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Sample records for augmented t-cell immunity

  1. Fusion of a viral antigen to invariant chain leads to augmented T-cell immunity and improved protection in gene-gun DNA-vaccinated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    against lethal peripheral challenge. The current study questioned whether the same strategy, i.e. linkage of GP to an Ii chain, could be applied to a naked DNA vaccine. Following gene-gun immunization with the linked construct (DNA-IiGP), GP-specific CD4(+) T cells could not be detected by flow cytometry...

  2. Priming immunization with DNA augments immunogenicity of recombinant adenoviral vectors for both HIV-1 specific antibody and T-cell responses.

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    Richard A Koup

    Full Text Available Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies.The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination.rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127(+ central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition.Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654.

  3. T cells and the humoral immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Muiswinkel (Willem)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractLymphoid cells and macrophages play an important role in the development and rnaintance of humoral and cellular immunity in mammals. The lymphoid cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs are divided into two major classes: (1) thymus-derived lymphocytes or T cells and (2) bursa-equivalent

  4. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  5. Augmentation of CAR T-cell Trafficking and Antitumor Efficacy by Blocking Protein Kinase A Localization.

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    Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Maceyko, Steven; Lo, Albert; Puré, Ellen; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Antitumor treatments based on the infusion of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) are still relatively ineffective for solid tumors, due to the presence of immunosuppressive mediators [such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and adenosine] and poor T-cell trafficking. PGE2 and adenosine activate protein kinase A (PKA), which then inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This inhibition process requires PKA to localize to the immune synapse via binding to the membrane protein ezrin. We generated CAR T cells that expressed a small peptide called the "regulatory subunit I anchoring disruptor" (RIAD) that inhibits the association of PKA with ezrin, thus blunting the negative effects of PKA on TCR activation. After exposure to PGE2 or adenosine in vitro, CAR-RIAD T cells showed increased TCR signaling, released more cytokines, and showed enhanced killing of tumor cells compared with CAR T cells. When injected into tumor-bearing mice, the antitumor efficacy of murine and human CAR-RIAD T cells was enhanced compared with that of CAR T cells, due to resistance to tumor-induced hypofunction and increased T-cell infiltration of established tumors. Subsequent in vitro assays showed that both mouse and human CAR-RIAD cells migrated more efficiently than CAR cells did in response to the chemokine CXCL10 and also had better adhesion to various matrices. Thus, the intracellular addition of the RIAD peptide to adoptively transferred CAR T cells augments their efficacy by increasing their effector function and by improving trafficking into tumor sites. This treatment strategy, therefore, shows potential clinical application for treating solid tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 541-51. ©2016 AACR.

  6. T cell immune responses in psoriasis.

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    Zohre Jadali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A central role for T cells and their cytokines in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed; however, there are controversies over the details of this issue. The goal of this study is to summarise currently available data on the importance of T cells in psoriasis pathogenesis. A systematic review of the English medical literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Iranian databases including Iranmedex, and SID for studies on associations between the involvement of T cell subsets and psoriasis. The results of the present study indicate that alterations in the number and function of different subsets of T-cells are associated with psoriasis. It appears that studies on T cell subsets contributed to understanding the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. In addition, it may have provided novel therapeutic opportunities in ameliorating immunopathologies.

  7. Mobilizing forces -CD4~+ helper T cells script adaptive immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédérick Masson; Gabrielle T Belz

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, CD4~+ T cells have been understood to play a key role in 'helping' CD8~+ T cells undergo efficient activation and proliferation in response to foreign pathogens. This has been thought to be directed primarily by CD4~+ T cell interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) [1, 2] that convert 'unlicenced' DCs into DCs capable of implementing a full blown immune response ('licenced' DCs).

  8. T cell intrinsic NOD2 is dispensable for CD8 T cell immunity.

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    Gloria H Y Lin

    Full Text Available NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that provides innate sensing of bacterial muramyl dipeptide by host cells, such as dendritic cells, macrophages and epithelial cells. While NOD2's role as an innate pathogen sensor is well established, NOD2 is also expressed at low levels in T cells and there are conflicting data as to whether NOD2 plays an intrinsic role in T cell function. Here we show that following adoptive transfer into WT hosts, NOD2(-/- OT-I T cells show a small decrease in the number of OVA-specific CD8 T cells recovered at the peak of the response to respiratory influenza virus infection. On the other hand, no such defect was observed upon intranasal immunization with a replication defective adenovirus carrying the OVA epitope recognized by OT-I, or when OVA was delivered with LPS subcutaneously, or when influenza-OVA was delivered intraperitoneally. Thus we observed a selective defect in NOD2-deficient T cell responses only during a live viral infection. Moreover, there was no apparent defect when NOD2(-/- OT-I T cells were stimulated in vitro. Finally, this selective defect in recovery of NOD2-deficient CD8 T cells was not observed in a non-transgenic respiratory infection model in which mixed bone marrow chimeras were used such that the NOD2(-/- T cells were allowed to develop and respond in a NOD2-sufficient host. Taken together our data indicate that T cell intrinsic NOD2 is not required for CD8 T cell responses to antigen delivered under a variety of conditions in vitro and in vivo. However, CD8 T cells that have developed in the absence of NOD2 show a selective and modest impairment in their response to live respiratory influenza infection.

  9. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

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    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  10. From T cell "exhaustion" to anti-cancer immunity.

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    Verdeil, Grégory; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Murray, Timothy; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has the potential to protect from malignant diseases for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, spontaneous immune responses are often inefficient. Significant effort is required to develop reliable, broadly applicable immunotherapies for cancer patients. A major innovation was transplantation with hematopoietic stem cells from genetically distinct donors for patients with hematologic malignancies. In this setting, donor T cells induce long-term remission by keeping cancer cells in check through powerful allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia effects. More recently, a long awaited breakthrough for patients with solid tissue cancers was achieved, by means of therapeutic blockade of T cell inhibitory receptors. In untreated cancer patients, T cells are dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell "exhaustion". Nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, indicating that many T cells are not entirely and irreversibly exhausted but can be mobilized to become highly functional. Novel antibody therapies that block inhibitory receptors can lead to strong activation of anti-tumor T cells, mediating clinically significant anti-cancer immunity for many years. Here we review these new treatments and the current knowledge on tumor antigen-specific T cells.

  11. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

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    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  12. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

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    Rafik Terra

    Full Text Available Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1 in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2 STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3 STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency.

  13. Foetal immune programming: hormones, cytokines, microbes and regulatory T cells.

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    Hsu, Peter; Nanan, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental cues play important roles in shaping the immune system. The first environment that the developing foetal immune system encounters is the uterus. Although physically the mother and the foetus are separated by the placental membranes, various factors such as hormones and cytokines may provide "environmental cues" to the foetal immune system. Additionally, increasing evidence suggests that prenatal maternal environmental factors, particularly microbial exposure, might significantly influence the foetal immune system, affecting long-term outcomes, a concept termed foetal immune programming. Here we discuss the potential mediators of foetal immune programming, focusing on the role of pregnancy-related hormones, cytokines and regulatory T cells, which play a critical role in immune tolerance.

  14. γδ T cells augment rejection of skin grafts by enhancing cross priming of CD8 T cells to skin derived antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimpour, Azad; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Yong, Michelle; Leggatt, Graham R; Steptoe, Raymond J.; Frazer, Ian H

    2012-01-01

    γδ T cells possess innate like properties and are proposed to bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. In this study we explored the role of γδ T cells in cutaneous immunity utilizing a skin transplantation model. Following engraftment of skin expressing cell associated model antigen (ovalbumin) in epithelial keratinocytes, skin resident γδ T cells enhanced graft rejection. While effector function of CD8 T cells was intact in the absence of γδ T cells, cross priming of CD8 T cell ...

  15. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

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    Jerod A Skyberg

    Full Text Available γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/- mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-, and GMCSF(-/- mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/- mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  16. Immune Thrombocytopenia in a Child with T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

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    Kayo Tokeji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with persistent thrombocytopenia during maintenance chemotherapy with mercaptopurine and methotrexate for T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. He was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP after thorough investigations for the relapse of lymphoma and was successfully treated with immunoglobulin and steroids. ITP is known to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but rarely with T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or in children. Diagnosis of ITP with lymphoma is challenging due to the many factors affecting platelet counts, and ITP often complicates the diagnosis or treatment course of lymphoma. The underlying mechanism of ITP with NHL is still unclear. Drug-induced immunomodulation with a reduction of regulatory T cells might have contributed to the development of ITP in our case.

  17. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2013-01-01

    Mice were immunized twice with a pool of five peptides selected among twenty 8-9-mer peptides for their ability to form stable complexes at 37°C with recombinant H-2K(b) (half-lives 10-15h). Vaccine-induced immunity of splenic CD8(+) T cells was studied in a 24h IFNγ Elispot assay. Surprisingly......, IFNγ spot-formation was observed without addition of peptide to the assay culture at 3 weeks and 3 months after immunization. To clarify if IFNγ spot formation in the absence of peptide exposure ex vivo is caused by the peptide-pool per se, mice were immunized with single peptides. Three of the five...... peptides induced normal peptide immunity i.e. the specific T cell reactivity in the Elispot culture was strictly dependent on exposure to the immunizing peptide ex vivo. However, immunization with two of the peptides, a VSV- and a Mycobacterium-derived peptide, resulted in IFNγ spot formation without...

  18. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  19. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolei Tang; Trevor RF Smith; Vipin Kumar

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations,suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming.

  20. Induction of Specific CD8+ T Cells against Intracellular Bacteria by CD8+ T-Cell-Oriented Immunization Approaches

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    Toshi Nagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For protection against intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, the cellular arm of adaptive immunity is necessary. A variety of immunization methods have been evaluated and are reported to induce specific CD8+ T cells against intracellular bacterial infection. Modified BCG vaccines have been examined to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. Naked DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce CD8+ T cells. In addition to this strategy, live attenuated intracellular bacteria such as Shigella, Salmonella, and Listeria have been utilized as carriers of DNA vaccines in animal models. Vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with antigenic peptides or the cells introduced antigen genes by virus vectors such as retroviruses is also a powerful strategy. Furthermore, vaccination with recombinant lentivirus has been attempted to induce specific CD8+ T cells. Combinations of these strategies (prime-boost immunization have been studied for the efficient induction of intracellular bacteria-specific CD8+ T cells.

  1. Delineation of canine parvovirus T cell epitopes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T cell clones from immunized dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.C.M. Poelen (Martien); R.H. Meloen; J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThree synthetic peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of VP2 of canine parvovirus (CPV) which were recently shown to represent three distinct T cell epitopes for BALB/c mice could prime BALB/c mice for a CPV-specific proliferative T cell response upon immunization. Proliferative

  2. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

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    Som Gowda Nanjappa

    Full Text Available Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+ T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+ T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 cells have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+ T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  3. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

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    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Heninger, Erika; Wüthrich, Marcel; Gasper, David Joseph; Klein, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+) T cells (Tc17 cells) have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+) T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  4. Follicular helper T cell in immunity and autoimmunity

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    D. Mesquita Jr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional concept that effector T helper (Th responses are mediated by Th1/Th2 cell subtypes has been broadened by the recent demonstration of two new effector T helper cells, the IL-17 producing cells (Th17 and the follicular helper T cells (Tfh. These new subsets have many features in common, such as the ability to produce IL-21 and to express the IL-23 receptor (IL23R, the inducible co-stimulatory molecule ICOS, and the transcription factor c-Maf, all of them essential for expansion and establishment of the final pool of both subsets. Tfh cells differ from Th17 by their ability to home to B cell areas in secondary lymphoid tissue through interactions mediated by the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13. These CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells are considered an effector T cell type specialized in B cell help, with a transcriptional profile distinct from Th1 and Th2 cells. The role of Tfh cells and its primary product, IL-21, on B-cell activation and differentiation is essential for humoral immunity against infectious agents. However, when deregulated, Tfh cells could represent an important mechanism contributing to exacerbated humoral response and autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. This review highlights the importance of Tfh cells by focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of normal immune response to infectious microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  5. Regulatory T cells and the immune pathogenesis of prenatal infection.

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    Rowe, Jared H; Ertelt, James M; Xin, Lijun; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Pregnancy in placental mammals offers exceptional comprehensive benefits of in utero protection, nutrition, and metabolic waste elimination for the developing fetus. However, these benefits also require durable strategies to mitigate maternal rejection of fetal tissues expressing foreign paternal antigens. Since the initial postulate of expanded maternal immune tolerance by Sir Peter Medawar 60 years ago, an amazingly elaborate assortment of molecular and cellular modifications acting both locally at the maternal-placental interface and systemically have been shown to silence potentially detrimental maternal immune responses. In turn, simultaneously maintaining host defense against the infinite array of potential pathogens during pregnancy is equally important. Fortunately, resistance against most infections is preserved seamlessly throughout gestation. On the other hand, recent studies on pathogens with unique predisposition for prenatal infections have uncovered distinctive holes in host defense associated with the reproductive process. Using these infections to probe the response during pregnancy, the immune suppressive regulatory subset of maternal CD4 T cells has been increasingly shown to dictate the inter-workings between prenatal infection susceptibility and pathogenesis of ensuing pregnancy complications. Herein, the recent literature suggesting a necessity for maternal regulatory T cells (Tregs) in pregnancy-induced immunological shifts that sustain fetal tolerance is reviewed. Additional discussion is focused on how expansion of maternal Treg suppression may become exploited by pathogens that cause prenatal infections and the perilous potential of infection-induced immune activation that may mitigate fetal tolerance and inadvertently inject hostility into the protective in utero environment.

  6. Autoreactive T cells in the immune pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris.

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    Amber, Kyle T; Staropoli, Patrick; Shiman, Michael I; Elgart, George W; Hertl, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a life-threatening autoimmune blistering disease caused by anti-desmoglein IgG autoantibodies that finally lead to acantholysis presenting clinically as progressive blistering. Whilst the production of pathogenic antibodies is key to the development of pemphigus vulgaris, many immunological steps are required prior to autoantibody induction. We review advances in the understanding of these immunologic processes with a focus on human leucocyte antigen polymorphisms and antigen recognition, epitope spreading, central and peripheral tolerance, T helper differentiation, induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and T-cell regulation of B cells. Targeting autoaggressive T cells as regulators and stimulators of B-cell antibody production should allow for more specific therapeutic immune interventions, avoiding the global immunosuppression seen with many commonly used immunosuppressants in pemphigus vulgaris.

  7. T cell metabolism. The protein LEM promotes CD8⁺ T cell immunity through effects on mitochondrial respiration.

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    Okoye, Isobel; Wang, Lihui; Pallmer, Katharina; Richter, Kirsten; Ichimura, Takahuru; Haas, Robert; Crouse, Josh; Choi, Onjee; Heathcote, Dean; Lovo, Elena; Mauro, Claudio; Abdi, Reza; Oxenius, Annette; Rutschmann, Sophie; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2015-05-29

    Protective CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity requires a massive expansion in cell number and the development of long-lived memory cells. Using forward genetics in mice, we identified an orphan protein named lymphocyte expansion molecule (LEM) that promoted antigen-dependent CD8(+) T cell proliferation, effector function, and memory cell generation in response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Generation of LEM-deficient mice confirmed these results. Through interaction with CR6 interacting factor (CRIF1), LEM controlled the levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and respiration, resulting in the production of pro-proliferative mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS). LEM provides a link between immune activation and the expansion of protective CD8(+) T cells driven by OXPHOS and represents a pathway for the restoration of long-term protective immunity based on metabolically modified cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells.

  8. Rapid and sustained CD4(+) T-cell-independent immunity from adenovirus-encoded vaccine antigens

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    Holst, Peter J; Bartholdy, Christina; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2007-01-01

    Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein to that e......Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein...... to that elicited with an adenovirus-encoded minimal epitope covalently linked to beta(2)-microglobulin. We demonstrate that the beta(2)-microglobulin-linked epitope induced an accelerated and augmented CD8(+) T-cell response. Furthermore, the immunity conferred by vaccination with beta(2)-microglobulin...... in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help were sustained in the long term and able to expand and control a secondary challenge with LCMV. Our results demonstrate that modifications to the antigen used in adenovirus vaccines may be used to improve the induced T-cell response. Such a strategy for CD4(+) T...

  9. Ctla-4 blockade plus adoptive T-cell transfer promotes optimal melanoma immunity in mice.

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    Mahvi, David A; Meyers, Justin V; Tatar, Andrew J; Contreras, Amanda; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; Leverson, Glen E; Sen, Siddhartha; Cho, Clifford S

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of advanced melanoma have relied on strategies that augment the responsiveness of endogenous tumor-specific T-cell populations [eg, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade-mediated checkpoint inhibition] or introduce exogenously prepared tumor-specific T-cell populations [eg, adoptive cell transfer (ACT)]. Although both approaches have shown considerable promise, response rates to these therapies remain suboptimal. We hypothesized that a combinatorial approach to immunotherapy using both CTLA-4 blockade and nonlymphodepletional ACT could offer additive therapeutic benefit. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with syngeneic B16F10 melanoma tumors transfected to express low levels of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus peptide GP33 (B16GP33), and treated with no immunotherapy, CTLA-4 blockade, ACT, or combination immunotherapy of CTLA-4 blockade with ACT. Combination immunotherapy resulted in optimal control of B16GP33 melanoma tumors. Combination immunotherapy promoted a stronger local immune response reflected by enhanced tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte populations, and a stronger systemic immune responses reflected by more potent tumor antigen-specific T-cell activity in splenocytes. In addition, whereas both CTLA-4 blockade and combination immunotherapy were able to promote long-term immunity against B16GP33 tumors, only combination immunotherapy was capable of promoting immunity against parental B16F10 tumors as well. Our findings suggest that a combinatorial approach using CTLA-4 blockade with nonlymphodepletional ACT may promote additive endogenous and exogenous T-cell activities that enable greater therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of melanoma.

  10. Adjuvant-enhanced CD4 T Cell Responses are Critical to Durable Vaccine Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A.O. Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based vaccines offer a safer alternative to live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines but have limited immunogenicity. The identification of adjuvants that augment immunogenicity, specifically in a manner that is durable and antigen-specific, is therefore critical for advanced development. In this study, we use the filovirus virus-like particle (VLP as a model protein-based vaccine in order to evaluate the impact of four candidate vaccine adjuvants on enhancing long term protection from Ebola virus challenge. Adjuvants tested include poly-ICLC (Hiltonol, MPLA, CpG 2395, and alhydrogel. We compared and contrasted antibody responses, neutralizing antibody responses, effector T cell responses, and T follicular helper (Tfh cell frequencies with each adjuvant's impact on durable protection. We demonstrate that in this system, the most effective adjuvant elicits a Th1-skewed antibody response and strong CD4 T cell responses, including an increase in Tfh frequency. Using immune-deficient animals and adoptive transfer of serum and cells from vaccinated animals into naïve animals, we further demonstrate that serum and CD4 T cells play a critical role in conferring protection within effective vaccination regimens. These studies inform on the requirements of long term immune protection, which can potentially be used to guide screening of clinical-grade adjuvants for vaccine clinical development.

  11. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  12. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin E Kara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H1/T(H2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  13. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  14. T cell immunity and vaccines against invasive fungal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, James Isami

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades much has been learned about the immunology of invasive fungal infection, especially invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Although quite different in their pathogenesis, the major common protective host response is Th1 mediated. It is through Th1 cytokine production that the effector cells, phagocytes, are activated to kill the fungus. A more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of disease, the elicited protective Th1 immune response, the T cell antigen(s) which elicit this response, and the mechanism(s) whereby one can enhance, reconstitute, or circumvent the immunosuppressed state will, hopefully, lead to the development of a vaccine(s) capable of protecting even the most immunocompromised of hosts.

  15. Engineering T cell immunity by TCR gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnemann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses against tumor-antigens are frequently observed for some human malignancies, in particular melanoma. However, the spontaneous development of T cell responses of a sufficient strength to eradicate human malignancies is rare. The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) αβ genes into autologo

  16. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy.

  17. Downregulation of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells may underlie enhanced Th1 immunity caused by immunization with activated autologous T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Cao; Dangsheng Li; Ningli Li; Li Wang; Fang Du; Huiming Sheng; Yan Zhang; Juanjuan Wu; Baihua Shen; Tianwei Shen; Jingwu Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play important roles in immune system homeostasis, and may also be involved in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing Thl immune response which is involved in anti-tumor immunity. We have previously reported that immunization with attenuated activated autologous T cells leads to enhanced anti-tumor immunity and upregulated Thl responses in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that Treg function was significantly downregulated in mice that received immunization of attenuated activated autologous T cells. We found that Foxp3 expression decreased in CD4+CD25+ T cells from the immunized mice. Moreover, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg obtained from immunized mice exhibited diminished immunosuppression ability compared to those from naive mice. Further analysis showed that the serum of immunized mice contains a high level of anti-CD25 antibody (about 30 ng/ml,/K0.01 vs controls). Consistent with a role of anti-CD25 response in the down-regulation of Treg, adoptive transfer of serum from immunized mice to naive mice led to a significant decrease in Treg population and function in recipient mice. The triggering of anti-CD25 response in immunized mice can be explained by the fact that CD25 was induced to a high level in the ConA activated autologous T cells used for immunization. Our results demonstrate for the first time that immunization with attenuated activated autologous T cells evokes anti-CD25 antibody production, which leads to impeded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg expansion and function in vivo. We suggest that dampened Treg function likely contributes to enhanced Thl response in immunized mice and is at least part of the mechanism underlying the boosted anti-tumor immunity.

  18. IL-7 inhibits tumor growth by promoting T cell-mediated antitumor immunity in Meth A model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-Cai; Shen, Guo-Bo; Wang, Shi-Min; Wan, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Immune suppression is well documented during tumor progression, which includes loss of effect of T cells and expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells. IL-7 plays a key role in the proliferation, survival and homeostasis of T cells and displays a potent antitumor activity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of IL-7 in Meth A model. IL-7 inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice with corresponding increases in the frequency of CD4 and CD8 T cells, Th1 (CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)), Tc1 (CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) and T cells cytolytic activity against Meth A cells. Neutralization of CD4 or CD8 T cells reversed the antitumor benefit of IL-7. Furthermore, IL-7 decreased regulatory T Foxp3 as well as cells suppressive activity with a reciprocal increase in SMAD7. In addition, we observed an increase of the serum concentrations of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and a significant decrease of TGF-β and IL-10 after IL-7 treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that IL-7 augments T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and improves the effect of antitumor in Meth A model.

  19. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  20. Distinct T cell dynamics in lymph nodes during the induction of tolerance and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugues, Stéphanie; Fetler, Luc; Bonifaz, Laura; Helft, Julie; Amblard, François; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2004-12-01

    Induction of immunity and peripheral tolerance requires contacts between antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) and cognate T cells. Using real-time two-photon microscopy, we have analyzed the dynamics of CD8(+) T cells in lymph nodes during the induction of antigen-specific immunity or tolerance. At 15-20 h after the induction of immunity, T cells stopped moving and established prolonged interactions with DCs. In tolerogenic conditions, despite effective initial T cell activation and proliferation, naive T cells remained motile and established serial brief contacts with multiple DCs. Thus, stable DC-T cell interactions occur during the induction of priming, whereas brief contacts may contribute to the induction of T cell tolerance.

  1. The role of invariant natural killer T cells in microbial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Yuki; Kitano, Naoki; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2013-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are unique lymphocytes with characteristic features, such as expression of an invariant T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) α-chain, recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules, and ability to rapidly produce large amounts of cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) upon TCR stimulation. Many studies have demonstrated that iNKT cells participate in immune response against diverse microbes, including bacteria, fungi, protozoan parasites, and viruses. Generally, these cells play protective roles in host defense against infections. However, in some contexts they play pathogenic roles, by inducing or augmenting inflammation. Recent reports show that iNKT cells recognize glycolipid antigens from pathogenic bacteria including Streptococcus pneumoniae, and they contribute to host defense against infection. iNKT cell responses to these microbial glycolipid antigens are highly conserved between rodents and humans, suggesting that iNKT cells are evolutionally conserved because their invariant TCR is useful in detecting certain pathogens. Furthermore, glycolipid-mediated iNKT cell activation during immunization has adjuvant activity, enhancing humoral and cell-mediated responses. Therefore, iNKT cell activation is an attractive target for developing new vaccines for infectious diseases.

  2. Discovering naturally processed antigenic determinants that confer protective T cell immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Spencer, Charles T; Conant, Stephanie B;

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (TCD8) confer protective immunity against many infectious diseases, suggesting that microbial TCD8 determinants are promising vaccine targets. Nevertheless, current T cell antigen identification approaches do not discern which epitopes drive protective immunity during active infectio...

  3. CD4+ T-cell priming as biomarker to study immune response to preventive vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCiabattini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available T-cell priming is a critical event in the initiation of the immune response to vaccination since it deeply influences both the magnitude and the quality of the immune response induced. CD4+ T-cell priming, required for the induction of high-affinity antibodies and immune memory, represents a key target for improving and modulating vaccine immunogenicity. A major challenge in the study of in vivo T-cell priming is due to the low frequency of antigen-specific T cells. This review discusses the current knowledge on antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell priming in the context of vaccination, as well as the most advanced tools for the characterization of the in vivo T-cell priming and the opportunities offered by the application of systems biology.

  4. Persistence and Adaptation in Immunity: T Cells Balance the Extent and Thoroughness of Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Matthew Fricke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective search strategies have evolved in many biological systems, including the immune system. T cells are key effectors of the immune response, required for clearance of pathogenic infection. T cell activation requires that T cells encounter antigen-bearing dendritic cells within lymph nodes, thus, T cell search patterns within lymph nodes may be a crucial determinant of how quickly a T cell immune response can be initiated. Previous work suggests that T cell motion in the lymph node is similar to a Brownian random walk, however, no detailed analysis has definitively shown whether T cell movement is consistent with Brownian motion. Here, we provide a precise description of T cell motility in lymph nodes and a computational model that demonstrates how motility impacts T cell search efficiency. We find that both Brownian and Lévy walks fail to capture the complexity of T cell motion. Instead, T cell movement is better described as a correlated random walk with a heavy-tailed distribution of step lengths. Using computer simulations, we identify three distinct factors that contribute to increasing T cell search efficiency: 1 a lognormal distribution of step lengths, 2 motion that is directionally persistent over short time scales, and 3 heterogeneity in movement patterns. Furthermore, we show that T cells move differently in specific frequently visited locations that we call "hotspots" within lymph nodes, suggesting that T cells change their movement in response to the lymph node environment. Our results show that like foraging animals, T cells adapt to environmental cues, suggesting that adaption is a fundamental feature of biological search.

  5. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo.

  6. T cell mediated cerebral hemorrhages and microhemorrhages during passive Aβ immunization in APPPS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Calignon Alix

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ, the peptide that accumulates in the form of senile plaques and in the cerebrovasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes a dramatic immune response that prevents plaque formation and clears accumulated Aβ in transgenic mice. In a clinical trial of Aβ immunization, some patients developed meningoencephalitis and hemorrhages. Neuropathological investigations of patients who died after the trial showed clearance of amyloid pathology, but also a powerful immune response involving activated T cells probably underlying the negative effects of the immunization. Results To define the impact of T cells on this inflammatory response we used passive immunization and adoptive transfer to separate the effect of IgG and T cell mediated effects on microhemorrhage in APPPS1 transgenic mice. Neither anti Aβ IgG nor adoptively transferred T cells, alone, led to increased cerebrovascular damage. However, the combination of adoptively transferred T cells and passive immunization led to massive cerebrovascular bleeding that ranged from multiple microhemorrhages in the parenchyma to large hematomas. Conclusions Our results indicate that vaccination can lead to Aβ and T cell induced cerebral micro-hemorrhages and acute hematomas, which are greatly exacerbated by T cell mediated activity.

  7. The interplay of sequence conservation and T cell immune recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Sette, Alessandro; Greenbaum, Jason

    2014-01-01

    examined the hypothesis that conservation of a peptide in bacteria that are part of the healthy human microbiome leads to a reduced level of immunogenicity due to tolerization of T cells to the commensal bacteria. This was done by comparing experimentally characterized T cell epitope recognition data from...... recognition of peptides in bacterial pathogens is influenced by their conservation in commensal bacteria. If the further work proves that this approach is successful, the degree of overlap of a peptide with the human proteome or microbiome could be added to the arsenal of tools available to assess peptide...

  8. Helper T-cell heterogeneity: a complex developmental issue in the immune system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Dong

    2010-01-01

    After activation by antigen-presenting cells, naive, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells differentiate into effector T cells. Two decades ago, Coffman and Mosman first discovered the heterogeneity of effector T cells, which were named as Th 1 or Th2 cells.1 Th 1 and Th2 cells are differentially induced and are involved in immunity against intracellular and extracellular pathogens, respectively, as well as immunopathologies such as autoimmunity and allergy.

  9. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  10. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  11. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4(+) T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4(+) T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will

  12. T Cell Receptors and the Evolution of Recognition Mechanisms in Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchley, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses recent advances in the study of mammalian immunology. Explains the roles of two families of lymphocytes, the B cells and T cells. Also examines evolutionary mechanisms related to the immune system. (ML)

  13. Inactivation of tumor suppressor Dlg1 augments transformation of a T-cell line induced by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yuetsu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax1 protein with the tumor suppressor Dlg1 is correlated with cellular transformation. Results Here, we show that Dlg1 knockdown by RNA interference increases the ability of Tax1 to transform a mouse T-cell line (CTLL-2, as measured interleukin (IL-2-independent growth. A Tax1 mutant defective for the Dlg1 interaction showed reduced transformation of CTLL-2 compared to wild type Tax1, but the transformation was minimally affected by Dlg1 reduction. The few Tax1ΔC-transduced CTLL-2 cells that became transformed expressed less Dlg1 than parental cells, suggesting that Dlg1-low cells were selectively transformed by Tax1ΔC. Moreover, all human T-cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1, including the recombinant HTLV-1-containing Tax1ΔC, expressed less Dlg1 than control T-cell lines. Conclusion These results suggest that inactivation of Dlg1 augments Tax1-mediated transformation of CTLL-2, and PDZ protein(s other than Dlg1 are critically involved in the transformation.

  14. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase specific, cytotoxic T cells as immune regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Svane, Inge Marie;

    2011-01-01

    , this caused an increase in the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha while decreasing the IL-10 production. Finally, the addition of IDO-inducing agents (ie, the TLR9 ligand cytosine-phosphate- guanosine, soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4...... show that the presence of such IDO-specific CD8(+) T cells boosted T-cell immunity against viral or tumor-associated antigens by eliminating IDO+ suppressive cells. This had profound effects on the balance between interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells. Furthermore...

  15. Vaginal immunization to elicit primary T-cell activation and dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pettini

    Full Text Available Primary T-cell activation at mucosal sites is of utmost importance for the development of vaccination strategies. T-cell priming after vaginal immunization, with ovalbumin and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant as model vaccine formulation, was studied in vivo in hormone-synchronized mice and compared to the one induced by the nasal route. Twenty-four hours after both vaginal or nasal immunization, antigen-loaded dendritic cells were detected within the respective draining lymph nodes. Vaginal immunization elicited a strong recruitment of antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells into draining lymph nodes that was more rapid than the one observed following nasal immunization. T-cell clonal expansion was first detected in iliac lymph nodes, draining the genital tract, and proliferated T cells disseminated towards distal lymph nodes and spleen similarly to what observed following nasal immunization. T cells were indeed activated by the antigen encounter and acquired homing molecules essential to disseminate towards distal lymphoid organs as confirmed by the modulation of CD45RB, CD69, CD44 and CD62L marker expression. A multi-type Galton Watson branching process, previously used for in vitro analysis of T-cell proliferation, was applied to model in vivo CFSE proliferation data in draining lymph nodes 57 hours following immunization, in order to calculate the probabilistic decision of a cell to enter in division, rest in quiescence or migrate/die. The modelling analysis indicated that the probability of a cell to proliferate was higher following vaginal than nasal immunization. All together these data show that vaginal immunization, despite the absence of an organized mucosal associated inductive site in the genital tract, is very efficient in priming antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells and inducing their dissemination from draining lymph nodes towards distal lymphoid organs.

  16. Depletion of CD25+CD4+T cells (Tregs) enhances the HBV-specific CD8+ T cell response primed by DNA immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshihiro Furuichi; Hirotake Tokuyama; Satoshi Ueha; Makoto Kurachi; Fuminori Moriyasu; Kazuhiro Kakimi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by a weak CD8+ T cell response to HBV. Immunotherapeutic strategies that overcome tolerance and boost these suboptimal responses may facilitate viral clearance in chronically infected individuals. Therefore, we examined whether CD25+CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells might be involved in a inhibition of CD8+T cell priming or in the modulation of the magnitude of the'peak' antiviral CD8+ T cell response primed by DNA immunization. METHODS: B10.D2 mice were immunized once with plasmid pCMV-S. Mice received 500 μg of anti-CD25 mAb injected intraperitoneally 3 d before DNA immunization to deplete CD25+ cells. Induction of HBV-specific CD8+ T ceils in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured by S28-39 peptide loaded DimerX staining and their function was analyzed by intracellular IFN-γ staining.RESULTS: DNA immunization induced HBV-specific CD8+ T cells. At the peak T cell response (d 10), 7.1±2.0% of CD8+ T cells were HBV-specific after DNA immunization, whereas 12.7±3.2% of CD8+ T cells were HBV-specific in Treg-depleted mice, suggesting that DNA immunization induced more antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD25+ Treg cells (n = 6, P<0.05). Similarly, fewer HBVspecific memory T cells were detected in the presence of these cells (1.3±0.4%) in comparison to Treg-depleted mice (2.6±0.9%) on d 30 after DNA immunization (n = 6, P<0.01). Both IFN-γ production and the avidity of the HBV-specific CD8+ T cell response to antigen were higher in HBV-specific CD8+ T cells induced in the absence of Treg cells.CONCLUSION: CD25+ Treg cells suppress priming and/or expansion of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells during DNA immunization and the peak CD8+ T cell response is enhanced by depleting this cell population. Furthermore, Treg cells appear to be involved in the contraction phase of the CD8+ T ceil response and may affect the quality of memory T cell pools. The elimination of Treg

  17. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  18. Interrogating the relationship between naïve and immune antiviral T cell repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gruta, Nicole L; Thomas, Paul G

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how naïve virus-specific CD8+ T cells influence the type of immune response generated after virus infection is critical for the development of enhanced therapeutic and vaccination strategies to exploit CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. Recent technological advances in T cell isolation and T receptor sequencing have allowed for greater understanding of the basic structure of immune T cell repertoires, the diversity of responses within and between individuals, and changes in repertoires over time and in response to infection conditions. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of how T cell repertoires contribute to potent antiviral responses. Additionally we compare the state of the art in receptor sequencing, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the three most common approaches: next-generation sequencing, template-switch anchored RT-PCR, and multiplex single cell PCR. Finally, we describe how TCR sequencing has delineated the relationship between naïve and immune T cell repertoires.

  19. Evasion of T cell immunity by Epstein-Barr virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.

    2011-01-01

    Immune evasion strategies are thought to contribute essentially to the life cycle of persistent viruses by delaying the elimination of the infected cell long enough to enable the virus to replicate. Exemplary in this context are the herpesviruses, large DNA viruses that are carried as a persistent a

  20. Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells and Fixed Immune Surveillance in Nonlymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Francis R

    2015-07-01

    T cell immunity is often defined in terms of memory lymphocytes that use the blood to access a range of organs. T cells are involved in two patterns of recirculation. In one, the cells shuttle back and forth between blood and secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in the second, memory cells recirculate between blood and nonlymphoid tissues. The latter is a means by which blood T cells control peripheral infection. It is now clear that there exists a distinct memory T cell subset that is absent from blood but found within nonlymphoid tissues. These nonrecirculating tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells develop within peripheral compartments and never spread beyond their point of lodgement. This review examines fixed immune surveillance by TRM cells, highlighting features that make them potent controllers of infection in nonlymphoid tissues. These features provide clues about TRM cell specialization, such as their ability to deal with sequestered, persisting infections confined to peripheral compartments.

  1. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J.O.; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recover...

  2. Lack of p53 Augments Antitumor Functions in Cytolytic T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anirban; Thyagarajan, Krishnamurthy; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Chakraborty, Paramita; Kesarwani, Pravin; Soloshchenko, Myroslawa; Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Andrijauskaite, Kristina; Moxley, Kelly; Janakiraman, Harinarayanan; Scheffel, Matthew J; Helke, Kristi; Armenson, Kent; Palanisamy, Viswanathan; Rubinstein, Mark P; Mayer, Elizabeth-Garrett; Cole, David J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Nishimura, Michael I; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-09-15

    Repetitive stimulation of T-cell receptor (TCR) with cognate antigen results in robust proliferation and expansion of the T cells, and also imprints them with replicative senescence signatures. Our previous studies have shown that life-span and antitumor function of T cells can be enhanced by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) or intervening with ROS-dependent JNK activation that leads to its activation-induced cell death. Because tumor suppressor protein p53 is also a redox active transcription factor that regulates cellular ROS generation that triggers downstream factor-mediating apoptosis, we determined if p53 levels could influence persistence and function of tumor-reactive T cells. Using h3T TCR transgenic mice, with human tyrosinase epitope-reactive T cells developed on p53 knockout (KO) background, we determined its role in regulating antitumor T-cell function. Our data show that as compared with h3T cells, h3T-p53 KO T cells exhibited enhanced glycolytic commitment that correlated with increased proliferation, IFNγ secretion, cytolytic capacity, expression of stemness gene signature, and decreased TGF-β signaling. This increased effector function correlated to the improved control of subcutaneously established murine melanoma after adoptive transfer of p53-KO T cells. Pharmacological inhibition of human TCR-transduced T cells using a combination of p53 inhibitors also potentiated the T-cell effector function and improved persistence. Thus, our data highlight the key role of p53 in regulating the tumor-reactive T-cell response and that targeting this pathway could have potential translational significance in adoptive T-cell therapy. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5229-40. ©2016 AACR.

  3. The influence of chronic stress on T cell immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Sommershof, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Chronic environmental and psychological stress has long been suspected to increase the susceptibility and outcome of numerous infectious and inflammatory diseases. The release of neurotransmitters (catecholamines) and adrenal hormones (glucocorticoids) has been well documented as the basis for a connection between the central nervous system and peripheral components of the immune system. Glucocorticoids, the end products of stress-induced neuroendocrine pathways and the hypothalamic-pituitary...

  4. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  5. γδ T Cell-Mediated Immunity to Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairallah, Camille; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Capone, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    γδ T lymphocytes are unconventional immune cells, which have both innate- and adaptive-like features allowing them to respond to a wide spectrum of pathogens. For many years, we and others have reported on the role of these cells in the immune response to human cytomegalovirus in transplant patients, pregnant women, neonates, immunodeficient children, and healthy people. Indeed, and as described for CD8+ T cells, CMV infection leaves a specific imprint on the γδ T cell compartment: (i) driving a long-lasting expansion of oligoclonal γδ T cells in the blood of seropositive individuals, (ii) inducing their differentiation into effector/memory cells expressing a TEMRA phenotype, and (iii) enhancing their antiviral effector functions (i.e., cytotoxicity and IFNγ production). Recently, two studies using murine CMV (MCMV) have corroborated and extended these observations. In particular, they have illustrated the ability of adoptively transferred MCMV-induced γδ T cells to protect immune-deficient mice against virus-induced death. In vivo, expansion of γδ T cells is associated with the clearance of CMV infection as well as with reduced cancer occurrence or leukemia relapse risk in kidney transplant patients and allogeneic stem cell recipients, respectively. Taken together, all these studies show that γδ T cells are important immune effectors against CMV and cancer, which are life-threatening diseases affecting transplant recipients. The ability of CMV-induced γδ T cells to act independently of other immune cells opens the door to the development of novel cellular immunotherapies that could be particularly beneficial for immunocompromised transplant recipients.

  6. Acellular pertussis booster in adolescents induces Th1 and memory CD8+ T cell immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Rieber

    Full Text Available In a number of countries, whole cell pertussis vaccines (wcP were replaced by acellular vaccines (aP due to an improved reactogenicity profile. Pertussis immunization leads to specific antibody production with the help of CD4(+ T cells. In earlier studies in infants and young children, wcP vaccines selectively induced a Th1 dominated immune response, whereas aP vaccines led to a Th2 biased response. To obtain data on Th1 or Th2 dominance of the immune response in adolescents receiving an aP booster immunization after a wcP or aP primary immunization, we analyzed the concentration of Th1 (IL-2, TNF-α, INF-γ and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 cytokines in supernatants of lymphocyte cultures specifically stimulated with pertussis antigens. We also investigated the presence of cytotoxic T cell responses against the facultative intracellular bacterium Bordetella pertussis by quantifying pertussis-specific CD8(+ T cell activation following the aP booster immunization. Here we show that the adolescent aP booster vaccination predominantly leads to a Th1 immune response based on IFNgamma secretion upon stimulation with pertussis antigen, irrespective of a prior whole cell or acellular primary vaccination. The vaccination also induces an increase in peripheral CD8(+CD69(+ activated pertussis-specific memory T cells four weeks after vaccination. The Th1 bias of this immune response could play a role for the decreased local reactogenicity of this adolescent aP booster immunization when compared to the preceding childhood acellular pertussis booster. Pertussis-specific CD8(+ memory T cells may contribute to protection against clinical pertussis.

  7. YB-1 immunization combined with regulatory T-cell depletion induces specific T-cell responses that protect against neuroblastoma in the early stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zheng; Ping Liu; Xiaofeng Yang

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and the most common cancer in infancy.Currently,no effective clinical treatments are available for advanced neuroblastoma.In a previous study,we screened Y Box protein 1 (YB-1) as a potential neuroblastoma-associated antigen from sera of AGN2a-immunized mice by serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries technique.The aim of this study is to explore if YB-1 immunization in the context of Treg depletion could induce protective immune response against the neuroblastoma in mice.YB-1 was expressed and purified by pET-15b prokaryotic expression system.It was demonstrated that anti-YB-1 CD8+ T-cell responses could be induced by AGN2a immunization,and the strongest CD8+ T-cell responses against AGN2a were induced by YB-1-immunized mice in the context of Treg depletion compared with YB-1 only immunization group and control group.Importantly,the survival rate of mice treated with YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion was 80% when challenged by 1 × 104 AGN2a cells,significantly higher than that of mice immunized with YB-1 alone (P< 0.01).Furthermore,T-cell adoptive therapy showed that the neuroblastoma growth was inhibited when T cells or splenic cells from YB-1-immunized mice with Treg depletion were transferred to AGN2a bearing mice.Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were involved in the anti-neuroblastoma responses induced by YB-1immunization combined with Treg depletion.These results indicated that YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion could induce specific T-cell responses against neuroblastoma and could be a potential strategy for the prevention and treatment of neuroblastoma in the early stage.

  8. Colon cancer and the immune system: The role of tumor invading T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maximilian Waldner; Carl C Schimanski; Markus F Neurath

    2006-01-01

    Colon cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the host immune system has been shown to react against tumor cells, mainly through tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and NK cells, tumor cells may utilize different ways to escape anti-tumor immune response. Tumor infiltration of CD8+ and CD4+ (T-bet+)effector T cells has been attributed to a beneficial outcome, and the enhancement of T cell activation through T cell receptor stimulation and co-stimulatory signals provides promising strategies for immunotherapy of colon cancer. Growing evidence supports a role for the Fas/FasL system in tumor immunology, although the mechanisms and consequences of FasL activation in colon cancer are not completely understood. In animal models, depletion of regulatory T cells (CD4+ CD25+T cells) can enhance the anti-tumor immune response under certain conditions. Taken together, recent insights in the immune reaction against colon carcinoma have provided new approaches to immunotherapy,although much remains to be learned about the exact mechanisms.

  9. Involvement of CD244 in regulating CD4+ T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfen Yang

    Full Text Available CD244 (2B4 is a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family of immune cell receptors and it plays an important role in modulating NK cell and CD8(+ T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CD244/2B4 on CD4(+ T cells from active TB patients and latent infection individuals. Active TB patients had significantly elevated CD244/2B4 expression on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells compared with latent infection individuals. The frequencies of CD244/2B4-expressing antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in retreatment active TB patients than in new active TB patients. Compared with CD244/2B4-dull and -middle CD4(+ T cells, CD244/2B4-bright CD4(+ T cell subset had significantly reduced expression of IFN-γ, suggesting that CD244/2B4 expression may modulate IFN-γ production in M. tuberculosis antigen-responsive CD4(+ T cells. Activation of CD244/2B4 signaling by cross-linking led to significantly decreased production of IFN-γ. Blockage of CD244/2B4 signaling pathway of T cells from patients with active TB resulted in significantly increased production of IFN-γ, compared with isotype antibody control. In conclusion, CD244/2B4 signaling pathway has an inhibitory role on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell function.

  10. Rho kinase regulates induction of T-cell immune dysfunction in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Z; Palani, K; Zhang, S; Lepsenyi, M; Hwaiz, R; Rahman, M; Syk, I; Jeppsson, B; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    T-cell dysfunction increases susceptibility to infections in patients with sepsis. In the present study, we hypothesized that Rho kinase signaling might regulate induction of T-cell dysfunction in abdominal sepsis. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with the specific Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (5 mg/kg of body weight) prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Spleen CD4 T-cell apoptosis, proliferation, and percentage of regulatory T cells (CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) were determined by flow cytometry. Formation of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in the spleen and plasma levels of HMBG1, IL-17, and IL-6 were quantified by use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It was found that CLP evoked apoptosis and decreased proliferation in splenic CD4 T cells. Inhibition of Rho kinase activity decreased apoptosis and enhanced proliferation of CD4 T cells in septic animals. In addition, CLP-evoked induction of regulatory T cells in the spleen was abolished by Rho kinase inhibition. CLP reduced the levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in the spleen. Pretreatment with Y-27632 inhibited the sepsis-induced decrease in IFN-γ but not IL-4 formation in the spleen. CLP increased plasma levels of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) by 20-fold and IL-6 by 19-fold. Inhibition of Rho kinase decreased this CLP-evoked increase of HMGB1, IL-6, and IL-17 levels in the plasma by more than 60%, suggesting that Rho kinase regulates systemic inflammation in sepsis. Moreover, we observed that pretreatment with Y-27632 abolished CLP-induced bacteremia. Together, our novel findings indicate that Rho kinase is a powerful regulator of T-cell immune dysfunction in abdominal sepsis. Thus, targeting Rho kinase signaling might be a useful strategy to improve T-cell immunity in patients with abdominal sepsis.

  11. Signatures of T cells as correlates of immunity to Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Eneslätt

    Full Text Available Tularemia or vaccination with the live vaccine strain (LVS of Francisella tularensis confers long-lived cell-mediated immunity. We hypothesized that this immunity depends on polyfunctional memory T cells, i.e., CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cells with the capability to simultaneously express several functional markers. Multiparametric flow cytometry, measurement of secreted cytokines, and analysis of lymphocyte proliferation were used to characterize in vitro recall responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to killed F. tularensis antigens from the LVS or Schu S4 strains. PBMC responses were compared between individuals who had contracted tularemia, had been vaccinated, or had not been exposed to F. tularensis (naïve. Significant differences were detected between either of the immune donor groups and naïve individuals for secreted levels of IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIP-1β. Expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, and CD107a by CD4(+CD45RO(+ or CD8(+CD45RO(+ T cells correlated to antigen concentrations. In particular, IFN-γ and MIP-1β strongly discriminated between immune and naïve individuals. Only one cytokine, IL-6, discriminated between the two groups of immune individuals. Notably, IL-2- or TNF-α-secretion was low. Our results identify functional signatures of T cells that may serve as correlates of immunity and protection against F. tularensis.

  12. Immune outcomes in the liver: Is CD8 T cell fate determined by the environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yik Chun; Tay, Szun Szun; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bowen, David G; Bertolino, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    The liver is known for its tolerogenic properties. This unique characteristic is associated with persistent infection of the liver by the hepatitis B and C viruses. Improper activation of cellular adaptive immune responses within the liver and immune exhaustion over time both contribute to ineffective cytotoxic T cell responses to liver-expressed antigens in animal models, and likely play a role in incomplete clearance of chronic hepatitis virus infections in humans. However, under some conditions, functional immune responses can be elicited against hepatic antigens, resulting in control of hepatotropic infections. In order to develop improved therapeutics in immune-mediated chronic liver diseases, including viral hepatitis, it is essential to understand how intrahepatic immunity is regulated. This review focuses on CD8 T cell immunity directed towards foreign antigens expressed in the liver, and explores how the liver environment dictates the outcome of intrahepatic CD8 T cell responses. Potential strategies to rescue unresponsive CD8 T cells in the liver are also discussed.

  13. Aptamer-targeted inhibition of mTOR in T cells enhances antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnoy, Alexey; Castro, Iris; Levay, Agata; Malek, Thomas R; Gilboa, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have underscored the importance of memory T cells in mediating protective immunity against pathogens and cancer. Pharmacological inhibition of regulators that mediate T cell differentiation promotes the differentiation of activated CD8(+) T cells into memory cells. Nonetheless, pharmacological agents have broad targets and can induce undesirable immunosuppressive effects. Here, we tested the hypothesis that aptamer-targeted siRNA inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) function in CD8(+) T cells can enhance their differentiation into memory T cells and potentiate antitumor immunity more effectively than the pharmacologic inhibitor rapamycin. To specifically target activated cells, we conjugated an siRNA targeting the mTORC1 component raptor to an aptamer that binds 4-1BB, a costimulatory molecule that is expressed on CD8(+) T cells following TCR stimulation. We found that systemic administration of the 4-1BB aptamer-raptor siRNA to mice downregulated mTORC1 activity in the majority of CD8(+) T cells, leading to the generation of a potent memory response that exhibited cytotoxic effector functions and enhanced vaccine-induced protective immunity in tumor-bearing mice. In contrast, while treatment with the general mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin also enhanced antigen-activated CD8(+) T cell persistence, the cytotoxic effector functions of the reactivated memory cells were reduced and the alloreactivity of DCs was diminished. Consistent with the immunological findings, mice treated with rapamycin, but not with 4-1BB aptamer-raptor siRNA, failed to reject a subsequent tumor challenge.

  14. PPARγ antagonist attenuates mouse immune-mediated bone marrow failure by inhibition of T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuya; Feng, Xingmin; Chen, Jichun; Li, Jungang; Muranski, Pawel; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells target hematopoietic cells; at presentation, the bone marrow is replaced by fat. It was reported that bone marrow adipocytes were negative regulators of hematopoietic microenvironment. To examine the role of adipocytes in bone marrow failure, we investigated peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, utilizing an antagonist of this factor called bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether. While bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether inhibited adipogenesis as expected, it also suppressed T cell infiltration of bone marrow, reduced plasma inflammatory cytokines, decreased expression of multiple inflammasome genes, and ameliorated marrow failure. In vitro, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether suppressed activation and proliferation, and reduced phospholipase C gamma 1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 expression, as well as inhibiting calcium flux in T cells. The in vivo effect of bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether on T cells was confirmed in a second immune-mediated bone marrow failure model, using different strains and non-major histocompatibility antigen mismatched: bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether ameliorated marrow failure by inhibition of T cell infiltration of bone marrow. Our data indicate that peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists may attenuate murine immune-mediated bone marrow failure, at least in part, by suppression of T cell activation, which might hold implications in the application of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists in immune-mediated pathophysiologies, both in the laboratory and in the clinic. Genetically "fatless" mice developed bone marrow failure with accumulation of marrow adipocytes in our model, even in the absence of body fat, suggesting different mechanisms of systematic and marrow adipogenesis and physiologic versus pathophysiologic fat accumulation.

  15. Direct and Indirect Role of Toll-Like Receptors in T Cell Mediated Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DamoXu; HaiyingLiu; MousaKomai-Koma

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognition receptors that play an important role in protective immunity against infection and inflammation. They act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists of microbial products. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors by microbial products leads to signaling pathways that activate not only innate, but also adaptive immunity by APC dependent or independent mechanisms. Recent evidence revealed that TLR signals played a determining role in the skewing of naive T cells towards either Thl or Th2 responses. Activation of Toll-like receptors also directly or indirectly influences regulatory T cell functions. Therefore, TLRs are required in both immune activation and immune regulation. Study of TLRs has significantly enhanced our understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses and provides novel therapeutic approaches against infectious and inflammatory diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  16. Direct and Indirect Role of Toll-Like Receptors in T Cell Mediated Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damo Xu; Haiying Liu; Mousa Komai-Koma

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognition receptors that play an important role in protective immunity against infection and inflammation. They act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists of microbial products. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors by microbial products leads to signaling pathways that activate not only innate, but also adaptive immunity by APC dependent or independent mechanisms. Recent evidence revealed that TLR signals played a determining role in the skewing of na(i)ve T cells towards either Th1 or Th2 responses. Activation of Toll-like receptors also directly or indirectly influences regulatory T cell functions. Therefore, TLRs are required in both immune activation and immune regulation. Study of TLRs has significantly enhanced our understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses and provides novel therapeutic approaches against infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  17. Dendritic cell-derived IL-15 controls the induction of CD8 T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, René; Brandt, Katja; Bulanova, Elena; Mirghomizadeh, Farhad; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-12-01

    The development and the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells are dependent on IL-15. Here, we have studied the source and mechanism of how IL-15 modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated Th1 immune responses by employing two delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) models. IL-15-deficient (IL-15(-/-)) mice or mice treated with soluble IL-15Ralpha as an IL-15 antagonist showed significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent DTH responses, while activation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell functions remained unaffected. Injection of antigen-labeled dendritic cells (DC) from IL-15(+/+), IL-15(-/-) or IL-15Ralpha(-/-) mice revealed that DC-derived IL-15 is an absolute requirement for the initiation of DTH response. The re-establishment of the interaction of IL-15 with the IL-15Ralpha by incubating IL-15(-/-) DC with IL-15 completely restored the capacity to prime T cells for DTH induction in vivo. Moreover, IL-15 also enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC and triggered in vitro CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 release. Taken together, the data suggest that an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Ralpha signaling loop in DC is essential for inducing CD8(+)-dependent Th1 immune responses in mice. Therefore, targeted manipulation of this loop promises to be an effective, novel strategy for therapeutic modulation of clinically relevant DTH reactions.

  18. TAP-independent self-peptides enhance T cell recognition of immune-escaped tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduijn, Elien M.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Querido, Bianca J.; Oliveira, Cláudia C.; Achour, Adnane; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van Hall, Thorbald

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells frequently escape from CD8+ T cell recognition by abrogating MHC-I antigen presentation. Deficiency in processing components, like the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), results in strongly decreased surface display of peptide/MHC-I complexes. We previously identified a class of hidden self-antigens known as T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing (TEIPP), which emerge on tumor cells with such processing defects. In the present study, we analyzed thymus selection and peripheral behavior of T cells with specificity for the prototypic TEIPP antigen, the “self” TRH4 peptide/Db complex. TEIPP T cells were efficiently selected in the thymus, egressed with a naive phenotype, and could be exploited for immunotherapy against immune-escaped, TAP-deficient tumor cells expressing low levels of MHC-I (MHC-Ilo). In contrast, overt thymus deletion and functionally impaired TEIPP T cells were observed in mice deficient for TAP1 due to TEIPP antigen presentation on all body cells in these mice. Our results strongly support the concept that TEIPPs derive from ubiquitous, nonmutated self-antigens and constitute a class of immunogenic neoantigens that are unmasked during tumor immune evasion. These data suggest that TEIPP-specific CD8+ T cells are promising candidates in the treatment of tumors that have escaped from conventional immunotherapies. PMID:26784543

  19. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  20. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  1. Epistasis between microRNAs 155 and 146a during T cell-mediated antitumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Thomas B.; Hu, Ruozhen; Runtsch, Marah C.; Bake, Erin; Chen, Xinjian; Zhao, Jimmy; Round, June L.; Baltimore, David; O’Connell, Ryan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY An increased understanding of antitumor immunity is necessary to improve cell-based immunotherapies against human cancers. Here, we investigated the roles of two immune system-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-155 and miR-146a, in the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Our results indicate that miR-155 promotes and miR-146a inhibits IFNγ responses by T cells and reduced solid tumor growth in vivo. Using a novel double knockout (DKO) mouse strain deficient in both miR-155 and miR-146a, we have also identified an epistatic relationship between these two miRNAs. DKO mice had defective T cell responses and tumor growth phenotypes similar to miR-155−/− mice. Further analysis of the T cell compartment revealed that miR-155 modulates IFNγ expression through a mechanism involving repression of Ship1. Our work reveals critical roles for miRNAs in the reciprocal regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity, and demonstrates the dominant nature of miR-155 during its promotion of immune responses. PMID:23200854

  2. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection.......-cell-mediated inflammation, no significant influence of VLA-1 was found either in the primary response or in the memory phase. However, alpha-VLA-4 antibody reduced the DTH-like reaction in VLA-1(-/-) mice to a higher degree than in wt mice, suggesting a synergistic effect of blocking both integrins. Taken together...

  3. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders.

  4. The plasticity of gamma delta T cells: innate immunity, antigen presentation and new immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti, Rita; Martino, Angelo

    2008-06-01

    Several signals influence dendritic cell (DC) functions and consequent the immune responses to infectious pathogens. Our recent findings provide a new model of intervention on DCs implicating human gammadelta T cell stimuli. Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells represent the major subset of circulating human gammadelta T cells and can be activated by non-peptidic molecules derived from different microorganisms or abnormal metabolic routes. With activated-Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell co-culture, immature DCs acquire features of mature DCs, such as increasing the migratory activity, up-regulating the chemokine receptors, and triggering the Th1 immune response. Similar to the NK-derived signals, DC activation is mediated by soluble factors as well as cell-to-cell contact. Many non-peptidic molecules including nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and pyrophosphomonoester drugs, can stimulate the activity of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in vitro and in vivo. The relatively low in vivo toxicity of many of these drugs makes possible novel vaccine and immune-based strategies against infectious diseases.

  5. The Plasticity of γδ T Cells: Innate Immunity, Antigen Presentation and New Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti, Rita; Martino, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Several signals influence dendritic cell (DC) functions and consequent the immune responses to infectious pathogens. Our recent findings provide a new model of intervention on DCs implicating human γδ T cell stimuli. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells represent the major subset of circulating human γδ T cells and can be activated by non-peptidic molecules derived from different microorganisms or abnormal metabolic routes. With activated-Vγ9Vδ2 T cell co-culture, immature DCs acquire features of mature DCs, such as increasing the migratory activity, up-regulating the chemokine receptors, and triggering the Th1 immune response. Similar to the NK-derived signals, DC activation is mediated by soluble factors as well as cell-to-cell contact. Many non-peptidic molecules including nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and pyrophosphomonoester drugs, can stimulate the activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in vitro and in vivo. The relatively low in vivo toxicity of many of these drugs makes possible novel vaccine and immune-based strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:18582397

  6. The Plasticity of γδT Cells: Innate Immunity, Antigen Presentation and New Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rita Casetti; Angelo Martino

    2008-01-01

    Several signals influence dendritic cell (DC) functions and consequent the immune responses to infectious pathogens. Our recent findings provide a new model of intervention on DCs implicating human γδ T cell stimuli. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells represent the major subset of circulating human γδ T cells and can be activated by non-peptidic molecules derived from different microorganisms or abnormal metabolic routes. With activated-Vγ9Vδ2 T cell co-culture, immature DCs acquire features of mature DCs, such as increasing the migratory activity, up-regulating the chemokine receptors, and triggering the Thl immune response. Similar to the NK-derived signals, DC activation is mediated by soluble factors as well as cell-to-cell contact. Many non-peptidic molecules including nitrogen- containing bisphosphonates and pyrophosphomonoester drugs, can stimulate the activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in vitro and in vivo. The relatively low in vivo toxicity of many of these drugs makes possible novel vaccine and immune-based strategies against infectious diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(3):161-170.

  7. T cell immunity as a tool for studying epigenetic regulation of cellular differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Edward Russ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation is regulated by the strict spatial and temporal control of gene expression. This is achieved, in part, by regulating changes in histone post-translational modifications (PTMs and DNA methylation that in-turn, impact transcriptional activity. Further, histone PTMs and DNA methylation are often propagated faithfully at cell division (termed epigenetic propagation, and thus contribute to maintaining cellular identity in the absence of signals driving differentiation. Cardinal features of adaptive T cell immunity include the ability to differentiate in response to infection, resulting in acquisition of immune functions required for pathogen clearance; and the ability to maintain this functional capacity in the long-term, allowing more rapid and effective pathogen elimination following re-infection. These characteristics underpin vaccination strategies by effectively establishing a long-lived T cell population that contributes to an immunologically protective state (termed immunological memory. As we discuss in this review, epigenetic mechanisms provide attractive and powerful explanations for key aspects of T cell-mediated immunity - most obviously and notably, immunological memory, because of the capacity of epigenetic circuits to perpetuate cellular identities in the absence of the initial signals that drive differentiation. Indeed, T cell responses to infection are an ideal model system for studying how epigenetic factors shape cellular differentiation and development generally. This review will examine how epigenetic mechanisms regulate T cell function and differentiation, and how these model systems are providing general insights into the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription during cellular differentiation.

  8. Memory CD8+ T Cells: Orchestrators and Key Players of Innate Immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvau, Grégoire; Goriely, Stanislas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decades, the dichotomy between innate and adaptive immune responses has largely dominated our understanding of immunology. Upon primary encounter with microbial pathogens, differentiation of adaptive immune cells into functional effectors usually takes several days or even longer, making them contribute to host protection only late during primary infection. However, once generated, antigen-experienced T lymphocytes can persist in the organism and constitute a pool of memory cells that mediate fast and effective protection to a recall infection with the same microbial pathogen. Herein, we challenge this classical paradigm by highlighting the "innate nature" of memory CD8+ T cells. First, within the thymus or in the periphery, naïve CD8+ T cells may acquire phenotypic and functional characteristics of memory CD8+ T cells independently of challenge with foreign antigens. Second, both the "unconventional" and the "conventional" memory cells can rapidly express protective effector functions in response to sets of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines signals, independent of cognate antigen triggering. Third, memory CD8+ T cells can act by orchestrating the recruitment, activation, and licensing of innate cells, leading to broad antimicrobial states. Thus, collectively, memory CD8+ T cells may represent important actors of innate immune defenses.

  9. The T cell antigen receptor: the Swiss army knife of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaf, M; Legut, M; Cole, D K; Sewell, A K

    2015-07-01

    The mammalian T cell receptor (TCR) orchestrates immunity by responding to many billions of different ligands that it has never encountered before and cannot adapt to at the protein sequence level. This remarkable receptor exists in two main heterodimeric isoforms: αβ TCR and γδ TCR. The αβ TCR is expressed on the majority of peripheral T cells. Most αβ T cells recognize peptides, derived from degraded proteins, presented at the cell surface in molecular cradles called major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Recent reports have described other αβ T cell subsets. These 'unconventional' T cells bear TCRs that are capable of recognizing lipid ligands presented in the context of the MHC-like CD1 protein family or bacterial metabolites bound to the MHC-related protein 1 (MR1). γδ T cells constitute a minority of the T cell pool in human blood, but can represent up to half of total T cells in tissues such as the gut and skin. The identity of the preferred ligands for γδ T cells remains obscure, but it is now known that this receptor can also functionally engage CD1-lipid, or immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily proteins called butyrophilins in the presence of pyrophosphate intermediates of bacterial lipid biosynthesis. Interactions between TCRs and these ligands allow the host to discriminate between self and non-self and co-ordinate an attack on the latter. Here, we describe how cells of the T lymphocyte lineage and their antigen receptors are generated and discuss the various modes of antigen recognition by these extraordinarily versatile receptors.

  10. Regulation of vesicular traffic at the T cell immune synapse: lessons from the primary cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Onnis, Anna; Baldari, Cosima T

    2015-03-01

    The signals that orchestrate the process of T cell activation are coordinated at the specialized interface that forms upon contact with an antigen presenting cell displaying a specific MHC-associated peptide ligand, known as the immune synapse. The central role of vesicular traffic in the assembly of the immune synapse has emerged only in recent years with the finding that sustained T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling involves delivery of TCR/CD3 complexes from an intracellular pool associated with recycling endosomes. A number of receptors as well as membrane-associated signaling mediators have since been demonstrated to exploit this process to localize to the immune synapse. Here, we will review our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for TCR recycling, with a focus on the intraflagellar transport system, a multimolecular complex that is responsible for the assembly and function of the primary cilium which we have recently implicated in polarized endosome recycling to the immune synapse.

  11. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg an

  12. T-cell immunity and cytokine production in cosmonauts after long-duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morukov, B.; Rykova, M.; Antropova, E.; Berendeeva, T.; Ponomaryov, S.; Larina, I.

    2011-04-01

    Long-duration spaceflight effects on T-cell immunity and cytokine production were studied in 12 Russian cosmonauts flown onto the International Space Station. Specific assays were performed before launch and after landing and included analysis of peripheral leukocyte distribution, analysis of T-cell phenotype, expression of activation markers, apoptosis, proliferation of T cells in response to a mitogen, concentrations of cytokines in supernatants of cell cultures. Statistically significant increase was observed in leukocytes', lymphocytes', monocytes' and granulocytes' total number, increase in percentage and absolutely number of CD3 +CD4 +-cells, CD4 +CD45RA +-cells and CD4 +CD45RA +/CD4 +CD45RО + ratio, CD4 +CD25 +Bright regulatory cells ( pIL-10. It revealed depression of IFN-g/IL-10 ratio after flight. Correlation analysis according to Spearman's rank correlation test established significant positive correlations ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and T-cell activation (CD25+, CD38+) and negative correlation ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and number of bulk memory CD4+T-cells (CD45RO+). Thus, these results suggest that T-cell dysfunction can be conditioned by cytokine dysbalance and could lead to development of disease after long-duration space flights.

  13. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  14. Immunization with vaccinia virus induces polyfunctional and phenotypically distinctive CD8+ T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precopio, Melissa L.; Betts, Michael R.; Parrino, Janie; Price, David A.; Gostick, Emma; Ambrozak, David R.; Asher, Tedi E.; Douek, Daniel C.; Harari, Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Bailer, Robert; Graham, Barney S.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus immunization provides lifelong protection against smallpox, but the mechanisms of this exquisite protection are unknown. We used polychromatic flow cytometry to characterize the functional and phenotypic profile of CD8+ T cells induced by vaccinia virus immunization in a comparative vaccine trial of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) versus Dryvax immunization in which protection was assessed against subsequent Dryvax challenge. Vaccinia virus–specific CD8+ T cells induced by both MVA and Dryvax were highly polyfunctional; they degranulated and produced interferon γ, interleukin 2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and tumor necrosis factor α after antigenic stimulation. Responding CD8+ T cells exhibited an unusual phenotype (CD45RO−CD27intermediate). The unique phenotype and high degree of polyfunctionality induced by vaccinia virus also extended to inserted HIV gene products of recombinant NYVAC. This quality of the CD8+ T cell response may be at least partially responsible for the profound efficacy of these vaccines in protection against smallpox and serves as a benchmark against which other vaccines can be evaluated. PMID:17535971

  15. Neutrophils are dispensable in the modulation of T cell immunity against cutaneous HSV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils rapidly infiltrate sites of inflammation during peripheral infection or tissue injury. In addition to their well described roles as pro-inflammatory phagocytes responsible for pathogen clearance, recent studies have demonstrated a broader functional repertoire including mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Specifically, neutrophils have been proposed to mediate antigen transport to lymph nodes (LN) to modulate T cell priming and to influence T cell migration to infected tissues. Using a mouse model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection we explored potential contributions of neutrophils toward anti-viral immunity. While a transient, early influx of neutrophils was triggered by dermal scarification, we did not detect migration of neutrophils from the skin to LN. Furthermore, despite recruitment of neutrophils into LN from the blood, priming and expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unaffected following neutrophil depletion. Finally, we found that neutrophils were dispensable for the migration of effector T cells into infected skin. Our study suggests that the immunomodulatory roles of neutrophils toward adaptive immunity may be context-dependent, and are likely determined by the type of pathogen and anatomical site of infection. PMID:28112242

  16. Virulent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium evades adaptive immunity by preventing dendritic cells from activating T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Jaime A; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Mora, Jorge E; Quezada, Sergio A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2006-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  17. Genetic adjuvantation of recombinant MVA with CD40L potentiates CD8 T cell mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning eLauterbach

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70 early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated CTLs also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases.

  18. The mucosal immune system in the oral cavity-an orchestra of T cell diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Qing Wu; Dun-Fang Zhang; Eric Tu; Qian-Ming Chen; WanJun Chen

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system defends against a vast array of pathogens, yet it exhibits limited responses to commensal microorganisms under healthy conditions. The oral-pharyngeal cavity, the gateway for both the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, is composed of complex anatomical structures and is constantly challenged by antigens from air and food. The mucosal immune system of the oral-pharyngeal cavity must prevent pathogen entry while maintaining immune homeostasis, which is achieved via a range of mechanisms that are similar or different to those utilized by the gastrointestinal immune system. In this review, we summarize the features of the mucosal immune system, focusing on T cell subsets and their functions. We also discuss our current understanding of the oral-pharyngeal mucosal immune system.

  19. Armc5 deletion causes developmental defects and compromises T-cell immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Lao, Linjiang; Mao, Jianning; Jin, Wei; Luo, Hongyu; Charpentier, Tania; Qi, Shijie; Peng, Junzheng; Hu, Bing; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw Martin; Lamarre, Alain; Wu, Jiangping

    2017-01-01

    Armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) is a cytosolic protein with no enzymatic activities. Little is known about its function and mechanisms of action, except that gene mutations are associated with risks of primary macronodular adrenal gland hyperplasia. Here we map Armc5 expression by in situ hybridization, and generate Armc5 knockout mice, which are small in body size. Armc5 knockout mice have compromised T-cell proliferation and differentiation into Th1 and Th17 cells, increased T-cell apoptosis, reduced severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis, and defective immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. These mice also develop adrenal gland hyperplasia in old age. Yeast 2-hybrid assays identify 16 ARMC5-binding partners. Together these data indicate that ARMC5 is crucial in fetal development, T-cell function and adrenal gland growth homeostasis, and that the functions of ARMC5 probably depend on interaction with multiple signalling pathways. PMID:28169274

  20. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  1. CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a path for vaccine development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Virgilio, Fernando; Pontes, Camila; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Ersching, Jonatan; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    MHC-restricted CD8(+) T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8(+) T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8(+) T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8(+) T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  2. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando dos Santos Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  3. Induction of regulatory T cells by high-dose gp96 suppresses murine liver immune hyperactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghui Li

    Full Text Available Immunization with high-dose heat shock protein gp96, an endoplasmic reticulum counterpart of the Hsp90 family, significantly enhances regulatory T cell (Treg frequency and suppressive function. Here, we examined the potential role and mechanism of gp96 in regulating immune-mediated hepatic injury in mice. High-dose gp96 immunization elicited rapid and long-lasting protection of mice against concanavalin A (Con A-and anti-CD137-induced liver injury, as evidenced by decreased alanine aminotransaminase (ALT levels, hepatic necrosis, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6, and number of IFN-γ (+ CD4(+ and IFN-γ (+ CD8(+ T cells in the spleen and liver. In contrast, CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ Treg frequency and suppressive function were both increased, and the protective effect of gp96 could be generated by adoptive transfer of Treg cells from gp96-immunized mice. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that gp96 stimulation enhanced Treg proliferation and suppressive function, and up-regulation of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β1 induced by gp96 was dependent on TLR2- and TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation. Our work shows that activation of Tregs by high-dose gp96 immunization protects against Con A- and anti-CD137-induced T cell-hepatitis and provides therapeutic potential for the development of a gp96-based anti-immune hyperactivation vaccine against immune-mediated liver destruction.

  4. T cell immunity to dengue virus and implications for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus infections are increasing at an alarming rate in many tropical and subtropical countries and represent, in some of these areas, a leading cause of hospitalization and death among children. The lack of a clear definition of the correlates of protection from severe dengue disease represents a major hurdle for vaccine development. In particular, the role of T lymphocytes during dengue infection remains unclear and there is evidence suggesting that these cells may be important for both protective immunity and/or immunopathology. In this review we discuss the findings that support a protective role of T cells versus those supporting their involvement in pathogenesis. A better understanding of T cell immunity is urgently needed for the development of safe and efficacious vaccines.

  5. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhaoChen; MeganS.Ford; KevinJ.Young; LiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4*CD8* double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  6. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhao Chen; Megan S. Ford; Kevin J. Young; Li Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  7. Calcium Signalling Triggered by NAADP in T Cells Determines Cell Shape and Motility During Immune Synapse Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Merle; Zhang, Bo; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) has been implicated as an initial Ca2+ trigger in T cell Ca2+ signalling, but its role in formation of the immune synapse in CD4+ effector T cells has not been analysed. CD4+ T cells are activated by the interaction with peptide-MHCII complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. Establishing a two-cell system including primary rat CD4+ T cells specific for myelin basic protein and rat astrocytes enabled us to mirror this activation process in vitro and to analyse Ca2+ signalling, cell shape changes and motility in T cells during formation and maintenance of the immune synapse. After immune synapse formation, T cells showed strong, antigen-dependent increases in free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Analysis of cell shape and motility revealed rounding and immobilization of T cells depending on the amplitude of the Ca2+ signal. NAADP-antagonist BZ194 effectively blocked Ca2+ signals in T cells evoked by the interaction with antigen-presenting astrocytes. BZ194 reduced the percentage of T cells showing high Ca2+ signals thereby supporting the proposed trigger function of NAADP for global Ca2+ signalling. Taken together, the NAADP signalling pathway is further confirmed as a promising target for specific pharmacological intervention to modulate T cell activation. PMID:27747143

  8. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component.

  9. Tissue-Resident T Cells as the Central Paradigm of Chlamydia Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond M; Brunham, Robert C

    2016-04-01

    For almost 2 decades, results from Chlamydia pathogenesis investigations have been conceptualized using a cytokine polarization narrative. Recent viral immunity studies identifying protective tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) suggest an alternative paradigm based on localized immune networks. As Chlamydia vaccines enter the preclinical pipeline and, in the case of an attenuated trachoma vaccine, are given to human subjects, it may be useful to ask whether cytokine polarization is the appropriate framework for understanding and evaluating vaccine efficacy. In this review, we revisit C. trachomatis pathogenesis data from mice and humans using a Trm narrative and note a comfortable concordance with the Chlamydia pathogenesis literature.

  10. CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV-infected patients express multiple negative immune checkpoints following stimulation with HCV peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathan, Muttiah; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chang, Li Yen; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Sigamani, Panneer; Saeidi, Alireza; Ram, M Ravishankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are key to successful viral clearance in HCV disease. Accumulation of exhausted HCV-specific T cells during chronic infection results in considerable loss of protective functional immune responses. The role of T-cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the frequency of HCV peptide-stimulated T cells expressing negative immune checkpoints (PD-1, CTLA-4, TRAIL, TIM-3 and BTLA) by flow cytometry, and measured the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines secreted by T cells by a commercial Multi-Analyte ELISArray™ following in vitro stimulation of T cells using HCV peptides and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV (CHC) patients showed significant increase of CTLA-4. Furthermore, HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ T cells of CHC patients also displayed relatively higher levels of PD-1 and TRAIL, whereas TIM-3 was up-regulated on HCV peptide-stimulated CD8+ T cells. Whereas the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 were significantly increased, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 were markedly decreased in the T cell cultures of CHC patients. Chronic HCV infection results in functional exhaustion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells likely contributing to viral persistence.

  11. Functional analysis of membrane-bound complement regulatory protein on T-cell immune response in ginbuna crucian carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Indriyani; Abdelkhalek, Nevien K; Motobe, Shiori; Nakamura, Ryota; Tsujikura, Masakazu; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2016-02-01

    Complements have long been considered to be a pivotal component in innate immunity. Recent researches, however, highlight novel roles of complements in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Membrane-bound complement regulatory protein CD46, a costimulatory protein for T cells, is a key molecule for T-cell immunomodulation. Teleost CD46-like molecule, termed Tecrem, has been newly identified in common carp and shown to function as a complement regulator. However, it remains unclear whether Tecrem is involved in T-cell immune response. We investigated Tecrem function related to T-cell responses in ginbuna crucian carp. Ginbuna Tecrem (gTecrem) proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation using anti-common carp Tecrem monoclonal antibody (mAb) and were ubiquitously expressed on blood cells including CD8α(+) and CD4(+) lymphocytes. gTecrem expression on leucocyte surface was enhanced after stimulation with the T-cell mitogen, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Coculture with the anti-Tecrem mAb significantly inhibited the proliferative activity of PHA-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that cross-linking of Tecrems on T-cells interferes with a signal transduction pathway for T-cell activation. These findings indicate that Tecrem may act as a T-cell moderator and imply that the complement system in teleost, as well as mammals, plays an important role for linking adaptive and innate immunity.

  12. Competition for IL-2 between regulatory and effector T cells to chisel immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHöfer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss how the competition for cytokines between different cells of the immune system can shape the system wide immune response. We focus on interleukin-2 (IL-2 secretion by activated effector T cells (Teff and on the competition for IL-2 consumption between Teff and regulatory T cells (Treg. We discuss the evidence for the mechanism in which the depletion of IL-2 by Treg cells would be sufficient to suppress an autoimmune response, yet not strong enough to prevent an immune response. We present quantitative estimations and summarize our modeling effort to show that the tug-of-war between Treg and Teff cells for IL-2 molecules can be won by Treg cells in the case of weak activation of Teff leading to the suppression of the immune response. Or, for strongly activated Teff cells, it can be won by Teff cells bringing about the activation of the whole adaptive immune system. Finally, we discuss some recent applications attempting to achieve clinical effects through the modulation of IL-2 consumption by Treg compartment.

  13. PD-1 expression on dendritic cells suppresses CD8+ T cell function and antitumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tong Seng; Chew, Valerie; Sieow, Je Lin; Goh, Siting; Yeong, Joe Poh-Sheng; Soon, Ai Ling; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed death one (PD-1) is a well-established co-inhibitory regulator that suppresses proliferation and cytokine production of T cells. Despite remarkable progress in delineating the functional roles of PD-1 on T lymphocytes, little is known about the regulatory role of PD-1 expressed on myeloid cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that CD8+ T cells can be more potently activated to secrete IL-2 and IFNγ by PD-1-deficient DCs compared to wild-type DCs. Adoptive transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs demonstrated their superior capabilities in inducing antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. In addition, we provide first evidence demonstrating the existence of peripheral blood DCs and CD11c+ tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that co-express PD-1 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The existence of PD-1-expressing HCC-infiltrating DCs (HIDCs) was further supported in a mouse model of HCC. Intratumoral transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs rendered recipient mice resistant to the growth of HCC by promoting tumor-infiltrating CD8+ effector T cells to secrete perforin and granzyme B. This novel finding provides a deeper understanding of the role of PD-1 in immune regulation and has significant implications for cancer immunotherapies targeting PD-1. PMID:27141339

  14. Monitoring of Pathogen-Specific T-Cell Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kapp, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been significantly improved during the last decades with regard to the reduction in organ failure, infection, and severe acute graft-versus-host disease. However, severe complications due to infectious diseases are still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT, in particular in patients receiving haploidentical HSCT or cord blood transplant due to a slow and often incomplete immune reconstitution. In order to improve the immune control of pathogens without an increased risk of alloreactivity, adoptive immunotherapy using highly enriched pathogen-specific T cells offers a promising approach. In order to identify patients who are at high risk for infectious diseases, several monitoring assays have been developed with potential for the guidance of immunosuppressive drugs and adoptive immunotherapy in clinical practice. In this article, we aim to give a comprehensive overview regarding current developments of T-cell monitoring techniques focusing on T cells against viruses and fungi. In particular, we will focus on rather simple, fast, non-labor-intensive, cellular assays which could be integrated in routine clinical screening approaches. PMID:24062744

  15. The mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 modulates T-cell receptor signalling at the immune synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Morlino, Giulia; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Calabia-Linares, Carmen; Veiga, Esteban; Serrador, Juan M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-04-06

    During antigen-specific T-cell activation, mitochondria mobilize towards the vicinity of the immune synapse. We show here that the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) docks at mitochondria, regulating their positioning and activity near the actin-rich ring of the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC) of the immune synapse. Mitochondrial redistribution in response to T-cell receptor engagement was abolished by Drp1 silencing, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant Drp1S637D and the Drp1-specific inhibitor mdivi-1. Moreover, Drp1 knockdown enhanced mitochondrial depolarization and T-cell receptor signal strength, but decreased myosin phosphorylation, ATP production and T-cell receptor assembly at the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC). Our results indicate that Drp1-dependent mitochondrial positioning and activity controls T-cell activation by fuelling central supramolecular activation cluster assembly at the immune synapse.

  16. Regulatory T-cells have a prominent role in the immune modulated vaccine response by specific oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Land, Belinda; Schijf, Marcel; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Schouten, Bastiaan; Boon, Louis; Garssen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells are increasingly important in vaccine strategies. In a Flu-vaccination model the role of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and the immune modulation by orally supplied prebiotic oligosaccharides consisting of scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS, were assessed using anti-CD25 (PC61) me

  17. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  18. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R;

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...... (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months...

  19. Strategy for eliciting antigen-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a cryptic CTL epitope of merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Bianca P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a relatively new addition to the expanding category of oncovirus-induced cancers. Although still comparably rare, the number of cases has risen dramatically in recent years. Further complicating this trend is that MCC is an extremely aggressive neoplasm with poor patient prognosis and limited treatment options for advanced disease. The causative agent of MCC has been identified as the merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. The MCPyV-encoded large T (LT antigen is an oncoprotein that is theorized to be essential for virus-mediated tumorigenesis and is therefore, an excellent MCC antigen for the generation of antitumor immune responses. As a foreign antigen, the LT oncoprotein avoids the obstacle of immune tolerance, which normally impedes the development of antitumor immunity. Ergo, it is an excellent target for anti-MCC immunotherapy. Since tumor-specific CD8+ T cells lead to better prognosis for MCC and numerous other cancers, we have generated a DNA vaccine that is capable of eliciting LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-CRT/LT encodes the LT antigen linked to a damage-associated molecular pattern, calreticulin (CRT, as it has been demonstrated that the linkage of CRT to antigens promotes the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Results The present study shows that DNA vaccine-induced generation of LT-specific CD8+ T cells is augmented by linking CRT to the LT antigen. This is relevant since the therapeutic effects of the pcDNA3-CRT/LT DNA vaccine is mediated by LT-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine produced demonstrably more LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine was also able to confer LT-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated protective and therapeutic effects to prolong the survival of mice with LT-expressing tumors. In the interest of determining the LT epitope which most MCC-specific CD8+ T cells recognize, we identified the amino acid sequence of the

  20. Role for Lyt-2+ T cells in resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis in immunized mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, J.P.; Muller, I.; Louis, J.A.

    1989-03-15

    The role of Lyt-2+ T cells in immunologic resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis was analyzed by comparing infection patterns in resistant C57BL/6 mice and susceptible BALB/c mice induced to heal their infections after sub-lethal irradiation or i.v. immunization, with similar mice treated in vivo with anti-Lyt-2 antibodies. Administration of anti-Lyt-2 mAb resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of lymphoid cells expressing the Lyt-2+ phenotype. Such treatment led to enhanced disease in both resistant C57BL/6 and irradiated BALB/c mice, as assessed by lesion size, but did not affect the capacity of these mice to ultimately resolve their infections. In contrast, anti-Lyt-2 treatment totally blocked the induction of resistance in i.v. immunized mice. These results suggest, that Lyt-2+ T cells may play a role in immunity to a Leishmania major infection and that their relative importance to resistance may depend on how resistance is induced.

  1. Protection of mice against Trypanosoma cruzi by immunization with paraflagellar rod proteins requires T cell, but not B cell, function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M J; Wrightsman, R A; Stryker, G A; Manning, J E

    1997-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that immunization of mice with the paraflagellar rod proteins (PAR) of Trypanosoma cruzi induces an immune response capable of protecting mice against an otherwise lethal challenge with this parasite. Herein, we define immunologic responses that do or do not play a critical role in PAR-mediated protection. Firstly, PAR-immunized Ab-deficient (muMT) strain mice survived an otherwise lethal T. cruzi challenge, indicating that a B cell response is not required for PAR-induced immunity. However, beta2m -/- mice, which are severely deficient in MHC class I and TCR alphabeta+ CD8+ CD4- T cells, did not survive challenge infection following PAR immunization, indicating that MHC class I/CD8+ T cell function is necessary for protection induced by PAR immunization. Surprisingly, PAR-immunized mice depleted of CD4+ T cells survived a T. cruzi challenge for >84 days postinfection while maintaining a parasitemia that is generally thought to be lethal (i.e., >10(6) trypomastigotes/ml), thus associating CD4+ T cell function with the process of parasite clearance. Consistent with this association, CD4+ T cells from PAR-immunized mice released INF-gamma and stimulated T. cruzi-infected macrophages to release nitric oxide. The importance of IFN-gamma in PAR-induced protective immunity is further indicated by the observation that PAR-immunized INF-gamma knockout mice developed an extremely high parasitemia and did not survive a challenge infection. Thus, while Ab-mediated immune mechanisms are not required for protection induced by PAR immunization, T cell responses are necessary for both elimination of bloodstream parasites and survival.

  2. Control of Her-2 tumor immunity and thyroid autoimmunity by MHC and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jennifer B; Kong, Yi-chi M; Meroueh, Chady; Snower, Daniel P; David, Chella S; Ho, Ye-Shih; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2007-07-15

    Immune reactivity to self-antigens in both cancer and autoimmune diseases can be enhanced by systemic immune modulation, posing a challenge in cancer immunotherapy. To distinguish the genetic and immune regulation of tumor immunity versus autoimmunity, immune responses to human ErbB-2 (Her-2) and mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) were tested in transgenic mice expressing Her-2 that is overexpressed in several cancers, and HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3) that is associated with susceptibility to several human autoimmune diseases, as well as experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT). To induce Her-2 response, mice were electrovaccinated with pE2TM and pGM-CSF encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of Her-2 and the murine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, respectively. To induce EAT, mice received mTg i.v. with or without lipopolysaccharide. Depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) with anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody enhanced immune reactivity to Her-2 as well as mTg, showing control of both Her-2 and mTg responses by Treg. When immunized with, Her-2xDR3 and B6xDR3 mice expressing H2(b)xDR3 haplotype developed more profound mTg response and thyroid pathology than Her-2 or B6 mice that expressed the EAT-resistant H2(b) haplotype. In Her-2xDR3 mice, the response to mTg was further amplified when mice were also immunized with pE2TM and pGM-CSF. On the contrary, Her-2 reactivity was comparable whether mice expressed DR3 or not. Therefore, induction of Her-2 immunity was independent of DR3 but development of EAT was dictated by this allele, whereas Tregs control the responses to both self-antigens. These results warrant close monitoring of autoimmunity during cancer immunotherapy, particularly in patients with susceptible MHC class II alleles.

  3. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Unique properties of decidual T cells and their role in immune regulation during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburgs, T; Claas, F H J; Scherjon, S A

    2010-03-01

    Maternal lymphocytes at the fetal-maternal interface play a key role in the immune acceptance of the allogeneic fetus. Most studies focus on decidual NK cells and their interaction with fetal trophoblasts, whereas limited data are available on the mechanisms of fetus specific immune recognition and immune regulation by decidual T cells at the fetal-maternal interface. The aim of this review is to describe the phenotypic characteristics of decidual T cell subsets present at the fetal-maternal interface, their interaction with HLA-C expressed by fetal trophoblasts and their role in immune recognition and regulation at the fetal-maternal interface during human pregnancy.

  4. Invariant natural killer T cells in adipose tissue: novel regulators of immune-mediated metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, M; Kalkhoven, E; Boes, M

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) represents a microenvironment where intersection takes place between immune processes and metabolic pathways. A variety of immune cells have been characterized in AT over the past decades, with the most recent addition of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. As members of the T cell family, iNKT cells represent a subset that exhibits both innate and adaptive characteristics and directs ensuing immune responses. In disease conditions, iNKT cells have established roles that include disorders in the autoimmune spectrum in malignancies and infectious diseases. Recent work supports a role for iNKT cells in the maintenance of AT homeostasis through both immune and metabolic pathways. The deficiency of iNKT cells can result in AT metabolic disruptions and insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent work on iNKT cells in immune regulation, with an emphasis on AT-resident iNKT cells, and identify the potential mechanisms by which adipocytes can mediate iNKT cell activity.

  5. Preferentially expanding Vγ1(+) γδ T cells are associated with protective immunity against Plasmodium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Niikura, Mamoru; Asahi, Hiroko; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Kawakami, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Fumie

    2017-04-01

    γδ T cells play a crucial role in controlling malaria parasites. Dendritic cell (DC) activation via CD40 ligand (CD40L)-CD40 signaling by γδ T cells induces protective immunity against the blood-stage Plasmodium berghei XAT (PbXAT) parasites in mice. However, it is unknown which γδ T-cell subset has an effector role and is required to control the Plasmodium infection. Here, using antibodies to deplete TCR Vγ1(+) cells, we saw that Vγ1(+) γδ T cells were important for the control of PbXAT infection. Splenic Vγ1(+) γδ T cells preferentially expand and express CD40L, and both Vγ1(+) and Vγ4(+) γδ T cells produce IFN-γ during infection. Although expression of CD40L on Vγ1(+) γδ T cells is maintained during infection, the IFN-γ positivity of Vγ1(+) γδ T cells is reduced in late-phase infection due to γδ T-cell dysfunction. In Plasmodium-infected IFN-γ signaling-deficient mice, DC activation is reduced, resulting in the suppression of γδ T-cell dysfunction and the dampening of γδ T-cell expansion in the late phase of infection. Our data suggest that Vγ1(+) γδ T cells represent a major subset responding to PbXAT infection and that the Vγ1(+) γδ T-cell response is dependent on IFN-γ-activated DCs.

  6. Ionizing radiation selectively reduces skin regulatory T cells and alters immune function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhou

    Full Text Available The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel.

  7. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  8. Regulatory T-cell stability and plasticity in mucosal and systemic immune systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, M; Krause, P; Cheroutre, H; Kronenberg, M

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) express the forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and suppress pathological immune responses against self and foreign antigens, including commensal microorganisms. Foxp3 has been proposed as a master key regulator for Treg, required for their differentiation, maintenance, and suppressive functions. Two types of Treg have been defined. Natural Treg (nTreg) are usually considered to be a separate sublineage arising during thymus differentiation. Induced Treg (iTreg) originate upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in the presence of tumor growth factor β. Although under homeostatic conditions most Treg in the periphery are nTreg, special immune challenges in the intestine promote more frequently the generation of iTreg. Furthermore, recent observations have challenged the notion that Treg are a stable sublineage, and they suggest that, particularly under lymphopenic and/or inflammatory conditions, Treg may lose Foxp3 and/or acquire diverse effector functions, especially in the intestine, which may contribute to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:20505662

  9. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  10. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Montalvillo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity. Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  11. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  12. HIV-specific T cell immunity across the entire HIV genome in Chinese men who have sex with men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-yan; SHAO Yi-ming; HUANG Xiang-gang; XU Jian-qing; LI Shen-wei; JIANG Shu-lin; ZHANG Xiao-xi; LI Dong-liang; RUAN Yu-hua; XING Hui

    2006-01-01

    Background Man who has sex with man (MSM) is one of the high risk groups for spreading HIV/AIDS. It was reported that the most prevalent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain among MSM is subtype B; however, T cell immunity remains unknown across the HIV-1 B genome in this population.Methods Using Elispot assay with synthetic peptides spanning the sequence of HIV-1 consensus B,HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte responses were quantified among 3 treated and 19 untreated HIV-1 infected MSM from Beijing, China. Cross-sectional association between viral loads and cellular immune responses were analyzed.Results Peptide pools corresponding to each HIV-1 protein were used for Env, Gag, Pol, Nef, Tat/Rev, Vpr/Vpu and Vif. The results showed that the magnitude of T cell responses in the 3 treated HIV+ MSM group [median,770 spot forming cells (SFCs) per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)] might be significantly lower than that in the 19 untreated HIV+ MSM group (median, 6175 SFCs per 106 PBMCs). Nef, Gag and Pol are the most frequently targeted HIV-1 antigens; and 16 subjects (73%) were identified with vigorous T cell immunity against each of these three proteins. The overall magnitude of T cell immunity closely related to its breadth (r=-0.72, P<0.05) and was inversely but weakly associated with viral loads (r=-0.15). Further analysis showed that both Gag (r=-0.24) and Pol specific T cells (r=-0.12) contributed to this inverse association whereas Nef specific T cells showed no association with viral loads.Conclusions The magnitude of HIV-1 specific T cells is inversely but weakly associated with viral loads among MSM; HIV-specific T cell responses against conservative sequences (Gag and Poi) are the main contributors to this association among Chinese HIV+ MSM. These findings have important implications for vaccine design.

  13. The immunology of pregnancy: regulatory T cells control maternal immune tolerance toward the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; Longobardi, Salvatore; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    Establishment and maintenance of pregnancy represents a challenge for the maternal immune system since it has to defend against pathogens and tolerate paternal alloantigens expressed in fetal tissues. Regulatory T (Treg) cells, a subset of suppressor CD4(+) T cells, play a dominant role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance by preventing immune and autoimmune responses against self-antigens. Although localized mechanisms contribute to fetal evasion from immune attack, in the last few years it has been observed that Treg cells are essential in promoting fetal survival avoiding the recognition of paternal semi-allogeneic tissues by maternal immune system. Several functional studies have shown that unexplained infertility, miscarriage and pre-clampsia are often associated with deficit in Treg cell number and function while normal pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal forkhead-box-P3(+) (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) Treg cells with fetal specificity. Some papers have been reported that the number of Treg cells persists at elevated levels long after delivery developing an immune regulatory memory against father's antigens, moreover these memory Treg cells rapidly proliferate during subsequent pregnancies, however, on the other hand, there are several evidence suggesting a clear decline of Treg cells number after delivery. Different factors such as cytokines, adipokines, pregnancy hormones and seminal fluid have immunoregulatory activity and influence the success of pregnancy by increasing Treg cell number and activity. The development of strategies capable of modulating immune responses toward fetal antigens through Treg cell manipulation, could have an impact on the induction of tolerance against fetal antigens during immune-mediated recurrent abortion.

  14. Insights into immune system development and function from mouse T-cell repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Zachary; Elhanati, Yuval; Dudgeon, Chrissy S.; Callan, Curtis G.; Levine, Arnold J.; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the adaptive immune system to respond to arbitrary pathogens stems from the broad diversity of immune cell surface receptors. This diversity originates in a stochastic DNA editing process (VDJ recombination) that acts on the surface receptor gene each time a new immune cell is created from a stem cell. By analyzing T-cell receptor (TCR) sequence repertoires taken from the blood and thymus of mice of different ages, we quantify the changes in the VDJ recombination process that occur from embryo to young adult. We find a rapid increase with age in the number of random insertions and a dramatic increase in diversity. Because the blood accumulates thymic output over time, blood repertoires are mixtures of different statistical recombination processes, and we unravel the mixture statistics to obtain a picture of the time evolution of the early immune system. Sequence repertoire analysis also allows us to detect the statistical impact of selection on the output of the VDJ recombination process. The effects we find are nearly identical between thymus and blood, suggesting that our analysis mainly detects selection for proper folding of the TCR receptor protein. We further find that selection is weaker in laboratory mice than in humans and it does not affect the diversity of the repertoire. PMID:28196891

  15. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase 1 reverse the immune evasion phenotype to enhance T-cell mediated lysis of prostate and breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Sofia R; Malamas, Anthony S; Tsang, Kwong Y; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W

    2016-02-16

    The clinical promise of cancer immunotherapy relies on the premise that the immune system can recognize and eliminate tumor cells identified as non-self. However, tumors can evade host immune surveillance through multiple mechanisms, including epigenetic silencing of genes involved in antigen processing and immune recognition. Hence, there is an unmet clinical need to develop effective therapeutic strategies that can restore tumor immune recognition when combined with immunotherapy, such as immune checkpoint blockade and therapeutic cancer vaccines. We sought to examine the potential of clinically relevant exposure of prostate and breast human carcinoma cells to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to reverse tumor immune escape to T-cell mediated lysis. Here we demonstrate that prostate (LNCAP) and breast (MDA-MB-231) carcinoma cells are more sensitive to T-cell mediated lysis in vitro after clinically relevant exposure to epigenetic therapy with either the pan-HDAC inhibitor vorinostat or the class I HDAC inhibitor entinostat. This pattern of immunogenic modulation was observed against a broad range of tumor-associated antigens, such as CEA, MUC1, PSA, and brachyury, and associated with augmented expression of multiple proteins involved in antigen processing and tumor immune recognition. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition studies identified HDAC1 as a key determinant in the reversal of carcinoma immune escape. Further, our findings suggest that the observed reversal of tumor immune evasion is driven by a response to cellular stress through activation of the unfolded protein response. This offers the rationale for combining HDAC inhibitors with immunotherapy, including therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  16. Comparative immune phenotypic analysis of cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Intraepidermal Carcinoma in immune-competent individuals: proportional representation of CD8+ T-cells but not FoxP3+ Regulatory T-cells is associated with disease stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Freeman

    Full Text Available Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC is a type of non-melanoma skin cancer prevalent in immune-suppressed transplant recipients and older individuals with a history of chronic sun-exposure. SCC itself is believed to be a late-stage manifestation that can develop from premalignant lesions including Intraepidermal Carcinoma (IEC. Notably, while SCC regression is rare, IEC typically regresses in response to immune modifying topical treatments, however the underlying immunological reasons for these differential responses remain unclear. This study aimed to define whether IEC and SCC are associated with distinct immune profiles. We investigated the immune cell infiltrate of photo-damaged skin, IEC, and SCC tissue using 10-colour flow cytometry following fresh lesion digest. We found that IEC lesions contain higher percentages of CD3+ T-cells than photo-damaged skin, however, the abundance of CD3-CD56+ Natural Killer (NK cells, CD11c+HLA-DR+ conventional Dendritic Cells (cDC, BDCA-2+HLA-DR+ plasmacytoid DC (pDC, FoxP3+ Regulatory T-cells (T-reg, Vα24+Vβ11+ invariant NKT-cells, and γδ Tcells did not alter with disease stage. Within the total T-cell population, high percentages of CD4+ T-cells were associated with SCC, yet CD8+ T-cells were less abundant in SCC compared with IEC. Our study demonstrates that while IEC lesions contain a higher proportion of T-cells than SCC lesions in general, SCC lesions specifically display a lower abundance of CD8+ T-cells than IEC. We propose that differences in CD8+ T-cell abundance contribute critically to the different capacity of SCC and IEC to regress in response to immune modifying topical treatments. Our study also suggests that a high ratio of CD4+ T-cells to CD8+ T-cells may be a immunological diagnostic indicator of late-stage SCC development in immune-competent patients.

  17. Comparative immune phenotypic analysis of cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Intraepidermal Carcinoma in immune-competent individuals: proportional representation of CD8+ T-cells but not FoxP3+ Regulatory T-cells is associated with disease stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Andrew; Bridge, Jennifer A; Maruthayanar, Pirashanthini; Overgaard, Nana H; Jung, Ji-Won; Simpson, Fiona; Prow, Tarl W; Soyer, H Peter; Frazer, Ian H; Freeman, Michael; Wells, James W

    2014-01-01

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is a type of non-melanoma skin cancer prevalent in immune-suppressed transplant recipients and older individuals with a history of chronic sun-exposure. SCC itself is believed to be a late-stage manifestation that can develop from premalignant lesions including Intraepidermal Carcinoma (IEC). Notably, while SCC regression is rare, IEC typically regresses in response to immune modifying topical treatments, however the underlying immunological reasons for these differential responses remain unclear. This study aimed to define whether IEC and SCC are associated with distinct immune profiles. We investigated the immune cell infiltrate of photo-damaged skin, IEC, and SCC tissue using 10-colour flow cytometry following fresh lesion digest. We found that IEC lesions contain higher percentages of CD3+ T-cells than photo-damaged skin, however, the abundance of CD3-CD56+ Natural Killer (NK) cells, CD11c+HLA-DR+ conventional Dendritic Cells (cDC), BDCA-2+HLA-DR+ plasmacytoid DC (pDC), FoxP3+ Regulatory T-cells (T-reg), Vα24+Vβ11+ invariant NKT-cells, and γδ Tcells did not alter with disease stage. Within the total T-cell population, high percentages of CD4+ T-cells were associated with SCC, yet CD8+ T-cells were less abundant in SCC compared with IEC. Our study demonstrates that while IEC lesions contain a higher proportion of T-cells than SCC lesions in general, SCC lesions specifically display a lower abundance of CD8+ T-cells than IEC. We propose that differences in CD8+ T-cell abundance contribute critically to the different capacity of SCC and IEC to regress in response to immune modifying topical treatments. Our study also suggests that a high ratio of CD4+ T-cells to CD8+ T-cells may be a immunological diagnostic indicator of late-stage SCC development in immune-competent patients.

  18. Intratumoral interleukin-21 increases antitumor immunity, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cell density and activity, and enlarges draining lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Henrik; Galsgaard, Elisabeth D; Bartholomaeussen, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is a novel cytokine in clinical development for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of subcutaneous and intratumoral (IT) administration of IL-21 protein in two syngeneic mouse tumor models, RenCa renal cell carcinoma and B16 melanoma, and inv......Interleukin (IL)-21 is a novel cytokine in clinical development for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of subcutaneous and intratumoral (IT) administration of IL-21 protein in two syngeneic mouse tumor models, RenCa renal cell carcinoma and B16 melanoma......, and investigated the mechanisms by which IL-21 enhances CD8 T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We found that in comparison to subcutaneous administration, IT administration of IL-21 more potently inhibited tumor growth and increased survival. This correlated with increased densities of tumor-infiltrating CD8...... microenvironment and activates tumor-draining LNs. Overall, our data suggest that IL-21 augments CD8 T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity through increased proliferation and effector function and acts both on tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells as well as on the draining LNs. IT administration led to superior CD8 T...

  19. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell immunity to Dengue - lessons for the study of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Lim, Mei Qiu

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are rapidly emerging mosquito-borne flaviviruses that represent a public health concern. Understanding host protective immunity to these viruses is critical for the design of optimal vaccines. Over a decade of research has highlighted a significant contribution of the T-cell response to both protection and/or disease enhancement during DENV infection, the latter being mainly associated with sub-optimal cross-reactive T-cell responses during secondary infections. Phase IIb/III clinical trials of the first licensed tetravalent dengue vaccine highlight increased vaccine efficacy in dengue-immune as opposed to dengue-naive vaccinees, suggesting a possible immunoprotective role of pre-existing DENV-specific T cells that are boosted upon vaccination. No vaccine is available for ZIKV and little is known about the T-cell response to this virus. ZIKV and DENV are closely related viruses with a sequence identity ranging from 44% and 56% for the structural proteins capsid and envelope to 68% for the more conserved non-structural proteins NS3/NS5, which represent the main targets of the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell response to DENV, respectively. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of T-cell immunity to DENV and what it can teach us for the study of ZIKV. The extent of T-cell cross-reactivity towards ZIKV of pre-existing DENV-specific memory T cells and its potential impact on protective immunity and/or immunopathology will also be discussed.

  20. Abacavir Induced T Cell Reactivity from Drug Naïve Individuals Shares Features of Allo-Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Adam; Natascha Wuillemin; Stephan Watkins; Heidi Jamin; Eriksson, Klara K.; Peter Villiger; Stefano Fontana; Pichler, Werner J.; Daniel Yerly

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was inde...

  1. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells and Cytokines Gene Expression of the T Cells in AIDS Patients with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome during Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heling; Xie, Yirui; Su, Junwei; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Yin, Michael; Zhou, Qihui

    2017-01-01

    Background. The etiology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in AIDS patients after the initiation of HAART remains unknown. Several researches indicated that the development of IRIS is associated with the production and variation of cytokines, whose gene expression are closely related to the Ca2+/CN-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. Methods. We studied the expression of NFAT isoforms and their major target cytokines genes in peripheral blood CD3+ T cells of subjects through fluorescence quantitative PCR and explored the expression changes of these genes before and after HAART. Results. After the initiation of HARRT, NFAT1, IL-6, and IL-8 gene expression showed a reversal trend in the CD3+ T cells of the IRIS group and changed from low expression before HARRT to high expression after HARRT. In particular, the relative gene expression of NFAT1 was markedly higher compared with the other three isoforms. The IRIS group also showed higher NFAT4, NFAT2, NFAT1, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-2, IL-18, and TNF-α gene expression than the non-IRIS group. Conclusion. This study suggested that high expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18 can predict the risk of IRIS. The increased expression of NFAT1 and NFAT4 may promote the expression of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, which may promote the occurrence of IRIS.

  2. Dietary antigens limit mucosal immunity by inducing regulatory T cells in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Han, Daehee; Yi, Jaeu; Jung, Jisun; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Minji; Surh, Charles D

    2016-02-19

    Dietary antigens are normally rendered nonimmunogenic through a poorly understood "oral tolerance" mechanism that involves immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells, especially Treg cells induced from conventional T cells in the periphery (pTreg cells). Although orally introducing nominal protein antigens is known to induce such pTreg cells, whether a typical diet induces a population of pTreg cells under normal conditions thus far has been unknown. By using germ-free mice raised and bred on an elemental diet devoid of dietary antigens, we demonstrated that under normal conditions, the vast majority of the small intestinal pTreg cells are induced by dietary antigens from solid foods. Moreover, these pTreg cells have a limited life span, are distinguishable from microbiota-induced pTreg cells, and repress underlying strong immunity to ingested protein antigens.

  3. Human Invariant Natural Killer T cells possess immune-modulating functions during Aspergillus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzen-Heineke, Antonia; Bouzani, Maria; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause for invasive fungal infections, a disease associated with high mortality in immune-compromised patients. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells compose a small subset of T cells known to impact the immune response toward various infectious pathogens. To investigate the role of human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection, we studied their activation as determined by CD69 expression and cytokine production in response to distinct fungal morphotypes in the presence of different CD1d(+) antigen presenting cells using flow cytometry and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among CD1d(+) subpopulations, CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs showed the highest potential to activate iNKT cells on a per cell basis. The presence of A. fumigatus decreased this effect of CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs on iNKT cells and led to reduced secretion of TNF-α, G-CSF and RANTES. Production of other Th1 and Th2 cytokines was not affected by the fungus, suggesting an immune-modulating function for human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection.

  4. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON RED BLOOD CELL IMMUNE AND T-CELL SUBGROUP IN THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高巍; 黄裕新; 陈洪; 孙大勇; 张洪新

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on immune system was observed in the rat by using micro- whole blood direct immunofluorescence Staining assay to detect changes of the peripheral blood T lymphocyte subgroup and employing red blood cell (RBC) C3b receptor- yeast rosette test and red blood cell-IC rosette test to analyze erythrocytic immune function. Resuits showed that after EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36), CD4+, RBC-C3bRR and RBC-ICR in the peripheral blood of the normal rats increased significantly while CDs+ had no any considerable changes and a positive correlation between CD~ and RBC-C3bRR was found. In immtttaosuppression model rats, the values of CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR were obviously lower than those of the normal control group while CD8+ had no any striking changes; but after EA treatment, there were no evident differences between EAgroup and normal control group in the above-mentioned indexes. There were also no any significant differences between non-acupoint group and normal control group in those indexes. Results suggest that EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36) can raise T cell immune function and RBC adhesion function in both normal rats and immunosuppression model rats, both of which present a positive correlation.

  5. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON RED BLOOD CELL IMMUNE AND T-CELL SUBGROUP IN THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GaoWei; HuangYuxin; ChenHong; SunDayong; ZhangHongxin

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on immune system was observed in the rat by using micro- whole blood direct immunofluoreseence Staining assay to detect changes of the peripheral blood T lymphocyte subgroup and employing red blood cell (RBC) C3b receptor- yeast rosette test and red blood cell-IC rosette test to analyze erythroeytic immune function. Results showed that after EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36), CD4+, RBC-C3bRR and RBC-ICR in the peripheral blood of the normal rats increased significantly while CD8+ had no any considerable changes and a positive correlation between CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR was found. In immuoosuppression model rats, the values of CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR were obviously lower than those of the normal control group while CD8+ had no any striking changes; but after EA treatment, there were no evident differences between EA group and normal control group in the above-mentioned indexes. There were also no any significant differences between non-acupoint group and normal control group in those indexes. Results suggest that EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36) can raise T cell immune function and RBC adhesion function in both normal rats and immunosuppression model rats, both of which present a positive correlation.

  6. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  7. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Kumagai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  8. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  9. Therapeutic immunization with HIV-1 Tat reduces immune activation and loss of regulatory T-cells and improves immune function in subjects on HAART.

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    Barbara Ensoli

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Although HAART suppresses HIV replication, it is often unable to restore immune homeostasis. Consequently, non-AIDS-defining diseases are increasingly seen in treated individuals. This is attributed to persistent virus expression in reservoirs and to cell activation. Of note, in CD4(+ T cells and monocyte-macrophages of virologically-suppressed individuals, there is continued expression of multi-spliced transcripts encoding HIV regulatory proteins. Among them, Tat is essential for virus gene expression and replication, either in primary infection or for virus reactivation during HAART, when Tat is expressed, released extracellularly and exerts, on both the virus and the immune system, effects that contribute to disease maintenance. Here we report results of an ad hoc exploratory interim analysis (up to 48 weeks on 87 virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals enrolled in a phase II randomized open-label multicentric clinical trial of therapeutic immunization with Tat (ISS T-002. Eighty-eight virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals, enrolled in a parallel prospective observational study at the same sites (ISS OBS T-002, served for intergroup comparison. Immunization with Tat was safe, induced durable immune responses, and modified the pattern of CD4(+ and CD8(+ cellular activation (CD38 and HLA-DR together with reduction of biochemical activation markers and persistent increases of regulatory T cells. This was accompanied by a progressive increment of CD4(+ T cells and B cells with reduction of CD8(+ T cells and NK cells, which were independent from the type of antiretroviral regimen. Increase in central and effector memory and reduction in terminally-differentiated effector memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells were accompanied by increases of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses against Env and recall antigens. Of note, more immune-compromised individuals experienced greater therapeutic effects. In contrast, these changes

  10. Critical role of SAP in progression and reactivation but not maintenance of T cell-dependent humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-03-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is a small adaptor molecule mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. SAP plays a critical role in the initiation of T cell-dependent B cell responses leading to germinal center reaction, the production of high-affinity antibodies, and B cell memory. However, whether SAP has a role in these responses beyond their initiation is not known. It is important to address this matter not only for mechanistic reasons but also because blockade of the SAP pathway is being contemplated as a means to treat autoimmune diseases in humans. Using an inducibly SAP deficient mouse, we found that SAP was required not only for the initiation but also for the progression of primary T cell-driven B cell responses to haptens. It was also necessary for the reactivation of T cell-dependent B cell immunity during secondary immune responses. These activities consistently correlated with the requirement of SAP for full expression of the lineage commitment factor Bcl-6 in follicular T helper (T(FH)) cells. However, once memory B cells and long-lived antibody-secreting cells were established, SAP became dispensable for maintaining T cell-dependent B cell responses. Thus, SAP is pivotal for nearly all phases, but not for maintenance, of T cell-driven B cell humoral immunity. These findings may have implications for the treatment of immune disorders by targeting the SAP pathway.

  11. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

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    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  12. Reduced interleukin-4 receptor α expression on CD8+ T cells correlates with higher quality anti-viral immunity.

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    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available With the hope of understanding how interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 modulated quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cells, we evaluated the expression of receptors for these cytokines following a range of viral infections (e.g. pox viruses and influenza virus. Results clearly indicated that unlike other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα was significantly down-regulated on anti-viral CD8(+ T cells in a cognate antigen dependent manner. The infection of gene knockout mice and wild-type (WT mice with vaccinia virus (VV or VV expressing IL-4 confirmed that IL-4, IL-13 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 were required to increase IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells, but not interferon (IFN-γ. STAT6 dependent elevation of IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells was a feature of poor quality anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity as measured by the production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α in response to VV antigen stimulation in vitro. We propose that down-regulation of IL-4Rα, but not the other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, is a mechanism by which CD8(+ T cells reduce responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13. This can improve the quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity. Our findings have important implications in understanding anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity and designing effective vaccines against chronic viral infections.

  13. Relationship between regulatory T cells and immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients interrupting antiretroviral therapy.

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    Laurence Weiss

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART. Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI (ANRS 116. Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12 of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r=-0.519. Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p=0.029; absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p=0.031. At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677.

  14. Role of T cell TGF beta signaling in intestinal cytokine responses and helminthic immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonization with helminthic parasites down-regulates inflammation in murine colitis and improves activity scores in human inflammatory bowel disease. Helminths induce mucosal regulatory T cells, which are important for intestinal immunologic homeostasis. Regulatory T cell function involves cytoki...

  15. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  16. Integrating innate and adaptive immune cells: Mast cells as crossroads between regulatory and effector B and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y; Frossi, Barbara; Mion, Francesca; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2016-05-05

    A diversity of immune mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from infection, but from immune damage too. Innate cells, as well as adaptive cells, are critical contributors to the correct development of the immune response and of tissue homeostasis. There is a dynamic "cross-talk" between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage as well as the development of the immune response. Mast cells have shown a great plasticity, modifying their behavior at different stages of immune response through interaction with effector and regulatory populations of adaptive immunity. Understanding the interplays among T effectors, regulatory T cells, B cells and regulatory B cells with mast cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immune-modulator and -suppressor elements in the innate and adaptive immune system.

  17. Oral vaccination with lipid-formulated BCG induces a long-lived, multifunctional CD4(+ T cell memory immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay R Ancelet

    Full Text Available Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4(+ T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4(+ T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4(+ T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4(+ T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4(+ T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4(+ T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines.

  18. Abacavir induced T cell reactivity from drug naïve individuals shares features of allo-immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jacqueline; Wuillemin, Natascha; Watkins, Stephan; Jamin, Heidi; Eriksson, Klara K; Villiger, Peter; Fontana, Stefano; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was independent of co-stimulatory signals, as neither DC maturation nor release of inflammatory cytokines were observed upon abacavir exposure. Abacavir induced T cells arose in the absence of professional APC and stemmed from naïve and memory compartments. These features are reminiscent of allo-reactivity. Screening for allo-reactivity revealed that about 5% of generated T cell clones (n = 136) from three donors were allo-reactive exclusively to the related HLA-B*58∶01. The addition of peptides which can bind to the HLA-B*57∶01-abacavir complex and to HLA-B*58∶01 during the induction phase increased the proportion of HLA-B*58∶01 allo-reactive T cell clones from 5% to 42%. In conclusion, abacavir can alter the HLA-B*57∶01-peptide complex in a way that mimics an allo-allele ('altered self-allele') and create the potential for robust T cell responses.

  19. CD147 stimulates hepatoma cells escaping from immune surveillance of T cells by interaction with Cyclophilin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi-Xin; Wang, Shu-Jing; Fan, Jian-Hui; Sun, Shi-Jie; Li, Xia; Padhiar, Arshad Ahmed; Zhang, Jia-Ning

    2016-05-01

    T cells play an important role in tumor immune surveillance. CD147 is a member of immunoglobulin superfamily present on the surface of many tumor cells and mediates malignant cell behaviors. Cyclophilin A (CypA) is an intracellular protein promoting inflammation when released from cells. CypA is a natural ligand for CD147. In this study, CD147 specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) were transfected into murine hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa1-6 cells to assess the effects of CD147 on hepatoma cells escaping from immune surveillance of T cells. We found extracellular CypA stimulated cell proliferation through CD147 by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Downregulation of CD147 expression on Hepa1-6 cells significantly suppressed tumor progression in vivo, and decreased cell viability when co-cultured with T cells in vitro. Importantly, knockdown of CD147 on Hepa1-6 cells resulted in significantly increased T cells chemotaxis induced by CypA both in vivo and in vitro. These findings provide novel mechanisms how tumor cells escaping from immune surveillance of T cells. We provide a potential therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting CD147 or CD147-CypA interactions.

  20. CD103 or LFA-1 engagement at the immune synapse between cytotoxic T cells and tumor cells promotes maturation and regulates T-cell effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Boutet, Marie; Vergnon, Isabelle; Schmitt, Alain; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2013-01-15

    T-cell adhesion/costimulatory molecules and their cognate receptors on target cells play a major role in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activities. Here, we compared the involvement of CD103 and LFA-1, and their respective ligands, in the maturation of the cytotoxic immune synapse (cIS) and in the activation of CTL effector functions. Our results indicate that cytotoxicity toward cancer cells and, to a lesser extent, cytokine production by specific CTL require, together with TCR engagement, the interaction of either CD103 with E-cadherin or LFA-1 with ICAM-1. Flow-based adhesion assay showed that engagement of CD103 or LFA-1, together with TCR, enhances the strength of the T-cell/target cell interaction. Moreover, electron microscopic analyses showed that integrin-dependent mature cIS (mcIS) displays a cohesive ultrastructure, with tight membrane contacts separated by extensive clefts. In contrast, immature cIS (icIS), which is unable to trigger target cell lysis, is loose, with multiple protrusions in the effector cell membrane. Experiments using confocal microscopy revealed polarized cytokine release and degranulation at the mcIS associated with target cell killing, whereas icIS is characterized by failure of IFN-γ and granzyme B relocalization. Thus, interactive forces between CTL and epithelial tumor cells, mainly regulated by integrin engagement, correlate with maturity and the ultrastructure of the cIS and influence CTL effector functions. These results provide new insights into molecular mechanisms regulating antitumor CTL responses and may lead to the development of more efficient cancer immunotherapy strategies.

  1. Recombinant yellow fever viruses elicit CD8+ T cell responses and protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Tayar Nogueira

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a major public health problem affecting nearly 10 million in Latin America. Despite several experimental vaccines have shown to be immunogenic and protective in mouse models, there is not a current vaccine being licensed for humans or in clinical trial against T. cruzi infection. Towards this goal, we used the backbone of Yellow Fever (YF 17D virus, one of the most effective and well-established human vaccines, to express an immunogenic fragment derived from T. cruzi Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (ASP-2. The cDNA sequence of an ASP-2 fragment was inserted between E and NS1 genes of YF 17D virus through the construction of a recombinant heterologous cassette. The replication ability and genetic stability of recombinant YF virus (YF17D/ENS1/Tc was confirmed for at least six passages in Vero cells. Immunogenicity studies showed that YF17D/ENS1/Tc virus elicited neutralizing antibodies and gamma interferon (IFN-γ producing-cells against the YF virus. Also, it was able to prime a CD8(+ T cell directed against the transgenic T. cruzi epitope (TEWETGQI which expanded significantly as measured by T cell-specific production of IFN-γ before and after T. cruzi challenge. However, most important for the purposes of vaccine development was the fact that a more efficient protective response could be seen in mice challenged after vaccination with the YF viral formulation consisting of YF17D/ENS1/Tc and a YF17D recombinant virus expressing the TEWETGQI epitope at the NS2B-3 junction. The superior protective immunity observed might be due to an earlier priming of epitope-specific IFN-γ-producing T CD8(+ cells induced by vaccination with this viral formulation. Our results suggest that the use of viral formulations consisting of a mixture of recombinant YF 17D viruses may be a promising strategy to elicit protective immune responses against pathogens, in general.

  2. Production of Autoantibodies in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is Associated with the Augmented Function of Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Hu, Tingting; Song, Xiaofei; Nie, Hong; Chen, Min; Chen, Weixian; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Dazhi; Hu, Huaidong; Hu, Peng; Ren, Hong

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) provide help to B cells to support their activation, expansion and differentiation. However, the role of Tfh cells in chronic HBV infection is poorly defined. The aim of this research was to examine the function of Tfh cells and whether they are involved in HBV related disease. Blood CXCR5+CD4+T cells and B cells in 85 patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) and health controls (HC) were examined by flow cytometry. The molecule expression in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was detected by real-time PCR. Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells and B cells were co-cultured and the production of Ig and cytokines was detected by ELISA. Autoantibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence and immunospot assay. We found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) expressed higher level of activation related molecules and cytokines than that from health controls (HC).In HBV patients, the frequency of blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was significantly correlated with serum ALT and AST. We also found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients could induce B cells to secret higher level of immunoglobulin than that from HC. Several autoantibodies, including ANA, ss-A, ss-B, Scl-70, Jo-1, ect, were indeed positive in 65% HBV patients. Among HBV patients, expression of function related molecules was significantly higher in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from patients with autoantibodies than that without autoantibodies. Our research indicated that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients were over activated and show augmented capacity to help B cells for antibody secreting, which might correlated with liver inflammation and the production of autoantibodies in extrahepatic manifestations. PMID:27612199

  3. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, T. S.; Norup, L. R.; Pedersen, A.R.;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use flow cytometry to assess chicken T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study two inbred genetic chicken lines (L130 and L133) were subjected to two times vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND) and a subsequent challenge by ND virus (NDV) infection...

  4. Differential control of immune cell homeostasis by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in murine peripheral lymph nodes and spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanez-Almeida, Pedro; Klawonn, Frank; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Huehn, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) hamper efficient immune responses to tumors and chronic infections. Therefore, depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs has been proposed as therapeutic option to boost immune responses and to improve vaccinations. Although Treg-mediated control of T cell homeostasis is well established, Foxp3(+) Treg interaction with other immune cell subsets is only incompletely understood. Thus, the present study aimed at examining dynamic effects of experimental Foxp3(+) Treg depletion on a broad range of immune cell subsets, including B cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells. Striking differences were observed when peripheral lymph nodes (LN) and spleen were compared. B cells, for example, showed a massive and long-lasting accumulation only in LN but not in spleen of transiently Treg-depleted mice. In contrast, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, which are potent inducers of T cell responses, also accumulated selectively, but only transiently in LN, suggesting that this cell population is under very strict control of Foxp3(+) Tregs. In summary, the observations described here provide insights into the dynamics of immune cells after selective depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs. This will allow a better prediction of the impact of Treg ablation in translational studies that aim at boosting immune responses and vaccinations.

  5. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurton, Lenka V; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M; Switzer, Kirsten C; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-11-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR(+) T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19(+) leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45RO(neg)CCR7(+)CD95(+), phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR(+) T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials.

  6. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurton, Lenka V.; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M.; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR+ T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19+ leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45ROnegCCR7+CD95+, phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR+ T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27849617

  7. Naturally Occurring Self-Reactive CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells: Universal Immune Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nafiseh Pakravan; Agheel Tabar Molla Hassan; Zuhair Muhammad Hassan

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring thymus-arisen CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered to play a central role in self-tolerance. Precise signals that promote the development of Treg cells remain elusive, but considerable evidence suggests that costimulatory molecules, cytokines, the nature of the TCR and the niche or the context in which the T cell encounters antigen in the thymus play important roles. Analysis of TCR from Treg cells has demonstrated that a large proportion of this population has a higher avidity to self-antigen in comparison with TCR from CD4+CD25- cells and that peripheral antigen is required for their development, maintenance, or expansion. Treg cells have been shown to undergo expansion in the periphery, likely regulated by the presence of self-antigen. Many studies have shown that the involvement of Treg cells in the tolerance induction is antigen-specific, even with MHC-mismatched,in transplantation/graft versus host disease (GVHD), autoimmunity, cancer, and pregnancy. Theses studies concluded a vital role for self-reactive Treg cells in maintenance of the body integrity. Based on those studies, we hypothesize that self-reactive Treg cells are shared among all healthy individuals and recognize same self-antigens and their TCR encodes for few dominant antigens of each organ which defines the healthy self. These dominant self antigens can be regarded as "universal immune code".

  8. Basophil-derived IL-6 regulates TH17 cell differentiation and CD4 T cell immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Chae Min; Park, Hyeung Ju; Kwon, Bo-In; Lah, Sang Joon; Chang, Jun; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Park, Su-Hyung; Hong, Seokchan; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2017-01-01

    Basophils are rare, circulating granulocytes proposed to be involved in T helper (TH) type 2 immunity, mainly through secretion of interleukin (IL)-4. In addition to IL-4, basophils produce IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) crosslinking. Differentiation of TH17 cells requires IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, but whether basophils play a significant role in TH17 induction is unknown. Here we show a role for basophils in TH17 cell development by using in vitro T cell differentiation and in vivo TH17-mediated inflammation models. Bone marrow derived-basophils (BMBs) and splenic basophils produce significant amounts of IL-6 as well as IL-4 following stimulation with IgE crosslink or cholera toxin (CT). In addition, through IL-6 secretion, BMBs cooperate with dendritic cells to promote TH17 cell differentiation. In the TH17 lung inflammation model, basophils are recruited to the inflamed lungs following CT challenge, and TH17 responses are significantly reduced in the absence of basophils or IL-6. Furthermore, reconstitution with wild-type, but not IL-6-deficient, basophils restored CT-mediated lung inflammation. Lastly, basophil-deficient mice showed reduced phenotypes of TH17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, our results indicate that basophils are an important inducer of TH17 cell differentiation, which is dependent on IL-6 secretion. PMID:28134325

  9. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  10. The impact of T cell intrinsic antigen adaptation on peripheral immune tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevil J Singh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Overlapping roles have been ascribed for T cell anergy, clonal deletion, and regulation in the maintenance of peripheral immunological tolerance. A measurement of the individual and additive impacts of each of these processes on systemic tolerance is often lacking. In this report we have used adoptive transfer strategies to tease out the unique contribution of T cell intrinsic receptor calibration (adaptation in the maintenance of tolerance to a systemic self-antigen. Adoptively transferred naïve T cells stably calibrated their responsiveness to a persistent self-antigen in both lymphopenic and T cell-replete hosts. In the former, this state was not accompanied by deletion or suppression, allowing us to examine the unique contribution of adaptation to systemic tolerance. Surprisingly, adapting T cells could chronically help antigen-expressing B cells, leading to polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and pathology, in the form of mild arthritis. The helper activity mediated by CD40L and cytokines was evident even if the B cells were introduced after extended adaptation of the T cells. In contrast, in the T cell-replete host, neither arthritis nor autoantibodies were induced. The containment of systemic pathology required host T cell-mediated extrinsic regulatory mechanisms to synergize with the cell intrinsic adaptation process. These extrinsic mechanisms prevented the effector differentiation of the autoreactive T cells and reduced their precursor frequency, in vivo.

  11. Immune inhibitory molecules LAG-3 and PD-1 synergistically regulate T-cell function to promote tumoral immune escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Turnis, Meghan E; Goldberg, Monica V; Bankoti, Jaishree; Selby, Mark; Nirschl, Christopher J; Bettini, Matthew L; Gravano, David M; Vogel, Peter; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Grosso, Joseph F; Netto, George; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Chaux, Alcides; Utz, Paul J; Workman, Creg J; Pardoll, Drew M; Korman, Alan J; Drake, Charles G; Vignali, Dario A A

    2012-02-15

    Inhibitory receptors on immune cells are pivotal regulators of immune escape in cancer. Among these inhibitory receptors, CTLA-4 (targeted clinically by ipilimumab) serves as a dominant off-switch while other receptors such as PD-1 and LAG-3 seem to serve more subtle rheostat functions. However, the extent of synergy and cooperative interactions between inhibitory pathways in cancer remain largely unexplored. Here, we reveal extensive coexpression of PD-1 and LAG-3 on tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in three distinct transplantable tumors. Dual anti-LAG-3/anti-PD-1 antibody treatment cured most mice of established tumors that were largely resistant to single antibody treatment. Despite minimal immunopathologic sequelae in PD-1 and LAG-3 single knockout mice, dual knockout mice abrogated self-tolerance with resultant autoimmune infiltrates in multiple organs, leading to eventual lethality. However, Lag3(-/-)Pdcd1(-/-) mice showed markedly increased survival from and clearance of multiple transplantable tumors. Together, these results define a strong synergy between the PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory pathways in tolerance to both self and tumor antigens. In addition, they argue strongly that dual blockade of these molecules represents a promising combinatorial strategy for cancer.

  12. Impairment of the humoral and CD4(+) T cell responses in HTLV-1-infected individuals immunized with tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Anselmo; Santos, Silvane; Carvalho, Lucas P; Grassi, Maria Fernanda R; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2016-08-01

    T cells from HTLV-1-infected individuals have a decreased ability to proliferate after stimulation with recall antigens. This abnormality may be due to the production of regulatory cytokine or a dysfunctional antigen presentation. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antibody production and cytokine expression by lymphocytes before and after immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT) and to evaluate the immune response of monocytes after stimulation with TT and frequency of dendritic cells (DC) subsets. HTLV-1 carriers (HC) and uninfected controls (UC) with negative serology for TT were immunized with TT, and the antibody titers were determined by ELISA as well as the cell activation markers expression by monocytes. The frequencies of DC subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Following immunization, the IgG anti-TT titers and the frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 in response to TT were lower in the HC than in the UC. Additionally, monocytes from HC did not exhibit increased HLA-DR expression after stimulation with TT, and presented low numbers of DC subsets, therefore, it's necessary to perform functional studies with antigen-presenting cells. Collectively, our finding suggests that HC present an impairment of the humoral and CD4(+) T cell immune responses after vaccination.

  13. An initial examination of the potential role of T-cell immunity in protection against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranyos, Alek M; Roff, Shannon R; Pu, Ruiyu; Owen, Jennifer L; Coleman, James K; Yamamoto, Janet K

    2016-03-14

    The importance of vaccine-induced T-cell immunity in conferring protection with prototype and commercial FIV vaccines is still unclear. Current studies performed adoptive transfer of T cells from prototype FIV-vaccinated cats to partial-to-complete feline leukocyte antigen (FLA)-matched cats a day before either homologous FIVPet or heterologous-subtype pathogenic FIVFC1 challenge. Adoptive-transfer (A-T) conferred a protection rate of 87% (13 of 15, p 13 × 10(6) cells were required for A-T protection against FIVFC1 strain, reported to be a highly pathogenic virus resistant to vaccine-induced neutralizing-antibodies. The addition of FLA-matched B cells alone was not protective. The poor quality of the anti-FIV T-cell immunity induced by the vaccine likely contributed to the lack of protection in an FLA-matched recipient against FIVFC1. The quality of the immune response was determined by the presence of high mRNA levels of cytolysin (perforin) and cytotoxins (granzymes A, B, and H) and T helper-1 cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ] and IL2). Increased cytokine, cytolysin and cytotoxin production was detected in the donors which conferred protection in A-T studies. In addition, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation and/or IFNγ responses to FIV p24 and reverse transcriptase increased with each year in cats receiving 1X-3X vaccine boosts over 4 years. These studies demonstrate that anti-FIV T-cell immunity induced by vaccination with a dual-subtype FIV vaccine is essential for prophylactic protection against AIDS lentiviruses such as FIV and potentially HIV-1.

  14. CD1-Restricted T Cells at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

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    Pereira, Catia S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-specific T cells comprise a group of T cells that recognize lipids bound to the MHC class I-like CD1 molecules. There are four isoforms of CD1 that are expressed at the surface of antigen presenting cells and therefore capable of presenting lipid antigens: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Each one of these isoforms has distinct structural features and cellular localizations, which promotes binding to a broad range of different types of lipids. Lipid antigens originate from either self-tissues or foreign sources, such as bacteria, fungus, or plants and their recognition by CD1-restricted T cells has important implications in infection but also in cancer and autoimmunity. In this review, we describe the characteristics of CD1 molecules and CD1-restricted lipid-specific T cells, highlighting the innate-like and adaptive-like features of different CD1-restricted T cell subtypes. PMID:28070524

  15. Flexible cytokine production by macrophages and T cells in response to probiotic bacteria: a possible mechanism by which probiotics exert multifunctional immune regulatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Kan; Nanno, Masanobu; Nagata, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics have been reported to be efficacious against cancers, infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune diseases, and it is important to explain how such multifunctional activities are realized. Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) is one of these multifunctional probiotics, and its ability to augment the host immune system has been extensively examined. We have shown that the cell wall structure of this probiotic strain is responsible for potently inducing IL-12 production. In addition, we have recently found that LcS differentially controls the inflammatory cytokine responses of macrophages and T cells in either Peyer's patches or the spleen. Other studies revealed that LcS-induced IL-12 production by macrophages is modified when other bacteria or their cell components are simultaneously present. These findings can provide a theoretical basis for understanding the multifunctional activities of specific probiotics.

  16. Adaptive Immunity in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Phenotype and Functional Alterations of T-Cells before and during Infliximab Therapy

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    Balázs Szalay

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to determine T-cell subsets in peripheral blood and their intracellular signaling during activation. The prevalence of Th2 and Th17 cells responsible for the regulation of adaptive immunity was higher in AS than in 9 healthy controls. Although IFX therapy improved patients' condition, immune phenotype did not normalize. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium responses of CD4+ and CD8+ cells to a specific activation were delayed, while NO generation was increased in AS. NO generation normalized sooner upon IFX than calcium response. These results suggest an abnormal immune phenotype with functional disturbances of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in AS.

  17. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

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    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  18. Delay in cART Initiation Results in Persistent Immune Dysregulation and Poor Recovery of T-Cell Phenotype Despite a Decade of Successful HIV Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumbi, Patricia; Falutz, Julian; Pant Pai, Nitika; Tsoukas, Christos M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) increases levels of CD4+ T-cells, however this increase may not accurately reflect long-term immune recovery since T-cell dysregulation and loss of T-cell homeostasis often persist. We therefore assessed the impact of a decade of effective cART on immune regulation, T-cell homeostasis, and overall T-cell phenotype. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 288 HIV+ cART-naïve patients initiating therapy. We identified 86 individuals who received cART for at least a decade, of which 44 consistently maintained undetectable plasma HIV-RNA levels throughout therapy. At baseline, participants were classified into three groups according to pre-treatment CD4+ T-cell counts: Group I (CD4350 cells/mm3). Outcomes of interest were: (1) CD4+ T-cell count restoration (CD4>532 cells/mm3); (2) normalization of CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio (1.2–3.3); (3) maintenance of CD3+ T-cell homeostasis (CD3: 65%–85% of peripheral lymphocytes); (4) normalization of the complete T-cell phenotype (TCP). Results Despite a decade of sustained successful cART, complete T-cell phenotype normalization only occurred in 16% of patients, most of whom had initiated therapy at high CD4+ T-cell counts (>350 cells/mm3). The TCP parameter that was the least restored among patients was the CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio. Conclusions Failure to normalize the complete T-cell phenotype was most apparent in patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm3. The impact of this impaired T-cell phenotype on life-long immune function and potential comorbidities remains to be elucidated. PMID:24710051

  19. Delay in cART initiation results in persistent immune dysregulation and poor recovery of T-cell phenotype despite a decade of successful HIV suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ndumbi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART increases levels of CD4+ T-cells, however this increase may not accurately reflect long-term immune recovery since T-cell dysregulation and loss of T-cell homeostasis often persist. We therefore assessed the impact of a decade of effective cART on immune regulation, T-cell homeostasis, and overall T-cell phenotype. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 288 HIV+ cART-naïve patients initiating therapy. We identified 86 individuals who received cART for at least a decade, of which 44 consistently maintained undetectable plasma HIV-RNA levels throughout therapy. At baseline, participants were classified into three groups according to pre-treatment CD4+ T-cell counts: Group I (CD4350 cells/mm3. Outcomes of interest were: (1 CD4+ T-cell count restoration (CD4>532 cells/mm3; (2 normalization of CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio (1.2-3.3; (3 maintenance of CD3+ T-cell homeostasis (CD3: 65%-85% of peripheral lymphocytes; (4 normalization of the complete T-cell phenotype (TCP. RESULTS: Despite a decade of sustained successful cART, complete T-cell phenotype normalization only occurred in 16% of patients, most of whom had initiated therapy at high CD4+ T-cell counts (>350 cells/mm3. The TCP parameter that was the least restored among patients was the CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Failure to normalize the complete T-cell phenotype was most apparent in patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm3. The impact of this impaired T-cell phenotype on life-long immune function and potential comorbidities remains to be elucidated.

  20. Depletion of alloreactive T-cells in vitro using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib preserves the immune response against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Belén; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Santamaría, Carlos; Inogés, Susana; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Current graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) inhibition approaches lead to abrogation of pathogen-specific T-cell responses. We propose an approach to inhibit GVHD without hampering immunity against pathogens: in vitro depletion of alloreactive T cells with the preoteasome inhibitor bortezomib. We show that PBMCs stimulated with allogeneic cells and treated with bortezomib greatly reduce their ability to produce IFN-γ when re-stimulated with the same allogeneic cells, but mainly preserve their ability to respond to citomegalovirus stimulation. Unlike in vivo administration of immunosuppressive drugs or other strategies of allodepletion, in vitro allodepletion with bortezomib maintains pathogen-specific T cells, representing a promising alternative for GVHD prophylaxis.

  1. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical, Hematompoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    determine whether the persistence of adoptively transferred T cells directly correlated with tumor size for individual mice. This was accomplished by plotting...to the SB11 transposase gene ( size f830 bp) was detected in T cells that were electroporated with the SB transposon and transposase and had undergone...unrelated adult volunteers after con- sent on an Institutional Review Board–approved protocol) were cocultured in culture medium (RPMI containing peni

  2. T cell immunity to influenza in older adults: A pathophysiological framework for development of more effective vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E McElhaney

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most profound public health consequences of immune senescence is reflected in an increased susceptibility to influenza and other acute respiratory illnesses, as well as a loss of influenza vaccine effectiveness in older people. Common medical conditions and mental and psychosocial health issues as well as degree of frailty and functional dependence accelerate changes associated with immune senescence. All contribute to the increased risk for complications of influenza infection including pneumonias, heart diseases and strokes that lead to hospitalization, disability and death in the over 65 population. Changes in mucosal barrier mechanisms and both innate and adaptive immune functions converge in the reduced response to influenza infection, and lead to a loss of antibody-mediated protection against influenza with age. The interactions of immune senescence and reduced adaptive immune responses, persistent cytomegalovirus infection, inflammaging (chronic elevation of inflammatory cytokines, and dysregulated cytokine production, pose major challenges to the development of vaccines designed to improve T-cell mediated immunity. In older adults, the goal of vaccination is more realistically targeted to providing clinical protection against disease rather than to inducing sterilizing immunity to infection. Standard assays of antibody titres correlate with protection against influenza illness but do not detect important changes in cellular immune mechanisms that correlate with vaccine-mediated protection against influenza in older people. This article will discuss: i the burden of influenza in older adults and how this relates to changes in T cell function, ii age-related changes in different T cell subsets and immunologic targets for improved influenza vaccine efficacy in older, and iii the development of correlates of clinical protection against influenza disease to expedite the process of new vaccine development for the 65 and older

  3. T Cell Adaptive Immunity Proceeds through Environment-Induced Adaptation from the Exposure of Cryptic Genetic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, James M.; Lin, Joseph; Harding, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Evolution is often characterized as a process involving incremental genetic changes that are slowly discovered and fixed in a population through genetic drift and selection. However, a growing body of evidence is finding that changes in the environment frequently induce adaptations that are much too rapid to occur by an incremental genetic search process. Rapid evolution is hypothesized to be facilitated by mutations present within the population that are silent or “cryptic” within the first environment but are co-opted or “exapted” to the new environment, providing a selective advantage once revealed. Although cryptic mutations have recently been shown to facilitate evolution in RNA enzymes, their role in the evolution of complex phenotypes has not been proven. In support of this wider role, this paper describes an unambiguous relationship between cryptic genetic variation and complex phenotypic responses within the immune system. By reviewing the biology of the adaptive immune system through the lens of evolution, we show that T cell adaptive immunity constitutes an exemplary model system where cryptic alleles drive rapid adaptation of complex traits. In naive T cells, normally cryptic differences in T cell receptor reveal diversity in activation responses when the cellular population is presented with a novel environment during infection. We summarize how the adaptive immune response presents a well studied and appropriate experimental system that can be used to confirm and expand upon theoretical evolutionary models describing how seemingly small and innocuous mutations can drive rapid cellular evolution. PMID:22363338

  4. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

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    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  5. Dengue virus infection elicits highly polarized CX3CR1+ cytotoxic CD4+ T cells associated with protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Bangs, Derek J; Sidney, John; Kolla, Ravi V; De Silva, Aruna D; de Silva, Aravinda M; Crotty, Shane; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-08-04

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a rapidly spreading pathogen with unusual pathogenesis, and correlates of protection from severe dengue disease and vaccine efficacy have not yet been established. Although DENV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses have been extensively studied, the breadth and specificity of CD4(+) T-cell responses remains to be defined. Here we define HLA-restricted CD4(+) T-cell epitopes resulting from natural infection with dengue virus in a hyperepidemic setting. Ex vivo flow-cytometric analysis of DENV-specific CD4(+) T cells revealed that the virus-specific cells were highly polarized, with a strong bias toward a CX3CR1(+) Eomesodermin(+) perforin(+) granzyme B(+) CD45RA(+) CD4 CTL phenotype. Importantly, these cells correlated with a protective HLA DR allele, and we demonstrate that these cells have direct ex vivo DENV-specific cytolytic activity. We speculate that cytotoxic dengue-specific CD4(+) T cells may play a role in the control of dengue infection in vivo, and this immune correlate may be a key target for dengue virus vaccine development.

  6. In Vitro Immune Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Effects on Murine Macrophages, CD4+ T Cells, and Gene Expression Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Bin; Fleming, James T.; Schultz, Terry W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process and shares chemical properties with natural and enriched uranium. To investigate the toxic effects of environmental DU exposure on the immune system, we examined the influences of DU (in the form of uranyl nitrate) on viability and immune function as well as cytokine gene expression in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenic CD4+ T cells. Macrophages and CD4+ T cells were exposed to various concentrations of DU, and cell death via apoptosis and necrosis was analyzed using annexin-V/propidium iodide assay. DU cytotoxicity in both cell types was concentration dependent, with macrophage apoptosis and necrosis occurring within 24 hr at 100 μM DU exposure, whereas CD4+ T cells underwent cell death at 500 μM DU exposure. Noncytotoxic concentrations for macrophages and CD4+ T cells were determined as 50 and 100 μM, respectively. Lymphoproliferation analysis indicated that macrophage accessory cell function was altered with 200 μM DU after exposure times as short as 2 hr. Microarray and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that DU alters gene expression patterns in both cell types. The most differentially expressed genes were related to signal transduction, such as c-jun, NF-κ Bp65, neurotrophic factors (e.g., Mdk), chemokine and chemokine receptors (e.g., TECK/CCL25), and interleukins such as IL-10 and IL-5, indicating a possible involvement of DU in cancer development, autoimmune diseases, and T helper 2 polarization of T cells. The results are a first step in identifying molecular targets for the toxicity of DU and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the immune modulation ability of DU. PMID:16393663

  7. Memory CD8+ T cells mediate antibacterial immunity via CCL3 activation of TNF/ROI+ phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narni-Mancinelli, Emilie; Campisi, Laura; Bassand, Delphine; Cazareth, Julie; Gounon, Pierre; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2007-09-03

    Cytolysis, interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha secretion are major effector mechanisms of memory CD8+ T cells that are believed to be required for immunological protection in vivo. By using mutants of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we found that none of these effector activities is sufficient to protect against secondary infection with wild-type (WT) bacteria. We demonstrated that CCL3 derived from reactivated memory CD8+ T cells is required for efficient killing of WT bacteria. CCL3 induces a rapid TNF-alpha secretion by innate inflammatory mononuclear phagocytic cells (MPCs), which further promotes the production of radical oxygen intermediates (ROIs) by both MPCs and neutrophils. ROI generation is the final bactericidal mechanism involved in L. monocytogenes clearance. These results therefore uncover two levels of regulation of the antibacterial secondary protective response: (a) an antigen-dependent phase in which memory CD8+ T cells are reactivated and control the activation of the innate immune system, and (b) an antigen-independent phase in which the MPCs coordinate innate immunity and promote the bactericidal effector activities. In this context, CCL3-secreting memory CD8+ T cells are able to mediate "bystander" killing of an unrelated pathogen upon antigen-specific reactivation, a mechanism that may be important for the design of therapeutic vaccines.

  8. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  9. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

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    Jonatan Ersching

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections.

  10. T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4⁺ T cells.

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    Arbore, Giuseppina; West, Erin E; Spolski, Rosanne; Robertson, Avril A B; Klos, Andreas; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Dutow, Pavel; Woodruff, Trent M; Yu, Zu Xi; O'Neill, Luke A; Coll, Rebecca C; Sher, Alan; Leonard, Warren J; Köhl, Jörg; Monk, Pete; Cooper, Matthew A; Arno, Matthew; Afzali, Behdad; Lachmann, Helen J; Cope, Andrew P; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-06-17

    The NLRP3 inflammasome controls interleukin-1β maturation in antigen-presenting cells, but a direct role for NLRP3 in human adaptive immune cells has not been described. We found that the NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in human CD4(+) T cells and initiates caspase-1-dependent interleukin-1β secretion, thereby promoting interferon-γ production and T helper 1 (T(H)1) differentiation in an autocrine fashion. NLRP3 assembly requires intracellular C5 activation and stimulation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1), which is negatively regulated by surface-expressed C5aR2. Aberrant NLRP3 activity in T cells affects inflammatory responses in human autoinflammatory disease and in mouse models of inflammation and infection. Our results demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome activity is not confined to "innate immune cells" but is an integral component of normal adaptive T(H)1 responses.

  11. Induction of T-cell immunity against leukemia by dendritic cells pulsed with total RNA isolated from leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李牧; 尤胜国; 葛薇; 马双; 马楠; 赵春华

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and efficacy of eliciting leukemia-specific T-cell responses in syngeneic mice in vitro and in vivo using dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with total RNA from leukemia cells.Methods DCs generated from bone marrow culture in vitro in the presence of combined cytokines were pulsed with cellular total RNA isolated from cultured L615 cells by cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP). T-cell responses were evaluated by in vitro proliferation, and cytotoxicity assay. And in vivo immune protection and proghosis of mice with leukemia were studied.Conclusions These data support the use of DCs/RNA vaccine as a feasible and effective route to elicit leukemia immunity against unidentified leukemia-associated antigens for treatment of leukemia-bearing animals.

  12. CD8+ T cells from a novel T cell receptor transgenic mouse induce liver-stage immunity that can be boosted by blood-stage infection in rodent malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Lei Shong; Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Mollard, Vanessa; Sturm, Angelika; Neller, Michelle A; Cozijnsen, Anton; Gregory, Julia L; Davey, Gayle M; Jones, Claerwen M; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Haque, Ashraful; Engwerda, Christian R; Nie, Catherine Q; Hansen, Diana S; Murphy, Kenneth M; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; de Koning-Ward, Tania; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Carbone, Francis R; Crabb, Brendan S; Heath, William R

    2014-05-01

    To follow the fate of CD8+ T cells responsive to Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection, we generated an MHC I-restricted TCR transgenic mouse line against this pathogen. T cells from this line, termed PbT-I T cells, were able to respond to blood-stage infection by PbA and two other rodent malaria species, P. yoelii XNL and P. chabaudi AS. These PbT-I T cells were also able to respond to sporozoites and to protect mice from liver-stage infection. Examination of the requirements for priming after intravenous administration of irradiated sporozoites, an effective vaccination approach, showed that the spleen rather than the liver was the main site of priming and that responses depended on CD8α+ dendritic cells. Importantly, sequential exposure to irradiated sporozoites followed two days later by blood-stage infection led to augmented PbT-I T cell expansion. These findings indicate that PbT-I T cells are a highly versatile tool for studying multiple stages and species of rodent malaria and suggest that cross-stage reactive CD8+ T cells may be utilized in liver-stage vaccine design to enable boosting by blood-stage infections.

  13. Depletion of regulatory T cells augments a vaccine-induced T effector cell response against the liver-stage of malaria but fails to increase memory.

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    Maria del Rosario Espinoza Mora

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (T(reg have been shown to restrict vaccine-induced T cell responses in different experimental models. In these studies CD4(+CD25(+ T(reg were depleted using monoclonal antibodies against CD25, which might also interfere with CD25 on non-regulatory T cell populations and would have no effect on Foxp3(+CD25(- T(reg. To obtain more insights in the specific function of T(reg during vaccination we used mice that are transgenic for a bacterial artificial chromosome expressing a diphtheria toxin (DT receptor-eGFP fusion protein under the control of the foxp3 gene locus (depletion of regulatory T cell mice; DEREG. As an experimental vaccine-carrier recombinant Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid fused with a MHC-class I-restricted epitope of the circumsporozoite protein (ACT-CSP of Plasmodium berghei (Pb was used. ACT-CSP was shown by us previously to introduce the CD8+ epitope of Pb-CSP into the MHC class I presentation pathway of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC. Using this system we demonstrate here that the number of CSP-specific T cells increases when T(reg are depleted during prime but also during boost immunization. Importantly, despite this increase of T effector cells no difference in the number of antigen-specific memory cells was observed.

  14. Effect of adefovir dipivoxil on T cell immune function in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and hepatocirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liting; Fu, Qilin; Huang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the T cell immune function in chronic hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis patients at the compensated and decompensated stage following treatment with adefovir dipivoxil. A total of 104 patients diagnosed with hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis during the period from October 2013 to October 2014 were enrolled in the study. Among the cases, there were 56 cases at compensated stage, and another 48 at decompensated stage. Adefovir dipivoxil was administered for antiviral therapy (10 mg/time, 1 time/day, for a total of 24 weeks), and we compared the virus disappearance rate, liver function improvement and T cell immune function between the two groups before and after treatment. The difference between the virus disappearance rate in the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The decreased level of ALT decrease in the compensated group was significantly higher than that in the decompensated group, while the increased level of albumin in the compensated group was significantly higher as well. The differences showed statistical significance (P0.05). Adefovir dipivoxil treatment can improve T cell immune function at the compensated and decompensated stages in chronic hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis patients. This may be associated with virus disappearance and liver function improvement.

  15. Cooperativity between CD8+ T cells, non-neutralizing antibodies, and alveolar macrophages is important for heterosubtypic influenza virus immunity.

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    Brian J Laidlaw

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential "universal" vaccine.

  16. Interplay among cytokines and T cell subsets in the progression and control of immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudgil, Kamal D

    2015-07-01

    Cytokines serve as key mediators of inflammation and tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. The induction, progression, and resolution of inflammation in such disorders are characterized by a dynamic balance between both the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as the pathogenic and protective T cell subsets. Over the past two decades, the roles of the interleukin-17 (IL-17) /IL-23 axis and the T helper 17 (Th17)/ T regulatory (Treg) cell balance in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and other inflammatory diseases have extensively been analyzed, and their significance validated. However, these studies, coupled with others devoted to well-established Th1/Th2 cytokines, have unraveled some challenging issues including the dual action of cytokines and the plasticity of T cell subsets. Nevertheless, major positive advances have also been made regarding cytokines and T cell subsets as therapeutic targets/agents. In this special issue, "Cytokines in Immune Pathology and Therapy," leading experts have shared their research work and perspectives on the roles of cytokines in the development and control of immune-mediated diseases. An outline of 14 articles in the first volume is presented here. The second volume will follow soon.

  17. Chitosan Interferon-γ Nanogene Therapy for Lung Disease: Modulation of T-Cell and Dendritic Cell Immune Responses

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    Kong Xiaoyuan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of chitosan nanoparticles as carriers for expression plasmids represents a major improvement in gene expression technology. We demonstrated previously that treatment with chitosan interferon-γ (IFN-γ plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA nanoparticles (chitosan interferon-γ nanogene [CIN] led to in situ production of IFN-γ and a reduction in inflammation and airway reactivity in mice, but the mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory effects of CIN remains unclear. In this report, the effect of CIN treatment on the immune responses of CD8+ T cells and dendritic cells was examined in a BALB/c mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced allergic asthma. OT1 mice (OVA-T cell receptor [TCR] transgenic were also used to test the effects of CIN on OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. CIN treatment caused a reduction in IFN-γ production in a subpopulation of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells cultured in vitro in the presence of OVA. CIN also reduced apoptosis of the CD8+ T cells. Examination of dendritic cells from lung and lymph nodes indicated that CIN treatment decreased their antigen-presenting activity, as evident from the reduction in CD80 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, CIN treatment significantly decreased the number of CD11c+b+ dendritic cells in lymph nodes, suggesting that endogenous IFN-γ expression may immunomodulate dendritic cell migration and activation. CIN therapy results in a reduction in proinflammatory CD8+ T cells and decreases the number and antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells.

  18. Vaccination with Altered Peptide Ligands of a Plasmodium berghei Circumsporozoite Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope: A Model to Generate T Cells Resistant to Immune Interference by Polymorphic Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minigo, Gabriela; Flanagan, Katie L.; Slattery, Robyn M.; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, display high levels of polymorphism within T-cell epitope regions of proteins associated with protective immunity. The T-cell epitope variants are often non-cross-reactive. Herein, we show in a murine model, which modifies a protective CD8 T-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium berghei (SYIPSAEKI), that simultaneous or sequential co-stimulation with two of its putative similarly non-cross-reactive altered peptide ligand (APL) epitopes (SYIPSAEDI or SYIPSAEAI) has radically different effects on immunity. Hence, co-immunization or sequential stimulation in vivo of SYIPSAEKI with its APL antagonist SYIPSAEDI decreases immunity to both epitopes. By contrast, co-immunization with SYIPSAEAI has no apparent initial effect, but it renders the immune response to SYIPSAEKI resistant to being turned off by subsequent immunization with SYIPSAEDI. These results suggest a novel strategy for vaccines that target polymorphic epitopes potentially capable of mutual immune interference in the field, by initiating an immune response by co-immunization with the desired index epitope, together with a carefully selected “potentiator” APL peptide.

  19. Absence of cross-presenting cells in the salivary gland and viral immune evasion confine cytomegalovirus immune control to effector CD4 T cells.

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    Senta M Walton

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transmission of cytomegaloviruses (CMV occurs via prolonged excretion from mucosal surfaces. We used murine CMV (MCMV infection to investigate the mechanisms of immune control in secretory organs. CD4 T cells were crucial to cease MCMV replication in the salivary gland (SG via direct secretion of IFNγ that initiated antiviral signaling on non-hematopoietic cells. In contrast, CD4 T cell helper functions for CD8 T cells or B cells were dispensable. Despite SG-resident MCMV-specific CD8 T cells being able to produce IFNγ, the absence of MHC class I molecules on infected acinar glandular epithelial cells due to viral immune evasion, and the paucity of cross-presenting antigen presenting cells (APCs prevented their local activation. Thus, local activation of MCMV-specific T cells is confined to the CD4 subset due to exclusive presentation of MCMV-derived antigens by MHC class II molecules on bystander APCs, resulting in IFNγ secretion interfering with viral replication in cells of non-hematopoietic origin.

  20. Correspondence of Neutralizing Humoral Immunity and CD4 T Cell Responses in Long Recovered Sudan Virus Survivors

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    Ariel Sobarzo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Robust humoral and cellular immunity are critical for survival in humans during an ebolavirus infection. However, the interplay between these two arms of immunity is poorly understood. To address this, we examined residual immune responses in survivors of the Sudan virus (SUDV outbreak in Gulu, Uganda (2000–2001. Cytokine and chemokine expression levels in SUDV stimulated whole blood cultures were assessed by multiplex ELISA and flow cytometry. Antibody and corresponding neutralization titers were also determined. Flow cytometry and multiplex ELISA results demonstrated significantly higher levels of cytokine and chemokine responses in survivors with serological neutralizing activity. This correspondence was not detected in survivors with serum reactivity to SUDV but without neutralization activity. This previously undefined relationship between memory CD4 T cell responses and serological neutralizing capacity in SUDV survivors is key for understanding long lasting immunity in survivors of filovirus infections.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

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    Caroline Junqueira

    Full Text Available Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, lipopeptide (Pam3Cys, and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128 derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ production by CD4(+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception. The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A; Salgado, Ana Paula C; Cunha, Thiago M; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L O; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4(+) T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  3. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

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    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  4. Immune escape from NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy via loss of heterozygosity in the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, Z K; Chou, J; Towlerton, A M; Voong, L N; Robbins, P; Bensinger, W I; Warren, E H

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.

  5. In vitro TNF blockade enhances ex vivo expansion of regulatory T cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hui; Bussel, James; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Summary Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in a number of autoimmune diseases including immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a bleeding disorder characterized by low platelet counts. In vitro TNF blockade increases expansion of the regulatory T cell (Treg) IKZF2 (also termed Helios) subset in T cell-monocyte cocultures from healthy donors, but its role on proliferative responses of Tregs in ITP patients, who have altered immunoregulatory compartment, remains unclear. TNF in CD4+ T cells from patients with chronic ITP were elevated and negatively correlated with peripheral Treg frequencies, suggesting a possible inhibitory effect of TNF on ITP Tregs. In vitro antibody neutralization with anti-TNF in T cell-monocyte cocultures resulted in a robust expansion of pre-existing ITP Tregs, higher than in healthy controls. Similar to the effects of anti-TNF antibodies, TNF blockade with antibodies against TNFRSF1B (anti-TNFRSF1B, previously termed anti-TNFRII) almost doubled ITP Treg expansion whereas neutralization with anti-TNFRSF1A (anti-TNFRI) antibodies had no effect on proliferative responses of Tregs. In addition, TNFRSF1B levels on ITP Tregs were significantly elevated, which may explain the increased susceptibility of patient Tregs to the actions of TNF blockade. Altogether, these data raise the possibility that TNF blockers, through their ability to increase Treg proliferation, may be efficacious in ITP patients. PMID:25252160

  6. PD-1 expression on dendritic cells suppresses CD8+ T cell function and antitumor immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Tong Seng; Chew, Valerie; Sieow, Je Lin; Goh, Siting; Yeong, Joe Poh-Sheng; Soon, Ai Ling; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Programmed death one (PD-1) is a well-established co-inhibitory regulator that suppresses proliferation and cytokine production of T cells. Despite remarkable progress in delineating the functional roles of PD-1 on T lymphocytes, little is known about the regulatory role of PD-1 expressed on myeloid cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that CD8+ T cells can be more potently activated to secrete IL-2 and IFNγ by PD-1-deficient DCs compared to wild-type DCs. Adoptive transfer of P...

  7. Reciprocity between Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells: Relevance to Polarized Immunity in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Soumi; Khaitan, Binod Kumar; Joshi, Beenu; Sengupta, Utpal; Nautiyal, Arvind Kumar; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    T cell defect is a common feature in lepromatous or borderline lepromatous leprosy (LL/BL) patients in contrast to tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid type (TT/BT) patients. Tuberculoid leprosy is characterized by strong Th1-type cell response with localized lesions whereas lepromatous leprosy is hallmarked by its selective Mycobacterium leprae specific T cell anergy leading to disseminated and progressive disease. FoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases also dampen proinflammatory T cells that include T helper 17 (Th17) cells. This study is aimed at evaluating the role of Treg cells in influencing other effector T cells and its relationship with the cytokine polarized state in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from of BT/TT (n = 15) and BL/LL (n = 15) patients were stimulated with M. leprae antigen (WCL) in presence of golgi transport inhibitor monensin for FACS based intracellular cytokine estimation. The frequency of Treg cells showed >5-fold increase in BL/LL in comparison to BT/TT and healthy contacts. These cells produced suppressive cytokine, IL-10 in BL/LL as opposed to BT/TT (p = 0.0200) indicating their suppressive function. The frequency of Th17 cells (CD4, CD45RO, IL-17) was, however, higher in BT/TT. Significant negative correlation (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) was also found between IL-10 of Treg cells and IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL. Blocking IL-10/TGF-β restored the IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL patients. Simultaneously, presence of Th17 related cytokines (TGF-β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-23) decreased the number of FoxP3+ Treg cells concomitantly increasing IL-17 producing CD4+ cells in lepromatous leprosy. Higher frequency of Programmed Death-1/PD-1+ Treg cells and its ligand, PDL-1 in antigen presenting cells (APCs) was found in BL/LL patients. Inhibition of this pathway led to rescue of IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T cells

  8. Agonist anti-GITR monoclonal antibody induces melanoma tumor immunity in mice by altering regulatory T cell stability and intra-tumor accumulation.

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    Adam D Cohen

    Full Text Available In vivo GITR ligation has previously been shown to augment T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity, yet the underlying mechanisms of this activity, particularly its in vivo effects on CD4+ foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, have not been fully elucidated. In order to translate this immunotherapeutic approach to the clinic it is important gain better understanding of its mechanism(s of action. Utilizing the agonist anti-GITR monoclonal antibody DTA-1, we found that in vivo GITR ligation modulates regulatory T cells (Tregs directly during induction of melanoma tumor immunity. As a monotherapy, DTA-1 induced regression of small established B16 melanoma tumors. Although DTA-1 did not alter systemic Treg frequencies nor abrogate the intrinsic suppressive activity of Tregs within the tumor-draining lymph node, intra-tumor Treg accumulation was significantly impaired. This resulted in a greater Teff:Treg ratio and enhanced tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell activity. The decreased intra-tumor Treg accumulation was due both to impaired infiltration, coupled with DTA-1-induced loss of foxp3 expression in intra-tumor Tregs. Histological analysis of B16 tumors grown in Foxp3-GFP mice showed that the majority of GFP+ cells had lost Foxp3 expression. These "unstable" Tregs were absent in IgG-treated tumors and in DTA-1 treated TDLN, demonstrating a tumor-specific effect. Impairment of Treg infiltration was lost if Tregs were GITR(-/-, and the protective effects of DTA-1 were reduced in reconstituted RAG1(-/- mice if either the Treg or Teff subset were GITR-negative and absent if both were negative. Our results demonstrate that DTA-1 modulates both Teffs and Tregs during effective tumor treatment. The data suggest that DTA-1 prevents intra-tumor Treg accumulation by altering their stability, and as a result of the loss of foxp3 expression, may modify their intra-tumor suppressive capacity. These findings provide further support for the continued development of agonist

  9. DAP12 deficiency in liver allografts results in enhanced donor DC migration, augmented effector T cell responses and abrogation of transplant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, O; Kimura, S; Dou, L; Matta, B M; Yokota, S; Ross, M A; Geller, D A; Thomson, A W

    2014-08-01

    Liver interstitial dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in immune regulation and tolerance induction. We found that the transmembrane immuno-adaptor DNAX-activating protein of 12 kDa (DAP12) negatively regulated conventional liver myeloid (m) DC maturation and their in vivo migratory and T cell allostimulatory ability. Livers were transplanted from C57BL/6(H2(b) ) (B6) WT or DAP12(-/-) mice into WT C3H (H2(k) ) recipients. Donor mDC (H2-K(b+) CD11c(+) ) were quantified in spleens by flow cytometry. Anti-donor T cell reactivity was evaluated by ex vivo carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-mixed leukocyte reaction and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, while T effector and regulatory T cells were determined by flow analysis. A threefold to fourfold increase in donor-derived DC was detected in spleens of DAP12(-/-) liver recipients compared with those given WT grafts. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in the graft, interferon gamma (IFNγ) production by graft-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells and systemic levels of IFNγ were all elevated significantly in DAP12(-/-) liver recipients. DAP12(-/-) grafts also exhibited reduced incidences of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells and enhanced CD8(+) T cell IFNγ secretion in response to donor antigen challenge. Unlike WT grafts, DAP12(-/-) livers failed to induce tolerance and were rejected acutely. Thus, DAP12 expression in liver grafts regulates donor mDC migration to host lymphoid tissue, alloreactive T cell responses and transplant tolerance.

  10. Constitutive CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminates germinal center response and leads to augmented plasma cell production in T cell areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Anna; Long, Eugene; Stapler, Dale; Cascalho, Marilia; Tsubata, Takeshi; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko

    2010-07-01

    CD40/CD40L engagement is essential to T cell-dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the precise role of CD40 signaling through cognate T-B interaction in the generation of germinal center and memory B cells is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, a B cell-specific CD40L transgene (CD40LBTg) was introduced into mice with B cell-restricted MHC class II deficiency. Using this mouse model, we show that constitutive CD40L expression on B cells alone could not induce germinal center differentiation of MHC class II-deficient B cells after immunization with T cell-dependent Ag. Thus, some other MHC class II-dependent T cell-derived signals are essential for the generation of germinal center B cells in response to T cell-dependent Ag. In fact, CD40LBTg mice generated a complex Ag-specific IgG1 response, which was greatly enhanced in early, but reduced in late, primary response compared with control mice. We also found that the frequency of Ag-specific germinal center B cells in CD40LBTg mice was abruptly reduced 1 wk after immunization. As a result, the numbers of Ag-specific IgG1 long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells were reduced. By histology, large numbers of Ag-specific plasma cells were found in T cell areas adjacent to Ag-specific germinal centers of CD40LBTg mice, temporarily during the second week of primary response. These results indicate that CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminated their ongoing germinal center response and produced plasma cells. Our results support the notion that CD40 signaling is an active termination signal for germinal center reaction.

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of tritiated thymidine incorporation and ELISPOT assays in identifying antigen specific T cell immune responses

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    MacLeod Beth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardization of cell-based immunologic monitoring is becoming increasingly important as methods for measuring cellular immunity become more complex. We assessed the ability of two commonly used cell-based assays, tritiated thymidine incorporation (proliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, to predict T cell responses to HER-2/neu, tetanus toxoid (tt, and cytomegalovirus (CMV antigens. These antigens were determined to be low (HER-2/neu, moderate (tt, and robustly (CMV immunogenic proteins. Samples from 27 Stage II, III, and IV HER-2/neu positive breast cancer patients, vaccinated against the HER-2/neu protein and tt, were analyzed by tritiated thymidine incorporation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT for T cell response. Results Linear regression analysis indicates that both stimulation index (SI (p = 0.011 and IFN-gamma secreting precursor frequency (p Conclusion These data underscore the importance of taking into consideration the performance characteristics of assays used to measure T cell immunity. This consideration is particularly necessary when determining which method to utilize for assessing responses to immunotherapeutic manipulations in cancer patients.

  12. Mathematical model of the primary CD8 T cell immune response: stability analysis of a nonlinear age-structured system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Emmanuelle; Marvel, Jacqueline; Arpin, Christophe; Gandrillon, Olivier; Crauste, Fabien

    2012-08-01

    The primary CD8 T cell immune response, due to a first encounter with a pathogen, happens in two phases: an expansion phase, with a fast increase of T cell count, followed by a contraction phase. This contraction phase is followed by the generation of memory cells. These latter are specific of the antigen and will allow a faster and stronger response when encountering the antigen for the second time. We propose a nonlinear mathematical model describing the T CD8 immune response to a primary infection, based on three nonlinear ordinary differential equations and one nonlinear age-structured partial differential equation, describing the evolution of CD8 T cell count and pathogen amount. We discuss in particular the roles and relevance of feedback controls that regulate the response. First we reduce our system to a system with a nonlinear differential equation with a distributed delay. We study the existence of two steady states, and we analyze the asymptotic stability of these steady states. Second we study the system with a discrete delay, and analyze global asymptotic stability of steady states. Finally, we show some simulations that we can obtain from the model and confront them to experimental data.

  13. The role of OX22- helper T cells in protective immunity to reinfection with Taenia taeniaeformis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Ito, A; Okamoto, K

    1993-12-01

    Spleen cells (SpC) and mesenteric lymph node cells (MLNC) from F344 donor rats actively immunized by oral inoculation with Taenia taeniaeformis eggs were syngeneically transferred into previously uninfected recipient rats by intravenous injection. Recipient rats were challenged with eggs after cell transfer. The degree of immunity was assessed by counting the number of growing metacestodes (MC) in the liver and compared with that in controls. Transfer of 2 x 10(8) SpC, obtained from donors immunized for ten or more (but not for three or five) days before cell transfer inhibited the establishment of most of MC. There were approximately 86-88% reductions in MC recoveries. SpC (2 x 10(8)) obtained from donors immunized for ten days inhibited the establishment of most of MC in recipient rats when transferred nought, two, or 24 h (but not 48 h) before egg challenge. Functional cells in the immune SpC were helper T cells W3/25+, OX8- and OX22-. However, immune MLNC obtained from donors immunized for three to ten days before cell transfer had no effect on transferring immunity.

  14. Induction of novel CD8+ T-cell responses during chronic untreated HIV-1 infection by immunization with subdominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloverpris, Henrik; Karlsson, Ingrid; Bonde, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    . RESULTS:: Previously undetected T-cell responses specific for one or more epitopes were induced in all 12 individuals. Half of the participants had sustained CD4 T-cell responses 32 weeks after immunization. No severe adverse effects were observed. No overall or sustained change in viral load or CD4 T...... with seven CD8 T-cell epitopes and three CD4 T-cell epitopes. Epitope-specific responses were evaluated by intracellular cytokine staining for interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-2 and/or pentamer labeling 3 weeks prior to, 10 weeks after and 32 weeks after the first immunization......-cell counts was observed. CONCLUSION:: These data show that it is possible to generate new T-cell responses in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected individuals despite high viral loads, and thereby redirect immunity to target new multiple and rationally selected subdominant CTL epitopes. Further optimization could...

  15. Navigating the immune system: Improving CD8+ T cell responses for vaccine design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Most vaccines rely on the protective effect of the humoral response. In case of intracellular- or rapidly mutating pathogens, humoral responses are less protective and the cellular response, mainly CD8+ T cells, can convey protection. However, vaccine efficacy is hampered by insufficient knowledge o

  16. CD8(+) T cells specific to a single Yersinia pseudotuberculosis epitope restrict bacterial replication in the liver but fail to provide sterilizing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiqian; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Blanchette, Krystle; Crimmins, Gregory; Bergman, Molly A; Isberg, Ralph R; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells use contact-dependent cytolysis of target cells to protect the host against intracellular pathogens. We have previously shown that CD8(+) T cells and perforin are required to protect against the extracellular pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we establish an experimental system where CD8(+) T cells specific to a single model antigen are the only memory response present at time of challenge. Using mice immunized with a vaccine strain of Listeria monocytogenes that expresses secreted ovalbumin (Lm-OVA), we show that OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide limited protection against challenge with virulent OVA(+)Y. pseudotuberculosis. Perforin expression by OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells was required, as Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-deficient mice showed higher bacterial burden as compared to Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-sufficient mice. Surprisingly, antigen-specific T cell protection waned over time, as Lm-OVA-immune mice eventually succumbed to Yersinia infection. Kinetic analysis of infection in mice with and without OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed that bacterial numbers increased sharply in OVA-naïve mice until death, while OVA-immune mice held bacterial burden to a lower level throughout the duration of illness until death. Clonal analysis of bacterial populations in OVA-naïve and OVA-immune mice at distinct time points revealed equivalent and severe bottle-neck effects for bacteria in both sets of mice immediately after intravenous challenge, demonstrating a dominant role for other aspects of the immune system regardless of CD8(+) T cell status. These studies indicate that CD8(+) T cells against a single antigen can restrict Y. pseudotuberculosis colonization in a perforin-dependent manner, but ultimately are insufficient in their ability to provide sterilizing immunity and protect against death.

  17. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Federico; Perea, Francisco; Bernal, Mónica; Sánchez-Palencia, Abel; Aptsiauri, Natalia; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I) expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). PMID:28264447

  18. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

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    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  19. Regulation of T cell immunity in atopic dermatitis by microbes: The Yin and Yang of cutaneous inflammation

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    Tilo eBiedermann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease predominantly mediated by T helper cells. While numerous adaptive immune mechanisms in AD pathophysiology have been elucidated in detail, deciphering the impact of innate immunity in AD pathogenesis has made substantial progress in recent years and is currently a fast evolving field. As innate and adaptive immunity are intimately linked cross-talks between these two branches of the immune system are critically influencing the resulting immune response and disease. Innate immune recognition of the cutaneous microbiota was identified to substantially contribute to immune homeostasis and shaping of protective adaptive immunity in the absence of inflammation. Disturbances in the composition of the skin microbiome with reduced microbial diversity and overabundance of Staphylococcus spp. have been shown to be associated with AD inflammation. Distinct S. aureus associated microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs binding to TLR2 heterodimers could be identified to initiate long lasting cutaneous inflammation driven by T helper cells and consecutively local immune suppression by induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC further favoring secondary skin infections as often seen in AD patients. Moreover dissecting cellular and molecular mechanisms in cutaneous innate immune sensing in AD pathogenesis paved the way for exploiting regulatory and anti-inflammatory pathways to attenuate skin inflammation. Activation of the innate immune system by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria on AD skin alleviated cutaneous inflammation. The induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells, Interleukin-10 expression and regulatory Tr1 cells were shown to mediate this beneficial effect. Thus, activation of innate immunity by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria for induction of regulatory T cell phenotypes seems to be a promising strategy for treatment of inflammatory skin disorders as atopic dermatitis. These

  20. Genetic ablation or pharmacological blockade of dipeptidyl peptidase IV does not impact T cell-dependent immune responses

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    Pryor Kellyann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current literature suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV; CD26 plays an essential role in T-dependent immune responses, a role that could have important clinical consequences. To rigorously define the role of DPP-IV in the immune system, we evaluated genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme on T-dependent immune responses in vivo. Results The DPP-IV null animals mounted robust primary and secondary antibody responses to the T dependent antigens, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl-ovalbumin (NP-Ova and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl-chicken gamma globulin (NP-CGG, which were comparable to wild type mice. Serum levels of antigen specific IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 were similar between the two groups of animals. DPP-IV null animals mounted an efficient germinal center reaction by day 10 after antigen stimulation that was comparable to wild type mice. Moreover, the antibodies produced by DPP-IV null animals after repeated antigenic challenge were affinity matured. Similar observations were made using wild type animals treated with a highly selective DPP-IV inhibitor during the entire course of the experiments. T cell recall responses to ovalbumin and MOG peptide, evaluated by measuring proliferation and IL-2 release from cells isolated from draining lymph nodes, were equivalent in DPP-IV null and wild type animals. Furthermore, mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor had intact T-cell recall responses to MOG peptide. In addition, female DPP-IV null and wild type mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor exhibited normal and robust in vivo cytotoxic T cell responses after challenge with cells expressing the male H-Y minor histocompatibility antigen. Conclusion These data indicate Selective inhibition of DPP-IV does not impair T dependent immune responses to antigenic challenge.

  1. Serial Assessment of Immune Status by Circulating CD8+ Effector T Cell Frequencies for Posttransplant Infectious Complications

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    Shinji Uemoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the role of CD8+ effector T cells for infectious complications, 92 recipients were classified according to the hierarchical clustering of preoperative CD8+CD45 isoforms: Group I was naive, Group II was effector memory, and Group III was effector (E T cell-dominant. The posttransplant infection rates progressively increased from 29% in Group I to 64.3% in Group III recipients. The posttransplant immune status was compared with the pretransplant status, based on the measure (% difference and its graphical form (scatter plot. In Groups I and II, both approaches showed a strong upward deviation from pretransplant status upon posttransplant infection, indicating an enhanced clearance of pathogens. In Group III, in contrast, both approaches showed a clear downward deviation from preoperative status, indicating deficient cytotoxicity. The % E difference and scatter plot can be used as a useful indicator of a posttransplant infectious complication.

  2. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-11-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, healing is mediated by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Thus, an efficacious vaccine should induce Th1 and Tc1 cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exogenous proteins primarily induce strong CD4-dependent immunity; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C kinase), as TAT-fusion proteins facilitate major histocompatibility complex class I-dependent antigen presentation. In vitro, TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs induced stronger proliferation of Leishmania-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with DCs incubated with LACK alone. Vaccination with TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs or fusion proteins plus adjuvant in vivo significantly improved disease outcome in Leishmania major-infected mice and was superior to vaccination with DCs treated with LACK alone. Vaccination with DC+TAT-LACK resulted in stronger proliferation of CD8(+) T cells when compared with immunization with DC+LACK. Upon depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, TAT-LACK-mediated protection was lost. TAT-LACK-pulsed IL-12p40-deficient DCs did not promote protection in vivo. In summary, these data show that TAT-fusion proteins are superior in activating Leishmania-specific Tc1 cells when compared with antigen alone and suggest that IL-12-dependent preferential induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cells promotes significant protection against this important human pathogen.

  3. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons; Anastas Pashov; Behjatolah Monzavi-Karbassi; Fariba Jousheghany; Cecile Artaud; Leah Hennings

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- an...

  4. Whole blood assay to access T cell-immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in healthy Brazilian individuals

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    Paulo RZ Antas

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of interferon gamma (IFNgamma guarantees effective T cell-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In the present study, we simply compare the in vitro immune responses to Mycobacterium antigens in terms of IFNg production in a total of 10 healthy Brazilian volunteers. Whole blood and mononuclear cells were cultivated in parallel with PPD, Ag85B, and M. bovis hsp65, and five-days supernatants were harvested for cytokine detection by ELISA. The inter-assay result was that the overall profile of agreement in response to antigens was highly correlated (r² = 0.9266; p = 0.0102. Potential analysis is in current progress to dictate the usefulness of this method to access the immune responses also in tuberculosis patients and its contacts.

  5. Regulatory T cells and immune regulation of allergic diseases: roles of IL-10 and TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, O; Martín-Fontecha, M; Lauener, R; Traidl-Hoffmann, C; Cavkaytar, O; Akdis, M; Akdis, C A

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has significantly increased in industrialized countries. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) remains as the only curative treatment. The knowledge about the mechanisms underlying healthy immune responses to allergens, the development of allergic reactions and restoration of appropriate immune responses to allergens has significantly improved over the last decades. It is now well-accepted that the generation and maintenance of functional allergen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells and regulatory B (Breg) cells are essential for healthy immune responses to environmental proteins and successful AIT. Treg cells comprise different subsets of T cells with suppressive capacity, which control the development and maintenance of allergic diseases by various ways of action. Molecular mechanisms of generation of Treg cells, the identification of novel immunological organs, where this might occur in vivo, such as tonsils, and related epigenetic mechanisms are starting to be deciphered. The key role played by the suppressor cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β produced by functional Treg cells during the generation of immune tolerance to allergens is now well established. Treg and Breg cells together have a role in suppression of IgE and induction of IgG4 isotype allergen-specific antibodies particularly mediated by IL-10. Other cell types such as subsets of dendritic cells, NK-T cells and natural killer cells producing high levels of IL-10 may also contribute to the generation of healthy immune responses to allergens. In conclusion, better understanding of the immune regulatory mechanisms operating at different stages of allergic diseases will significantly help the development of better diagnostic and predictive biomarkers and therapeutic interventions.

  6. Targeting Transcriptional Regulators of CD8+ T Cell Dysfunction to Boost Anti-Tumor Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Katherine A; Leach, Sonia M; Slansky, Jill E

    2015-01-01

    Transcription is a dynamic process influenced by the cellular environment: healthy, transformed, and otherwise. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles reflect the collective impact of pathways modulating cell function under different conditions. In this review we focus on the transcriptional pathways that control tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cell (TIL) function. Simultaneous restraint of overlapping inhibitory pathways may confer TIL resistance to multiple mechanisms of suppression traditionally referred to as exhaustion, tolerance, or anergy. Although decades of work have laid a solid foundation of altered transcriptional networks underlying various subsets of hypofunctional or "dysfunctional" CD8+ T cells, an understanding of the relevance in TIL has just begun. With recent technological advances, it is now feasible to further elucidate and utilize these pathways in immunotherapy platforms that seek to increase TIL function.

  7. Targeting Transcriptional Regulators of CD8+ T Cell Dysfunction to Boost Anti-Tumor Immunity

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    Katherine A. Waugh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is a dynamic process influenced by the cellular environment: healthy, transformed, and otherwise. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles reflect the collective impact of pathways modulating cell function under different conditions. In this review we focus on the transcriptional pathways that control tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cell (TIL function. Simultaneous restraint of overlapping inhibitory pathways may confer TIL resistance to multiple mechanisms of suppression traditionally referred to as exhaustion, tolerance, or anergy. Although decades of work have laid a solid foundation of altered transcriptional networks underlying various subsets of hypofunctional or “dysfunctional” CD8+ T cells, an understanding of the relevance in TIL has just begun. With recent technological advances, it is now feasible to further elucidate and utilize these pathways in immunotherapy platforms that seek to increase TIL function.

  8. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

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    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  9. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are sensitive to low dose cyclophosphamide: implications for the immune response.

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    Daniel Heylmann

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg play a pivotal role in the immune system since they inhibit the T cell response. It is well known that cyclophosphamide applied at low dose is able to stimulate the immune response while high dose cyclophosphamide exerts inhibitory activity. Data obtained in mice indicate that cyclophosphamide provokes a reduction in the number of Treg and impairs their suppressive activity, resulting in immune stimulation. Here, we addressed the question of the sensitivity of human Treg to cyclophosphamide, comparing Treg with cytotoxic T cells (CTL and T helper cells (Th. We show that Treg are more sensitive than CTL and Th to mafosfamide, which is an active derivative of cyclophosphamide, which does not need metabolic activation. The high sensitivity of Treg was due to the induction of apoptosis. Treg compared to CTL and Th were not more sensitive to the alkylating drugs temozolomide and nimustine and also not to mitomycin C, indicating a specific Treg response to mafosfamide. The high sensitivity of Treg to mafosfamide resulted not only in enhanced cell death, but also in impaired Treg function as demonstrated by a decline in the suppressor activity of Treg in a co-culture model with Th and Helios positive Treg. Treatment of Treg with mafosfamide gave rise to a high level of DNA crosslinks, which were not repaired to the same extent as observed in Th and CTL. Also, Treg showed a low level of γH2AX foci up to 6 h and a high level 24 h after treatment, indicating alterations in the DNA damage response. Overall, this is the first demonstration that human Treg are, in comparison with Th and CTL, hypersensitive to cyclophosphamide, which is presumably due to a DNA repair defect.

  10. Sterile immunity to malaria after DNA prime/adenovirus boost immunization is associated with effector memory CD8+T cells targeting AMA1 class I epitopes.

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    Martha Sedegah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad. Four volunteers (27% demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA did not develop sterile protection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of

  11. Ex vivo expansion of human T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using the novel Xeno-free CTS Immune Cell Serum Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey; Økern, Grethe; Rehan, Sweera; Beagley, Leone; Lee, Sau K; Aarvak, Tanja; Schjetne, Karoline W; Khanna, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of clinical grade cellular products for adoptive immunotherapy requires ex vivo culture and expansion of human T cells. One of the key components in manufacturing of T cell therapies is human serum (HS) or fetal bovine serum (FBS), which can potentially expose immunotherapy recipient to adventitious infectious pathogens and are thus considered as non-cGMP compliant for adoptive therapy. Here we describe a novel xeno-free serum replacement (SR) with defined components that can be reproducibly used for the production of clinical grade T-cell therapies in combination with several different cell culture media. Dynabeads CD3/CD28 Cell Therapy System (CTS)-activated or antigen-specific T cells expanded using the xeno-free SR, CTS Immune Cell SR, showed comparable growth kinetics observed with cell culture media supplemented with HS or FBS. Importantly the xeno-free SR supplemented medium supported the optimal expansion of T cells specific for subdominant tumour-associated antigens and promoted expansion of T cells with central memory T-cell phenotype, which is favourable for in vivo survival and persistence following adoptive transfer. Furthermore, T cells expanded using xeno-free SR medium were highly amenable to lentivirus-mediated gene transduction for potential application for gene-modified T cells. Taken together, the CTS Immune Cell SR provides a novel platform strategy for the manufacture of clinical grade adoptive cellular therapies.

  12. Critical role of perforin-dependent CD8+ T cell immunity for rapid protective vaccination in a murine model for human smallpox.

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    Melanie Kremer

    Full Text Available Vaccination is highly effective in preventing various infectious diseases, whereas the constant threat of new emerging pathogens necessitates the development of innovative vaccination principles that also confer rapid protection in a case of emergency. Although increasing evidence points to T cell immunity playing a critical role in vaccination against viral diseases, vaccine efficacy is mostly associated with the induction of antibody responses. Here we analyze the immunological mechanism(s of rapidly protective vaccinia virus immunization using mousepox as surrogate model for human smallpox. We found that fast protection against lethal systemic poxvirus disease solely depended on CD4 and CD8 T cell responses induced by vaccination with highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA or conventional vaccinia virus. Of note, CD4 T cells were critically required to allow for MVA induced CD8 T cell expansion and perforin-mediated cytotoxicity was a key mechanism of MVA induced protection. In contrast, selected components of the innate immune system and B cell-mediated responses were fully dispensable for prevention of fatal disease by immunization given two days before challenge. In conclusion, our data clearly demonstrate that perforin-dependent CD8 T cell immunity plays a key role in MVA conferred short term protection against lethal mousepox. Rapid induction of T cell immunity might serve as a new paradigm for treatments that need to fit into a scenario of protective emergency vaccination.

  13. Cross-reactive memory CD8(+) T cells alter the immune response to heterologous secondary dengue virus infections in mice in a sequence-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Mathew, Anuja; Bashyam, Hema S; Rothman, Alan L

    2008-02-15

    Dengue virus is the causative agent of dengue fever and the more-severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Human studies suggest that the increased risk of DHF during secondary infection is due to immunopathology partially mediated by cross-reactive memory T cells from the primary infection. To model T cell responses to sequential infections, we immunized mice with different sequences of dengue virus serotypes and measured the frequency of peptide-specific T cells after infection. The acute response after heterologous secondary infections was enhanced compared with the acute or memory response after primary infection. Also, the hierarchy of epitope-specific responses was influenced by the specific sequence of infection. Adoptive-transfer experiments showed that memory T cells responded preferentially to the secondary infection. These findings demonstrate that cross-reactive T cells from a primary infection alter the immune response during a heterologous secondary infection.

  14. The double-edge role of B cells in mediating antitumor T-cell immunity: Pharmacological strategies for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence reveals the controversial role of B cells in antitumor immunity, but the underlying mechanisms have to be explored. Three latest articles published in the issue 521 of Nature in 2015 reconfirmed the puzzling topic and put forward some explanations of how B cells regulate antitumor T-cell responses both positively and negatively. This paper attempts to demonstrate that different B-cell subpopulations have distinct immunological properties and that they are involved in either antitumor responses or immunosuppression. Recent studies supporting the positive and negative roles of B cells in tumor development were summarized comprehensively. Several specific B-cell subpopulations, such as IgG(+), IgA(+), IL-10(+), and regulatory B cells, were described in detail. The mechanisms underlying the controversial B-cell effects were mainly attributed to different B-cell subpopulations, different B-cell-derived cytokines, direct B cell-T cell interaction, different cancer categories, and different malignant stages, and the immunological interaction between B cells and T cells is mediated by dendritic cells. Promising B-cell-based antitumor strategies were proposed and novel B-cell regulators were summarized to present interesting therapeutic targets. Future investigations are needed to make sure that B-cell-based pharmacological strategies benefit cancer immunotherapy substantially.

  15. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  16. Targeted antigen delivery to dendritic cells elicits robust antiviral T cell-mediated immunity in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckmar, Julia; Gereke, Marcus; Ebensen, Thomas; Riese, Peggy; Philipsen, Lars; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Wohlleber, Dirk; Klopfleisch, Robert; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Müller, Andreas J.; Gruber, Achim D.; Knolle, Percy; Guzman, Carlos A.; Bruder, Dunja

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis C virus cause life-threatening chronic liver infections in millions of people worldwide. Targeted in vivo antigen-delivery to cross-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stimulating antigen-specific T cell responses. To determine whether this approach would as well be suitable to induce local antiviral effector T cells in the liver we compared different vaccine formulations based on either the targeting of DEC-205 or TLR2/6 on cross-presenting DCs or formulations not involving in vivo DC targeting. As read-outs we used in vivo hepatotropic adenovirus challenge, histology and automated multidimensional fluorescence microscopy (MELC). We show that targeted in vivo antigen delivery to cross-presenting DCs is highly effective in inducing antiviral CTLs capable of eliminating virus-infected hepatocytes, while control vaccine formulation not involving DC targeting failed to induce immunity against hepatotropic virus. Moreover, we observed distinct patterns of CD8+ T cell interaction with virus-infected and apoptotic hepatocytes in the two DC-targeting groups suggesting that the different vaccine formulations may stimulate distinct types of effector functions. Our findings represent an important step toward the future development of vaccines against hepatotropic viruses and the treatment of patients with hepatic virus infection after liver transplantation to avoid reinfection. PMID:28266658

  17. How numbers, nature and immune status of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells shape the early immunological events in tumor development.

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    Guillaume eDarrasse-Jeze

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs on cancer progression has been demonstrated in a large number of preclinical models and confirmed in several types of malignancies. Neoplastic processes trigger an increase of Treg numbers in draining lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and tumors, leading to the suppression of anti-tumor responses. Treg depletion before or early in tumor development may lead to complete tumor eradication and extends survival of mice and humans. However this strategy is ineffective in established tumors, highlighting the critical role of the early Treg-tumor encounters. In this review, after discussing old and new concepts of immunological tumor tolerance, we focus on the nature (thymus-derived vs. peripherally-derived and status (naïve or activated / memory of the regulatory T cells at tumor emergence. The recent discoveries in this field suggest that the activation status of Tregs and effector T cells (Teffs at the first encounter with the tumor are essential to shape the fate and speed of the immune response across a variety of tumor models. The relative timing of activation/recruitment of antitumor cells versus tolerogenic cells at tumor emergence appears to be crucial in the identification of tumor cells as friend or foe, which has broad implications for the design of cancer immunotherapies.

  18. [Epstein-Barr virus-specific immunity in asymptomatic carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, K W

    1995-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients are immunosuppressed as evidenced by anergy to recall antigens and the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The immunosuppression appears to be a critical factor or a predictive sign for the development of ATL in carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). This study was aimed at assessing the immune status of asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers with the immunity specific to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential. Forty-three asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers were examined for their EBV serology and EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cell (EBV-CTL) activity, in comparison with 10 HTLV-I-non-infected normal controls. Both carriers and controls were all positive for EBV capsid antigen (VCA) IgG. Significantly elevated titer of VCAIgG and lower titer of EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) antibodies were observed in asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers, suggesting reactivation of EBV. Among the HTLV-I carriers, 9 (20.9%) had reduced activity of EBV-CTL as revealed by lower incidence of regression of in vitro EBV-induced B-cell transformation. Accordingly, asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers were divided into three groups: the carriers with reduced EBV-specific cellular immunity (group I), the carriers showing normal cellular immunity but aberrant EBV-specific antibody titers (group II), and the carriers with normal EBV-specific cellular immunity and serology (group III). Higher positive rate of anti-HTLV-I Tax antibody was found in the former two groups (44.4% and 56.5%, respectively) compared with group III (18.2%). An immunosuppressive agent, 4-deoxyphorbol ester induced a remarkable decrease of EBV-CTL activity in the carriers of group II and III at the concentration that affected none of the normal controls. These findings indicate that asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers suffer stepwise impairment of EBV-specific immunities, which may be caused by HTLV-I infection.

  19. Parallels between immune driven-hematopoiesis and T cell activation: 3 signals that relay inflammatory stress to the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libregts, Sten F.W.M.; Nolte, Martijn A., E-mail: m.nolte@sanquin.nl

    2014-12-10

    Quiescence, self-renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) towards fully mature blood cells are a complex process that involves both intrinsic and extrinsic signals. During steady-state conditions, most hematopoietic signals are provided by various resident cells inside the bone marrow (BM), which establish the HSC micro-environment. However, upon infection, the hematopoietic process is also affected by pathogens and activated immune cells, which illustrates an effective feedback mechanism to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) via immune-mediated signals. Here, we review the impact of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines on the quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSCs and more committed progenitors. As modulation of HSPC function via these immune-mediated signals holds an interesting parallel with the “three-signal-model” described for the activation and differentiation of naïve T-cells, we propose a novel “three-signal” concept for immune-driven hematopoiesis. In this model, the recognition of PAMPs and DAMPs will activate HSCs and induce proliferation, while costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines confer a second and third signal, respectively, which further regulate expansion, lineage commitment and differentiation of HSPCs. We review the impact of inflammatory stress on hematopoiesis along these three signals and we discuss whether they act independently from each other or that concurrence of these signals is important for an adequate response of HSPCs upon infection. - Highlights: • Inflammation and infection have a direct impact on hematopoiesis in the bone marrow. • We draw a striking parallel between immune-driven hematopoiesis and T cell activation. • We review how PAMPs and DAMPs, costimulation and cytokines influence HSPC function.

  20. Development of CD4 T cell dependent immunity against N. brasiliensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eHarvie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Of all the microbial infections relevant to mammals the relationship between parasitic worms and what constitutes and regulates a host protective immune response is perhaps the most complex and evolved. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is a tissue migrating parasitic roundworm of rodents that exemplifies many of the salient features of parasitic worm infection, including parasite development through sequential larval stages as it migrates through specific tissue sites. Immune competent hosts respond to infection by N. brasiliensis with a rapid and selective development of a profound Th2 immune response that appears able to confer life long protective immunity against reinfection. This review details how the lung can be the site of migrating nematode immune killing and the gut a site of rapid immune mediated clearance of worms. Furthermore it appears that N. brasiliensis induced responses in the lung are sufficient for conferring immunity in lung and gut while infection of the gut only confers immunity in the gut. This review also covers the role of IL-4, STAT6 and the innate cytokines IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP in the generation of CD4-mediated immunity against N. brasiliensis reinfection and discusses what cytokines might be involved in mediated killing or expulsion of helminth parasites.

  1. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses.

  2. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M.; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses. PMID:26630176

  3. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...

  4. Burn Wound gammadelta T-Cells Support a Th2 and Th17 Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    MC. Biologic therapies in clinical development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Clin Rheumatol 2005;11(3 Suppl):S45–54. 25. Kupetsky EA...Mathers AR, Ferris LK. Anti-cytokine therapy in the treatment of psoriasis . Cytokine 2013;61:704–12. 26. Greenblatt MB, Vrbanac V, Vbranac V, et al...disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), psoriasis , and graft vs host disease.24–27 Gamma-δ T-cells are functionally specialized and are involved in

  5. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of LCMV gp33-41-Specific CD8 T Cells Elicited by Multiple Peptide Immunization in Mice Revealed the Up-regulation of PD-1 Expression on Antigen Specific CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Liu; Lihui Xu; Yiqun Jiang; Jianfang Sun; Xianhui He

    2007-01-01

    The phenotype and function of antigen-specific CD8 T cells are closely associated with the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccination. Here we showed that multiple immunizations with LCMV gp33-41 peptide (KAV) in Freund's adjuvant could induce KAV-specific CD8 T cells with low expression of CD127 and CD62L molecules. The inhibitory receptor PD-1 was also expressed on a substantial part of KAV-specific CD8 T cells, and its expression level on KAV-specific CD8 T cells in spleen and lymph nodes was much higher when compared to those in peripheral blood. Furthermore, KAV-specific CD8 T cells could specifically kill KAV-pulsed target cells in vivo but the efficiency was low. These data suggest that prime-boost vaccination schedule with peptide in Freund's adjuvant can elicit antigen-specific CD8 T cells of effector-like phenotype with partial functional exhaustion, which may only provide short-term protection against the pathogen.

  6. Toll-like receptors on regulatory T cells: expanding immune regulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Morgan, M.E.; Netea, M.G.; Grauer, O.M.; Adema, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain peripheral tolerance and limit effector responses to prevent excessive immune-mediated tissue damage. However, recent research reveals that Treg cells also dampen the induction of immune responses and, thus, must be controlled to enable the effective protection aga

  7. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we...

  8. Transfer of T-cell mediated immunity to Hymenolepis nana from mother mice to their neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Okamoto, K

    1992-01-15

    Administration of lymph node cells from Hymenolepis nana-infected mice into lactating mothers, or directly suckling neonates successfully transferred immunity to the neonates. The capacity of lymph node cells to transfer immunity was completely abrogated by pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement.

  9. Evasion of influenza A viruses from human T-cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAbstract : Cellular immunity plays an important role in the control of viral infections, including those caused by influenza viruses. However, viruses can exploit a variety of strategies to evade cellular immunity, like the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in CTL e

  10. MHC class II restricted innate-like double negative T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary immunity to Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhirong Mou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is generally believed that CD4(+ T cells play important roles in anti-Leishmania immunity, some studies suggest that they may be dispensable, and that MHC II-restricted CD3(+CD4(-CD8(- (double negative, DN T cells may be more important in regulating primary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, while there are reports of increased numbers of DN T cells in Leishmania-infected patients, dogs and mice, concrete evidence implicating these cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity has not yet been documented. Here, we report that DN T cells extensively proliferate and produce effector cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF and IL-17 and granzyme B (GrzB in the draining lymph nodes and spleens of mice following primary and secondary L. major infections. DN T cells from healed mice display functional characteristics of protective anti-Leishmania memory-like cells: rapid and extensive proliferation and effector cytokines production following L. major challenge in vitro and in vivo. DN T cells express predominantly (> 95% alpha-beta T cell receptor (αβ TCR, are Leishmania-specific, restricted mostly by MHC class II molecules and display transcriptional profile of innate-like genes. Using in vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies, we show that DN T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary anti-Leishmania immunity in mice. These results directly identify DN T cells as important players in effective and protective primary and secondary anti-L. major immunity in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  11. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abschuetz, Oliver [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Osen, Wolfram [Division of Translational Immunology, German Cancer Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Frank, Kathrin [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kato, Masashi [Unit of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Schadendorf, Dirk [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45122 (Germany); Umansky, Viktor, E-mail: v.umansky@dkfz.de [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2012-04-26

    Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA) tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  12. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Lam, L K Metthew; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2016-07-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines.

  13. Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan-Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 588-595

  14. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Ingram, Rebecca J; Chu, Karen K; Reynolds, Catherine J; Musson, Julie A; Doganay, Mehmet; Metan, Gökhan; Ozkul, Yusuf; Baillie, Les; Sriskandan, Shiranee; Moore, Stephen J; Gallagher, Theresa B; Dyson, Hugh; Williamson, E Diane; Robinson, John H; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA) and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF) or edema factor (EF). Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  15. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF or edema factor (EF. Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  16. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4⁺ effector memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo.

  17. Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in cancer immunity: from antigen identification to tumor prognosis and development of therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protti, M P; De Monte, L; Monte, L D; Di Lullo, G; Lullo, G D

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells comprise a large fraction of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and it is now established that they may exert an important role in tumor immune-surveillance. Several CD4(+) T cell subsets [i.e. T helper (Th)1, Th2, T regulatory (Treg), Th17, Th22 and follicular T helper (Tfh)] have been described and differentiation of each subset depends on both the antigen presenting cells responsible for its activation and the cytokine environment present at the site of priming. Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells with different functional activity have been found in the blood of cancer patients and different CD4(+) T cell subsets have been identified at the tumor site by the expression of specific transcription factors and the profile of secreted cytokines. Importantly, depending on the subset, CD4(+) T cells may exert antitumor versus pro-tumor functions. Here we review the studies that first identified the presence of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells in cancer patients, the techniques used to identify the tumor antigens recognized, the role of the different CD4(+) T cell subsets in tumor immunity and in cancer prognosis and the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at activating efficient antitumor CD4(+) T cell effectors.

  18. Amino acids and immune response: a role for cysteine, glutamine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and arginine in T-cell function and cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikalidis, Angelos K

    2015-01-01

    While proteins are critical for immunity, T-cells constitute a critical component of adaptive immunity by clearing cancerous cells among other abnormal cells. However, cancer cells exhibit a potential to escape T-cell control by employing mechanisms not completely delineated. Interesting work has investigated how certain amino acids affect the proliferation rate of T-cells as well as their effectiveness in clearing tumors. The role of amino acids cysteine, glutamine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and arginine in immunomodulation and particularly regarding T-cell proliferation and activation is discussed. The redox balance is reported to affect T-cell proliferation via modulation of cysteine availability. In addition antigen presenting cells (APCs), similar to myeloid cells determine the availability of amino acids in the extracellular microenvironment affecting T-cell proliferation and activation. A better mechanistic understanding of T-cell function modulation via amino acid signaling or metabolic properties may be helpful towards optimization of adaptive immunity with implications for cancer prognosis and treatment.

  19. Oct2 and Obf1 as facilitators of B:T cell collaboration during a humoral immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn M Corcoran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Oct2 protein, encoded by the Pou2f2 gene, was originally predicted to act as a DNA binding transcriptional activator of immunoglobulin (Ig in B lineage cells. This prediction flowed from the earlier observation that an 8 bp sequence, the octamer motif, was a highly conserved component of most Ig gene promoters and enhancers, and evidence from over-expression and reporter assays confirmed Oct2-mediated, octamer-dependent gene expression. Complexity was added to the story when Oct1, an independently encoded protein, ubiquitously expressed from the Pou2f 1 gene, was characterised and found to bind to the octamer motif with almost identical specificity, and later, when the co-activator Obf1 (OCA-B, Bob.1, encoded by the Pou2af1 gene, was cloned. Obf1 joins Oct2 (and Oct1 on the DNA of a subset of octamer motifs to enhance their transactivation strength. While these proteins variously carried the mantle of determinants of Ig gene expression in B cells for many years, such a role has not been borne out for them by characterisation of mice lacking functional copies of the genes, either as single or as compound mutants. Instead, we and others have shown that Oct2 and Obf1 are required for B cells to mature fully in vivo, for B cells to respond to the T cell cytokines IL5 and IL4, and for B cells to produce IL6 normally during a T cell dependent immune response. We show here that Oct2 affects Syk gene expression, thus influencing B cell receptor signalling, and that Oct2 loss blocks Slamf1 expression in vivo as a result of incomplete B cell maturation. Upon IL4 signalling, Stat6 up-regulates Obf1, indirectly via Xbp1, to enable plasma cell differentiation. Thus, Oct2 and Obf1 enable B cells to respond normally to antigen receptor signals, to express surface receptors that mediate physical interaction with T cells, or to produce and respond to cytokines that are critical drivers of B cell and T cell differentiation during a humoral immune response.

  20. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers.

  1. Epistasis between MicroRNAs 155 and 146a during T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B. Huffaker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An increased understanding of antitumor immunity is necessary for improving cell-based immunotherapies against human cancers. Here, we investigated the roles of two immune system-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs, miR-155 and miR-146a, in the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Our results indicate that miR-155 promotes and miR-146a inhibits interferon γ (IFNγ responses by T cells and reduces solid tumor growth in vivo. Using a double-knockout (DKO mouse strain deficient in both miR-155 and miR-146a, we have also identified an epistatic relationship between these two miRNAs. DKO mice had defective T cell responses and tumor growth phenotypes similar to miR-155−/− mice. Further analysis of the T cell compartment revealed that miR-155 modulates IFNγ expression through a mechanism involving repression of Ship1. Our work reveals critical roles for miRNAs in the reciprocal regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and demonstrates the dominant nature of miR-155 during its promotion of immune responses.

  2. Function of Helper T Cells in the Memory CTL-mediated Anti-tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丰光; GermainJ.P.Fernendo; 刘文军

    2004-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the role of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immunity, the RAG-1 gene knock out mice were adoptively transferred with OT-1 cells to generate the memory CTL, the C57B1/6 mice immunized with the epitope peptide of OVA specific Th cells and with different adjuvants were adopfively transferred with these memory-CTLs, and then the animals were challenged with tumor cells EGT. It was found that although the simple immunization of mice with the epitope peptide of the OVA specific Th cells could generate more effect CTL, but this effect was not so strong enough to resist completely the challenges with tumor cells. Nevertheless, the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune effect required the helps of Th1 and Th2 cells. The cross-regulation between Thl and Th2 cells seemed to be beneficial for the host to generate more effector CTL for mounting an efficient anti-tumor response. It concluded that the interaction between Thl and Th2 cells might be more important than the single subset of Th cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune response. More attention should be paid in this regard for the future studies.

  3. Interleukin 10 promotes immune response by increasing the survival of activated CD8(+) T cells in human papillomavirus 16-infected cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ma, Yan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Xin-Yan

    2016-10-11

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific CD8(+) T cells are present in HPV-infected cervical cancer patients and have demonstrated potent antitumor properties. However, these cells cannot control tumor progression in most patients. To investigate the underlying mechanisms involved in suppressing or promoting CD8(+) T cell functions, we focused on interleukin 10 (IL-10), a pleiotropic cytokine with controversial roles in antitumor immunity. We found that compared to healthy controls, circulating CD8(+) T cells in HPV 16-infected cervical cancer patients expressed significantly higher levels of IL-10. Interestingly, these CD8(+) T cells from cervical cancer patients, but not those from healthy controls, responded to HPV 16 E6/E7 peptide stimulation by increasing IL-10 expression, demonstrating an antigen-specific IL-10 release. Addition of exogenous IL-10 improved the survival, but did not increase the proliferation, of peptide-stimulated CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells cultured in the presence of IL-10 also resulted in significantly higher interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and granzyme B concentration, primarily due to improved cell survival. In resected cervical tumors, the frequency of tumor-infiltrating IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cells was positively correlated with the frequency of tumor-infiltrating IFN-gamma(+) and granzyme B(+) CD8(+) T cells. Tumor-associated macrophages were more potent than peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages at inducing IL-10 expression in CD8(+) T cells, possibly explaining the elevated IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cell frequency in cervical cancer patients. Together, these results are consistent with an immunostimulatory role of IL-10, which promoted CD8(+) T cell response by increasing the survival of activated CD8(+) T cells.

  4. Rapid T-cell receptor CD4+ repertoire reconstitution and immune recovery in unrelated umbilical cord blood transplanted pediatric leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchi, Andrea; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Di Cesare, Silvia; Puliafito, Pamela; Pensieroso, Simone; Rana, Ippolita; Pinto, Rita; Cancrini, Caterina; De Rossi, Giulio; Caniglia, Maurizio; Rossi, Paolo

    2006-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation has been successfully employed for treatment of many immune and hematologic disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of immune reconstitution after umbilical cord blood transplantation in 6 leukemia children. T-cell receptor Vbeta third complementary region spectratyping was used for monitoring the contribution of the thymic pathway in patients' immune reconstitution. Absolute numbers of lymphocyte subsets (T, B, and natural killer), and lymphoproliferative in vitro response to mitogens, recovered within 12 months after transplantation. Furthermore, an overall diversification of T-cell receptor complexity in the repopulating T cells, with a polyclonal Gaussian profiles in most (74%) of total families was observed. Noteworthy, we showed a wider and more rapid reconstitution of T-cell receptor CD4+ T cell families compared with T-cell receptor CD8+ T ones still exhibiting some perturbations at 24 months. These data show that umbilical cord blood transplantation allows immune reconstitution already within 12 months with generation of newly diversified CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets.

  5. Type 1 CD8+ T Cells are Superior to Type 2 CD8+ T Cells in Tumor Immunotherapy due to Their Efficient Cytotoxicity, Prolonged Survival and Type 1 Immune Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenmin Ye; Chaoke Tang; Shulin Xu; Bei Zhang; Xueshu Zhang; Terence Moyana; Jicheng Yang; Jim Xiang

    2007-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cells play a crucial role in host immune responses to cancer, and in this context, adoptive CD8+ Tc cell therapy has been studied in numerous animal tumor models. Its antitumor efficacy is, to a large extent,determined by the ability of Tc cells to survive and infiltrate tumors. In clinical trials, such in vitro-activated T cells often die within hours to days, and this greatly limits their therapeutic efficacy. CD8+ Tc cells fall into two subpopulations based upon their differential cytokine secretion. In this study, we in vitro generated that ovalbumin(OVA)-pulsed dendritic cell (DCOVA)-activated CD8+ type 1 Tc (Tc1) cells secreting IFN-γ, and CD8+ type 2 Tc (Tc2)cells secreting IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10, which were derived from OVA-specific T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic OT I mice. We then systemically investigated the in vitro and in vivo effector function and survival of Tc1 and Tc2 cells,and then assessed their survival kinetics after adoptively transferred into C57BL/6 mice, respectively. We demonstrated that, when compared to CD8+ Tc2, Tc1 cells were significantly more effective in perforin-mediated cytotoxicity to tumor cells, had a significantly higher capacity for in vivo survival after the adoptive T cell transfer,and had a significantly stronger therapeutic effect on eradication of well-established tumors expressing OVA in animal models. In addition, CD8+Tc1 and Tc2 cells skewed the phenotype of CD4+ T cells toward Th1 and Th2 type, respectively. Therefore, the information regarding the differential effector function, survival and immune modulation of CD8+ Tc1 and Tc2 cells may provide useful information when preparing in vitro DC-activated CD8+ T cells for adoptive T cell therapy of cancer.

  6. Regulatory T-cells and immune tolerance in pregnancy : a new target for infertility treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerin, Leigh R.; Prins, Jelmer R.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semi-allogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success, and disturbances in maternal tolerance are implicated in infertility and reproductive pathologies. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a recently discovered subset of T-lymphocytes with

  7. B and T cell crosstalk in anti-bacterial immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Wit

    2012-01-01

    This thesis shows that phagocytosis of Salmonella by B cells may generate a survival niche and transport vehicle for Salmonella, but that simultaneously Salmonella-infected B cells induce an optimal anti-Salmonella response through activation of multiple arms of the adaptive immune response. The the

  8. Complement Deposition on Nanoparticles Can Modulate Immune Responses by Macrophage, B and T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, K.M.; Tsolaki, A.G.; Paudyal, B.; Shamij, M.H.; Switzer, A.; Pathan, A.A.; Abozaid, S.M.; Haken, ten B.; Stenbeck, G.; Sim, R.B.; Kishore, U.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are attractive drug delivery vehicles for targeted organ-specific as well as systemic therapy. However, their interaction with the immune system offers an intriguing challenge to the success of nanotherapeutics in vivo. Recently, we showed that pristine and derivatised carbon nanotubes

  9. The Role of MicroRNAs in Regulatory T Cells and in the Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-02-01

    The discovery of microRNA (miRNA) is one of the major scientific breakthroughs in recent years and has revolutionized current cell biology and medical science. miRNAs are small (19~25nt) noncoding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by targeting the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for degradation of translation repression. Genetic ablation of the miRNA machinery, as well as loss or degradation of certain individual miRNAs, severely compromises immune development and response, and can lead to immune disorders. Several sophisticated regulatory mechanisms are used to maintain immune homeostasis. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent publications have provided compelling evidence that miRNAs are highly expressed in Treg cells, that the expression of Foxp3 is controlled by miRNAs and that a range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity. A large number of studies have reported links between alterations of miRNA homeostasis and pathological conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as psychiatric and neurological diseases. Although it is still unclear how miRNA controls Treg cell development and function, recent studies certainly indicate that this topic will be the subject of further research. The specific circulating miRNA species may also be useful for the diagnosis, classification, prognosis of diseases and prediction of the therapeutic response. An explosive literature has focussed on the role of miRNA. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the role of miRNAs in Treg cells and in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response. I also review the explosive current studies about clinical application of miRNA.

  10. Regulatory T Cells, a Potent Immunoregulatory Target for CAM Researchers: Modulating Tumor Immunity, Autoimmunity and Alloreactive Immunity (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristo Vojdani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are the major arbiter of immune responses, mediating actions through the suppression of inflammatory and destructive immune reactions. Inappropriate Treg cell frequency or functionality potentiates the pathogenesis of myriad diseases with ranging magnitudes of severity. Lack of suppressive capability hinders restraint on immune responses involved in autoimmunity and alloreactivity, while excessive suppressive capacity effectively blocks processes necessary for tumor destruction. Although the etiology of dysfunctional Treg cell populations is under debate, the ramifications, and their mechanisms, are increasingly brought to light in the medical community. Methods that compensate for aberrant immune regulation may not address the underlying complications; however, they hold promise for the alleviation of debilitating immune system-related disorders. The dominant immunoregulatory nature of Treg cells, coupled with recent mechanistic knowledge of natural immunomodulatory compounds, highlights the importance of Treg cells to practitioners and researchers of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.

  11. Efficient induction of CD25- iTreg by co-immunization requires strongly antigenic epitopes for T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jinyao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that co-immunization with a protein antigen and a DNA vaccine coding for the same antigen induces CD40low IL-10high tolerogenic DCs, which in turn stimulates the expansion of antigen-specific CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (CD25- iTreg. However, it was unclear how to choose the antigen sequence to maximize tolerogenic antigen presentation and, consequently, CD25- iTreg induction. Results In the present study, we demonstrated the requirement of highly antigenic epitopes for CD25- iTreg induction. Firstly, we showed that the induction of CD25- iTreg by tolerogenic DC can be blocked by anti-MHC-II antibody. Next, both the number and the suppressive activity of CD25- iTreg correlated positively with the overt antigenicity of an epitope to activate T cells. Finally, in a mouse model of dermatitis, highly antigenic epitopes derived from a flea allergen not only induced more CD25- iTreg, but also more effectively prevented allergenic reaction to the allergen than did weakly antigenic epitopes. Conclusions Our data thus indicate that efficient induction of CD25- iTreg requires highly antigenic peptide epitopes. This finding suggests that highly antigenic epitopes should be used for efficient induction of CD25- iTreg for clinical applications such as flea allergic dermatitis.

  12. Synergistic effects of host B7-H4 deficiency and gemcitabine treatment on tumor regression and anti-tumor T cell immunity in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joanne; St-Onge, Philippe; Stagg, John; Suh, Woong-Kyung

    2017-04-01

    B7-H4 (B7x/B7S1), a B7 family inhibitor of T cell activity, is expressed in multiple human cancers and correlates with decreased infiltrating lymphocytes and poor prognosis. In murine models, tumor-expressed B7-H4 enhances tumor growth and reduces T cell immunity, and blockade of tumor-B7-H4 rescues T cell activity and lowers tumor burden. This implicates B7-H4 as a target for cancer immunotherapy, yet limits the efficacy of B7-H4 blockade exclusively to patients with B7-H4+ tumors. Given the expression of B7-H4 on host immune cells, we have previously shown that BALB/c mice lacking host B7-H4 have enhanced anti-tumor profiles, yet similar 4T1 tumor growth relative to control. Given that T cell-mediated immunotherapies work best for tumors presenting tumor-associated neoantigens, we further investigated the function of host B7-H4 in the growth of a more immunogenic derivative, 4T1-12B, which is known to elicit strong anti-tumor CD8 T cell responses due to expression of a surrogate tumor-specific antigen, firefly luciferase. Notably, B7-H4 knockout hosts not only mounted greater tumor-associated anti-tumor T cell responses, but also displayed reduced tumors. Additionally, B7-H4-deficiency synergized with gemcitabine to further inhibit tumor growth, often leading to tumor eradication and the generation of protective T cell immunity. These findings imply that inhibition of host B7-H4 can enhance anti-tumor T cell immunity in immunogenic cancers, and can be combined with other anti-cancer therapies to further reduce tumor burden regardless of tumor-B7-H4 positivity.

  13. Enhancement of BCG-induced Th1 immune response through Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell activation with non-peptidic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Angelo; Casetti, Rita; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2007-01-22

    Since drug-activated gammadelta T cells promote dendritic cell (DC) maturation, we analyzed the effect of combining gammadelta T cell specific drugs with BCG in vitro. BCG-induced DC maturation was increased by bromohydrin-pirophosphate (BrHPP) or zoledronate (Zol)-activated gammadelta T cells. Specifically, the co-culture with activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells with BCG-infected DC resulted in a significant increase of the expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD25 molecules on DC. Moreover, DC were able to produce increased levels of TNF-alpha and synthesize ex novo IL-15 without altering the IL-10/IL-12 immunoregulatory pathway. Finally, the Th1 immunity induced by BCG-infected DC on naïve CD4 T cells was increased by gammadelta T cell activation with BrHpp or Zol. These data indicate that gammadelta T cell triggering drugs could be used to enhance the BCG induced Th1 immunity.

  14. The role of a novel protein ligand hMSH 2 in Vγ9δ2 T cell-mediated anti-cervix cancer immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代玉梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of hMSH2,a novel endogenous tumor-associated protein ligand recognized by Vγ9δ2 T cells,in innate anti-cervix cancer immunity.Methods hMSH2 that expressed on the surface of cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells was blocked by specific antibody.Then the differences in their effects on Vγ9δ2T cells before and after antibody blockage were evaluated by cytotoxicity of Vγ9δ2 T cells and cytokines secretion.

  15. IκB Kinase ε Is an NFATc1 Kinase that Inhibits T Cell Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT is crucial for immune responses. IKKε is an IκB kinase (IKK-related kinase, and the function of IKKε remains obscure in T cells, despite its abundant expression. We report that IKKε inhibits NFAT activation and T cell responses by promoting NFATc1 phosphorylation. During T cell activation, IKKε was transiently activated to phosphorylate NFATc1. Loss of IKKε elevated T cell antitumor and antiviral immunity and, therefore, reduced tumor development and persistent viral infection. IKKε was activated in CD8+ T cells of mice bearing melanoma or persistently infected with a model herpesvirus. These results collectively show that IKKε promotes NFATc1 phosphorylation and inhibits T cell responses, identifying IKKε as a crucial negative regulator of T cell activation and a potential target for immunotherapy.

  16. Regulatory T Cells: Molecular Actions on Effector Cells in Immune Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiel Arce-Sillas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory cells play a key role in the control of the immune response, both in health and during illness. While the mechanisms through which T regulatory cells exert their function have been extensively described, their molecular effects on effector cells have received little attention. Thus, this revision is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge on those regulation mechanisms on the target cells from a molecular perspective.

  17. A Generalized Kinetic Model of the T-Cell Independent Primary Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Immune response Immunology 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere elde If neceery amd idenlify by block number) A generalized kinetic model has been developed...scientific discovery. Unfortunately, Jenner’s discovery had little impact on preventing any other disease or on our detailed understanding of the...if the rate of replication of the antigen is varied it is possible for the antigen concentration not to come down for longer than the _ life

  18. CD4+ T-cell loss and delayed expression of modulators of immune responses at mucosal sites of vaccinated macaques following SIV(mac251) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, M; Boasso, A; Ma, Z-M; Cecchinato, V; Venzon, D; Doster, M N; Tsai, W P; Shearer, G M; Fuchs, D; Felber, B K; Pavlakis, G N; Miller, C J; Franchini, G

    2008-11-01

    Systemic immunization of macaques with a combination of DNA-poxvirus-based vaccines confers protection from high level of both systemic and mucosal viral replication following rectal exposure to the pathogenic SIV(mac251). Here we investigated early post-infection events in rectal and vaginal tissues, and found that the loss of CCR5+CD4+ T cells was equivalent in vaccinated and control macaques, despite a three logs reduction at mucosal sites of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA in the vaccinated group. Even though a normal CD4+ T cell number is not reconstituted at mucosal sites in either group, vaccination appeared to confer a better preservation of the CD4+ CCR5+ T cells that replenish these sites. Analysis of rectal tissues RNA following challenge exposure demonstrated a decreased expression in vaccinated macaques of transforming growth factor-beta, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, FoxP3, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an immune suppressive enzyme expressed by dendritic cells that converts tryptophan to kynurenine and limits T-cell responses. Accordingly, the ratio of kynurenine and tryptophan in the plasma was significantly reduced in the vaccinated animals respect to the controls. Thus, preexisting adaptive immune responses induced by these vaccine modalities, although they do not protect from CD4+ T-cell depletion, nevertheless, they contain SIV(mac251) replication and delay expression of markers of T-cell activation and/or suppression at mucosal sites.

  19. Chemoprophylaxis with sporozoite immunization in P. knowlesi rhesus monkeys confers protection and elicits sporozoite-specific memory T cells in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Michele D.; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Ubalee, Ratawan; Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Remarque, Edmond J.; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Philip L.; Saunders, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Whole malaria sporozoite vaccine regimens are promising new strategies, and some candidates have demonstrated high rates of durable clinical protection associated with memory T cell responses. Little is known about the anatomical distribution of memory T cells following whole sporozoite vaccines, and immunization of nonhuman primates can be used as a relevant model for humans. We conducted a chemoprophylaxis with sporozoite (CPS) immunization in P. knowlesi rhesus monkeys and challenged via mosquito bites. Half of CPS immunized animals developed complete protection, with a marked delay in parasitemia demonstrated in the other half. Antibody responses to whole sporozoites, CSP, and AMA1, but not CelTOS were detected. Peripheral blood T cell responses to whole sporozoites, but not CSP and AMA1 peptides were observed. Unlike peripheral blood, there was a high frequency of sporozoite-specific memory T cells observed in the liver and bone marrow. Interestingly, sporozoite-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells in the liver highly expressed chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR6, both of which are known for liver sinusoid homing. The majority of liver sporozoite-specific memory T cells expressed CD69, a phenotypic marker of tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells, which are well positioned to rapidly control liver-stage infection. Vaccine strategies that aim to elicit large number of liver TRM cells may efficiently increase the efficacy and durability of response against pre-erythrocytic parasites. PMID:28182750

  20. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  1. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs. To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I, and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  2. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses. PMID:24213131

  3. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~10(4) CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7- and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines.

  4. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A.; Magder, Laurence S.; Darton, Thomas C.; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S.; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~104 CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7− and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines. PMID:28303138

  5. Integrative Analysis of Immunological Data to Explore Chronic Immune T-Cell Activation in Successfully Treated HIV Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picat, Marie-Quitterie; Pellegrin, Isabelle; Bitard, Juliette; Wittkop, Linda; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Liquet, Benoît; Moreau, Jean-François; Bonnet, Fabrice; Blanco, Patrick; Thiébaut, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To unravel the complex relationships between cytomegalovirus-induced-, autoimmune-induced responses, microbial translocation and chronic immune activation (CIA) in successfully treated HIV-infected patients and to explore the mediating role of alpha-interferon in these processes. Design Cross-sectional study nested in the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, a prospective hospital-based cohort of HIV-1-infected patients in South-Western France. Methods Patients initiated antiretroviral therapy between 2005 and 2008 and were treated with sustained virological suppression for at least two years. CIA was defined by the percentage of HLA-DR+/CD38+ among CD8+T-cells. Integrative analyses were performed using structural equation modelling (SEM). Results The main analysis was performed in 57 HLA-A*0201 positive patients, due to availability of percentages of actin-, vimentin-, lamin-specific CD8+T-cells (HLA-A2-restricted tests) to further characterize autoimmune response. Cytomegalovirus-induced response was assessed by Quantiferon and pp-65 ELISPOT. SEM revealed a direct effect of cytomegalovirus-induced response on CIA (standardized estimate βstd = 0.56, p-value = 0.0004). The effect of autoimmune-induced response on CIA was indirect through alpha-interferon pathway, assessed by expression levels of 5 alpha-interferon-stimulated genes ADAR, ISG15, IFIT1, Mx1 and OAS1 (effect of autoimmune response on alpha-interferon: βstd = 0.36, p-value = 0.0401; effect of alpha-interferon on CIA: βstd = 0.39, p-value = 0.0044). There was no direct effect of autoimmune-induced response on CIA (p-value = 0.3169). Microbial translocation as measured by 16SrDNA and sCD14 in plasma was not associated with CIA. Results were consistent in 142 patients in whom cytomegalovirus and auto-immunity responses were measured by Quantiferon and anti-nuclear antibodies, respectively. All analyses performed in HLA-A*0201 positive patients and in the overall population revealed a significant effect

  6. Effects of Electro-acupuncture on T Cell Subpopulations, NK Activity,Humoral Immunity and Leukocyte Count in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Fang; Liu Deshan; Wang Shuli; Xu Lan; Wang Xinzhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of electro-acupuncture on T cell subpopulations, natural killer cell (NK)activity, humoral immunity and leukocyte count in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Methods:Electro-acupuncture was added for patients undergoing chemotherapy. Tests were done on T cell subpopulations, NK activity, humoral immunity and leukocyte count before treatment and after 4 courses of treatment. Results: After 4 courses of treatment with chemotherapy and electro-acupuncture, no obvious changes were found in T cell subpopulations, NK activity, humoral immunity and leukocyte count (P > 0.05) as compared with those before treatment. Patients undergoing chemotherapy combined with electro-acupuncture showed obviously higher leukocyte count than that of the control group given no leukogenic drugs (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Electro-acupuncture may reduce immunologic damage caused by chemotherapy, thus it can be used as the auxiliary therapy for patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  7. Comparative analysis of immune activation markers of CD8+ T cells in lymph nodes of different origins in SIV-infected Chinese rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbiao Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered T-cell homeostasis, such as expansion of CD8+ T cells to the secondary lymphatic compartments has been suggested as a mechanism of HIV/SIV-pathogenesis. However, the role of immune activation of CD8+ T cells in the CD4/CD8 turnover and viral replication in these tissues is not completely understood. In the present study, we compared the expression of immune activation markers (CD69 and HLA-DR on CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs of SIV-infected/uninfected Chinese rhesus macaques. SIV-infected macaques had significantly higher percentages of CD8+CD69+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells in all these anatomical compartments than uninfected macaques except for CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells in peripheral blood. LNs that located close to the gastrointestinal (GI tract (colon, mesenteric and iliac LNs of SIV-infected macaques had profoundly lower numbers of CD4+ T cells, but no significantly difference in expression of activation marker (CD8+CD69+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ as compared with the peripheral lymphatic tissues (axillary and inguinal LNs. The CD4/CD8 ratios were negatively correlated with the activation of CD8 T cells in the overall LNs, with further associations with CD8+HLA-DR+ in GI LNs while CD8+CD69+ in peripheral LNs. These observations demonstrate that the increase of CD8+ T cell activation is a contributing factor for the decline of CD4/CD8 ratios in GI system.

  8. The small GTPase Rab8 interacts with VAMP-3 to regulate the delivery of recycling T-cell receptors to the immune synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Galgano, Donatella; Cassioli, Chiara; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Pazour, Gregory J; Baldari, Cosima T

    2015-07-15

    IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, regulates immune synapse assembly in the non-ciliated T-cell by promoting T-cell receptor (TCR) recycling. Here, we have addressed the role of Rab8 (for which there are two isoforms Rab8a and Rab8b), a small GTPase implicated in ciliogenesis, in TCR traffic to the immune synapse. We show that Rab8, which colocalizes with IFT20 in Rab11(+) endosomes, is required for TCR recycling. Interestingly, as opposed to in IFT20-deficient T-cells, TCR(+) endosomes polarized normally beneath the immune synapse membrane in the presence of dominant-negative Rab8, but were unable to undergo the final docking or fusion step. This could be accounted for by the inability of the vesicular (v)-SNARE VAMP-3 to cluster at the immune synapse in the absence of functional Rab8, which is responsible for its recruitment. Of note, and similar to in T-cells, VAMP-3 interacts with Rab8 at the base of the cilium in NIH-3T3 cells, where it regulates ciliary growth and targeting of the protein smoothened. The results identify Rab8 as a new player in vesicular traffic to the immune synapse and provide insight into the pathways co-opted by different cell types for immune synapse assembly and ciliogenesis.

  9. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT.

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    Keiko Yasuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT, in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1.

  10. HPV16E7-HSP70 Hybrid DNA Vaccine Induces E7-Specific Cytotoxic T Cells and Antitumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Liqin; LI Hui; XIONG Jinhu; WANG Tongxiang; OU Xuan; WEI Yun; WU Xinxing

    2006-01-01

    Using human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 as an antigen and Heat Shock Protein 70 as adjuvant, we constructed a DNA vaccine by linking HSP70 gene to E7C91G gene. Mice, after being immunized with E7C91G-HSP70, E7C91G/HSP70, E7C91G, and wild E7 DNA vaccines respectively, produced E7 specific CD8+ T-cell precursor frequencies oF280. 33±2.52, 144.34±4. 04, 164.34±5.13 and 82.33± 3.51 respectively within every 1 × 105 mouse splenocytes. This proves that E7C91G-HSP70 fusion vaccine can significantly enhance the E7 specific cellular immunity within the mice body(p<0.01). After being immunized with E7C91G-HSP70 fusion vaccine, tumor-bearing mice of the group being treated have significantly longer latency and survival periods, comparing with other three categories of E7 vaccines. Experiment shows that this vaccine has a significant effect on enhancing E7 positive tumor-treatment within mice body. After being immunized with E7C91G-HSP70 vaccine, there were no pathological changes found in livers, kidneys and spleens of the mice, which proves that the vaccine is quite safe. After all,E7C91G-HSP70 fusion vaccine has a much stronger tumor- treatment effect than that of wild type E7 DNA vaccine.

  11. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

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    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  12. A novel mechanism of soluble HLA-G mediated immune modulation: downregulation of T cell chemokine receptor expression and impairment of chemotaxis.

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    Fabio Morandi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years, many immunoregulatory functions have been ascribed to soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G. Since chemotaxis is crucial for an efficient immune response, we have investigated for the first time the effects of sHLA-G on chemokine receptor expression and function in different human T cell populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T cell populations isolated from peripheral blood were stimulated in the presence or absence of sHLA-G. Chemokine receptors expression was evaluated by flow cytometry. sHLA-G downregulated expression of i CCR2, CXCR3 and CXCR5 in CD4(+ T cells, ii CXCR3 in CD8(+ T cells, iii CXCR3 in Th1 clones iv CXCR3 in TCR Vdelta2gamma9 T cells, and upregulated CXCR4 expression in TCR Vdelta2gamma9 T cells. sHLA-G inhibited in vitro chemotaxis of i CD4(+ T cells towards CCL2, CCL8, CXCL10 and CXCL11, ii CD8(+ T cells towards CXCL10 and CXCL11, iii Th1 clones towards CXCL10, and iv TCR Vdelta2gamma9 T cells towards CXCL10 and CXCL11. Downregulation of CXCR3 expression on CD4+ T cells by sHLA-G was partially reverted by adding a blocking antibody against ILT2/CD85j, a receptor for sHLA-G, suggesting that sHLA-G downregulated chemokine receptor expression mainly through the interaction with ILT2/CD85j. Follicular helper T cells (T(FH were isolated from human tonsils and stimulated as described above. sHLA-G impaired CXCR5 expression in T(FH and chemotaxis of the latter cells towards CXCL13. Moreover, sHLA-G expression was detected in tonsils by immunohistochemistry, suggesting a role of sHLA-G in local control of T(FH cell chemotaxis. Intracellular pathways were investigated by Western Blot analysis on total extracts from CD4+ T cells. Phosphorylation of Stat5, p70 s6k, beta-arrestin and SHP2 was modulated by sHLA-G treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrated that sHLA-G impairs expression and functionality of different chemokine receptors in T cells. These findings delineate a novel mechanism whereby s

  13. Characterization of the metabolic phenotype of rapamycin-treated CD8+ T cells with augmented ability to generate long-lasting memory cells.

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    Shan He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism plays a critical role in regulating T cell responses and the development of memory T cells with long-term protections. However, the metabolic phenotype of antigen-activated T cells that are responsible for the generation of long-lived memory cells has not been characterized. DESIGN AND METHODS: Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV peptide gp33-specific CD8(+ T cells derived from T cell receptor transgenic mice, we characterized the metabolic phenotype of proliferating T cells that were activated and expanded in vitro in the presence or absence of rapamycin, and determined the capability of these rapamycin-treated T cells to generate long-lived memory cells in vivo. RESULTS: Antigen-activated CD8(+ T cells treated with rapamycin gave rise to 5-fold more long-lived memory T cells in vivo than untreated control T cells. In contrast to that control T cells only increased glycolysis, rapamycin-treated T cells upregulated both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. These rapamycin-treated T cells had greater ability than control T cells to survive withdrawal of either glucose or growth factors. Inhibition of OXPHOS by oligomycin significantly reduced the ability of rapamycin-treated T cells to survive growth factor withdrawal. This effect of OXPHOS inhibition was accompanied with mitochondrial hyperpolarization and elevation of reactive oxygen species that are known to be toxic to cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that these rapamycin-treated T cells may represent a unique cell model for identifying nutrients and signals critical to regulating metabolism in both effector and memory T cells, and for the development of new methods to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell cancer therapy.

  14. The immune checkpoint regulator PD-L1 is a specific target for naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Shamaila; Andersen, Gitte Holmen; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    and - to lesser extents - healthy donors, by means of ELISPOT assays. PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells appeared to be TH17 cells exhibiting an effector T-cell cytokine profile. Hence, PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells released interferon γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in response...

  15. Natural killer T cells and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Fat chews on the immune system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Kremer; Ian N Hines

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) are an important subset of T lymphocytes. They are unique in their ability to produce both T helper 1 and T helper 2 associated cytokines, thus being capable of steering the immune system into either inflammation or tolerance. Disruption of NKT cell numbers or function results in severe deficits in immune surveillance against pathogens and tumor cells. Growing experimental evidence suggests that hepatosteatosis may reduce resident hepatic as well as peripheral NICE cells. Those models of hepatosteatosis and the change in NKT cell numbers are associated with a disruption of cytokine homeostasis, resulting in a more pronounced release of proinflammatory cytokines which renders the steatotic liver highly susceptible to secondary insults. In this letter to the editor, we focus on recently published data in the World Journal of Gastroenterology by Xu and colleagues demonstrating reduced peripheral NKT ceils in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, compare those findings with ours and others in different animal models of hepatosteatosis, and hypothesize about the potential underlying mechanism.

  16. Preferential effects of leptin on CD4 T cells in central and peripheral immune system are critically linked to the expression of leptin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Yong; Lim, Ju Hyun [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Won [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Arts and Sciences (S.W.C), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 18450 (United States); Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Seong-Tae [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon; Cho, You Sook [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-600 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Eunyoung, E-mail: chun.eunyoung@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Young, E-mail: thylee@med.skku.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-09

    Leptin can enhance thymopoiesis and modulate the T-cell immune response. However, it remains controversial whether these effects correlate with the expression of leptin receptor, ObR. We herein addressed this issue by using in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems. Leptin treatment in both ob/ob mice and normal young mice induced increases of CD4 SP thymocytes in thymus and CD4 T cells in the periphery. Interestingly, expression of the long form ObR was significantly restricted to DN, DP and CD4 SP, but not CD8 SP thymocytes. Moreover, in the reaggregated DP thymocyte cultures with leptin plus TSCs, leptin profoundly induced differentiation of CD4 SP but not CD8 SP thymocytes, suggesting that the effects of leptin on thymocyte differentiation might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor in developing thymocytes. Surprisingly, ObR expression was markedly higher in peripheral CD4 T cells than that in CD8 T cells. Furthermore, leptin treatment with or without IL-2 and PHA had preferential effects on cell proliferation of CD4 T cells compared to that of CD8 T cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the effects of leptin on differentiation and proliferation of CD4 T cells might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor.

  17. Targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 costimulation differentially controls immune synapses and function of human regulatory and conventional T-cells.

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    Nahzli Dilek

    Full Text Available CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, the three identified ligands for CD80/86, are pivotal positive and negative costimulatory molecules that, among other functions, control T cell motility and formation of immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs. What remains incompletely understood is how CD28 leads to the activation of effector T cells (Teff but inhibition of suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs, while CTLA-4 and PD-L1 inhibit Teff function but are crucial for the suppressive function of Tregs. Using alloreactive human T cells and blocking antibodies, we show here by live cell dynamic microscopy that CD28, CTLA-4, and PD-L1 differentially control velocity, motility and immune synapse formation in activated Teff versus Tregs. Selectively antagonizing CD28 costimulation increased Treg dwell time with APCs and induced calcium mobilization which translated in increased Treg suppressive activity, in contrast with the dampening effect on Teff responses. The increase in Treg suppressive activity after CD28 blockade was also confirmed with polyclonal Tregs. Whereas CTLA-4 played a critical role in Teff by reversing TCR-induced STOP signals, it failed to affect motility in Tregs but was essential for formation of the Treg immune synapse. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for PD-L1-CD80 interactions in suppressing motility specifically in Tregs. Thus, our findings reveal that the three identified ligands of CD80/86, CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, differentially control immune synapse formation and function of the human Teff and Treg cells analyzed here. Individually targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 might therefore represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat immune disorders where effector and regulatory T cell functions need to be differentially targeted.

  18. Eliciting Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Cell Response by Immunization with Microbial Protein Antigens Formulated with α-Galactosylceramide: Theory, Practice, and Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Knight, Frances C; Wilson, John T; Joyce, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes confer protection against infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Hence, significant efforts have been invested into devising ways to generate CD8+ T cell-targeted vaccines. Generation of microbe-free protein subunit vaccines requires a thorough knowledge of protective target antigens. Such antigens are proteolytically processed peptides presented by MHC class I molecules. To induce a robust antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response through vaccination, it is essential to formulate the antigen with an effective adjuvant. Here, we describe a versatile method for generating high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cells through immunization of mice using the invariant natural killer T cell agonist α-galactosylceramide as the adjuvant.

  19. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...... cells and protective memory responses using adenoviral vectors, which seem to contrast with recent reports suggesting that an exhausted CD8(+) T cell phenotype is induced by inoculation with adenoviral vectors. Accordingly, we investigated the route and dose interrelationship for transgene-specific CD8......(+) T cells using adenoviral vectors encoding beta-galactosidase applied either s.c. or i.v. Irrespective of the route of inoculation, most of the adenoviral inoculum was found to disseminate systemically as the dose was raised beyond 10(9) particles. The number of transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells...

  20. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

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    Aleksandra Djekic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirectly prevent H. pylori-specific T-cell responses and immune control of the infection. In particular, the ability of VacA-proficient H. pylori to skew T-cell responses towards regulatory T-cells and the effects of Tregs on H. pylori chronicity are highlighted. The by-stander effects of VacA-driven immunomodulation on extragastric diseases are discussed as well.

  1. Natural CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cell-secreted exosomes capable of suppressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immunity against B16 melanoma

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    Xie, Yufeng; Zhang, Xueshu; Zhao, Tuo; Li, Wei; Xiang, Jim, E-mail: jim.xiang@saskcancer.ca

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cells secrete tolerogenic exosomes. •CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cell-derived exosomes exhibit immunosuppressive effect. •CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T cell-derived exosomes inhibit antitumor immunity. -- Abstract: Natural CD4{sup +}25{sup +} and CD8{sup +}25{sup +} regulatory T (Tr) cells have been shown to inhibit autoimmune diseases. Immune cells secrete exosomes (EXOs), which are crucial for immune regulation. However, immunomodulatory effect of natural Tr cell-secreted EXOs is unknown. In this study, we purified natural CD8{sup +}25{sup +} Tr cells from C57BL/6 mouse naive CD8{sup +} T cells, and in vitro amplified them with CD3/CD28 beads. EXOs (EXO{sub Tr}) were purified from Tr cell’s culture supernatants by differential ultracentrifugation and analyzed by electron microscopy, Western blot and flow cytometry. Our data showed that EXO{sub Tr} had a “saucer” or round shape with 50–100 nm in diameter, contained EXO-associated markers LAMP-1 and CD9, and expressed natural Tr cell markers CD25 and GITR. To assess immunomodulatory effect, we i.v. immunized C57BL/6 mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed DCs (DC{sub OVA}) plus Tr cells or EXO{sub Tr}, and then assessed OVA-specific CD8{sup +} T cell responses using PE-H-2K{sup b}/OVA tetramer and FITC-anti-CD8 antibody staining by flow cytometry and antitumor immunity in immunized mice with challenge of OVA-expressing BL6–10{sub OVA} melanoma cells. We demonstrated that DC{sub OVA}-stimulated CD8{sup +} T cell responses and protective antitumor immunity significantly dropped from 2.52% to 1.08% and 1.81% (p < 0.05), and from 8/8 to 2/8 and 5/8 mice DC{sub OVA} (p < 0.05) in immunized mice with co-injection of Tr cells and EXO{sub Tr}, respectively. Our results indicate that natural CD8{sup +}25{sup +} Tr cell-released EXOs, alike CD8{sup +}25{sup +} Tr cells, can inhibit CD8{sup +} T cell responses and antitumor immunity. Therefore, EXOs derived from

  2. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

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    Christelle Basset

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (restimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP, the adjuvant (LT-R192G or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  3. Memory T-Cell-Mediated Immune Responses Specific to an Alternative Core Protein in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Christine; Parroche, Peggy; Lavergne, Jean Pierre; Duverger, Blandine; Vieux, Claude; Dubois, Valérie; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Trépo, Christian; Gebuhrer, Lucette; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Penin, François; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies have described the synthesis of an alternative reading frame form of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein that was named F protein or ARFP (alternative reading frame protein) and includes a domain coded by the +1 open reading frame of the RNA core coding region. The expression of this protein in HCV-infected patients remains controversial. We have analyzed peripheral blood from 47 chronically or previously HCV-infected patients for the presence of T lymphocytes and antibodies specific to the ARFP. Anti-ARFP antibodies were detected in 41.6% of the patients infected with various HCV genotypes. Using a specific ARFP 99-amino-acid polypeptide as well as four ARFP predicted class I-restricted 9-mer peptides, we show that 20% of the patients display specific lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon, interleukin-10, or both cytokines. Patients harboring three different viral genotypes (1a, 1b, and 3) carried T lymphocytes reactive to genotype 1b-derived peptides. In longitudinal analysis of patients receiving therapy, both core and ARFP-specific T-cell- and B-cell-mediated responses were documented. The magnitude and kinetics of the HCV antigen-specific responses differed and were not linked with viremia or therapy outcome. These observations provide strong and new arguments in favor of the synthesis, during natural HCV infection, of an ARFP derived from the core sequence. Moreover, the present data provide the first demonstration of the presence of T-cell-mediated immune responses directed to this novel HCV antigen. PMID:15367612

  4. Innate immune control of EBV-infected B cells by invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Allan, Lenka L; Zheng, Dong Jun; Nie, Johnny C; Biggs, Catherine M; Hasan, Mohammad R; Kozak, Frederick K; van den Elzen, Peter; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2013-10-10

    Individuals with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease lack invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and are exquisitely susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To determine whether iNKT cells recognize or regulate EBV, resting B cells were infected with EBV in the presence or absence of iNKT cells. The depletion of iNKT cells increased both viral titers and the frequency of EBV-infected B cells. However, EBV-infected B cells rapidly lost expression of the iNKT cell receptor ligand CD1d, abrogating iNKT cell recognition. To determine whether induced CD1d expression could restore iNKT recognition in EBV-infected cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were treated with AM580, a synthetic retinoic acid receptor-α agonist that upregulates CD1d expression via the nuclear protein, lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1). AM580 significantly reduced LEF-1 association at the CD1d promoter region, induced CD1d expression on LCL, and restored iNKT recognition of LCL. CD1d-expressing LCL elicited interferon γ secretion and cytotoxicity by iNKT cells even in the absence of exogenous antigen, suggesting an endogenous iNKT antigen is expressed during EBV infection. These data indicate that iNKT cells may be important for early, innate control of B cell infection by EBV and that downregulation of CD1d may allow EBV to circumvent iNKT cell-mediated immune recognition.

  5. Induction of T-cell immunity against Epstein-Barr virus-associated tumors by means of adenovirally transduced dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙华; 姚堃; 陈云; 周锋

    2004-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful antigen-presenting cells to induce specific T-cell immunity, which plays an important role in the body's anti-tumor responses. In this study, we assessed the feasibility and efficacy of inducing T-cell immunity against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated tumors in vivo using dendritic cells transfected with EBV latent membrane 2A (LMP2A) recombinant adenovirus.Methods Cytokine-activated bone marrow-derived DCs transfected with EBV LMP2A recombinant adenovirus were infused into BALB/c mice. Splenic cytotoxic T-cell responses were evaluated by cytotoxicity and interferon-γ production assays. In vivo immune protection was then assessed in the mice tumor models implanted with tumor cells expressing EBV LMP2A.Results DCs transfected with EBV LMP2A recombinant adenovirus could strongly induce EBV LMP2A-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses and upregulate interferon-γ production in vivo. Vaccination using these DCs led to prolongation of overall survival rates in the mice tumor models and retarded tumor growth. Conclusions The results suggest that DCs transfected with EBV LMP2A recombinant adenovirus can serve as a feasible and effective tool for eliciting LMP2A-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses against EBV LMP2A in vivo in the treatment of EBV-associated tumors.

  6. Preexisting CD4+ T-cell immunity in human population to avian influenza H7N9 virus: whole proteome-wide immunoinformatics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Venkata R; Duvvuri, Bhargavi; Alice, Christilda; Wu, Gillian E; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Wu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus was identified in human in China. The antigenically distinct H7N9 surface glycoproteins raised concerns about lack of cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. Epitope-specific preexisting T-cell immunity was one of the protective mechanisms in pandemic 2009 H1N1 even in the absence of cross-protective antibodies. Hence, the assessment of preexisting CD4+ T-cell immunity to conserved epitopes shared between H7N9 and human influenza A viruses (IAV) is critical. A comparative whole proteome-wide immunoinformatics analysis was performed to predict the CD4+ T-cell epitopes that are commonly conserved within the proteome of H7N9 in reference to IAV subtypes (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2). The CD4+ T-cell epitopes that are commonly conserved (∼ 556) were further screened against the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) to validate their immunogenic potential. This analysis revealed that 45.5% (253 of 556) epitopes are experimentally proven to induce CD4+ T-cell memory responses. In addition, we also found that 23.3% of CD4+ T-cell epitopes have ≥ 90% of sequence homology with experimentally defined CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We also conducted the population coverage analysis across different ethnicities using commonly conserved CD4+ T-cell epitopes and corresponding HLA-DRB1 alleles. Interestingly, the indigenous populations from Canada, United States, Mexico and Australia exhibited low coverage (28.65% to 45.62%) when compared with other ethnicities (57.77% to 94.84%). In summary, the present analysis demonstrate an evidence on the likely presence of preexisting T-cell immunity in human population and also shed light to understand the potential risk of H7N9 virus among indigenous populations, given their high susceptibility during previous pandemic influenza events. This information is crucial for public health policy, in targeting priority groups for immunization programs.

  7. Preexisting CD4+ T-cell immunity in human population to avian influenza H7N9 virus: whole proteome-wide immunoinformatics analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata R Duvvuri

    Full Text Available In 2013, a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus was identified in human in China. The antigenically distinct H7N9 surface glycoproteins raised concerns about lack of cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. Epitope-specific preexisting T-cell immunity was one of the protective mechanisms in pandemic 2009 H1N1 even in the absence of cross-protective antibodies. Hence, the assessment of preexisting CD4+ T-cell immunity to conserved epitopes shared between H7N9 and human influenza A viruses (IAV is critical. A comparative whole proteome-wide immunoinformatics analysis was performed to predict the CD4+ T-cell epitopes that are commonly conserved within the proteome of H7N9 in reference to IAV subtypes (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2. The CD4+ T-cell epitopes that are commonly conserved (∼ 556 were further screened against the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB to validate their immunogenic potential. This analysis revealed that 45.5% (253 of 556 epitopes are experimentally proven to induce CD4+ T-cell memory responses. In addition, we also found that 23.3% of CD4+ T-cell epitopes have ≥ 90% of sequence homology with experimentally defined CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We also conducted the population coverage analysis across different ethnicities using commonly conserved CD4+ T-cell epitopes and corresponding HLA-DRB1 alleles. Interestingly, the indigenous populations from Canada, United States, Mexico and Australia exhibited low coverage (28.65% to 45.62% when compared with other ethnicities (57.77% to 94.84%. In summary, the present analysis demonstrate an evidence on the likely presence of preexisting T-cell immunity in human population and also shed light to understand the potential risk of H7N9 virus among indigenous populations, given their high susceptibility during previous pandemic influenza events. This information is crucial for public health policy, in targeting priority groups for immunization programs.

  8. The Non-structural Protein 5 and Matrix Protein Are Antigenic Targets of T Cell Immunity to Genotype 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Helen; Pedrera, Miriam; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Biffar, Lucia; Hammer, Sabine E.; Kvisgaard, Lise K.; Larsen, Lars E.; Stewart, Graham R.; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Steinbach, Falko; Graham, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the cause of one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine worldwide. Efforts to develop a next-generation vaccine have largely focused on envelope glycoproteins to target virus-neutralizing antibody responses. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate the necessary efficacy to progress toward market. T cells are crucial to the control of many viruses through cytolysis and cytokine secretion. Since control of PRRSV infection is not dependent on the development of neutralizing antibodies, it has been proposed that T cell-mediated immunity plays a key role. Therefore, we hypothesized that conserved T cell antigens represent prime candidates for the development a novel PRRS vaccine. Antigens were identified by screening a proteome-wide synthetic peptide library with T cells from cohorts of pigs rendered immune by experimental infections with a closely related (subtype 1) or divergent (subtype 3) PRRSV-1 strain. Dominant T cell IFN-γ responses were directed against the non-structural protein 5 (NSP5), and to a lesser extent, the matrix (M) protein. The majority of NSP5-specific CD8 T cells and M-specific CD4 T cells expressed a putative effector memory phenotype and were polyfunctional as assessed by coexpression of TNF-α and mobilization of the cytotoxic degranulation marker CD107a. Both antigens were generally well conserved among strains of both PRRSV genotypes. Thus, M and NSP5 represent attractive vaccine candidate T cell antigens, which should be evaluated further in the context of PRRSV vaccine development. PMID:26909080

  9. The non-structural protein 5 and matrix protein are antigenic targets of T cell immunity to genotype 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eMokhtar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is the cause of one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine worldwide. Efforts to develop a next-generation vaccine have largely focussed on envelope glycoproteins to target virus-neutralising antibody responses. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate the necessary efficacy to progress towards market. T cells are crucial to the control of many viruses through cytolysis and cytokine secretion. Since control of PRRSV infection is not dependent on the development of neutralising antibodies, it has been proposed that T cell mediated immunity plays a key role. We therefore hypothesised that conserved T cell antigens represent prime candidates for the development a novel PRRS vaccine. Antigens were identified by screening a proteome-wide synthetic peptide library with T cells from cohorts of pigs rendered immune by experimental infections with a closely-related (subtype 1 or divergent (subtype 3 PRRSV-1 strain. Dominant T cell IFN-γ responses were directed against the non-structural protein 5 (NSP5, and to a lesser extent, the matrix (M protein. The majority of NSP5-specific CD8 T cells and M-specific CD4 T cells expressed a putative effector memory phenotype and were polyfunctional as assessed by co-expression of TNF-α and mobilisation of the cytotoxic degranulation marker CD107a. Both antigens were generally well conserved amongst strains of both PRRSV genotypes. Thus M and NSP5 represent attractive vaccine candidate T cell antigens which should be evaluated further in the context of PRRSV vaccine development.

  10. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Wang, Chaoyuan [College of Life Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Su, Hanwen, E-mail: suhanwen-1@163.com [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Meixian, E-mail: xiangmeixian99@163.com [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China)

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  11. Inducible nitric-oxide synthase plays a minimal role in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo;

    1999-01-01

    -mediated immune response was found to be unaltered in iNOS-deficient mice compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and LCMV- induced general immunosuppression was equally pronounced in both strains. In vivo analysis revealed identical kinetics of virus clearance, as well as unaltered clinical severity of systemic......By using mice with a targetted disruption in the gene encoding inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), we have studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology. The afferent phase of the T cell....... This might suggest a role of NO in regulating vascular reactivity in the context of T cell-mediated inflammation. In conclusion, these findings indicate a minimal role for iNOS/NO in the host response to LCMV. Except for a reduced local oedema in the knockout mice, iNOS/NO seems to be redundant...

  12. Peptide Immunization Elicits Polyomavirus-Specific MHC Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells in MHC Class Ia Allogeneic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Amelia R.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Unlike the polymorphic MHC class Ia molecules, MHC class Ib molecules are oligomorphic or nonpolymorphic. We recently discovered a protective CD8 T cell response to mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) in H-2b haplotype mice that is restricted by H2-Q9, a member of the Qa-2 MHC class Ib family. Here, we demonstrate that immunization with a peptide corresponding to a virus capsid-derived peptide presented by Q9 also elicits MHC class Ib-restricted MPyV-specific CD8 T cells in mice of H-2s and H-2g7 strains. These findings support the concept that immunization with a single MHC class Ib-restricted peptide can expand CD8 T cells in MHC class Ia allogeneic hosts. PMID:23374150

  13. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  14. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abildgaard Steffensen

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii. To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  15. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  16. CD8 T cells in innate immune responses: using STAT4-dependent but antigen-independent pathways to gamma interferon during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ramirez, Jenny E; Tarrio, Margarite L; Kim, Kwangsin; Demers, Delia A; Biron, Christine A

    2014-10-21

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ), with antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions, can be produced by T cells following stimulation through their T cell receptors (TCRs) for antigen. The innate cytokines type 1 IFNs and interleukin-12 (IL-12) can also stimulate IFN-γ production by natural killer (NK) but not naive T cells. High basal expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4), used by type 1 IFN and IL-12 to induce IFN-γ as well as CD25, contributes to the NK cell responses. During acute viral infections, antigen-specific CD8 T cells are stimulated to express elevated STAT4 and respond to the innate factors with IFN-γ production. Little is known about the requirements for cytokine compared to TCR stimulation. Primary infections of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) demonstrated that although the elicited antigen-specific CD8 T cells acquired STAT4-dependent innate cytokine responsiveness for IFN-γ and CD25 induction ex vivo, TCR stimulation induced these through STAT4-independent pathways. During secondary infections, LCMV-immune CD8 T cells had STAT4-dependent IFN-γ expression at times of innate cytokine induction but subsequently expanded through STAT4-independent pathways. At times of innate cytokine responses during infection with the antigen-distinct murine cytomegalovirus virus (MCMV), NK and LCMV-immune CD8 T cells both had activation of pSTAT4 and IFN-γ. The T cell IFN-γ response was STAT4 and IL-12 dependent, but antigen-dependent expansion was absent. By dissecting requirements for STAT4 and antigen, this work provides novel insights into the endogenous regulation of cytokine and proliferative responses and demonstrates conditioning of innate immunity by experience. Importance: Understanding the regulation and function of adaptive immunity is key to the development of new and improved vaccines. Its CD8 T cells are activated through antigen-specific receptors to contribute to long

  17. INFLUENCE OF AGING ON ANTIBODY-FORMATION INVIVO AFTER IMMUNIZATION WITH THE PRIMARY T-CELL DEPENDENT ANTIGEN HELIX-POMATIA HEMOCYANIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGREEF, GE; KALLENBERG, CGM; VANSTAALDUINEN, GJ; REMARQUE, EJ; TJANDRA, YI; HIJMANS, W

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo antibody response to the primary T-cell dependent antigen Helix pomatia Haemocyanin (HPH) was studied, in order to detect the possible presence of a humoral immune deficiency in ageing. The IgG subclass distribution of the specific antibodies was also determined. In order to define a dos

  18. In vitro effects of mesenchymal stem cells on secreting function of T lymphocytes and CD4~+CD25~+T cells from patients with immune thrombo-cytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze in vitro the effect of mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs)on secreting cytokines by T lymphocytes and ratio of CD4+CD25+T cells from patients with immune thrombocytopenia(ITP).Methods Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated by Ficoll Hypaque and cultured for proliferating to passage cells.Allogeneic T lymphocytes

  19. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals.

  20. NK-like T cells and plasma cytokines, but not anti-viral serology, define immune fingerprints of resilience and mild disability in exceptional aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbe N Vallejo

    Full Text Available Exceptional aging has been defined as maintenance of physical and cognitive function beyond the median lifespan despite a history of diseases and/or concurrent subclinical conditions. Since immunity is vital to individual fitness, we examined immunologic fingerprint(s of highly functional elders. Therefore, survivors of the Cardiovascular Health Study in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA were recruited (n = 140; mean age = 86 years and underwent performance testing. Blood samples were collected and examined blindly for humoral factors and T cell phenotypes. Based on results of physical and cognitive performance testing, elders were classified as "impaired" or "unimpaired", accuracy of group assignment was verified by discriminant function analysis. The two groups showed distinct immune profiles as determined by factor analysis. The dominant immune signature of impaired elders consisted of interferon (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and T cells expressing inhibitory natural killer-related receptors (NKR CD158a, CD158e, and NKG2A. In contrast, the dominant signature of unimpaired elders consisted of IL-5, IL-12p70, and IL-13 with co-expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, and T cells expressing stimulatory NKRs CD56, CD16, and NKG2D. In logistic regression models, unimpaired phenotype was predicted independently by IL-5 and by CD4(+CD28(nullCD56(+CD57(+ T cells. All elders had high antibody titers to common viruses including cytomegalovirus. In cellular bioassays, T cell receptor (TCR-independent ligation of either CD56 or NKG2D elicited activation of T cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate the importance of immunological parameters in distinguishing between health phenotypes of older adults. NKR(+ T cells and cytokine upregulation indicate a unique physiologic environment in old age. Correlation of particular NKR(+ T cell subsets and IL-5 with unimpaired performance, and NKR-driven TCR-independent activation of T

  1. Activation of natural killer T cells by alpha-galactosylceramide rapidly induces the full maturation of dendritic cells in vivo and thereby acts as an adjuvant for combined CD4 and CD8 T cell immunity to a coadministered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Smith, Caroline; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M

    2003-07-21

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) allows these antigen-presenting cells to initiate immunity. We pursued this concept in situ by studying the adjuvant action of alpha-galactosylceramide (alphaGalCer) in mice. A single i.v. injection of glycolipid induced the full maturation of splenic DCs, beginning within 4 h. Maturation was manifest by marked increases in costimulator and major histocompatibility complex class II expression, interferon (IFN)-gamma production, and stimulation of the mixed leukocyte reaction. These changes were not induced directly by alphaGalCer but required natural killer T (NKT) cells acting independently of the MyD88 adaptor protein. To establish that DC maturation was responsible for the adjuvant role of alphaGalCer, mice were given alphaGalCer together with soluble or cell-associated ovalbumin antigen. Th1 type CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses developed, and the mice became resistant to challenge with ovalbumin-expressing tumor. DCs from mice given ovalbumin plus adjuvant, but not the non-DCs, stimulated ovalbumin-specific proliferative responses and importantly, induced antigen-specific, IFN-gamma producing, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon transfer into naive animals. In the latter instance, immune priming did not require further exposure to ovalbumin, alphaGalCer, NKT, or NK cells. Therefore a single dose of alphaGalCer i.v. rapidly stimulates the full maturation of DCs in situ, and this accounts for the induction of combined Th1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immunity to a coadministered protein.

  2. Activation of Natural Killer T Cells by α-Galactosylceramide Rapidly Induces the Full Maturation of Dendritic Cells In Vivo and Thereby Acts as an Adjuvant for Combined CD4 and CD8 T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Smith, Caroline; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) allows these antigen-presenting cells to initiate immunity. We pursued this concept in situ by studying the adjuvant action of α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) in mice. A single i.v. injection of glycolipid induced the full maturation of splenic DCs, beginning within 4 h. Maturation was manifest by marked increases in costimulator and major histocompatibility complex class II expression, interferon (IFN)-γ production, and stimulation of the mixed leukocyte reaction. These changes were not induced directly by αGalCer but required natural killer T (NKT) cells acting independently of the MyD88 adaptor protein. To establish that DC maturation was responsible for the adjuvant role of αGalCer, mice were given αGalCer together with soluble or cell-associated ovalbumin antigen. Th1 type CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses developed, and the mice became resistant to challenge with ovalbumin-expressing tumor. DCs from mice given ovalbumin plus adjuvant, but not the non-DCs, stimulated ovalbumin-specific proliferative responses and importantly, induced antigen-specific, IFN-γ producing, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon transfer into naive animals. In the latter instance, immune priming did not require further exposure to ovalbumin, αGalCer, NKT, or NK cells. Therefore a single dose of αGalCer i.v. rapidly stimulates the full maturation of DCs in situ, and this accounts for the induction of combined Th1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immunity to a coadministered protein. PMID:12874260

  3. Influenza Virus–induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Is Associated with the Induction of Strong T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered, Normally Nonimmunogenic Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimnes, Marie K.; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the proposal that during microbial infection, dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation and present a mixture of peptides derived from the microbe as well as harmless environmental antigens. Mice were exposed to an aerosol of endotoxin free ovalbumin (OVA) in the absence or presence of influenza virus. In its absence, OVA failed to induce B and T cell responses and even tolerized, but with influenza, OVA-specific antibodies and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes developed. With or without infection, OVA was presented selectively in the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, as assessed by the comparable proliferation of infused, CD8+ and CD4+, TCR transgenic T cells. In the absence of influenza, these OVA-specific T cells produced little IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, but with infection, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells made high levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. The OVA plus influenza-treated mice also showed accelerated recovery to a challenge with recombinant vaccinia OVA virus. CD11c+ DCs from the mediastinal lymph nodes of infected mice selectively stimulated both OVA- and influenza-specific T cells and underwent maturation, with higher levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 molecules. The relatively slow (2–3 d) kinetics of maturation correlated closely to the time at which OVA inhalation elicited specific antibodies. Therefore respiratory infection can induce DC maturation and simultaneously B and T cell immunity to an innocuous antigen inhaled concurrently. PMID:12847140

  4. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) shapes both innate and CD8(+) T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, James D; Daffis, Stephane; Lazear, Helen M; Cho, Hyelim; Suthar, Mehul S; Gale, Michael; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN)-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/-) mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV) infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/-) cells and mice. IRF-1(-/-) mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/-) macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/-) fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+) T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+) T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/-) mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+) T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response.

  5. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  6. Immune tolerance induced by intravenous transfer of immature dendritic cells via up-regulating numbers of suppressive IL-10(+) IFN-γ(+)-producing CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate immunity and immune tolerance in vivo. However, the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous (i.v.) transfer of bone marrow-derived DCs pulsed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide blocks the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6J mice. i.v. transfer of MOG-pulsed DCs leads to the down-regulation of the production of IL-17A and IFN-γ and up-regulation of IL-10 secretion. The development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is facilitated via up-regulation of FoxP3 expression and production of IL-10. The number of suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells is also improved. The expression of OX40, CD154, and CD28 is down-regulated, but the expression of CD152, CD80, PD-1, ICOS, and BTLA is up-regulated on CD4(+) T cells after i.v. transfer of immature DCs. The expression of CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7 on CD4(+) T cells is also improved. Our results suggest that immature DCs may induce tolerance via facilitating the development of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs and suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells in vivo.

  7. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  8. IFNγ producing CD8+ T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8+ T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8+ T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8+ T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8+ T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8+ T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients. PMID:25949872

  9. IFNγ producing CD8(+) T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-02-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8(+) T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8(+) T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8(+) T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8(+) T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8(+) T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients.

  10. An exploratory trial of cyclooxygenase type 2 inhibitor in HIV-1 infection: downregulated immune activation and improved T cell-dependent vaccine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Frank O; Torheim, Eirik A; Dahm, Anders E A; Aaberge, Ingeborg S; Lind, Andreas; Holm, Malin; Aandahl, Einar M; Sandset, Per M; Taskén, Kjetil; Kvale, Dag

    2011-07-01

    Chronic HIV infection is characterized by chronic immune activation and dysfunctional T cells with elevated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which inhibits the T cell activation capability. cAMP may be induced by prostaglandin E(2) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) in monocytes due to the elevated LPS levels in patients with chronic HIV infection. This hypothesis was tested using celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, for 12 weeks in HIV-infected patients without antiretroviral treatment in a prospective, open, randomized exploratory trial. Thirty-one patients were randomized in the trial; 27 completed the study, including 13 patients on celecoxib. Celecoxib reduced chronic immune activation in terms of CD38 density on CD8(+) T cells (-24%; P = 0.04), IgA levels (P = 0.04), and a combined score for inflammatory markers (P < 0.05). Celecoxib further reduced the inhibitory surface receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1) on CD8(+) T cells (P = 0.01), including PD-1 on the HIV Gag-specific subset (P = 0.02), enhanced the number of CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo/-) Treg or activated cells (P = 0.02), and improved humoral memory recall responses to a T cell-dependent vaccine (P = 0.04). HIV RNA (P = 0.06) and D dimers (P = 0.07) tended to increase in the controls, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6) possibly decreased in the treatment arm (P = 0.10). In conclusion, celecoxib downmodulated the immune activation related to clinical progression of chronic HIV infection and improved T cell-dependent functions in vivo.

  11. A Single 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination Provides Lifelong Immunity; Characterization of Yellow-Fever-Specific Neutralizing Antibody and T-Cell Responses after Vaccination.

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    Rosanne W Wieten

    Full Text Available Prompted by recent amendments of Yellow Fever (YF vaccination guidelines from boost to single vaccination strategy and the paucity of clinical data to support this adjustment, we used the profile of the YF-specific CD8+ T-cell subset profiles after primary vaccination and neutralizing antibodies as a proxy for potentially longer lasting immunity.PBMCs and serum were collected in six individuals on days 0, 3, 5, 12, 28 and 180, and in 99 individuals >10 years after YF-vaccination. Phenotypic characteristics of YF- tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were determined using class I tetramers. Antibody responses were measured using a standardized plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Also, characteristics of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were compared between individuals who had received a primary- and a booster vaccination. YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were detectable on day 12 (median tetramer+ cells as percentage of CD8+ T-cells 0.2%, range 0.07-3.1%. On day 180, these cells were still present (median 0.06%, range 0.02-0.78%. The phenotype of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells shifted from acute phase effector cells on day 12, to late differentiated or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA-/+CD27- on day 28. Two subsets of YF-tetramer positive T-cells (CD45RA+CD27- and CD45RA+CD27+ persisted until day 180. Within all phenotypic subsets, the T-bet: Eomes ratio tended to be high on day 28 after vaccination and shifted towards predominant Eomes expression on day 180 (median 6.0 (day 28 vs. 2.2 (day 180 p = 0.0625, suggestive of imprinting compatible with long-lived memory properties. YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were detectable up to 18 years post vaccination, YF-specific antibodies were detectable up to 40 years after single vaccination. Booster vaccination did not increase titers of YF-specific antibodies (mean 12.5 vs. 13.1, p = 0.583, nor induce frequencies or alter phenotypes of YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells.The presence of a functionally competent YF

  12. The Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Induces Conversion of Effector T Cells into Treg Cells

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    Andrew W. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH has an important role in modulating immunity and homeostasis. The production of IFN-γ by effector T cells is suppressed by α-MSH, while TGF-β production is promoted in the same cells. Such α-MSH-treated T cells have immune regulatory activity and suppress hypersensitivity, autoimmune diseases, and graft rejection. Previous characterizations of the α-MSH-induced Treg cells showed that the cells are CD4+ T cells expressing the same levels of CD25 as effector T cells. Therefore, we further analyzed the α-MSH-induced Treg cells for expression of effector and regulatory T-cell markers. Also, we examined the potential for α-MSH-induced Treg cells to be from the effector T-cell population. We found that the α-MSH-induced Treg cells are CD25+  CD4+ T cells that share similar surface markers as effector T cells, except that they express on their surface LAP. Also, the α-MSH treatment augments FoxP3 message in the effector T cells, and α-MSH induction of regulatory activity was limited to the effector CD25+ T-cell population. Therefore, α-MSH converts effector T cells into Treg cells, which suppress immunity targeting specific antigens and tissues.

  13. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory......Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector...... immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells...

  14. Increase in frequencies of circulating Th-17 cells correlates with microbial translocation, immune activation and exhaustion in HIV-1 infected patients with poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiathan, Ranjini; Asthana, Deshratn

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the association of circulating Th-17 cells (cTh-17) with immune activation (IA), immune exhaustion (IE) and regulatory T-cells (T-regs) in 20 human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infected patients with impaired restoration of CD4 T-cell counts despite prolonged suppression of plasma viremia (discordant) and compared it with 20 HIV-1 infected patients showing good immunologic and virologic responses (concordant) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Discordant HIV-1 infected patients showed significantly higher frequencies of cTh-17 cells compared to concordant patients and healthy controls after PMA+Ionomicin stimulation. Discordant patients also showed higher CD4 T-cell immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+) than concordant patients which directly correlated with microbial translocation. Additionally, CD4 T-cells of discordant patients showed higher frequencies of CD4 T-cells expressing multiple immune exhaustion markers (Tim3+PD-1+) which correlated with immune activation indicating that combined analysis of inhibitory molecules along with PD-1 might be a better predictor for immune exhaustion of CD4 T-cells. Increased cTh-17 cell frequency correlated inversely with CD4 T-cell percentages and absolute counts and directly with CD4 T-cell immune activation and T-reg frequencies. Persistent CD4 T-cell immune activation might favor differentiation of activated CD4 T-cells toward cTh-17 phenotype in discordant patients. Discordant patients had significantly lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts and higher viral load at the initiation of HAART and higher immune activation and immune exhaustion after being on HAART for long time indicating that these factors might be associated with an increase in cTh-17 cell frequency, thus, increasing the risk of disease progression despite virologic control.

  15. Breadth of T cell responses after immunization with adenovirus vectors encoding ancestral antigens or polyvalent papillomavirus antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2017-01-01

    to the other PV proteins. The PV sequences were fused to a T cell adjuvant, the murine invariant chain and encoded in a recombinant adenoviral vector which was administered to naïve outbred mice. By measuring T cell responses induced by these different vaccines and towards peptide pools representing 3...

  16. Down regulation of the TCR complex CD3 ζ-chain on CD3+ T cells: a potential mechanism for helminth mediated immune modulation

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    Laura Jane Appleby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The CD3ζ forms part of the T cell receptor (TCR where it plays an important role in coupling antigen recognition to several intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to T cell effector functions. Down regulation of CD3ζ leads to impairment of immune responses including reduced cell proliferation and cytokine production. In experimental models helminth parasites have been shown to modulate immune responses directed against them and unrelated antigens, so called bystander antigens, but there is a lack of studies validating these observations in humans. This study focused on investigated the relationship between expression levels of the TCR CD3ζ chain with lymphocyte cell proliferation during human infection with the helminth parasite, Schistosoma haematobium which causes uro-genital schistosomiasis. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from individuals naturally exposed to S. haematobium in rural Zimbabwe were phenotyped, and expression levels of CD3ζ on T cells were related to intensity of infection. In this population, parasite infection intensity was inversely related to CD3ζ expression levels (p<0.05, consistent with down-regulation of CD3ζ expression during helminth infection. Furthermore, PBMC proliferation was positively related to expression levels of CD3ζ (p<0.05 after allowing for confounding variables (host age, sex, infection level. CD3ζ expression levels had a differing relationship between immune correlates of susceptibility and immunity, measured by antibody responses, indicating a complex relationship between immune activation status and immunity. The relationships between the CD3ζ chain of the TCR and schistosome infection, PBMC proliferation and schistosome-specific antibody responses have not previously been reported, and these results may indicate a mechanism for the impaired T cell proliferative responses observed during human schistosome infection.

  17. CD4 T cell immunity is critical for the control of simian varicella virus infection in a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection.

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    Kristen Haberthur

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV results in varicella (more commonly known as chickenpox after which VZV establishes latency in sensory ganglia. VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster (shingles, a debilitating disease that affects one million individuals in the US alone annually. Current vaccines against varicella (Varivax and herpes zoster (Zostavax are not 100% efficacious. Specifically, studies have shown that 1 dose of varivax can lead to breakthrough varicella, albeit rarely, in children and a 2-dose regimen is now recommended. Similarly, although Zostavax results in a 50% reduction in HZ cases, a significant number of recipients remain at risk. To design more efficacious vaccines, we need a better understanding of the immune response to VZV. Clinical observations suggest that T cell immunity plays a more critical role in the protection against VZV primary infection and reactivation. However, no studies to date have directly tested this hypothesis due to the scarcity of animal models that recapitulate the immune response to VZV. We have recently shown that SVV infection of rhesus macaques models the hallmarks of primary VZV infection in children. In this study, we used this model to experimentally determine the role of CD4, CD8 and B cell responses in the resolution of primary SVV infection in unvaccinated animals. Data presented in this manuscript show that while CD20 depletion leads to a significant delay and decrease in the antibody response to SVV, loss of B cells does not alter the severity of varicella or the kinetics/magnitude of the T cell response. Loss of CD8 T cells resulted in slightly higher viral loads and prolonged viremia. In contrast, CD4 depletion led to higher viral loads, prolonged viremia and disseminated varicella. CD4 depleted animals also had delayed and reduced antibody and CD8 T cell responses. These results are similar to clinical observations that children with agammaglobulinemia have

  18. HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cell function augmented by blockade of 2B4/CD48 interaction in HTLV-1 infection.

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    Chibueze Chioma Ezinne

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cell response is important in the response to viral infections; this response though is regulated by inhibitory receptors. Expression of inhibitory receptors has been positively correlated with CD8+ T cell exhaustion; the consequent effect of simultaneous blockade of these inhibitory receptors on CD8+ T cell response in viral infections have been studied, however, the role of individual blockade of receptor-ligand pair is unclear. 2B4/CD48 interaction is involved in CD8+T cell regulation, its signal transducer SAP (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM-associated protein is required for stimulatory function of 2B4/CD244 on lymphocytes hence, we analyzed 2B4/CD244 (natural killer cell receptor and SAP (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule(SLAM-associated protein on total CD8+ and HTLV-1 specific CD8+T cells in HTLV-1 infection and the effect of blockade of interaction with ligand CD48 on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cell function. We observed a high expression of 2B4/CD244 on CD8+ T cells relative to uninfected and further upregulation on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cells. 2B4+ CD8+ T cells exhibited more of an effector and terminally differentiated memory phenotype. Blockade of 2B4/CD48 interaction resulted in improvement in function via perforin expression and degranulation as measured by CD107a surface mobilization on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cells. In the light of these findings, we thus propose an inhibitory role for 2B4/CD48 interaction on CD8+T cell function.

  19. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

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    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  20. SH2 domain–containing adaptor protein B expressed in dendritic cells is involved in T-cell homeostasis by regulating dendritic cell–mediated Th2 immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Src homology 2 domain–containing adaptor protein B (SHB) is widely expressed in immune cells and acts as an important regulator for hematopoietic cell function. SHB silencing induces Th2 immunity in mice. SHB is also involved in T-cell homeostasis in vivo. However, SHB has not yet been studied and addressed in association with dendritic cells (DCs). Materials and Methods The effects of SHB expression on the immunogenicity of DCs were assessed by Shb gene silencing in mouse bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs). After silencing, surface phenotype, cytokine expression profile, and T-cell stimulation capacity of BMDCs were examined. We investigated the signaling pathways involved in SHB expression during BMDC development. We also examined the immunogenicity of SHB-knockdown (SHBKD) BMDCs in a mouse atopic dermatitis model. Results SHB was steadily expressed in mouse splenic DCs and in in vitro–generated BMDCs in both immature and mature stages. SHB expression was contingent on activation of the mitogen- activated protein kinase/Foxa2 signaling pathway during DC development. SHBKD increased the expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules without affecting the cytokine expression of BMDCs. When co-cultured with T cells, SHBKD in BMDCs significantly induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation and the expression of Th2 cytokines, while the regulatory T cell (Treg) population was downregulated. In mouse atopic dermatitis model, mice inoculated with SHBKD DCs developed more severe symptoms of atopic dermatitis compared with mice injected with control DCs. Conclusion SHB expression in DCs plays an important role in T-cell homeostasis in vivo by regulating DC-mediated Th2 polarization. PMID:28168174

  1. Immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. Transfer of immunity with primed CD45RC+ and CD45RC- CD4 T-cell subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1996-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen CD4 T cells were separated by antibody...

  2. Depletion of regulatory T lymphocytes reverses the imbalance between pro- and anti-tumor immunities via enhancing antigen-specific T cell immune responses.

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    Yu-Li Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulatory T cells (Tregs can actively suppress the immune responses. However, literature about detailed changes of host effective and suppressive immunities before and after depletion of Tregs in ovarian carcinomas, is rare. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ovarian cancer patients and the ascitogenic animal model were employed. Immunologic profiles with flow cytometric analyses, immunohistochemistric staining, RT-PCR, ELISA, and ELISPOT assays were performed. In vivo depletion of Treg cells with the mAb PC61was also performed in the animal model. RESULTS: The cytokines, including IL-4 (p=0.017 and TNF-α (p=0.046, significantly decreased while others such as TGF-β (p=0.013, IL-6 (p=0.016, and IL-10 (p=0.018 were elevated in ascites of ovarian cancer patients, when the disease progressed to advanced stages. The ratio of CD8(+ T cell/Treg cell in ascites was also lower in advanced diseases than in early diseases (advanced 7.37 ± 0.64 vs. early 14.25 ± 3.11, p=0.037. The kinetic low-dose CD25 Ab depletion group had significantly lower intra-peritoneal tumor weight (0.20 ± 0.03 g than the sequential high-dose (0.69 ± 0.06 g and sequential low-dose (0.67 ± 0.07 g CD25 Ab deletion groups (p=0.001 after 49 days of tumor challenge in the animal. The kinetic low-dose CD25 Ab depletion group generated the highest number of IFN-γ-secreting, mesothelin-specific T lymphocytes compared to the other groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The imbalance between effective and suppressive immunities becomes more severe as a tumor progresses. The depletion of Treg cells can correct the imbalance of immunologic profiles and generate potent anti-tumor effects. Targeting Treg cells can be a new strategy for the immunotherapy of ovarian carcinoma.

  3. OMOLOGICAL AND HETEROLOGICAL ANTIBODY AND T CELL IMMUNE RESPONSES TO LIVE ATTENUATED INFLUENZA VACCINE A (H5N2 AND A (H7N3

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    A. N. Naykhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From the beginning of 21th century outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian flu are registered from time to time. These viruses are considered as one of the possible causes of the next pandemia. The development of avian influenza vaccines is one of the WHO priorities. The aim of this work was to study antibody and cellular immune responses to avian A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs. We examined serum antibodies (HAI assay, microneutralization assay, ELISA, local antibodies (ELISA and virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ central memory and effector memory T cells. Two doses vaccination of healthy volunteers with A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 LAIVs induced homological antibody and cellular immune responses (i. e. serum and local antibody conversions, virus-specific memory T cell growth. These vaccines also stimulated heterological immunity (heterological serum and local antibodies and T cells. Heterological immune response intensity depended on antigenic structure of vaccine strain and heterological virus, particularly on HA type. 

  4. Dendritic cell function and pathogen-specific T cell immunity are inhibited in mice administered levonorgestrel prior to intranasal Chlamydia trachomatis infection

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    Quispe Calla, Nirk E.; Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D.; Mei, Ao; Fan, Shumin; Gilmore, Jocelyn R.; Cherpes, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The growing popularity of levonorgestrel (LNG)-releasing intra-uterine systems for long-acting reversible contraception provides strong impetus to define immunomodulatory properties of this exogenous progestin. In initial in vitro studies herein, we found LNG significantly impaired activation of human dendritic cell (DCs) and their capacity to promote allogeneic T cell proliferation. In follow-up studies in a murine model of intranasal Chlamydia trachomatis infection, we analogously found that LNG treatment prior to infection dramatically reduced CD40 expression in DCs isolated from draining lymph nodes at 2 days post infection (dpi). At 12 dpi, we also detected significantly fewer CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lungs of LNG-treated mice. This inhibition of DC activation and T cell expansion in LNG-treated mice also delayed chlamydial clearance and the resolution of pulmonary inflammation. Conversely, administering agonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody to LNG-treated mice at 1 dpi restored lung T cell numbers and chlamydial burden at 12 dpi to levels seen in infected controls. Together, these studies reveal that LNG suppresses DC activation and function, and inhibits formation of pathogen-specific T cell immunity. They also highlight the need for studies that define in vivo effects of LNG use on human host response to microbial pathogens. PMID:27892938

  5. PD-L1 blockade improves immune dysfunction of spleen dendritic cells and T-cells in zymosan-induced multiple organs dysfunction syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Min; Jin, Yiduo; Lu, Jiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This research is to investigate the role of tolerant spleen dendritic cells (DC) in multiple organs dysfunction syndromes (MODS) at late stage. Tolerant DC and MODS were induced by intraperotineal injection of zymosan. The immunity of DC was determined by examining interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-2, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), CD86, programmed death (PD-1), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) or T-cell proliferation in serum, spleen homogenate, DC culture or DC/T-cell co-culture. The PD-L1/PD-1 pathway was blocked using PD-L1 antibody. The IL-12p70 in serum, spleen homogenate and DC culture supernatant were decreased at 5 d and 12 d after zymosan injection while the IL-12p40 and IL-10 were increased. The expression of MHC, cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86), PD-1 and PD-L1 in spleen DCs were increased at early stage after zymosan injection. At 5 d and 12 d, the expression of MHC and CD86 was reduced while the expression of PD-1, PD-L1 and PIR-B was increased, accompanied with decreased proliferation of T-cell and decrease of IL-2 in spleen and serum. Application of PD-L1 antibody improved the above changes. At late stage of MODS mice induced by zymosan, the expression of co-stimulators and inhibitors in spleen DCs was imbalanced to form tolerant DCs which reduced the activation of T-cells. PD-L1 antibody improved the immune tolerance of DCs through intervening PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, and attenuated the inhibition of T-cell activities by tolerant DCs and the immune inhibition.

  6. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route

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    Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Costa, Simone M.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  7. Immune Privilege as an Intrinsic CNS Property: Astrocytes Protect the CNS against T-Cell-Mediated Neuroinflammation

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    Ulrike Gimsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have many functions in the central nervous system (CNS. They support differentiation and homeostasis of neurons and influence synaptic activity. They are responsible for formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and make up the glia limitans. Here, we review their contribution to neuroimmune interactions and in particular to those induced by the invasion of activated T cells. We discuss the mechanisms by which astrocytes regulate pro- and anti-inflammatory aspects of T-cell responses within the CNS. Depending on the microenvironment, they may become potent antigen-presenting cells for T cells and they may contribute to inflammatory processes. They are also able to abrogate or reprogram T-cell responses by inducing apoptosis or secreting inhibitory mediators. We consider apparently contradictory functions of astrocytes in health and disease, particularly in their interaction with lymphocytes, which may either aggravate or suppress neuroinflammation.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of the Early CD8 T-Cell Immune Response in Lymph Nodes: An Integrative Study

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    Sotiris A. Prokopiou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T-cells are critical  in controlling infection by intracellular  pathogens. Upon encountering antigen presenting cells, T-cell receptor activation promotes the differentiation of naïve CD8 T-cells into strongly proliferating  activated and effector stages. We propose a 2D-multiscale computational model to study the maturation of CD8 T-cells in a lymph node controlled by their molecular profile. A novel molecular pathway is presented and converted into an ordinary differential  equation model, coupled with a cellular Potts model to describe cell-cell interactions. Key molecular  players such as activated IL2 receptor and Tbet levels  control the differentiation  from naïve into activated and effector stages, respectively,  while caspases and Fas-Fas ligand interactions control cell apoptosis.  Coupling  this molecular model to the cellular scale successfully  reproduces  qualitatively the evolution of total CD8 T-cell counts observed in mice lymph node, between Day 3 and 5.5 post-infection. Furthermore, this model allows us to make testable predictions  of the evolution of the different CD8 T-cell stages.

  9. Prolonged antigen presentation by immune complex-binding dendritic cells programs the proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E

    2014-07-28

    The commitment of naive CD8 T cells to effector or memory cell fates can occur after a single day of antigenic stimulation even though virus-derived antigens (Ags) are still presented by DCs long after acute infection is resolved. However, the effects of extended Ag presentation on CD8 T cells are undefined and the mechanisms that regulate prolonged Ag presentation are unknown. We showed that the sustained presentation of two different epitopes from influenza virus by DCs prevented the premature contraction of the primary virus-specific CD8 T cell response. Although prolonged Ag presentation did not alter the number of memory CD8 T cells that developed, it was essential for programming the capacity of these cells to proliferate, produce cytokines, and protect the host after secondary challenge. Importantly, prolonged Ag presentation by DCs was dependent on virus-specific, isotype-switched antibodies (Abs) that facilitated the capture and cross-presentation of viral Ags by FcγR-expressing DCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that B cells and Abs can regulate the quality and functionality of a subset of antiviral CD8 T cell memory responses and do so by promoting sustained Ag presentation by DCs during the contraction phase of the primary T cell response.

  10. Identification and visualization of CD8+ T cell mediated IFN-γ signaling in target cells during an antiviral immune response in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Puntel

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells infiltrate the brain during an anti-viral immune response. Within the brain CD8(+ T cells recognize cells expressing target antigens, become activated, and secrete IFNγ. However, there are no methods to recognize individual cells that respond to IFNγ. Using a model that studies the effects of the systemic anti-adenoviral immune response upon brain cells infected with an adenoviral vector in mice, we describe a method that identifies individual cells that respond to IFNγ. To identify individual mouse brain cells that respond to IFNγ we constructed a series of adenoviral vectors that contain a transcriptional response element that is selectively activated by IFNγ signaling, the gamma-activated site (GAS promoter element; the GAS element drives expression of a transgene, Cre recombinase (Ad-GAS-Cre. Upon binding of IFNγ to its receptor, the intracellular signaling cascade activates the GAS promoter, which drives expression of the transgene Cre recombinase. We demonstrate that upon activation of a systemic immune response against adenovirus, CD8(+ T cells infiltrate the brain, interact with target cells, and cause an increase in the number of cells expressing Cre recombinase. This method can be used to identify, study, and eventually determine the long term fate of infected brain cells that are specifically targeted by IFNγ. The significance of this method is that it will allow to characterize the networks in the brain that respond to the specific secretion of IFNγ by anti-viral CD8(+ T cells that infiltrate the brain. This will allow novel insights into the cellular and molecular responses underlying brain immune responses.

  11. Infection with host-range mutant adenovirus 5 suppresses innate immunity and induces systemic CD4+ T cell activation in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Qureshi

    Full Text Available Ad5 is a common cause of respiratory disease and an occasional cause of gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis, and seroconversion before adolescence is common in humans. To gain some insight into how Ad5 infection affects the immune system of rhesus macaques (RM 18 RM were infected with a host-range mutant Ad5 (Ad5hr by 3 mucosal inoculations. There was a delay of 2 to 6 weeks after the first inoculation before plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC frequency and function increased in peripheral blood. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed IFN-γ mRNA expression, but the second Ad5hr exposure induced a rapid increase in IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed CCL20, TNF and IL-1 mRNA expression in PBMC, and subsequent virus exposures further dampened expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. Primary, but not secondary, Ad5hr inoculation increased the frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells in blood, while secondary, but not primary, Ad5hr infection transiently increased the frequencies of Ki67+, HLADR+ and CD95+/CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in blood. Ad5hr infection induced polyfunctional CD4 and CD8+ T cells specific for the Ad5 hexon protein in all of the animals. Thus, infection with Ad5hr induced a complex pattern of innate and adaptive immunity in RM that included transient systemic CD4+ T cell activation and suppressed innate immunity on re-exposure to the virus. The complex effects of adenovirus infection on the immune system may help to explain the unexpected results of testing Ad5 vector expressing HIV antigens in Ad5 seropositive people.

  12. CRACC-targeting Fc-fusion protein induces activation of NK cells and DCs and improves T cell immune responses to antigenic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Rastall, David P W; Chen, Weimin; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Kaminski, Norbert E; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-06-08

    The CD2-like receptor activating cytotoxic cell (CRACC) receptor is a member of the SLAM family of receptors that are found on several types of immune cells. We previously demonstrated that increasing the abundance of the adaptor protein EAT-2 during vaccination enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccine antigens. Engagement of the CRACC receptor in the presence of the EAT-2 adaptor generally results in immune cell activation, while activating CRACC signaling in cells that lack EAT-2 adaptor inhibits their effector and regulatory functions. As EAT-2 is the only SAP adaptor that interacts with the CRACC receptor, we hypothesized that technologies that specifically modulate CRACC signaling during vaccination may also improve antigen specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a CRACC-targeting Fc fusion protein and included it in vaccination attempts. Indeed, mice co-vaccinated with the CRACC-Fc fusion protein and an adenovirus vaccine expressing the HIV-Gag protein had improved Gag-specific T cell responses, as compared to control mice. These responses are characterized by increased numbers of Gag-specific tetramer+ CD8+ T cells and increases in production of IFNγ, TNFα, and IL2, by Gag-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results revealed that use of the CRACC-Fc fusion protein enhances vaccine-elicited innate immune responses, as characterized by increased dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and IFNγ production from NK cells. This study highlights the importance of CRACC signaling during the induction of an immune response generally, and during vaccinations specifically, and also lends insight into the mechanisms underlying our prior results noting EAT-2-dependent improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  13. The Influence of Immunization Route, Tissue Microenvironment, and Cytokine Cell Milieu on HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Measured Using Fluidigm Dynamic Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhanshi Trivedi

    Full Text Available Thirty different genes including cytokines, chemokines, granzymes, perforin and specifically integrins were evaluated in Peyer's patch-KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells (pools of 100 cells using Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays following three different prime-boost immunization strategies. Data revealed that the route of prime or the booster immunization differentially influenced the integrin expression profile on gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, elevated numbers of integrin αE and αD expressing gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells were detected following mucosal but not systemic priming. Also, αE/β7 and αD/β2 heterodimerization were more noticeable in an intranasal (i.n./i.n. vaccination setting compared to i.n./intramuscular (i.m or i.m./i.m. vaccinations. Moreover, in all vaccine groups tested α4 appeared to heterodimerize more closely with β7 then β1. Also MIP-1β, RANTES, CCR5, perforin and integrin α4 bio-markers were significantly elevated in i.n./i.m. and i.m./i.m. immunization groups compared to purely mucosal i.n./i.n. delivery. Furthermore, when wild type (WT BALB/c and IL-13 knockout (KO mice were immunized using i.n./i.m. strategy, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, integrins α4, β1 and β7 mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly different, in mucosal verses systemic KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the numbers of gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells expressing gut-homing markers α4β7 and CCR9 protein were also significantly elevated in IL-13 KO compared to WT control. Collectively, our findings further corroborate that the route of vaccine delivery, tissue microenvironment and IL-13 depleted cytokine milieu can significantly alter the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell gene expression profiles and in turn modulate their functional avidities as well as homing capabilities.

  14. Broad T Cell Immunity to the LcrV Virulence Protein is Induced by Targeted Delivery to DEC-205/CD205-Positive Mouse Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-13

    Frontline: Broad T cell immunity to the LcrV virulence protein is induced by targeted delivery to DEC-205/CD205-positive mouse dendritic cells Yoonkyung...Received 30/8/07 Accepted 8/11/07 [DOI 10.1002/eji.200737799] Key words: CD205/DEC-205 Cellular immunity Dendritic cells LcrV Yersinia pestis...positive mouse dendritic cells . European Journal of Immunology 38:20 -29 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  15. Characterization of effector and memory T cell subsets in the immune response to bovine tuberculosis in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara F Maggioli

    Full Text Available Cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm responses with humans; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly characterized in cattle. Vaccine-elicited cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. However, whether this assay measures cattle Tcm responses or not is uncertain. The objective of the present study was to characterize the relative contribution of Tcm (CCR7+, CD62Lhi, CD45RO+, T effector memory (Tem, defined as: CCR7-, CD62Llow/int, CD45RO+, and T effector cells (CCR7-, CD62L-/low, CD45RO-, in the immune response to Mycobacterium bovis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from infected cattle were stimulated with a cocktail of M. bovis purified protein derivative, rTb10.4 and rAg85A for 13 days with periodic addition of fresh media and rIL-2. On day 13, cultured PBMC were re-stimulated with medium alone, rESAT-6:CFP10 or PPDb with fresh autologous adherent cells for antigen presentation. Cultured cells (13 days or fresh PBMCs (ex vivo response from the same calves were analyzed for IFN-γ production, proliferation, and CD4, CD45RO, CD62L, CD44, and CCR7 expression via flow cytometry after overnight stimulation. In response to mycobacterial antigens, ~75% of CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells in long-term cultures expressed a Tcm phenotype while less than 10% of the ex vivo response consisted of Tcm cells. Upon re-exposure to antigen, long-term cultured cells were highly proliferative, a distinctive characteristic of Tcm, and the predominant phenotype within the long-term cultures switched from Tcm to Tem. These findings suggest that proliferative responses of Tcm cells to some extent occurs simultaneously with reversion to effector phenotypes (mostly Tem. The present study characterizes Tcm cells of cattle and their participation in the response to M. bovis infection.

  16. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  17. Immune competence of cancer-reactive T cells generated de novo in adult tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Kenneth F; Lute, Kenneth; Kocak, Ergun; Abdessalam, Shahab; Yin, Lijie; Li, Ou; Guan, Zhen; Philips, Gary; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    The impact of timing of antigen introduction into fetus and neonates leads to the suggestion that pre-existing antigens are tolerogenic to immunocompetent cells generated thereafter. This hypothesis predicts that in patients with cancer who are undergoing bone marrow transplantation, newly produced T cells with specificity for pre-existing tumor cells will be inactivated by the tumor antigens in the host. Because the effect of tumor cells on developing cancer-reactive T cells has not been investigated, we set out to systematically analyze the impact of tumor cells in the periphery on the development of tumor-reactive T cells in the thymus and their immunocompetence in the periphery. Our data demonstrate that in the host in which a tumor is established in the periphery, the cancer-reactive T cells develop normally, remain fully immunocompetent, become activated in the periphery, and cause regression of large established tumors. The immunocompetence of T cells generated in an antigen-bearing host is also confirmed in a skin graft transplantation model.

  18. T-cell costimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1996-01-01

    The CD40L molecule expressed by CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes is known to deliver signals that activate B cells and macrophages. It now appears that CD40L regulates T cells themselves, during both their development and their participation in adaptive immune responses....

  19. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  20. Heterogeneity of multifunctional IL-17A producing S. Typhi-specific CD8+ T cells in volunteers following Ty21a typhoid immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A McArthur

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality world-wide. CD8+ T cells are an important component of the cell mediated immune (CMI response against S. Typhi. Recently, interleukin (IL-17A has been shown to contribute to mucosal immunity and protection against intracellular pathogens. To investigate multifunctional IL-17A responses against S. Typhi antigens in T memory subsets, we developed multiparametric flow cytometry methods to detect up to 6 cytokines/chemokines (IL-10, IL-17A, IL-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β simultaneously. Five volunteers were immunized with a 4 dose regimen of live-attenuated S. Typhi vaccine (Ty21a, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were isolated before and at 11 time points after immunization, and CMI responses were evaluated. Of the 5 immunized volunteers studied, 3 produced detectable CD8+ T cell responses following stimulation with S. Typhi-infected autologous B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL. Additionally, 2 volunteers had detectable levels of intracellular cytokines in response to stimulation with S. Typhi-infected HLA-E restricted cells. Although the kinetics of the responses differed among volunteers, all of the responses were bi- or tri-phasic and included multifunctional CD8+ T cells. Virtually all of the IL-17A detected was derived from multifunctional CD8+ T cells. The presence of these multifunctional IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells was confirmed using an unsupervised analysis program, flow cytometry clustering without K (FLOCK. This is the first report of IL-17A production in response to S. Typhi in humans, indicating the presence of a Tc17 response which may be important in protection. The presence of IL-17A in multifunctional cells co-producing Tc1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α may also indicate that the distinction between Tc17 and

  1. Immunization with analog peptide in combination with CpG and montanide expands tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcade, Julien; Kudela, Pavol; Andrade Filho, Pedro A; Janjic, Bratislav; Land, Stephanie R; Sander, Cindy; Krieg, Arthur; Donnenberg, Albert; Shen, Hongmei; Kirkwood, John M; Zarour, Hassane M

    2008-10-01

    Analog peptides represent a promising tool to further optimize peptide-based vaccines in promoting the expansion of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here, we report the results of a pilot trial designed to study the immunogenicity of the analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V in combination with CpG 7909/PF3512676 and Montanide ISA 720 in patients with stage III/IV NY-ESO-1-expressing melanoma. Eight patients were immunized either with Montanide and CpG (arm 1, 3 patients); Montanide and peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V (arm 2, 2 patients); or with Montanide, CpG, and peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V (arm 3, 3 patients). Only the 3 patients immunized with Montanide, CpG, and peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V in arm 3 developed a rapid increase of effector-memory NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells, detectable ex vivo. The majority of these cells exhibited an intermediate/late-stage differentiated phenotype (CD28-). Our study further demonstrated that our vaccine approach stimulated spontaneous tumor-reactive NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in 2 patients with advanced disease, but failed to prime tumor-reactive NY-ESO-1-specific T cells in 1 patient with no spontaneously tumor-induced CD8+ T-cell responses to NY-ESO-1. Collectively, our data support the capability of the analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V in combination with CpG and Montanide to promote the expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in patients with advanced cancer. They also suggest that the presence of tumor-induced NY-ESO-1-specific T cells of well-defined clonotypes is critical for the expansion of tumor-reactive NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells after peptide-based vaccine strategies.

  2. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells.

  3. Phenotypic characterization of CD8+ T cell populations in HIV disease and in anti-HIV immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watret, K C; Whitelaw, J A; Froebel, K S; Bird, A G

    1993-04-01

    The CD8+ T cell population is believed to play an important role in the control of viral infection, both for suppression of viral replication and for cytotoxic activity against viral infected cells. Elevated numbers of CD8+ T cells have been demonstrated in HIV infection, and CD8+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) activity is associated with the early, asymptomatic stage of disease. We investigated the phenotypic characteristics of the CD8 population, in whole blood, in HIV disease and determined the predominant CD8+ subpopulation involved in anti-HIV CTL activity. We found that CD8+ T cells co-expressing markers of activation (HLA-DR), memory (CD45RO, CD29), and cytotoxic activity (S6F1) were significantly elevated in the early stages of disease, while the numbers of naive (CD45RA) cells remained unchanged. Progression to AIDS resulted in an overall loss of absolute CD8+ T cells, though the percentages of CD8+ HLA-DR+ and CD8+ S6F1+ remained elevated. In contrast to patients in the late stages of disease, anti-HIVgag CTL activity, following in vitro stimulation, was present in most HIV+ asymptomatic subjects and was associated with an expansion of CD8+ HLA-DR+ and CD8+ CD45RO+ cells. The absence of CTL activity was associated with a reduced ability of these populations to expand in vitro and with a significant loss of peripheral CD4+ T cells, independent of clinical stage. We suggest that CD8+ expressing HLA-DR+ CD45RO+ and S6F1+ play an important role in anti-HIV cytotoxicity.

  4. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio J S Gonçalves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1 induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50, which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50. The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity.

  5. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Oliveira, Edson R A; Costa, Simone M; Paes, Marciano V; Silva, Juliana F A; Azevedo, Adriana S; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M A; Almeida, Cecília J; Alves, Ada M B

    2015-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1) induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50), which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50). The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity.

  6. Uveitis and Myositis as Immune Complications in Chemorefractory NK/T-Cell Nasal-Type Lymphoma Successfully Treated with Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Gómez-Crespo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NK/T-cell lymphomas are a group of clonal proliferations of NK- or, rarely, T-cell types and have peculiar clinicopathologic features. Most common site of involvement is the upper aerodigestive tract (nasal cavity, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and palate. Association of autoimmune paraneoplastic disorders with NK/T-cell lymphomas is not well studied. Our patient was diagnosed with NK/T-cell lymphoma stage IV with skin involvement and treated frontline with CHOEP regimen. While he was under treatment, two immune complications presented: anterior uveitis of autoimmune origin refractory to steroids and myositis in lower limbs muscles. Autologous transplantation was rejected due to confirmed early relapse after first-line treatment, and the patient received second-line treatment according to the SMILE scheme, reaching complete response after four cycles. The patient underwent allogeneic transplantation and at the time of manuscript preparation is alive despite multiple complications. The disease should be suspected in patients with rhinitis or recurrent sinusitis, and early biopsy is recommended for all patients to avoid a delay in diagnosis. Our patient also presented symptoms of disease progression after first-line treatment, representing a paraneoplastic process, a very rare phenomenon in T-type lymphomas. This case is novel for the appearance of an inflammatory myositis, a histologically verified paraneoplastic phenomenon that responded to treatment for lymphoma.

  7. CD8+ T-cell Responses in Flavivirus-Naive Individuals Following Immunization with a Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haiyan; George, Sarah L; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D

    2015-11-15

    We are developing a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) candidate based on an attenuated dengue 2 virus (TDV-2) and 3 chimeric viruses containing the premembrane and envelope genes of dengue viruses (DENVs) -1, -3, and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). In this study, we analyzed and characterized the CD8(+) T-cell response in flavivirus-naive human volunteers vaccinated with 2 doses of TDV 90 days apart via the subcutaneous or intradermal routes. Using peptide arrays and intracellular cytokine staining, we demonstrated that TDV elicits CD8(+) T cells targeting the nonstructural NS1, NS3, and NS5 proteins of TDV-2. The cells were characterized by the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and to a lesser extent interleukin-2. Responses were highest on day 90 after the first dose and were still detectable on 180 days after the second dose. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were multifunctional, producing ≥2 cytokines simultaneously, and cross-reactive to NS proteins of the other 3 DENV serotypes. Overall, these findings describe the capacity of our candidate dengue vaccine to elicit cellular immune responses and support the further evaluation of T-cell responses in samples from future TDV clinical trials.

  8. Uveitis and Myositis as Immune Complications in Chemorefractory NK/T-Cell Nasal-Type Lymphoma Successfully Treated with Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Crespo, Maria José; López-Lorenzo, Jose Luis; Villaescusa, Teresa; Rodríguez-Pinilla, María; Fortes, José; Serrano, Cristina; Machan, Salma; Llamas, Pilar; Córdoba, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    NK/T-cell lymphomas are a group of clonal proliferations of NK- or, rarely, T-cell types and have peculiar clinicopathologic features. Most common site of involvement is the upper aerodigestive tract (nasal cavity, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and palate). Association of autoimmune paraneoplastic disorders with NK/T-cell lymphomas is not well studied. Our patient was diagnosed with NK/T-cell lymphoma stage IV with skin involvement and treated frontline with CHOEP regimen. While he was under treatment, two immune complications presented: anterior uveitis of autoimmune origin refractory to steroids and myositis in lower limbs muscles. Autologous transplantation was rejected due to confirmed early relapse after first-line treatment, and the patient received second-line treatment according to the SMILE scheme, reaching complete response after four cycles. The patient underwent allogeneic transplantation and at the time of manuscript preparation is alive despite multiple complications. The disease should be suspected in patients with rhinitis or recurrent sinusitis, and early biopsy is recommended for all patients to avoid a delay in diagnosis. Our patient also presented symptoms of disease progression after first-line treatment, representing a paraneoplastic process, a very rare phenomenon in T-type lymphomas. This case is novel for the appearance of an inflammatory myositis, a histologically verified paraneoplastic phenomenon that responded to treatment for lymphoma.

  9. Role of the 2B4 Receptor in CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Immune Control of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Mice With Reconstituted Human Immune System Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijioke, Obinna; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Moretta, Alessandro; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease due to deficiency in the adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) are highly susceptible to one specific viral pathogen, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This susceptibility might result from impaired CD8(+) T-cell and natural killer cell responses to EBV infection in these patients. We demonstrate that antibody blocking of the SAP-dependent 2B4 receptor is sufficient to induce XLP-like aggravation of EBV disease in mice with reconstituted human immune system components. CD8(+) T cells require 2B4 for EBV-specific immune control, because 2B4 blockade after CD8(+) T-cell depletion did not further aggravate symptoms of EBV infection.

  10. Viral vector-based prime-boost immunization regimens : a possible involvement of T-cell competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mare, A.; Lambeck, A. J. A.; Regts, J.; van Dam, G. M.; Nijman, H. W.; Snippe, H.; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination with recombinant viral vectors may be impeded by preexisting vector-specific immunity or by vector-specific immunity induced during the priming immunization. It is assumed that virus-neutralizing antibodies represent the principal effector mechanism of vector-specific immunity, while kil

  11. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity.

  12. Adjuvanted HLA-supertype restricted subdominant peptides induce new T-cell immunity during untreated HIV-1-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Brandt, Lea; Vinner, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    -cell responses specific for one or more vaccine epitopes were induced in 10/10 vaccinees. The responses were dominated by CD107a and MIP1β expression. There were no significant changes in HIV-1 viral load or CD4 T-cell counts. Our study demonstrates that the peptide/CAF01 vaccine is safe and that it is possible...

  13. Expression of CD28 and CTLA4 on T Cells in Bone Morrow of Immune-mediated Aplastic Anemia Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the expression and significance of CD28 and CTLA4 on T cells in bone marrow of aplastic anemia (AA) mice, in vitro bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were activated through being incubated with PHA (15μg/mL). The expression of CD28 and CTLA4 on T cells incubated with or without PHA was detected by two-color flow cytometry. The expression of CD28 and CTLA4 was significantly increased after PHA stimulation. In the AA mice, the expression of CD28 with or without PHA stimulation was both higher than that in the normal mice (both P<0.01), but the expression of CTLA4 with or without PHA stimulation showed no significant difference in comparison to that in the normal mice (both P>0.05). In the AA mice, there were more activation and activated potential of T cells than the normal, and the abnormal expression of CD28 and CTLA4 may participate in immunological disorder mediated by T cells.

  14. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei Nico

    Full Text Available Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36 responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314 and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011 that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and

  15. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune......-reactive T cells that recognize such targets may be activated due to the strong activation signal given by their cognate targets. The current review describes the existing knowledge regarding these self-reactive anti-Tregs, providing examples of antigen-specific anti-Tregs and discussing their possible roles...

  16. Fucoidan can function as an adjuvant in vivo to enhance dendritic cell maturation and function and promote antigen-specific T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, including promoting antigen uptake and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of fucoidan in vivo, especially its adjuvant effect on in vivo anti-tumor immune responses, was not fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the function of spleen dendritic cells (DCs and its adjuvant effect in vivo. Systemic administration of fucoidan induced up-regulation of CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen cDCs. Fucoidan also promoted the generation of IFN-γ-producing Th1 and Tc1 cells in an IL-12-dependent manner. When used as an adjuvant in vivo with ovalbumin (OVA antigen, fucoidan promoted OVA-specific antibody production and primed IFN-γ production in OVA-specific T cells. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced OVA-induced up-regulation of MHC class I and II on spleen cDCs and strongly prompted the proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, OVA immunization with fucoidan as adjuvant protected mice from the challenge with B16-OVA tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that fucoidan can function as an adjuvant to induce Th1 immune response and CTL activation, which may be useful in tumor vaccine development.

  17. Characteristics of T-cell and B-cell immune respoonses to pollen allergens in Bulgarian patients with pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHIVKA KOSTOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the pollen allergens and identification of the main T-cell and B-cell epitopes is of crucial importance, since the clarification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms will allow long-term control of this type allergic diseases and development of safe immunotherapeutic medication. The objective of this study was to identify which pollen allergens are responsible for the T-cell activation in atopic patients with pollinosis and to determine whether the same allergens are responsible for the IgE-mediated reactions. Thirty-seven patients with pollinosis and thirteen non-allergic subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were collected out of the pollen season. T-cell responses (IFN-γ production towards different pollen allergens and levels of pollen specific IgE and IgG in the sera were measured by ELISA. The T-cell reactivity in most patients was directed towards the grass pollen B1, tree pollen I and autumn pollen B5. 70% of the allergic individuals responded to allergens from Lolium perenne, 84% to Dactylis glomerata, 11% to Phleum pratense, 65% to Betula pendula and 70% to Taxus baccata. Elevated serum levels of specific IgE in the allergic patients (p<0.01 were measured against the tree pollen I and autumn pollen, which include widespread deciduous trees (birch, willow, poplar and yew and Artemisia absinthium, respectively. Our results show that the T-cell reactivity and antibody responses may be directed towards different or the same allergens. In addition, we propose that short synthetic peptides, which contain overlapping T- and B-cell epitopes can be used for specific immunotherapy treatment if they lack antibody recognition domains.

  18. Recombinant E.coli LLO/OVA Vaccination Effectively Inhibits Murine Melanoma Metastasis to Lung by CD8+T Cells Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man Xu; Ming-shen Dai; Can Mi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To construct recombinant E.coli LLO/OVA and investigate its tumor metastatic inhibition effect in B16 OVA melanoma challenged mice.Methods: Recombinant E.coli LLO/OVA was constructed and the expression of listeriolysin O (LLO) and ovalbumin (OVA) of the vaccine was determined by coomassie brilliant blue staining and western blotting. After 3 subcutaneous injections of E.coli LLO/OVA, the percentages of CD3+CD4+T, CD4+CD25+T, CD3+CD8+T and OVA257(264 SIINFEKL specific CD8+T cells were determined by flow cytomytry, and the tumor metastatic inhibition effect in B16 OVA melanoma challenged mice was observed.Results: Recombinant E.coli LLO/OVA was successfully constructed, and the expression of LLO and OVA of the vaccine was confirmed. After 3 subcutaneous injections of E.coli LLO/OVA and E.coli OVA in mice, the percentages of CD3+CD4+T, CD4+CD25+T and CD3+CD8+T cells were equivalent in the two groups of mice. However, there were significantly more OVA257(264 SIINFEKL specific CD8+T cells in E.coli LLO/OVA vaccinated mice than that in E.coli OVA vaccinated mice. The prophylactic E.coli LLO/OVA vaccination effectively prevented the tumor metastasis to lungs in B16 OVA melanoma challenged mice. Depletion of CD8+T cells significantly impaired the tumor inhibition effect of the vaccine in B16 OVA challenged mice. The therapeutic vaccination of E.coli LLO/OVA significantly prevented melanoma metastasis to lungs in B16 OVA challenged mice too.Conclusion: Recombinant E.coli LLO/OVA vaccination is highly effective in inhibiting murine malignant melanoma metastasis by promoting CD8+T cell immunity.

  19. Regulatory functions of hapten-reactive helper and suppressor T lymphocytes. II. Selective inactivation of hapten-reactive suppressor T cells by hapten-nonimmunogenic copolymers of D-amino acids, and its application to the study of suppressor T-cell effect on helper T-cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaoka, T; Yoshizawa, M; Yamamoto, H; Kuroki, M; Kitagawa, M

    1977-01-01

    An experimental condition was established in vivo for selectively eliminating hapten-reactive suppressor T-cell activity generated in mice primed with a para-azobenzoate (PAB)-mouse gamma globulin (MGG)-conjugate and treated with PAB-nonimmunogenic copolymer of D-amino acids (D- glutamic acid and D-lysine; D-GL). The elimination of suppressor T-cell activity with PAB-D-GL treatment from the mixed populations of hapten- reactive suppressor and helper T cells substantially increased apparent helper T-cell activity. Moreover, the inhibition of PAB-reactive suppressor T-cell generation by the pretreatment with PAB-D-GL before the PAB-MGG-priming increased the development of PAB-reactive helper T-cell activity. The analysis of hapten-specificity of helper T cells revealed that the reactivity of helper cells developed in the absence of suppressor T cells was more specific for primed PAB-determinants and their cross-reactivities to structurally related determinants such as meta-azobenzoate (MAB) significantly decreased, as compared with the helper T-cell population developed in the presence of suppressor T lymphocytes. In addition, those helper T cells generated in the absence of suppressor T cells were highly susceptible to tolerogenesis by PAB-D- GL. Similarly, the elimination of suppressor T lymphocytes also enhanced helper T-cell activity in a polyclonal fashion in the T-T cell interactions between benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-reactive T cells and PAB- reactive T cells after immunization of mice with BPO-MGG-PAB. Thus inhibition of BPO-reactive suppressor T-cell development by the BPO-v-GL- pretreatment resulted in augmented generation of PAB-reactive helper T cells with higher susceptibility of tolerogenesis to PAB-D-GL. Thus, these results support the notion that suppressor T cells eventually suppress helper T-cell activity and indicate that the function of suppressor T cells related to helper T-cell development is to inhibit the increase in the specificity and apparent

  20. Exosomes Isolated from Ascites of T-Cell Lymphoma-Bearing Mice Expressing Surface CD24 and HSP-90 Induce a Tumor-Specific Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menay, Florencia; Herschlik, Leticia; De Toro, Julieta; Cocozza, Federico; Tsacalian, Rodrigo; Gravisaco, María José; Di Sciullo, María Paula; Vendrell, Alejandrina; Waldner, Claudia I.; Mongini, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including endosome-derived nanovesicles (exosomes), are involved in cell–cell communication. Through transfer of their molecular contents, extracellular nanovesicles can alter the function of recipient cells. Due to these characteristics, EVs have shown potential as a new alternative for cancer immunotherapy. Tumor exosomes isolated from malignant ascites can activate dendritic cells, thereby priming the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. However, a suppressive role on tumor immune response has also been reported, suggesting that the neoplastic stage of carcinogenesis and the microenvironment where tumor cells grow may influence the amount of EVs released by the cell. This neoplastic stage and microenvironment may also impact EVs’ components such as proteins and miRNA, determining their biological behavior. Most T-cell lymphomas have an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. Consequently, complementary alternative therapies are needed to improve the survival rates achieved with conventional treatments. In this work, we have characterized EVs isolated from ascites of mice bearing a very aggressive murine T-cell lymphoma and have studied their immunogenic properties. Small EVs were isolated by differential centrifugation, ultrafiltration, and ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g on a sucrose cushion. The EVs were defined as exosomes by their morphology and size analyzed by electron microscopy, their floating density on a sucrose gradient, as well as their expression of endosome marker proteins ALIX, TSG-101; the tetraspanins CD63, CD9, and CD81. In addition, they contain tumor antigens, the marker for malignancy CD24, the heat shock protein HSP-70, and an unusual surface expression of HSP-90 was demonstrated. The administration of EVs isolated from ascites (EVs A) into naïve-syngeneic mice induced both humoral and cellular immune responses that allowed the rejection of subsequent tumor challenges. However

  1. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anipindi, Varun C.; Dizzell, Sara E.; Nguyen, Philip V.; Shaler, Christopher R.; Chu, Derek K.; Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Liang, Hong; Swift, Stephanie; Nazli, Aisha; Kafka, Jessica K.; Bramson, Jonathan; Xing, Zhou; Jordana, Manel; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P.; Stampfli, Martin R.; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2) confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway. PMID:27148737

  2. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anipindi, Varun C; Bagri, Puja; Roth, Kristy; Dizzell, Sara E; Nguyen, Philip V; Shaler, Christopher R; Chu, Derek K; Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Liang, Hong; Swift, Stephanie; Nazli, Aisha; Kafka, Jessica K; Bramson, Jonathan; Xing, Zhou; Jordana, Manel; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P; Stampfli, Martin R; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-05-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2) confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway.

  3. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun C Anipindi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2 confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway.

  4. Effect of Nadir CD4+ T cell count on clinical measures of periodontal disease in HIV+ adults before and during immune reconstitution on HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance T Vernon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The contribution of HIV-infection to periodontal disease (PD is poorly understood. We proposed that immunological markers would be associated with improved clinical measures of PD. METHODS: We performed a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-infected adults who had started highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART 0mm, clinical attachment level (CAL ≥ 4.0mm, and bleeding on probing (BOP at ≥ 4 sites/tooth and microbiologically as specific periodontopathogen concentration. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the associations between immune function and PD. RESULTS: Forty (40 subjects with median 2.7 months on HAART and median nadir CD4+ T-cell count of 212 cells/μl completed a median 3 visits. Over 24 months, CD4+ T-cell count increased by a mean 173 cells/µl (p<0.001 and HIV RNA decreased by 0.5 log10 copies/ml (p<0.001; concurrently, PPD, CAL and BOP decreased by a mean 11.7%, 12.1%, and 14.7% respectively (all p<0.001. Lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with worse baseline REC (-6.72%; p=0.04 and CAL (9.06%; p<0.001. Further, lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with a greater relative longitudinal improvement in PPD in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis (p=0.027, and BOP in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Treponema denticola (p=0.001 and p=0.006 respectively. Longitudinal changes from baseline in CD4+ T-cell count and level of HIV RNA were not independently associated with longitudinal changes in any clinical markers of PD. CONCLUSION: Degree of immunosuppression was associated with baseline gingival recession. After HAART initiation, measures of active PD improved most in those with lower nadir CD4+ T-cell counts and higher baseline levels of specific periodontopathogens. Nadir CD4+ T-cell count differentially influences periodontal disease both before and after HAART in HIV-infected adults.

  5. Cytotoxic capacity of SIV-specific CD8(+ T cells against primary autologous targets correlates with immune control in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mendoza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the study of non-human primates has resulted in important advances for understanding HIV-specific immunity, a clear correlate of immune control over simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV replication has not been found to date. In this study, CD8(+ T-cell cytotoxic capacity was examined to determine whether this function is a correlate of immune control in the rhesus macaque (RM SIV infection model as has been suggested in chronic HIV infection. SIVmac251-infected human reverse transcriptase (hTERT-transduced CD4(+ T-cell clone targets were co-incubated with autologous macaque effector cells to measure infected CD4(+ T-cell elimination (ICE. Twenty-three SIV-infected rhesus macaques with widely varying plasma viral RNA levels were evaluated in a blinded fashion. Nineteen of 23 subjects (83% were correctly classified as long-term nonprogressor/elite controller (LTNP/EC, slow progressor, progressor or SIV-negative rhesus macaques based on measurements of ICE (weighted Kappa 0.75. LTNP/EC had higher median ICE than progressors (67.3% [22.0-91.7%] vs. 23.7% [0.0-58.0%], p = 0.002. In addition, significant correlations between ICE and viral load (r = -0.57, p = 0.01, and between granzyme B delivery and ICE (r = 0.89, p<0.001 were observed. Furthermore, the CD8(+ T cells of LTNP/EC exhibited higher per-cell cytotoxic capacity than those of progressors (p = 0.004. These findings support that greater lytic granule loading of virus-specific CD8(+ T cells and efficient delivery of active granzyme B to SIV-infected targets are associated with superior control of SIV infection in rhesus macaques, consistent with observations of HIV infection in humans. Therefore, such measurements appear to represent a correlate of control of viral replication in chronic SIV infection and their role as predictors of immunologic control in the vaccine setting should be evaluated.

  6. Antibody and T cell responses induced in chickens immunized with avian influenza virus N1 and NP DNA vaccine with chicken IL-15 and IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian-Lam; Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Yeap, Swee Keong; Mohamed Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ideris, Aini; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2013-12-01

    We had examined the immunogenicity of a series of plasmid DNAs which include neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes from avian influenza virus (AIV). The interleukin-15 (IL-15) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) as genetic adjuvants were used for immunization in combination with the N1 and NP AIV genes. In the first trial, 8 groups of chickens were established with 10 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens per group while, in the second trial 7 SPF chickens per group were used. The overall N1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titer in chickens immunized with the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 was higher compared to the chickens immunized with the pDis/N1 and this suggesting that chicken IL-15 could play a role in enhancing the humoral immune response. Besides that, the chickens that were immunized at 14-day-old (Trial 2) showed a higher N1 antibody titer compared to the chickens that were immunized at 1-day-old (Trial 1). Despite the delayed in NP antibody responses, the chickens co-administrated with IL-15 were able to induce earlier and higher antibody response compared to the pDis/NP and pDis/NP+pDis/IL-18 inoculated groups. The pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 inoculated chickens also induced higher CD8+ T cells increase than the pDis/N1 group in both trials (P0.05) in inducing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells when co-administered with the pDis/IL-18 in both trials in comparison to the pDis/NP. Our data suggest that the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 combination has the potential to be used as a DNA vaccine against AIV in chickens.

  7. Early treatment with Lactobacillus delbrueckii strain induces an increase in intestinal T-cells and granulocytes and modulates immune-related genes of larval Dicentrarchus labrax (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchietti, Simona; Fausto, Anna Maria; Randelli, Elisa; Carnevali, Oliana; Taddei, Anna Rita; Buonocore, Francesco; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Abelli, Luigi

    2009-03-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. delbrueckii (AS13B), isolated from the gut of adult Dicentrarchus labrax, was administered live to developing sea bass using rotifers and Artemia as live carriers. Immune-related gene transcripts were quantified in post-larvae at day 70 post-hatch (ph) and histology, electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the intestinal tissue were performed at day 74 ph. Since the probiotic was orally administered the studies were focused on intestinal immunity. In treated fish gut integrity was unaffected, while the density of T-cells and acidophilic granulocytes in the intestinal mucosa was significantly higher than in controls. Probiotic-induced increases in intestinal T-cells and total body TcR-beta transcripts are first reported in fish. Significantly lower IL-1beta transcripts and a trend towards lower IL-10, Cox-2 and TGF-beta transcription were found in the treated group. Evidence is provided that early feeding with probiotic-supplemented diet stimulated the larval gut immune system and lowered transcription of key pro-inflammatory genes.

  8. Tomatine Adjuvantation of Protective Immunity to a Major Pre-erythrocytic Vaccine Candidate of Malaria is Mediated via CD8+ T Cell Release of IFN-γ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen G. Heal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycoalkaloid tomatine, derived from the wild tomato, can act as a powerful adjuvant to elicit an antigen-specific cell-mediated immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS protein, a major pre-erythrocytic stage malaria vaccine candidate antigen. Using a defined MHC-class-I-restricted CS epitope in a Plasmodium berghei rodent model, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and IFN-γ secretion ex vivo were both significantly enhanced compared to responses detected from similarly stimulated splenocytes from naive and tomatine-saline-immunized mice. Further, through lymphocyte depletion it is demonstrated that antigen-specific IFN-γ is produced exclusively by the CD8+ T cell subset. We conclude that the processing of the P. berghei CS peptide as an exogenous antigen and its presentation via MHC class I molecules to CD8+ T cells leads to an immune response that is an in vitro correlate of protection against pre-erythrocytic malaria. Further characterization of tomatine as an adjuvant in malaria vaccine development is indicated.

  9. Augmentation of Antitumor T-Cell Responses by Increasing APC T-Cell C5a/C3a-C5aR/C3aR Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    signaling which drives Th1/ Th17 effector cell responses (14). While we described the connection of C3aR/C5aR signaling with the PI-3Kγ- AKT-mTOR...involved in controlling the anti-tumor immune response, i.e. biasing between Th1/ Th17 effector cell vs Treg commitment, but also directly involved in

  10. Intravaginal HPV DNA vaccination with electroporation induces local CD8+ T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against cervicovaginal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Peng, S; Qiu, J; Miao, J; Yang, B; Jeang, J; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have the potential to inhibit the progression of an established HPV infection to precancer and cancer lesions by targeting HPV oncoproteins. We have previously developed a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to E7, CRT/E7 DNA vaccine, for use in the treatment of HPV-associated lesions. Since the transfection efficiency of DNA vaccines administered in vivo is typically low, we examined the use of electroporation as well as different routes of administration to enhance antigen-specific tumor control. We tested the effects of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine administered intramuscularly or intravaginally, with or without electroporation, on the generation of CD8+ T-cell immunity and therapeutic antitumor effects in HPV16 E7-expressing cervicovaginal tumor-bearing mice. We found that intravaginal vaccination of CRT/E7 DNA followed by electroporation-induced potent E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in the cervicovaginal tract, compared with intramuscular injection followed by electroporation. Furthermore, tumor-bearing mice vaccinated intravaginally followed by electroporation had an enhanced survival, antitumor effects and local production of IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells compared with those vaccinated intramuscularly with electroporation. Thus, we show that intravaginal CRT/E7 DNA vaccination followed by electroporation generates the most potent therapeutic antitumor effects against an orthotopic E7-expressing tumor model. The current study will have significant clinical implications once a clinically applicable electroporation device for intravaginal use becomes available.

  11. Enhanced early innate and T cell-mediated responses in subjects immunized with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minang, Jacob T; Inglefield, Jon R; Harris, Andrea M; Lathey, Janet L; Alleva, David G; Sweeney, Diane L; Hopkins, Robert J; Lacy, Michael J; Bernton, Edward W

    2014-11-28

    NuThrax™ (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed with CPG 7909 Adjuvant) (AV7909) is in development. Samples obtained in a phase Ib clinical trial were tested to confirm biomarkers of innate immunity and evaluate effects of CPG 7909 (PF-03512676) on adaptive immunity. Subjects received two intramuscular doses of commercial BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA), or two intramuscular doses of one of four formulations of AV7909. IP-10, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated 24-48 h after administration of AV7909 formulations, returning to baseline by Day 7. AVA (no CPG 7909) resulted in elevated IL-6 and CRP, but not IP-10. Another marker of CpG, transiently decreased absolute lymphocyte counts (ALCs), correlated with transiently increased IP-10. Cellular recall responses to anthrax protective antigen (PA) or PA peptides were assessed by IFN-γ ELISpot assay performed on cryopreserved PBMCs obtained from subjects prior to immunization and 7 days following the second immunization (study day 21). One-half of subjects that received AV7909 with low-dose (0.25mg/dose) CPG 7909 possessed positive Day 21 T cell responses to PA. In contrast, positive T cell responses occurred at an 11% average rate (1/9) for AVA-treated subjects. Differences in cellular responses due to dose level of CPG 7909 were not associated with differences in humoral anti-PA IgG responses, which were elevated for recipients of AV7909 compared to recipients of AVA. Serum markers at 24 or 48 h (i.e. % ALC decrease, or increase in IL-6, IP-10, or CRP) correlated with the humoral (antibody) responses 1 month later, but did not correlate with cellular ELISpot responses. In summary, biomarkers of early responses to CPG 7909 were confirmed, and adding a CpG adjuvant to a vaccine administered twice resulted in increased T cell effects relative to vaccine alone. Changes in early biomarkers correlated with subsequent adaptive humoral immunity but not cellular immunity.

  12. Identification of dendritic cells, B cell and T cell subsets in Tasmanian devil lymphoid tissue; evidence for poor immune cell infiltration into devil facial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Lauren J; Morris, Katrina M; Kobayashi, Takumi; Tovar, Cesar; Kreiss, Alexandre; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Corcoran, Lynn; Belov, Katherine; Woods, Gregory M

    2014-05-01

    The Tasmanian devil is under threat of extinction due to the transmissible devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). This fatal tumor is an allograft that does not induce an immune response, raising questions about the activity of Tasmanian devil immune cells. T and B cell analysis has been limited by a lack of antibodies, hence the need to produce such reagents. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that CD4, CD8, IgM, and IgG were closely related to other marsupials. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against CD4, CD8, IgM, and IgG by generating bacterial fusion proteins. These, and commercial antibodies against CD1a and CD83, identified T cells, B cells and dendritic cells by immunohistochemistry. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were identified in pouch young thymus, adult lymph nodes, spleen, bronchus- and gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Their anatomical distribution was characteristic of mammalian lymphoid tissues with more CD4(+) than CD8(+) cells in lymph nodes and splenic white pulp. IgM(+) and IgG(+) B cells were identified in adult lymph nodes, spleen, bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue and gut-associated lymphoid tissue, with more IgM(+) than IgG(+) cells. Dendritic cells were identified in lymph node, spleen and skin. This distribution is consistent with eutherian mammals and other marsupials, indicating they have the immune cell subsets for an anti-tumor immunity. Devil facial tumor disease tumors contained more CD8(+) than CD4(+) cells, but in low numbers. There were also low numbers of CD1a(+) and MHC class II(+) cells, but no CD83(+) IgM(+) or IgG(+) B cells, consistent with poor immune cell infiltration.

  13. AIM2 co-immunization favors specific multifunctional CD8(+) T cell induction and ameliorates coxsackievirus B3-induced chronic myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Dafei; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2015-07-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection can cause acute myocarditis and chronic myocarditis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with no effective therapeutic strategy. Therefore, we investigated the potential of absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of DNA vaccine against CVB3-induced chronic myocarditis. Mice were infected with CVB3 and then intranasally immunized with chitosan-pcDNA3.1 (mock), chitosan-pAIM2 (CS-pAIM2), chitosan-pVP1 (CS-pVP1), or chitosan-pAIM2 plus chitosan-pVP1 (CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1) at 7, 21, and 35d. Therapeutic efficacies of various vaccines were evaluated at day 56d. Compared with CS-pVP1 immunization, CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 co-immunization significantly increased survival rate, improved cardiac function, as well as decreased myocardial injury and fibrosis, this result indicated that CVB3-induced chronic myocarditis was alleviated. CVB3-specific T lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses of the CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 co-immunization group were also increased. More interestingly, CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 co-immunization could facilitate CVB3-specific multifunctional CD8(+) T cell induction in the intestinal mucosa, and this induction was closely correlated with myocardial scores, this result indicated that CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 vaccine exhibits therapeutic efficacy by enhancing multifunctional CD8(+) T cells. This study may represent a novel therapy for CVB3-induced chronic myocarditis.

  14. Prophylactic immunization against experimental leishmaniasis. III. Protection against fatal Leishmania tropica infection induced by irradiated promastigotes involves Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that do not mediate cutaneous DTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, F.Y.; Howard, J.G.; Hale, C.

    1984-01-01

    Protective immunity against fatal L. tropica infection in genetically vulnerable BALB/c mice can be induced by prophylactic immunization with irradiated promastigotes even when heat-killed. Such immunity is adoptively transferable transiently into intact or durably into sub-lethally irradiated (200 or 550 rad) syngeneic recipients by splenic T but not B cells. The effector T cells are of the Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ phenotype, devoid of demonstrable cytotoxic activity. The immune splenic T cell population expresses specific helper activity for antibody synthesis. A causal role for helper T cells in this capacity, however, seems unlikely, because it was shown that antibody does not determine the protective immunity against L. tropica. The immunized donors show no detectable cutaneous DTH or its early memory recall in response to live or killed promastigotes or a soluble L. tropica antigen preparation. Spleen, lymph node, and peritoneal exudate cells from protectively immunized donors similarly fail to transfer DTH locally or systemically. These cells also lack demonstrable suppressive activity against the expression or induction of DTH to L. tropica. Thus, protection against L. tropica induced by prophylactic i.v. immunization with irradiated promastigotes appears to be conferred by Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that are distinguishable from T cells mediating either both DTH and T help, or cytotoxicity.

  15. Pre-cART Elevation of CRP and CD4+ T-cell Immune Activation Associated with HIV Clinical Progression in a Multinational Case-Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopal, Ashwin; Asmuth, David M.; Yang, Wei-Teng; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupte, Nikhil; Smeaton, Laura; Kanyama, Cecilia; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Santos, Breno; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Lama, Javier R.; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Zulu, Fatima; Pawar, Jyoti S; Riviere, Cynthia; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James; Li, Xiao-Dong; Pollard, Richard B.; Semba, Richard D.; Thomas, David L.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a subset of HIV-infected patients who initiate cART develop early clinical progression to AIDS; therefore some cART initiators are not fully benefitted by cART. Immune activation pre-cART may predict clinical progression in cART initiators. Methods A case-cohort study (n=470) within the multinational Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource-Limited Settings (PEARLS) clinical trial (1571 HIV treatment-naïve adults who initiated cART; CD4+ T cell count <300 cells/mm3; nine countries) was conducted. A subcohort of 30 participants/country was randomly selected; additional cases were added from the main cohort. Cases (n=236 [random subcohort–36; main cohort–200]) had clinical progression (incident WHO Stage 3/4 event or death) within 96 weeks following cART initiation. Immune activation biomarkers were quantified pre-cART. Associations between biomarkers and clinical progression were examined using weighted multivariable Cox-proportional hazards models. Results Median age was 35 years, 45% were women, 49% black, 31% Asian, and 9% white. Median CD4+ T-cell count was 167 cells/mm3. In multivariate analysis, highest quartile CRP concentration (adjusted hazards ratio [aHR] 2.53, 95%CI 1.02-6.28) and CD4+ T-cell activation (aHR 5.18, 95CI 1.09-24.47) were associated with primary outcomes, compared to lowest quartiles. sCD14 had a trend towards association with clinical failure (aHR 2.24, 95%CI 0.96–5.21). Conclusions Measuring CRP and CD4+ T-cell activation may identify patients with CD4+ T cell counts < 300 cells/mm3 at risk for early clinical progression when initiating cART. Additional vigilance and symptom-based screening may be required in this subset of patients even after beginning cART. PMID:26017661

  16. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  17. Immunization of mice with a TolA-like surface protein of Trypanosoma cruzi generates CD4(+) T-cell-dependent parasiticidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanquin, N M; Galaviz, C; Fouts, D L; Wrightsman, R A; Manning, J E

    1999-09-01

    The gene family encoding a trypomastigote-specific protein restricted to the part of the flagellum in contact with the cell body of the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi has been isolated, characterized, and expressed in a baculovirus expression system. The gene family contains three tandemly repeated members that have 97 to 100% sequence identity. The predicted protein encoded by the gene family has both significant amino acid sequence identity and other physical and biological features in common with the TolA proteins of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on these similarities, we have designated this gene family tolT. Immunization of mice with recombinant TolT generates a population of CD4(+) T lymphocytes that recognize T. cruzi-infected macrophages, resulting in the production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), which leads to NO production and a 50 to 60% reduction in parasite numbers compared to that seen with infected macrophages incubated with naive T cells. This population of T cells also produces both IFN-gamma and interleukin 2 (IL-2) but not IL-4 or IL-5 when incubated with spleen cells stimulated with TolT antigen, indicating that they are of the T-helper 1 type. T cells from mice chronically infected with T. cruzi also produce significant levels of IFN-gamma when cocultured with macrophages and either TolT protein or paraflagellar rod protein, indicating that both of these flagellar proteins produce positive T-cell responses in mice chronically infected with T. cruzi.

  18. Immunization of Mice with a TolA-Like Surface Protein of Trypanosoma cruzi Generates CD4+ T-Cell-Dependent Parasiticidal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanquin, Natalie M.; Galaviz, Charles; Fouts, David L.; Wrightsman, Ruth A.; Manning, Jerry E.

    1999-01-01

    The gene family encoding a trypomastigote-specific protein restricted to the part of the flagellum in contact with the cell body of the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi has been isolated, characterized, and expressed in a baculovirus expression system. The gene family contains three tandemly repeated members that have 97 to 100% sequence identity. The predicted protein encoded by the gene family has both significant amino acid sequence identity and other physical and biological features in common with the TolA proteins of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on these similarities, we have designated this gene family tolT. Immunization of mice with recombinant TolT generates a population of CD4+ T lymphocytes that recognize T. cruzi-infected macrophages, resulting in the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), which leads to NO production and a 50 to 60% reduction in parasite numbers compared to that seen with infected macrophages incubated with naive T cells. This population of T cells also produces both IFN-γ and interleukin 2 (IL-2) but not IL-4 or IL-5 when incubated with spleen cells stimulated with TolT antigen, indicating that they are of the T-helper 1 type. T cells from mice chronically infected with T. cruzi also produce significant levels of IFN-γ when cocultured with macrophages and either TolT protein or paraflagellar rod protein, indicating that both of these flagellar proteins produce positive T-cell responses in mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. PMID:10456906

  19. Defined breast milk EV subsets boost the immune response and skew the T-cell balance towards a regulatory phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld, Marijke; Van Herwijnen, Martijn; Brouwers, Jos; Garssen, Johan; Redegeld, Frank; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Wauben, Marca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the past years it has become clear that cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EV) are present in human breast milk and that these EV can play a role in the instruction of the immune system. Since breast milk impacts the development of the neonatal immune system by conveying environme

  20. Interleukin-2/Anti-Interleukin-2 Immune Complex Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction through Expansion of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells have protective effects in wound healing and adverse ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI. We hypothesize that the interleukin- (IL- 2 complex comprising the recombinant mouse IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb (JES6-1 attenuates cardiac remodeling after MI through the expansion of Treg. Mice were subjected to surgical left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and treated with either PBS or IL-2 complex. The IL-2 complex significantly attenuates ventricular remodeling, as demonstrated by reduced infarct size, improved left ventricular (LV function, and attenuated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The IL-2 complex increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, which may be recruited to the infarcted heart, and decreased the frequencies of IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing CD4+ T helper (Th cells among the CD4+Foxp3− T cells in the spleen. Furthermore, the IL-2 complex inhibited the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines as well as macrophage infiltrates in the infarcted myocardium and induced the differentiation of macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype in border zone of infarcted myocardium. Our studies indicate that the IL-2 complex may serve as a promising therapeutic approach to attenuate adverse remodeling after MI through expanding Treg cells specifically.

  1. The Functional Roles of Lipid Rafts in T-Cell Activation, Immune Diseases and HIV Infection and Prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Lou; Kou Wang; Dequan Liu; Yan Li; Qinshi Zhao

    2008-01-01

    The first appearance of lipid rafts, or lipid rafts-like structure, was occasionally observed by cryo-electronic microscopy in 1980s as cavity, such as caveolae. However, the fully understanding of lipid raft was attributed by the studies of T cell activation. virus entry/budding, and other membrane events. During the interaction of T cell and antigen presenting cell, a highly organized structure is formed at the interface of the two cells, where cholesterol and sphingolipids are enriched, and form a liquid ordered phase that facilitates the signaling proteins on and off. Lipid rafts are also involved in virus entry and assembly. In this review, we will discuss cholesterol sphingolipid floating micro domain, the lipid raft as a unique compartment of the plasma membrane, with biological functions that ensure correct intracellular traffic of proteins and lipids, such as protein-protein interactions by concentrating certain proteins in these micro domains, while excluding others. We also discuss the disruption of lipid rafts is re teed to different diseases and aging, and we especially exploit the lipid rafts as pharmaceutical targets for anti-virus and anti-inflammation. Particularly a new approach to control HIV infection for AIDS prevention and perfection by inhibition or disruption of lipid rafts. Cellular & Molecular Immunology 2008;5(1):1-7.

  2. Role of NKT cells in the digestive system. IV. The role of canonical natural killer T cells in mucosal immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Lymphocytes that combine features of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells are named natural killer T (NKT) cells. The majority of NKT cells in mice bear highly conserved invariant Valpha chains, and to date two populations of such canonical NKT cells are known in mice: those that express Valpha14 and those that express Valpha7.2. Both populations are selected by nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex class I-like antigen-presenting molecules expressed by hematopoietic cells in the thymus: CD1d for Valpha14-expressing NKT cells and MR1 for those cells expressing Valpha7.2. The more intensely studied Valpha14 NKT cells have been implicated in diverse immune reactions, including immune regulation and inflammation in the intestine; the Valpha7.2 expressing cells are most frequently found in the lamina propria. In humans, populations of canonical NKT cells are found to be highly similar in terms of the expression of homologous, invariant T cell antigen-receptor alpha-chains, specificity, and function, although their frequency differs from those in the mouse. In this review, we will focus on the role of both of these canonical NKT cell populations in the mucosal tissues of the intestine.

  3. Effect of Schistosoma mansoni Infection on Innate and HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Ugandan Fisher Folk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuku, Andrew Ekii; Asiki, Gershim; Abaasa, Andrew; Ssonko, Isaac; Harari, Alexandre; van Dam, Govert J; Corstjens, Paul L; Joloba, Moses; Ding, Song; Mpendo, Juliet; Nielsen, Leslie; Kamali, Anatoli; Elliott, Alison M; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Pala, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    In Uganda, fisher folk have HIV prevalence rates, about four times higher than the national average, and are often coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni. We hypothesized that innate immune responses and HIV-specific Th1 immune responses might be downmodulated in HIV/S. mansoni-coinfected individuals compared with HIV+/S. mansoni-negative individuals. We stimulated whole blood with innate receptor agonists and analyzed supernatant cytokines by Luminex. We evaluated HIV-specific responses by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α. We found that the plasma viral load and CD4 count were similar between the HIV+SM+ and HIV+SM- individuals. In addition, the TNF-α response to the imidazoquinoline compound CL097 and β-1, 3-glucan (curdlan), was significantly higher in HIV/S. mansoni-coinfected individuals compared with HIV only-infected individuals. The frequency of HIV-specific IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α- CD8 T cells and IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α+ CD4 T cells was significantly higher in HIV/S. mansoni-coinfected individuals compared with HIV only-infected individuals. These findings do not support the hypothesis that S. mansoni downmodulates innate or HIV-specific Th1 responses in HIV/S. mansoni-coinfected individuals.

  4. Evasion by stealth: inefficient immune activation underlies poor T cell response and severe disease in SARS-CoV-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincun Zhao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome caused substantial morbidity and mortality during the 2002-2003 epidemic. Many of the features of the human disease are duplicated in BALB/c mice infected with a mouse-adapted version of the virus (MA15, which develop respiratory disease with high morbidity and mortality. Here, we show that severe disease is correlated with slow kinetics of virus clearance and delayed activation and transit of respiratory dendritic cells (rDC to the draining lymph nodes (DLN with a consequent deficient virus-specific T cell response. All of these defects are corrected when mice are treated with liposomes containing clodronate, which deplete alveolar macrophages (AM. Inhibitory AMs are believed to prevent the development of immune responses to environmental antigens and allergic responses by interacting with lung dendritic cells and T cells. The inhibitory effects of AM can also be nullified if mice or AMs are pretreated with poly I:C, which directly activate AMs and rDCs through toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3. Further, adoptive transfer of activated but not resting bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC protect mice from lethal MA15 infection. These results may be relevant for SARS in humans, which is also characterized by prolonged virus persistence and delayed development of a SARS-CoV-specific immune response in individuals with severe disease.

  5. AFCo1, a meningococcal B-derived cochleate adjuvant, strongly enhances antibody and T-cell immunity against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 4 and 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Gustavo; Zayas, Caridad; Wang, Lina; Coppel, Ross; Pérez, Oliver; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    Background Whilst a large number of malaria antigens are being tested as candidate malaria vaccines, a major barrier to the development of an effective vaccine is the lack of a suitable human adjuvant capable of inducing a strong and long lasting immune response. In this study, the ability of AFCo1, a potent T and B cell adjuvant based on cochleate structures derived from meningococcal B outer membrane proteoliposomes (MBOMP), to boost the immune response against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4) and 5 (MSP5), was evaluated. Methods Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), which is able to confer protection against malaria in animal MSP4/5 vaccine challenge models, was used as positive control adjuvant. MSP4 and 5-specific IgG, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), T-cell proliferation, and cytokine production were evaluated in parallel in mice immunized three times intramuscularly with MSP4 or MSP5 incorporated into AFCo1, synthetic cochleate structures, CFA or phosphate buffered saline. Results AFCo1 significantly enhanced the IgG and T-cell response against MSP4 and MSP5, with a potency equivalent to CFA, with the response being characterized by both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, increased interferon gamma production and a strong DTH response, consistent with the ability of AFCo1 to induce Th1-like immune responses. Conclusion Given the proven safety of MBOMP, which is already in use in a licensed human vaccine, AFCo1 could assist the development of human malaria vaccines that require a potent and safe adjuvant. PMID:19250541

  6. Vaccination with EphA2-derived T cell-epitopes promotes immunity against both EphA2-expressing and EphA2-negative tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatano Manabu

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel tyrosine kinase receptor EphA2 is expressed at high levels in advanced and metastatic cancers. We examined whether vaccinations with synthetic mouse EphA2 (mEphA2-derived peptides that serve as T cell epitopes could induce protective and therapeutic anti-tumor immunity. Methods C57BL/6 mice received subcutaneous (s.c. vaccinations with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs pulsed with synthetic peptides recognized by CD8+ (mEphA2671–679, mEphA2682–689 and CD4+ (mEphA230–44 T cells. Splenocytes (SPCs were harvested from primed mice to assess the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against syngeneic glioma, sarcoma and melanoma cell lines. The ability of these vaccines to prevent or treat tumor (s.c. injected MCA205 sarcoma or B16 melanoma; i.v. injected B16-BL6 establishment/progression was then assessed. Results Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with mEphA2-derived peptides induced specific CTL responses in SPCs. Vaccination with mEPhA2 peptides, but not control ovalbumin (OVA peptides, prevented the establishment or prevented the growth of EphA2+ or EphA2-negative syngeneic tumors in both s.c. and lung metastasis models. Conclusions These data indicate that mEphA2 can serve as an attractive target against which to direct anti-tumor immunity. The ability of mEphA2 vaccines to impact EphA2-negative tumors such as the B16 melanoma may suggest that such beneficial immunity may be directed against alternative EphA2+ target cells, such as the tumor-associated vascular endothelial cells.

  7. Immune hierarchy among HIV-1 CD8+ T cell epitopes delivered by dendritic cells depends on MHC-I binding irrespective of mode of loading and immunization in HLA-A*0201 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloverpris, Henrik N; Karlsson, Ingrid; Thorn, Mette

    2009-01-01

    Recent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccination strategies aim at targeting a broad range of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from different HIV-1 proteins by immunization with multiple CTL epitopes simultaneously. However, this may establish an immune hierarchical response......, where the immune system responds to only a small number of the epitopes administered. To evaluate the feasibility of such vaccine strategies, we used the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 transgenic (tg) HHD murine in vivo model and immunized with dendritic cells pulsed with seven HIV-1-derived HLA......-A*0201 binding CTL epitopes. The seven peptides were simultaneously presented on the same dendritic cell (DC) or on separate DCs before immunization to one or different lymphoid compartments. Data from this study showed that the T-cell response, as measured by cytolytic activity and gamma-interferon (IFN...

  8. Mosaic vaccines elicit CD8+ T cell responses in monkeys that confer immune coverage of diverse HIV strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Will [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Creation of a successful HIV vaccine will require the development of a strategy to generate cellular immunity with sufficient cross-clade breadth to deal with the extreme genetic diversity of the virus. Polyvalent mosaic immunogens derived from in silica recombination of natural strains of HIV are designed to induce cellular immune responses that maximally cover the sequence diversity of circulating virus isolates. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with plasmid DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine constructs expressing either consensus immunogens or polyvalent mosaic immunogens elicited a CD4+ T lymphocyte-biased response with comparably broad epitope-specific total T lymphocyte specificities. However, immunization with the mosaic immunogens induced HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses with markedly greater depth and breadth. Therefore, the use of polyvalent mosaic immunogens is a promising strategy for a global vaccine for HIV.

  9. Regulatory functions of hapten-reactive helper and suppressor T lymphocytes. I. Detection and characterization of hapten-reactive suppressor T-cell activity in mice immunized with hapten-isologous protein conjugate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Hamaoka, T; Yoshizawa, M; Kuroki, M; Kitagawa, M

    1977-01-01

    Helper and suppressor T-cell activities were detected simultaneously in the spleen cells of mice immunized with para-azobenzoate (PAB)-mouse gammaglobulin (MGG). Dinitrophenyl (DNP)-specific B cells were raised by immunization with DNP-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and used as the indicator B-cell population. The helper and suppressor T-cell activities were determined after adoptively transferring spleen cells from PAB-MGG- primed donors and DNP-KLH-primed donors into X-irradiated recipients. Stimulation of these recipients with DNP-MGG-PAB detected helper T-cell activity, which was measured in terms of increased anti-DNP antibody responses of DNP-KLH-primed cells over these responses in the presence of unprimed cells. On the other hand, when DNP-KLH-primed cells were stimulated with DNP-KLH-PAB in the presence of PAB-MGG-primed cells, anti-DNP antibody responses were substantially lower than in unprimed normal cells. This suppressor cell population was (a) hapten-reactive, (b) present in B-cell-depleted spleen cells, (c) Thy-1 positive, (d) detectable earlier than the helper T-cell activities after priming (e) more radiosensitive than helper cells, and (f) found in the spleen but not the lymph nodes in contrast to helper T cells. These data indicate that these suppressor T cells are distinct from the helper T cells. PAB-reactive T cells clearly suppressed the antibody response by inhibiting KLH-reactive helper T-cell functions. The hapten-reactive T-lymphocyte system described here should be useful for analyzing and manipulating the immune response and for studying regulatory interactions of helper and suppressor T cells in the induction of antibody responses. PMID:68994

  10. Towards Developing a Malaria Vaccine Based on CD4 T Cell Mediated Immunity in Blood Stage of Malaria Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐沪济

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-one years after malaria antigens were first cloned a vaccine still appears to be a long way off. There have been periods of great excitement and in model systems subunit vaccine homologues can induce robust protection. However, significant challenges exist concerning antigenic variation and polymorphism, immunological non-respons-iveness to individual vaccine antigens, parasite-induced apoptosis of immune effector and memory cells and immune deviation as a result of maternal immtmity and alterations of dendritic cell function.

  11. The immune privilege of the eye: human retinal pigment epithelial cells selectively modulate T-cell activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Lovato, Paola; Ødum, Niels

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the effect of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of T cells. METHODS: Resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were stimulated with PHA with or without the presence of gamma-irradiated RPE cells. Proliferation and the cell...... cycle profile were thereafter investigated by 3H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis. In addition, the PBLs expression of CD69, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II, CD3, as well as the IL-2 receptor chains were evaluated by flow cytometry, and the content of IL-2...... in cell culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Human RPE cells were found to suppress PHA-induced proliferation, cyclin A, IL-2R-alpha and -gamma, and CD71 expression and decrease the production of IL-2; but RPE cells do not inhibit the PHA-induced expression of early activation markers CD69...

  12. Cellular Immune Responses for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen Recognized by T Cells 3 in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Arai, Kuniaki; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Fushimi, Kazumi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Kazutoshi; Terashima, Takeshi; Kitahara, Masaaki; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells 3 (SART3), a tumor-associated antigen expressed in many cancers, functions in tumor rejection. In this study, we investigated its usefulness as an immunotherapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods The expression of SART3 in hepatoma cell lines and HCC tissues was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses. Two peptides derived from SART3 (SART3109 and SART3315) were used for immunological analysis. T-cell responses were investigated by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 47 patients, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in 8 of 47 patients with HCC. The safety of immunotherapy using a SART3-derived peptide was investigated by vaccinations of SART3109 in 12 patients with HCC (trial registration: UMIN000005677). Results The immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses showed that SART3 was expressed in six HCC cell lines, and in HCC tissues including of alpha-fetoprotein-negative individuals. SART3-specific CTLs were generated by stimulating PBMCs with the peptides, and they showed cytotoxicity against HCC cells expressing the protein. Of the 47 HCC patients, 25.5% and 10.6% showed significant responses to SART3109 and SART3315, respectively. The infiltration of SART3109-specific IFN-γ-producing CTLs into the tumor site was confirmed. In the vaccination study, no severe adverse events were observed, and the peptide-specific CTLs were newly induced in four of five patients tested. Conclusions SART3 is an immunotherapeutic candidate, and peptides from this antigen may be applied in HCC immunotherapy. Trial Registration UMIN000005677 PMID:28114424

  13. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  14. An oral Salmonella-based vaccine inhibits liver metastases by promoting tumor-specific T cell-mediated immunity in celiac & portal lymph nodes. A preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina eVendrell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumor excision is one of the therapies of cancer most widely used. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent source of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally-administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was immunized with CVD 915 via o.g. while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac & portal lymph nodes (LDLN 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4+ and DC cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ were found in the celiac & portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination.

  15. An Oral Salmonella-Based Vaccine Inhibits Liver Metastases by Promoting Tumor-Specific T-Cell-Mediated Immunity in Celiac and Portal Lymph Nodes: A Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Alejandrina; Mongini, Claudia; Gravisaco, María José; Canellada, Andrea; Tesone, Agustina Inés; Goin, Juan Carlos; Waldner, Claudia Inés

    2016-01-01

    Primary tumor excision is one of the most widely used therapies of cancer. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent sources of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was orogastrically immunized with CVD 915, while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC) detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac and portal lymph nodes (LDLN) 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4(+) and dendritic cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF) were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) were found in the celiac and portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination.

  16. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    research is to assess the efficacy of augmenting immune responses to breast cancer through the use of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF), suspensions of...poly(NIPAAm) onto silica nanoparticles using ATRP has been investigated by [5, 6]. In the present work, MRFs were synthesized from suspensions of...of Iron-Based Nanofluids ”, International Journal of Modern Physics B, Vol. 21, pp. 4774 – 4781, 2007 18. J. P. Jakubovics, “Magnetism and Magnetic

  17. SHP-1 phosphatase activity counteracts increased T cell receptor affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeisen, Michael; Baitsch, Lukas; Presotto, Danilo; Baumgaertner, Petra; Romero, Pedro; Michielin, Olivier; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-03-01

    Anti-self/tumor T cell function can be improved by increasing TCR-peptide MHC (pMHC) affinity within physiological limits, but paradoxically further increases (K(d) affinity for the tumor antigen HLA-A2/NY-ESO-1, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this high-affinity-associated loss of function. As compared with cells expressing TCR affinities generating optimal function (K(d) = 5 to 1 μM), those with supraphysiological affinity (K(d) = 1 μM to 15 nM) showed impaired gene expression, signaling, and surface expression of activatory/costimulatory receptors. Preferential expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) was limited to T cells with the highest TCR affinity, correlating with full functional recovery upon PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade. In contrast, upregulation of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1/PTPN6) was broad, with gradually enhanced expression in CD8(+) T cells with increasing TCR affinities. Consequently, pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 with sodium stibogluconate augmented the function of all engineered T cells, and this correlated with the TCR affinity-dependent levels of SHP-1. These data highlight an unexpected and global role of SHP-1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation and responsiveness and support the development of therapies inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases to enhance T cell-mediated immunity.

  18. cDNA immunization of mice with human thyroglobulin generates both humoral and T cell responses: a novel model of thyroid autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Jacobson

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin (Tg represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT, are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis.

  19. Oxidative stress and age-related changes in T cells: is thalassemia a model of accelerated immune system aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatreh-Samani, Mahdi; Esmaeili, Nafiseh; Soleimani, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan; Shirzad, Hedayatolah

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major occurs mainly due to blood transfusion, an essential treatment for β-thalassemia major patients, which results in oxidative stress. It has been thought that oxidative stress causes elevation of immune system senescent cells. Under this condition, cells normally enhance in aging, which is referred to as premature immunosenescence. Because there is no animal model for immunosenescence, most knowledge on the immunosenescence pattern is based on induction of immunosenescence. In this review, we describe iron overload and oxidative stress in β-thalassemia major patients and how they make these patients a suitable human model for immunosenescence. We also consider oxidative stress in some kinds of chronic virus infections, which induce changes in the immune system similar to β-thalassemia major. In conclusion, a therapeutic approach used to improve the immune system in such chronic virus diseases, may change the immunosenescence state and make life conditions better for β-thalassemia major patients.

  20. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274) suppresses host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, Ryan A.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wada, David A.; Yang, Zhi-Zhang; Comfere, Nneka I.; Dong, Haidong; Kwon, Eugene D.; Novak, Anne J.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Mark R Pittelkow; Witzig, Thomas E.; Ansell, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal elements present within the tumor microenvironment may suppress host immunity and promote the growth of malignant lymphocytes in B cell–derived non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In contrast, little is known about the microenvironment's role in T cell–derived NHL. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274), a member of the B7 family of costimulatory/coinhibitory ligands expressed by both malignant cells and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment, has emerged as an important immune modulator capable of su...

  1. Regulating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, N T; Chao, N

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress activation of other immune cells and thereby maintain immune system homeostasis, self-tolerance as well as control excessive response to foreign antigens. The mere concept of Tregs was the subject of significant controversy among immunologists for many years owing to the paucity of reliable markers for defining these cells and the ambiguity of the nature and molecular basis of suppressive phenomena. However, recent advances in the molecular characterization of this cell population have firmly established their existence and their vital role in the vertebrate immune system. Of interest, accumulating evidence from both humans and experimental animal models has implicated the involvement of Tregs in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The demonstration that Tregs could separate GVHD from graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity suggests that their immunosuppressive potential could be manipulated to reduce GVHD without detrimental consequence on GVT effect. Although a variety of T lymphocytes with suppressive capabilities have been reported, the two best-characterized subsets are the naturally arising, intrathymic-generated Tregs (natural Tregs) and the peripherally generated, inducible Tregs (inducible Tregs). This review summarizes our current knowledge of the generation, function and regulation of these two populations of Tregs during an immune response. Their role in the development of GVHD and their therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of GVHD will also be described.

  2. Transplantational and specific antitumor immunity in retrospective view: new models based on transgenesis of individual chains of T-cell receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Kazanskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings in experimental oncology in beginning of last century and subsequent achievements of genetics of tissue compatibility resulted in divergence of transplantational immunology and oncoimmunology. However, central achievements of both scientific fields are based on unified phenomenon of interaction between T-cell receptor (TCR and histocompatibility molecules. In this review we describe the history of ideas, achievements and unique experience of the team of the Laboratory of Regulatory Mechanisms in Immunity at Scientific Research Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center for all time of existence. This experience shows that efficiency of immunological defense including immunological surveillance are critically influenced by T-cell receptor repertoire. Transgenesis of individual chains of TCR is one of possible means to manage T-cell repertoire. Functional outcomes of transgenesis may be different due to diverse extent of dependence of α- and β-chains expression on the rules of allelic exclusion. Expression of transgenic β-chains results in the expansion of TCR repertoire diversity. Expression of β-chains is under strong control by allelic exclusion, resulting in formation of repertoire bearing mainly invariant transgenic β-chain pared with different α-chains and overall narrowing of repertoire. Earlier, we cloned genes encoding α- and β-chains of TCR of CD8+ memory cells specific to histocompatibility molecule H-2Kb . After introduction them in zigotes we have obtained transgenic mouse strains, which could be used for modeling of interactions between tumor cells and immune system of recipient. Normally, B10. D2 (R101 mice reject lymphoma EL4 cells in 12–14 days after transplantation, in spite of the fact, that allogeneic difference between B10. D2 (R101 (Kd Id Db mice and lymphoma EL4 (H-2b cells is only in one product of MHC, the H-2Kb molecule. Transgenics carrying β-chains of TCR displayed

  3. PB1 as a potential target for increasing the breadth of T-cell mediated immunity to Influenza A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida E M; Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we showed that combined intranasal and subcutaneous immunization with a non-replicating adenoviral vector expressing NP of influenza A, strain PR8, induced long-standing protection against a range of influenza A viruses. However, H-2(b) mice challenged with an influenza A strain mutated...

  4. Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Both Contribute to Pathological CD4 T Cell Activation in HIV-1 Infected Ugandans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    infected homosexual men: NIAID Multicenter AIDS cohort study. Clin Immunol Immunopathol 52: 10–18. 2. Hazenberg MD, Otto SA, van Benthem BH, Roos MT...1 Incidence and Genetic Complexity Along Main Roads in Rakai District, Uganda. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 43: 440–445. 39. Harris M, Serwada D

  5. Protective immunity induced with the RTS,S/AS vaccine is associated with IL-2 and TNF-α producing effector and central memory CD4 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M Lumsden

    Full Text Available A phase 2a RTS,S/AS malaria vaccine trial, conducted previously at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, conferred sterile immunity against a primary challenge with infectious sporozoites in 40% of the 80 subjects enrolled in the study. The frequency of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP-specific CD4(+ T cells was significantly higher in protected subjects as compared to non-protected subjects. Intrigued by these unique vaccine-related correlates of protection, in the present study we asked whether RTS,S also induced effector/effector memory (T(E/EM and/or central memory (T(CM CD4(+ T cells and whether one or both of these sub-populations is the primary source of cytokine production. We showed for the first time that PBMC from malaria-non-exposed RTS,S-immunized subjects contain both T(E/EM and T(CM cells that generate strong IL-2 responses following re-stimulation in vitro with CSP peptides. Moreover, both the frequencies and the total numbers of IL-2-producing CD4(+ T(E/EM cells and of CD4(+ T(CM cells from protected subjects were significantly higher than those from non-protected subjects. We also demonstrated for the first time that there is a strong association between the frequency of CSP peptide-reactive CD4(+ T cells producing IL-2 and the titers of CSP-specific antibodies in the same individual, suggesting that IL-2 may be acting as a growth factor for follicular Th cells and/or B cells. The frequencies of CSP peptide-reactive, TNF-α-producing CD4(+ T(E/EM cells and of CD4(+ T(E/EM cells secreting both IL-2 and TNF-α were also shown to be higher in protected vs. non-protected individuals. We have, therefore, demonstrated that in addition to TNF-α, IL-2 is also a significant contributing factor to RTS,S/AS vaccine induced immunity and that both T(E/EM and T(CM cells are major producers of IL-2.

  6. Location and dynamics of the immunodominant CD8 T cell response to SIVΔnef immunization and SIVmac251 vaginal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K Sasikala-Appukuttan

    Full Text Available Live-attenuated SIV vaccines (LAVs have been the most effective to date in preventing or partially controlling infection by wild-type SIV in non-human primate models of HIV-1 transmission to women acting by mechanisms of protection that are not well understood. To gain insights into mechanisms of protection by LAVs that could aid development of effective vaccines to prevent HIV-1 transmission to women, we used in situ tetramer staining to determine whether increased densities or changes in the local distribution of SIV-specific CD8 T cells correlated with the maturation of SIVΔnef vaccine-induced protection prior to and after intra-vaginal challenge with wild-type SIVmac251. We evaluated the immunodominant Mamu-A1*001:01/Gag (CM9 and Mamu-A1*001:01/Tat (SL8 epitope response in genital and lymphoid tissues, and found that tetramer+ cells were present at all time points examined. In the cervical vaginal tissues, most tetramer+ cells were distributed diffusely throughout the lamina propria or co-localized with other CD8 T cells within lymphoid aggregates. The distribution and densities of the tetramer+ cells at the portal of entry did not correlate with the maturation of protection or change after challenge. Given these findings, we discuss the possibility that changes in other aspects of the immune system, including the quality of the resident population of virus-specific effector CD8 T cells could contribute to maturation of protection, as well as the potential for vaccine strategies that further increase the size and quality of this effector population to prevent HIV-1 transmission.

  7. Immunization with Neospora caninum profilin induces limited protection and a regulatory T-cell response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Florencia Celeste; Quintana, María Eugenia; Langellotti, Cecilia; Wilda, Maximiliano; Martinez, Andrea; Fonzo, Adriana; Moore, Dadín Prando; Cardoso, Nancy; Capozzo, Alejandra Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Profilins are actin-binding proteins that regulate the polymerization of actin filaments. In apicomplexan parasites, they are essential for invasion. Profilins also trigger the immune response of the host by activating TLRs on dendritic cells (DCs), inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study we characterized for the first time the immune response and protection elicited by a vaccine based on Neospora caninum profilin in mice. Groups of eight BALB/c mice received either two doses of a recombinant N. caninum profilin expressed in Escherichia coli. (rNcPRO) or PBS, both formulated with an aqueous soy-based adjuvant enriched in TLR-agonists. Specific anti-profilin antibodies were detected in rNcPRO-vaccinated animals, mainly IgM and IgG3, which were consumed after infection. Splenocytes from rNcPRO-immunized animals proliferated after an in vitro stimulation with rNcPRO before and after challenge. An impairment of the cellular response was observed in NcPRO vaccinated and infected mice following an in vitro stimulation with native antigens of N. caninum, related to an increase in the percentage of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+. Two out of five rNcPRO-vaccinated challenged mice were protected; they were negative for parasite DNA in the brain and showed no histopathological lesions, which were found in all PBS-vaccinated animals. As a whole, our results provide evidence of a regulatory response elicited by immunization with rNcPRO, and suggest a role of profilin in the modulation and/or evasion of immune responses against N. caninum.

  8. Enhanced immune response and protective effects of nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine encoding T cell epitopes of Esat-6 and FL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganzhu Feng

    Full Text Available Development of a novel and effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb is a challenging for preventing TB infection. In this study, a novel nanoparticle-based recombinant DNA vaccine was developed, which contains Esat-6 three T cell epitopes (Esat-6/3e and fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL genes (termed Esat-6/3e-FL, and was enveloped with chitosan (CS nanoparticles (nano-chitosan. The immunologic and protective efficacy of the nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine (termed nano-Esat-6/3e-FL was assessed in C57BL/6 mice after intramuscular prime vaccination with the plasmids DNA and nasal boost with the Esat-6/3e peptides. The results showed that the immunized mice remarkably elicited enhanced T cell responses and protection against M.tb H37Rv challenge. These findings indicate that the nano-chitosan can significantly elevate the immunologic and protective effects of the DNA vaccine, and the nano-Esat-6/3e-FL is a useful vaccine for preventing M.tb infection in mice.

  9. Effect of bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination on CD4+Foxp3+ T cells during acquired immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela I; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Arnett, Kimberly; Shanley, Crystal A; Podell, Brendan; Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2016-04-01

    Increasing information has shown that many newly emerging strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including the highly prevalent and troublesome Beijing family of strains, can potently induce the emergence of Foxp3(+)CD4 Tregs Although the significance of this is still not fully understood, we have previously provided evidence that the emergence of this population can significantly ablate the protective effect of BCG vaccination, causing progressive fatal disease in the mouse model. However, whether the purpose of this response is to control inflammation or to directly dampen the acquired immune response is still unclear. In the present study, we have shown, using both cell depletion and adoptive transfer strategies, that Tregs can have either properties. Cell depletion resulted in a rapid, but transient, decrease in the lung bacterial load, suggesting release or temporary re-expansion of effector immunity. Transfer of Tregs into Rag2(-/-)or marked congenic mice worsened the disease course and depressed cellular influx of effector T cells into the lungs. Tregs from infected donors seemed to preferentially depress the inflammatory response and granulocytic influx. In contrast, those from BCG-vaccinated and then challenged donors seemed more focused on depression of acquired immunity. These qualitative differences might be related to increasing knowledge reflecting the plasticity of the Treg response.

  10. HTLV-1 propels thymic human T cell development in "human immune system" Rag2⁻/⁻ gamma c⁻/⁻ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaudy, Julien; Wencker, Mélanie; Gadot, Nicolas; Gillet, Nicolas A; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Gazzolo, Louis; Manz, Markus G; Bangham, Charles R M; Dodon, Madeleine Duc

    2011-09-01

    Alteration of early haematopoietic development is thought to be responsible for the onset of immature leukemias and lymphomas. We have previously demonstrated that Tax(HTLV-1) interferes with ß-selection, an important checkpoint of early thymopoiesis, indicating that human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection has the potential to perturb thymic human αβ T-cell development. To verify that inference and to clarify the impact of HTLV-1 infection on human T-cell development, we investigated the in vivo effects of H