. Recent sequence analyses of a large number of viral isolates suggested that distinct EBV strains have evolved in different parts of the world. Here, we assessed the impact of such sequence variations on EBV-specific T-cell immunity. With the exceptions of EBNA2 and the EBNA3 family of proteins, an overall low protein sequence disparity of about 1% was noted between Asian viral isolates, including the newly characterized M81 strain, and the prototypic EBV type 1 and type 2 strains. However, when T-cell epitopes including their flanking regions were compared, a substantial proportion was found to be polymorphic in different EBV strains. Importantly, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones specific for viral epitopes from one strain often showed diminished recognition of the corresponding epitopes in other strains. In addition, T-cell recognition of a conserved epitope was affected by amino acid exchanges within the epitope flanking region. Moreover, the CD8+ T-cell response against polymorphic epitopes varied between donors and often ignored antigen variants. These results demonstrate that viral strain heterogeneity may impair antiviral T-cell immunity and suggest that immunotherapeutic approaches against EBV should preferably target broad sets of conserved epitopes including their flanking regions.

  18. NK Cells Help Induce Anti-Hepatitis B Virus CD8+ T Cell Immunity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    Although recent clinical studies demonstrate that NK cell function is impaired in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-persistent patients, whether or how NK cells play a role in anti-HBV adaptive immunity remains to be explored. Using a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection by hydrodynamic injection of an HBV plasmid, we observed that although serum hepatitis B surface Ag and hepatitis B envelope Ag were eliminated within 3 to 4 wk, HBV might persist for >8 wk in CD8(-/-) mice and that adoptive transfer of anti-HBV CD8(+) T cells restored the ability to clear HBV in HBV-carrier Rag1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that CD8(+) T cells are critical in HBV elimination. Furthermore, NK cells increased IFN-γ production after HBV plasmid injection, and NK cell depletion led to significantly increased HBV persistence along with reduced frequency of hepatitis B core Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ-sufficient NK cells restored donor CD8(+) T cell function, indicating that NK cells positively regulated CD8(+) T cells via secreting IFN-γ. We also observed that NK cell depletion correlated with decreased effector memory CD8(+) T cell frequencies. Importantly, adoptive transfer experiments showed that NK cells were involved in anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell recall responses. Moreover, DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional, but not DX5(-)CD49a(+) liver-resident, NK cells were involved in improving CD8(+) T cell responses against HBV. Overall, the current study reveals that NK cells, especially DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional NK cells, promote the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cell responses via secreting IFN-γ in a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. A combined nucleocapsid vaccine induces vigorous SARS-CD8+ T-cell immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Ali; Aucoin, Susan; Tadesse, Helina; Frost, Rita; Ghorbani, Masoud; Soare, Catalina; Naas, Turaya; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cell-mediated immune responses play a crucial role in controlling viral replication. As such, a candidate SARS vaccine should elicit broad CD8+ T-cell immune responses. Several groups of mice were immunized alone or in combination with SARS-nucleocapsid immunogen. A high level of specific SARS-CD8+ T-cell response was demonstrated in mice that received DNA encoding the SARS-nucleocapsid, protein and XIAP as an adjuvant. We also observed that co-administration of a plasmid expressing nucleocapsid, recombinant protein and montanide/CpG induces high antibody titers in immunized mice. Moreover, this vaccine approach merits further investigation as a potential candidate vaccine against SARS. PMID:16115319

  20. Hypertension and immunity: mechanisms of T cell activation and pathways of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abais-Battad, Justine M; Rudemiller, Nathan P; Mattson, David L

    2015-09-01

    The role of immune mechanisms to amplify hypertension in patients and animal models has been appreciated for decades. This review briefly summarizes recent studies exploring the mechanistic pathways, whereby the immune system participates in hypertension and renal disease. Emphasis in this review is placed upon recent studies exploring the role of T cell subtypes, newly described mechanisms of T cell activation, the identification of potential neoantigens, and environmental influences on immune cell activation. Significant advancements have been made in the search for antigens and pathways responsible for activation of the adaptive immune response, furthering our understanding of the factors contributing to hypertension and potentially leading to the development of new and more effective therapies.

  1. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg

  2. Clipboard: Putting T cells to sleep: a new paradigm for immune ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-11-13

    Nov 13, 2006 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Clipboard: Putting T cells to sleep: a new paradigm for immune evasion by persistent viruses. Shweta Dubey Shahid Jameel. Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 497-501 ...

  3. Establishment of functional influenza virus-specific CD8(+) T cell memory pools after intramuscular immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongfang; Chua, Brendon Y; Ramos, Javier Vega; Parra, Sergio M Quiñones; Fairmaid, Emily; Brown, Lorena E; Jackson, David C; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2015-09-22

    The emergence of the avian-origin influenza H7N9 virus and its pandemic potential has highlighted the ever-present need to develop vaccination approaches to induce cross-protective immunity. In this study, we examined the establishment of cross-reactive CD8(+) T cell immunity in mice following immunization with live A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8; H1N1) influenza virus via two non-productive inoculation routes. We found that immunization via the intramuscular (IM) route established functional influenza-virus specific memory CD8(+) T cell pools capable of cross-reactive recall responses. Epitope-specific primary, memory and recall CD8(+) T-cell responses induced by the IM route, highly relevant to human influenza immunisations, were of comparable magnitude and quality to those elicited by the intraperitoneal (IP) priming, commonly used in mice. Furthermore, IM immunisation resulted in lower lung viral titres following heterologous challenge with A/Aichi/68 (X31; H3N2) compared to the IP route. Examining the ability of DCs from lymphoid organs to present viral antigen revealed that immune induction following IM immunization occurred in draining lymph nodes, while immunization via the IP route resulted in the priming of responses in distal lymphoid organs, indicative of a systemic distribution of antigen. No major differences in the pulmonary cytokine environment of immunized animals following X31 challenge were observed that could account for the improved heterologous protection induced by the IM route. However, while both routes induced similar levels of PR8-specific antibodies, higher levels of cross-reactive antibodies against X31 were induced following IM inoculation. Our data demonstrate how non-replicative routes of infection can induce efficient cross-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses and strong strain-specific antibody responses, with the additional benefit from IM priming of enhanced heterosubtypic antibody production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. Lung dendritic cells imprint T cell lung homing and promote lung immunity through the chemokine receptor CCR4

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhak, Zamaneh; Strassner, James P.; Luster, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    T cell trafficking into the lung is critical for lung immunity, but the mechanisms that mediate T cell lung homing are not well understood. Here, we show that lung dendritic cells (DCs) imprint T cell lung homing, as lung DC–activated T cells traffic more efficiently into the lung in response to inhaled antigen and at homeostasis compared with T cells activated by DCs from other tissues. Consequently, lung DC–imprinted T cells protect against influenza more effectively than do gut and skin DC...

  5. Evidence for T cell-dependent immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an intraabdominal abscess model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onderdonk, A B; Markham, R B; Zaleznik, D F; Cisneros, R L; Kasper, D L

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized animals to nonimmunized recipients resulted in protection against abscesses following challenge with B. fragilis. These data suggested that a T cell-dependent immune response was involved in protection against abscess development after immunization with B. fragilis capsular antigen. To determine the possible role of cell-mediated immunity prompted by the capsular antigen, inbred congenitally athymic OLA/Rnu rats and their phenotypically normal littermates were actively immunized. Despite the development of high titers of anti-B. fragilis capsular antibody, 100% of actively immunized athymic rats developed abscesses, as did 100% of unimmunized athymic control rats. However, no phenotypically normal littermate control rats that were actively immunized developed abscesses, while 100% of phenotypically normal unimmunized rats developed abscesses. Additional studies showed that adoptive transfer of T cell-enriched spleen cell preparations from Wistar/Lewis rats immunized with the capsular polysaccharide to nonimmune recipients also resulted in protection against B. fragilis-induced abscesses. We conclude that the protection afforded by immunization with B. fragilis capsule against intraabdominal abscesses caused by that organism is T cell-mediated and does not require the presence of serum antibody.

  6. T-cell immune responses to Bordetella pertussis infection and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, Giorgio; Cassone, Antonio; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2015-10-01

    The recent immunological investigations, stemming from the studies performed in the nineties within the clinical trials of the acellular pertussis vaccines, have highlighted the important role played by T-cell immunity to pertussis in humans. These studies largely confirmed earlier investigations in the murine respiratory infection models that humoral immunity alone is not sufficient to confer protection against Bordetella pertussis infection and that T-cell immunity is required. Over the last years, knowledge of T-cell immune response to B. pertussis has expanded broadly, taking advantage of the general progress in the understanding of anti-bacterial immunity and of refinements in methods to approach immunological investigations. In particular, experimental models of B. pertussis infection highlighted the cooperative role played by T-helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells for protection. Furthermore, the new baboon experimental model suggested a plausible explanation for the differences observed in the strength and persistence of protective immunity induced by the acellular or whole-cell pertussis vaccines and natural infection in humans, contributing to explain the upsurge of recent pertussis outbreaks. Despite the progress, open questions remain, the answer to them will possibly provide better tools to fight one of the hardest-to-control vaccine preventable disease. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Hospicells derived from ovarian cancer stroma inhibit T-cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Ludovic; Poupot, Rémy; Mirshahi, Pejman; Rafii, Arash; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Mirshahi, Massoud; Poupot, Mary

    2010-05-01

    With metastatic disease at diagnosis for 70% of patients, ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Ovarian carcinomas are aggressive malignancies that can evade immune surveillance and frequently develop into metastases. The tumor microenvironment is decisive for preventing immune attack but, in the case of ovarian carcinoma, the mechanisms are unclear. We recently isolated a novel type of stromal cell from the ascitis of patients with ovarian carcinoma that interacts with epithelial ovarian cancers conferring them chemoresistance. These cells, called Hospicells, have the cell surface markers CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146 and CD166. Here, we investigated whether Hospicells also have immunomodulatory functions that might interfere with immunity to cancer. We report that Hospicells inhibit the proliferation of human CD4(+), CD8(+) and Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in vitro and the production of cytokines by these immune cells. The immunosuppression of CD4(+) T cells is independent of direct contact with the Hospicells and is mainly due to nitric oxide produced by the inducible nitric oxide synthase and to products of the tryptophan degradation by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. We proposed that Hospicells in the microenvironment of the tumor mediate immunosuppression of T cells and thus allow ovarian cancers to evade immune surveillance. Targeting of Hospicells could be an alternative to strong chemotherapy through the recovery of immune responses against tumor cells.

  8. T-cell immunity and cytokine production in cosmonauts after long-duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morukov, B.; Rykova, M.; Antropova, E.; Berendeeva, T.; Ponomaryov, S.; Larina, I.

    2011-04-01

    Long-duration spaceflight effects on T-cell immunity and cytokine production were studied in 12 Russian cosmonauts flown onto the International Space Station. Specific assays were performed before launch and after landing and included analysis of peripheral leukocyte distribution, analysis of T-cell phenotype, expression of activation markers, apoptosis, proliferation of T cells in response to a mitogen, concentrations of cytokines in supernatants of cell cultures. Statistically significant increase was observed in leukocytes', lymphocytes', monocytes' and granulocytes' total number, increase in percentage and absolutely number of CD3 +CD4 +-cells, CD4 +CD45RA +-cells and CD4 +CD45RA +/CD4 +CD45RО + ratio, CD4 +CD25 +Bright regulatory cells ( pcytokine production and T-cell activation (CD25+, CD38+) and negative correlation ( pcytokine production and number of bulk memory CD4+T-cells (CD45RO+). Thus, these results suggest that T-cell dysfunction can be conditioned by cytokine dysbalance and could lead to development of disease after long-duration space flights.

  9. AIM2 Co-immunization with VP1 Is Associated with Increased Memory CD8 T Cells and Mounts Long Lasting Protection against Coxsackievirus B3 Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recurrent Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 infection is the most important cause of intractable myocarditis which often leads to chronic myocarditis and even dilated cardiomyopathy. Therefore, enhanced DNA vaccines capable of memory CD8 T cells are essential for long-lasting immunological protection against CVB3 infection. In this study, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2 was used as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of memory CD8 T cells elicited by VP1 (viral capsid protein 1 vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly injected with 50 μg AIM2 plasmid and equal amount of VP1 plasmid (pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals. We observed that the protection of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine against CVB3 challenge was evidenced by significantly improved cardiac function, reduced myocardial injuries, and increased survival rate when compared with immunization with pVP1. Co-immunization with pAIM2/pVP1 robustly augmented T lymphocytes proliferation and CVB3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Importantly, 16 weeks after the last immunization, pAIM2/pVP1 co-immunization significantly enhanced the expression of Bcl-6, SOCS3, and Sca-1 which are critical for memory CD8 T cells as compared with pVP1 immunization. Notably, CD8 T cells that are likely vaccine-induced memory T cells were responsible for the protective efficacy of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine by abolition of a CD8 T cell immune response following a lethal dose of CVB3 infection. Our results indicate that AIM2-adjuvanted vaccine could be a potential and promising approach to promote a long-lasting protection against CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  10. Blocking Tumor Necrosis Factor α Enhances CD8 T-cell-Dependent Immunity in Experimental Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Florie; Rochotte, Julia; Colacios, Céline; Montfort, Anne; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise; Touriol, Christian; Rochaix, Philippe; Lajoie-Mazenc, Isabelle; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Levade, Thierry; Benoist, Hervé; Ségui, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    TNF plays a dual, still enigmatic role in melanoma, either acting as a cytotoxic cytokine or favoring a tumorigenic inflammatory microenvironment. Herein, the tumor growth of melanoma cell lines expressing major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at high levels (MHC-I(high)) was dramatically impaired in TNF-deficient mice, and this was associated with enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Immunodepletion of CD8 T cells fully restored melanoma growth in TNF(-/-) mice. Systemic administration of Etanercept inhibited MHC-I(high) melanoma growth in immunocompetent but not in immunodeficient (IFNγ(-/-), nude, or CD8(-/-)) mice. MHC-I(high) melanoma growth was also reduced in mice lacking TNF-R1, but not TNF-R2. TNF(-/-) and TNF-R1(-/-) mice as well as Etanercept-treated WT mice displayed enhanced intratumor content of high endothelial venules surrounded by high CD8(+) T-cell density. Adoptive transfer of activated TNF-R1-deficient or -proficient CD8(+) T cells in CD8-deficient mice bearing B16K1 tumors demonstrated that TNF-R1 deficiency facilitates the accumulation of live CD8(+) T cells into the tumors. Moreover, in vitro experiments indicated that TNF triggered activated CD8(+) T cell death in a TNF-R1-dependent manner, likely limiting the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in TNF/TNF-R1-proficient animals. Collectively, our observations indicate that TNF-R1-dependent TNF signaling impairs tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T-cell accumulation and may serve as a putative target to favor CD8(+) T-cell-dependent immune response in melanoma. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. T-cell immunity in myocardial inflammation: pathogenic role and therapeutic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, E; Savvatis, K; Mohiddin, S A; Marelli-Berg, F M

    2017-11-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity has been linked not only to a variety of heart diseases, including classic inflammatory diseases such as myocarditis and post-myocardial infarction (Dressler's) syndrome, but also to conditions without an obvious inflammatory component such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertensive cardiomyopathy. It has been recently proposed that in all these conditions, the heart becomes the focus of T-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation following ischaemic or infectious injury. For example, in acute myocarditis, an inflammatory disease of heart muscle, T-cell responses are thought to arise as a consequence of a viral infection. In a number of patients, persistent T-cell-mediated responses in acute viral myocarditis can lead to autoimmunity and chronic cardiac inflammation resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy. In spite of the major progress made in understanding the mechanisms of pathogenic T-cell responses, effective and safe therapeutic targeting of the immune system in chronic inflammatory diseases of the heart has not yet been developed due to the lack of specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers at an early stage. This has also prevented the identification of targets for patient-tailored immunomodulatory therapies that are both disease- and organ-selective. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the development and functional characteristics of pathogenic T-cell-mediated immune responses in the heart, and, in particular, in myocarditis, as well as recent advances in experimental models which have the potential to translate into heart-selective immunomodulation. This article is part of a themed section on Targeting Inflammation to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.22/issuetoc and http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bcp.v82.4/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. MHCII-mediated dialog between group 2 innate lymphoid cells and CD4(+) T cells potentiates type 2 immunity and promotes parasitic helminth expulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Christopher J; Hwang, You Yi; Walker, Jennifer A; Salimi, Maryam; Wong, See Heng; Brewer, James M; Englezakis, Alexandros; Barlow, Jillian L; Hams, Emily; Scanlon, Seth T; Ogg, Graham S; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2014-08-21

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) release interleukin-13 (IL-13) during protective immunity to helminth infection and detrimentally during allergy and asthma. Using two mouse models to deplete ILC2s in vivo, we demonstrate that T helper 2 (Th2) cell responses are impaired in the absence of ILC2s. We show that MHCII-expressing ILC2s interact with antigen-specific T cells to instigate a dialog in which IL-2 production from T cells promotes ILC2 proliferation and IL-13 production. Deletion of MHCII renders IL-13-expressing ILC2s incapable of efficiently inducing Nippostrongylus brasiliensis expulsion. Thus, during transition to adaptive T cell-mediated immunity, the ILC2 and T cell crosstalk contributes to their mutual maintenance, expansion and cytokine production. This interaction appears to augment dendritic-cell-induced T cell activation and identifies a previously unappreciated pathway in the regulation of type-2 immunity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell Surface Delivery of TRAIL Strongly Augments the Tumoricidal Activity of T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, Marco; Wei, Yunwei; Wiersma, Valerie R.; Samplonius, Douwe F.; Klip, Harry G.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Yang, Baofeng; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adoptive T-cell therapy generally fails to induce meaningful anticancer responses in patients with solid tumors. Here, we present a novel strategy designed to selectively enhance the tumoricidal activity of T cells by targeted delivery of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to the

  14. Interleukin-10 deficiency impairs regulatory T cell-derived neuropilin-1 functions and promotes Th1 and Th17 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shimin; Gao, Xiang; Shen, Guobo; Wang, Wei; Li, Jingyu; Zhao, Jingyi; Wei, Yu-Quan; Edwards, Carl K

    2016-04-14

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expand in peripheral lymphoid organs and can produce immunosuppressive cytokines to support tumor growth. IL-10 abrogation efficiently induces Treg formation but dampens tumoral neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1) Treg signaling, which simultaneously augments Th1 and Th17 immunity. These effects are associated with the plasticity and stability of Tregs and effector T cell functions that can limit tumorigenesis. Within the tumor microenvironment, there appears to be a "mutual antagonism" between immunoenhancement and immunosuppression mechanisms, eventually leading to decreased metastasis. In contrast, tumor progression is paralleled by a reduction in Nrp-1-producing Tregs controlled by the IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels. However, Th1, Th17 and Treg immunity is primarily regulated by IL-10 or Nrp-1 and not TGF-β1 except when combined with IL-10. These results emphasize the important implications for the therapeutic use of Tregs. The number of Treg cells must be maintained in a healthy and dynamic homeostatic range to prevent malignant diseases. Moreover, Treg-mediated immunosuppression can be limited by reducing tumor-derived Treg Nrp-1 levels.

  15. Expanded Regulatory T Cells in Chronically Friend Retrovirus-Infected Mice Suppress Immunity to a Murine Cytomegalovirus Superinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Duppach, Janine; Francois, Sandra; Jara J Joedicke; Dittmer, Ulf; Kraft, Anke R. M.

    2014-01-01

    It is still unclear whether expanded and activated regulatory T cells (Tregs) in chronic viral infections can influence primary immune responses against superinfections with unrelated viruses. Expanded Tregs found in the spleens of chronically Friend virus (FV)-infected mice decreased murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV)-specific CD8+ T cell responses during acute mCMV superinfection. This suppression of mCMV-specific T cell immunity was found only in organs with FV-induced Treg expansion. Surprisin...

  16. Genetic adjuvantation of recombinant MVA with CD40L potentiates CD8 T cell mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning eLauterbach

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70 early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated CTLs also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases.

  17. Role of T cell competition in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity during viral vector-based immunization regimens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, A.J.A.; Nijman, H.W.; Hoogeboom, B.N.; Regts, J.; Mare, A. de; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.

    2010-01-01

    T cell competition between antigen- and vector-specific T cells may determine the outcome of viral vector-based immunization regimens, as we previously proposed. Here, we unravelled the interplay between antigen- and vector-specific immunity, using recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV). Priming of

  18. Regulatory T Cell and Forkhead Box Protein 3 as Modulators of Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonn Mendes Soares Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3 is an essential molecular marker of regulatory T cell (Treg development in different microenvironments. Tregs are cells specialized in the suppression of inadequate immune responses and the maintenance of homeostatic tolerance. Studies have addressed and elucidated the role played by FOXP3 and Treg in countless autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as in more specific cases, such as cancer. Within this context, the present article reviews aspects of the immunoregulatory profile of FOXP3 and Treg in the management of immune homeostasis, including issues relating to pathology as well as immune tolerance.

  19. Regulatory T Cell and Forkhead Box Protein 3 as Modulators of Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Leonn Mendes Soares; Gomes, Samara Tatielle Monteiro; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) is an essential molecular marker of regulatory T cell (Treg) development in different microenvironments. Tregs are cells specialized in the suppression of inadequate immune responses and the maintenance of homeostatic tolerance. Studies have addressed and elucidated the role played by FOXP3 and Treg in countless autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as in more specific cases, such as cancer. Within this context, the present article reviews aspects of the immunoregulatory profile of FOXP3 and Treg in the management of immune homeostasis, including issues relating to pathology as well as immune tolerance.

  20. Regulatory T cells (Treg and Their Roles in Immune System with Respect to Immunopathological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Kondělková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress immune response, thereby maintaining homeostasis and self-tolerance. It has been shown that Tregs are able to inhibit T cell proliferation and cytokine production and play a critical role in preventing autoimmunity. Different subsets with various functions of Treg cells exist. Tregs can be usually identified by flow cytometry. The most specific marker for these cells is FoxP3, which is localized intracellulary. Selected surface markers such as CD25high (high molecular density and CD127low (low molecular density could serve as surrogate markers to detect Tregs in a routine clinical practice. Dysregulation in Treg cell frequency or functions may lead to the development of autoimmune disease. Therapeutical Treg modulation is considered to be a promising therapeutical approach to treat some selected disorders, such as allergies, and to prevent allograft rejection.

  1. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  2. CD4+ T Cells Orchestrate Lethal Immune Pathology despite Fungal Clearance during Cryptococcus neoformans Meningoencephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Lori M.; Xing, Enze; Xu, Jintao; Kolbe, Jessica L.; Osterholzer, John J.; Segal, Benjamin M.; Williamson, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a major fungal pathogen that disseminates to the central nervous system (CNS) to cause fatal meningoencephalitis, but little is known about immune responses within this immune-privileged site. CD4+ T cells have demonstrated roles in anticryptococcal defenses, but increasing evidence suggests that they may contribute to clinical deterioration and pathology in both HIV-positive (HIV+) and non-HIV patients who develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and post-infectious inflammatory response syndrome (PIIRS), respectively. Here we report a novel murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and a potential damaging role of T cells in disseminated cryptococcal CNS infection. In this model, fungal burdens plateaued in the infected brain by day 7 postinfection, but activation of microglia and accumulation of CD45hi leukocytes was significantly delayed relative to fungal growth and did not peak until day 21. The inflammatory leukocyte infiltrate consisted predominantly of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T cells, conventionally believed to promote fungal clearance and recovery. However, more than 50% of mice succumbed to infection and neurological dysfunction between days 21 and 35 despite a 100-fold reduction in fungal burdens. Depletion of CD4+ cells significantly impaired IFN-γ production, CD8+ T cell and myeloid cell accumulation, and fungal clearance from the CNS but prevented the development of clinical symptoms and mortality. These findings conclusively demonstrate that although CD4+ T cells are necessary to control fungal growth, they can also promote significant immunopathology and mortality during CNS infection. The results from this model may provide important guidance for development and use of anti-inflammatory therapies to minimize CNS injury in patients with severe cryptococcal infections. PMID:29162707

  3. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando dos Santos Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  4. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  5. Induction of regulatory T cells by high-dose gp96 suppresses murine liver immune hyperactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghui Li

    Full Text Available Immunization with high-dose heat shock protein gp96, an endoplasmic reticulum counterpart of the Hsp90 family, significantly enhances regulatory T cell (Treg frequency and suppressive function. Here, we examined the potential role and mechanism of gp96 in regulating immune-mediated hepatic injury in mice. High-dose gp96 immunization elicited rapid and long-lasting protection of mice against concanavalin A (Con A-and anti-CD137-induced liver injury, as evidenced by decreased alanine aminotransaminase (ALT levels, hepatic necrosis, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6, and number of IFN-γ (+ CD4(+ and IFN-γ (+ CD8(+ T cells in the spleen and liver. In contrast, CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ Treg frequency and suppressive function were both increased, and the protective effect of gp96 could be generated by adoptive transfer of Treg cells from gp96-immunized mice. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that gp96 stimulation enhanced Treg proliferation and suppressive function, and up-regulation of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β1 induced by gp96 was dependent on TLR2- and TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation. Our work shows that activation of Tregs by high-dose gp96 immunization protects against Con A- and anti-CD137-induced T cell-hepatitis and provides therapeutic potential for the development of a gp96-based anti-immune hyperactivation vaccine against immune-mediated liver destruction.

  6. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  7. l-Citrulline Metabolism in Mice Augments CD4+ T Cell Proliferation and Cytokine Production In Vitro, and Accumulation in the Mycobacteria-Infected Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Shannon M; McKell, Melanie C; Schmidt, Stephanie M; Hossfeld, Austin P; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kinder, Jeremy M; McAlees, Jaclyn W; Lewkowich, Ian P; Way, Sing Sing; Turner, Joanne; Qualls, Joseph E

    2017-01-01

    Activation, recruitment, and effector function of T lymphocytes are essential for control of mycobacterial infection. These processes are tightly regulated in T cells by the availability of l-arginine within the microenvironment. In turn, mycobacterial infection dampens T cell responsiveness through arginase induction in myeloid cells, promoting sequestration of l-arginine within the local milieu. Here, we show T cells can replenish intracellular l-arginine through metabolism of l-citrulline to mediate inflammatory function, allowing anti-mycobacterial T cells to overcome arginase-mediated suppression. Furthermore, T cell l-citrulline metabolism is necessary for accumulation of CD4+ T cells at the site of infection, suggesting this metabolic pathway is involved during anti-mycobacterial T cell immunity in vivo. Together, these findings establish a contribution for l-arginine synthesis by T cells during mycobacterial infection, and implicate l-citrulline as a potential immuno-nutrient to modulate host immunity.

  8. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. T-cell autophagy deficiency increases mortality and suppresses immune responses after sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Lin

    Full Text Available Although the role of autophagy in sepsis has been characterized in several organs, its role in the adaptive immune system remains to be ascertained. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in sepsis-induced T cell apoptosis and immunosuppression, using knockout mice with T cell specific deletion of autophagy essential gene Atg7.Sepsis was induced in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model, with T-cell-specific Atg7-knockout mice compared to control mice. Autophagic vacuoles examined by electron microscopy were decreased in the spleen after CLP. Autophagy proteins LC3-II and ATG7, and autophagosomes and autolysosomes stained by Cyto-ID Green and acridine orange were decreased in CD4+ and CD8+ splenocytes at 18 h and 24 h after CLP. This decrease in autophagy was associated with increased apoptosis of CD4+ and CD8+ after CLP. Moreover, mice lacking Atg7 in T lymphocytes showed an increase in sepsis-induced mortality, T cell apoptosis and loss of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, in comparison to control mice. This was accompanied by suppressed cytokine production of Th1/Th2/Th17 by CD4+ T cells, reduced phagocytosis in macrophages and decreased bacterial clearance in the spleen after sepsis.These results indicated that sepsis led to down-regulation of autophagy in T lymphocytes, which may result in enhanced apoptosis induction and decreased survival in sepsis. Autophagy may therefore play a protective role against sepsis-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis and immunosuppression.

  10. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  11. Regulatory T Cells and Immune Tolerance to Coagulation Factor IX in the Context of Intramuscular AAV1 Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Meagan; Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Tacke, Frank; Chao, Hengjun

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells play a major role in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and immunological homeostasis. A variety of strategies have been attempted to induce regulatory T cells for control of unwanted, adverse immunity in autoimmune diseases, transplantation as well as gene transfer. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. In the current study, we performed a systematic and comprehensi...

  12. Elevated humoral response to cytomegalovirus in HIV-infected individuals with poor CD4+ T-cell immune recovery.

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    Elisabet Gómez-Mora

    Full Text Available Some HIV-infected c-ART-suppressed individuals show incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery, abnormal T-cell activation and higher mortality. One potential source of immune activation could be coinfection with cytomegalovirus (CMV. IgG and IgM levels, immune activation, inflammation and T-cell death in c-ART-suppressed individuals with CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/μL (immunoconcordant, n = 133 or <350 cells/μL (immunodiscordant, n = 95 were analyzed to evaluate the effect of CMV humoral response on immune recovery. In total, 27 HIV-uninfected individuals were included as controls. In addition, the presence of CMV IgM antibodies was retrospectively analyzed in 58 immunoconcordant individuals and 66 immunodiscordant individuals. Increased CMV IgG levels were observed in individuals with poor immune reconstitution (p = 0.0002. Increased CMV IgG responses were significantly correlated with lower nadir and absolute CD4+ T-cell counts. In contrast, CMV IgG responses were positively correlated with activation (HLA-DR+ and death markers in CD4+ T-cells and activated memory CD8+ T-cells (CD45RA-CD38+. Longitudinal subanalysis revealed an increased frequency of IgM+ samples in individuals with poor CD4+ T-cell recovery, and an association was observed between retrospective IgM positivity and the current level of IgG. The magnitude of the humoral immune response to CMV is associated with nadir CD4+ T-cell counts, inflammation, immune activation and CD4+ T-cell death, thus suggesting that CMV infection may be a relevant driving force in the increased morbidity/mortality observed in HIV+ individuals with poor CD4+ T-cell recovery.

  13. Competition for IL-2 between regulatory and effector T cells to chisel immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHöfer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss how the competition for cytokines between different cells of the immune system can shape the system wide immune response. We focus on interleukin-2 (IL-2 secretion by activated effector T cells (Teff and on the competition for IL-2 consumption between Teff and regulatory T cells (Treg. We discuss the evidence for the mechanism in which the depletion of IL-2 by Treg cells would be sufficient to suppress an autoimmune response, yet not strong enough to prevent an immune response. We present quantitative estimations and summarize our modeling effort to show that the tug-of-war between Treg and Teff cells for IL-2 molecules can be won by Treg cells in the case of weak activation of Teff leading to the suppression of the immune response. Or, for strongly activated Teff cells, it can be won by Teff cells bringing about the activation of the whole adaptive immune system. Finally, we discuss some recent applications attempting to achieve clinical effects through the modulation of IL-2 consumption by Treg compartment.

  14. IL-1R and MyD88 signalling in CD4+ T cells promote Th17 immunity and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbertsen, Daniel; Rattik, Sara; Wigren, Maria; Vallejo, Jenifer; Marinkovic, Goran; Schiopu, Alexandru; Björkbacka, Harry; Nilsson, Jan; Bengtsson, Eva

    2018-01-01

    The role of CD4+ T cells in atherosclerosis has been shown to be dependent on cytokine cues that regulate lineage commitment into mature T helper sub-sets. In this study, we tested the roles of IL-1R1 and MyD88 signalling in CD4+ T cells in atherosclerosis. We transferred apoe-/-myd88+/+ or apoe-/-myd88-/- CD4+ T cells to T- and B-cell-deficient rag1-/-apoe-/- mice fed high fat diet. Mice given apoe-/-myd88-/- CD4+ T cells exhibited reduced atherosclerosis compared with mice given apoe-/-myd88+/+ CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells from apoe-/-myd88-/- produced less IL-17 but similar levels of IFN-γ. Treatment of human CD4+ T cells with a MyD88 inhibitor inhibited IL-17 secretion in vitro. Transfer of il1r1-/- CD4+ T cells recapitulated the phenotype seen by transfer of myd88-/- CD4+ T cells with reduced lesion development and a reduction in Th17 and IL-17 production compared with wild type CD4+ T cell recipients. Relative collagen content of lesions was reduced in mice receiving il1r1-/- CD4+ T cells. We demonstrate that both IL1R and MyD88 signalling in CD4+ T cells promote Th17 immunity, plaque growth and may regulate plaque collagen levels.

  15. AIRE polymorphism, melanoma antigen-specific T cell immunity, and susceptibility to melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Giuseppina; Fenoglio, Daniela; Parodi, Alessia; Battaglia, Florinda; Kalli, Francesca; Negrini, Simone; Tardito, Samuele; Ferrera, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Millo, Enrico; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Barra, Giusi; Damonte, Gianluca; Indiveri, Francesco; Ferrone, Soldano; Filaci, Gilberto

    2016-09-20

    AIRE is involved in susceptibility to melanoma perhaps regulating T cell immunity against melanoma antigens (MA). To address this issue, AIRE and MAGEB2 expressions were measured by real time PCR in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) from two strains of C57BL/6 mice bearing either T or C allelic variant of the rs1800522 AIRE SNP. Moreover, the extent of apoptosis induced by mTECs in MAGEB2-specific T cells and the susceptibility to in vivo melanoma B16F10 cell challenge were compared in the two mouse strains.The C allelic variant, protective in humans against melanoma, induced lower AIRE and MAGEB2 expression in C57BL/6 mouse mTECs than the T allele. Moreover, mTECs expressing the C allelic variant induced lower extent of apoptosis in MAGEB2-specific syngeneic T cells than mTECs bearing the T allelic variant (p AIRE genotype than in those bearing the TT one (p AIRE SNP may differentially shape the MA-specific T cell repertoire potentially influencing susceptibility to melanoma.

  16. Monitoring of pathogen-specific T-cell immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo eFuji

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has been significantly improved during the last decades with regard to the reduction in organ failure, infection, and severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. However, severe complications due to infectious diseases are still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT, in particular in patients receiving haploidentical HSCT or cord blood transplant due to a slow and often incomplete immune reconstitution. In order to improve the immune control of pathogens without an increased risk of alloreactivity, adoptive immunotherapy using highly enriched pathogen-specific T cells offers a promising approach. In order to identify patients who are at high risk for infectious diseases, several monitoring assays have been developed with potential for the guidance of immunosuppressive drugs and adoptive immunotherapy in clinical practice. In this article, we aim to give a comprehensive overview regarding current developments of T-cell monitoring techniques focusing on T cells against viruses and fungi. In particular, we will focus on rather simple, fast, non-labor-intensive, cellular assays which could be integrated in routine clinical screening approaches.

  17. Gene Therapy for Modulation of T Cell Mediated Immune Response Provoked by Corneal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastak, Marko; Kleff, Veronika; Saban, Daniel Raphael; Czugala, Marta; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Ergün, Süleyman; Singer, Bernhard; Fuchsluger, Thomas Armin

    2017-10-07

    Corneal transplantation (=keratoplasty) is the most common type of tissue replacement in the world. The increased rate of graft rejection after keratoplasty is a central problem for repeated transplantations and in inflamed host corneas. It has been shown that apoptosis of grafted epithelium has a role in corneal allograft rejection. Our study focused on the T cell response triggered in BALB/c mice after allogeneic corneal transplantation with and without anti-apoptotic p35-transduced epithelium. To restrict p35 expression to the epithelial cells we created modified allogeneic composite grafts. As a result we found that the proportion of alloreactive CD4+ T cells in postoperatively removed cervical lymph nodes was reduced in the p35-transduced group compared to the allogeneic control group. Diminished priming of the CD4+ T cells was supported by significantly decreased proliferation and lower interferon gamma secretion when compared to allogeneic engraftments. The reduced priming of CD4+ lymphocytes is the first confirmation of the functionality of p35 in the epithelium of corneal grafts to alter the development of the recipient's immune response. Thus, modification of allosensibilization seems to be a promising tool for reducing graft-mediated immune response following corneal transplantation.

  18. Regulatory T cells and immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX in the context of intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Meagan; Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Tacke, Frank; Chao, Hengjun

    2010-02-01

    Regulatory T cells play a major role in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and immunological homeostasis. A variety of strategies have been attempted to induce regulatory T cells for control of unwanted, adverse immunity in autoimmune diseases, transplantation as well as gene transfer. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. In the current study, we performed a systematic and comprehensive examination of the role and function of regulatory T cells in induction and maintenance of FIX tolerance in the context of intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. We observed no significant upregulation of regulatory T cells in the FIX-tolerant mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of splenocytes from FIX-tolerant mice did not suppress anti-hFIX immunity in recipient mice. Both in vitro and in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells failed to reverse FIX tolerance. These observations revealed that regulatory T cells do not play a significant role in the maintenance/protection of the established FIX tolerance. Our results provide critical insight into the role and function of regulatory T cells in induction and maintenance/protection of immune tolerance in gene transfer, complementing the current paradigm of immune tolerance mechanism.

  19. Role of the Ca2+-Calcineurin-Nuclear Factor of Activated T cell Pathway in Mitofusin-2-Mediated Immune Function of Jurkat Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Ping Xu

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MFN2 may regulate T cell immune functions primarily through the Ca2+-calcineurin-NFAT pathway. MFN2 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T cell immune dysfunction-related diseases.

  20. Relevance of compartmentalization of T-cell subsets for clinical improvement in psoriasis: effect of immune-targeted antipsoriatic therapies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingen, R.G. van; Korver, J.E.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Berends, M.A.M.; Rens, D.W.A. van; Langewouters, A.M.G.; Boezeman, J.B.M.; Seyger, M.M.B.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapies targeting the T cell-mediated pathology of psoriasis have been found to achieve remarkable clinical improvement and have confirmed the crucial role of the immune system either in peripheral blood (PB) or in skin. No analyses of T-cell counts in both compartments have been

  1. Overnight Resting of PBMC Changes Functional Signatures of Antigen Specific T- Cell Responses: Impact for Immune Monitoring within Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutscher, Sarah; Dembek, Claudia J.; Deckert, Simone; Russo, Carolina; Körber, Nina; Bogner, Johannes R.; Geisler, Fabian; Umgelter, Andreas; Neuenhahn, Michael; Albrecht, Julia; Cosma, Antonio; Protzer, Ulrike; Bauer, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Polyfunctional CD4 or CD8 T cells are proposed to represent a correlate of immune control for persistent viruses as well as for vaccine mediated protection against infection. A well-suited methodology to study complex functional phenotypes of antiviral T cells is the combined staining of intracellular cytokines and phenotypic marker expression using polychromatic flow cytometry. In this study we analyzed the effect of an overnight resting period at 37°C on the quantity and functionality of HIV-1, EBV, CMV, HBV and HCV specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in a cohort of 21 individuals. We quantified total antigen specific T cells by multimer staining and used 10-color intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) to determine IFNγ, TNFα, IL2 and MIP1β production. After an overnight resting significantly higher numbers of functionally active T cells were detectable by ICS for all tested antigen specificities, whereas the total number of antigen specific T cells determined by multimer staining remained unchanged. Overnight resting shifted the quality of T-cell responses towards polyfunctionality and increased antigen sensitivity of T cells. Our data suggest that the observed effect is mediated by T cells rather than by antigen presenting cells. We conclude that overnight resting of PBMC prior to ex vivo analysis of antiviral T-cell responses represents an efficient method to increase sensitivity of ICS-based methods and has a prominent impact on the functional phenotype of T cells. PMID:24146841

  2. HCV coinfection contributes to HIV pathogenesis by increasing immune exhaustion in CD8 T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallón, Norma; García, Marcial; García-Samaniego, Javier; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cabello, Alfonso; Restrepo, Clara; Álvarez, Beatriz; García, Rosa; Górgolas, Miguel; Benito, José M

    2017-01-01

    There are several contributors to HIV-pathogenesis or insufficient control of the infection. However, whether HIV/HCV-coinfected population exhibits worst evolution of HIV-pathogenesis remains unclear. Recently, some markers of immune exhaustion have been proposed as preferentially upregulated on T-cells during HIV-infection. Herein, we have analyzed T-cell exhaustion together with several other contributors to HIV-pathogenesis that could be affected by HCV-coinfection. Ninety-six patients with chronic HIV-infection (60 HIV-monoinfected and 36 HIV/HCV-coinfected), and 20 healthy controls were included in the study. All patients were untreated for both infections. Several CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets involved in HIV-pathogenesis were investigated. Non-parametric tests were used to establish differences between groups and associations between variables. Multivariate linear regression was used to ascertain the variables independently associated with CD4 counts. HIV-patients presented significant differences compared to healthy controls in most of the parameters analyzed. Both HIV and HIV/HCV groups were comparable in terms of age, CD4 counts and HIV-viremia. Compared to HIV group, HIV/HCV group presented significantly higher levels of exhaustion (Tim3+PD1- subset) in total CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.003), and higher levels of exhaustion in CD8+HLADR+CD38+ (p = 0.04), CD8+HLADR-CD38+ (p = 0.009) and CD8+HLADR-CD38- (p = 0.006) subsets of CD8+ T-cells. Interestingly these differences were maintained after adjusting by CD4 counts and HIV-viremia. We show a significant impact of HCV-coinfection on CD8 T-cells exhaustion, an important parameter associated with CD8 T-cell dysfunction in the setting of chronic HIV-infection. The relevance of this phenomenon on immunological and/or clinical HIV progression prompts HCV treatment to improve management of coinfected patients.

  3. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...... (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months...

  4. Innate and adaptive immune responses both contribute to pathological CD4 T cell activation in HIV-1 infected Ugandans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Eller

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 disease progression is associated with persistent immune activation. However, the nature of this association is incompletely understood. Here, we investigated immune activation in the CD4 T cell compartment of chronically HIV-1 infected individuals from Rakai, Uganda. Levels of CD4 T cell activation, assessed as co-expression of PD-1, CD38 and HLA-DR, correlated directly to viral load and inversely to CD4 count. Deeper characterization of these cells indicated an effector memory phenotype with relatively frequent expression of Ki67 despite their PD-1 expression, and levels of these cells were inversely associated with FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. We therefore use the term deregulated effector memory (DEM cells to describe them. CD4 T cells with a DEM phenotype could be generated by antigen stimulation of recall responses in vitro. Responses against HIV-1 and CMV antigens were enriched among the DEM CD4 T cells in patients, and the diverse Vβ repertoire of DEM CD4 T cells suggested they include diverse antigen-specificities. Furthermore, the levels of DEM CD4 T cells correlated directly to soluble CD14 (sCD14 and IL-6, markers of innate immune activation, in plasma. The size of the activated DEM CD4 T cell subset was predictive of the rate of disease progression, whereas IL-6 was only weakly predictive and sCD14 was not predictive. Taken together, these results are consistent with a model where systemic innate immune activation and chronic antigen stimulation of adaptive T cell responses both play important roles in driving pathological CD4 T cell immune activation in HIV-1 disease.

  5. Role for Lyt-2+ T cells in resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis in immunized mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, J.P.; Muller, I.; Louis, J.A.

    1989-03-15

    The role of Lyt-2+ T cells in immunologic resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis was analyzed by comparing infection patterns in resistant C57BL/6 mice and susceptible BALB/c mice induced to heal their infections after sub-lethal irradiation or i.v. immunization, with similar mice treated in vivo with anti-Lyt-2 antibodies. Administration of anti-Lyt-2 mAb resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of lymphoid cells expressing the Lyt-2+ phenotype. Such treatment led to enhanced disease in both resistant C57BL/6 and irradiated BALB/c mice, as assessed by lesion size, but did not affect the capacity of these mice to ultimately resolve their infections. In contrast, anti-Lyt-2 treatment totally blocked the induction of resistance in i.v. immunized mice. These results suggest, that Lyt-2+ T cells may play a role in immunity to a Leishmania major infection and that their relative importance to resistance may depend on how resistance is induced.

  6. Leukemia inhibitory factor tips the immune balance towards regulatory T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Kris; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Lucas, Sophie; van Horssen, Jack; Somers, Veerle; Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A; Slaets, Helena; Hellings, Niels

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), for which current treatments are unable to prevent disease progression. Based on its neuroprotective and neuroregenerating properties, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family, is proposed as a novel candidate for MS therapy. However, its effect on the autoimmune response remains unclear. In this study, we determined how LIF modulates T cell responses that play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of MS. We demonstrate that expression of the LIF receptor was strongly increased on immune cells of MS patients. LIF treatment potently boosted the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy controls and MS patients with low serum levels of IL-6. Moreover, IL-6 signaling was reduced in the donors that responded to LIF treatment in vitro. Our data together with previous findings revealing that IL-6 inhibits Treg development, suggest an opposing function of LIF and IL-6. In a preclinical animal model of MS we shifted the LIF/IL-6 balance in favor of LIF by CNS-targeted overexpression. This increased the number of Tregs in the CNS during active autoimmune responses and reduced disease symptoms. In conclusion, our data show that LIF downregulates the autoimmune response by enhancing Treg numbers, providing further impetus for the use of LIF as a novel treatment for MS and other autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg and if Treg depletion improves the efficacy of this vaccine against tumours. The vaccine is based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The recombinant SFV replicon particles encode a fusion protein of E6 and E7 from human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (SFVeE6,7). We demonstrated that SFVeE6,7 immunization did not change Treg levels and their suppressive activity. Depletion of Treg in mice, using the novel anti-folate receptor 4 antibody, did not enhance the immune response induced by SFVeE6,7 immunization. Both the priming and the proliferation phases of the HPV-specific response elicited with SFVeE6,7 were not affected by the immune-suppressive activity of Treg. Moreover, Treg depletion did not improve the therapeutic antitumour response of SFVeE6,7 in a murine tumour model. The efficacy of the SFVeE6,7 vaccine was not hampered by Treg. Therefore, SFVeE6,7 seems a very promising candidate for the treatment of HPV-induced disease, as it may not require additional immune interventions to modulate Treg activity.

  8. MAVS Is Essential for Primary CD4+ T Cell Immunity but Not for Recall T Cell Responses following an Attenuated West Nile Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huanle; Winkelmann, Evandro; Xie, Guorui; Fang, Rong; Peng, Bi-Hung; Li, Li; Lazear, Helen M; Paessler, Slobodan; Diamond, Michael S; Gale, Michael; Barrett, Alan D; Wang, Tian

    2017-03-15

    The use of pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) agonists and the molecular mechanisms involved have been the major focus of research in individual vaccine development. West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural (NS) 4B-P38G mutant has several features for an ideal vaccine candidate, including significantly reduced neuroinvasiveness, induction of strong adaptive immunity, and protection of mice from wild-type (WT) WNV infection. Here, we determined the role of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), the adaptor protein for RIG-I-like receptor in regulating host immunity against the NS4B-P38G vaccine. We found that Mavs-/- mice were more susceptible to NS4B-P38G priming than WT mice. Mavs-/- mice had a transiently reduced production of antiviral cytokines and an impaired CD4+ T cell response in peripheral organs. However, antibody and CD8+ T cell responses were minimally affected. NS4B-P38G induced lower type I interferon (IFN), IFN-stimulating gene, and proinflammatory cytokine responses in Mavs-/- dendritic cells and subsequently compromised the antigen-presenting capacity for CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, Mavs-/- mice surviving NS4B-P38G priming were all protected from a lethal WT WNV challenge. NS4B-P38G-primed Mavs-/- mice exhibited equivalent levels of protective CD4+ T cell recall response, a modestly reduced WNV-specific IgM production, but more robust CD8+ T cell recall response. Taken together, our results suggest that MAVS is essential for boosting optimal primary CD4+ T cell responses upon NS4B-P38G vaccination and yet is dispensable for host protection and recall T cell responses during secondary WT WNV infection.IMPORTANCE The production of innate cytokines induced by the recognition of pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) via their cognate ligands are critical for enhancing antigen-presenting cell functions and influencing T cell responses during microbial infection. The use of PRR agonists and the underlying molecular mechanisms have been the major

  9. Optimized clonotypic analysis of T-cell receptor repertoire in immune reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Amy N; Muraro, Paolo A

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing analysis has proven an effective technique for the identification of T-cell populations of interest in cancer and autoimmunity, as well as for the characterization of peripheral immune repertoire reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, despite its increased utilization, to our knowledge no group has investigated the minimum number of sequences necessary to accurately and efficiently describe the composition of TCR repertoire. The primary aim of this study was to optimize a procedure for clonotypic analysis of the TCR repertoire in patients undergoing autologous HSCT. TCR beta-chain diversity was analyzed by DNA sequencing and CDR3 spectratyping CD8(+) T cells isolated from three patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing autologous HSCT. Samples were collected at baseline and 1 or 2 years post-HSCT. Using DNA cloning and high throughput sequencing, we analyzed over 1500 in-frame TCR sequences, allowing us to evaluate how our measures of TCR repertoire diversity change with increasing numbers of sequences included in the analysis. Our findings show that by analyzing 75 to 100 in-frame sequences, we are able to estimate TCR diversity within 5.0% to 7.4% of the values obtained at endpoint analysis (213-312 sequences per sample). This study confirms the use of TCR sequencing as an effective technique for the characterization of immune renewal after autologous HSCT. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time convincing evidence to support the use of moderate sample sizes to accurately and efficiently evaluate TCR repertoire diversity.

  10. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  11. Ionizing radiation selectively reduces skin regulatory T cells and alters immune function.

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    Yu Zhou

    Full Text Available The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel.

  12. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

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    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  13. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system

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    Enrique Montalvillo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity. Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  14. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

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    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  15. Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Immune Regulation of Blood Cancers: Harnessing Their Potential in Immunotherapies

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    Pui Yeng Lam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a unique innate T lymphocyte population that possess cytolytic properties and profound immunoregulatory activities. iNKT cells play an important role in the immune surveillance of blood cancers. They predominantly recognize glycolipid antigens presented on CD1d, but their activation and cytolytic activities are not confined to CD1d expressing cells. iNKT cell stimulation and subsequent production of immunomodulatory cytokines serve to enhance the overall antitumor immune response. Crucially, the activation of iNKT cells in cancer often precedes the activation and priming of other immune effector cells, such as NK cells and T cells, thereby influencing the generation and outcome of the antitumor immune response. Blood cancers can evade or dampen iNKT cell responses by downregulating expression of recognition receptors or by actively suppressing or diverting iNKT cell functions. This review will discuss literature on iNKT cell activity and associated dysregulation in blood cancers as well as highlight some of the strategies designed to harness and enhance iNKT cell functions against blood cancers.

  16. Fetus specific immune recognition and regulation by T cells at the fetal-maternal inferface in human pregnancy

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    Tilburgs, Tamara

    2008-01-01

    During pregnancy the maternal immune system tolerates the persistence of fetal cells in maternal tissue. The fetus expresses maternal as well as paternal encoded molecules but is not rejected by the maternal immune system. The aim of this thesis was to determine whether maternal T cells contribute

  17. Comparative immune phenotypic analysis of cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Intraepidermal Carcinoma in immune-competent individuals: proportional representation of CD8+ T-cells but not FoxP3+ Regulatory T-cells is associated with disease stage.

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    Andrew Freeman

    Full Text Available Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC is a type of non-melanoma skin cancer prevalent in immune-suppressed transplant recipients and older individuals with a history of chronic sun-exposure. SCC itself is believed to be a late-stage manifestation that can develop from premalignant lesions including Intraepidermal Carcinoma (IEC. Notably, while SCC regression is rare, IEC typically regresses in response to immune modifying topical treatments, however the underlying immunological reasons for these differential responses remain unclear. This study aimed to define whether IEC and SCC are associated with distinct immune profiles. We investigated the immune cell infiltrate of photo-damaged skin, IEC, and SCC tissue using 10-colour flow cytometry following fresh lesion digest. We found that IEC lesions contain higher percentages of CD3+ T-cells than photo-damaged skin, however, the abundance of CD3-CD56+ Natural Killer (NK cells, CD11c+HLA-DR+ conventional Dendritic Cells (cDC, BDCA-2+HLA-DR+ plasmacytoid DC (pDC, FoxP3+ Regulatory T-cells (T-reg, Vα24+Vβ11+ invariant NKT-cells, and γδ Tcells did not alter with disease stage. Within the total T-cell population, high percentages of CD4+ T-cells were associated with SCC, yet CD8+ T-cells were less abundant in SCC compared with IEC. Our study demonstrates that while IEC lesions contain a higher proportion of T-cells than SCC lesions in general, SCC lesions specifically display a lower abundance of CD8+ T-cells than IEC. We propose that differences in CD8+ T-cell abundance contribute critically to the different capacity of SCC and IEC to regress in response to immune modifying topical treatments. Our study also suggests that a high ratio of CD4+ T-cells to CD8+ T-cells may be a immunological diagnostic indicator of late-stage SCC development in immune-competent patients.

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection impairs immune responses and accentuates T-cell pool changes observed in mice with aging.

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    Luka Cicin-Sain

    Full Text Available Prominent immune alterations associated with aging include the loss of naïve T-cell numbers, diversity and function. While genetic contributors and mechanistic details in the aging process have been addressed in multiple studies, the role of environmental agents in immune aging remains incompletely understood. From the standpoint of environmental infectious agents, latent cytomegalovirus (CMV infection has been associated with an immune risk profile in the elderly humans, yet the cause-effect relationship of this association remains unclear. Here we present direct experimental evidence that mouse CMV (MCMV infection results in select T-cell subset changes associated with immune aging, namely the increase of relative and absolute counts of CD8 T-cells in the blood, with a decreased representation of the naïve and the increased representation of the effector memory blood CD8 T-cells. Moreover, MCMV infection resulted in significantly weaker CD8 responses to superinfection with Influenza, Human Herpes Virus I or West-Nile-Virus, even 16 months following MCMV infection. These irreversible losses in T-cell function could not be observed in uninfected or in vaccinia virus-infected controls and were not due to the immune-evasive action of MCMV genes. Rather, the CD8 activation in draining lymph nodes upon viral challenge was decreased in MCMV infected mice and the immune response correlated directly to the frequency of the naïve and inversely to that of the effector cells in the blood CD8 pool. Therefore, latent MCMV infection resulted in pronounced changes of the T-cell compartment consistent with impaired naïve T-cell function.

  19. CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immunity to Dengue - lessons for the study of Zika virus.

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    Rivino, Laura; Lim, Mei Qiu

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are rapidly emerging mosquito-borne flaviviruses that represent a public health concern. Understanding host protective immunity to these viruses is critical for the design of optimal vaccines. Over a decade of research has highlighted a significant contribution of the T-cell response to both protection and/or disease enhancement during DENV infection, the latter being mainly associated with sub-optimal cross-reactive T-cell responses during secondary infections. Phase IIb/III clinical trials of the first licensed tetravalent dengue vaccine highlight increased vaccine efficacy in dengue-immune as opposed to dengue-naive vaccinees, suggesting a possible immunoprotective role of pre-existing DENV-specific T cells that are boosted upon vaccination. No vaccine is available for ZIKV and little is known about the T-cell response to this virus. ZIKV and DENV are closely related viruses with a sequence identity ranging from 44% and 56% for the structural proteins capsid and envelope to 68% for the more conserved non-structural proteins NS3/NS5, which represent the main targets of the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell response to DENV, respectively. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of T-cell immunity to DENV and what it can teach us for the study of ZIKV. The extent of T-cell cross-reactivity towards ZIKV of pre-existing DENV-specific memory T cells and its potential impact on protective immunity and/or immunopathology will also be discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution.

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    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C; Beilman, Greg J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Schacker, Timothy W; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T

    2012-08-30

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1-infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution.

  1. Fetal intervention increases maternal T cell awareness of the foreign conceptus and can lead to immune-mediated fetal demise.

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    Wegorzewska, Marta; Nijagal, Amar; Wong, Charissa M; Le, Tom; Lescano, Ninnia; Tang, Qizhi; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2014-02-15

    Fetal interventions to diagnose and treat congenital anomalies are growing in popularity but often lead to preterm labor. The possible contribution of the maternal adaptive immune system to postsurgical pregnancy complications has not been explored. We recently showed that fetal intervention in mice increases maternal T cell trafficking into the fetus and hypothesized that this process also may lead to increased maternal T cell recognition of the foreign conceptus and subsequent breakdown in maternal-fetal tolerance. In this study, we show that fetal intervention in mice results in accumulation of maternal T cells in the uterus and that these activated cells can produce effector cytokines. In adoptive transfer experiments, maternal T cells specific for a fetal alloantigen proliferate after fetal intervention, escape apoptosis, and become enriched compared with endogenous T cells in the uterus and uterine-draining lymph nodes. Finally, we demonstrate that such activation and accumulation can have a functional consequence: in utero transplantation of hematopoietic cells carrying the fetal alloantigen leads to enhanced demise of semiallogeneic fetuses within a litter. We further show that maternal T cells are necessary for this phenomenon. These results suggest that fetal intervention enhances maternal T cell recognition of the fetus and that T cell activation may be a culprit in postsurgical pregnancy complications. Our results have clinical implications for understanding and preventing complications associated with fetal surgery such as preterm labor.

  2. CD47 in the tumor microenvironment limits cooperation between anti-tumor T cell immunity and radiation therapy

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    Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Terabe, Masaki; Ghosh, Arunima; Ridnour, Lisa A.; DeGraff, William G.; Wink, David A.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Roberts, David D.

    2014-01-01

    While significant advances in radiotherapy have increased its effectiveness in many cancer settings, general strategies to widen the therapeutic window between normal tissue toxicity and malignant tumor destruction would still offer great value. CD47 blockade has been found to confer radioprotection to normal tissues while enhancing tumor radiosensitivity. Here we report that CD47 blockade directly enhances tumor immunosurveillance by CD8+ T cells. Combining CD47 blockade with irradiation did not affect fibrosarcoma growth in T cell-deficient mice, whereas adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells restored combinatorial efficacy. Further, ablation of CD8+ T cells abolished radiotherapeutic response in immunocompetent syngeneic hosts. CD47 blockade in either target cells or effector cells was sufficient to enhance antigen-dependent CD8+ CTL-mediated tumor cell killing in vitro. In CD47-deficient syngeneic hosts, engrafted B16 melanomas were 50% more sensitive to irradiation, establishing that CD47 expression in the microenvironment was sufficient to limit tumor radiosensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in a CD47-deficient microenvironment, with an associated increase in T cell-dependent intratumoral expression of granzyme B. Correspondingly, an inverse correlation between CD8+ T cell infiltration and CD47 expression was observed in human melanomas. Our findings establish that blocking CD47 in the context of radiotherapy enhances antitumor immunity by directly stimulating CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, with the potential to increase curative responses. PMID:25297630

  3. The role of CD4 T cell memory in generating protective immunity to novel and potentially pandemic strains of influenza

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    Anthony eDiPiazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have made it clear that potentially pandemic strains of influenza regularly pose a threat to human populations. Therefore, it is essential that we develop better strategies to enhance vaccine design and evaluation, to predict those that will be poor responders to vaccination and to identify those that are at particular risk of disease-associated complications following infection. Simplified animal models have revealed the discrete functions that CD4 T cells play in the developing immune response and to influenza immunity. However, humans have a complex immunological history with influenza through periodic infection and vaccination with seasonal variants, leading to the establishment of heterogeneous memory populations of CD4 T cells that participate in subsequent responses. The continual evolution of the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire involves both specificity and function and overlays other restrictions on CD4 T cell activity derived from viral antigen handling and MHC class II:peptide epitope display. Together, these complexities in the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire constitute a formidable obstacle to predicting protective immune response to potentially pandemic strains of influenza and in devising optimal vaccine strategies to potentiate these responses. We suggest that more precise efforts to identify and enumerate both the positive and negative contributors within the CD4 T cell compartment will aid significantly in achievement of these goals.

  4. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

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    Kenichi Kumagai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  5. What roles do regulatory T cells play in the control of the adaptive immune response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Melvin

    2008-09-01

    The immune system, like many systems responsive to specific stimuli, requires feedback regulation. The key regulatory element determining antigen-specific responsiveness is the effector T helper. As the response tends to overshoot, a feedback control of the magnitude of the response is critical to avoid immunopathology. This is the proposed role of the effector T suppressor (T(s)). The reasons for this interpretation of the data are discussed as are the reasons that the competing postulate is ruled out, namely that T(s) function in determining the self-non-self-discrimination. The regulatory T cell family consists of two lineages, T helpers and T(s). Differentiated derivatives of the T helper lineage drive the expression and amplification of specific classes of defensive effector cells. T(s) feedback to limit the magnitude of the process so that debilitating immunopathology is acceptably infrequent.

  6. Immunoregulatory mechanisms in Chagas disease: modulation of apoptosis in T-cell mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Ana Thereza; de Assis Silva Gomes Estanislau, Juliana; Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Guimarães, Pedro Henrique Gazzinelli; de Souza Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Morato, Maria José; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Costa Rocha, Manoel Otávio; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2016-04-30

    Chronic Chagas disease presents different clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic (namely indeterminate) to severe cardiac and/or digestive. Previous results have shown that the immune response plays an important role, although no all mechanisms are understood. Immunoregulatory mechanisms such as apoptosis are important for the control of Chagas disease, possibly affecting the morbidity in chronic clinical forms. Apoptosis has been suggested to be an important mechanism of cellular response during T. cruzi infection. We aimed to further understand the putative role of apoptosis in Chagas disease and its relation to the clinical forms of the disease. Apoptosis of lymphocytes, under antigenic stimuli (soluble T. cruzi antigens - TcAg) where compared to that of non-stimulated cells. Apoptosis was evaluated using the expression of annexin and caspase 3(+) by T cells and the percentage of cells positive evaluated by flow cytometry. In addition activation and T cell markers were used for the identification of TCD4(+) and TCD8(+) subpopulations. The presence of intracellular and plasma cytokines were also evaluated. Analysis of the activation status of the peripheral blood cells showed that patients with Chagas disease presented higher levels of activation determined by the expression of activation markers, after TcAg stimulation. PCR array were used to evaluate the contribution of this mechanism in specific cell populations from patients with different clinical forms of human Chagas disease. Our results showed a reduced proliferative response associated a high expression of T CD4(+)CD62L(-) cells in CARD patients when compared with IND group and NI individuals. We also observed that both groups of patients presented a significant increase of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets in undergoing apoptosis after in vitro stimulation with T. cruzi antigens. In CARD patients, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing TNF-α were highly susceptible to undergo apoptosis

  7. IP-10-mediated T cell homing promotes cerebral inflammation over splenic immunity to malaria infection.

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    Catherine Q Nie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria causes 660 million clinical cases with over 2 million deaths each year. Acquired host immunity limits the clinical impact of malaria infection and provides protection against parasite replication. Experimental evidence indicates that cell-mediated immune responses also result in detrimental inflammation and contribute to severe disease induction. In both humans and mice, the spleen is a crucial organ involved in blood stage malaria clearance, while organ-specific disease appears to be associated with sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vascular beds and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes. Using a rodent model of cerebral malaria, we have previously found that the majority of T lymphocytes in intravascular infiltrates of cerebral malaria-affected mice express the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Here we investigated the effect of IP-10 blockade in the development of experimental cerebral malaria and the induction of splenic anti-parasite immunity. We found that specific neutralization of IP-10 over the course of infection and genetic deletion of this chemokine in knockout mice reduces cerebral intravascular inflammation and is sufficient to protect P. berghei ANKA-infected mice from fatality. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that lack of IP-10 during infection significantly reduces peripheral parasitemia. The increased resistance to infection observed in the absence of IP-10-mediated cell trafficking was associated with retention and subsequent expansion of parasite-specific T cells in spleens of infected animals, which appears to be advantageous for the control of parasite burden. Thus, our results demonstrate that modulating homing of cellular immune responses to malaria is critical for reaching a balance between protective immunity and immunopathogenesis.

  8. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody Fc variants differentially impact regulatory T cells and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, David J; Pellerin, Alex F; Collette, Brian P; Kannan, Arun K; Peng, Liaomin; Datta, Abhishek; Wipke, Brian T; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis through its non-redundant role in regulatory T (Treg) cell biology. There is major interest in therapeutic modulation of the IL-2 pathway to promote immune activation in the context of tumour immunotherapy or to enhance immune suppression in the context of transplantation, autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Antibody-mediated targeting of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α chain (IL-2Rα or CD25) offers a direct mechanism to target IL-2 biology and is being actively explored in the clinic. In mouse models, the rat anti-mouse CD25 clone PC61 has been used extensively to investigate the biology of IL-2 and Treg cells; however, there has been controversy and conflicting data on the exact in vivo mechanistic function of PC61. Engineering antibodies to alter Fc/Fc receptor interactions can significantly alter their in vivo function. In this study, we re-engineered the heavy chain constant region of an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody to generate variants with highly divergent Fc effector function. Using these anti-CD25 Fc variants in multiple mouse models, we investigated the in vivo impact of CD25 blockade versus depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells on immune homeostasis. We report that immune homeostasis can be maintained during CD25 blockade but aberrant T-cell activation prevails when CD25(+) Treg cells are actively depleted. These results clarify the impact of PC61 on Treg cell biology and reveal an important distinction between CD25 blockade and depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells. These findings should inform therapeutic manipulation of the IL-2 pathway by targeting the high-affinity IL-2R. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Critical role of SAP in progression and reactivation but not maintenance of T cell-dependent humoral immunity.

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    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-03-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is a small adaptor molecule mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. SAP plays a critical role in the initiation of T cell-dependent B cell responses leading to germinal center reaction, the production of high-affinity antibodies, and B cell memory. However, whether SAP has a role in these responses beyond their initiation is not known. It is important to address this matter not only for mechanistic reasons but also because blockade of the SAP pathway is being contemplated as a means to treat autoimmune diseases in humans. Using an inducibly SAP deficient mouse, we found that SAP was required not only for the initiation but also for the progression of primary T cell-driven B cell responses to haptens. It was also necessary for the reactivation of T cell-dependent B cell immunity during secondary immune responses. These activities consistently correlated with the requirement of SAP for full expression of the lineage commitment factor Bcl-6 in follicular T helper (T(FH)) cells. However, once memory B cells and long-lived antibody-secreting cells were established, SAP became dispensable for maintaining T cell-dependent B cell responses. Thus, SAP is pivotal for nearly all phases, but not for maintenance, of T cell-driven B cell humoral immunity. These findings may have implications for the treatment of immune disorders by targeting the SAP pathway.

  10. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

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    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  11. Reduced interleukin-4 receptor α expression on CD8+ T cells correlates with higher quality anti-viral immunity.

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    Wijesundara, Danushka K; Tscharke, David C; Jackson, Ronald J; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2013-01-01

    With the hope of understanding how interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 modulated quality of anti-viral CD8(+) T cells, we evaluated the expression of receptors for these cytokines following a range of viral infections (e.g. pox viruses and influenza virus). Results clearly indicated that unlike other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα) was significantly down-regulated on anti-viral CD8(+) T cells in a cognate antigen dependent manner. The infection of gene knockout mice and wild-type (WT) mice with vaccinia virus (VV) or VV expressing IL-4 confirmed that IL-4, IL-13 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) were required to increase IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+) T cells, but not interferon (IFN)-γ. STAT6 dependent elevation of IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+) T cells was a feature of poor quality anti-viral CD8(+) T cell immunity as measured by the production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in response to VV antigen stimulation in vitro. We propose that down-regulation of IL-4Rα, but not the other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, is a mechanism by which CD8(+) T cells reduce responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13. This can improve the quality of anti-viral CD8(+) T cell immunity. Our findings have important implications in understanding anti-viral CD8(+) T cell immunity and designing effective vaccines against chronic viral infections.

  12. T Cell Factor 1-Expressing Memory-like CD8(+) T Cells Sustain the Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Charmoy, Mélanie; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Pousse, Laurène; Ferreira, Daniela Pais; Calderon-Copete, Sandra; Danilo, Maxime; Alfei, Francesca; Hofmann, Maike; Wieland, Dominik; Pradervand, Sylvain; Thimme, Robert; Zehn, Dietmar; Held, Werner

    2016-08-16

    Chronic infections promote the terminal differentiation (or "exhaustion") of T cells and are thought to preclude the formation of memory T cells. In contrast, we discovered a small subpopulation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that sustained the T cell response during chronic infections. These cells were defined by, and depended on, the expression of the transcription factor Tcf1. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this population shared key characteristics of central memory cells but lacked an effector signature. Unlike conventional memory cells, Tcf1-expressing T cells displayed hallmarks of an "exhausted" phenotype, including the expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1 and Lag-3. This population was crucial for the T cell expansion that occurred in response to inhibitory receptor blockade during chronic infection. These findings identify a memory-like T cell population that sustains T cell responses and is a prime target for therapeutic interventions to improve the immune response in chronic infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. T cell reconstitution after lymphopenia. Does the immune system forgive and forget?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den

    2015-01-01

    Throughout life, in absence of disease, the size and composition of the peripheral T-lymphocyte pool is tightly regulated and maintained at relatively constant levels. This T-cell homeostasis depends on two sources: thymopoiesis resulting in the generation of new T-cells and via expansion of T-cells

  14. Oral Vaccination with Lipid-Formulated BCG Induces a Long-lived, Multifunctional CD4+ T Cell Memory Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancelet, Lindsay R.; Aldwell, Frank E.; Rich, Fenella J.; Kirman, Joanna R.

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG) targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4+ T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4+ T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4+ T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4+ T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4+ T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4+ T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines. PMID:23049885

  15. In vivo induction of regulatory T cells for immune tolerance in hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Terhorst, Cox; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-03-01

    Current therapy for the X-linked coagulation disorder hemophilia is based on intravenous infusion of the specifically deficient coagulation factor. However, 20-30% of hemophilia A patients (factor VIII, FVIII, deficiency) generate inhibitory antibodies against FVIII. While formation of inhibitors directed against factor IX, FIX, resulting from hemophilia B treatment is comparatively rare, a serious complication that is often associated with additional immunotoxicities, e.g. anaphylaxis, occurs. Current immune tolerance protocols to eradiate inhibitors are lengthy, expensive, not effective in all patients, and there are no prophylactic tolerance regimens to prevent inhibitor formation. The outcomes of recent experiments in animal models of hemophilia demonstrate that regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg) are of paramount importance in controlling B cell responses to FVIII and FIX. This article reviews several novel strategies designed to in vivo induce coagulation factor-specific Treg cells and discusses the subsets of Treg that may promote immune tolerance in hemophilia. Among others, drug- and gene transfer-based protocols, lymphocyte transplant, and oral tolerance are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Harnessing the Effect of Adoptively Transferred Tumor-Reactive T Cells on Endogenous (Host-Derived Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Nesbeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell transfer therapy, the ex vivo activation, expansion, and subsequent administration of tumor-reactive T cells, is already the most effective therapy against certain types of cancer. However, recent evidence in animal models and clinical trials suggests that host conditioning interventions tailored for some of the most aggressive and frequent epithelial cancers will be needed to maximize the benefit of this approach. Similarly, the subsets, stage of differentiation, and ex vivo expansion procedure of tumor-reactive T cells to be adoptively transferred influence their in vivo effectiveness and may need to be adapted for different types of cancer and host conditioning interventions. The effects of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive T cells on the mechanisms of endogenous (host-derived antitumor immunity, and how to maximize their combined effects, are further discussed.

  17. Immune function of peripheral T cells in patients with venous thromboembolism or coronary artery atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Song, Haoming; Xu, Wenjun; Xu, Jiahong; Jiang, Jinfa; Gong, Zhu; Liu, Yang; Yan, Wenwen; Wang, Lemin

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the major risk factors for arterial thrombotic diseases are closely associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study aimed to investigate the expression of CD3, CD4 and CD8 in T lymphocytes, the CD4/CD8 ratio and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in patients with VTE, coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA) and healthy subjects. A total of 82 healthy subjects, 51 VTE patients and 114 CAA patients were recruited, and the expression of CD3, CD4 and CD8 in T lymphocytes and the CD4/CD8 ratio were determined. Serum hs-CRP was also measured. Compared to healthy subjects, VTE patients had significantly reduced CD3 expression (p=0.019), comparable CD4 expression (p=0.868), significantly reduced CD8 expression (p<0.001) and increased CD4/CD8 ratio (p=0.044). However, VTE patients had comparable expression of CD3, CD4 and CD8 and CD4/CD8 ratio to CAA patients. In addition, among patients with VTE or CAA, the proportion of patients with reduced CD3+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes or increased CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly higher than in healthy subjects. In addition, hs-CRP in both VTE and CAA groups was significantly higher than in healthy subjects. The antigen recognition and signal transduction activation of T cells is significantly reduced in patients with VTE or CAA, and the killing effect of T cells on pathogens, including viruses, is also significantly compromised. In addition, inflammatory and immune mechanisms are involved in the occurrence and development of venous and arterial thrombosis. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-01-01

    Background CCR10 and CCL27 are the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate migration and/or maintenance of skin T cells and suggested as therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. Objective We sought to determine expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Methods Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10-knockout/EGFP-knockin mice, we assessed expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens and auto-reactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10-knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. Results CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10-knockout mice, the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmamia infection in the skin. Conclusion CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. PMID:24767879

  19. Prominence of gamma delta T cells in the ruminant immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, W R; Mackay, C R

    1991-01-01

    The lymphoid systems of sheep and cattle contain a large number of gamma delta T cells, in striking contrast to the lymphoid systems of humans and mice. In neonatal animals particularly, these cells comprise the predominant fraction of T cells in the blood. Here Wayne Hein and Charles Mackay discuss what is currently known about the ontogeny, phenotype, tissue distribution and function of gamma delta T cells in ruminants. There are a number of interesting molecular features that characterize ruminant gamma delta T cells, but these do not entirely explain the high frequency of use of the gamma delta T-cell receptor in these animals. Studies on sheep, cattle or other animals that preferentially use gamma delta T cells should provide insights into the biological significance of the existence of two distinct forms of the T-cell receptor.

  20. Nutritional imbalances and infections affect the thymus: consequences on T-cell-mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Wilson; Dardenne, Mireille

    2010-11-01

    The thymus gland, where T lymphocyte development occurs, is targeted in malnutrition secondary to protein energy deficiency. There is a severe thymic atrophy, resulting from massive thymocyte apoptosis (particularly affecting the immature CD4+CD8+ cell subset) and decrease in cell proliferation. The thymic microenvironment (the non-lymphoid compartment that drives intrathymic T-cell development) is also affected in malnutrition: morphological changes in thymic epithelial cells were found, together with a decrease of thymic hormone production, as well as an increase of intrathymic contents of extracellular proteins. Profound changes in the thymus can also be seen in deficiencies of vitamins and trace elements. Taking Zn deficiency as an example, there is a substantial thymic atrophy. Importantly, marginal Zn deficiency in AIDS subjects, children with diarrhoea and elderly persons, significantly impairs the host's immunity, resulting in an increased risk of opportunistic infections and mortality; effects that are reversed by Zn supplementation. Thymic changes also occur in acute infectious diseases, including a severe thymic atrophy, mainly due to the depletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, decrease in thymocyte proliferation, in parallel to densification of the epithelial network and increase in the extracellular matrix contents, with consequent disturbances in thymocyte migration and export. In conclusion, the thymus is targeted in several conditions of malnutrition as well as in acute infections. These changes are related to the impaired peripheral immune response seen in malnourished and infected individuals. Thus, strategies inducing thymus replenishment should be considered as adjuvant therapeutics to improve immunity in malnutrition and/or acute infectious diseases.

  1. Adjuvanted HLA-supertype restricted subdominant peptides induce new T-cell immunity during untreated HIV-1-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Brandt, Lea; Vinner, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the potential of inducing additional T-cell immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection directed to subdominant HIV-1 epitopes from common HLA-supertypes. Ten treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals were immunized with peptides in the adjuvant CAF01. One individual received placebo...... responses specific for one or more vaccine epitopes were induced in 10/10 vaccinees. The responses were dominated by CD107a and MIP1β expression. There were no significant changes in HIV-1 viral load or CD4 T-cell counts. Our study demonstrates that the peptide/CAF01 vaccine is safe and that it is possible...... to generate new HIV-1 T-cell responses to defined epitopes in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals....

  2. Distinct roles of CD4+ T cell subpopulations in retroviral immunity: lessons from the Friend virus mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassiotis George

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well established that CD4+ T cells play an important role in immunity to infections with retroviruses such as HIV. However, in recent years CD4+ T cells have been subdivided into several distinct populations that are differentially regulated and perform widely varying functions. Thus, it is important to delineate the separate roles of these subsets, which range from direct antiviral activities to potent immunosuppression. In this review, we discuss contributions from the major CD4+ T cell subpopulations to retroviral immunity. Fundamental concepts obtained from studies on numerous viral infections are presented along with a more detailed analysis of studies on murine Friend virus. The relevance of these studies to HIV immunology and immunotherapy is reviewed.

  3. Changes in T Cell and Dendritic Cell Phenotype from Mid to Late Pregnancy Are Indicative of a Shift from Immune Tolerance to Immune Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nishel Mohan; Herasimtschuk, Anna A; Boasso, Adriano; Benlahrech, Adel; Fuchs, Dietmar; Imami, Nesrina; Johnson, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    During pregnancy, the mother allows the immunologically distinct fetoplacental unit to develop and grow. Opinions are divided as to whether this represents a state of fetal-specific tolerance or of a generalized suppression of the maternal immune system. We hypothesized that antigen-specific T cell responses are modulated by an inhibitory T cell phenotype and modified dendritic cell (DC) phenotype in a gestation-dependent manner. We analyzed changes in surface markers of peripheral blood T cells, ex vivo antigen-specific T cell responses, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity (kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, KTR), plasma neopterin concentration, and the in vitro expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) in response to peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture with progesterone. We found that mid gestation is characterized by reduced antigen-specific T cell responses associated with (1) predominance of effector memory over other T cell subsets; (2) upregulation of inhibitory markers (programmed death ligand 1); (3) heightened response to progesterone (PIBF); and (4) reduced proportions of myeloid DC and concurrent IDO activity (KTR). Conversely, antigen-specific T cell responses normalized in late pregnancy and were associated with increased markers of T cell activation (CD38, neopterin). However, these changes occur with a simultaneous upregulation of immune suppressive mechanisms including apoptosis (CD95), coinhibition (TIM-3), and immune regulation (IL-10) through the course of pregnancy. Together, our data suggest that immune tolerance dominates in the second trimester and that it is gradually reversed in the third trimester in association with immune activation as the end of pregnancy approaches.

  4. High T-cell immune activation and immune exhaustion among individuals with suboptimal CD4 recovery after 4 years of antiretroviral therapy in an African cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colebunders Robert

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART partially corrects immune dysfunction associated with HIV infection. The levels of T-cell immune activation and exhaustion after long-term, suppressive ART and their correlation with CD4 T-cell count reconstitution among ART-treated patients in African cohorts have not been extensively evaluated. Methods T-cell activation (CD38+HLA-DR+ and immune exhaustion (PD-1+ were measured in a prospective cohort of patients initiated on ART; 128 patient samples were evaluated and subcategorized by CD4 reconstitution after long-term suppressive treatment: Suboptimal [median CD4 count increase 129 (-43-199 cells/μl], N = 34 ], optimal [282 (200-415 cells/μl, N = 64] and super-optimal [528 (416-878 cells/μl, N = 30]. Results Both CD4+ and CD8 T-cell activation was significantly higher among suboptimal CD4 T-cell responders compared to super-optimal responders. In a multivariate model, CD4+CD38+HLADR+ T-cells were associated with suboptimal CD4 reconstitution [AOR, 5.7 (95% CI, 1.4-23, P = 0.014]. T-cell exhaustion (CD4+PD1+ and CD8+PD1+ was higher among suboptimal relative to optimal (P P = 0.022]. Conclusion T-cell activation and exhaustion persist among HIV-infected patients despite long-term, sustained HIV-RNA viral suppression. These immune abnormalities were associated with suboptimal CD4 reconstitution and their regulation may modify immune recovery among suboptimal responders to ART.

  5. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Unique properties of decidual T cells and their role in immune regulation during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburgs, T; Claas, F H J; Scherjon, S A

    2010-03-01

    Maternal lymphocytes at the fetal-maternal interface play a key role in the immune acceptance of the allogeneic fetus. Most studies focus on decidual NK cells and their interaction with fetal trophoblasts, whereas limited data are available on the mechanisms of fetus specific immune recognition and immune regulation by decidual T cells at the fetal-maternal interface. The aim of this review is to describe the phenotypic characteristics of decidual T cell subsets present at the fetal-maternal interface, their interaction with HLA-C expressed by fetal trophoblasts and their role in immune recognition and regulation at the fetal-maternal interface during human pregnancy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MyD88 Shapes Vaccine Immunity by Extrinsically Regulating Survival of CD4+ T Cells during the Contraction Phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Soaring rates of systemic fungal infections worldwide underscore the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity is essential. We previously reported that Th17 cells are required for vaccine immunity to the systemic dimorphic fungi of North America, and that Card9 and MyD88 signaling are required for the development of protective Th17 cells. Herein, we investigated where, when and how MyD88 regulates T cell development. We uncovered a novel mechanism in which MyD88 extrinsically regulates the survival of activated T cells during the contraction phase and in the absence of inflammation, but is dispensable for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. The poor survival of activated T cells in Myd88-/- mice is linked to increased caspase3-mediated apoptosis, but not to Fas- or Bim-dependent apoptotic pathways, nor to reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Moreover, TLR3, 7, and/or 9, but not TLR2 or 4, also were required extrinsically for MyD88-dependent Th17 cell responses and vaccine immunity. Similar MyD88 requirements governed the survival of virus primed T cells. Our data identify unappreciated new requirements for eliciting adaptive immunity and have implications for designing vaccines.

  7. Protective Immunity against Lethal F. tularensis holarctica LVS Provided by Vaccination with Selected Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Haim, Erez; Bar-On, Liat; Ehrlich, Sharon; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2014-01-01

    Recently we described an unbiased bacterial whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis aimed at selection of potential CTL epitopes located in “hotspots” of predicted MHC-I binders. Applying this approach to the proteome of the facultative intra-cellular pathogen Francisella tularensis resulted in identification of 170 novel CTL epitopes, several of which were shown to elicit highly robust T cell responses. Here we demonstrate that by DNA immunization using a short DNA fragment expressing six of the most prominent identified CTL epitopes a potent and specific CD8+ T cell responses is being induced, to all encoded epitopes, a response not observed in control mice immunized with the DNA vector alone Moreover, this CTL-specific mediated immune response prevented disease development, allowed for a rapid clearance of the bacterial infection and provided complete protection against lethal challenge (10LD50) with F. tularensis holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) (a total to 30 of 30 immunized mice survived the challenge while all control DNA vector immunized mice succumbed). Furthermore, and in accordance with these results, CD8 deficient mice could not be protected from lethal challenge after immunization with the CTL-polyepitope. Vaccination with the DNA poly-epitope construct could even protect mice (8/10) against the more demanding pulmonary lethal challenge of LVS. Our approach provides a proof-of-principle for selecting and generating a multi-epitpoe CD8 T cell-stimulating vaccine against a model intracellular bacterium. PMID:24400128

  8. Protective immunity against lethal F. tularensis holarctica LVS provided by vaccination with selected novel CD8+ T cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Shahar; Cohen, Ofer; Bar-Haim, Erez; Bar-On, Liat; Ehrlich, Sharon; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2014-01-01

    Recently we described an unbiased bacterial whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis aimed at selection of potential CTL epitopes located in "hotspots" of predicted MHC-I binders. Applying this approach to the proteome of the facultative intra-cellular pathogen Francisella tularensis resulted in identification of 170 novel CTL epitopes, several of which were shown to elicit highly robust T cell responses. Here we demonstrate that by DNA immunization using a short DNA fragment expressing six of the most prominent identified CTL epitopes a potent and specific CD8+ T cell responses is being induced, to all encoded epitopes, a response not observed in control mice immunized with the DNA vector alone Moreover, this CTL-specific mediated immune response prevented disease development, allowed for a rapid clearance of the bacterial infection and provided complete protection against lethal challenge (10LD50) with F. tularensis holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) (a total to 30 of 30 immunized mice survived the challenge while all control DNA vector immunized mice succumbed). Furthermore, and in accordance with these results, CD8 deficient mice could not be protected from lethal challenge after immunization with the CTL-polyepitope. Vaccination with the DNA poly-epitope construct could even protect mice (8/10) against the more demanding pulmonary lethal challenge of LVS. Our approach provides a proof-of-principle for selecting and generating a multi-epitpoe CD8 T cell-stimulating vaccine against a model intracellular bacterium.

  9. Direct Evidence for a Chronic CD8+-T-Cell-Mediated Immune Reaction to Tax within the Muscle of a Human T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Virus Type 1-Infected Patient with Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Simona; Cochet, Madeleine; Mikol, Jacqueline; Teixeira, Antonio; Gessain, Antoine; Pique, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection can lead to the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), concomitantly with or without other inflammatory disorders such as myositis. These pathologies are considered immune-mediated diseases, and it is assumed that migration within tissues of both HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cells and anti-HTLV-1 cytotoxic T cells represents a pivotal event. However, although HTLV-1-infected T cells were found in inflamed lesions, the antigenic specificity of coinfiltrated CD8+ T cells remains to be determined. In this study, we performed both ex vivo and in situ analyses using muscle biopsies obtained from an HTLV-1-infected patient with HAM/TSP and sporadic inclusion body myositis. We found that both HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells directed to the dominant Tax antigen can be amplified from muscle cell cultures. Moreover, we were able to detect in two successive muscle biopsies both tax mRNA-positive mononuclear cells and T cells recognized by the Tax11-19/HLA-A*02 tetramer and positive for perforin. These findings provide the first direct demonstration that anti-Tax cytotoxic T cells are chronically recruited within inflamed tissues of an HTLV-1 infected patient, which validates the cytotoxic immune reaction model for the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease. PMID:15367598

  10. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  11. Clinical responses to adoptive T-cell transfer can be modeled in an autologous immune-humanized mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Henrik; Lindberg, Mattias F; Donia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous tumor-infiltrating T cells have shown durable responses in patients with melanoma. To study ACT and immunotherapies in a humanized model, we have developed PDXv2.0 - a melanoma PDX model where tumor cells and tumor......-infiltrating T cells from the same patient are transplanted sequentially in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immune-deficient/common gamma chain (NOG/NSG) knockout mouse. Key to T-cell survival/effect in this model is the continuous presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Tumors that grow in PDXv2.0 are eradicated...... if the autologous tumor cells and T cells come from a patient that exhibited an objective response to ACT in the clinic. However, T cells from patients that are non-responders to ACT cannot kill tumor cells in PDXv2.0. Taken together, PDXv2.0 provides the potential framework to further model genetically diverse...

  12. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( Plymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are probably not affected by microwave radiation. It is clear from our experiments that although chronic microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2 leads to suppression of peripheral T lymphocyte numbers, there is no concomitant functional impairment of these cells as evidenced by functional assays.

  13. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells and CD4+Foxp3+ T cells by probiotics administration suppresses immune disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Lee, Choong-Gu; So, Jae-Seon; Chae, Chang-Suk; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Sahoo, Anupama; Nam, Jong Hee; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotics have been described in many diseases, but the mechanism by which they modulate the immune system is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a mixture of probiotics that up-regulates CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Administration of the probiotics mixture induced both T-cell and B-cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulated T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines without apoptosis induction. It also induced generation of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs from...

  14. Transcriptome Signatures Reveal Rapid Induction of Immune-Responsive Genes in Human Memory CD8(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Khanniche, Asma; DiSpirito, Joanna R; Ji, Ping; Wang, Shujun; Wang, Ying; Shen, Hao

    2016-05-31

    Memory T cells (TM) play a prominent role in protection and auto-immunity due to their ability to mount a more effective response than naïve T cells (TN). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying enhanced functionality of TM are not well defined, particularly in human TM. We examined the global gene expression profiles of human CD8(+) TN and TM before and after stimulation. There were 1,284, 1,373 and 1,629 differentially expressed genes between TN and TM at 0 hr, 4 hr and 24 hr after stimulation, respectively, with more genes expressed to higher levels in TM. Genes rapidly up-regulated in TN cells were largely involved in nitrogen, nucleoside and amino acid metabolisms. In contrast, those in CD8(+) TM were significantly enriched for immune-response-associated processes, including cytokine production, lymphocyte activation and chemotaxis. Multiple cytokines were rapidly up-regulated in TM cells, including effector cytokines known to be produced by CD8(+) T cells and important for their functions, as well as regulatory cytokines, both pro- and anti-inflammatory, that are not typically produced by CD8(+) T cells. These results provide new insights into molecular mechanisms that contribute to the enhanced functionality of human CD8(+) TM and their prominent role in protection and auto-immunity.

  15. Human cytomegalovirus latency-associated proteins elicit immune-suppressive IL-10 producing CD4⁺ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin M Mason

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a widely prevalent human herpesvirus, which, after primary infection, persists in the host for life. In healthy individuals, the virus is well controlled by the HCMV-specific T cell response. A key feature of this persistence, in the face of a normally robust host immune response, is the establishment of viral latency. In contrast to lytic infection, which is characterised by extensive viral gene expression and virus production, long-term latency in cells of the myeloid lineage is characterised by highly restricted expression of viral genes, including UL138 and LUNA. Here we report that both UL138 and LUNA-specific T cells were detectable directly ex vivo in healthy HCMV seropositive subjects and that this response is principally CD4⁺ T cell mediated. These UL138-specific CD4⁺ T cells are able to mediate MHC class II restricted cytotoxicity and, importantly, show IFNγ effector function in the context of both lytic and latent infection. Furthermore, in contrast to CDCD4⁺ T cells specific to antigens expressed solely during lytic infection, both the UL138 and LUNA-specific CD4⁺ T cell responses included CD4⁺ T cells that secreted the immunosuppressive cytokine cIL-10. We also show that cIL-10 expressing CD4⁺ T-cells are directed against latently expressed US28 and UL111A. Taken together, our data show that latency-associated gene products of HCMV generate CD4⁺ T cell responses in vivo, which are able to elicit effector function in response to both lytic and latently infected cells. Importantly and in contrast to CD4⁺ T cell populations, which recognise antigens solely expressed during lytic infection, include a subset of cells that secrete the immunosuppressive cytokine cIL-10. This suggests that HCMV skews the T cell responses to latency-associated antigens to one that is overall suppressive in order to sustain latent carriage in vivo.

  16. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, T. S.; Norup, L. R.; Pedersen, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use flow cytometry to assess chicken T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study two inbred genetic chicken lines (L130 and L133) were subjected to two times vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND) and a subsequent challenge by ND virus (NDV) infection....... Furthermore, peripheral lymphocytes from L133 exhibited a significantly higher expression of CD44 and CD45 throughout the experiment. Interestingly, also vaccine-induced differences were observed in L133 as immune chickens had a significantly higher CD45 expression on their lymphocytes than the naïve controls....... Immune chickens from both lines had a significantly higher frequency of circulating γδ T cells than the naïve controls both after vaccination and challenge. Finally, the proliferative capacity of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ cells specific for NDV was addressed 3 weeks after vaccination and 1 week after...

  17. Infusing CD19-directed T cells to augment disease control in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for advanced B-lymphoid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A; Hackett, Perry B; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-05-01

    Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR(+) T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR(+) T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources.

  18. Perturbed CD8+ T cell immunity across universal influenza epitopes in the elderly.

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    Nguyen, Thi H O; Sant, Sneha; Bird, Nicola L; Grant, Emma J; Clemens, E Bridie; Koutsakos, Marios; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Gras, Stephanie; Lappas, Martha; Jaworowski, Anthony; Crowe, Jane; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2018-02-01

    Influenza epidemics lead to severe illness, life-threatening complications, and deaths, especially in the elderly. As CD8+ T cells are associated with rapid recovery from influenza, we investigated the effects of aging on antigen-specific CD8+ T cells across the universal influenza epitopes in humans. We show that aging is characterized by altered frequencies in T cell subsets, with naive T cells being partially replaced by activated effector/memory populations. Although we observed no striking differences in TCR signaling capacity, T cells in the elderly had increased expression of transcription factors Eomes and T-bet, and such changes were most apparent in CD8+ T cells. Strikingly, the numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells across universal influenza epitopes were reduced in the elderly, although their effector/memory phenotypes remained stable. To understand whether diminished numbers of influenza-specific CD8+ T cells in the elderly resulted from alteration in TCR clonotypes, we dissected the TCRαβ repertoire specific for the prominent HLA-A*02:01-restricted-M158-66 (A2/M158 ) influenza epitope. We provide the first ex vivo data on paired antigen-specific TCRαβ clonotypes in the elderly, showing that influenza-specific A2/M158+ TCRαβ repertoires in the elderly adults varied from those in younger adults, with the main features being a reduction in the frequency of the public TRAV27-TRBV19 TCRαβ clonotype, increased proportion of private TCRαβ signatures, broader use of TRAV and TRBV gene segments, and large clonal expansion of private TCRαβ clonotypes with longer CDR3 loops. Our study supports the development of T cell-targeted influenza vaccines that would boost the T cell compartment during life and maintain the numbers and optimal TCRαβ signatures in the elderly. ©2017 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Oral immunization with a live coxsackievirus/HIV recombinant induces gag p24-specific T cell responses.

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    Rui Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine has proven to be elusive. Because human vaccine trials have not yet demonstrated efficacy, new vaccine strategies are needed for the HIV vaccine pipeline. We have been developing a new HIV vaccine platform using a live enterovirus, coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4 vector. Enteroviruses are ideal candidates for development as a vaccine vector for oral delivery, because these viruses normally enter the body via the oral route and survive the acidic environment of the stomach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We constructed a live coxsackievirus B4 recombinant, CVB4/p24(73(3, that expresses seventy-three amino acids of the gag p24 sequence (HXB2 and assessed T cell responses after immunization of mice. The CVB4 recombinant was physically stable, replication-competent, and genetically stable. Oral or intraperitoneal immunization with the recombinant resulted in strong systemic gag p24-specific T cell responses as determined by the IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay and by multiparameter flow cytometry. Oral immunization with CVB4/p24(73(3 resulted in a short-lived, localized infection of the gut without systemic spread. Because coxsackieviruses are ubiquitous in the human population, we also evaluated whether the recombinant was able to induce gag p24-specific T cell responses in mice pre-immunized with the CVB4 vector. We showed that oral immunization with CVB4/p24(73(3 induced gag p24-specific immune responses in vector-immune mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CVB4/p24(73(3 recombinant retained the physical and biological characteristics of the parental CVB4 vector. Oral immunization with the CVB4 recombinant was safe and resulted in the induction of systemic HIV-specific T cell responses. Furthermore, pre-existing vector immunity did not preclude the development of gag p24-specific T cell responses. As the search continues for new vaccine strategies, the present study suggests that live CVB4/HIV recombinants are

  20. Adaptive Immunity in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Phenotype and Functional Alterations of T-Cells before and during Infliximab Therapy

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    Balázs Szalay

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to determine T-cell subsets in peripheral blood and their intracellular signaling during activation. The prevalence of Th2 and Th17 cells responsible for the regulation of adaptive immunity was higher in AS than in 9 healthy controls. Although IFX therapy improved patients' condition, immune phenotype did not normalize. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium responses of CD4+ and CD8+ cells to a specific activation were delayed, while NO generation was increased in AS. NO generation normalized sooner upon IFX than calcium response. These results suggest an abnormal immune phenotype with functional disturbances of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in AS.

  1. Circumsporozoite protein-specific K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells mediate protective antimalaria immunity in sporozoite-immunized MHC-I-K(d) transgenic mice.

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    Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Tsuji, Moriya

    2014-01-01

    Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6) transgenic (Tg) mice, expressing K(d) molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg), which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  2. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

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    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  3. Depletion of alloreactive T-cells in vitro using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib preserves the immune response against pathogens.

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    Blanco, Belén; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Santamaría, Carlos; Inogés, Susana; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Current graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) inhibition approaches lead to abrogation of pathogen-specific T-cell responses. We propose an approach to inhibit GVHD without hampering immunity against pathogens: in vitro depletion of alloreactive T cells with the preoteasome inhibitor bortezomib. We show that PBMCs stimulated with allogeneic cells and treated with bortezomib greatly reduce their ability to produce IFN-γ when re-stimulated with the same allogeneic cells, but mainly preserve their ability to respond to citomegalovirus stimulation. Unlike in vivo administration of immunosuppressive drugs or other strategies of allodepletion, in vitro allodepletion with bortezomib maintains pathogen-specific T cells, representing a promising alternative for GVHD prophylaxis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of Autoantibodies in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is Associated with the Augmented Function of Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T Cells.

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    Yu Lei

    Full Text Available T follicular helper cells (Tfh provide help to B cells to support their activation, expansion and differentiation. However, the role of Tfh cells in chronic HBV infection is poorly defined. The aim of this research was to examine the function of Tfh cells and whether they are involved in HBV related disease. Blood CXCR5+CD4+T cells and B cells in 85 patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients and health controls (HC were examined by flow cytometry. The molecule expression in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was detected by real-time PCR. Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells and B cells were co-cultured and the production of Ig and cytokines was detected by ELISA. Autoantibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence and immunospot assay. We found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients expressed higher level of activation related molecules and cytokines than that from health controls (HC.In HBV patients, the frequency of blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was significantly correlated with serum ALT and AST. We also found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients could induce B cells to secret higher level of immunoglobulin than that from HC. Several autoantibodies, including ANA, ss-A, ss-B, Scl-70, Jo-1, ect, were indeed positive in 65% HBV patients. Among HBV patients, expression of function related molecules was significantly higher in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from patients with autoantibodies than that without autoantibodies. Our research indicated that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients were over activated and show augmented capacity to help B cells for antibody secreting, which might correlated with liver inflammation and the production of autoantibodies in extrahepatic manifestations.

  5. Suicidal emperipolesis: a process leading to cell-in-cell structures, T cell clearance and immune homeostasis.

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    Sierro, F; Tay, S S; Warren, A; Le Couteur, D G; McCaughan, G W; Bowen, D G; Bertolino, P

    2015-01-01

    "Suicidal emperipolesis" is one of the most recently reported processes leading to cell-in-cell structures that promote cell death. This process was discovered in studies investigating the fate of autoreactive CD8 T cells activated within the liver. Recently, we reported that activated T cells invaded hepatocytes, formed transient cell-in-cell structures, and were rapidly degraded within endosomal/lysosomal compartments by a non-apoptotic pathway. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of this process caused intrahepatic accumulation of tissue-reactive T cells and breach of immune tolerance. The characterization of the molecular mechanisms of suicidal emperipolesis is still in its infancy, but initial studies suggest this phenomenon is distinct from other reported cell-in-cell structures. As opposed to the formation of other cell-in-cell structures, suicidal emperipolesis takes place in a non-malignant environment, and without obvious pathology. It is therefore the first cell-in-cell structure described to have a role in maintaining homeostasis in normal physiology in higher organisms. T cell emperipolesis within hepatocytes has also been observed by pathologists in a range of chronic human liver pathologies. As T cell-in-hepatocyte structures resulting from suicidal emperipolesis are very transiently observed in normal physiology, their accumulation during liver disease would suggest that severe tissue injury is promoted by, or associated with, defective T cell clearance. In this review, we compare "suicidal emperipolesis" to other processes leading to cell-in-cell structures, and consider its potential biological roles in maintaining immune homeostasis and tolerance in the context of the hepatic environment.

  6. Flexible cytokine production by macrophages and T cells in response to probiotic bacteria: a possible mechanism by which probiotics exert multifunctional immune regulatory activities.

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    Shida, Kan; Nanno, Masanobu; Nagata, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics have been reported to be efficacious against cancers, infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune diseases, and it is important to explain how such multifunctional activities are realized. Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) is one of these multifunctional probiotics, and its ability to augment the host immune system has been extensively examined. We have shown that the cell wall structure of this probiotic strain is responsible for potently inducing IL-12 production. In addition, we have recently found that LcS differentially controls the inflammatory cytokine responses of macrophages and T cells in either Peyer's patches or the spleen. Other studies revealed that LcS-induced IL-12 production by macrophages is modified when other bacteria or their cell components are simultaneously present. These findings can provide a theoretical basis for understanding the multifunctional activities of specific probiotics.

  7. T cell immunity to influenza in older adults: A pathophysiological framework for development of more effective vaccines

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    Janet E McElhaney

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most profound public health consequences of immune senescence is reflected in an increased susceptibility to influenza and other acute respiratory illnesses, as well as a loss of influenza vaccine effectiveness in older people. Common medical conditions and mental and psychosocial health issues as well as degree of frailty and functional dependence accelerate changes associated with immune senescence. All contribute to the increased risk for complications of influenza infection including pneumonias, heart diseases and strokes that lead to hospitalization, disability and death in the over 65 population. Changes in mucosal barrier mechanisms and both innate and adaptive immune functions converge in the reduced response to influenza infection, and lead to a loss of antibody-mediated protection against influenza with age. The interactions of immune senescence and reduced adaptive immune responses, persistent cytomegalovirus infection, inflammaging (chronic elevation of inflammatory cytokines, and dysregulated cytokine production, pose major challenges to the development of vaccines designed to improve T-cell mediated immunity. In older adults, the goal of vaccination is more realistically targeted to providing clinical protection against disease rather than to inducing sterilizing immunity to infection. Standard assays of antibody titres correlate with protection against influenza illness but do not detect important changes in cellular immune mechanisms that correlate with vaccine-mediated protection against influenza in older people. This article will discuss: i the burden of influenza in older adults and how this relates to changes in T cell function, ii age-related changes in different T cell subsets and immunologic targets for improved influenza vaccine efficacy in older, and iii the development of correlates of clinical protection against influenza disease to expedite the process of new vaccine development for the 65 and older

  8. Identification of a T cell surface molecule using a monoclonal antibody produced by TCR/CD3 complex immunization.

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    Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2015-06-01

    Several molecules are known to be involved in T-cell activation via the TCR/CD3 complex and while the mechanisms of late T cell signaling have been well characterized, the very early events are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify yet unknown molecules associated with the TCR/CD3 complex. To identify new molecules associated with the TCR/CD3 complex, a monoclonal antibody termed MT3 was produced by immunoprecipitated beads immunization. Colocalization of the MT3 mAb recognizing molecules with the TCR/CD3 complexes was verified by confocal microscopic analysis. The surface antigen recognized by MT3 antibody was expressed on a subpopulation of CD3+ T cells, and on both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. The antigen was also expressed on na?ve CD4+ T cells and on a subset of memory CD4+ T cells. In contrast, in the CD8 population, the majority of MT3+ cells were found in the na?ve population. The MT3 mAb recognizing molecules were also expressed on red blood cells but only in particular subjects. Similar to peripheral blood leukocytes, MT3 mAb recognizing molecules are exclusively expressed on T cell lines. Based on the cellular distribution patterns and confocal microscopic analysis, the MT3 mAb recognizing molecule that we investigated is proposed to be a TCR/CD3 associated molecule and might be involved in the antigen recognition of T cells.

  9. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

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    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  10. The kinase TBK1 functions in dendritic cells to regulate T cell homeostasis, autoimmunity, and antitumor immunity.

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    Xiao, Yichuan; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Liu, Ting; Li, Haiyan S; Jie, Zuliang; Jin, Jin; Hu, Hongbo; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xuhong; Wang, Hui; Marie, Isabelle; Levy, David E; Watowich, Stephanie S; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2017-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for mediating immune responses but, when deregulated, also contribute to immunological disorders, such as autoimmunity. The molecular mechanism underlying the function of DCs is incompletely understood. In this study, we have identified TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), a master innate immune kinase, as an important regulator of DC function. DC-specific deletion of Tbk1 causes T cell activation and autoimmune symptoms and also enhances antitumor immunity in animal models of cancer immunotherapy. The TBK1-deficient DCs have up-regulated expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased T cell-priming activity. We further demonstrate that TBK1 negatively regulates the induction of a subset of genes by type I interferon receptor (IFNAR). Deletion of IFNAR1 could largely prevent aberrant T cell activation and autoimmunity in DC-conditional Tbk1 knockout mice. These findings identify a DC-specific function of TBK1 in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and tolerance. © 2017 Xiao et al.

  11. Enhanced CD8+ T cell immune responses and protection elicited against Plasmodium berghei malaria by prime boost immunization regimens using a novel attenuated fowlpox virus.

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    Anderson, Richard J; Hannan, Carolyn M; Gilbert, Sarah C; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Sheu, Eric G; Korten, Simone; Sinden, Robert; Butcher, Geoffrey A; Skinner, Michael A; Hill, Adrian V S

    2004-03-01

    Sterile immunity can be provided against the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria by IFN-gamma-secreting CD8(+) T cells that recognize parasite-infected hepatocytes. In this study, we have investigated the use of attenuated fowlpox virus (FPV) strains as recombinant vaccine vectors for eliciting CD8(+) T cells against Plasmodium berghei. The gene encoding the P. berghei circumsporozoite (PbCS) protein was inserted into an FPV vaccine strain licensed for use in chickens, Webster's FPV, and the novel FPV vaccine strain FP9 by homologous recombination. The novel FP9 strain proved more potent as a vaccine for eliciting CD8(+) T cell responses against the PbCS Ag. Sequential immunization with rFP9 and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Anakara (MVA) encoding the PbCS protein, administered by clinically acceptable routes, elicited potent CD8(+) T cell responses against the PbCS protein. This immunization regimen elicited substantial protection against a stringent liver-stage challenge with P. berghei and was more immunogenic and protective than DNA/MVA prime/boost immunization. However, further improvement was not achieved by sequential (triple) immunization with a DNA vaccine, FP9, and MVA.

  12. CD11b+ migratory dendritic cells mediate CD8 T cell cross-priming and cutaneous imprinting after topical immunization.

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    Suzanne T Nizza

    Full Text Available Topical antigen application is a focus of current vaccine research. This immunization route mimics natural antigen exposure across a barrier tissue and generates T cells imprinted for skin-selective homing. Soluble antigens introduced through this route require cross-presentation by DC to generate CD8 T cell responses. Here we have explored the relative contribution of various skin-derived DC subsets to cross-priming and skin-selective imprinting. In our model, DC acquire soluble Ag in vivo from immunized murine skin for cross-presentation to naïve CD8 T cells ex vivo. We find CD11b(+ migratory DC to be the relevant cross-priming DC in this model. Both Langerin(+ and Langerin(- CD11b(+ migratory DC can cross-present antigen in our system, but only the Langerin+ subset can induce expression of the skin-selective addressin E-selectin ligand. Thus, the CD11b(+ Langerin(+ migratory DC population, comprised primarily of Langerhans cells, both cross-primes naïve CD8 T cells and imprints them with skin-homing capabilities.

  13. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

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    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho; Rodrigues, Maurício M

    2016-06-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections.

  14. Incomplete recovery of pneumococcal CD4 T cell immunity after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected malawian adults.

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    Enoch Sepako

    Full Text Available HIV-infected African adults are at a considerably increased risk of life-threatening invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD which persists despite antiretroviral therapy (ART. Defects in naturally acquired pneumococcal-specific T-cell immunity have been identified in HIV-infected adults. We have therefore determined the extent and nature of pneumococcal antigen-specific immune recovery following ART. HIV-infected adults were followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months after initiating ART. Nasopharyngeal swabs were cultured to determine carriage rates. Pneumococcal-specific CD4 T-cell immunity was assessed by IFN-γ ELISpot, proliferation assay, CD154 expression and intracellular cytokine assay. S. pneumoniae colonization was detected in 27% (13/48 of HIV-infected patients prior to ART. The rates remained elevated after 12 months ART, 41% (16/39 (p = 0.17 and significantly higher than in HIV-uninfected individuals (HIVneg 14%(4/29; p = 0.0147. CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses to pneumococcal antigens increased significantly to levels comparable with HIV-negative individuals at 12 months ART (p = 0.0799. However, recovery of the pneumococcal-specific CD154 expression was incomplete (p = 0.0015 as were IFN-γ ELISpot responses (p = 0.0040 and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses (TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ expression (p = 0.0040 to a pneumolysin-deficient mutant strain. Impaired control of pneumococcal colonisation and incomplete restoration of pneumococcal-specific immunity may explain the persistently higher risk of IPD amongst HIV-infected adults on ART. Whether vaccination and prolonged ART can overcome this immunological defect and reduce the high levels of pneumococcal colonisation requires further evaluation.

  15. CD8+ T cells from a novel T cell receptor transgenic mouse induce liver-stage immunity that can be boosted by blood-stage infection in rodent malaria.

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    Lei Shong Lau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To follow the fate of CD8+ T cells responsive to Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection, we generated an MHC I-restricted TCR transgenic mouse line against this pathogen. T cells from this line, termed PbT-I T cells, were able to respond to blood-stage infection by PbA and two other rodent malaria species, P. yoelii XNL and P. chabaudi AS. These PbT-I T cells were also able to respond to sporozoites and to protect mice from liver-stage infection. Examination of the requirements for priming after intravenous administration of irradiated sporozoites, an effective vaccination approach, showed that the spleen rather than the liver was the main site of priming and that responses depended on CD8α+ dendritic cells. Importantly, sequential exposure to irradiated sporozoites followed two days later by blood-stage infection led to augmented PbT-I T cell expansion. These findings indicate that PbT-I T cells are a highly versatile tool for studying multiple stages and species of rodent malaria and suggest that cross-stage reactive CD8+ T cells may be utilized in liver-stage vaccine design to enable boosting by blood-stage infections.

  16. Antitumor Immunity Produced by the Liver Kupffer Cells, NK Cells, NKT Cells, and CD8+ CD122+ T Cells

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    Shuhji Seki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse and human livers contain innate immune leukocytes, NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophage-lineage Kupffer cells. Various bacterial components, including Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands and an NKT cell ligand (α-galactocylceramide, activate liver Kupffer cells, which produce IL-1, IL-6, IL-12, and TNF. IL-12 activates hepatic NK cells and NKT cells to produce IFN-γ, which further activates hepatic T cells, in turn activating phagocytosis and cytokine production by Kupffer cells in a positive feedback loop. These immunological events are essentially evoked to protect the host from bacterial and viral infections; however, these events also contribute to antitumor and antimetastatic immunity in the liver by activated liver NK cells and NKT cells. Bystander CD8+CD122+ T cells, and tumor-specific memory CD8+T cells, are also induced in the liver by α-galactocylceramide. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments have revealed that activated liver lymphocytes may migrate to other organs to inhibit tumor growth, such as the lungs and kidneys. The immunological mechanism underlying the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic livers in hepatitis C patients and liver innate immunity as a double-edged sword (hepatocyte injury/regeneration, septic shock, autoimmune disease, etc. are also discussed.

  17. Immunodominance of Adenovirus-Derived CD8+ T Cell Epitopes Interferes with the Induction of Transgene-Specific Immunity in Adenovirus-Based Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Dominik; Hrycak, Camilla Patrizia; Windmann, Sonja; Lapuente, Dennis; Dittmer, Ulf; Tenbusch, Matthias; Bayer, Wibke

    2017-10-15

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based immunization is a popular approach in vaccine development, and Ad-based vectors are renowned for their potential to induce strong CD8+ T cell responses to the encoded transgene. Surprisingly, we previously found in the mouse Friend retrovirus (FV) model that Ad-based immunization did not induce CD8+ T cell responses to the FV Leader-Gag-derived immunodominant epitope GagL85-93 We show now that induction of GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cells was highly effective when leader-Gag was delivered by plasmid DNA immunization, implying a role for Ad-derived epitopes in mediating unresponsiveness. By immunizing with DNA constructs encoding strings of GagL85-93 and the two Ad-derived epitopes DNA-binding protein418-426 (DBP418-426) and hexon486-494, we confirmed that Ad epitopes prevent induction of GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, while DBP418-426 did not interfere with GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cell induction, the H-2Dd-restricted hexon486-494 suppressed the CD8+ T cell response to the H-2Db-restricted GagL85-93 strongly in H-2b/d mice but not in H-2b/b mice. This finding indicates that competition occurs at the level of responding CD8+ T cells, and we could indeed demonstrate that coimmunization with an interleukin 2 (IL-2)-encoding plasmid restored GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cell responses to epitope strings in the presence of hexon486-494 IL-2 codelivery did not restore GagL85-93 responsiveness in Ad-based immunization, however, likely due to the presence of further epitopes in the Ad vector. Our findings show that seemingly immunodominant transgene epitopes can be dominated by Ad-derived epitopes. These findings underline the importance of thorough characterization of vaccine vectors, and modifications of vectors or immunogens may be required to prevent impaired transgene-specific immune responses.IMPORTANCE Ad-based vectors are widely used in experimental preclinical and clinical immunization studies against numerous infectious agents

  18. Immune tolerance maintained by cooperative interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells shapes a diverse TCR repertoire

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    Katharine eBest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self-peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates co-operative interactions between T cells of different specificity. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programming optimisation problem, which can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains the diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire remains heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire is stable. Our study combines the salient features of the danger model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping which underlies tolerance in this model suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation.

  19. Cutting Edge: Skin CCR10+ CD8+ T Cells Support Resident Regulatory T Cells through the B7.2/Receptor Axis To Regulate Local Immune Homeostasis and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yaoyao; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Na

    2016-06-15

    Resident T cells in barrier tissues are important in protecting against foreign agents but can also contribute to inflammatory diseases if dysregulated. How T cell homeostasis is maintained in barrier tissues is still poorly understood. We report that resident CD8(+) T cells directly support maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the skin to promote immune homeostasis. Impaired establishment of resident CD8(+) T cells caused by knockout of the skin-homing chemokine receptor CCR10 resulted in an altered balance of resident Tregs and CD4(+) effector T cells in the skin and overreactive inflammatory responses to cutaneous stimulations. Furthermore, B7.2 expressed on skin CD8(+) T cells supports the survival of Tregs, likely through interaction with its receptor CTLA-4, which is highly expressed on skin Tregs. Our findings provide novel insights into T cell homeostatic regulation in the skin and may improve our understanding of the pathobiology of tissue inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Mechanisms underlying the induction of regulatory T cells and its relevance in the adaptive immune response in parasitic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Fleury, Agnes; Sciutto, Edda

    2011-01-01

    To fulfill its function, the immune system must detect and interpret a wide variety of signals and adjust the magnitude, duration, and specific traits of each response during the complex host-parasite relationships in parasitic infections. Inflammation must be tightly regulated since uncontrolled inflammation may be as destructive as the triggering stimulus and leads to immune-mediated tissue injury. During recent years, increasing evidence points to regulatory T cells (Tregs) as key anti-inflammatory cells, critically involved in limiting the inflammatory response. Herein, we review the published information on the induction of Tregs and summarize the most recent findings on Treg generation in parasitic diseases.

  1. Patterns of PD-L1 expression and CD8 T cell infiltration in gastric adenocarcinomas and associated immune stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Elizabeth D; Zahurak, Marianna; Murphy, Adrian; Cornish, Toby; Cuka, Nathan; Abdelfatah, Eihab; Yang, Stephen; Duncan, Mark; Ahuja, Nita; Taube, Janis M; Anders, Robert A; Kelly, Ronan J

    2017-05-01

    Recent data supports a significant role for immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of solid tumours. Here, we evaluate gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction (G/GEJ) adenocarcinomas for their expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), infiltration by CD8+ T cells and the relationship of both factors to patient survival. Thirty-four resections of primary invasive G/GEJ were stained by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 and CD8 and by DNA in situ hybridisation for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). CD8+ T cell densities both within tumours and at the tumour-stromal interface were analysed using whole slide digital imaging. Patient survival was evaluated according to PD-L1 status and CD8 density. 12% of resections showed tumour cell membranous PD-L1 expression and 44% showed expression within the immune stroma. Two cases (6%) were EBV positive, with one showing membranous PD-L1 positivity. Increasing CD8+ densities both within tumours and immune stroma was associated with increasing percentage of tumour (p=0.027) and stromal (p=0.005) PD-L1 expression. Both tumour and immune stromal PD-L1 expression and high intratumoral or stromal CD8+ T cell density (>500/mm(2)) were associated with worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). PD-L1 is expressed on both tumour cells and in the immune stroma across all stages and histologies of G/GEJ. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that increasing CD8 infiltration is correlated with impaired PFS and OS. Patients with higher CD8+ T cell densities also have higher PD-L1 expression, indicating an adaptive immune resistance mechanism may be occurring. Further characterisation of the G/GEJ immune microenvironment may highlight targets for immune-based therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Mucosal immunization in macaques upregulates the innate APOBEC 3G anti-viral factor in CD4(+) memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufei; Bergmeier, Lesley A; Stebbings, Richard; Seidl, Thomas; Whittall, Trevor; Singh, Mahavir; Berry, Neil; Almond, Neil; Lehner, Thomas

    2009-02-05

    APOBEC3G is an innate intracellular anti-viral factor which deaminates retroviral cytidine to uridine. In vivo studies of APOBEC3G (A3G) were carried out in rhesus macaques, following mucosal immunization with SIV antigens and CCR5 peptides, linked to the 70kDa heat shock protein. A progressive increase in A3G mRNA was elicited in PBMC after each immunization (panti-viral factor in CCR5(+)CD4(+) memory and CD4(+)CD95(+)CCR7(-) effector memory T cells.

  3. Vaccination with Altered Peptide Ligands of a Plasmodium berghei Circumsporozoite Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope: A Model to Generate T Cells Resistant to Immune Interference by Polymorphic Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minigo, Gabriela; Flanagan, Katie L; Slattery, Robyn M; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, display high levels of polymorphism within T-cell epitope regions of proteins associated with protective immunity. The T-cell epitope variants are often non-cross-reactive. Herein, we show in a murine model, which modifies a protective CD8 T-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium berghei (SYIPSAEKI), that simultaneous or sequential co-stimulation with two of its putative similarly non-cross-reactive altered peptide ligand (APL) epitopes (SYIPSAEDI or SYIPSAEAI) has radically different effects on immunity. Hence, co-immunization or sequential stimulation in vivo of SYIPSAEKI with its APL antagonist SYIPSAEDI decreases immunity to both epitopes. By contrast, co-immunization with SYIPSAEAI has no apparent initial effect, but it renders the immune response to SYIPSAEKI resistant to being turned off by subsequent immunization with SYIPSAEDI. These results suggest a novel strategy for vaccines that target polymorphic epitopes potentially capable of mutual immune interference in the field, by initiating an immune response by co-immunization with the desired index epitope, together with a carefully selected "potentiator" APL peptide.

  4. T cell exhaustion and immune-mediated disease-the potential for therapeutic exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Eoin F; Smith, Kenneth Gc

    2016-12-01

    T cell exhaustion represents a continuous spectrum of cellular dysfunction induced during chronic viral infection, facilitating viral persistence and associating with poor clinical outcome. Modulation of T cell exhaustion can restore function in exhausted CD8 T cells, promoting viral clearance. Exhaustion has also been implicated as playing an important role in anti-tumour responses, whereby exhausted tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes fail to control tumour progression. More recently exhaustion has been linked to long-term clinical outcome in multiple autoimmune diseases but, in contrast to cancer or infection, it is associated with a favourable clinical outcome characterised by fewer relapses. An increasing understanding of key inhibitory signals promoting exhaustion has led to advances in therapy for chronic infection and cancer. An increasing understanding of this biology may facilitate novel treatment approaches for autoimmunity through the therapeutic induction of exhaustion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Junqueira

    Full Text Available Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, lipopeptide (Pam3Cys, and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128 derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ production by CD4(+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception. The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Adjuvants Potentiate T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by a NY-ESO-1 Based Antitumor Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A.; Salgado, Ana Paula C.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant. PMID:22567144

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system with special emphasis on the interaction of dendritic and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Katrin; Glasow, Annegret; Paape, Daniel; Hildebrandt, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), as professional antigen-presenting cells, are members of the innate immune system and function as key players during the induction phase of adaptive immune responses. Uptake, processing, and presentation of antigens direct the outcome toward either tolerance or immunity. The cells of the immune system are among the most highly radiosensitive cells in the body. For high doses of ionizing radiation (HD-IR) both immune-suppressive effects after whole body irradiation and possible immune activation during tumor therapy were observed. On the other hand, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (LD-IR) on the immune system are controversial and seem to show high variability among different individuals and species. There are reports revealing that protracted LD-IR can result in radioresistance. But immune-suppressive effects of chronic LD-IR are also reported, including the killing or sensitizing of certain cell types. This article shall review the current knowledge of radiation-induced effects on the immune system, paying special attention to the interaction of DCs and T cells.

  8. Correspondence of Neutralizing Humoral Immunity and CD4 T Cell Responses in Long Recovered Sudan Virus Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobarzo, Ariel; Stonier, Spencer W; Herbert, Andrew S; Ochayon, David E; Kuehne, Ana I; Eskira, Yael; Fedida-Metula, Shlomit; Tali, Neta; Lewis, Eli C; Egesa, Moses; Cose, Stephen; Lutwama, Julius Julian; Yavelsky, Victoria; Dye, John M; Lobel, Leslie

    2016-05-11

    Robust humoral and cellular immunity are critical for survival in humans during an ebolavirus infection. However, the interplay between these two arms of immunity is poorly understood. To address this, we examined residual immune responses in survivors of the Sudan virus (SUDV) outbreak in Gulu, Uganda (2000-2001). Cytokine and chemokine expression levels in SUDV stimulated whole blood cultures were assessed by multiplex ELISA and flow cytometry. Antibody and corresponding neutralization titers were also determined. Flow cytometry and multiplex ELISA results demonstrated significantly higher levels of cytokine and chemokine responses in survivors with serological neutralizing activity. This correspondence was not detected in survivors with serum reactivity to SUDV but without neutralization activity. This previously undefined relationship between memory CD4 T cell responses and serological neutralizing capacity in SUDV survivors is key for understanding long lasting immunity in survivors of filovirus infections.

  9. Correspondence of Neutralizing Humoral Immunity and CD4 T Cell Responses in Long Recovered Sudan Virus Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Sobarzo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Robust humoral and cellular immunity are critical for survival in humans during an ebolavirus infection. However, the interplay between these two arms of immunity is poorly understood. To address this, we examined residual immune responses in survivors of the Sudan virus (SUDV outbreak in Gulu, Uganda (2000–2001. Cytokine and chemokine expression levels in SUDV stimulated whole blood cultures were assessed by multiplex ELISA and flow cytometry. Antibody and corresponding neutralization titers were also determined. Flow cytometry and multiplex ELISA results demonstrated significantly higher levels of cytokine and chemokine responses in survivors with serological neutralizing activity. This correspondence was not detected in survivors with serum reactivity to SUDV but without neutralization activity. This previously undefined relationship between memory CD4 T cell responses and serological neutralizing capacity in SUDV survivors is key for understanding long lasting immunity in survivors of filovirus infections.

  10. Current status of chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell-based and immune checkpoint blockade-based cancer immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Upendra P; Mukherji, Bijay

    2017-05-11

    Adoptive cell therapies with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T cells (CAR-T) and immune checkpoint inhibition (ICI)-based cancer immunotherapies have lately shown remarkable success in certain tumor types. CAR-T cell-based therapies targeting CD19 can now induce durable remissions as well as prolong disease-free survival of patients with CD19 positive treatment refractory B cell malignancies and ICI-based therapies with humanized monoclonal antibodies against the T cell inhibitory receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1 as well as against the PD-1 ligand, PD-L1, can now achieve durable remissions as well as prolongation of life of a sizeable fraction of patients with melanoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-small cell cancers. Most importantly, these immuno-therapeutic treatment modalities have raised the possibility of achieving long-term "containment" as well as "cures" for certain types of cancer. While this represents major advances in cancer immunotherapy, both modalities come with considerable toxicities, including fatalities. Although more work will be needed to bring CAR-T cell-based therapies to the bedside for most major cancers and a good deal more will be needed to make ICI-alone or in combination with other treatment modalities-work more consistently and across most major cancers, these two treatment modalities stand out as superb examples of successful translation of bench research to the bedside as well as represent real progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Immune escape from NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy via loss of heterozygosity in the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, Z K; Chou, J; Towlerton, A M; Voong, L N; Robbins, P; Bensinger, W I; Warren, E H

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.

  12. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Drabczyk, Malgorzata; Neff, C Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S; Palmer, Brent E; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-10-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  13. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  14. T cell immunity. Functional heterogeneity of human memory CD4⁺ T cell clones primed by pathogens or vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Simone; Latorre, Daniela; Mele, Federico; Foglierini, Mathilde; De Gregorio, Corinne; Cassotta, Antonino; Fernandez, Blanca; Kelderman, Sander; Schumacher, Ton N; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica

    2015-01-23

    Distinct types of CD4(+) T cells protect the host against different classes of pathogens. However, it is unclear whether a given pathogen induces a single type of polarized T cell. By combining antigenic stimulation and T cell receptor deep sequencing, we found that human pathogen- and vaccine-specific T helper 1 (T(H)1), T(H)2, and T(H)17 memory cells have different frequencies but comparable diversity and comprise not only clones polarized toward a single fate, but also clones whose progeny have acquired multiple fates. Single naïve T cells primed by a pathogen in vitro could also give rise to multiple fates. Our results unravel an unexpected degree of interclonal and intraclonal functional heterogeneity of the human T cell response and suggest that polarized responses result from preferential expansion rather than priming. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Reciprocity between Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells: Relevance to Polarized Immunity in Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Soumi; Khaitan, Binod Kumar; Joshi, Beenu; Sengupta, Utpal; Nautiyal, Arvind Kumar; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    T cell defect is a common feature in lepromatous or borderline lepromatous leprosy (LL/BL) patients in contrast to tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid type (TT/BT) patients. Tuberculoid leprosy is characterized by strong Th1-type cell response with localized lesions whereas lepromatous leprosy is hallmarked by its selective Mycobacterium leprae specific T cell anergy leading to disseminated and progressive disease. FoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases also dampen proinflammatory T cells that include T helper 17 (Th17) cells. This study is aimed at evaluating the role of Treg cells in influencing other effector T cells and its relationship with the cytokine polarized state in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from of BT/TT (n = 15) and BL/LL (n = 15) patients were stimulated with M. leprae antigen (WCL) in presence of golgi transport inhibitor monensin for FACS based intracellular cytokine estimation. The frequency of Treg cells showed >5-fold increase in BL/LL in comparison to BT/TT and healthy contacts. These cells produced suppressive cytokine, IL-10 in BL/LL as opposed to BT/TT (p = 0.0200) indicating their suppressive function. The frequency of Th17 cells (CD4, CD45RO, IL-17) was, however, higher in BT/TT. Significant negative correlation (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) was also found between IL-10 of Treg cells and IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL. Blocking IL-10/TGF-β restored the IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL patients. Simultaneously, presence of Th17 related cytokines (TGF-β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-23) decreased the number of FoxP3+ Treg cells concomitantly increasing IL-17 producing CD4+ cells in lepromatous leprosy. Higher frequency of Programmed Death-1/PD-1+ Treg cells and its ligand, PDL-1 in antigen presenting cells (APCs) was found in BL/LL patients. Inhibition of this pathway led to rescue of IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T cells

  16. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated...... that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD......8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity....

  17. Hyperreactive Onchocerciasis is Characterized by a Combination of Th17-Th2 Immune Responses and Reduced Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katawa, Gnatoulma; Layland, Laura E.; Debrah, Alex Y.; von Horn, Charlotte; Batsa, Linda; Kwarteng, Alexander; Arriens, Sandra; W. Taylor, David; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Adjobimey, Tomabu

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestations in onchocerciasis range from generalized onchocerciasis (GEO) to the rare but severe hyperreactive (HO)/sowda form. Since disease pathogenesis is associated with host inflammatory reactions, we investigated whether Th17 responses could be related to aggravated pathology in HO. Using flow cytometry, filarial-specific cytokine responses and PCR arrays, we compared the immune cell profiles, including Th subsets, in individuals presenting the two polar forms of infection and endemic normals (EN). In addition to elevated frequencies of memory CD4+ T cells, individuals with HO showed accentuated Th17 and Th2 profiles but decreased CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ regulatory T cells. These profiles included increased IL-17A+, IL-4+, RORC2+ and GATA3+CD4+ T cell populations. Flow cytometry data was further confirmed using a PCR array since Th17-related genes (IL-17 family members, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-22) and Th2-related (IL-4, IL-13, STAT6) genes were all significantly up-regulated in HO individuals. In addition, stronger Onchocerca volvulus-specific Th2 responses, especially IL-13, were observed in vitro in hyperreactive individuals when compared to GEO or EN groups. This study provides initial evidence that elevated frequencies of Th17 and Th2 cells form part of the immune network instigating the development of severe onchocerciasis. PMID:25569210

  18. A crucial role for Kupffer cell-derived galectin-9 in regulation of T cell immunity in hepatitis C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Mengshol

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 200 million people throughout the world are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. One of the most striking features of HCV infection is its high propensity to establish persistence (approximately 70-80% and progressive liver injury. Galectins are evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding proteins with diverse roles in innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that galectin-9, the natural ligand for the T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3, circulates at very high levels in the serum and its hepatic expression (particularly on Kupffer cells is significantly increased in patients with chronic HCV as compared to normal controls. Galectin-9 production from monocytes and macrophages is induced by IFN-gamma, which has been shown to be elevated in chronic HCV infection. In turn, galectin-9 induces pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver-derived and peripheral mononuclear cells; galectin-9 also induces anti-inflammatory cytokines from peripheral but not hepatic mononuclear cells. Galectin-9 results in expansion of CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+CD127(low regulatory T cells, contraction of CD4(+ effector T cells, and apoptosis of HCV-specific CTLs. In conclusion, galectin-9 production by Kupffer cells links the innate and adaptive immune response, providing a potential novel immunotherapeutic target in this common viral infection.

  19. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells and CD4+Foxp3+ T cells by probiotics administration suppresses immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Lee, Choong-Gu; So, Jae-Seon; Chae, Chang-Suk; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Sahoo, Anupama; Nam, Jong Hee; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2010-02-02

    The beneficial effects of probiotics have been described in many diseases, but the mechanism by which they modulate the immune system is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a mixture of probiotics that up-regulates CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Administration of the probiotics mixture induced both T-cell and B-cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulated T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines without apoptosis induction. It also induced generation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs from the CD4(+)CD25(-) population and increased the suppressor activity of naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. Conversion of T cells into Foxp3(+) Tregs is directly mediated by regulatory dendritic cells (rDCs) that express high levels of IL-10, TGF-beta, COX-2, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Administration of probiotics had therapeutical effects in experimental inflammatory bowel disease, atopic dermatitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The therapeutical effect of the probiotics is associated with enrichment of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in the inflamed regions. Collectively, the administration of probiotics that enhance the generation of rDCs and Tregs represents an applicable treatment of inflammatory immune disorders.

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of tritiated thymidine incorporation and ELISPOT assays in identifying antigen specific T cell immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLeod Beth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardization of cell-based immunologic monitoring is becoming increasingly important as methods for measuring cellular immunity become more complex. We assessed the ability of two commonly used cell-based assays, tritiated thymidine incorporation (proliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, to predict T cell responses to HER-2/neu, tetanus toxoid (tt, and cytomegalovirus (CMV antigens. These antigens were determined to be low (HER-2/neu, moderate (tt, and robustly (CMV immunogenic proteins. Samples from 27 Stage II, III, and IV HER-2/neu positive breast cancer patients, vaccinated against the HER-2/neu protein and tt, were analyzed by tritiated thymidine incorporation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT for T cell response. Results Linear regression analysis indicates that both stimulation index (SI (p = 0.011 and IFN-gamma secreting precursor frequency (p Conclusion These data underscore the importance of taking into consideration the performance characteristics of assays used to measure T cell immunity. This consideration is particularly necessary when determining which method to utilize for assessing responses to immunotherapeutic manipulations in cancer patients.

  1. Agonist anti-GITR monoclonal antibody induces melanoma tumor immunity in mice by altering regulatory T cell stability and intra-tumor accumulation.

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    Adam D Cohen

    Full Text Available In vivo GITR ligation has previously been shown to augment T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity, yet the underlying mechanisms of this activity, particularly its in vivo effects on CD4+ foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, have not been fully elucidated. In order to translate this immunotherapeutic approach to the clinic it is important gain better understanding of its mechanism(s of action. Utilizing the agonist anti-GITR monoclonal antibody DTA-1, we found that in vivo GITR ligation modulates regulatory T cells (Tregs directly during induction of melanoma tumor immunity. As a monotherapy, DTA-1 induced regression of small established B16 melanoma tumors. Although DTA-1 did not alter systemic Treg frequencies nor abrogate the intrinsic suppressive activity of Tregs within the tumor-draining lymph node, intra-tumor Treg accumulation was significantly impaired. This resulted in a greater Teff:Treg ratio and enhanced tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell activity. The decreased intra-tumor Treg accumulation was due both to impaired infiltration, coupled with DTA-1-induced loss of foxp3 expression in intra-tumor Tregs. Histological analysis of B16 tumors grown in Foxp3-GFP mice showed that the majority of GFP+ cells had lost Foxp3 expression. These "unstable" Tregs were absent in IgG-treated tumors and in DTA-1 treated TDLN, demonstrating a tumor-specific effect. Impairment of Treg infiltration was lost if Tregs were GITR(-/-, and the protective effects of DTA-1 were reduced in reconstituted RAG1(-/- mice if either the Treg or Teff subset were GITR-negative and absent if both were negative. Our results demonstrate that DTA-1 modulates both Teffs and Tregs during effective tumor treatment. The data suggest that DTA-1 prevents intra-tumor Treg accumulation by altering their stability, and as a result of the loss of foxp3 expression, may modify their intra-tumor suppressive capacity. These findings provide further support for the continued development of agonist

  2. Navigating the immune system: Improving CD8+ T cell responses for vaccine design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, A.C.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375805613

    2016-01-01

    Most vaccines rely on the protective effect of the humoral response. In case of intracellular- or rapidly mutating pathogens, humoral responses are less protective and the cellular response, mainly CD8+ T cells, can convey protection. However, vaccine efficacy is hampered by insufficient knowledge

  3. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

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    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  4. Regulation of T cell immunity in atopic dermatitis by microbes: The Yin and Yang of cutaneous inflammation

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    Tilo eBiedermann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease predominantly mediated by T helper cells. While numerous adaptive immune mechanisms in AD pathophysiology have been elucidated in detail, deciphering the impact of innate immunity in AD pathogenesis has made substantial progress in recent years and is currently a fast evolving field. As innate and adaptive immunity are intimately linked cross-talks between these two branches of the immune system are critically influencing the resulting immune response and disease. Innate immune recognition of the cutaneous microbiota was identified to substantially contribute to immune homeostasis and shaping of protective adaptive immunity in the absence of inflammation. Disturbances in the composition of the skin microbiome with reduced microbial diversity and overabundance of Staphylococcus spp. have been shown to be associated with AD inflammation. Distinct S. aureus associated microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs binding to TLR2 heterodimers could be identified to initiate long lasting cutaneous inflammation driven by T helper cells and consecutively local immune suppression by induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC further favoring secondary skin infections as often seen in AD patients. Moreover dissecting cellular and molecular mechanisms in cutaneous innate immune sensing in AD pathogenesis paved the way for exploiting regulatory and anti-inflammatory pathways to attenuate skin inflammation. Activation of the innate immune system by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria on AD skin alleviated cutaneous inflammation. The induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells, Interleukin-10 expression and regulatory Tr1 cells were shown to mediate this beneficial effect. Thus, activation of innate immunity by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria for induction of regulatory T cell phenotypes seems to be a promising strategy for treatment of inflammatory skin disorders as atopic dermatitis. These

  5. Splenic CD8(+) T cells secrete TGF-beta 1 to exert suppression in mice with anterior chamber-associated immune deviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.Q.; He, H.; Yang, P.Z.; Lin, X.M.; Zhou, H.Y.; Huang, X.K.; Kijlstra, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background CD8(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have been considered to be involved in a model of ocular-induced tolerance, known as anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID). The mechanisms of suppression by CD8(+) T cells in ACAID remain only poorly understood. TGF-beta 1 is considered as

  6. Cyclophosphamide chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-dependent CD8 T cell-mediated immune attack resulting in suppression of tumor growth.

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    Robbert G van der Most

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-cancer chemotherapy can be simultaneously lymphodepleting and immunostimulatory. Pre-clinical models clearly demonstrate that chemotherapy can synergize with immunotherapy, raising the question how the immune system can be mobilized to generate anti-tumor immune responses in the context of chemotherapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a mouse model of malignant mesothelioma, AB1-HA, to investigate T cell-dependent tumor resolution after chemotherapy. Established AB1-HA tumors were cured by a single dose of cyclophosphamide in a CD8 T cell- and NK cell-dependent manner. This treatment was associated with an IFN-alpha/beta response and a profound negative impact on the anti-tumor and total CD8 T cell responses. Despite this negative effect, CD8 T cells were essential for curative responses. The important effector molecules used by the anti-tumor immune response included IFN-gamma and TRAIL. The importance of TRAIL was supported by experiments in nude mice where the lack of functional T cells could be compensated by agonistic anti-TRAIL-receptor (DR5 antibodies. CONCLUSION: The data support a model in which chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells for T cell-, and possibly NK cell-, mediated apoptosis. A key role of tumor cell sensitization to immune attack is supported by the role of TRAIL in tumor resolution and explains the paradox of successful CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor responses in the absence of CD8 T cell expansion.

  7. IL28B genetic variation and cytomegalovirus-specific T-cell immunity in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Isabel; Solano, Carlos; Amat, Paula; Giménez, Estela; de la Cámara, Rafael; Nieto, José; López, Javier; García-Noblejas, Ana; Piñana, José Luis; Navarro, David

    2017-04-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), 3 kbp upstream of the IL28B gene (rs12979860; C/T), has been shown to influence the dynamics of cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT). We investigated whether this SNP had any effect on the dynamics of CMV-specific T-cell immunity in these patients. CMV pp65/IE-1 IFN-γ CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were enumerated by flow cytometry in 85 patients with no prior CMV DNAemia (group A) and in 57 after the onset of CMV DNAemia (group B). Donor IL28B genotype was determined by real-time PCR and plasma levels of IL-28B were quantitated by ELISA. CMV-specific T-cell counts and plasma IL-28B levels in patients in group A were not significantly different among the IL28B genotype groups. Patients harboring the donor IL28B T/T genotype appeared to expand CMV-specific IFN-γ CD8(+) cells to a higher level in response to viral replication than their C/T and C/C counterparts. Fewer patients in the T/T group received pre-emptive antiviral therapy (P = 0.05). Overall, a significant inverse correlation was observed between median IL-28B levels measured prior to the CMV DNAemia onset and the level of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells enumerated after detection of CMV DNAemia (σ = -0.471; P = 0.013). In summary, the data suggested that the protective effect attributed to the rs12979860 SNP minor T allele could be mediated, at least in part, by eliciting robust CMV-specific T-cell responses. J. Med. Virol. 89:685-695, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Serial Assessment of Immune Status by Circulating CD8+ Effector T Cell Frequencies for Posttransplant Infectious Complications

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    Shinji Uemoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the role of CD8+ effector T cells for infectious complications, 92 recipients were classified according to the hierarchical clustering of preoperative CD8+CD45 isoforms: Group I was naive, Group II was effector memory, and Group III was effector (E T cell-dominant. The posttransplant infection rates progressively increased from 29% in Group I to 64.3% in Group III recipients. The posttransplant immune status was compared with the pretransplant status, based on the measure (% difference and its graphical form (scatter plot. In Groups I and II, both approaches showed a strong upward deviation from pretransplant status upon posttransplant infection, indicating an enhanced clearance of pathogens. In Group III, in contrast, both approaches showed a clear downward deviation from preoperative status, indicating deficient cytotoxicity. The % E difference and scatter plot can be used as a useful indicator of a posttransplant infectious complication.

  9. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  10. Isotype-like suppression of T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. I. Delayed-type hypersensitivity specificity of T cell suppression induced by antigen-binding T cell factors that initiate contact sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, W; Bereta, M; Ptak, M; Askenase, P W

    1986-03-01

    A new form of immunoregulation is described that is based on the recent suggestion that the effector phase of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses consists of a cascade of steps that are dependent on the sequential action of two types of antigen-specific Ly-1+ effector cells. According to this formulation, which is based on analysis of contact sensitivity (CS) in mice, DTH consists of at least two T cell-dependent steps that must occur in sequence. The first of these steps occurs within 2 hr of challenge and depends on DTH-initiating, antigen-binding, antigen-specific T cell factors that sensitize the tissues for an obligatory initial vasoactive step, which allows the antigen/major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, Ly-1+ effector T cells of classic 24 to 48 hr DTH responses to enter the tissues and produce chemoattractant lymphokines. We have now found that nonspecific suppression of CS responses can be induced by i.v. injection of these antigen-binding, CS-initiating T cell factors. Injection of the antigen-binding T cell factor induces Ly-2+, I-J-, cyclophosphamide sensitive, seemingly nonspecific suppressor T cells to inhibit initiation of CS responses. These suppressor cells do not affect the late-acting lymphokine-producing T cells, but probably act by preventing production of antigen-specific factors of the type that are required to initiate DTH responses. Furthermore, injection of CS-initiating antigen-binding T cell factors also induces suppression of sheep red blood cell (SRBC)-specific DTH, but does not affect classic anti-SRBC B cell responses, which are dependent on antigen/MHC-restricted Ly-1+ helper T cells; skin allograft rejection responses are also not affected. Thus, the suppression is DTH-specific. In addition, suppression induced by antigen-binding T cell factors is Igh and not MHC/H-2 restricted. These findings and data in the companion manuscript showing that these suppressor T cells act by production of soluble suppressor

  11. Characterization of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for in vitro induction of regulatory T cells for cellular immune intervention in transplant medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Stefanie Schulze; Ukena, Sya N; Velaga, Sarvari; Franzke, Anke

    2013-04-01

    The application of regulatory T cells in the field of solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is under investigation to develop novel cellular strategies for tolerance induction. Establishing in vitro procedures to induce and expand regulatory T cells seeks to overcome the limiting small number of this rare T cell population. The present study is based on growing evidence that granulocyte colony stimulating factor exerts immune regulatory function in the adaptive immune system and may induce regulatory T cells in vivo. We analyzed the effect of recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor to directly convert CD4+CD25- T cells into regulatory T cells in vitro. Marker molecules were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent-activated cell sorter analyses. Functional assays were performed to investigate the suppressive capacity of granulocyte colony stimulating factor stimulated T cells. Kinetic analyses of Foxp3 gene expression uncovered increased levels early after in vitro stimulation with granulocyte colony stimulating factor. However, protein analyses for the master transcription factor Foxp3 and other regulatory T cells revealed that granulocyte colony stimulating factor did not directly induce a regulatory T cell phenotype. Moreover, functional analyses demonstrated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor stimulation in vitro does not result in a suppressive, immune regulatory T cell population. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor does not induce regulatory T cells with a specific phenotype and suppressive potency in vitro. Therefore, granulocyte colony stimulating factor does not qualify for developing protocols aimed at higher regulatory T cell numbers for adoptive transfer strategies in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  12. Clinical Dosing Regimen of Selinexor Maintains Normal Immune Homeostasis and T-cell Effector Function in Mice: Implications for Combination with Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Paul M; Servos, Mariah M; de Vries, Romy C; Klebanov, Boris; Kashyap, Trinayan; Sacham, Sharon; Landesman, Yosef; Dougan, Michael; Dougan, Stephanie K

    2017-03-01

    Selinexor (KPT-330) is a first-in-class nuclear transport inhibitor currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. To determine how selinexor might affect antitumor immunity, we analyzed immune homeostasis in mice treated with selinexor and found disruptions in T-cell development, a progressive loss of CD8 T cells, and increases in inflammatory monocytes. Antibody production in response to immunization was mostly normal. Precursor populations in bone marrow and thymus were unaffected by selinexor, suggesting that normal immune homeostasis could recover. We found that a high dose of selinexor given once per week preserved nearly normal immune functioning, whereas a lower dose given 3 times per week did not restore immune homeostasis. Both naïve and effector CD8 T cells cultured in vitro showed impaired activation in the presence of selinexor. These experiments suggest that nuclear exportins are required for T-cell development and function. We determined the minimum concentration of selinexor required to block T-cell activation and showed that T-cell-inhibitory effects of selinexor occur at levels above 100 nmol/L, corresponding to the first 24 hours post-oral dosing. In a model of implantable melanoma, selinexor treatment at 10 mg/kg with a 4-day drug holiday led to intratumoral IFNγ(+), granzyme B(+) cytotoxic CD8 T cells that were comparable with vehicle-treated mice. Overall, selinexor treatment leads to transient inhibition of T-cell activation, but clinically relevant once and twice weekly dosing schedules that incorporate sufficient drug holidays allow for normal CD8 T-cell functioning and development of antitumor immunity. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(3); 428-39. ©2017 AACRSee related article by Farren et al., p. 417. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Whole blood assay to access T cell-immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in healthy Brazilian individuals

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    Paulo RZ Antas

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of interferon gamma (IFNgamma guarantees effective T cell-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In the present study, we simply compare the in vitro immune responses to Mycobacterium antigens in terms of IFNg production in a total of 10 healthy Brazilian volunteers. Whole blood and mononuclear cells were cultivated in parallel with PPD, Ag85B, and M. bovis hsp65, and five-days supernatants were harvested for cytokine detection by ELISA. The inter-assay result was that the overall profile of agreement in response to antigens was highly correlated (r² = 0.9266; p = 0.0102. Potential analysis is in current progress to dictate the usefulness of this method to access the immune responses also in tuberculosis patients and its contacts.

  14. miR-625-3p is upregulated in CD8+ T cells during early immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kriti; Jyotsana, Nidhi; Buenting, Ivonne; Luther, Susanne; Pfanne, Angelika; Thum, Thomas; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael; Weissinger, Eva M; Hambach, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    Alloreactive CD8+ T-cells mediate the curative graft-versus-leukaemia effect, the anti-viral immunity and graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Thus, immune reconstitution with CD8+ T-cells is critical for the outcome of patients after allogeneic SCT. Certain miRNAs such as miR-146a or miR-155 play an important role in the regulation of post-transplant immunity in mice. While some miRNAs e.g. miR-423 or miR-155 are regulated in plasma or full blood during acute GvHD also in man, the relevance and expression profile of miRNAs in T-cells after allogeneic SCT is unknown. miR-625-3p has recently been described to be overexpressed in colorectal malignancies where it promotes migration, invasion and apoptosis resistance. Since similar regulative functions in cancer and T-cells have been described for an increasing number of miRNAs, we assumed a role for the cancer-related miR-625-3p also in T-cells. Here, we studied miR-625-3p expression selectively in CD8+ T-cells both in vitro and during immune reconstitution after allogeneic SCT in man. T-cell receptor stimulation lead to miR-625-3p upregulation in human CD8+ T-cells in vitro. Maintenance of elevated miR-625-3p expression levels was dependent on ongoing T-cell proliferation and was abrogated by withdrawal of interleukin 2 or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Finally, miR-625-3p expression was analyzed in human CD8+ T-cells purified from 137 peripheral blood samples longitudinally collected from 74 patients after allogeneic SCT. miR-625-3p expression was upregulated on day 25 and on day 45, i.e. during the early phase of CD8+ T-cell reconstitution after allogeneic SCT and subsequently declined with completion of CD8+ T-cell reconstitution until day 150. In conclusion, this study has shown for the first time that miR-625-3p is regulated in CD8+ T-cells during proliferation in vitro and during early immune reconstitution after allogeneic SCT in vivo. These results warrant further

  15. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Karen A; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A; Tindle, Robert W

    2004-02-20

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses.

  16. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

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    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  17. The Analysis of CD83 Expression on Human Immune Cells Identifies a Unique CD83+-Activated T Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xinsheng; Silveira, Pablo A; Hsu, Wei-Hsun; Elgundi, Zehra; Alingcastre, Renz; Verma, Nirupama D; Fromm, Phillip D; Hsu, Jennifer L; Bryant, Christian; Li, Ziduo; Kupresanin, Fiona; Lo, Tsun-Ho; Clarke, Candice; Lee, Kenneth; McGuire, Helen; Fazekas de St Groth, Barbara; Larsen, Stephen R; Gibson, John; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Clark, Georgina J; Hart, Derek N J

    2016-12-15

    CD83 is a member of the Ig gene superfamily, first identified in activated lymphocytes. Since then, CD83 has become an important marker for defining activated human dendritic cells (DC). Several potential CD83 mRNA isoforms have been described, including a soluble form detected in human serum, which may have an immunosuppressive function. To further understand the biology of CD83, we examined its expression in different human immune cell types before and after activation using a panel of mouse and human anti-human CD83 mAb. The mouse anti-human CD83 mAbs, HB15a and HB15e, and the human anti-human CD83 mAb, 3C12C, were selected to examine cytoplasmic and surface CD83 expression, based on their different binding characteristics. Glycosylation of CD83, the CD83 mRNA isoforms, and soluble CD83 released differed among blood DC, monocytes, and monocyte-derived DC, and other immune cell types. A small T cell population expressing surface CD83 was identified upon T cell stimulation and during allogeneic MLR. This subpopulation appeared specifically during viral Ag challenge. We did not observe human CD83 on unstimulated human natural regulatory T cells (Treg), in contrast to reports describing expression of CD83 on mouse Treg. CD83 expression was increased on CD4+, CD8+ T, and Treg cells in association with clinical acute graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients. The differential expression and function of CD83 on human immune cells reveal potential new roles for this molecule as a target of therapeutic manipulation in transplantation, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are sensitive to low dose cyclophosphamide: implications for the immune response.

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    Daniel Heylmann

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg play a pivotal role in the immune system since they inhibit the T cell response. It is well known that cyclophosphamide applied at low dose is able to stimulate the immune response while high dose cyclophosphamide exerts inhibitory activity. Data obtained in mice indicate that cyclophosphamide provokes a reduction in the number of Treg and impairs their suppressive activity, resulting in immune stimulation. Here, we addressed the question of the sensitivity of human Treg to cyclophosphamide, comparing Treg with cytotoxic T cells (CTL and T helper cells (Th. We show that Treg are more sensitive than CTL and Th to mafosfamide, which is an active derivative of cyclophosphamide, which does not need metabolic activation. The high sensitivity of Treg was due to the induction of apoptosis. Treg compared to CTL and Th were not more sensitive to the alkylating drugs temozolomide and nimustine and also not to mitomycin C, indicating a specific Treg response to mafosfamide. The high sensitivity of Treg to mafosfamide resulted not only in enhanced cell death, but also in impaired Treg function as demonstrated by a decline in the suppressor activity of Treg in a co-culture model with Th and Helios positive Treg. Treatment of Treg with mafosfamide gave rise to a high level of DNA crosslinks, which were not repaired to the same extent as observed in Th and CTL. Also, Treg showed a low level of γH2AX foci up to 6 h and a high level 24 h after treatment, indicating alterations in the DNA damage response. Overall, this is the first demonstration that human Treg are, in comparison with Th and CTL, hypersensitive to cyclophosphamide, which is presumably due to a DNA repair defect.

  19. Sterile immunity to malaria after DNA prime/adenovirus boost immunization is associated with effector memory CD8+T cells targeting AMA1 class I epitopes.

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    Martha Sedegah

    Full Text Available Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad. Four volunteers (27% demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA did not develop sterile protection.We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans.We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches that elicit responses to these epitopes will increase the

  20. CD154 blockade alters innate immune cell recruitment and programs alloreactive CD8+ T cells into KLRG-1(high short-lived effector T cells.

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    Ivana R Ferrer

    Full Text Available CD154/CD40 blockade combined with donor specific transfusion remains one of the most effective therapies in prolonging allograft survival. Despite this, the mechanisms by which these pathways synergize to prevent rejection are not completely understood. Utilizing a BALB/c (H2-K(d to B6 (H2-K(b fully allogeneic skin transplant model system, we performed a detailed longitudinal analysis of the kinetics and magnitude of CD8(+ T cell expansion and differentiation in the presence of CD154/CD40 pathway blockade. Results demonstrated that treatment with anti-CD154 vs. DST had distinct and opposing effects on activated CD44(high CD62L(low CD8(+ T cells in skin graft recipients. Specifically, CD154 blockade delayed alloreactive CD8(+ T cell responses, while DST accelerated them. DST inhibited the differentiation of alloreactive CD8(+ T cells into multi-cytokine producing effectors, while CD40/CD154 blockade led to the diminution of the KLRG-1(low long-lived memory precursor population compared with either untreated or DST treated animals. Moreover, only CD154 blockade effectively inhibited CXCL1 expression and neutrophil recruitment into the graft. When combined, anti-CD154 and DST acted synergistically to profoundly diminish the absolute number of IFN-γ producing alloreactive CD8(+ T cells, and intra-graft expression of inflammatory chemokines. These findings demonstrate that the previously described ability of anti-CD154 and DST to result in alloreactive T cell deletion involves both delayed kinetics of T cell expansion and differentiation and inhibited development of KLRG-1(low memory precursor cells.

  1. Low antigen dose formulated in CAF09 adjuvant Favours a cytotoxic T-cell response following intraperitoneal immunization in Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft

    2017-01-01

    in order to generate a certain type of immune response. To investigate this area further, we used Göttingen minipigs asan animal model especially due to the similar body size and high degree of immunome similarity between humans and pigs. In this study, we show that both a humoral and a cell......-dose immunization. Independent of antigen dose, intraperitoneal administration of antigen increased the amount of TT-specific cytotoxic CD8β+ T cells within the cytokine-producing T-cell pool when compared to the non-cytokine producing T-cell compartment. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a full...... protein formulated in the CAF09 adjuvant and administered to pigs via the intraperitoneal route effectively generates a cytotoxic T-cell response. Moreover, we confirm the inverse relationship between the antigen dose and the induction of polyfunctional T cells in a large animal model. These finding can...

  2. Critical role of perforin-dependent CD8+ T cell immunity for rapid protective vaccination in a murine model for human smallpox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kremer

    Full Text Available Vaccination is highly effective in preventing various infectious diseases, whereas the constant threat of new emerging pathogens necessitates the development of innovative vaccination principles that also confer rapid protection in a case of emergency. Although increasing evidence points to T cell immunity playing a critical role in vaccination against viral diseases, vaccine efficacy is mostly associated with the induction of antibody responses. Here we analyze the immunological mechanism(s of rapidly protective vaccinia virus immunization using mousepox as surrogate model for human smallpox. We found that fast protection against lethal systemic poxvirus disease solely depended on CD4 and CD8 T cell responses induced by vaccination with highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA or conventional vaccinia virus. Of note, CD4 T cells were critically required to allow for MVA induced CD8 T cell expansion and perforin-mediated cytotoxicity was a key mechanism of MVA induced protection. In contrast, selected components of the innate immune system and B cell-mediated responses were fully dispensable for prevention of fatal disease by immunization given two days before challenge. In conclusion, our data clearly demonstrate that perforin-dependent CD8 T cell immunity plays a key role in MVA conferred short term protection against lethal mousepox. Rapid induction of T cell immunity might serve as a new paradigm for treatments that need to fit into a scenario of protective emergency vaccination.

  3. Critical role of perforin-dependent CD8+ T cell immunity for rapid protective vaccination in a murine model for human smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Melanie; Suezer, Yasemin; Volz, Asisa; Frenz, Theresa; Majzoub, Monir; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Lehmann, Michael H; Kalinke, Ulrich; Sutter, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is highly effective in preventing various infectious diseases, whereas the constant threat of new emerging pathogens necessitates the development of innovative vaccination principles that also confer rapid protection in a case of emergency. Although increasing evidence points to T cell immunity playing a critical role in vaccination against viral diseases, vaccine efficacy is mostly associated with the induction of antibody responses. Here we analyze the immunological mechanism(s) of rapidly protective vaccinia virus immunization using mousepox as surrogate model for human smallpox. We found that fast protection against lethal systemic poxvirus disease solely depended on CD4 and CD8 T cell responses induced by vaccination with highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or conventional vaccinia virus. Of note, CD4 T cells were critically required to allow for MVA induced CD8 T cell expansion and perforin-mediated cytotoxicity was a key mechanism of MVA induced protection. In contrast, selected components of the innate immune system and B cell-mediated responses were fully dispensable for prevention of fatal disease by immunization given two days before challenge. In conclusion, our data clearly demonstrate that perforin-dependent CD8 T cell immunity plays a key role in MVA conferred short term protection against lethal mousepox. Rapid induction of T cell immunity might serve as a new paradigm for treatments that need to fit into a scenario of protective emergency vaccination.

  4. Merck Ad5/HIV induces broad innate immune activation that predicts CD8⁺ T-cell responses but is attenuated by preexisting Ad5 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Daniel E; Andersen-Nissen, Erica; Peterson, Eric R; Sato, Alicia; Hamilton, M Kristina; Borgerding, Joleen; Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Chang, Joanne T; Adams, Devin J; Hensley, Tiffany R; Salter, Alexander I; Morgan, Cecilia A; Duerr, Ann C; De Rosa, Stephen C; Aderem, Alan; McElrath, M Juliana

    2012-12-11

    To better understand how innate immune responses to vaccination can lead to lasting protective immunity, we used a systems approach to define immune signatures in humans over 1 wk following MRKAd5/HIV vaccination that predicted subsequent HIV-specific T-cell responses. Within 24 h, striking increases in peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression associated with inflammation, IFN response, and myeloid cell trafficking occurred, and lymphocyte-specific transcripts decreased. These alterations were corroborated by marked serum inflammatory cytokine elevations and egress of circulating lymphocytes. Responses of vaccinees with preexisting adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) neutralizing antibodies were strongly attenuated, suggesting that enhanced HIV acquisition in Ad5-seropositive subgroups in the Step Study may relate to the lack of appropriate innate activation rather than to increased systemic immune activation. Importantly, patterns of chemoattractant cytokine responses at 24 h and alterations in 209 peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcripts at 72 h were predictive of subsequent induction and magnitude of HIV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This systems approach provides a framework to compare innate responses induced by vectors, as shown here by contrasting the more rapid, robust response to MRKAd5/HIV with that to yellow fever vaccine. When applied iteratively, the findings may permit selection of HIV vaccine candidates eliciting innate immune response profiles more likely to drive HIV protective immunity.

  5. Constitutive CD40L Expression on B Cells Prematurely Terminates Germinal Center Response and Leads to Augmented Plasma Cell Production in T Cell Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Anna; Long, Eugene; Stapler, Dale; Cascalho, Marilia; Tsubata, Takeshi; Koni, Pandelakis A.; Shimoda, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    CD40/CD40L engagement is essential to T cell-dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the precise role of CD40 signaling through cognate T–B interaction in the generation of germinal center and memory B cells is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, a B cell-specific CD40L transgene (CD40LBTg) was introduced into mice with B cell-restricted MHC class II deficiency. Using this mouse model, we show that constitutive CD40L expression on B cells alone could not induce germinal center differentiation of MHC class II-deficient B cells after immunization with T cell-dependent Ag. Thus, some other MHC class II-dependent T cell-derived signals are essential for the generation of germinal center B cells in response to T cell-dependent Ag. In fact, CD40LBTg mice generated a complex Ag-specific IgG1 response, which was greatly enhanced in early, but reduced in late, primary response compared with control mice. We also found that the frequency of Ag-specific germinal center B cells in CD40LBTg mice was abruptly reduced 1 wk after immunization. As a result, the numbers of Ag-specific IgG1 long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells were reduced. By histology, large numbers of Ag-specific plasma cells were found in T cell areas adjacent to Ag-specific germinal centers of CD40LBTg mice, temporarily during the second week of primary response. These results indicate that CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminated their ongoing germinal center response and produced plasma cells. Our results support the notion that CD40 signaling is an active termination signal for germinal center reaction. PMID:20505142

  6. Coinhibitory Receptor Expression and Immune Checkpoint Blockade: Maintaining a Balance in CD8+ T Cell Responses to Chronic Viral Infections and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel S. Okoye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In cancer and chronic viral infections, T cells are exposed to persistent antigen stimulation. This results in expression of multiple inhibitory receptors also called “immune checkpoints” by T cells. Although these inhibitory receptors under normal conditions maintain self-tolerance and prevent immunopathology, their sustained expression deteriorates T cell function: a phenomenon called exhaustion. Recent advances in cancer immunotherapy involve blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programmed cell death 1 in order to reverse T cell exhaustion and reinvigorate immunity, which has translated to dramatic clinical remission in many cases of metastatic melanoma and lung cancer. With the paucity of therapeutic vaccines against chronic infections such as HIV, HPV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, such adjunct checkpoint blockade strategies are required including the blockade of other inhibitory receptors such as T cell immunoreceptor with immunoglobulin (Ig and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domains, T cell Ig and mucin-domain containing-3, lymphocyte activation gene 3, and V-domain Ig-containing suppressor of T cell activation. The nature of different chronic viral infections and cancers is likely to influence the level, composition, and pattern of inhibitory receptors expressed by responding T cells. This will have implications for checkpoint antibody blockade strategies employed for treating tumors and chronic viral infections. Here, we review recent advances that provide a clearer insight into the role of coinhibitory receptor expression in T cell exhaustion and reveal novel antibody-blockade therapeutic targets for chronic viral infections and cancer. Understanding the mechanism of T cell exhaustion in response to chronic virus infections and cancer as well as the nature of restored T cell responses will contribute to further improvement of immune checkpoint blockade strategies.

  7. CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation and increased production of regulatory T cells in the thymus of HIV-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bandera

    Full Text Available Mechanisms by which HIV affects the thymus are multiple and only partially known, and the role of thymic dysfunction in HIV/AIDS immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. To evaluate the effects of HIV infection on intra-thymic precursors of T cells in HIV-infected adults, we conducted a detailed immunophenotypic study of thymic tissue isolated from 7 HIV-infected and 10 HIV-negative adults who were to undergo heart surgery. We found that thymuses of HIV-infected individuals were characterized by a relative depletion of CD4+ single positive T cells and a corresponding enrichment of CD8+ single positive T cells. In addition, thymocytes derived from HIV-infected subjects showed increased levels of activated and proliferating cells. Our analysis also revealed a decreased expression of interleukin-7 receptor in early thymocytes from HIV-infected individuals, along with an increase in this same expression in mature double- and single-positive cells. Frequency of regulatory T cells (CD25+FoxP3+ was significantly increased in HIV-infected thymuses, particularly in priorly-committed CD4 single positive cells. Our data suggest that HIV infection is associated with a complex set of changes in the immunophenotype of thymocytes, including a reduction of intrathymic CD4+ T cell precursors, increased expression of activation markers, changes in the expression pattern of IL-7R and enrichment of T regulatory cells generation.

  8. Single dose CpG immunization protects against a heterosubtypic challenge and generates antigen specific memory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eVogel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, influenza A virus (IAV remains a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. Emerging pandemics from highly pathogenic IAV strains such as H5N1 and pandemic H1N1 highlight the need for universal, cross-protective vaccines. Current vaccine formulations generate strain-specific neutralizing antibodies primarily against the outer coat proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. In contrast to these highly mutable proteins, internal proteins of IAV are more conserved and are a favorable target for developing vaccines that induce strong T cell responses in addition to humoral immunity. Here, we found that intranasal administration with a single dose of CpG and inactivated x31 (H3N2 reduced viral titers and partially protected mice from a heterosubtypic challenge with a lethal dose of PR8 (H1N1. Early after immunization, vaccinated mice showed increased innate immune activation with high levels of MHCII and CD86 expression on dendritic cells in both the draining lymph nodes and lungs. Three days after immunization, CD4 and CD8 cells in the lung upregulated CD69, suggesting that activated lymphocytes are present at the site of vaccine administration. The ensuing effector Th1 responses were capable of producing multiple cytokines and were present at least 30 days after immunization. Furthermore, functional memory responses were observed, as antigen specific IFN-γ+ and GrB+ cells were detected early after lethal infection. Together, this work provides evidence for using pattern recognition receptor agonists as a mucosal vaccine platform for inducing robust T cell responses capable of protecting against heterologous IAV challenges.

  9. Impact of in utero Exposure to Malaria on Fetal T cell Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Odorizzi, Pamela M.; Feeney, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated malaria, including placental malaria, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, it has been suggested that in utero exposure of the fetus to malaria antigens may negatively impact the developing immune system and result in tolerance to malaria. Here, we review our current knowledge of fetal immunity to malaria, focusing on the dynamic interactions between maternal malaria infection, placental development and the fetal immune system. A better understa...

  10. Development of CD4 T cell dependent immunity against N. brasiliensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eHarvie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Of all the microbial infections relevant to mammals the relationship between parasitic worms and what constitutes and regulates a host protective immune response is perhaps the most complex and evolved. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is a tissue migrating parasitic roundworm of rodents that exemplifies many of the salient features of parasitic worm infection, including parasite development through sequential larval stages as it migrates through specific tissue sites. Immune competent hosts respond to infection by N. brasiliensis with a rapid and selective development of a profound Th2 immune response that appears able to confer life long protective immunity against reinfection. This review details how the lung can be the site of migrating nematode immune killing and the gut a site of rapid immune mediated clearance of worms. Furthermore it appears that N. brasiliensis induced responses in the lung are sufficient for conferring immunity in lung and gut while infection of the gut only confers immunity in the gut. This review also covers the role of IL-4, STAT6 and the innate cytokines IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP in the generation of CD4-mediated immunity against N. brasiliensis reinfection and discusses what cytokines might be involved in mediated killing or expulsion of helminth parasites.

  11. Burn Wound gammadelta T-Cells Support a Th2 and Th17 Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    penicillin and 50 μg/ml streptomycin (GIBCO, Grand Island, NY). Skin tissues were collected in a 60-mm petri dish (Corning, Tewksbury, MA) and minced...U/ml penicillin and 50 μg/ml strep- tomycin (GIBCO) supplemented with 10 U/ml murine recombinant IL-2 (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA). Cells were...Bhavsar D, Mailänder P. The biology of burn in- jury. Exp Dermatol 2010;19:777–83. 6. Romagnani S. T-cell subsets (Th1 versus Th2). Ann Allergy Asthma

  12. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, S.; Fonseca, L.S.; Hunter, J.T.; Rapp, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity.

  13. [The impact of conservative and hypervariable immunodominant epitopes in internal proteins of the influenza A virus on cytotoxic T-cell immune responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naikhin, A N; Losev, I V

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-cell immune response plays an important role in the prevention of influenza infection and reducing of the illness severity. The knowledge about mechanisms of the virus-specific CD8+ T-cell induction in humans is necessary for better understanding of influenza epidemiology and vaccine development. Due to application of new immunological and genetic methods in last years, considerable amount of.data became available in the literature about CD8+ T-cell immune responses to different influenza A viruses. This review summarizes these data. The main attention is paid to (i) heterosubtypic CTL responses to conservative immunodominant sites; (ii) mechanisms of viral escape from the virus-specific CTLs by means of evolutional escape-mutations; (iii) influence of the HLA haplotype on CD8+ T-cell immune responses. The importance of these data for immunology and vaccinology is discussed.

  14. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we...

  15. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical, Hematompoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Accelerated telomere shorten - ing in response to life stress . Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2004;101: 17312–5.Cancer Research ciation for Cancer Research on June 23, 2011urnals.org ...cells typically have shortened telomeres compared with CD28+ T cells (43), predicting a restricted life span in vivo after infusion (44...burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing

  16. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abschuetz, Oliver [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Osen, Wolfram [Division of Translational Immunology, German Cancer Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Frank, Kathrin [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kato, Masashi [Unit of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Schadendorf, Dirk [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45122 (Germany); Umansky, Viktor, E-mail: v.umansky@dkfz.de [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2012-04-26

    Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA) tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  17. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines.

  18. T-cell immunity of SARS-CoV: Implications for vaccine development against MERS-CoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, William J; Zhao, Min; Liu, Kefang; Xu, Kun; Wong, Gary; Tan, Wenjie; Gao, George F

    2017-01-01

    Over 12 years have elapsed since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) triggered the first global alert for coronavirus infections. Virus transmission in humans was quickly halted by public health measures and human infections of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) have not been observed since. However, other coronaviruses still pose a continuous threat to human health, as exemplified by the recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in humans. The work on SARS-CoV widens our knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and immunology of coronaviruses and may shed light on MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It has been confirmed that T-cell immunity plays an important role in recovery from SARS-CoV infection. Herein, we summarize T-cell immunological studies of SARS-CoV and discuss the potential cross-reactivity of the SARS-CoV-specific immunity against MERS-CoV, which may provide useful recommendations for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against coronavirus infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Involvement of the Th1 subset of CD4+ T cells in acquired immunity to mouse infection with Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perito, S; Calabresi, A; Romani, L; Puccetti, P; Bistoni, F

    1992-09-01

    Heat- or merthiolate-inactivated Trypanosoma equiperdum was administered to recipient mice that were subsequently challenged with viable inocula of the same stabilate. Only mice inoculated with merthiolate-killed parasites were completely protected from a challenge inoculum of 10(3) trypanosomes, an effect that was abolished by prior immunosuppression of mice. Immune sera from protected animals contained high levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma and specific IgG2a antibodies. Spleen cells from these mice produced high amounts of interleukin (IL)-2 and IFN-gamma in vitro in response to specific antigen or concanavalin A, whereas splenocytes from mice receiving heat-killed parasites produced high amounts of IL-6. In contrast, the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and colony-stimulating activity (CSA) was not significantly different in mice receiving either killed parasite preparation. The protection in immunized mice was associated with the detection of strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to T. equiperdum antigens, an effect that could be adoptively transferred onto naive recipients by specifically immune CD4+ lymphocytes. These results suggest that the development of protective immunity in mice to T. equiperdum by our immunization protocol may involve the activity of helper/DTH T cells, particularly those of the Th1 subset.

  20. Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan-Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 588-595

  1. Age-dependent changes in the sphingolipid composition of CD4+ T cell membranes and immune synapses implicate glucosylceramides in age-related T cell dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sphingolipid (SL4) composition can influence the biophysical properties of cell membranes. Additionally, specific SL modulate signaling pathways involved in proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. We investigated age-dependent changes in the SL composition of CD4+ T cells, and the impact of these ...

  2. Immune Mediators in Osteoarthritis: Infrapatellar Fat Pad-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells Are Increased in Osteoarthritic Patients with Higher Clinical Radiographic Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirun Apinun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a condition of joint failure characterized by many pathologic changes of joint-surrounding tissues. Many evidences suggest the role of both innate and adaptive immunity that interplay, resulting either in initiation or in progression of osteoarthritis. Adaptive immune cells, in particular T cells, have been demonstrated to play a role in the development of OA in animal models. However, the underlying mechanism is yet unclear. Our aim was to correlate the frequency and phenotype of tissue-infiltrating T cells in the synovial tissue and infrapatellar fat pad with radiographic grading. Our results show that CD8+ T cells are increased in osteoarthritic patients with higher radiographic grading. When peripheral blood CD8+ T cells were examined, we show that CD8+ T cells possess a significantly higher level of activation than its CD4+ T cell counterpart (P<0.0001. Our results suggest a role for CD8+ T cells and recruitment of these activated circulating peripheral blood CD8+ T cells to the knee triggering local inflammation within the knee joint.

  3. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF or edema factor (EF. Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  4. Atorvastatin reduces T-cell activation and exhaustion among HIV-infected cART-treated suboptimal immune responders in Uganda: a randomised crossover placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Nabatanzi, Rose; Bayigga, Lois; Kiragga, Agnes; Joloba, Moses; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kambugu, Andrew D; Kamya, Moses R; Sekaly, Rafick; Elliott, Alison; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2015-03-01

    T-cell activation independently predicts mortality, poor immune recovery and non-AIDS illnesses during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Atorvastatin showed anti-immune activation effects among HIV-infected cART-naïve individuals. We investigated whether adjunct atorvastatin therapy reduces T-cell activation among cART-treated adults with suboptimal immune recovery. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial, of atorvastatin 80 mg daily vs. placebo for 12 weeks, was conducted among individuals with CD4 increase <295 cells/μl after seven years of suppressive cART. Change in T-cell activation (CD3 + CD4 + /CD8 + CD38 + HLADR+) and in T-cell exhaustion (CD3 + CD4 + /CD8 + PD1 + ) was measured using flow cytometry. Thirty patients were randomised, 15 to each arm. Atorvastatin resulted in a 28% greater reduction in CD4 T-cell activation (60% reduction) than placebo (32% reduction); P = 0.001. Atorvastatin also resulted in a 35% greater reduction in CD8-T-cell activation than placebo (49% vs. 14%, P = 0.0009), CD4 T-cell exhaustion (27% vs. 17% in placebo), P = 0.001 and CD8 T-cell exhaustion (27% vs. 16%), P = 0.004. There was no carry-over/period effect. Expected adverse events were comparable in both groups, and no serious adverse events were reported. Atorvastatin reduced T-cell immune activation and exhaustion among cART-treated adults in a Ugandan cohort. Atorvastatin adjunct therapy should be explored as a strategy to improve HIV treatment outcomes among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell immunity between the pandemic H1N1-2009 and H1N1-1918 influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Laurie, Karen; Liu, Yu Chih; Denholm, Justin T; Richards, Michael J; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Kelso, Anne; Doherty, Peter C; Turner, Stephen J; Rossjohn, Jamie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2010-07-13

    Preexisting T-cell immunity directed at conserved viral regions promotes enhanced recovery from influenza virus infections, with there being some evidence of cross-protection directed at variable peptides. Strikingly, many of the immunogenic peptides derived from the current pandemic A(H1N1)-2009 influenza virus are representative of the catastrophic 1918 "Spanish flu" rather than more recent "seasonal" strains. We present immunological and structural analyses of cross-reactive CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity directed at a variable (although highly cross-reactive) immunodominant NP(418-426) peptide that binds to a large B7 family (HLA-B*3501/03/0702) found throughout human populations. Memory CD8(+) T-cell specificity was probed for 12 different NP(418) mutants that emerged over the 9 decades between the 1918 and 2009 pandemics. Although there is evidence of substantial cross-reactivity among seasonal NP(418) mutants, current memory T-cell profiles show no preexisting immunity to the 2009-NP(418) variant or the 1918-NP(418) variant. Natural infection with the A(H1N1)-2009 virus, however, elicits CD8(+) T cells specific for the 2009-NP(418) and 1918-NP(418) epitopes. This analysis points to the potential importance of cross-reactive T-cell populations that cover the possible spectrum of T-cell variants and suggests that the identification of key residues/motifs that elicit cross-reactive T-cell sets could facilitate the evolution of immunization protocols that provide a measure of protection against unpredicted pandemic influenza viruses. Thus, it is worth exploring the potential of vaccines that incorporate peptide variants with a proven potential for broader immunogenicity, especially to those that are not recognized by the current memory T-cell pool generated by exposure to influenza variants that cause successive seasonal epidemics.

  6. Regulatory T-cells and immune tolerance in pregnancy: a new target for infertility treatment?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerin, Leigh R; Prins, Jelmer R; Robertson, Sarah A

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semi-allogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success, and disturbances in maternal tolerance are implicated in infertility and reproductive pathologies. T regulatory (Treg...

  7. Evidence for T Cell-dependent Immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an Intraabdominal Abscess Model

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Markham, Richard B.; Zaleznik, Dori F.; Cisneros, Ronald L.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immu...

  8. Oct2 and Obf1 as facilitators of B:T cell collaboration during a humoral immune response

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    Lynn M Corcoran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Oct2 protein, encoded by the Pou2f2 gene, was originally predicted to act as a DNA binding transcriptional activator of immunoglobulin (Ig in B lineage cells. This prediction flowed from the earlier observation that an 8 bp sequence, the octamer motif, was a highly conserved component of most Ig gene promoters and enhancers, and evidence from over-expression and reporter assays confirmed Oct2-mediated, octamer-dependent gene expression. Complexity was added to the story when Oct1, an independently encoded protein, ubiquitously expressed from the Pou2f 1 gene, was characterised and found to bind to the octamer motif with almost identical specificity, and later, when the co-activator Obf1 (OCA-B, Bob.1, encoded by the Pou2af1 gene, was cloned. Obf1 joins Oct2 (and Oct1 on the DNA of a subset of octamer motifs to enhance their transactivation strength. While these proteins variously carried the mantle of determinants of Ig gene expression in B cells for many years, such a role has not been borne out for them by characterisation of mice lacking functional copies of the genes, either as single or as compound mutants. Instead, we and others have shown that Oct2 and Obf1 are required for B cells to mature fully in vivo, for B cells to respond to the T cell cytokines IL5 and IL4, and for B cells to produce IL6 normally during a T cell dependent immune response. We show here that Oct2 affects Syk gene expression, thus influencing B cell receptor signalling, and that Oct2 loss blocks Slamf1 expression in vivo as a result of incomplete B cell maturation. Upon IL4 signalling, Stat6 up-regulates Obf1, indirectly via Xbp1, to enable plasma cell differentiation. Thus, Oct2 and Obf1 enable B cells to respond normally to antigen receptor signals, to express surface receptors that mediate physical interaction with T cells, or to produce and respond to cytokines that are critical drivers of B cell and T cell differentiation during a humoral immune response.

  9. Epitope-specific CD8+ T cell kinetics rather than viral variability determine the timing of immune escape in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyushev, Alexey P; Petravic, Janka; Grimm, Andrew J; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Reece, Jeanette C; Cromer, Deborah; Kent, Stephen J; Davenport, Miles P

    2015-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells are important for the control of chronic HIV infection. However, the virus rapidly acquires "escape mutations" that reduce CD8(+) T cell recognition and viral control. The timing of when immune escape occurs at a given epitope varies widely among patients and also among different epitopes within a patient. The strength of the CD8(+) T cell response, as well as mutation rates, patterns of particular amino acids undergoing escape, and growth rates of escape mutants, may affect when escape occurs. In this study, we analyze the epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells in 25 SIV-infected pigtail macaques responding to three SIV epitopes. Two epitopes showed a variable escape pattern and one had a highly monomorphic escape pattern. Despite very different patterns, immune escape occurs with a similar delay of on average 18 d after the epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells reach 0.5% of total CD8(+) T cells. We find that the most delayed escape occurs in one of the highly variable epitopes, and that this is associated with a delay in the epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells responding to this epitope. When we analyzed the kinetics of immune escape, we found that multiple escape mutants emerge simultaneously during the escape, implying that a diverse population of potential escape mutants is present during immune selection. Our results suggest that the conservation or variability of an epitope does not appear to affect the timing of immune escape in SIV. Instead, timing of escape is largely determined by the kinetics of epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Chemotherapy Delivered After Viral Immunogene Therapy Augments Antitumor Efficacy Via Multiple Immune-mediated Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlender, Zvi G; Sun, Jing; Singhal, Sunil; Kapoor, Veena; Cheng, Guanjun; Suzuki, Eiji; Albelda, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    The most widely used approach to cancer immunotherapy is vaccines. Unfortunately, the need for multiple administrations of antigens often limits the use of one of the most effective vaccine approaches, immunogene therapy using viral vectors, because neutralizing antibodies are rapidly produced. We hypothesized that after viral immunogene therapy “primed” an initial strong antitumor immune response, subsequent “boosts” could be provided by sequential courses of chemotherapy. Three adenoviral (Ad)-based immunogene therapy regimens were administered to animals with large malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer tumors followed by three weekly administrations of a drug regimen commonly used to treat these tumors (Cisplatin/Gemcitabine). Immunogene therapy followed by chemotherapy resulted in markedly increased antitumor efficacy associated with increased numbers of antigen-specific, activated CD8+ T-cells systemically and within the tumors. Possible mechanisms included: (i) decreases in immunosuppressive cells such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), T-regulatory cells (T-regs), and B-cells, (ii) stimulation of memory cells by intratumoral antigen release leading to efficient cross-priming, (iii) alteration of the tumor microenvironment with production of “danger signals” and immunostimulatory cytokines, and (iv) augmented trafficking of T-cells into the tumors. This approach is currently being tested in a clinical trial and could be applied to other trials of viral immunogene therapy. PMID:20683443

  11. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

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    Sunyoung Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers.

  12. Interleukin-2/Anti-Interleukin-2 Immune Complex Expands Regulatory T Cells and Reduces Angiotensin II-Induced Aortic Stiffening

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    Beenish Majeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive immune function is implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Inhibition of T-lymphocyte function has been shown to reduce hypertension, target-organ damage, and vascular stiffness. To study the role of immune inhibitory cells, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, on vascular stiffness, we stimulated the proliferation of Treg lymphocytes in vivo using a novel cytokine immune complex of Interleukin-2 (IL-2 and anti-IL-2 monoclonal antibody clone JES6-1 (mAbCD25. Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with IL-2/mAbCD25 concomitantly with continuous infusion of angiotensin type 1 receptor agonist, [Val5]angiotensin II. Our results indicate that the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex effectively induced Treg phenotype expansion by 5-fold in the spleens with minimal effects on total CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers. The IL-2/mAbCD25 complex inhibited angiotensin II-mediated aortic collagen remodeling and the resulting stiffening, analyzed with in vivo pulse wave velocity and effective Young’s modulus. Furthermore, the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex suppressed angiotensin II-mediated Th17 responses in the lymphoid organs and reduced gene expression of IL-17 as well as T cell and macrophage infiltrates in the aortic tissue. This study provides data that support the protective roles of Tregs in vascular stiffening and highlights the use of the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex as a new potential therapy in angiotensin II-related vascular diseases.

  13. Regulatory T cells contribute to the impaired immune response in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Jeroen N; van der Molen, Renate G; Baan, Carla C; van der Laan, Luc J W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G; Janssen, Harry L A

    2005-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by a weak immune response to HBV. Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) can suppress the function of effector T cells and may thus be key players in this impaired immune response. Changes in the functionality or number of T(reg) could explain the decreased antiviral response in chronic HBV patients. To investigate the role of T(reg) in chronic HBV infection, we compared the proportional frequency and functionality of T(reg) in peripheral blood of 50 chronic HBV patients, 23 healthy controls, and 9 individuals with a resolved HBV infection. A higher percentage of T(reg), defined as CD4, CD25, CD45RO, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4-positive cells, was detected within the population of CD4(+) cells in peripheral blood of chronic HBV patients compared with healthy controls and individuals with a resolved HBV infection. Accordingly, chronic HBV patients displayed a higher FoxP3 messenger RNA level than healthy controls. Depletion of CD25(+) cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of chronic HBV patients resulted in an enhanced proliferation after stimulation with HBV core antigen. Reconstitution of these depleted PBMC with CD4(+)CD25(+) T(reg) resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of both HBV-specific proliferation and interferon gamma production. In conclusion, chronic HBV patients harbor an increased percentage of T(reg) in peripheral blood compared with controls. T(reg) have an immunosuppressive effect on HBV-specific T helper cells. The presence of HBV-specific T(reg) could contribute to an inadequate immune response against the virus, leading to chronic infection.

  14. Decidual vascular endothelial cells promote maternal-fetal immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells through canonical Notch1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yanyi; Song, Jieping; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Nian

    2016-05-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semiallogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success. However, the mechanisms by which the fetus avoids rejection despite expression of paternal alloantigens remain incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are pivotal for maintaining immune homeostasis, preventing autoimmune disease and fetus rejection. In this study, we found that maternal decidual vascular endothelial cells (DVECs) sustained Foxp3 expression in resting Treg cells in vitro. Moreover, under in vitro Treg cell induction condition with agonistic antibodies and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, DVECs promoted Treg cell differentiation from non-Treg conventional T cells. Consistent with the promotion of Treg cell maintenance and differentiation, Treg cell-associated gene expression such as TGF-β, Epstein-Barr-induced gene-3, CD39 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor was also increased in the presence of DVECs. Further study revealed that DVECs expressed Notch ligands such as Jagged-1, Delta-like protein 1 (DLL-1) and DLL-4, while Treg cells expressed Notch1 on their surface. The effects of DVECs on Treg cells was inhibited by siRNA-induced knockdown of expression of Jagged-1 and DLL-1 in DVECs. Downregulation of Notch1 in Treg cells using lentiviral shRNA transduction decreased Foxp3 expression in Treg cells. Adoptive transfer of Notch1-deficient Treg cells increased abortion rate in a murine semiallogeneic pregnancy model. Taken together, our study suggests that maternal DVECs are able to maintain decidual Treg cell identity and promote Treg cell differentiation through activation of Notch1 signal pathway in Treg cells and subsequently inhibit the immune response against semiallogeneic fetuses and preventing spontaneous abortion.

  15. CD4 regulatory T cells augment HIV-1 expression of polarized M1 and M2 monocyte derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tanya O; Zhang, Mingce; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Smythies, Lesley E; Cron, Randall Q

    2017-04-01

    Previous in vitro studies have shown that the HIV-1 virus can alter the cytokine/chemokine profile of polarized macrophages which may lead to their increased susceptibility to viral infection. Here, we found that M2 monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) were significantly more permissive to productive infection by R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, including transmitted founder (T/F) viruses, than M1 MDM. Previous in vitro studies by our lab showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress HIV-1 infection in non-Treg CD4 T cells. Here, we investigated potential inhibitory effects of Tregs on HIV-1 infection of polarized MDM. We found that Tregs significantly increased HIV-1 infection in M1 and M2 MDM via a mechanism that was cell contact dependent. These findings suggest a potential role for Tregs in HIV-1 infection of tissue resident macrophages of M1 and M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the establishment and pathogenesis of HIV-1 disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HMBPP-deficient Listeria mutant immunization alters pulmonary/systemic responses, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencher, James T.; Shen, Hongbo; Yan, Lin; Wilson, Jessica O.; Freitag, Nancy E.; Rizzo, Alicia N.; Chen, Crystal Y.; Chen, Zheng W.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas infection or immunization of humans/primates with microbes coproducing HMBPP/IPP can remarkably activate Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, in vivo studies have not been done to dissect HMBPP- and IPP-driven expansion, pulmonary trafficking, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We define these phosphoantigen-host interplays by comparative immunizations of macaques with the HMBPP/IPP-coproducing Listeria ΔactA prfA* and HMBPP-deficient Listeria ΔactAΔgcpE prfA* mutant. The HMBPP-deficient ΔgcpE mutant shows lower ability to expand Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in vitro than the parental HMBPP-producing strain but displays comparably attenuated infectivity or immunogenicity. Respiratory immunization of macaques with the HMBPP-deficient mutant elicits lower pulmonary and systemic responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells compared with the HMBPP-producing vaccine strain. Interestingly, HMBPP-deficient mutant reimmunization or boosting elicits enhanced responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but the magnitude is lower than that by HMBPP-producing listeria. HMBPP-deficient listeria differentiated fewer Vγ2Vδ2 T effector cells capable of coproducing IFN-γ and TNF-α and inhibiting intracellular listeria than HMBPP-producing listeria. Furthermore, HMBPP deficiency in listerial immunization influences memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Thus, both HMBPP and IPP production in listerial immunization or infection elicit systemic/pulmonary responses and differentiation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but a role for HMBPP is more dominant. Findings may help devise immune intervention. PMID:25114162

  17. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cell Interactions with Commensal and Pathogenic Bacteria: Potential Role in Antimicrobial Immunity in the Child

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    Liana Ghazarian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are unconventional CD3+CD161high T lymphocytes that recognize vitamin B2 (riboflavin biosynthesis precursor derivatives presented by the MHC-I related protein, MR1. In humans, their T cell receptor is composed of a Vα7.2-Jα33/20/12 chain, combined with a restricted set of Vβ chains. MAIT cells are very abundant in the liver (up to 40% of resident T cells and in mucosal tissues, such as the lung and gut. In adult peripheral blood, they represent up to 10% of circulating T cells, whereas they are very few in cord blood. This large number of MAIT cells in the adult likely results from their gradual expansion with age following repeated encounters with riboflavin-producing microbes. Upon recognition of MR1 ligands, MAIT cells have the capacity to rapidly eliminate bacterially infected cells through the production of inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-17 and cytotoxic effector molecules (perforin and granzyme B. Thus, MAIT cells may play a crucial role in antimicrobial defense, in particular at mucosal sites. In addition, MAIT cells have been implicated in diseases of non-microbial etiology, including autoimmunity and other inflammatory diseases. Although their participation in various clinical settings has received increased attention in adults, data in children are scarce. Due to their innate-like characteristics, MAIT cells might be particularly important to control microbial infections in the young age, when long-term protective adaptive immunity is not fully developed. Herein, we review the data showing how MAIT cells may control microbial infections and how they discriminate pathogens from commensals, with a focus on models relevant for childhood infections.

  18. B and T cell crosstalk in anti-bacterial immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, J.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis shows that phagocytosis of Salmonella by B cells may generate a survival niche and transport vehicle for Salmonella, but that simultaneously Salmonella-infected B cells induce an optimal anti-Salmonella response through activation of multiple arms of the adaptive immune response. The

  19. Prospective monitoring reveals dynamic levels of T cell immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in HIV infected individuals.

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    Jessica E Mitchell

    Full Text Available Monitoring of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection may prevent disease. We tested an ESAT-6 and CFP-10-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay (RD1-Elispot on 163 HIV-infected individuals living in a TB-endemic setting. An RD1-Elispot was performed every 3 months for a period of 3-21 months. 62% of RD1-Elispot negative individuals were positive by cultured Elispot. Fluctuations in T cell response were observed with rates of change ranging from -150 to +153 spot-forming cells (SFC/200,000 PBMC in a 3-month period. To validate these responses we used an RD1-specific real time quantitative PCR assay for monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG and IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10 (MIG: r=0.6527, p=0.0114; IP-10: r=0.6967, p=0.0056; IP-10+MIG: r=0.7055, p=0.0048. During follow-up 30 individuals were placed on ARVs and 4 progressed to active TB. Fluctuations in SFC did not correlate with CD4 count, viral load, treatment initiation, or progression to active TB. The RD1-Elispot appears to have limited value in this setting.

  20. Regulatory T Cells, a Potent Immunoregulatory Target for CAM Researchers: Modulating Tumor Immunity, Autoimmunity and Alloreactive Immunity (III

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    Aristo Vojdani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are the major arbiter of immune responses, mediating actions through the suppression of inflammatory and destructive immune reactions. Inappropriate Treg cell frequency or functionality potentiates the pathogenesis of myriad diseases with ranging magnitudes of severity. Lack of suppressive capability hinders restraint on immune responses involved in autoimmunity and alloreactivity, while excessive suppressive capacity effectively blocks processes necessary for tumor destruction. Although the etiology of dysfunctional Treg cell populations is under debate, the ramifications, and their mechanisms, are increasingly brought to light in the medical community. Methods that compensate for aberrant immune regulation may not address the underlying complications; however, they hold promise for the alleviation of debilitating immune system-related disorders. The dominant immunoregulatory nature of Treg cells, coupled with recent mechanistic knowledge of natural immunomodulatory compounds, highlights the importance of Treg cells to practitioners and researchers of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.

  1. Fetal intervention increases maternal T cell awareness of the foreign conceptus and can lead to immune-mediated fetal demise1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegorzewska, Marta; Nijagal, Amar; Wong, Charissa M.; Le, Tom; Lescano, Ninnia; Tang, Qizhi; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal interventions to diagnose and treat congenital anomalies are growing in popularity but often lead to preterm labor. The possible contribution of the maternal adaptive immune system to post-surgical pregnancy complications has not been explored. We recently showed that fetal intervention in mice increases maternal T cell trafficking into the fetus and hypothesized that this process may also lead to increased maternal T cell recognition of the foreign conceptus and subsequent breakdown in maternal-fetal tolerance. Here, we show that fetal intervention in mice results in accumulation of maternal T cells in the uterus and that these activated cells can produce effector cytokines. In adoptive transfer experiments, maternal T cells specific for a fetal alloantigen proliferate after fetal intervention, escape apoptosis, and become enriched compared to endogenous T cells in the uterus and uterine-draining lymph nodes. Finally, we demonstrate that such activation and accumulation can have a functional consequence: in utero transplantation of hematopoietic cells carrying the fetal alloantigen leads to enhanced demise of semiallogeneic fetuses within a litter. We further show that maternal T cells are necessary for this phenomenon. These results suggest that fetal intervention enhances maternal T cell recognition of the fetus and that T cell activation may be a culprit in post-surgical pregnancy complications. Our results have clinical implications for understanding and preventing complications associated with fetal surgery such as preterm labor. PMID:24415782

  2. Defining T-Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Rotavirus-Infected Juvenile Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Sestak, K.; McNeal, M M; Choi, A.; Cole, M. J.; Ramesh, G.; Alvarez, X.; Aye, P. P.; Bohm, R P; Mohamadzadeh, M.; Ward, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    The appearance of virus-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood of captive juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) was observed following rotavirus infection. These cell-mediated immune responses were measured following experimental or natural infection after rotavirus was isolated from stool specimens of asymptomatic animals. The virus isolated was a new strain of simian rotavirus that we named TUCH (for Tulane University and Cincinnati Children's Hospital). Restimulati...

  3. Liver-Primed Memory T Cells Generated under Noninflammatory Conditions Provide Anti-infectious Immunity

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    Jan P. Böttcher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of CD8+ T cell (CTL immunity or tolerance is linked to the conditions during T cell priming. Dendritic cells (DCs matured during inflammation generate effector/memory T cells, whereas immature DCs cause T cell deletion/anergy. We identify a third outcome of T cell priming in absence of inflammation enabled by cross-presenting liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Such priming generated memory T cells that were spared from deletion by immature DCs. Similar to central memory T cells, liver-primed T cells differentiated into effector CTLs upon antigen re-encounter on matured DCs even after prolonged absence of antigen. Their reactivation required combinatorial signaling through the TCR, CD28, and IL-12R and controlled bacterial and viral infections. Gene expression profiling identified liver-primed T cells as a distinct Neuropilin-1+ memory population. Generation of liver-primed memory T cells may prevent pathogens that avoid DC maturation by innate immune escape from also escaping adaptive immunity through attrition of the T cell repertoire.

  4. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~104 CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7- and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines.

  5. Lack of interleukin-6 in the tumor microenvironment augments type-1 immunity and increases the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yosuke; Toyoshima, Yujiro; Yurino, Hideaki; Monma, Norikazu; Xiang, Huihui; Sumida, Kentaro; Kaneumi, Shun; Terada, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ikeo, Kazuho; Homma, Shigenori; Kawamura, Hideki; Takahashi, Norihiko; Taketomi, Akinobu; Kitamura, Hidemitsu

    2017-10-01

    Conquering immunosuppression in tumor microenvironments is crucial for effective cancer immunotherapy. It is well known that interleukin (IL)-6, a pleiotropic cytokine, is produced in the tumor-bearing state. In the present study, we investigated the precise effects of IL-6 on antitumor immunity and the subsequent tumorigenesis in tumor-bearing hosts. CT26 cells, a murine colon cancer cell line, were intradermally injected into wild-type and IL-6-deficient mice. As a result, we found that tumor growth was decreased significantly in IL-6-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice and the reduction was abrogated by depletion of CD8 + T cells. We further evaluated the immune status of tumor microenvironments and confirmed that mature dendritic cells, helper T cells and cytotoxic T cells were highly accumulated in tumor sites under the IL-6-deficient condition. In addition, higher numbers of interferon (IFN)-γ-producing T cells were present in the tumor tissues of IL-6-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Surface expression levels of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and MHC class I on CT26 cells were enhanced under the IL-6-deficient condition in vivo and by IFN-γ stimulation in vitro. Finally, we confirmed that in vivo injection of an anti-PD-L1 antibody or a Toll-like receptor 3 ligand, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, effectively inhibited tumorigenesis under the IL-6-deficient condition. Based on these findings, we speculate that a lack of IL-6 produced in tumor-bearing host augments induction of antitumor effector T cells and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo, suggesting that IL-6 signaling may be a promising target for the development of effective cancer immunotherapies. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Increased CD4(+) T cell co-inhibitory immune receptor CEACAM1 in neonatal sepsis and soluble-CEACAM1 in meningococcal sepsis: a role in sepsis-associated immune suppression?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Sharma, D.B.; Estevao, S.; Emonts, M.; Rook, D.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Goudoever, J.B. van; Hartwig, N.G.

    2013-01-01

    The co-inhibitory immune receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell-adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) and its self-ligand CEACAM1 can suppress T cell function. Suppression of T cell function in sepsis is well documented. Late-onset neonatal sepsis in VLBW-infants was associated with an increased

  7. Increased CD4+ T Cell Co-Inhibitory Immune Receptor CEACAM1 in Neonatal Sepsis and Soluble-CEACAM1 in Meningococcal Sepsis: A Role in Sepsis-Associated Immune Suppression?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Flier (Michiel); D.B. Sharma (Dyana); S. Estevão (Silvia); M. Emonts (Marieke); D. Rook (Denise); J.A. Hazelzet (Jan); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans); N.G. Hartwig (Nico)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe co-inhibitory immune receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell-adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) and its self-ligand CEACAM1 can suppress T cell function. Suppression of T cell function in sepsis is well documented. Late-onset neonatal sepsis in VLBW-infants was associated with an

  8. Incorporation of Immune Checkpoint Blockade into Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells (CAR-Ts: Combination or Built-In CAR-T

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    Dok Hyun Yoon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy represents the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved gene therapy and these engineered cells function with unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of refractory CD19 positive hematologic malignancies. CAR translation to solid tumors is also being actively investigated; however, efficacy to date has been variable due to tumor-evolved mechanisms that inhibit local immune cell activity. To bolster the potency of CAR-T cells, modulation of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment with immune-checkpoint blockade is a promising strategy. The impact of this approach on hematological malignancies is in its infancy, and in this review we discuss CAR-T cells and their synergy with immune-checkpoint blockade.

  9. Safe adoptive transfer of virus-specific T-cell immunity for the treatment of systemic adenovirus infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtinger, Tobias; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Richard, Celine; Lion, Thomas; Fuhrer, Monika; Hamprecht, Klaus; Handgretinger, Rupert; Peters, Christina; Schuster, Friedhelm R; Beck, Robert; Schumm, Michael; Lotfi, Ramin; Jahn, Gerhard; Lang, Peter

    2006-07-01

    During periods of immunosuppression, such as postallogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), patients are at significant risk for severe viral infections. Human adenovirus (HAdV) infection is a serious complication post-SCT, especially in children. Virus-specific T cells are essential for the clearance of HAdV, as antiviral chemotherapy has revealed limited success. We present feasibility data for a new treatment option using virus-specific donor T cells for adoptive transfer of immunity to patients with HAdV-infection/reactivation. Virus-specific donor T cells were isolated and infused into nine children with systemic HAdV infection after SCT. Isolation was based on gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion after short in vitro stimulation with viral antigen, resulting in a combination of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. 1.2-50 x 10(3)/kg T cells were infused for adoptive transfer. Isolated cells showed high specificity and markedly reduced alloreactivity in vitro. Adoptive transfer of HAdV-specific immunity was successful in five of six evaluable patients, documented by a dose-independent and sustained in vivo expansion of HAdV-specific T cells, associated with a durable clearance/decrease of viral copies. T-cell infusion was well tolerated in all nine patients, except one case with graft-versus-host disease II of the skin. In conclusion, induction of a specific T-cell response through adoptive transfer was feasible and effective. When performed early in the course of infection, adoptive T-cell transfer may protect from HAdV-related complications.

  10. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Yasuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT, in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1.

  11. CD8 T Cells in Innate Immune Responses: Using STAT4-Dependent but Antigen-Independent Pathways to Gamma Interferon during Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ramirez, Jenny E.; Tarrio, Margarite L.; Kim, Kwangsin; Demers, Delia A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ), with antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions, can be produced by T cells following stimulation through their T cell receptors (TCRs) for antigen. The innate cytokines type 1 IFNs and interleukin-12 (IL-12) can also stimulate IFN-γ production by natural killer (NK) but not naive T cells. High basal expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4), used by type 1 IFN and IL-12 to induce IFN-γ as well as CD25, contributes to the NK cell responses. During acute viral infections, antigen-specific CD8 T cells are stimulated to express elevated STAT4 and respond to the innate factors with IFN-γ production. Little is known about the requirements for cytokine compared to TCR stimulation. Primary infections of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) demonstrated that although the elicited antigen-specific CD8 T cells acquired STAT4-dependent innate cytokine responsiveness for IFN-γ and CD25 induction ex vivo, TCR stimulation induced these through STAT4-independent pathways. During secondary infections, LCMV-immune CD8 T cells had STAT4-dependent IFN-γ expression at times of innate cytokine induction but subsequently expanded through STAT4-independent pathways. At times of innate cytokine responses during infection with the antigen-distinct murine cytomegalovirus virus (MCMV), NK and LCMV-immune CD8 T cells both had activation of pSTAT4 and IFN-γ. The T cell IFN-γ response was STAT4 and IL-12 dependent, but antigen-dependent expansion was absent. By dissecting requirements for STAT4 and antigen, this work provides novel insights into the endogenous regulation of cytokine and proliferative responses and demonstrates conditioning of innate immunity by experience. PMID:25336459

  12. Identification of immediate early gene products of bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1) as dominant antigens recognized by CD8 T cells in immune cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jane; MacHugh, Niall D; Sheldrake, Tara; Nielsen, Morten; Morrison, W Ivan

    2017-07-01

    In common with other herpes viruses, bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1) induces strong virus-specific CD8 T-cell responses. However, there is a paucity of information on the antigenic specificity of the responding T-cells. The development of a system to generate virus-specific CD8 T-cell lines from BHV-1-immune cattle, employing Theileria-transformed cell lines for antigen presentation, has enabled us to address this issue. Use of this system allowed the study to screen for CD8 T-cell antigens that are efficiently presented on the surface of virus-infected cells. Screening of a panel of 16 candidate viral gene products with CD8 T-cell lines from 3 BHV-1-immune cattle of defined MHC genotypes identified 4 antigens, including 3 immediate early (IE) gene products (ICP4, ICP22 and Circ) and a tegument protein (UL49). Identification of the MHC restriction specificities revealed that the antigens were presented by two or three class I MHC alleles in each animal. Six CD8 T-cell epitopes were identified in the three IE proteins by screening of synthetic peptides. Use of an algorithm (NetMHCpan) that predicts the peptide-binding characteristics of restricting MHC alleles confirmed and, in some cases refined, the identity of the epitopes. Analyses of the epitope specificity of the CD8 T-cell lines showed that a large component of the response is directed against these IE epitopes. The results indicate that these IE gene products are dominant targets of the CD8 T-cell response in BHV-I-immune cattle and hence are prime-candidate antigens for the generation of a subunit vaccine.

  13. Defining T-cell-mediated immune responses in rotavirus-infected juvenile rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, K; McNeal, M M; Choi, A; Cole, M J; Ramesh, G; Alvarez, X; Aye, P P; Bohm, R P; Mohamadzadeh, M; Ward, R L

    2004-10-01

    The appearance of virus-specific CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T lymphocytes in peripheral blood of captive juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) was observed following rotavirus infection. These cell-mediated immune responses were measured following experimental or natural infection after rotavirus was isolated from stool specimens of asymptomatic animals. The virus isolated was a new strain of simian rotavirus that we named TUCH (for Tulane University and Cincinnati Children's Hospital). Restimulation of peripheral T lymphocytes by inactivated double- or triple-layered TUCH rotavirus particles containing either VP6 or VP4 and VP7 on their respective surfaces resulted in increased quantities of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-12 in cell culture supernatants. Recall responses to rotavirus by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were associated with accumulation of intracellular IL-6 and gamma interferon. Antigen presentation of TUCH rotavirus to lymphocytes was mediated via differentiated cultures of monocyte-derived dendritic (HLA-DR(+)) cells. This is the first report demonstrating cell-mediated immune responses to rotavirus in nonhuman primates. Further exploration of rhesus macaques in vaccine trials with human rotavirus vaccine candidates is the major objective of future studies.

  14. Effector Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Immune Homeostasis Depend on the Transcription Factor Myb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sheila; D'Amico, Angela; Cretney, Erika; Liao, Yang; Tellier, Julie; Bruggeman, Christine; Almeida, Francisca F; Leahy, Jamie; Belz, Gabrielle T; Smyth, Gordon K; Shi, Wei; Nutt, Stephen L

    2017-01-17

    FoxP3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining immune homeostasis. Activated Treg cells undergo further differentiation into an effector state that highly expresses genes critical for Treg cell function, although how this process is coordinated on a transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that mice lacking the transcription factor Myb in Treg cells succumbed to a multi-organ inflammatory disease. Myb was specifically expressed in, and required for the differentiation of, thymus-derived effector Treg cells. The combination of transcriptome and genomic footprint analyses revealed that Myb directly regulated a large proportion of the gene expression specific to effector Treg cells, identifying Myb as a critical component of the gene regulatory network controlling effector Treg cell differentiation and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulatory T cells, maternal-foetal immune tolerance and recurrent miscarriage: new therapeutic challenging opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Melnychuk, Taisiia; Gris, Josep Maria

    2015-03-15

    Because maternal alloreactive lymphocytes are not depleted during pregnancy, local and/or systemic mechanisms have to play a key role in altering the maternal immune response. Peripheral T regulatory cells (pTregs) at the maternal-foetal interface are necessary in situ to prevent early abortion, but only those pTregs that have been previously exposed to paternal alloantigens. It has been showed that pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) (Foxp3Tregs) cells with foetal specificity. Interestingly, after delivery, foetal-specific pTregs persist at elevated levels, maintain tolerance to pre-existing foetal antigen, and rapidly re-accumulate during subsequent pregnancy. pTreg up-regulation could be hypothesized as a possible future therapeutic strategy in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Divergent Response Profile in Activated Cord Blood T cells from First-born Child Implies Birth-order-associated in Utero Immune Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Kragh, Marie; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Wolsk, Helene Mygind; Bisgaard, Hans Flinker; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2016-01-01

    Background: First-born children are at higher risk for development of a range of immune-mediated diseases. The underlying mechanism of ‘birth-order-effects’ on disease risk is largely unknown, but in utero programming of the child's immune system may play a role. Objective: We studied the association between birth-order and the functional response of stimulated cord blood T cells. Method: Purified cord blood T cells were polyclonally activated with anti-CD3/CD28-coated beads in a subgroup of ...

  17. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  18. The immune checkpoint regulator PD-L1 is a specific target for naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Shamaila; Andersen, Gitte Holmen; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    and - to lesser extents - healthy donors, by means of ELISPOT assays. PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells appeared to be TH17 cells exhibiting an effector T-cell cytokine profile. Hence, PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells released interferon γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in response...

  19. T-cell immune function in tumor, skin, and peripheral blood of advanced stage melanoma patients: implications for immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin, Esther P. M.; Konijnenberg, Debby; Krebbers, Gabrielle; Mallo, Henk; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Bos, Jan D.; Nieweg, Omgo E.; Kroon, Bin B. R.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Vyth-Dreese, Florry A.; Luiten, Rosalie M.

    2011-01-01

    To predict the potential antitumor effect of antigen-specific T cells in melanoma patients, we investigated T-cell effector function in relation to tumor-escape mechanisms. CD8(+) T cells isolated from tumor, adjacent normal skin, and peripheral blood of 17 HLA-A2(+) patients with advanced-stage

  20. Systemic Immune-Inflammation Index and Circulating T-Cell Immune Index Predict Outcomes in High-Risk Acral Melanoma Patients Treated with High-Dose Interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available High-dose interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b improves the survival of patients with high-risk melanoma. We aimed to identify baseline peripheral blood biomarkers to predict the outcome of acral melanoma patients treated with IFN-α-2b. Pretreatment baseline parameters and clinical data were assessed in 226 patients with acral melanoma. Relapse-free survival (RFS and overall survival (OS were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate Cox regression analyses were applied after adjusting for stage, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and ulceration. Univariate analysis showed that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥2.35, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥129, systemic immune-inflammation index (SII ≥615 × 109/l, and elevated LDH were significantly associated with poor RFS and OS. The SII is calculated as follows: platelet count × neutrophil count/lymphocyte count. On multivariate analysis, the SII was associated with RFS [hazard ratio (HR=1.661, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.066-2.586, P=.025] and OS (HR=2.071, 95% CI: 1.204-3.564, P=.009. Additionally, we developed a novel circulating T-cell immune index (CTII calculated as follows: cytotoxic T lymphocytes/(CD4+ regulatory T cells × CD8+ regulatory T cells. On univariate analysis, the CTII was associated with OS (HR=1.73, 95% CI: 1.01-2.94, P=.044. The SII and CTII might serve as prognostic indicators in acral melanoma patients treated with IFN-α-2b. The indexes are easily obtainable via routine tests in clinical practice.

  1. A Unique Subset of γδ T Cells Expands and Produces IL-10 in Patients with Naturally Acquired Immunity against Falciparum Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyo Taniguchi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although expansions in γδ T cell populations are known to occur in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum, the role of these cells in people with naturally acquired immunity against P. falciparum who live in malaria-endemic areas is poorly understood. We used a cross-sectional survey to investigate the role of peripheral blood γδ T cells in people living in Lao People’s Democratic Republic, a malaria-endemic area. We found that the proportion of non-Vγ9 γδ T cells was higher in non-hospitalized uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients (UMPs from this region. Notably, we found that the non-Vγ9 γδ T cells in the peripheral blood of UMPs and negative controls from this region had the potential to expand and produce IL-10 and interferon-γ when cultured in the presence of IL-2 and/or crude P. falciparum antigens for 10 days. Furthermore, these cells were associated with plasma interleukin 10 (IL-10, which was elevated in UMPs. This is the first report demonstrating that, in UMPs living in a malaria-endemic area, a γδ T cell subset, the non-Vγ9 γδT cells, expands and produces IL-10. These results contribute to understanding of the mechanisms of naturally acquired immunity against P. falciparum.

  2. Preferential effects of leptin on CD4 T cells in central and peripheral immune system are critically linked to the expression of leptin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Yong; Lim, Ju Hyun [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Won [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Arts and Sciences (S.W.C), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 18450 (United States); Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Seong-Tae [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon; Cho, You Sook [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-600 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Eunyoung, E-mail: chun.eunyoung@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Young, E-mail: thylee@med.skku.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-09

    Leptin can enhance thymopoiesis and modulate the T-cell immune response. However, it remains controversial whether these effects correlate with the expression of leptin receptor, ObR. We herein addressed this issue by using in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems. Leptin treatment in both ob/ob mice and normal young mice induced increases of CD4 SP thymocytes in thymus and CD4 T cells in the periphery. Interestingly, expression of the long form ObR was significantly restricted to DN, DP and CD4 SP, but not CD8 SP thymocytes. Moreover, in the reaggregated DP thymocyte cultures with leptin plus TSCs, leptin profoundly induced differentiation of CD4 SP but not CD8 SP thymocytes, suggesting that the effects of leptin on thymocyte differentiation might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor in developing thymocytes. Surprisingly, ObR expression was markedly higher in peripheral CD4 T cells than that in CD8 T cells. Furthermore, leptin treatment with or without IL-2 and PHA had preferential effects on cell proliferation of CD4 T cells compared to that of CD8 T cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the effects of leptin on differentiation and proliferation of CD4 T cells might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor.

  3. A novel mechanism of immune regulation: interferon-γ regulates retention of CD4+ T cells during delayed type hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Tim J; Borron, Paul J; Dudler, Lisbeth; Hay, John B; Young, Alan J

    2005-01-01

    The local immune response is characterized by an increase in the rate of entry of lymphocytes from the blood into regional lymph nodes and changes in the output of cells in lymph. While significant data are available regarding the role of inflammation-induced vascular adhesion processes in regulating lymphocyte entry into inflamed tissues and lymph nodes, relatively little is known about the molecular processes governing lymphocyte exit into efferent lymph. We have defined a novel role for lymphatic endothelial cells in the regulation of lymphocyte exit during a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to mycobacterial purified protein derivative (PPD). Soluble, pro-adhesive factors were identified in efferent lymph concomitant with reduced lymphocyte output in lymph, which significantly increased lymphocyte binding to lymphatic endothelial cells. While all lymphocyte subsets were retained, CD4+ T cells appeared less susceptible than others. Among a panel of cytokines in inflammatory lymph plasma, interferon (IFN)-γ alone appeared responsible for this retention. In vitro adhesion assays using physiological levels of IFN-γ confirmed the interaction between recirculating lymphocytes and lymphatic endothelium. These data demonstrate a new level of immune regulation, whereby the exit of recirculating lymphocytes from lymph nodes is selectively and sequentially regulated by cytokines in a manner equally as complex as lymphocyte recruitment. PMID:16162267

  4. Augmentation of autologous T cell reactivity with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts by Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, RuiKun; Li, Hongying; Messer, Karen; Lane, Thomas A.; Zhou, Jiehua; Ball, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether TNF-α, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7/8 agonist resiquimod (R848), the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their combinations can enhance autologous AML-reactive T cell generation in an in vitro culture. AML peripheral blood or bone marrow mononuclear cells were cultured in medium supplemented with GM-CSF/IL-4 to induce dendritic cell (DC) differentiation of AML blasts (AML-DC). The impact of TNF-α, LPS, R848 and their combinations on AML-DC cultures was analyzed. Significantly enhanced CD80, CD40, CD83, CD54, HLADR and CD86 expression of AML cells was observed by addition of TNF-α, LPS, R848 alone or combinations. Induced CD80 expression of AML cells was significantly higher through the combination of TNF-α, LPS and R848 (T + L + R) than that by T alone. CTL induced from T + L + R, T + R, T + L, L + R and R, but not T, L alone stimulated cultures showed significantly higher IFN-γ release than the medium control in response to autologous AML cells. IFN-γ release by T + L + R was significantly higher than T or L alone, and T + R was significantly higher than T alone. CTL generated from T + L + R, T + L, T + R, L + R and L alone exerted significantly higher AML cell killing than medium control. AML cell killing by T + L + R and T + R was significantly higher than T or R alone. These results indicate that the combination of T + L + R induces a significantly enhanced antigen presentation effect of AML-DC. We speculate that the complementary effects of reagent combinations may better address the heterogeneity of responses to any single agent in AML cells from different patients. PMID:25795133

  5. Intratumoral interleukin-21 increases antitumor immunity, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cell density and activity, and enlarges draining lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Henrik; Galsgaard, Elisabeth D; Bartholomaeussen, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is a novel cytokine in clinical development for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of subcutaneous and intratumoral (IT) administration of IL-21 protein in two syngeneic mouse tumor models, RenCa renal cell carcinoma and B16 melanoma......, and investigated the mechanisms by which IL-21 enhances CD8 T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We found that in comparison to subcutaneous administration, IT administration of IL-21 more potently inhibited tumor growth and increased survival. This correlated with increased densities of tumor-infiltrating CD8...... and CD4CD25 T cells, but not CD4CD25FoxP3 T cells. Furthermore, IT administration of IL-21 increased degranulation, and expression of interferon-gamma and granzyme B in tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells. Tumors injected with IL-21 grew slower than contralateral tumors, suggesting that the increased efficacy...

  6. Intratumoral Interleukin-21 Increases Antitumor Immunity, Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T-cell Density and Activity, and Enlarges Draining Lymph Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, H.; Galsgaard, E.D.; Bartholomaeussen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is a novel cytokine in clinical development for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of subcutaneous and intratumoral (IT) administration of IL-21 protein in two syngeneic mouse tumor models, RenCa renal cell carcinoma and B16 melanoma......, and investigated the mechanisms by which IL-21 enhances CD8(+) T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We found that in comparison to subcutaneous administration, IT administration of IL-21 more potently inhibited tumor growth and increased survival. This correlated with increased densities of tumor-infiltrating CD8......(+) and CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells, but not CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T cells. Furthermore, IT administration of IL-21 increased degranulation, and expression of interferon-gamma and granzyme B in tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells. Tumors injected with IL-21 grew slower than contralateral tumors, suggesting...

  7. Targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 costimulation differentially controls immune synapses and function of human regulatory and conventional T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahzli Dilek

    Full Text Available CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, the three identified ligands for CD80/86, are pivotal positive and negative costimulatory molecules that, among other functions, control T cell motility and formation of immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs. What remains incompletely understood is how CD28 leads to the activation of effector T cells (Teff but inhibition of suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs, while CTLA-4 and PD-L1 inhibit Teff function but are crucial for the suppressive function of Tregs. Using alloreactive human T cells and blocking antibodies, we show here by live cell dynamic microscopy that CD28, CTLA-4, and PD-L1 differentially control velocity, motility and immune synapse formation in activated Teff versus Tregs. Selectively antagonizing CD28 costimulation increased Treg dwell time with APCs and induced calcium mobilization which translated in increased Treg suppressive activity, in contrast with the dampening effect on Teff responses. The increase in Treg suppressive activity after CD28 blockade was also confirmed with polyclonal Tregs. Whereas CTLA-4 played a critical role in Teff by reversing TCR-induced STOP signals, it failed to affect motility in Tregs but was essential for formation of the Treg immune synapse. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for PD-L1-CD80 interactions in suppressing motility specifically in Tregs. Thus, our findings reveal that the three identified ligands of CD80/86, CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, differentially control immune synapse formation and function of the human Teff and Treg cells analyzed here. Individually targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 might therefore represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat immune disorders where effector and regulatory T cell functions need to be differentially targeted.

  8. Importance of reciprocal balance of T cell immunity in Mycobacterium abscessus complex lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Young Kim

    Full Text Available Little is known about the nature of the host immune response to Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABC infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether alterations in serum immunomolecule levels after treating MABC lung disease patients with antibiotics can reflect the disease-associated characteristics.A total of 22 immunomolecules in 24 MABC lung disease patients before and after antibiotic therapy were quantitatively analyzed using a multiplex bead-based system.In general, the pre-treatment levels of T helper type 1 (Th1-related cytokines, i.e., interferon (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-12, and Th2-related cytokines, i.e., IL-4 and IL-13, were significantly decreased in patients compared with control subjects. In contrast, the pre-treatment levels of Th17-related cytokines, i.e., IL-17 and IL-23, were significantly increased in MABC patients. Interestingly, significantly higher levels of IFN-γ-induced protein (IP-10 and monokine induced by IFN-γ protein (MIG were detected in patients with failure of sputum conversion at post-treatment compared to patients with successful sputum conversion.Reduced Th1 and Th2 responses and enhanced Th17 responses in patients may perpetuate MABC lung disease, and the immunomolecules IP-10 and MIG, induced through IFN-γ, may serve as key markers for indicating the treatment outcome.

  9. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Basset

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (restimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP, the adjuvant (LT-R192G or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  10. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Fatou; Martino, Cyrille Di; Bon, Fabienne; Charpilienne, Annie; Cachia, Claire; Poncet, Didier; Clements, John D.; Basset, Christelle; Kohli, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP) and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (re)stimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP), the adjuvant (LT-R192G) or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols. PMID:22069670

  11. Unexpected modulation of recall B and T cell responses after immunization with rotavirus-like particles in the presence of LT-R192G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Fatou; Martino, Cyrille Di; Bon, Fabienne; Charpilienne, Annie; Cachia, Claire; Poncet, Didier; Clements, John D; Basset, Christelle; Kohli, Evelyne

    2010-08-01

    LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP) and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) helper T cells after in vitro (re)stimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP), the adjuvant (LT-R192G) or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) nor Foxp3(+) T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) and Foxp3(+) T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  12. Natural CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cell-secreted exosomes capable of suppressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immunity against B16 melanoma

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    Xie, Yufeng; Zhang, Xueshu; Zhao, Tuo; Li, Wei; Xiang, Jim, E-mail: jim.xiang@saskcancer.ca

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cells secrete tolerogenic exosomes. •CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cell-derived exosomes exhibit immunosuppressive effect. •CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cell-derived exosomes inhibit antitumor immunity. -- Abstract: Natural CD4{sup +}25{sup +} and CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T (Tr) cells have been shown to inhibit autoimmune diseases. Immune cells secrete exosomes (EXOs), which are crucial for immune regulation. However, immunomodulatory effect of natural Tr cell-secreted EXOs is unknown. In this study, we purified natural CD8{sup +}25{sup +} Tr cells from C57BL/6 mouse naive CD8{sup +} T cells, and in vitro amplified them with CD3/CD28 beads. EXOs (EXO{sub Tr}) were purified from Tr cell’s culture supernatants by differential ultracentrifugation and analyzed by electron microscopy, Western blot and flow cytometry. Our data showed that EXO{sub Tr} had a “saucer” or round shape with 50–100 nm in diameter, contained EXO-associated markers LAMP-1 and CD9, and expressed natural Tr cell markers CD25 and GITR. To assess immunomodulatory effect, we i.v. immunized C57BL/6 mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed DCs (DC{sub OVA}) plus Tr cells or EXO{sub Tr}, and then assessed OVA-specific CD8{sup +} T cell responses using PE-H-2K{sup b}/OVA tetramer and FITC-anti-CD8 antibody staining by flow cytometry and antitumor immunity in immunized mice with challenge of OVA-expressing BL6–10{sub OVA} melanoma cells. We demonstrated that DC{sub OVA}-stimulated CD8{sup +} T cell responses and protective antitumor immunity significantly dropped from 2.52% to 1.08% and 1.81% (p < 0.05), and from 8/8 to 2/8 and 5/8 mice DC{sub OVA} (p < 0.05) in immunized mice with co-injection of Tr cells and EXO{sub Tr}, respectively. Our results indicate that natural CD8{sup +}25{sup +} Tr cell-released EXOs, alike CD8{sup +}25{sup +} Tr cells, can inhibit CD8{sup +} T cell responses and antitumor immunity. Therefore, EXOs derived from

  13. Tenofovir treatment augments anti-viral immunity against drug-resistant SIV challenge in chronically infected rhesus macaques

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    Marx Preston

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of drug-resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a major obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected patients. Whether antiviral immunity can augment ART by suppressing replication of drug-resistant HIV-1 in humans is not well understood, but can be explored in non-human primates infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV. Rhesus macaques infected with live, attenuated SIV develop robust SIV-specific immune responses but remain viremic, often at low levels, for periods of months to years, thus providing a model in which to evaluate the contribution of antiviral immunity to drug efficacy. To investigate the extent to which SIV-specific immune responses augment suppression of drug-resistant SIV, rhesus macaques infected with live, attenuated SIVmac239Δnef were treated with the reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitor tenofovir, and then challenged with pathogenic SIVmac055, which has a five-fold reduced sensitivity to tenofovir. Results Replication of SIVmac055 was detected in untreated macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef, and in tenofovir-treated, naïve control macaques. The majority of macaques infected with SIVmac055 experienced high levels of plasma viremia, rapid CD4+ T cell loss and clinical disease progression. By comparison, macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef and treated with tenofovir showed no evidence of replicating SIVmac055 in plasma using allele-specific real-time PCR assays with a limit of sensitivity of 50 SIV RNA copies/ml plasma. These animals remained clinically healthy with stable CD4+ T cell counts during three years of follow-up. Both the tenofovir-treated and untreated macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef had antibody responses to SIV gp130 and p27 antigens and SIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses prior to SIVmac055 challenge, but only those animals receiving concurrent treatment with tenofovir resisted infection with SIVmac055. Conclusion

  14. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

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    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Wang, Chaoyuan [College of Life Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Su, Hanwen, E-mail: suhanwen-1@163.com [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Meixian, E-mail: xiangmeixian99@163.com [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China)

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  15. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-09-01

    CCR10 and CCL27 make up the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate the migration, maintenance, or both of skin T cells and is suggested to be therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. We sought to determine the expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into the potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10 knockout/enhanced green fluorescent protein knockin mice, we assessed the expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens, and autoreactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10 knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10 knockout mice the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmania species infection in the skin. CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. T Cells in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-09-25

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4⁺ and CD8α⁺ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4⁺ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α⁺, CD4⁺ T-cells and sIgM⁺ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells.

  17. Acyclovir Therapy Reduces the CD4+ T Cell Response against the Immunodominant pp65 Protein from Cytomegalovirus in Immune Competent Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Pachnio

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infects the majority of the global population and leads to the development of a strong virus-specific immune response. The CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune response can comprise between 10 and 50% of the T cell pool within peripheral blood and there is concern that this may impair immunity to other pathogens. Elderly individuals with the highest magnitude of CMV-specific immune response have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of mortality and there is increasing interest in interventions that may serve to moderate this. Acyclovir is an anti-viral drug with activity against a range of herpes viruses and is used as long term treatment to suppress reactivation of herpes simplex virus. We studied the immune response to CMV in patients who were taking acyclovir to assess if therapy could be used to suppress the CMV-specific immune response. The T cell reactivity against the immunodominant late viral protein pp65 was reduced by 53% in people who were taking acyclovir. This effect was seen within one year of therapy and was observed primarily within the CD4+ response. Acyclovir treatment only modestly influenced the immune response to the IE-1 target protein. These data show that low dose acyclovir treatment has the potential to modulate components of the T cell response to CMV antigen proteins and indicate that anti-viral drugs should be further investigated as a means to reduce the magnitude of CMV-specific immune response and potentially improve overall immune function.

  18. Bacteria modulate the CD8+ T cell epitope repertoire of host cytosol-exposed proteins to manipulate the host immune response.

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    Yaakov Maman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The main adaptive immune response to bacteria is mediated by B cells and CD4+ T-cells. However, some bacterial proteins reach the cytosol of host cells and are exposed to the host CD8+ T-cells response. Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria can translocate proteins to the cytosol through type III and IV secretion and ESX-1 systems, respectively. The translocated proteins are often essential for the bacterium survival. Once injected, these proteins can be degraded and presented on MHC-I molecules to CD8+ T-cells. The CD8+ T-cells, in turn, can induce cell death and destroy the bacteria's habitat. In viruses, escape mutations arise to avoid this detection. The accumulation of escape mutations in bacteria has never been systematically studied. We show for the first time that such mutations are systematically present in most bacteria tested. We combine multiple bioinformatic algorithms to compute CD8+ T-cell epitope libraries of bacteria with secretion systems that translocate proteins to the host cytosol. In all bacteria tested, proteins not translocated to the cytosol show no escape mutations in their CD8+ T-cell epitopes. However, proteins translocated to the cytosol show clear escape mutations and have low epitope densities for most tested HLA alleles. The low epitope densities suggest that bacteria, like viruses, are evolutionarily selected to ensure their survival in the presence of CD8+ T-cells. In contrast with most other translocated proteins examined, Pseudomonas aeruginosa's ExoU, which ultimately induces host cell death, was found to have high epitope density. This finding suggests a novel mechanism for the manipulation of CD8+ T-cells by pathogens. The ExoU effector may have evolved to maintain high epitope density enabling it to efficiently induce CD8+ T-cell mediated cell death. These results were tested using multiple epitope prediction algorithms, and were found to be consistent for most proteins tested.

  19. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune-regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S

    2016-01-01

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with cross-linking. These mechanisms may also tar...

  20. Long-term central and effector SHIV-specific memory T cell responses elicited after a single immunization with a novel lentivector DNA vaccine.

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    Géraldine Arrode-Brusés

    Full Text Available Prevention of HIV acquisition and replication requires long lasting and effective immunity. Given the state of HIV vaccine development, innovative vectors and immunization strategies are urgently needed to generate safe and efficacious HIV vaccines. Here, we developed a novel lentivirus-based DNA vector that does not integrate in the host genome and undergoes a single-cycle of replication. Viral proteins are constitutively expressed under the control of Tat-independent LTR promoter from goat lentivirus. We immunized six macaques once only with CAL-SHIV-IN- DNA using combined intramuscular and intradermal injections plus electroporation. Antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored for 47 weeks post-immunization (PI. PBMCs were assessed directly ex vivo or after 6 and 12 days of in vitro culture using antigenic and/or homeostatic proliferation. IFN-γ ELISPOT was used to measure immediate cytokine secretion from antigen specific effector cells and from memory precursors with high proliferative capacity (PHPC. The memory phenotype and functions (proliferation, cytokine expression, lytic content of specific T cells were tested using multiparametric FACS-based assays. All immunized macaques developed lasting peripheral CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses mainly against Gag and Nef antigens. During the primary expansion phase, immediate effector cells as well as increasing numbers of proliferating cells with limited effector functions were detected which expressed markers of effector (EM and central (CM memory phenotypes. These responses contracted but then reemerged later in absence of antigen boost. Strong PHPC responses comprising vaccine-specific CM and EM T cells that readily expanded and acquired immediate effector functions were detected at 40/47 weeks PI. Altogether, our study demonstrated that a single immunization with a replication-limited DNA vaccine elicited persistent vaccine-specific CM and EM CD8+ and CD4+ T cells with immediate and

  1. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

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    Maria Abildgaard Steffensen

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii. To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  2. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  3. Age-related changes in immune reactivity: The influence of intrinsic defects and of a changed composition of the CD4+ T cell compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, E.W.P.; Nagelkerken, L.

    1992-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by a decline in immune reactivity which to a major extent can be attributed to changes at the level of the regulatory CD4+ T cells. In addition to evidence pointing to intrinsic defects, resulting in improper responsiveness of lymphocytes, it is likely that many age-related

  4. INFLUENCE OF AGING ON ANTIBODY-FORMATION INVIVO AFTER IMMUNIZATION WITH THE PRIMARY T-CELL DEPENDENT ANTIGEN HELIX-POMATIA HEMOCYANIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGREEF, GE; KALLENBERG, CGM; VANSTAALDUINEN, GJ; REMARQUE, EJ; TJANDRA, YI; HIJMANS, W

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo antibody response to the primary T-cell dependent antigen Helix pomatia Haemocyanin (HPH) was studied, in order to detect the possible presence of a humoral immune deficiency in ageing. The IgG subclass distribution of the specific antibodies was also determined. In order to define a

  5. MHC class II-dependent basophil-CD4(+) T cell interactions promote T(H)2 cytokine-dependent immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrigoue, J.G.; Saenz, S.A.; Siracusa, M.C.; Allenspach, E.J.; Taylor, B.C.; Giacomin, P.; Nair, M.G.; Du, Y.R.; Zaph, C.; Rooijen, van N.; Comeau, M.R.; Pearce, E.J.; Laufer, T.M.; Artis, D.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells can prime naive CD4(+) T cells; however, here we demonstrate that dendritic cell-mediated priming was insufficient for the development of T helper type 2 cell-dependent immunity. We identify basophils as a dominant cell population that coexpressed major histocompatibility complex

  6. Intra-tumoral production of IL18, but not IL12, by TCR-engineered T cells is non-toxic and counteracts immune evasion of solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kunert (Andre); M. Chmielewski (Markus); R. Wijers (Rebecca); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); H. Abken (Hinrich); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAdoptive therapy with engineered T cells shows promising results in treating patients with malignant disease, but is challenged by incomplete responses and tumor recurrences. Here, we aimed to direct the tumor microenvironment in favor of a successful immune response by local secretion

  7. T Cell Immunity to Varicella-Zoster Virus in the Setting of Advanced HIV and Multiple Varicella-Zoster Virus Recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender Ignacio, Rachel A; Ramchandani, Meena S; Laing, Kerry J; Johnston, Christine M; Koelle, David M

    A woman presented with at least four manifestations of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, including central nervous system vasculitis, during her first 2 years of HIV infection. We evaluated her CD4 T cell responses to VZV given the infrequency with which multiple recurrences of VZV occurred, especially following immune reconstitution on antiretroviral therapy.

  8. Costimulatory ligand CD70 allows induction of CD8+ T-cell immunity by immature dendritic cells in a vaccination setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Anna M.; Xiao, Yanling; Peperzak, Victor; Naik, Shalin H.; Borst, Jannie

    2009-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) as anticancer vaccines holds promise for therapy but requires optimization. We have explored the potential of costimulatory ligand CD70 to boost the capacity of DCs to evoke effective CD8(+) T-cell immunity. We show that immature conventional DCs, when endowed with

  9. Clonal Immune Responses of Mycobacterium-Specific γδ T Cells in Tuberculous and Non-Tuberculous Tissues during M. tuberculosis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liyou; Shen, Yun; Du, George; Zhou, Keyuan; Wang, Richard; Chen, Zheng W.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that unvaccinated macaques infected with large-dose M.tuberculosis(Mtb) exhibited delays for pulmonary trafficking of Ag-specific αβ and γδ T effector cells, and developed severe lung tuberculosis(TB) and “secondary” Mtb infection in remote organs such as liver and kidney. Despite delays in lungs, local immunity in remote organs may accumulate since progressive immune activation after pulmonary Mtb infection may allow IFNγ-producing γδ T cells to adequately develop and traffic to lately-infected remote organs. As initial efforts to test this hypothesis, we comparatively examined TCR repertoire/clonality, tissue trafficking and effector function of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in lung with severe TB and in liver/kidney without apparent TB. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized conventional infection-immunity approaches in macaque TB model, and employed our decades-long expertise for TCR repertoire analyses. TCR repertoires in Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell subpopulation were broad during primary Mtb infection as most TCR clones found in lymphoid system, lung, kidney and liver were distinct. Polyclonally-expanded Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell clones from lymphoid tissues appeared to distribute and localize in lung TB granuloms at the endpoint after Mtb infection by aerosol. Interestingly, some TCR clones appeared to be more predominant than others in lymphocytes from liver or kidney without apparent TB lesions. TCR CDR3 spetratyping revealed such clonal dominance, and the clonal dominance of expanded Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in kidney/liver tissues was associated with undetectable or low-level TB burdens. Furthermore, Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from tissue compartments could mount effector function for producing anti-mycobacterium cytokine. Conclusion We were the first to demonstrate clonal immune responses of mycobacterium-specific Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in the lymphoid system, heavily-infected lungs and lately subtly-infected kidneys or livers during primary Mtb infection

  10. Interleukin 27R regulates CD4+ T cell phenotype and impacts protective immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Egidio; Fountain, Jeffrey J; Liao, Mingfeng; Tighe, Michael; Reiley, William W; Lai, Rachel P; Meintjes, Graeme; Pearl, John E; Chen, Xinchun; Zak, Daniel E; Thompson, Ethan G; Aderem, Alan; Ghilardi, Nico; Solache, Alejandra; McKinstry, K Kai; Strutt, Tara M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Swain, Susan L; Cooper, Andrea M

    2015-08-24

    CD4+ T cells mediate protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb); however, the phenotype of protective T cells is undefined, thereby confounding vaccination efforts. IL-27 is highly expressed during human tuberculosis (TB), and absence of IL-27R (Il27ra) specifically on T cells results in increased protection. IL-27R deficiency during chronic Mtb infection does not impact antigen-specific CD4+ T cell number but maintains programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD69, and CD127 expression while reducing T-bet and killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) expression. Furthermore, T-bet haploinsufficiency results in failure to generate KLRG1+, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, and in improved protection. T cells in Il27ra(-/-) mice accumulate preferentially in the lung parenchyma within close proximity to Mtb, and antigen-specific CD4+ T cells lacking IL-27R are intrinsically more fit than intact T cells and maintain IL-2 production. Improved fitness of IL-27R-deficient T cells is not associated with increased proliferation but with decreased expression of cell death-associated markers. Therefore, during Mtb infection, IL-27R acts intrinsically on T cells to limit protection and reduce fitness, whereas the IL-27R-deficient environment alters the phenotype and location of T cells. The significant expression of IL-27 in TB and the negative influence of IL-27R on T cell function demonstrate the pathway by which this cytokine/receptor pair is detrimental in TB. © 2015 Torrado et al.

  11. Skin CCR10+ CD8+ T cells support resident Treg cells through the B7.2/receptor axis to regulate local immune homeostasis and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yaoyao; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Na

    2016-01-01

    Resident T cells in barrier tissues are important in protecting against foreign agents but could also contribute to inflammatory diseases if dysregulated. How T cell homeostasis is maintained in barrier tissues is still poorly understood. Herein we report that resident CD8+ T cells directly support maintenance of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the skin to promote immune homeostasis. Impaired establishment of resident CD8+ T cells due to knockout of the skin-homing chemokine receptor CCR10 resulted in altered balance of resident Treg and CD4+ effector T (Teff) cells in the skin and over-reactive inflammatory responses to cutaneous stimulations. Furthermore, B7.2 expressed on skin CD8+ T cells is involved in supporting survival of Treg cells, likely through interaction with its receptor CTLA-4, which is highly expressed on skin Treg cells. Our findings provide novel insight into T cell homeostatic regulation in the skin and may help understand pathobiology of tissue inflammatory diseases. PMID:27183612

  12. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  13. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) shapes both innate and CD8(+) T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, James D; Daffis, Stephane; Lazear, Helen M; Cho, Hyelim; Suthar, Mehul S; Gale, Michael; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN)-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/-) mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV) infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/-) cells and mice. IRF-1(-/-) mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/-) macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/-) fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+) T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+) T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/-) mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+) T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response.

  14. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1 shapes both innate and CD8(+ T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Brien

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/- mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/- cells and mice. IRF-1(-/- mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/- macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/- fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+ T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+ T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/- mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+ T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+ T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell response.

  15. Immune adaptor ADAP in T cells regulates HIV-1 transcription and cell-cell viral spread via different co-receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bin; Han, Lei; Abbink, Truus E M; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Lim, Daina; Thaker, Youg Raj; Gao, Wei; Zhai, Rongrong; Wang, Jianhua; Lever, Andrew; Jolly, Clare; Wang, Hongyan; Rudd, Christopher E

    2013-09-18

    Immune cell adaptor protein ADAP (adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein) mediates aspects of T-cell adhesion and proliferation. Despite this, a connection between ADAP and infection by the HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-1) has not been explored. In this paper, we show for the first time that ADAP and its binding to SLP-76 (SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa) regulate HIV-1 infection via two distinct mechanisms and co-receptors. siRNA down-regulation of ADAP, or expression of a mutant that is defective in associating to its binding partner SLP-76 (termed M12), inhibited the propagation of HIV-1 in T-cell lines and primary human T-cells. In one step, ADAP and its binding to SLP-76 were needed for the activation of NF-κB and its transcription of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) in cooperation with ligation of co-receptor CD28, but not LFA-1. In a second step, the ADAP-SLP-76 module cooperated with LFA-1 to regulate conjugate formation between T-cells and dendritic cells or other T-cells as well as the development of the virological synapse (VS) and viral spread between immune cells. These findings indicate that ADAP regulates two steps of HIV-1 infection cooperatively with two distinct receptors, and as such, serves as a new potential target in the blockade of HIV-1 infection.

  16. Characterization of the metabolic phenotype of rapamycin-treated CD8+ T cells with augmented ability to generate long-lasting memory cells.

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    Shan He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism plays a critical role in regulating T cell responses and the development of memory T cells with long-term protections. However, the metabolic phenotype of antigen-activated T cells that are responsible for the generation of long-lived memory cells has not been characterized. DESIGN AND METHODS: Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV peptide gp33-specific CD8(+ T cells derived from T cell receptor transgenic mice, we characterized the metabolic phenotype of proliferating T cells that were activated and expanded in vitro in the presence or absence of rapamycin, and determined the capability of these rapamycin-treated T cells to generate long-lived memory cells in vivo. RESULTS: Antigen-activated CD8(+ T cells treated with rapamycin gave rise to 5-fold more long-lived memory T cells in vivo than untreated control T cells. In contrast to that control T cells only increased glycolysis, rapamycin-treated T cells upregulated both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. These rapamycin-treated T cells had greater ability than control T cells to survive withdrawal of either glucose or growth factors. Inhibition of OXPHOS by oligomycin significantly reduced the ability of rapamycin-treated T cells to survive growth factor withdrawal. This effect of OXPHOS inhibition was accompanied with mitochondrial hyperpolarization and elevation of reactive oxygen species that are known to be toxic to cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that these rapamycin-treated T cells may represent a unique cell model for identifying nutrients and signals critical to regulating metabolism in both effector and memory T cells, and for the development of new methods to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell cancer therapy.

  17. A simple method for measuring immune complex-mediated, Fc gamma receptor dependent antigen-specific activation of primary human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Fabian; Krishnarajah, Sinduya; Qureshi, Omar; Humphreys, David; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz

    2018-03-01

    Immune complex (IC) deposition of IgG containing autologous antigens has been observed in autoimmunity. This can lead to IC-mediated antigen uptake and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APC) driving T cell dependent inflammation. IgG receptors (FcγRs) have been suggested to be involved in this process. Since ICs have been linked to autoimmune diseases, interfering with IC mediated effects on APCs and subsequent autoimmune T cell activation via FcγR blockade may be therapeutically beneficial. However, this is currently challenging due to a lack of translatable animal models and specific human in vitro assays to study IC-driven T cell responses. Here, we developed a simple cellular assay to study IC-mediated T cell activation in vitro using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tetanus toxoid as a model antigen. We observed that tetanus ICs led to a strong induction of T cell proliferation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are hallmarks of chronic inflammation. This process was exacerbated when compared to tetanus toxoid challenge alone. IC-mediated T cell effects were FcγR dependent and inhibited by high-dose intravenous IgG (IVIg), a drug often used for the clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases. Similar effects were also seen using a hepatitis antigen. Consequently, we propose our assay as a rapid yet robust alternative to more labour-intense and time-consuming protocols, for example involving separate maturation of dendritic cells followed by T cell co-culture to study antigen specific primary T cell activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

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    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  19. Augmented primary humoral immune response and decreased cell-mediated immunity by Murraya koenigii in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderjit; Bhatia, Sneh; Bhati, Yogendra; Sharma, Vinay; Mediratta, Pramod K; Bhattacharya, Swapan K

    2014-05-01

    Murraya koenigii (Rutaceae) (curry patta: Hindi) of the family Rutaceae is used in the traditional Indian system of medicine for its immunomodulatory properties. The essential oil of the leaves of M. koenigii possesses antimicrobial, antifungal, and pesticidal activities and is used for the treatment of amebiasis, diabetes, and hepatitis. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of M. koenigii on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in rats. Aqueous extract of M. koenigii leaves was administered orally in a dose of 350 mg/kg. Cell-mediated immunity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness following sensitization by injection of keyhole limpet hemocyanin and subsequent challenge by the same. Humoral immunity was assessed by measurement of hemagglutination titer to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). In the humoral immune response, the administration of M. koenigii [350 mg/kg per os (p.o.)] from day 1 to day 7 after sensitization with SRBC on day 0 caused a significant increase in the primary anti-SRBC titer. However, the secondary immune response was decreased significantly (pkoenigii (350 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered for 14 days, produced a significant (pkoenigii augments primary humoral immune response and decreases cell-mediated immunity.

  20. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses. PMID:24213131

  1. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs. To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I, and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  2. Immune activation and HIV-specific T cell responses are modulated by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor in untreated HIV-infected individuals: An exploratory clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Prebensen

    Full Text Available Pathologically elevated immune activation and inflammation contribute to HIV disease progression and immunodeficiency, potentially mediated by elevated levels of prostaglandin E2, which suppress HIV-specific T cell responses. We have previously shown that a high dose of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib can reduce HIV-associated immune activation and improve IgG responses to T cell-dependent vaccines. In this follow-up study, we included 56 HIV-infected adults, 28 antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve and 28 on ART with undetectable plasma viremia but CD4 counts below 500 cells/μL. Patients in each of the two study groups were randomized to receive 90 mg qd of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor etoricoxib for six months, two weeks or to a control arm, respectively. T cell activation status, HIV Gag-specific T cell responses and plasma inflammatory markers, tryptophan metabolism and thrombin generation were analyzed at baseline and after four months. In addition, patients received tetanus toxoid, conjugated pneumococcal and seasonal influenza vaccines, to which IgG responses were determined after four weeks. In ART-naïve patients, etoricoxib reduced the density of the activation marker CD38 in multiple CD8+ T cell subsets, improved Gag-specific T cell responses, and reduced in vitro plasma thrombin generation, while no effects were seen on plasma markers of inflammation or tryptophan metabolism. No significant immunological effects of etoricoxib were observed in ART-treated patients. Patients receiving long-term etoricoxib treatment had poorer tetanus toxoid and conjugated pneumococcal vaccine responses than those receiving short-course etoricoxib. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may attenuate harmful immune activation in HIV-infected patients without access to ART.

  3. MiR-15a/16 deficiency enhances anti-tumor immunity of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells through targeting mTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiao; Liu, Ronghua; Deng, Yuting; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Yuedi; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Feifei; Chu, Yiwei

    2017-11-15

    MiR-15a/16, a miRNA cluster located at chromosome 13q14, has been reported to act as an immune regulator in inflammatory disorders besides its aberrant expression in cancers. However, little is known about its regulation in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. In our study, using an orthotropic GL261 mouse glioma model, we found that miR-15a/16 deficiency in host inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mice survival, which might be associated with the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. More importantly, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells without miR-15a/16 showed lower expression of PD-1, Tim-3 and LAG-3, and stronger secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α than WT tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Also, our in vitro experiments further confirmed that miR-15a/16-/- CD8+ T displayed higher active phenotypes, more cytokines secretion and faster expansion, compared to WT CD8+ T cells. Mechanismly, mTOR was identified as a target gene of miR-15a/16 to negatively regulate the activation of CD8+ T cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-15a/16 deficiency resists the exhaustion and maintains the activation of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells to alleviate glioma progression via targeting mTOR. Our findings provide evidence for the potential immunotherapy through targeting miR-15a/16 in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. © 2017 UICC.

  4. A Single 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination Provides Lifelong Immunity; Characterization of Yellow-Fever-Specific Neutralizing Antibody and T-Cell Responses after Vaccination.

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    Rosanne W Wieten

    Full Text Available Prompted by recent amendments of Yellow Fever (YF vaccination guidelines from boost to single vaccination strategy and the paucity of clinical data to support this adjustment, we used the profile of the YF-specific CD8+ T-cell subset profiles after primary vaccination and neutralizing antibodies as a proxy for potentially longer lasting immunity.PBMCs and serum were collected in six individuals on days 0, 3, 5, 12, 28 and 180, and in 99 individuals >10 years after YF-vaccination. Phenotypic characteristics of YF- tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were determined using class I tetramers. Antibody responses were measured using a standardized plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Also, characteristics of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were compared between individuals who had received a primary- and a booster vaccination. YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were detectable on day 12 (median tetramer+ cells as percentage of CD8+ T-cells 0.2%, range 0.07-3.1%. On day 180, these cells were still present (median 0.06%, range 0.02-0.78%. The phenotype of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells shifted from acute phase effector cells on day 12, to late differentiated or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA-/+CD27- on day 28. Two subsets of YF-tetramer positive T-cells (CD45RA+CD27- and CD45RA+CD27+ persisted until day 180. Within all phenotypic subsets, the T-bet: Eomes ratio tended to be high on day 28 after vaccination and shifted towards predominant Eomes expression on day 180 (median 6.0 (day 28 vs. 2.2 (day 180 p = 0.0625, suggestive of imprinting compatible with long-lived memory properties. YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were detectable up to 18 years post vaccination, YF-specific antibodies were detectable up to 40 years after single vaccination. Booster vaccination did not increase titers of YF-specific antibodies (mean 12.5 vs. 13.1, p = 0.583, nor induce frequencies or alter phenotypes of YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells.The presence of a functionally competent YF

  5. Low antigen dose formulated in CAF09 adjuvant Favours a cytotoxic T-cell response following intraperitoneal immunization in Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft

    2017-01-01

    in order to generate a certain type of immune response. To investigate this area further, we used Göttingen minipigs asan animal model especially due to the similar body size and high degree of immunome similarity between humans and pigs. In this study, we show that both a humoral and a cell...... protein formulated in the CAF09 adjuvant and administered to pigs via the intraperitoneal route effectively generates a cytotoxic T-cell response. Moreover, we confirm the inverse relationship between the antigen dose and the induction of polyfunctional T cells in a large animal model. These finding can...

  6. Tumor-specific suppressor T-cells which inhibit the in vitro generation of cytolytic T-cells from immune and early tumor-bearing host spleens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, H D

    1986-04-01

    Spleen cells from DBA/2 mice, after immunization with syngeneic P815 mastocytoma cells and Corynebacterium parvum, respond to P815 in vitro with a brisk, secondary-type generation of cytotoxic cells. This cytotoxicity is mediated by antigen-specific T-lymphocytes and correlates with resistance to in vivo challenge. This model confirms the observations of previous investigators made in semisyngeneic hosts using an in vivo transfer model. Spleen cells from "early" tumor-bearing hosts (TBHs), 7-12 days after intradermal (i.d.) inoculation of 10(6) P815 cells alone, made a similar, but generally higher, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in vitro. Spleen cells from "late" TBHs (18-28 days) completely suppressed the in vitro CTL response of immune cells (e.g., from 71% specific release in controls down to 8% at an effector: target ratio of 40:1). Early i.d. TBH spleen cells, because of their higher level response, appeared to be resistant to this suppression (85% release for controls and 84% when suppressor cells were added at 40:1). By testing early TBH CTL at lower effector: target ratios, however, suppression by late TBH spleen cells could be readily demonstrated. When TBHs were inoculated s.c. instead of i.d. or with lower doses of tumor cells, responses were lower and susceptibility of splenic CTLs to suppression was increased. At intermediate times after tumor inoculation (14-20 days), spleen cells from TBHs still can respond in vitro, but they are completely suppressed by spleen cells from late TBHs. The suppressor cells are antigen-specific, radiation-sensitive, Thy1+ cells.

  7. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S.; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown, but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4+ T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4+ T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogeneticity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. PMID:25800545

  8. Down regulation of the TCR complex CD3 ζ-chain on CD3+ T cells: a potential mechanism for helminth mediated immune modulation

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    Laura Jane Appleby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The CD3ζ forms part of the T cell receptor (TCR where it plays an important role in coupling antigen recognition to several intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to T cell effector functions. Down regulation of CD3ζ leads to impairment of immune responses including reduced cell proliferation and cytokine production. In experimental models helminth parasites have been shown to modulate immune responses directed against them and unrelated antigens, so called bystander antigens, but there is a lack of studies validating these observations in humans. This study focused on investigated the relationship between expression levels of the TCR CD3ζ chain with lymphocyte cell proliferation during human infection with the helminth parasite, Schistosoma haematobium which causes uro-genital schistosomiasis. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from individuals naturally exposed to S. haematobium in rural Zimbabwe were phenotyped, and expression levels of CD3ζ on T cells were related to intensity of infection. In this population, parasite infection intensity was inversely related to CD3ζ expression levels (p<0.05, consistent with down-regulation of CD3ζ expression during helminth infection. Furthermore, PBMC proliferation was positively related to expression levels of CD3ζ (p<0.05 after allowing for confounding variables (host age, sex, infection level. CD3ζ expression levels had a differing relationship between immune correlates of susceptibility and immunity, measured by antibody responses, indicating a complex relationship between immune activation status and immunity. The relationships between the CD3ζ chain of the TCR and schistosome infection, PBMC proliferation and schistosome-specific antibody responses have not previously been reported, and these results may indicate a mechanism for the impaired T cell proliferative responses observed during human schistosome infection.

  9. Immune tolerance induced by platelet-targeted factor VIII gene therapy in hemophilia A mice is CD4 T cell mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Luo, X; Schroeder, J A; Chen, J; Baumgartner, C K; Hu, J; Shi, Q

    2017-10-01

    Essentials The immune response is a significant concern in gene therapy. Platelet-targeted gene therapy can restore hemostasis and induce immune tolerance. CD4 T cell compartment is tolerized after platelet gene therapy. Preconditioning regimen affects immune tolerance induction in platelet gene therapy. Background Immune responses are a major concern in gene therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that platelet-targeted factor VIII (FVIII) (2bF8) gene therapy together with in vivo drug selection of transduced cells can rescue the bleeding diathesis and induce immune tolerance in FVIII(null) mice. Objective To investigate whether non-selectable 2bF8 lentiviral vector (LV) for the induction of platelet-FVIII expression is sufficient to induce immune tolerance and how immune tolerance is induced after 2bF8LV gene therapy. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression was introduced by 2bF8LV transduction and transplantation. FVIII assays and tail bleeding tests were used to confirm the success of platelet gene therapy. Animals were challenged with rhF8 to explore if immune tolerance was induced after gene therapy. Treg cell analysis, T-cell proliferation assay and memory B-cell-mediated ELISPOT assay were used to investigate the potential mechanisms of immune tolerance. Results We showed that platelet-FVIII expression was sustained and the bleeding diathesis was restored in FVIII(null) mice after 2bF8LV gene therapy. None of the transduced recipients developed anti-FVIII inhibitory antibodies in the groups preconditioned with 660 cGy irradiation or busulfan plus ATG treatment even after rhF8 challenge. Treg cells significantly increased in 2bF8LV-transduced recipients and the immune tolerance developed was transferable. CD4(+) T cells from treated animals failed to proliferate in response to rhF8 re-stimulation, but memory B cells could differentiate into antibody secreting cells in 2bF8LV-transduced recipients. Conclusion 2bF8LV gene transfer without in vivo selection of

  10. Specific immune response to Parietaria judaica plant profilin: a low T cell proliferative response supports high IgE and skin prick test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, D; García-Ortega, P; Picado, C; Milà, J; Vives, J; Martínez, J; Vilella, R

    2002-01-01

    allergic disease caused by Parietaria judaica (Pj) has been widely documented in Mediterranean area. Profilins have been identified as widely distributed allergenic proteins. The role of Pj profilin in specific immune response in Pj-sensitized patients is unknown. skin prick test and determination of specific and total IgE levels in serum were performed in all patients (n = 28) and non-allergic controls (n = 18). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from both groups and stimulated with crude extract or highly purified Pj profilin. The production of type I and type II cytokines was determined by specific and polyclonal stimuli in patients and controls. T-cell lines specific to Pj profilin were established and cross-reactivity with another highly purified profilin from Phleum pratense (Phl p) was evaluated. Pj profilin-sensitized patients showed a small but significantly increased in T-cell proliferative response to this profilin compared with non-atopic controls. The production of interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ in response to the specific stimulus was undetectable. However, the production of IL-4 in response to a polyclonal stimulus [phytohemagglutinin (PHA)] was significantly higher in atopic patients than in controls. The T-cell response did not correlate with the magnitude of response to skin prick tests with Pj profilin or with Pj-specific serum IgE levels. In addition, the production of IL-4 in response to a polyclonal stimulus (PHA) did not correlate with the individual skin prick tests to Pj profilin or with Pj-specific IgE levels in serum. The T-cell lines tested showed no cross-reactivity with Phl p profilin. our results suggest that Pj profilin is partly responsible for the T-cell-mediated response in patients allergic to Pj. The high skin reactivity to Pj profilin is these patients was accompanied by a small increase in the T-cell response to this profilin. The response was highly specific since Pj profilin specific T-cell

  11. CD4 T cell immunity is critical for the control of simian varicella virus infection in a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Haberthur

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV results in varicella (more commonly known as chickenpox after which VZV establishes latency in sensory ganglia. VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster (shingles, a debilitating disease that affects one million individuals in the US alone annually. Current vaccines against varicella (Varivax and herpes zoster (Zostavax are not 100% efficacious. Specifically, studies have shown that 1 dose of varivax can lead to breakthrough varicella, albeit rarely, in children and a 2-dose regimen is now recommended. Similarly, although Zostavax results in a 50% reduction in HZ cases, a significant number of recipients remain at risk. To design more efficacious vaccines, we need a better understanding of the immune response to VZV. Clinical observations suggest that T cell immunity plays a more critical role in the protection against VZV primary infection and reactivation. However, no studies to date have directly tested this hypothesis due to the scarcity of animal models that recapitulate the immune response to VZV. We have recently shown that SVV infection of rhesus macaques models the hallmarks of primary VZV infection in children. In this study, we used this model to experimentally determine the role of CD4, CD8 and B cell responses in the resolution of primary SVV infection in unvaccinated animals. Data presented in this manuscript show that while CD20 depletion leads to a significant delay and decrease in the antibody response to SVV, loss of B cells does not alter the severity of varicella or the kinetics/magnitude of the T cell response. Loss of CD8 T cells resulted in slightly higher viral loads and prolonged viremia. In contrast, CD4 depletion led to higher viral loads, prolonged viremia and disseminated varicella. CD4 depleted animals also had delayed and reduced antibody and CD8 T cell responses. These results are similar to clinical observations that children with agammaglobulinemia have

  12. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of vitamin D deficiency on immune T cells in asthmatic children: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maalmi H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Haïfa Maalmi,1,2 Anissa Berraïes,1,2,3 Eya Tangour,1,2,3 Jamel Ammar,1,2,3 Hanadi Abid,1,2,3 Kamel Hamzaoui,1,2 Agnes Hamzaoui1,2,31Department of Basic Sciences, Medicine School of Tunis, University Tunis El Manar, Tunis; 2Unit Research, Homeostasis and Cell Dysfunction, Ariana; 3Department of Pneumopediatry, A Mami Hospital, Ariana, Tunisia Background: Vitamin D exerts profound effects on both adaptive and innate immune functions involved in the development and course of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. As the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency is surprisingly high in the general population, experimental studies have started to investigate whether vitamin D levels (measured as serum 25 hydroxy vitamin D-25[OH]D are correlated with immune cells and clinical parameters.Purpose: The aim of the present research was to investigate serum vitamin D status in a case-control study in children with asthma and to study associations between vitamin D levels and certain immunological parameters.Materials and methods: A case control study of thirty-nine children with clinically controlled asthma was enrolled to assess the relationship between serum vitamin D concentrations and disease activity. Vitamin D was assayed with a radioimmunoassay kit. We evaluated the relationship between vitamin D concentrations and forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, and the FEV1/FVC ratio. Correlations between inflammatory mediators, Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Treg and vitamin D were investigated.Results: Only 15.38% of our asthmatic children had a sufficient serum 25(OHD (≥30 ng/mL whereas 80% of healthy children expressed sufficient levels. Deficient values of vitamin D (<20 ng/mL were observed in 17 (43.59% asthmatic patients (14.40 ± 3.30 ng/mL; P = 0.0001. Deficiency was not observed in controls. Th1/Th2 ratio was significantly correlated to 25(OHD level (r = 0.698; P = 0.0001. A significant negative correlation

  14. A Two-Component DNA-Prime/Protein-Boost Vaccination Strategy for Eliciting Long-Term, Protective T Cell Immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Shivali Gupta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the long-term efficacy of a two-component subunit vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with TcG2/TcG4 vaccine delivered by a DNA-prime/Protein-boost (D/P approach and challenged with T. cruzi at 120 or 180 days post-vaccination (dpv. We examined whether vaccine-primed T cell immunity was capable of rapid expansion and intercepting the infecting T. cruzi. Our data showed that D/P vaccine elicited CD4+ (30-38% and CD8+ (22-42% T cells maintained an effector phenotype up to 180 dpv, and were capable of responding to antigenic stimulus or challenge infection by a rapid expansion (CD8>CD4 with type 1 cytokine (IFNγ+ and TFNα+ production and cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL activity. Subsequently, challenge infection at 120 or 180 dpv, resulted in 2-3-fold lower parasite burden in vaccinated mice than was noted in unvaccinated/infected mice. Co-delivery of IL-12- and GMCSF-encoding expression plasmids provided no significant benefits in enhancing the anti-parasite efficacy of the vaccine-induced T cell immunity. Booster immunization (bi with recombinant TcG2/TcG4 proteins 3-months after primary vaccine enhanced the protective efficacy, evidenced by an enhanced expansion (1.2-2.8-fold increase of parasite-specific, type 1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a potent CTL response capable of providing significantly improved (3-4.5-fold control of infecting T. cruzi. Further, CD8+T cells in vaccinated/bi mice were predominantly of central memory phenotype, and capable of responding to challenge infection 4-6-months post bi by a rapid expansion to a poly-functional effector phenotype, and providing a 1.5-2.3-fold reduction in tissue parasite replication. We conclude that the TcG2/TcG4 D/P vaccine provided long-term anti-T. cruzi T cell immunity, and bi would be an effective strategy to maintain or enhance the vaccine-induced protective immunity against T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease.

  15. Subchronic exposure to ellagic acid impairs cytotoxic T-cell function and suppresses humoral immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C T; Peden-Adams, M M; EuDaly, J; Keil, D E

    2003-08-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) is present in a variety of foods such as grapes, strawberries, raspberries, and nuts. It is a dietary plant phenol that has been shown to inhibit oxidative stress and chemical carcinogenesis. Although several studies have examined the protective mechanisms of dietary EA including the induction of detoxifying enzymes, regulation of cell cycle, chelation of nickel, and prevention of DNA methylation, none have addressed the role of EA in immunological surveillance. This study investigates the status of immune function in B6C3F1 mice exposed continuously to EA in drinking water at 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Although this range of exposure is above the estimated human daily intake (approximately 940 microg/day for 70 kg person or 13.4 microg/kg/day), these levels would not be unreasonable if EA were used as a dietary supplement or as a chemotherapeutic agent. Previous reports have demonstrated the anticarcinogenic effects of EA at levels 10- to 250-fold greater than those applied in this study. Immunological parameters assessed included natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity, IgM antibody plaque forming cell (PFC) response, thymus, spleen, kidney, and liver mass, and total cellularity for the thymus and spleen. Subchronic exposure to EA for 28 days in drinking water caused significant suppression of specific IgM antibody responses in the 2.0 mg/kg EA treatment group and suppressed cytotoxic T-cell function in the 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg EA treatment groups. All other immunological parameters were within normal ranges. Kidney and liver mass were not altered after treatment with EA. The results from this study indicate that EA suppressed both IgM antibody responses and CTLs. These observations suggest important implications on human health should EA be prescribed as a chemotherapeutic agent or a preventative dietary supplement for cancer.

  16. Th1 versus Th2 T cell polarization by whole-cell and acellular childhood pertussis vaccines persists upon re-immunization in adolescence and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Tara; Dillon, Myles B C; da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; Crotty, Shane; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in cases of whooping cough among teenagers in the US suggests that the acellular Bordetella pertussis vaccine (aP) that became standard in the mid 1990s might be relatively less effective than the whole-bacteria formulation (wP) previously used since the 1950s. To understand this effect, we compared antibody and T cell responses to a booster immunization in subjects who received either the wP or aP vaccine as their initial priming dose in childhood. Antibody responses in wP- and aP-primed donors were similar. Magnitude of T cell responses was higher in aP-primed individuals. Epitope mapping revealed the T cell immunodominance patterns were similar for both vaccines. Further comparison of the ratios of IFNγ and IL-5 revealed that IFNγ strongly dominates the T cell response in wP-primed donors, while IL-5 is dominant in aP primed individuals. Surprisingly, this differential pattern is maintained after booster vaccination, at times from eighteen years to several decades after the original aP/wP priming. These findings suggest that childhood aP versus wP vaccination induces functionally different T cell responses to pertussis that become fixed and are unchanged even upon boosting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mucosal immunity and novel tuberculosis vaccine strategies: route of immunisation-determined T-cell homing to restricted lung mucosal compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rocky; Afkhami, Sam; Haddadi, Siamak; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Xing, Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Despite the use of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) for almost a century, pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a serious global health concern. Therefore, there has been a pressing need for the development of new booster vaccines to enhance existing BCG-induced immunity. Protection following mucosal intranasal immunisation with AdHu5Ag85A is associated with the localisation of antigen-specific T-cells to the lung airway. However, parenteral intramuscular immunisation is unable to provide protection despite the apparent presence of antigen-specific T-cells in the lung interstitium. Recent advances in intravascular staining have allowed us to reassess the previously established T-cell distribution profile and its relationship with the observed differential protection. Respiratory mucosal immunisation empowers T-cells to home to both the lung interstitium and the airway lumen, whereas intramuscular immunisation-activated T-cells are largely trapped within the pulmonary vasculature, unable to populate the lung interstitium and airway. Given the mounting evidence supporting the safety and enhanced efficacy of respiratory mucosal immunisation over the traditional parenteral immunisation route, a greater effort should be made to clinically develop respiratory mucosal-deliverable TB vaccines. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  18. OMOLOGICAL AND HETEROLOGICAL ANTIBODY AND T CELL IMMUNE RESPONSES TO LIVE ATTENUATED INFLUENZA VACCINE A (H5N2 AND A (H7N3

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    A. N. Naykhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From the beginning of 21th century outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian flu are registered from time to time. These viruses are considered as one of the possible causes of the next pandemia. The development of avian influenza vaccines is one of the WHO priorities. The aim of this work was to study antibody and cellular immune responses to avian A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs. We examined serum antibodies (HAI assay, microneutralization assay, ELISA, local antibodies (ELISA and virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ central memory and effector memory T cells. Two doses vaccination of healthy volunteers with A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 LAIVs induced homological antibody and cellular immune responses (i. e. serum and local antibody conversions, virus-specific memory T cell growth. These vaccines also stimulated heterological immunity (heterological serum and local antibodies and T cells. Heterological immune response intensity depended on antigenic structure of vaccine strain and heterological virus, particularly on HA type. 

  19. Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Both Contribute to Pathological CD4 T Cell Activation in HIV-1 Infected Ugandans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    well U-bottom plates with Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) hexon peptides (Miltenyi Biotec Inc., Auburn, CA) at 1 mg/ml, Candida albicans allergenic extract...effector memory CD4 T cell subset elevated in HIV-1 infection. (A) Identification of CD4 T cells co-expressing PD-1, HLA-DR and CD38 in HIV-1 infected and...particular CMV and Candida antigens, provoked significant expansions of triple- positive CD4 T cells (Figure 6B). In a second approach, we assessed CD4 T

  20. Delayed BCG vaccination results in minimal alterations in T cell immunogenicity of acellular pertussis and tetanus immunizations in HIV-exposed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakney, Anna K; Tchakoute, Christophe Toukam; Hesseling, Anneke C; Kidzeru, Elvis B; Jones, Christine E; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Sodora, Donald L; Gray, Clive M; Jaspan, Heather B

    2015-09-11

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is effective in preventing disseminated tuberculosis (TB) in children but may also have non-specific benefits, and is thought to improve immunity to unrelated antigens through trained innate immunity. In HIV-infected infants, there is a risk of BCG-associated adverse events. We aimed to explore whether delaying BCG vaccination by 8 weeks, in utero or perinatal HIV infection is excluded, affected T-cell responses to B. pertussis (BP) and tetanus toxoid (TT), in HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Infants were randomized to receive BCG vaccination at birth or 8 weeks of age. At 8 and 14 weeks, T cell proliferation and intracellular cytokine (IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-γ) expression was analyzed in response to BP, TT and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) antigens. Delaying BCG vaccination did not alter T-cell proliferation to BP or TT antigens. Infants immunized with BCG at birth had higher CD4+ T cell proliferation to SEB at 14 weeks of age (p=0.018). Birth-vaccinated infants had increased CD8+ IL-2 expression in response to BP, but not TT or SEB, at 8 weeks. Infants vaccinated with BCG at 8 weeks had significantly lower IL-13 expression by BP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at 14 weeks (p=0.032 and p=0.0035, respectively). There were no observed differences in multifunctional cytokine response to TT, BP or SEB between infants vaccinated with BCG at birth versus 8 weeks of age. Delaying BCG vaccination until 8 weeks of age results in robust T-cellular responses to BP and TT in HIV-exposed infants. NCT02062580. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. Transfer of immunity with primed CD45RC+ and CD45RC- CD4 T-cell subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1996-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen CD4 T cells were separated by antibody....... typhimurium. Transfer of CD45RC+ and CD45RC- CD4 T cells induced a significant survival, p = 0.022 and p = 0.023 respectively, following inoculation with S. typhimurium compared to animals with no cells transferred. The infection induced an increase in CD4 T cells expressing the CD45RC isoform compared...

  2. CAR T Cells Releasing IL-18 Convert to T-Bethigh FoxO1low Effectors that Exhibit Augmented Activity against Advanced Solid Tumors

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    Markus Chmielewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells has achieved remarkable efficacy in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies. However, eradicating large solid tumors in advanced stages of the disease remains challenging. We explored augmentation of the anti-tumor immune reaction by establishing an acute inflammatory reaction. Systematic screening indicates that IL-18 polarizes CAR T cells toward T-bethigh FoxO1low effectors with an acute inflammatory response. CAR T cells engineered with inducible IL-18 release exhibited superior activity against large pancreatic and lung tumors that were refractory to CAR T cells without cytokines. IL-18 CAR T cell treatment was accompanied by an overall change in the immune cell landscape associated with the tumor. More specifically, CD206− M1 macrophages and NKG2D+ NK cells increased in number, whereas Tregs, suppressive CD103+ DCs, and M2 macrophages decreased, suggesting that “iIL18 TRUCKs” can be used to sensitize large solid tumor lesions for successful immune destruction.

  3. The Microbiome Activates CD4 T-cell–mediated Immunity to Compensate for Increased Intestinal PermeabilitySummary

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    Karen L. Edelblum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Despite a prominent association, chronic intestinal barrier loss is insufficient to induce disease in human subjects or experimental animals. We hypothesized that compensatory mucosal immune activation might protect individuals with increased intestinal permeability from disease. We used a model in which intestinal barrier loss is triggered by intestinal epithelial-specific expression of constitutively active myosin light chain kinase (CA-MLCK. Here we asked whether constitutive tight junction barrier loss impacts susceptibility to enteric pathogens. Methods: Acute or chronic Toxoplasma gondii or Salmonella typhimurium infection was assessed in CA-MLCK transgenic or wild-type mice. Germ-free mice or those lacking specific immune cell populations were used to investigate the effect of microbial-activated immunity on pathogen translocation in the context of increased intestinal permeability. Results: Acute T gondii and S typhimurium translocation across the epithelial barrier was reduced in CA-MLCK mice. This protection was due to enhanced mucosal immune activation that required CD4+ T cells and interleukin 17A but not immunoglobulin A. The protective mucosal immune activation in CA-MLCK mice depended on segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB, because protection against early S typhimurium invasion was lost in germ-free CA-MLCK mice but could be restored by conventionalization with SFB-containing, not SFB-deficient, microbiota. In contrast, chronic S typhimurium infection was more severe in CA-MLCK mice, suggesting that despite activation of protective mucosal immunity, barrier defects ultimately result in enhanced disease progression. Conclusions: Increased epithelial tight junction permeability synergizes with commensal bacteria to promote intestinal CD4+ T-cell expansion and interleukin 17A production that limits enteric pathogen invasion. Keywords: Barrier Function, Tight Junction, Microbiota, CD4 T Cell, Mucosal Immunity

  4. T-cell epitopes identified by BALB/c mice immunized with vaccinia expressing HIV-1 gag lie within immunodominant regions recognized by HIV-infected Indian patients

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    Ashwini V Shete

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antigens from transmitted strains of HIV would prove crucial in vaccine designing for prevention of HIV infection. Immune response generated by Vaccinia construct expressing the HIV-1 gag gene from transmitted Indian HIV-1 subtype C strain (Vgag in BALB/c mice is reported in the present study along with the identification of epitopes responsible for induction of the immune response. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine immune response generated by the constructs in a mouse model and to understand the epitope specificities of the response. Settings and Design: This was an observational study carried out in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: The immunogenecity of Vgag construct was evaluated in BALB/c mice after multiple immunizations. T-cell response was monitored by the interferon-γ ELISPOT assay using HIV-1 C Gag overlapping peptides and anti-P24 antibodies were estimated by ELISA. Statistical Analysis Used: Graphpad prism software was used for statistical analysis and for plotting graphs. Results: IFN-γ-secreting T cells and antibodies were detected against HIV Gag in mice after immunization. Although after repeated immunizations, antibody-mediated immune response increased or remained sustained, the magnitude of IFN-γ-secreting T cell was found to be decreased over time. The Gag peptides recognized by mice were mainly confined to the P24 region and had a considerable overlap with earlier reported immunodominant regions recognized by HIV-infected Indian patients. Conclusion: Vaccinia construct with a gag gene from transmitted HIV-1 virus was found to be immunogenic. The Gag regions identified by mice could have important implications in terms of future HIV vaccine designing.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of the Early CD8 T-Cell Immune Response in Lymph Nodes: An Integrative Study

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    Sotiris A. Prokopiou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T-cells are critical  in controlling infection by intracellular  pathogens. Upon encountering antigen presenting cells, T-cell receptor activation promotes the differentiation of naïve CD8 T-cells into strongly proliferating  activated and effector stages. We propose a 2D-multiscale computational model to study the maturation of CD8 T-cells in a lymph node controlled by their molecular profile. A novel molecular pathway is presented and converted into an ordinary differential  equation model, coupled with a cellular Potts model to describe cell-cell interactions. Key molecular  players such as activated IL2 receptor and Tbet levels  control the differentiation  from naïve into activated and effector stages, respectively,  while caspases and Fas-Fas ligand interactions control cell apoptosis.  Coupling  this molecular model to the cellular scale successfully  reproduces  qualitatively the evolution of total CD8 T-cell counts observed in mice lymph node, between Day 3 and 5.5 post-infection. Furthermore, this model allows us to make testable predictions  of the evolution of the different CD8 T-cell stages.

  6. Systemic expression of Notch ligand Delta-like 4 during mycobacterial infection alters the T cell immune response

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    Matthew Schaller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (DLL4 is known to fine-tune the CD4+ T cell cytokine response. DLL4 is expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells in a MyD88 dependent manner. We found that DLL4 expression was upregulated on bone marrow progenitor cells and antigen presenting cells in mice infected with BCG mycobacterium. Transfer of DLL4+ progenitor cells from infected hosts resulted in an increase DLL4+ myeloid cells in the spleen, indicating that expression of the dll4 gene is propagated throughout hematopoiesis. We also found an increase in DLL4+ monocytes from individuals that were infected with M. tuberculosis. In latent individuals, DLL4 expression correlated with increased cytokine production from T cells in response to PPD stimulation. Finally, antibody blockade of DLL4 reduced T cell cytokine production from naïve T cells stimulated with antigen. These results demonstrate that the Notch ligand DLL4 can influence T cell cytokine production in both humans and mice, and further reveal that expression of DLL4 is upregulated on early hematopoietic progenitors in response to chronic mycobacterial infection. These data suggest that widespread DLL4 expression may occur as a result of mycobacterial infection, and that this expression may alter CD4+ T cell responses to both previously encountered and novel antigens.

  7. T-cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in beta2-integrin (CD18)- and ICAM-1 (CD54)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1996-01-01

    the inflammatory reaction, indicating that under conditions of more limited immune activation both molecules do play a role in formation of the inflammatory exudate. Finally, virus control was found to be somewhat impaired in both mutant strains. In conclusion, our results indicate that although LFA-1-ICAM-1......The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice with deficient expression of beta2-integrins or ICAM-1. In such mice, the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was only slightly impaired and bystander activation was as extensive as that observed in wild......-type mice. T-cell-mediated inflammation, assessed as primary footpad swelling and susceptibility to intracerebral infection, was slightly compromised only in beta2-integrin-deficient mice. However, adoptive immunization of mutant mice soon after local infection did reveal a reduced capacity to support...

  8. Computational and experimental validation of B and T-cell epitopes of the in vivo immune response to a novel malarial antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Steers, Nicholas J; Sabato, Mark; Delvecchio, Vito; Wallqvist, Anders S; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Angov, Evelina

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine development efforts will be guided by algorithms that predict immunogenic epitopes. Such prediction methods rely on classification-based algorithms that are trained against curated data sets of known B and T cell epitopes. It is unclear whether this empirical approach can be applied prospectively to predict epitopes associated with protective immunity for novel antigens. We present a comprehensive comparison of in silico B and T cell epitope predictions with in vivo validation using an previously uncharacterized malaria antigen, CelTOS. CelTOS has no known conserved structural elements with any known proteins, and thus is not represented in any epitope databases used to train prediction algorithms. This analysis represents a blind assessment of this approach in the context of a novel, immunologically relevant antigen. The limited accuracy of the tested algorithms to predict the in vivo immune responses emphasizes the need to improve their predictive capabilities for use as tools in vaccine design.

  9. Computational and experimental validation of B and T-cell epitopes of the in vivo immune response to a novel malarial antigen.

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    Elke S Bergmann-Leitner

    Full Text Available Vaccine development efforts will be guided by algorithms that predict immunogenic epitopes. Such prediction methods rely on classification-based algorithms that are trained against curated data sets of known B and T cell epitopes. It is unclear whether this empirical approach can be applied prospectively to predict epitopes associated with protective immunity for novel antigens. We present a comprehensive comparison of in silico B and T cell epitope predictions with in vivo validation using an previously uncharacterized malaria antigen, CelTOS. CelTOS has no known conserved structural elements with any known proteins, and thus is not represented in any epitope databases used to train prediction algorithms. This analysis represents a blind assessment of this approach in the context of a novel, immunologically relevant antigen. The limited accuracy of the tested algorithms to predict the in vivo immune responses emphasizes the need to improve their predictive capabilities for use as tools in vaccine design.

  10. Infection with host-range mutant adenovirus 5 suppresses innate immunity and induces systemic CD4+ T cell activation in rhesus macaques.

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    Huma Qureshi

    Full Text Available Ad5 is a common cause of respiratory disease and an occasional cause of gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis, and seroconversion before adolescence is common in humans. To gain some insight into how Ad5 infection affects the immune system of rhesus macaques (RM 18 RM were infected with a host-range mutant Ad5 (Ad5hr by 3 mucosal inoculations. There was a delay of 2 to 6 weeks after the first inoculation before plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC frequency and function increased in peripheral blood. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed IFN-γ mRNA expression, but the second Ad5hr exposure induced a rapid increase in IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed CCL20, TNF and IL-1 mRNA expression in PBMC, and subsequent virus exposures further dampened expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. Primary, but not secondary, Ad5hr inoculation increased the frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells in blood, while secondary, but not primary, Ad5hr infection transiently increased the frequencies of Ki67+, HLADR+ and CD95+/CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in blood. Ad5hr infection induced polyfunctional CD4 and CD8+ T cells specific for the Ad5 hexon protein in all of the animals. Thus, infection with Ad5hr induced a complex pattern of innate and adaptive immunity in RM that included transient systemic CD4+ T cell activation and suppressed innate immunity on re-exposure to the virus. The complex effects of adenovirus infection on the immune system may help to explain the unexpected results of testing Ad5 vector expressing HIV antigens in Ad5 seropositive people.

  11. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...... effector functions, accumulated in the spleen. These findings indicate that the localization of the adenoviral inoculum and not the total Ag load determines the quality of the CD8(+) T cell response induced with adenoviral vaccines....

  12. T-cell mediated immune responses in calves primary-infected or re-infected with Cooperia oncophora: similar effector cells but different timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanobana, K; Koets, A; Bakker, N; Ploeger, H W; Vervelde, L

    2003-11-01

    Cooperia oncophora is the most prevalent intestinal nematode of cattle occurring in Western Europe. Primary infection with 100000 third stage infective larvae (L3) induces acquired immunity in a high proportion of the animals but there is little information on immunity against re-infection. In the current experiment, the contribution of the T-cell mediated immunity in protection against re-infection with C. oncophora was investigated in detail. Priming elicited long-lasting protective immunity that was evidenced by a significantly decreased worm burden and egg excretion in primed animals compared to challenge control animals. Lymphocyte proliferation tests with excretory/secretory products (ESP) of C. oncophora and with three distinct ESP fractions indicated an enhanced reactivity in primed animals and suggested that by fractionating of ESP we selected for proteins involved in protective immunity against re-infection with C. oncophora. Phenotypic analysis of T cell subsets at diverse anatomical locations revealed that the enhanced reactivity of lymphocytes from peripheral blood and lymph nodes of the infected animals coincided with a significantly increased frequency of CD4(+) cells at these locations but a deceased frequency of CD4(+) cells in the lamina propria. These findings were independent of the immune status of the animals but more pronounced in the primed animals than in the challenge control animals. In addition we demonstrated that primary and secondary infections with C. oncophora were associated with two waves of eosinophils and that the kinetics of this cell population differed as a result of priming. Based on the observed correlations we propose that the early increase of eosinophils is T cell independent and merely a consequence of inflammation in the parasitised gut. In contrast, the second wave of eosinophils depends upon CD4(+) cells and correlations with parasitological parameters at this time point support a role of eosinophils as effector

  13. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  14. Impact of Pre-Transplant Anti-T Cell Globulin (ATG on Immune Recovery after Myeloablative Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

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    Sophie Servais

    Full Text Available Pre-transplant infusion of rabbit anti-T cell globulin (ATG is increasingly used as prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT. However, the precise impact of pre-transplant ATG on immune recovery after PBSCT is still poorly documented.In the current study, we compared immune recovery after myeloablative PBSCT in 65 patients who either received (n = 37 or did not (n = 28 pre-transplant ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F. Detailed phenotypes of circulating T, B, natural killer (NK and invariant NKT (iNKT cells were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry at serial time-points from day 40 to day 365 after transplantation. Thymic function was also assessed by sjTREC quantification. Serious infectious events were collected up to 2 years post-transplantation.Pre-transplant ATG-F had a prolonged (for at least up to 1-year and selective negative impact on the T-cell pool, while it did not impair the recovery of B, NK nor iNKT cells. Among T cells, ATG-F selectively compromised the recovery of naïve CD4+, central memory CD4+ and naïve CD8+ cells, while it spared effector memory T and regulatory T cells. Levels of sjTRECs were similar in both cohorts at 1-year after PBSCT, suggesting that ATG-F unlikely impaired thymopoiesis at long-term after PBSCT. Finally, the incidence and rate of serious infections were similar in both groups, while ATG-F patients had a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease.Pre-transplant ATG-F induces long-lasting modulation of the circulating T-cell pool after myeloablative PBSCT, that may participate in preventing graft-versus-host disease without deeply compromising anti-pathogen defenses.

  15. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Bahia El Idrissi

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC. Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7, multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7, and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL (n = 6 or reversal reaction (RR (n = 4 and controls (n = 5 were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = <0.05, p = <0.001 and p = <0.001 respectively, with a significant association between LAM and C3d or MAC in the skin biopsies of leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, p< 0.0001 and r = 0.8585, p<0.0001 respectively. In skin lesions of multibacillary patients, MAC deposition was found on axons and co-localizing with LAM. In skin lesions of paucibacillary patients, we found C3d positive T-cells in and surrounding granulomas, but hardly any MAC deposition. In addition, MAC immunoreactivity was increased in both ENL and RR skin lesions compared to non-reactional leprosy patients (p = <0.01 and p = <0.01 respectively. The present findings demonstrate that complement is deposited in skin lesions of leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions

  16. T-cell costimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1996-01-01

    The CD40L molecule expressed by CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes is known to deliver signals that activate B cells and macrophages. It now appears that CD40L regulates T cells themselves, during both their development and their participation in adaptive immune responses....

  17. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  18. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T; Sullivan, Thomas D; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A; Jenkins, Marc K; Klein, Bruce

    2015-04-08

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad-spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4(+) T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae, and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes, including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats, induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4(+) T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogenicity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgical Stress Abrogates Pre-Existing Protective T Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Immunity Leading to Postoperative Cancer Recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhirami A Ananth

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells are a key determinant for overall survival in patients following surgical resection for solid malignancies. Using a mouse model of cancer vaccination (adenovirus expressing melanoma tumor-associated antigen (TAA-dopachrome tautomerase (AdDCT and resection resulting in major surgical stress (abdominal nephrectomy, we demonstrate that surgical stress results in a reduction in the number of CD8+ T cell that produce cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, Granzyme B in response to TAA. This effect is secondary to both reduced proliferation and impaired T cell function following antigen binding. In a prophylactic model, surgical stress completely abrogates tumor protection conferred by vaccination in the immediate postoperative period. In a clinically relevant surgical resection model, vaccinated mice undergoing a positive margin resection with surgical stress had decreased survival compared to mice with positive margin resection alone. Preoperative immunotherapy with IFNα significantly extends survival in surgically stressed mice. Importantly, myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC population numbers and functional impairment of TAA-specific CD8+ T cell were altered in surgically stressed mice. Our observations suggest that cancer progression may result from surgery-induced suppression of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. Preoperative immunotherapies aimed at targeting the prometastatic effects of cancer surgery will reduce recurrence and improve survival in cancer surgery patients.

  20. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8(+)T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-05-04

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing.

  1. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8+T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing. PMID:27143649

  2. Annual vaccination against influenza virus hampers development of virus-specific CD8 + T cell immunity in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bodewes (Rogier); P.L.A. Fraaij (Pieter); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); A.M.C. van Rossum (Annemarie); F.R. van der Klis (Fiona); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractInfection with seasonal influenza A viruses induces immunity to potentially pandemic influenza A viruses of other subtypes (heterosubtypic immunity). We recently demonstrated that vaccination against seasonal influenza prevented the induction of heterosubtypic immunity against influenza

  3. Divergence of primary cognate B- and T-cell proliferative responses to subcutaneous and intravenous immunization with virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temchura, Vladimir; Kalinin, Svetlana; Nabi, Ghulam; Tippler, Bettina; Niezold, Thomas; Uberla, Klaus

    2014-08-22

    A major advantage of virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines against HIV is their structural identity to wild-type viruses, ensuring that antigen-specific B-cells encounter the envelope protein in its natural conformation. For the induction of affinity-matured antibodies, the B-cells must also obtain help from T-cells that are restricted by linear epitopes. Using B- and T-cell transgenic mouse models, we compared the efficacy of modified HIV-VLPs delivered by subcutaneous and intravenous immunization to stimulate primary B- and T-cell proliferative responses in different lymphoid organs. VLPs containing an influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope within the HIV-Gag protein induced comparable primary cognate T-cell proliferative responses in the draining lymph node and the spleen, irrespective of the delivery route. In contrast, after subcutaneous immunization with HIV-Gag VLPs containing hen egg lysozyme (HEL) on their surface, the proliferative response of transgenic HEL-specific B-cells was restricted to the draining lymph nodes, while intravenous VLP immunization primarily induced a B-cell proliferative response in the spleen. In vitro co-culture experiments further revealed that the presentation of VLP-associated surface antigens by dendritic cells to cognate B-cells is inefficient. This is consistent with a direct triggering of the B-cell proliferative response by the VLPs and suggests that HIV VLPs may indeed be suitable to directly promote the expansion of B-cells specific for conformational epitopes that are unique to functionally-active Env spikes on the virion. Further investigations are warranted to explore potential differences in the quality and protective potency of HIV-specific antibody responses induced by the two routes.

  4. Divergence of Primary Cognate B- and T-Cell Proliferative Responses to Subcutaneous and Intravenous Immunization with Virus-Like Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Temchura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A major advantage of virus-like particle (VLP vaccines against HIV is their structural identity to wild-type viruses, ensuring that antigen-specific B-cells encounter the envelope protein in its natural conformation. For the induction of affinity-matured antibodies, the B-cells must also obtain help from T-cells that are restricted by linear epitopes. Using B- and T-cell transgenic mouse models, we compared the efficacy of modified HIV-VLPs delivered by subcutaneous and intravenous immunization to stimulate primary B- and T-cell proliferative responses in different lymphoid organs. VLPs containing an influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope within the HIV-Gag protein induced comparable primary cognate T-cell proliferative responses in the draining lymph node and the spleen, irrespective of the delivery route. In contrast, after subcutaneous immunization with HIV-Gag VLPs containing hen egg lysozyme (HEL on their surface, the proliferative response of transgenic HEL-specific B-cells was restricted to the draining lymph nodes, while intravenous VLP immunization primarily induced a B-cell proliferative response in the spleen. In vitro co-culture experiments further revealed that the presentation of VLP-associated surface antigens by dendritic cells to cognate B-cells is inefficient. This is consistent with a direct triggering of the B-cell proliferative response by the VLPs and suggests that HIV VLPs may indeed be suitable to directly promote the expansion of B-cells specific for conformational epitopes that are unique to functionally-active Env spikes on the virion. Further investigations are warranted to explore potential differences in the quality and protective potency of HIV-specific antibody responses induced by the two routes.

  5. Effect of administration timing of postchemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on host-immune cell recovery and CD8+T-cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Labib; Nassef, Mohamed; Abdel Salam, Soha G R; Zidan, Abdelaziz; Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Badr, Gamal; Rubinstein, Mark; Cole, David

    2016-11-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, is a standard supportive therapy given during cancer treatment. It induces acceleration in neutrophil recovery through stimulation of mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors. Given that the latter is also induced by chemotherapy itself, the timing of administration of G-CSF postchemotherapy might impact the resultant overall effects. The present study aimed to determine the optimal timing of G-CSF postchemotherapy to exert its optimal effects on the immune cell recovery and its impact on antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell response. B6 mice were treated once with cyclophosphamide (4 mg/mouse; CTX) and then daily with G-CSF (5 g/mouse) from Days 1-5, 2-5 or 5-9 post-CTX treatment. The total numbers of various immune cell types were analyzed on Days 7, 9 and 12 post-CTX treatment. To evaluate effects on CD8 + T-cell response, a pmel-1 transgenic mouse model was used in combination with prime boost peptide vaccination therapy. The total number of white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, granulocytes and dendritic cells (DC) were significantly increased after G-CSF treatment in particular when G-CSF was administered from Days 2-5 post-CTX treatment. Application of this timing of G-CSF and CTX treatment after adoptive transfer of T-cells followed by prime-boost vaccination with antigenic peptide did not block the expansion of the donor pmel-1 CD8 + T-cells. In conclusion, adjusting the timing of treatment with G-CSF postchemotherapy can optimize its promoting effects on recovery of myeloid cells without altering the associated antigen-specific immunity.

  6. Breadth of T Cell Responses After Immunization with Adenovirus Vectors Encoding Ancestral Antigens or Polyvalent Papillomavirus Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonnaud, E; Pedersen, A G; Holst, P J

    2017-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are in most cases eliminated by intervention of T cells. As many other pathogens, these oncogenic HPVs belong to an ancient and diverse virus family. Therefore, we found it relevant to investigate the potential and limitations of inducing a broad response-either by inducing cross-reactive T cells or by administering a polyvalent vaccine. To test these strategies, we designed three ancestral and two circulating sequences based on the two domains of the E1 and E2 proteins of papillomaviruses (PVs) that exhibit the highest degree of conservation in comparison with the other PV proteins. The PV sequences were fused to a T cell adjuvant, the murine invariant chain and encoded in a recombinant adenoviral vector which was administered to naïve outbred mice. By measuring T cell responses induced by these different vaccines and towards peptide pools representing three circulating strains and a putative ancestor of oncogenic HPVs, we showed that the ancestral vaccine antigen has to be approximately 90% identical to the circulating PVs before a marked drop of ~90% mean CD8+ T cell responses ensues. Interestingly, the combination of two or three type-specific PV vaccines did not induce a significant decrease in the CD8+ T cell response to the individual-targeted PV types. Polyvalent HPV vaccine based on the E1 and E2 proteins seem to be capable of triggering responses towards more than one type of PV while the cross-reactivity of ancestral vaccine seems insufficient in consideration of the sequence diversity between HPV types. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  7. Increased Expression of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 by T Cells, Induced by B7 in Sera, Reduces Adaptive Immunity in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khamri, Wafa; Abeles, Robin D; Hou, Tie Zheng

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have defects in innate immune responses to microbes (immune paresis) and are susceptible to sepsis. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), which interacts with the membrane receptor B7 (also called CD80 and CD86), is a negat......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have defects in innate immune responses to microbes (immune paresis) and are susceptible to sepsis. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), which interacts with the membrane receptor B7 (also called CD80 and CD86...... through September 2015 (45 patients with ALF, 20 patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, 15 patients with cirrhosis with no evidence of acute decompensation, 20 patients with septic shock but no cirrhosis or liver disease, and 20 healthy individuals). Circulating CD4+T cells were isolated...

  8. Persistent Low-Level Replication of SIVΔnef Drives Maturation of Antibody and CD8 T Cell Responses to Induce Protective Immunity against Vaginal SIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sama Adnan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Defining the correlates of immune protection conferred by SIVΔnef, the most effective vaccine against SIV challenge, could enable the design of a protective vaccine against HIV infection. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of immune responses that protect against SIV infection through detailed analyses of cellular and humoral immune responses in the blood and tissues of rhesus macaques vaccinated with SIVΔnef and then vaginally challenged with wild-type SIV. Despite the presence of robust cellular immune responses, animals at 5 weeks after vaccination displayed only transient viral suppression of challenge virus, whereas all macaques challenged at weeks 20 and 40 post-SIVΔnef vaccination were protected, as defined by either apparent sterile protection or significant suppression of viremia in infected animals. Multiple parameters of CD8 T cell function temporally correlated with maturation of protection, including polyfunctionality, phenotypic differentiation, and redistribution to gut and lymphoid tissues. Importantly, we also demonstrate the induction of a tissue-resident memory population of SIV-specific CD8 T cells in the vaginal mucosa, which was dependent on ongoing low-level antigenic stimulation. Moreover, we show that vaginal and serum antibody titers inversely correlated with post-challenge peak viral load, and we correlate the accumulation and affinity maturation of the antibody response to the duration of the vaccination period as well as to the SIVΔnef antigenic load. In conclusion, maturation of SIVΔnef-induced CD8 T cell and antibody responses, both propelled by viral persistence in the gut mucosa and secondary lymphoid tissues, results in protective immune responses that are able to interrupt viral transmission at mucosal portals of entry as well as potential sites of viral dissemination.

  9. Lung CD4 Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity Induced by Previous Infection of Mice with Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Mieszko M; Misiak, Alicja; McManus, Róisín M; Allen, Aideen C; Lynch, Marina A; Mills, Kingston H G

    2017-07-01

    Th1 and Th17 cells have an established role in protective immunity to Bordetella pertussis, but this evidence is based largely on peripheral T cells. There is emerging evidence that local tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells that accumulate in tissue following mucosal infection may be crucial for long-term immunity. In this study, we examined the role of respiratory CD4 TRM cells in immunity to B. pertussis Natural immunity to B. pertussis induced by infection is considered long lasting and effective at preventing reinfection. Consistent with this, we found that convalescent mice rapidly cleared the bacteria after reinfection. Furthermore, CD4 T cells with a TRM cell phenotype (CD44+CD62L-CD69+ or CD44+CD62L-CD69+CD103+) accumulated in the lungs of mice during infection with B. pertussis and significantly expanded through local proliferation following reinfection. These CD4 TRM cells were B. pertussis specific and secreted IL-17 or IL-17 and IFN-γ. Treatment of mice with FTY720, which prevented migration of T and B cells from lymph nodes to the circulation, significantly exacerbated B. pertussis infection. This was associated with significantly reduced infiltration of central memory T cells and B cells into the lungs. However, the local expansion of TRM cells and the associated rapid clearance of the secondary infection were not affected by treatment with FTY720 before rechallenge. Moreover, adoptive transfer of lung CD4 TRM cells conferred protection in naive mice. Our findings reveal that Ag-specific CD4 TRM cells play a critical role in adaptive immunity against reinfection and memory induced by natural infection with B. pertussis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Combination immunotherapy and active-specific tumor cell vaccination augments anti-cancer immunity in a mouse model of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Engel Natasja K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active-specific immunotherapy used as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy is rather unexplored for cancers with poorly characterized tumor antigens like gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to augment a therapeutic immune response to a low immunogenic tumor cell line derived from a spontaneous gastric tumor of a CEA424-SV40 large T antigen (CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mouse. Methods Mice were treated with a lymphodepleting dose of cyclophosphamide prior to reconstitution with syngeneic spleen cells and vaccination with a whole tumor cell vaccine combined with GM-CSF (a treatment strategy abbreviated as LRAST. Anti-tumor activity to subcutaneous tumor challenge was examined in a prophylactic as well as a therapeutic setting and compared to corresponding controls. Results LRAST enhances tumor-specific T cell responses and efficiently inhibits growth of subsequent transplanted tumor cells. In addition, LRAST tended to slow down growth of established tumors. The improved anti-tumor immune response was accompanied by a transient decrease in the frequency and absolute number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells (Tregs. Conclusions Our data support the concept that whole tumor cell vaccination in a lymphodepleted and reconstituted host in combination with GM-CSF induces therapeutic tumor-specific T cells. However, the long-term efficacy of the treatment may be dampened by the recurrence of Tregs. Strategies to counteract suppressive immune mechanisms are required to further evaluate this therapeutic vaccination protocol.

  11. Two alternate strategies for innate immunity to Epstein-Barr virus: One using NK cells and the other NK cells and γδ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaoud, Zakia; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Horowitz, Amir; Azzi, Tarik; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Olive, Daniel; Nadal, David; Norman, Paul J; Münz, Christian; Parham, Peter

    2017-06-05

    Most humans become infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which then persists for life. Infrequently, EBV infection causes infectious mononucleosis (IM) or Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Type I EBV infection, particularly type I BL, stimulates strong responses of innate immune cells. Humans respond to EBV in two alternative ways. Of 24 individuals studied, 13 made strong NK and γδ T cell responses, whereas 11 made feeble γδ T cell responses but stronger NK cell responses. The difference does not correlate with sex, HLA type, or previous exposure to EBV or cytomegalovirus. Cohorts of EBV+ children and pediatric IM patients include both group 1 individuals, with high numbers of γδ T cells, and group 2 individuals, with low numbers. The even balance of groups 1 and 2 in the human population points to both forms of innate immune response to EBV having benefit for human survival. Correlating these distinctive responses with the progress of EBV infection might facilitate the management of EBV-mediated disease. © 2017 Djaoud et al.

  12. Restimulation-induced T-cell death through NTB-A/SAP signaling pathway is impaired in tuberculosis patients with depressed immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Pellegrini, Joaquín M; Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Álvarez, Guadalupe I; Rolandelli, Agustín; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Malbran, Alejandro; Pasquinelli, Virginia; García, Verónica E

    2017-09-01

    Production of IFN-γ contributes to host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. We previously demonstrated that Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) expression on cells from tuberculosis (TB) patients was inversely correlated with IFN-γ production. Here we first investigated the role of NK, T- and B-cell antigen (NTB-A)/SAP pathway in the regulation of Th1 response against Mtb. Upon antigen stimulation, NTB-A phosphorylation rapidly increases and afterwards modulates IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion. To sustain a healthy immune system, controlled expansion and contraction of lymphocytes, both during and after an adaptive immune response, is essential. Besides, restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) results in an essential homeostatic mechanism for precluding excess T-cell accumulation and associated immunopathology during the course of certain infections. Accordingly, we found that the NTB-A/SAP pathway was required for RICD during active tuberculosis. In low responder (LR) TB patients, impaired RICD was associated with diminished FASL levels, IL-2 production and CD25(high) expression after cell-restimulation. Interestingly, we next observed that SAP mediated the recruitment of the Src-related kinase FYNT, only in T cells from LR TB patients that were resistant to RICD. Together, we showed that the NTB-A/SAP pathway regulates T-cell activation and RICD during human TB. Moreover, the NTB-A/SAP/FYNT axis promotes polarization to an unfavorable Th2-phenotype.

  13. Viral vector-based prime-boost immunization regimens : a possible involvement of T-cell competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mare, A.; Lambeck, A. J. A.; Regts, J.; van Dam, G. M.; Nijman, H. W.; Snippe, H.; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.

    Vaccination with recombinant viral vectors may be impeded by preexisting vector-specific immunity or by vector-specific immunity induced during the priming immunization. It is assumed that virus-neutralizing antibodies represent the principal effector mechanism of vector-specific immunity, while

  14. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune......-reactive T cells that recognize such targets may be activated due to the strong activation signal given by their cognate targets. The current review describes the existing knowledge regarding these self-reactive anti-Tregs, providing examples of antigen-specific anti-Tregs and discussing their possible roles...

  15. Gene-modified T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of renal cell cancer maintain transgene-specific immune functions in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S.C.L. Langeveld (Sabine); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: We have treated three patients with carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) positive metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) by adoptive transfer of autologous T-cells that had been gene-transduced to express a single-chain antibody-G250 chimeric receptor [scFv(G250)], and

  16. The immune privilege of the eye: human retinal pigment epithelial cells selectively modulate T-cell activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Lovato, Paola; Ødum, Niels

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the effect of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of T cells. METHODS: Resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were stimulated with PHA with or without the presence of gamma-irradiated RPE cells. Proliferation and the cell...

  17. Breadth of T cell responses after immunization with adenovirus vectors encoding ancestral antigens or polyvalent papillomavirus antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2017-01-01

    circulating strains and a putative ancestor of oncogenic HPVs, we showed that the ancestral vaccine antigen has to be approximately 90% identical to the circulating PVs before a marked drop of ~90% mean CD8+ T cell responses ensues. Interestingly, the combination of two or three type-specific PV vaccines did...

  18. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Dirlei; Claser, Carla; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P; Travassos, Luiz R; Palatnik, Marcos; Soares, Irene da Silva; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2010-11-09

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314) and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011) that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and for multivalent

  19. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

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    Dirlei Nico

    Full Text Available Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36 responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314 and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011 that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and

  20. Radioimmunotherapy Combined with Maintenance Anti-CD20 Antibody May Trigger Long-Term Protective T Cell Immunity in Follicular Lymphoma Patients

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    Franz Buchegger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that the patient’s immune response may play a major role in the long-term efficacy of antibody therapies of follicular lymphoma (FL. Particular long-lasting recurrence free survivals have been observed after first line, single agent rituximab or after radioimmunotherapy (RIT. Rituximab maintenance, furthermore, has a major efficacy in prolonging recurrence free survival after chemotherapy. On the other hand, RIT as a single step treatment showed a remarkable capacity to induce complete and partial remissions when applied in recurrence and as initial treatment of FL or given for consolidation. These clinical results strongly suggest that RIT combined with rituximab maintenance could stabilize the high percentages of patients with CR and PR induced by RIT. While the precise mechanisms of the long-term efficacy of these 2 treatments are not elucidated, different observations suggest that the patient’s T cell immune response could be decisive. With this review, we discuss the potential role of the patient’s immune system under rituximab and RIT and argue that the T cell immunity might be particularly promoted when combining the 2 antibody treatments in the early therapy of FL.

  1. Fucoidan can function as an adjuvant in vivo to enhance dendritic cell maturation and function and promote antigen-specific T cell immune responses.

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    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, including promoting antigen uptake and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of fucoidan in vivo, especially its adjuvant effect on in vivo anti-tumor immune responses, was not fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the function of spleen dendritic cells (DCs and its adjuvant effect in vivo. Systemic administration of fucoidan induced up-regulation of CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen cDCs. Fucoidan also promoted the generation of IFN-γ-producing Th1 and Tc1 cells in an IL-12-dependent manner. When used as an adjuvant in vivo with ovalbumin (OVA antigen, fucoidan promoted OVA-specific antibody production and primed IFN-γ production in OVA-specific T cells. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced OVA-induced up-regulation of MHC class I and II on spleen cDCs and strongly prompted the proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, OVA immunization with fucoidan as adjuvant protected mice from the challenge with B16-OVA tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that fucoidan can function as an adjuvant to induce Th1 immune response and CTL activation, which may be useful in tumor vaccine development.

  2. Characteristics of T-cell and B-cell immune respoonses to pollen allergens in Bulgarian patients with pollinosis

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    ZHIVKA KOSTOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the pollen allergens and identification of the main T-cell and B-cell epitopes is of crucial importance, since the clarification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms will allow long-term control of this type allergic diseases and development of safe immunotherapeutic medication. The objective of this study was to identify which pollen allergens are responsible for the T-cell activation in atopic patients with pollinosis and to determine whether the same allergens are responsible for the IgE-mediated reactions. Thirty-seven patients with pollinosis and thirteen non-allergic subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were collected out of the pollen season. T-cell responses (IFN-γ production towards different pollen allergens and levels of pollen specific IgE and IgG in the sera were measured by ELISA. The T-cell reactivity in most patients was directed towards the grass pollen B1, tree pollen I and autumn pollen B5. 70% of the allergic individuals responded to allergens from Lolium perenne, 84% to Dactylis glomerata, 11% to Phleum pratense, 65% to Betula pendula and 70% to Taxus baccata. Elevated serum levels of specific IgE in the allergic patients (p<0.01 were measured against the tree pollen I and autumn pollen, which include widespread deciduous trees (birch, willow, poplar and yew and Artemisia absinthium, respectively. Our results show that the T-cell reactivity and antibody responses may be directed towards different or the same allergens. In addition, we propose that short synthetic peptides, which contain overlapping T- and B-cell epitopes can be used for specific immunotherapy treatment if they lack antibody recognition domains.

  3. Natural splice variant of MHC class I cytoplasmic tail enhances dendritic cell-induced CD8+ T-cell responses and boosts anti-tumor immunity.

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    Tania G Rodríguez-Cruz

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC-mediated presentation of MHC class I (MHC-I/peptide complexes is a crucial first step in the priming of CTL responses, and the cytoplasmic tail of MHC-I plays an important role in modulating this process. Several species express a splice variant of the MHC-I tail that deletes exon 7-encoding amino acids (Δ7, including a conserved serine phosphorylation site. Previously, it has been shown that Δ7 MHC-I molecules demonstrate extended DC surface half-lives, and that mice expressing Δ7-K(b generate significantly augmented CTL responses to viral challenge. Herein, we show that Δ7-D(b-expressing DCs stimulated significantly more proliferation and much higher cytokine secretion by melanoma antigen-specific (Pmel-1 T cells. Moreover, in combination with adoptive Pmel-1 T-cell transfer, Δ7-D(b DCs were superior to WT-D(b DCs at stimulating anti-tumor responses against established B16 melanoma tumors, significantly extending mouse survival. Human DCs engineered to express Δ7-HLA-A*0201 showed similarly enhanced CTL stimulatory capacity. Further studies demonstrated impaired lateral membrane movement and clustering of human Δ7-MHC-I/peptide complexes, resulting in significantly increased bioavailability of MHC-I/peptide complexes for specific CD8+ T cells. Collectively, these data suggest that targeting exon 7-encoded MHC-I cytoplasmic determinants in DC vaccines has the potential to increase CD8+ T-cell stimulatory capacity and substantially improve their clinical efficacy.

  4. Increased Number of Circulating CD8/CD26 T Cells in the Blood of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients Is Associated with Augmented Binding of Adenosine Deaminase and Higher Muscular Strength Scores

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    Jonathan H. Soslow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked disorder that leads to cardiac and skeletal myopathy. The complex immune activation in boys with DMD is incompletely understood. To better understand the contribution of the immune system into the progression of DMD, we performed a systematic characterization of immune cell subpopulations obtained from peripheral blood of DMD subjects and control donors. We found that the number of CD8 cells expressing CD26 (also known as adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2 was increased in DMD subjects compared to control. No differences, however, were found in the levels of circulating factors associated with pro-inflammatory activation of CD8/CD26 cells, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, granzyme B, and interferon-γ (IFNγ. The number of CD8/CD26 cells correlated directly with quantitative muscle testing (QMT in DMD subjects. Since CD26 mediates binding of adenosine deaminase (ADA to the T cell surface, we tested ADA-binding capacity of CD8/CD26 cells and the activity of bound ADA. We found that mononuclear cells (MNC obtained from DMD subjects with an increased number of CD8/CD26 T cells had a greater capacity to bind ADA. In addition, these MNC demonstrated increased hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine. Altogether, our data demonstrated that (1 an increased number of circulating CD8/CD26 T cells is associated with preservation of muscle strength in DMD subjects, and (2 CD8/CD26 T cells from DMD subjects mediated degradation of adenosine by adenosine deaminase. These results support a role for T cells in slowing the decline in skeletal muscle function, and a need for further investigation into contribution of CD8/CD26 T cells in the regulation of chronic inflammation associated with DMD.

  5. A comparative analysis of HIV-specific mucosal/systemic T cell immunity and avidity following rDNA/rFPV and poxvirus-poxvirus prime boost immunisations.

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    Ranasinghe, Charani; Eyers, Fiona; Stambas, John; Boyle, David B; Ramshaw, Ian A; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2011-04-05

    In this study we have firstly compared a range of recombinant DNA poxvirus prime-boost immunisation strategies and shown that combined intramuscular (i.m.) 2× DNA-HIV/intranasal (i.n.) 2× FPV-HIV prime-boost immunisation can generate high-level of HIV-specific systemic (spleen) and mucosal (genito-rectal nodes, vaginal tissues and lung tissues) T cell responses and HIV-1 p24 Gag-specific serum IgG1, IgG2a and mucosal IgG, SIgA responses in vaginal secretions in BALB/c mice. Data indicate that following rDNA priming, two rFPV booster immunisations were necessary to generate good antibody and mucosal T cell immunity. This data also revealed that mucosal uptake of recombinant fowl pox (rFPV) was far superior to plasmid DNA. To further evaluate CD8+ T cell immunity, i.m. 2× DNA-HIV/i.n. 1× FPV-HIV immunisation strategy was directly compared with single shot poxvirus/poxvirus, i.n. FPV-HIV/i.m. VV-HIV immunisation. Results indicate that the latter strategy was able to generate strong sustained HIV-specific CD8+ T cells with higher avidity, broader cytokine/chemokine profiles and better protection following influenza-K(d)Gag(197-205) challenge compared to rDNA poxvirus prime-boost strategy. Our findings further substantiate the importance of vector selection/combination, order and route of delivery when designing effective vaccines for HIV-1. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway.

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    Varun C Anipindi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2 confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway.

  7. Reconstitution of the cellular immune response by lactoferrin in cyclophosphamide-treated mice is correlated with renewal of T cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Jolanta; Zimecki, Michal; Kruzel, Marian L

    2003-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is an alkylating agent used to treat both malignant and non-malignant immune-mediated inflammatory disorders in humans. It is also known as a potent immunosuppressive drug in humans and experimental animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of lactoferrin (LF) on cellular responses and reconstruction of the lymphocyte pool in mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP). Twelve week-old CBA mice were given a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of CP (400 mg/kg body weight), then were treated per os with seven doses of LF (1 mg/dose) on alternate days. We demonstrated that the magnitude of delayed type hypersensitivity to ovalbumin, strongly diminished by CP action, was reconstituted by LF. Oral LF treatment also resulted in partial recovery of Concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. Blood profile analysis revealed elevation of leukocytosis by LF in CP-treated mice (from 64.9 to 84.76% of the control value). LF also caused substantial restoration of the percentage of the lymphocyte population in circulating blood (from 43.4 to 60.2% of the control values). LF alone had no effect on the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in normal mice, however, the total number of leukocytes decreased by 23.25%. Furthermore, we showed that LF increased the cellularity of spleens isolated from CP-treated mice (from 53.2 to 78.8%) and the content of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages (elevations from 50.6 to 67.3% and from 65.2 to 83.6%, respectively). Lastly, using panning technique, we demonstrated that LF strongly elevated the pool of CD3+ T cells in normal and CP-immunocompromised mice and CD4+ T cell content. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that lactoferrin, given orally to CP-immunosuppressed mice, could reconstitute a T-cell mediated immune response by renewal of the T cell pool.

  8. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

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    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  9. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

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    Avijit Dutta; Ching-Tai Huang; Chun-Yen Lin; Tse-Ching Chen; Yung-Chang Lin; Chia-Shiang Chang; Yueh-Chia He

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus i...

  10. Antibody and T cell responses induced in chickens immunized with avian influenza virus N1 and NP DNA vaccine with chicken IL-15 and IL