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Sample records for auf molecular imaging

  1. Contributions on biomedical imaging, with a side-look at molecular imaging; Beitraege zur biomedizinischen Bildgebung mit einem Seitenblick auf Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, G. (ed.)

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended as a brief introduction to the emerging scientific field of biomedical imaging. The breadth of the subject is shown and future fields of research are indicated, which hopefully will serve as a guide to the identification of starting points for the research in 'Biomedical and/or Molecular Imaging' at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health. The report starts with a brief sketch of the history. Then a - necessarily incomplete - list of research topics is presented. It is organized in two parts: the first one addresses medical imaging, and the second one is concerned with biological point aspects of the matter. (orig.) [German] In diesem Bericht sind einige Beitraege zum Gebiet 'Bildgebende Verfahren in Biologie und Medizin' zusammengestellt. Sie stammen saemtlich aus dem Institut fuer Biomathematik und Biometrie, IBB, am Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, GSF, in Muenchen/Neuherberg, und seinem engeren Umfeld. Ziel war es, zu sichten, was in und um diesen Themenkreis herum an Wissen und sonstiger Kompetenz hier vorhanden ist. Einige am IBB etablierte Gebiete wie Roentgen-Mammographie oder funktionelle Magnetresonanztherapie wurden ausgeblendet. Der Grund ist die Fokussierung auf ein nicht exakt definierbares, neues Gebiet der Bildgebung, das unter dem Namen 'Molecular Imaging' kursiert und derzeit Furore macht macht. (orig.)

  2. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  3. A Facile Approach to Fabricate Water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 Nanoparticle for Liver Cancer Cells Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁重时; 吴献荣; 谢叶归; 刘顺英

    2012-01-01

    Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were widely used as nanoplatforms for biologic applications through readily further functionalization. Dopamine (DA)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (DA@Fe3O4) have been successfully synthesized using a one-step process by modified coprecipitation method. Then 2--3 nm gold nanoparticles were easily conjugated to DA@Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the electrostatic force between gold nanoparti- cles and amino groups of dopamine to afford water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 hybrid nanoparticles. A detailed investigation by dynamic light scatting (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed in order to characterize the physicochemical properties of the hybrid nanoparticles. The hybrid nanoparticles were easily functionalized with a targeted small peptide A54 (AGKGTPSLETTP) and fluorescence probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for liver cancer cell BEL-7402 imaging. This simple approach to prepare hybrid nanoparticles provides a facile nanoplatform for muti-functional derivations and may be extended to the immobilization of other metals or bimolecular on SPIO surface.

  4. [Molecular diagnostics and imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Christian; Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Huss, Ralf; Nestle, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic methods and biological imaging techniques can make a major contribution to tailoring patients' treatment needs with regard to medical, ethical and pharmaco-economic aspects. Modern diagnostic methods are already being used to help identify different sub-groups of patients with thoracic tumours who are most likely to benefit significantly from a particular type of treatment. This contribution looks at the most recent developments that have been made in the field of thoracic tumour diagnosis and analyses the pros and cons of new molecular and other imaging techniques in day-to-day clinical practice.

  5. Molecular imaging I

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    Semmler, Wolfhard [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (DE). Abt. fuer Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie (E020) Forschungsschwerpunkt Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie (E); Schwaiger, Markus (eds.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this textbook of molecular imaging is to provide an up to date review of this rapidly growing field and to discuss basic methodological aspects necessary for the interpretation of experimental and clinical results. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of imaging technology and probe development, since the physical properties of the imaging approach need to be closely linked with the biologic application of the probe (i.e. nanoparticles and microbubbles). Various chemical strategies are discussed and related to the biologic applications. Reporter-gene imaging is being addressed not only in experimental protocols, but also first clinical applications are discussed. Finally, strategies of imaging to characterize apoptosis and angiogenesis are described and discussed in the context of possible clinical translation. (orig.)

  6. Molecular imaging II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Wolfhard [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (DE). Abt. fuer Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie (E020) Forschungsschwerpunkt Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie (E); Schwaiger, Markus (eds.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this textbook of molecular imaging is to provide an up to date review of this rapidly growing field and to discuss basic methodological aspects necessary for the interpretation of experimental and clinical results. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of imaging technology and probe development, since the physical properties of the imaging approach need to be closely linked with the biologic application of the probe (i.e. nanoparticles and microbubbles). Various chemical strategies are discussed and related to the biologic applications. Reporter-gene imaging is being addressed not only in experimental protocols, but also first clinical applications are discussed. Finally, strategies of imaging to characterize apoptosis and angiogenesis are described and discussed in the context of possible clinical translation. (orig.)

  7. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  8. Molecular imaging in neurological diseases; Molekulare Bildgebung bei neurologischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimold, M.; Fougere, C. la [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Abteilung Nuklearmedizin und Klinische Molekulare Bildgebung, Department Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    In neurodegeneration and in neuro-oncology, the standard imaging procedure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), shows limited sensitivity and specificity. Molecular imaging with specific positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers allows various molecular targets and metabolic processes to be assessed and is thus a valuable adjunct to MRI. Two important examples are referred to here: amino acid transport for neuro-oncological issues, and the recently approved PET tracers for detecting amyloid depositions during the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. This review discusses the clinical relevance and indications for the following nuclear medicine imaging procedures: amyloid PET, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, and dopamine transporter (DaT)-SPECT for the diagnosis of dementia and the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, in addition to amino acid PET for the diagnosis of brain tumors and somatostatin receptor imaging in meningioma. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) weist als Standardverfahren bei neurodegenerativen und neuroonkologischen Fragestellungen eine eingeschraenkte Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet auf. Die nuklearmedizinische molekulare Bildgebung mit spezifischen Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)- und single-photon-emission-computed-tomography(SPECT)-Tracern ermoeglicht die Darstellung verschiedener molekularer Targets bzw. Stoffwechselprozesse und stellt damit eine wichtige Ergaenzung zur MRT dar. Hier sei exemplarisch auf die Darstellung des Aminosaeuretransports im Rahmen neuroonkologischer Fragestellungen verwiesen, sowie auf die bereits im praeklinischen Stadium der Alzheimer-Demenz nachweisbaren Amyloidablagerungen mit hierfuer seit Kurzem zugelassenen PET-Tracern. Dieser Uebersichtsbeitrag bespricht die klinische Bedeutung bzw. die Indikationen der folgenden nuklearmedizinischen Untersuchungsverfahren: der Amyloid-PET, der {sup 18}F

  9. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  10. Molecular breast imaging. An update; Molekulare Brustbildgebung. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K.; Helbich, T.H.; Magometschnigg, H.; Baltzer, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Molekulare Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Fueger, B. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Molekulare Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of molecular imaging is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. Molecular imaging using various techniques has recently become established in breast imaging. Currently molecular imaging techniques comprise multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRSI), nuclear imaging by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission mammography (PEM) and combinations of techniques (e.g. PET-CT and multiparametric PET-MRI). Recently, novel techniques for molecular imaging of breast tumors, such as sodium imaging ({sup 23}Na-MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRSI) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as specific radiotracers have been developed and are currently under investigation. It can be expected that molecular imaging of breast tumors will enable a simultaneous assessment of the multiple metabolic and molecular processes involved in cancer development and thus an improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring of response to treatment will become possible. (orig.) [German] Die molekulare Bildgebung zielt auf die Darstellung, Beschreibung und Quantifizierung biologischer, physiologischer und pathologischer Prozesse auf zellulaerer und molekularer Ebene ab. In den letzten Jahren hat sich die molekulare Bildgebung mit ihren verschiedenen Modalitaeten in der Brustdiagnostik etabliert. Die molekularen Brustbildgebung umfasst derzeit die multiparametrische(MP)-MRT mit funktioneller und morphologischer kontrastmittelverstaerkter MRT (KM-MRT), molekularer diffusionsgewichteter Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) und metabolischer Protonenspektroskopie ({sup 1}H-MRSI) sowie nuklearmedizinische Verfahren (brustspezifische Gammakamerabildgebung [BSGI], Positronenemissionstomographie [PET], PET

  11. Molecular imaging applications for immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Isabel Junie; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2004-05-01

    The use of multimodality molecular imaging has recently facilitated the study of molecular and cellular events in living subjects in a noninvasive and repetitive manner to improve the diagnostic capability of traditional assays. The noninvasive imaging modalities utilized for both small animal and human imaging include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT). Techniques specific to small-animal imaging include bioluminescent imaging (BIm) and fluorescent imaging (FIm). Molecular imaging permits the study of events within cells, the examination of cell trafficking patterns that relate to inflammatory diseases and metastases, and the ability to rapidly screen new drug treatments for distribution and effectiveness. In this paper, we will review the current field of molecular imaging assays (especially those utilizing PET and BIm modalities) and examine how they might impact animal models and human disease in the field of clinical immunology.

  12. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi; Ali Mahmoud Pashazadeh; Majid Assadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods...

  13. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  14. Tumor Molecular Imaging with Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI can provide not only structural images using traditional imaging techniques but also functional and molecular information using many newly emerging imaging techniques. Over the past decade, the utilization of nanotechnology in MI has exhibited many significant advantages and provided new opportunities for the imaging of living subjects. It is expected that multimodality nanoparticles (NPs can lead to precise assessment of tumor biology and the tumor microenvironment. This review addresses topics related to engineered NPs and summarizes the recent applications of these nanoconstructs in cancer optical imaging, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radionuclide imaging. Key challenges involved in the translation of NPs to the clinic are discussed.

  15. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M. [Maastricht University, Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L. [Maastricht University, Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Narula, J. [University of California Irvine, Department of Cardiology, Irvine (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  16. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods: In this review, using keywords such as photoacoustic, optoacoustic, laser-ultrasound, thermoacoustic at databases such as PubMed and ISI, studies performed in the field of photoacoustic and related findings were evaluated. Results: Photoacoustic imaging, acquiring images with high contrast and desired resolution, provides an opportunity to perform physiologic and anatomic studies. Because this technique does not use ionizing radiation, it is not restricted by the limitation of the ionizing-based imaging systems therefore it can be used noninvasively to make images from cell, vessels, whole body imaging of the animal and distinguish tumor from normal tissue. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging is a new method in preclinical researches which can be used in various physiologic and anatomic studies. This method, because of application of non-ionizing radiation, may resolve limitation of radiation based method in diagnostic assessments.

  17. Advances in multimodal molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, Luigi; Gramanzini, Matteo; Gargiulo, Sara; Albanese, Sandra; Salvatore, Marco; Greco, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical molecular imaging is an emerging field. Improving the ability of scientists to study the molecular basis of human pathology in animals is of the utmost importance for future advances in all fields of human medicine. Moreover, the possibility of developing new imaging techniques or of implementing old ones adapted to the clinic is a significant area. Cardiology, neurology, immunology and oncology have all been studied with preclinical molecular imaging. The functional techniques of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in association with each other or with the anatomic reference provided by computed tomography (CT) as well as with anatomic and functional information provided by magnetic resonance (MR) have all been proficiently applied to animal models of human disease. All the above-mentioned imaging techniques have shown their ability to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in animal models of disease. The clinical translatability of most of the techniques motivates the ongoing study of their possible fields of application. The ability to combine two or more techniques allows obtaining as much information as possible on the molecular processes involved in pathologies, reducing the number of animals necessary in each experiment. Merging molecular probes compatible with various imaging technique will further expand the capability to achieve the best results.

  18. Molecular imaging with terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Jae; Choi, Jihye; Maeng, Inhee; Park, Jae Yeon; Lee, Kwangyeol; Huh, Yong-Min; Suh, Jin-Suck; Haam, Seungjoo; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2011-02-28

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive THz molecular imaging (TMI) technique involving differential modulation of surface plasmons induced on nanoparticles and obtain target specific in vivo images of cancers. This technique can detect quantities of gold nanoparticles as small as 15 µM in vivo. A comparison of TMI images with near infrared absorption images shows the superior sensitivity of TMI. Furthermore, the quantification property of TMI is excellent, being linearly proportional to the concentration of nanoparticles. The target specificity issue is also addressed at the ex vivo and cell levels. The high thermal sensitivity of TMI can help extend photonic-based photothermal molecular imaging researches from the in vitro level to the in vivo level. The TMI technique can be used for monitoring drug delivery processes and for early cancer diagnosis.

  19. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jie (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Intelligent Medical Research Center

    2013-07-01

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  20. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Mark H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  1. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  2. Molecular Imaging of the Kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Zsolt; Alachkar, Nada; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B.; Rabb, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging of the kidneys with gamma cameras involves the use of labeled molecules seeking functionally critical molecular mechanisms in order to detect the pathophysiology of the diseased kidneys and achieve an early, sensitive and accurate diagnosis. The most recent imaging technology, PET, permits quantitative imaging of the kidney at a spatial resolution appropriate for the organ. H215O, 82RbCl, and [64Cu] ETS are the most important radiopharmaceuticals for measuring renal blood flow. The renin angiotensin system is the most important regulator of renal blood flow; this role is being interrogated by detecting angiotensin receptor subtype AT1R using in vivo PET imaging. Membrane organic anion transporters are important for the function of the tubular epithelium; therefore, Tc-99m MAG3 as well as some novel radiopharmaceuticals such as copper-64 labeled mono oxo-tetraazamacrocyclic ligands have been utilized for molecular renal imaging. Additionally, other radioligands that interact with the organic cation transporters or peptide transporters have developed. Focusing on early detection of kidney injury at the molecular level is an evolving field of great significance. Potential imaging targets are the kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1) that is highly expressed in kidney injury and renal cancer but not in normal kidneys. While pelvic clearance, in addition to parenchymal transport, is an important measure in obstructive nephropathy, techniques that focus on upregulated molecules in response to tissue stress resulted from obstruction will be of great implication. Monocyte chemoattractant protein -1 (MCP-1) is a well-suited molecule in this case. The greatest advances in molecular imaging of the kidneys have been recently achieved in detecting renal cancer. In addition to the ubiquitous [18F]FDG, other radioligands such as [11C]acetate and anti-[18F]FACBC have emerged. Radioimmuno-imaging with [124I]G250 could lead to radioimmunotherapy for renal cancer

  3. Molecular Imaging of Pituitary Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-01-01

    The presence of large numbers and/or the high affinity of dopamine D2 and/or somatostatin receptors on pituitary adenomas may enable their visualization with radionuclide-coupled receptor agonists or antagonists. However, the role of these imaging modalities in the differential diagnosis of or therapeutic purposes for pituitary lesions is very limited. Only in very specific cases might these molecular imaging techniques become helpful. These include the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions, ectopic production of pituitary hormones, such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone, growth hormone (GH) or their releasing hormones (corticotropin-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone), and the localization of metastases from pituitary carcinomas.

  4. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Habib

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT and functional or metabolic (PET information provided in a "one-stop shop" and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed.

  5. Sparse image reconstruction for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Michael; Hero, Alfred O

    2008-01-01

    The application that motivates this paper is molecular imaging at the atomic level. When discretized at sub-atomic distances, the volume is inherently sparse. Noiseless measurements from an imaging technology can be modeled by convolution of the image with the system point spread function (psf). Such is the case with magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), an emerging technology where imaging of an individual tobacco mosaic virus was recently demonstrated with nanometer resolution. We also consider additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) in the measurements. Many prior works of sparse estimators have focused on the case when H has low coherence; however, the system matrix H in our application is the convolution matrix for the system psf. A typical convolution matrix has high coherence. The paper therefore does not assume a low coherence H. A discrete-continuous form of the Laplacian and atom at zero (LAZE) p.d.f. used by Johnstone and Silverman is formulated, and two sparse estimators derived by maximizing t...

  6. Molecular imaging: current status and emerging strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pysz, M.A. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gambhir, S.S. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departments of Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Willmann, J.K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.ed [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use positron-emission tomography (PET) or single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research, novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multi-modality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound (US) with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and US imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies as they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and US techniques involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with US. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation, such as endoscopes and microcatheters, suggest that these molecular imaging methods have numerous potential clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future.

  7. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  8. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  9. Principle and applications of terahertz molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2013-05-31

    The principle, characteristics and applications of molecular imaging with terahertz electromagnetic waves are reviewed herein. The terahertz molecular imaging (TMI) technique uses nanoparticle probes to achieve dramatically enhanced sensitivity compared with that of conventional terahertz imaging. Surface plasmons, induced around the nanoparticles, raise the temperature of water in biological cells, and the temperature-dependent changes in the optical properties of water, which are large in the terahertz range, are measured differentially by terahertz waves. TMI has been applied to cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug delivery imaging. The technique is also compared with magnetic resonance imaging by using a dual-modality nanoparticle probe.

  10. Advanced imaging of colorectal cancer: From anatomy to molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    García-Figueiras, Roberto; Baleato-González, Sandra; Padhani, Anwar R.; Marhuenda, Ana; Luna, Antonio; Alcalá, Lidia; Carballo-Castro, Ana; Álvarez-Castro, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Imaging techniques play a key role in the management of patients with colorectal cancer. The introduction of new advanced anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging techniques may improve the assessment of diagnosis, prognosis, planning therapy, and assessment of response to treatment of these patients. Functional and molecular imaging techniques in clinical practice may allow the assessment of tumour-specific characteristics and tumour heterogeneity. This paper will review recent...

  11. Acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed.

  12. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  13. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  14. Acoustic and Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed. PMID:24187042

  15. Molecular imaging of movement disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karlo J Lizarraga; Alessandra Gorgulho; Wei Chen; Antonio A De Salles

    2016-01-01

    -to-rostral direction. Uptake declines prior to symptom presentation and progresses from contralateral to the most symptomatic side to bilateral, correlating with symptom severity. In progressive supranuclear palsy(PSP) and multiple system atrophy(MSA), striatal activity is symmetrically and diffusely decreased. The caudal-to-rostral pattern is lost in PSP, but could be present in MSA. In corticobasal degeneration(CBD), there is asymmetric, diffuse reduction of striatal activity, contralateral to the most symptomatic side. Additionally, there is hypometabolism in contralateral parietooccipital and frontal cortices in PD; bilateral putamen and cerebellum in MSA; caudate, thalamus, midbrain, mesial frontal and prefrontal cortices in PSP; and contralateral cortices in CBD. Finally, cardiac sympathetic SPECT signal is decreased in PD. The capacity of molecular imaging to provide in vivo time courses of gene expression, protein synthesis, receptor and transporter binding, could facilitate the development and evaluation of novel medical, surgical and genetic therapies in movement disorders.

  16. Oncological image analysis: medical and molecular image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael

    2007-03-01

    This paper summarises the work we have been doing on joint projects with GE Healthcare on colorectal and liver cancer, and with Siemens Molecular Imaging on dynamic PET. First, we recall the salient facts about cancer and oncological image analysis. Then we introduce some of the work that we have done on analysing clinical MRI images of colorectal and liver cancer, specifically the detection of lymph nodes and segmentation of the circumferential resection margin. In the second part of the paper, we shift attention to the complementary aspect of molecular image analysis, illustrating our approach with some recent work on: tumour acidosis, tumour hypoxia, and multiply drug resistant tumours.

  17. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  18. Microbubbles for Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Skachkov (Ilya)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn my thesis, microbubbles (MBs) for ultrasound (US) imaging, ultrasound molecular imaging, and drug delivery were studied. Microbubbles are gas-encapsulated lipid or polymer shell coated micro-particles, widely used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). MBs oscillate in response to t

  19. Molecular Imaging of Autoimmune Diseases and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anna Sargsyan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging methods allow the noninvasive detection and localization of specific molecules. Agents that report on molecular disease biomarkers can be used to diagnose and monitor disease. Many inflammatory diseases have molecular signatures within altered tissues. Although tissue biopsy is still the gold standard for detecting these signatures, several molecular imaging markers have been developed. Pharmacologic agents that block specific immune molecules have recently entered the clinic, and these drugs have already transformed the way we care for patients with immune-mediated diseases. The use of immunomodulatory drugs is usually guided by clinical assessment of the patient's response. Unfortunately, clinical assessment may miss the signs of inflammation, and many of the serologic markers of immune-mediated diseases correlate poorly with the underlying inflammatory activity within target tissues. Molecular imaging methods have the potential to improve our ability to detect and characterize tissue inflammation. We discuss some of the molecular signatures of immune activation and review molecular imaging methods that have been developed to detect active tissue inflammation.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Urogenital Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Steve Y.; Szabo, Zsolt; Morgan, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    There is an expanding and exciting repertoire of PET imaging radiotracers for urogenital diseases, particularly in prostate cancer, renal cell cancer, and renal function. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. With growing therapeutics options for the treatment of metastatic and advanced prostate cancer, improved functional imaging of prostate cancer beyond the limitations of conventional computed tomography (CT) and bone scan (BS) is becoming increasingly important for both clinical management and drug development. PET radiotracers beyond 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for prostate cancer include 18F-Sodium Fluoride, 11C-Choline and 18F-Fluorocholine and 11C-Acetate. Other emerging and promising PET radiotracers include a synthetic L-leucine amino acid analog (anti-18F-FACBC), dihydrotestosterone analog (18F-FDHT) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) based PET radiotracers (ex. 18F-DCFBC, 89Zr-DFO-J591, 68Ga(HBED-CC)). Larger prospective and comparison trials of these PET radiotracers are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer. Renal cell cancer imaging with FDG PET/CT although available can be limited, especially for detection of the primary tumor. Improved renal cell cancer detection with carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) based antibody (124I-girentuximab) and radioimmunotherapy targeting with 177Lu-cG250 appear promising. Evaluation of renal injury by imaging renal perfusion and function with novel PET radiotracers include p-18F-fluorohippurate (18F-PFH) and hippurate m-cyano-p-18F-fluorohippurate (18F-CNPFH) and Rubidium-82 chloride (typically used for myocardial perfusion imaging). Renal receptor imaging of the renal renin angiotensin system with a variety of selective PET radioligands are also becoming available for clinical translation. PMID:24484747

  1. Molecular and Functional Imaging of Internet Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA, which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  2. Molecular and functional imaging of internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqi; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA), which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  3. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  4. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  5. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in translational medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Costanzo, Pierluigi; Marciano, Caterina; Vassallo, Enrico; Marsico, Fabio; Ruggiero, Donatella; Petretta, Maria Piera; Chiariello, Massimo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Mount Sinai Medical Center, Z. and M.A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and M.-J. and H.R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, New York, NY (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Functional characterization of atherosclerosis is a promising application of molecular imaging. Radionuclide-based techniques for molecular imaging in the large arteries (e.g. aorta and carotids), along with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have been studied both experimentally and in clinical studies. Technical factors including cardiac and respiratory motion, low spatial resolution and partial volume effects mean that noninvasive molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries is not ready for prime time. Positron emission tomography imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose can measure vascular inflammation in the large arteries with high reproducibility, and signal change in response to anti-inflammatory therapy has been described. MRI has proven of value for quantifying carotid artery inflammation when iron oxide nanoparticles are used as a contrast agent. Macrophage accumulation of the iron particles allows regression of inflammation to be measured with drug therapy. Similarly, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is also being evaluated for functional characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. For all of these techniques, however, large-scale clinical trials are mandatory to define the prognostic importance of the imaging signals in terms of risk of future vascular events. (orig.)

  6. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  7. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  8. Radiogenomic imaging-linking diagnostic imaging and molecular diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathias; Goyen

    2014-01-01

    Radiogenomic imaging refers to the correlation between cancer imaging features and gene expression and is one of the most promising areas within science and medicine. High-throughput biological techniques have reshaped the perspective of biomedical research allowing for fast and efficient assessment of the entire molecular topography of a cell’s physiology providing new insights into human cancers. The use of non-invasive imaging tools for gene expression profiling of solid tumors could serve as a means for linking specific imaging features with specific gene expression patterns thereby allowing for more accurate diagnosis and prognosis and obviating the need for high-risk invasive biopsy procedures. This review focuses on the medical imaging part as one of the main drivers for the development of radiogenomic imaging.

  9. NAOMI: nanoparticle assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Graf, Christina; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2006-02-01

    Our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using OCT as the imaging modality are presented. We derive an expression to estimate the sensitivity of this technique. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with suitable dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. This report presents preliminary results of our investigation on the use of nanoshells to serve as contrast agents We injected nanoshells with specific contrast features in the 800 nm wavelength region in excised porcine eyes. The nanoshells showed up as bright reflecting structures in the OCT images, which confirm their potential as contrast agents.

  10. Towards molecular imaging by means of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norek, M.

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in the thesis is focused on the design of highly efficient contrast agents for molecular imaging by means of MRI based on the detailed physical characterization of the given material. Specifically, attention is paid on the development of contrast agents for magnetic fields higher

  11. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  12. Imaging molecular structure with photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll, Rebecca

    2014-07-02

    The possibility to study the structure of polyatomic gas-phase molecules by photoelectron diffraction is investigated with the goal of developing a method capable of imaging ultrafast photochemical reactions with femtosecond temporal and sub-Angstroem spatial resolution. The fluorine 1s-level of adiabatically laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 5}F) molecules was ionized by X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source Free-Electron Laser, and the angular distributions of photoelectrons with kinetic energies between 30 and 60 eV were recorded by velocity map imaging. Comparison with density functional theory calculations allows relating the measured distributions to the molecular structure. The results of an IR-pump, X-ray-probe experiment on aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}Br{sub 2})molecules are presented to explore the potential of photoelectron diffraction for time-resolved imaging. The influence of the alignment laser pulse on the pumping and probing step is discussed. Laser-alignment is contrasted with determination of the molecular orientation by photoelectron-photoion coincidences for an exemplary data set on 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene molecules recorded at the PETRA III synchrotron. Both methods are evaluated with respect to their applicability to record time-dependent snapshots of molecular structure. The results obtained in this work indicate possible future avenues for investigating ultrafast molecular dynamics using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers.

  13. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  14. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  15. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy of self-assembled monolayers of molecular switches on noble metal surfaces; Photoelektronenspektroskopie selbstorganisierter Adsorbatschichten aus molekularen Schaltern auf Edelmetalloberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Nils

    2012-09-12

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of butanethiolate (C4) on single crystalline Au(111) surfaces were prepared by adsorption from solution. The thermally activated desorption behaviour of the C4 molecules from the gold substrate was examined by qualitative thermal desorption measurements (TDM), through this a desorption temperature T{sub Des}=473 K could be determined. With this knowledge, it was possible to produce samples of very good surface quality, by thermal treatment T{sub Sample}image potential states. The reversible photo- and thermally activated isomerization of the molecular switch 3-(4-(4-Hexyl-phenylazo)-phenoxy)-propane-1-thiol (ABT), deposited by self-assembly from solution on Au(111), was examined using laser-based photoelectron spectroscopy. Differences in the molecular dipole moment characteristic for the trans and the cis isomer of ABT were observed via changes in the sample work function, accessible by detection of the threshold energy for photoemission. A quantitative

  17. Molecular orbital imaging for partially aligned molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    We investigate molecular orbital reconstruction using high-order harmonic emissions from partially aligned molecular ensembles. By carrying out the reconstruction procedure using the harmonic sampling with or without the spectral minimum, the roles of the harmonic phase and amplitude modulation due to the partial alignment can be separately studied. It is found that with the prior knowledge of the orbital symmetry, the reconstructed result is very sensitive to the modulation of the harmonic phase for the πg orbital, while in the case of σg orbital, the reconstructed result is mainly determined by the harmonic amplitude. These results can provide an important reference for the future experiment of molecular orbital imaging.

  18. Molecular Imaging in Synthetic Biology, and Synthetic Biology in Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Assaf A; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-02-17

    Biomedical synthetic biology is an emerging field in which cells are engineered at the genetic level to carry out novel functions with relevance to biomedical and industrial applications. This approach promises new treatments, imaging tools, and diagnostics for diseases ranging from gastrointestinal inflammatory syndromes to cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. As these cellular technologies undergo pre-clinical and clinical development, it is becoming essential to monitor their location and function in vivo, necessitating appropriate molecular imaging strategies, and therefore, we have created an interest group within the World Molecular Imaging Society focusing on synthetic biology and reporter gene technologies. Here, we highlight recent advances in biomedical synthetic biology, including bacterial therapy, immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. We then discuss emerging molecular imaging approaches to facilitate in vivo applications, focusing on reporter genes for noninvasive modalities such as magnetic resonance, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, bioluminescence, and radionuclear imaging. Because reporter genes can be incorporated directly into engineered genetic circuits, they are particularly well suited to imaging synthetic biological constructs, and developing them provides opportunities for creative molecular and genetic engineering.

  19. Molecular Imaging with Activatable Reporter Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a newly emerged multiple disciplinary field that aims to visualize, characterize and quantitatively measure biological processes at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems. A reporter gene is a piece of DNA encoding reporter protein, which presents as a readily measurable phenotype that can be distinguished easily from the background of endogenous protein. After being transferred into cells of organ systems (transgenes, the reporter gene can be utilized to visualize transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, or trafficking of proteins or cells in living subjects. Herein, we review previous classification of reporter genes and regroup the reporter gene based imaging as basic, inducible and activatable, based on the regulation of reporter gene transcription and post-translational modification of reporter proteins. We then focus on activatable reporters, in which the signal can be activated at the posttranslational level for visualizing protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylation or tertiary structure changes. The applications of several types of activatable reporters will also be summarized. We conclude that activatable reporter imaging can benefit both basic biomedical research and drug development.

  20. Radiolabeled nanogels for nuclear molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Smriti; Bingöl, Bahar; Morgenroth, Agnieszka; Mottaghy, Felix M; Möller, Martin; Schmaljohann, Jörn

    2013-04-12

    An efficient and simple synthesis approach to form stable (68) Ga-labeled nanogels is reported and their fundamental properties investigated. Nanogels are obtained by self-assembly of amphiphilic statistical prepolymers derivatised with chelating groups for radiometals. The resulting nanogels exhibit a well-defined spherical shape with a diameter of 290 ± 50 nm. The radionuclide (68) Ga is chelated in high radiochemical yields in an aqueous medium at room temperature. The phagocytosis assay demonstrates a highly increased internalization of nanogels by activated macrophages. Access to these (68) Ga-nanogels will allow the investigation of general behavior and clearance pathways of nanogels in vivo by nuclear molecular imaging.

  1. Molecular imaging and sensing using plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew James

    Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties that are beneficial to a variety of applications, including molecular imaging. The large scattering cross sections of nanoparticles provide high contrast necessary for biomarkers. Unlike alternative contrast agents, nanoparticles provide refractive index sensitivity revealing information regarding the local cellular environment. Altering the shape and composition of the nanoparticle shifts the peak resonant wavelength of scattered light, allowing for implementation of multiple spectrally distinct tags. In this project, nanoparticles that scatter in different spectral windows are functionalized with various antibodies recognizing extra-cellular receptors integral to cancer progression. A hyperspectral imaging system is developed, allowing for visualization and spectral characterization of cells labeled with these conjugates. Various molecular imaging and microspectroscopy applications of plasmonic nanoparticles are then investigated. First, anti-EGFR gold nanospheres are shown to quantitatively measure receptor expression with similar performance to fluorescence assays. Second, anti-EGFR gold nanorods and novel anti-IGF-1R silver nanospheres are implemented to indicate local cellular refractive indices. Third, because biosensing capabilities of nanoparticle tags may be limited by plasmonic coupling, polarization mapping is investigated as a method to discern these effects. Fourth, plasmonic coupling is tested to monitor HER-2 dimerization. Experiments reveal the interparticle conformation of proximal HER-2 bound labels, required for plasmonic coupling-enhanced dielectric sensing. Fifth, all three functionalized plasmonic tags are implemented simultaneously to indicate clinically relevant cell immunophenotype information and changes in the cellular dielectric environment. Finally, flow cytometry experiments are conducted utilizing the anti-EGFR nanorod tag to demonstrate profiling of receptor expression

  2. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  3. Erosionsrinnen auf dem Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Reiß, Dennis Emil

    2010-01-01

    The work presented here analyses gullies on Mars using high resolution images (Mars Orbiter Camera – MOC) of the Mars Global Surveyor Mission (MGS). Gullies on Earth are formed by debris flows, a mass movement in which water is involved. It is assumed that gully features on Mars are young and therefore they could indicate the presence of liquid water in the recent past. The main focus of this work lies in a morphological analysis, a global mapping of their distribution and a determination of ...

  4. Mit der Technik auf du

    OpenAIRE

    Gleitsmann, Rolf-Jürgen; Kunze, Rolf-Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Im Vordergrund auch dieses dritten Bandes mit Technikessays steht die Bildinterpretation und die Erschließung von Bildquellen für die kontextualisierende, sozialkonstruktivistische Kulturgeschichte der Technik, die bislang noch wenig oder gar nicht Gegenstand historischer Betrachtung waren: u. a. der Graphiken von Carl G. Evers aus den 1950er Jahren, amerikanischer und deutscher Modellbahnzeitschriften, von Industriewerbung und einem Verkehrsbilderbuch. Zeitlich liegt der Schwerpunkt auf der ...

  5. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  6. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, N. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Needles, A. [Visualsonics, Toronto (Canada); Willmann, J.K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.ed [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic.

  7. Translational research of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Ma, X; Tian, J

    2013-12-01

    In the medical imaging field, molecular imaging is a rapidly developing discipline and forms many imaging modalities, providing us effective tools to visualize, characterize, and measure molecular and cellular mechanisms in complex biological processes of living organisms, which can deepen our understanding of biology and accelerate preclinical research including cancer study and medicine discovery. Among many molecular imaging modalities, although the penetration depth of optical imaging and the approved optical probes used for clinics are limited, it has evolved considerably and has seen spectacular advances in basic biomedical research and new drug development. With the completion of human genome sequencing and the emergence of personalized medicine, the specific drug should be matched to not only the right disease but also to the right person, and optical molecular imaging should serve as a strong adjunct to develop personalized medicine by finding the optimal drug based on an individual's proteome and genome. In this process, the computational methodology and imaging system as well as the biomedical application regarding optical molecular imaging will play a crucial role. This review will focus on recent typical translational studies of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future development of optical molecular imaging are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the review is then concluded.

  8. Molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with stem cells holds tremendous therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Over the last decade, molecular imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted cells and assessing the therapeutic efficacy. This current review summarizes the role and capabilities of different molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. We discuss current challenges and perspectives of these techniques and encompass updated information such as theranostic imaging and optogenetics in stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Click reaction: An applicable radiolabeling method for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Byung Chul [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, the click reaction has found rapidly growing applications in the field of radiochemistry, ranging from a practical labeling method to molecular imaging of biomacromolecules. This present review details the development of highly reliable, powerful and selective click chemistry reactions for the rapid synthesis of new radiotracers for molecular imaging.

  10. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Beylergil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several molecular imaging modalities have been evaluated in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare and aggressive tumor with a high tendency to metastasize. Continuous progress in the field of molecular imaging might improve management in these patients. The authors review the current modalities and their impact on MCC in this brief review article.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: A Concise Synopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and continues to be a major public health problem. Imaging of prostate cancer remains particularly challenging owing to disease heterogeneity. Molecular imaging can provide unprecedented opportunities for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the development and natural progression of prostate cancer from a localized process to the hormone-refractory metastatic disease. Such understanding will be the key for targeted imaging and therapy and for predicting and evaluating treatment response and prognosis. In this article, we review briefly the contribution of multimodality molecular imaging methods for the in vivo characterization of the pathophysiology of prostate cancer.

  12. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Osamu F; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene th...

  13. Molecular imaging in Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Anders; Schaadt, Bente K; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Bruun, Niels E

    2015-04-01

    We present a 54-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), fever, pericardial effusion and a mitral valve vegetation. (18)F-Fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) showed very high accumulation of the isotope at the mitral valve. The patient underwent cardiothoracic surgery and pathologic examinations showed characteristic morphology of Libman-Sacks vegetations. All microbiological examinations including blood cultures, microscopy, culture and 16s PCR of the valve were negative and the diagnosis of Libman-Sacks endocarditis was convincing. It is difficult to distinguish Libman-Sacks endocarditis from culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular imaging techniques are being used increasingly in cases of suspected IE but no studies have previously reported the use in patients with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In the present case, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT clearly demonstrated the increased glucose uptake caused by infiltrating white blood cells in the ongoing inflammatory process at the mitral valve. In conclusion, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT cannot be used to distinguish between IE and non-infective Libman-Sacks vegetations.

  14. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  15. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  16. Nanomedicine: Perspective and promises with ligand-directed molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Dipanjan [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States)], E-mail: dipanjan@wustl.edu; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA (United States)], E-mail: scaruthers@cmrl.wustl.edu

    2009-05-15

    Molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery play an important role toward personalized medicine, which is the future of patient management. Of late, nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary area, which shows promises to understand the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The unprecedented potential of nanoplatforms for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases, have found application in every biomedical imaging modality. Biological and biophysical barriers are overcome by the integration of targeting ligands, imaging agents and therapeutics into the nanoplatform which allow for theranostic applications. In this article, we have discussed the opportunities and potential of targeted molecular imaging with various modalities putting a particular emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion-based platform technology.

  17. Inversion of Strong Field Photoelectron Spectra for Molecular Orbital Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R; Peters, M; Nguyen-Dang, T T; Atabek, O; Charron, E

    2016-01-01

    Imaging structures at the molecular level is a fast developing interdisciplinary research field that spans across the boundaries of physics and chemistry. High spatial resolution images of molecules can be obtained with photons or ultrafast electrons. In addition, images of valence molecular orbitals can be extracted via tomographic techniques based on the coherent XUV radiation emitted by a molecular gas exposed to an intense ultra-short infrared laser pulse. In this paper, we demonstrate that similar information can be obtained by inverting energy resolved photoelectron spectra using a simplified analytical model.

  18. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Our objective is to develop an arsenic- based radiopharmaceutical platform for IGF1R-targeted imaging and therapy of PCa. The hypothesis is that...arsenic- based , IGF1R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals can allow for PET imaging, IRT, and monitoring the therapeutic response of PCa. Specific Aims: Aim 1: To...models with PET imaging. Aim 3: To monitor the efficacy of 76As- based IRT of PCa with multimodality imaging.

  19. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Boerman, O.C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life th

  20. Agents described in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database for imaging carbonic anhydrase IX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is selectively expressed in a range of hypoxic tumours and is a validated endogenous hypoxia marker with prognostic significance; hence, CA IX is of great interest as a molecular imaging target in oncology. In this review, we present an overview of the different imaging agents and imaging modalities that have been applied for the in vivo detection of CA IX. The imaging agents reviewed are all entries in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) and comprise antibody, antibody fragments and small molecule imaging agents. The effectiveness of these agents for imaging CA IX in vivo gave variable performance; however, a number of agents proved very capable. As molecular imaging has become indispensable in current medical practice we anticipate that the clinical significance of CA IX will see continued development and improvements in imaging agents for targeting this enzyme.

  1. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  2. Molecular aspects of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, C

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well known diagnostic tool in radiology that produces unsurpassed images of the human body, in particular of soft tissue. However, the medical community is often not aware that MRI is an important yet limited segment of magnetic resonance (MR) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as this method is called in basic science. The tremendous morphological information of MR images sometimes conceal the fact that MR signals in general contain much more information, especially on processes on the molecular level. NMR is successfully used in physics, chemistry, and biology to explore and characterize chemical reactions, molecular conformations, biochemical pathways, solid state material, and many other applications that elucidate invisible characteristics of matter and tissue. In medical applications, knowledge of the molecular background of MRI and in particular MR spectroscopy (MRS) is an inevitable basis to understand molecular phenomenon leading to macroscopic effects visible in diagnostic images or spectra. This review shall provide the necessary background to comprehend molecular aspects of magnetic resonance applications in medicine. An introduction into the physical basics aims at an understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms without extended mathematical treatment. The MR typical terminology is explained such that reading of original MR publications could be facilitated for non-MR experts. Applications in MRI and MRS are intended to illustrate the consequences of molecular effects on images and spectra.

  3. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...

  4. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  5. Advances of molecular imaging in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Galovic, M.; Koepp, M.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the loc...

  6. Advances of Molecular Imaging in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Galovic, Marian; Koepp, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the loc...

  7. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information.

  8. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm......Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...

  9. Intensitätsverteilung auf der Sonnenscheibe

    OpenAIRE

    Bräuhofer, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Intensitätsverteilung auf der Sonnenscheibe. Strahlungsgleichgewicht in den sichtbaren Fleckschichten. Diagramm. Entstehungszeit um 1935. Quelle: Zeitschrift für Astrophysik, Heft V, S. 318, Abb. 10 Signatur: Astr.-HGD-A-45

  10. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers...... for malignant thyroid lesions, in FTC133 thyroid tumors subcutaneously implanted in nude mice. The imaging agent used to visualize tumors was MMP activatable photoacoustic probe, Alexa750-CXeeeeXPLGLAGrrrrrXK-BHQ3. Cleavage of the MMP activatable agent was imaged after intratumoral and intravenous injections...... With the combination of high spatial resolution and signal specificity, targeted photoacoustic imaging holds great promise as a noninvasive method for early diagnosis of follicular thyroid carcinomas....

  11. Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions for quantitative molecular imaging and targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Megan M; Caruthers, Shelton; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2009-10-01

    A broad array of nanomaterials is available for use as contrast agents for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Due to the lack of endogenous background signal in vivo and the high NMR sensitivity of the (19)F atom, liquid perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions make ideal agents for cellular and magnetic resonance molecular imaging. The perfluorocarbon core material is surrounded by a lipid monolayer which can be functionalized with a variety of agents including targeting ligands, imaging agents and drugs either individually or in combination. Multiple copies of targeting ligands (approximately 20-40 monoclonal antibodies or 200-400 small molecule ligands) serve to enhance avidity through multivalent interactions while the composition of the particle's perfluorocarbon core results in high local concentrations of (19)F. Additionally, lipophilic drugs contained within molecularly targeted nanoemulsions can result in contact facilitated drug delivery to target cells. Ultimately, the dual use of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for both site targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging may provide both imaging of disease states as well as conclusive evidence that drug delivery is localized to the area of interest. This review will focus on liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticles as (19)F molecular imaging agents and for targeted drug delivery in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  12. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  13. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life than those used for PET. In addition, SPECT is a less expensive technique than PET. Commonly used gamma emitters are: {sup 99m}Tc (E{sub max} 141 keV, T{sub 1/2} 6.02 h), {sup 123}I (E{sub max} 529 keV, T{sub 1/2} 13.0 h) and {sup 111}In (E{sub max} 245 keV, T{sub 1/2} 67.2 h). Compared to clinical SPECT, PET has a higher spatial resolution and the possibility to more accurately estimate the in vivo concentration of a tracer. In preclinical imaging, the situation is quite different. The resolution of microSPECT cameras (<0.5 mm) is higher than that of microPET cameras (>1.5 mm). In this report, studies on new radiolabelled tracers for SPECT imaging of angiogenesis in tumours are reviewed. (orig.)

  14. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  15. Advances of Molecular Imaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovic, Marian; Koepp, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the location of the epileptic focus. PET studies have examined the role of opioids, cannabinoids, acetylcholine, and dopamine in modulating neuronal hyperexcitability and seizure termination. In vivo analyses of drug transporters, e.g., P-glycoprotein, have increased our understanding of pharmacoresistance that could inform new therapeutic strategies. Finally, PET experiments targeting neuroinflammation and glutamate receptors might guide the development of novel biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  16. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Put, Stéphanie; Westhovens, René; Lahoutte, Tony; Matthys, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ₃ integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein.

  17. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven (United States). Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis.

  18. Direct Imaging of Laser-driven Ultrafast Molecular Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuse, Kenta; Fujimoto, Romu; Mizutani, Nobuo; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-04

    We present a method for visualizing laser-induced, ultrafast molecular rotational wave packet dynamics. We have developed a new 2-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging setup in which a hitherto-impractical camera angle is realized. In our imaging technique, diatomic molecules are irradiated with a circularly polarized strong laser pulse. The ejected atomic ions are accelerated perpendicularly to the laser propagation. The ions lying in the laser polarization plane are selected through the use of a mechanical slit and imaged with a high-throughput, 2-dimensional detector installed parallel to the polarization plane. Because a circularly polarized (isotropic) Coulomb exploding pulse is used, the observed angular distribution of the ejected ions directly corresponds to the squared rotational wave function at the time of the pulse irradiation. To create a real-time movie of molecular rotation, the present imaging technique is combined with a femtosecond pump-probe optical setup in which the pump pulses create unidirectionally rotating molecular ensembles. Due to the high image throughput of our detection system, the pump-probe experimental condition can be easily optimized by monitoring a real-time snapshot. As a result, the quality of the observed movie is sufficiently high for visualizing the detailed wave nature of motion. We also note that the present technique can be implemented in existing standard ion imaging setups, offering a new camera angle or viewpoint for the molecular systems without the need for extensive modification.

  19. Emerging applications of conjugated polymers in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junwei; Liu, Jie; Wei, Chen-Wei; Liu, Bin; O'Donnell, Matthew; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-10-28

    In recent years, conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention from the imaging community as a new class of contrast agent due to their intriguing structural, chemical, and optical properties. Their size and emission wavelength tunability, brightness, photostability, and low toxicity have been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro sensing and cellular imaging applications, and have just begun to show impact in in vivo settings. In this Perspective, we summarize recent advances in engineering conjugated polymers as imaging contrast agents, their emerging applications in molecular imaging (referred to as in vivo uses in this paper), as well as our perspectives on future research.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  1. Molecular imaging probes spy on the body's inner workings: miniaturized microscopes, microbubbles, 7- and 15-T scanners, diffusion-tensor MRI, and other molecular-imaging technologies are pushing molecular imaging into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is one of the hot-button areas within medical imaging. This technology employs imaging techniques in concert with molecular probes, or biomarkers, that together noninvasively spy on cellular function and molecular processes. In some cases, this technology may be able to detect the very earliest stages of diseases and eliminate them on the spot. This paper discusses how miniaturized microscopes, microbubbles, 7T and 15T scanners, diffusion-tensor MRI and other molecular imaging technologies are pushing molecular imaging into the future.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  3. Molecular imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A., E-mail: k.a.miles@bsms.ac.u [Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a quantitative technique that employs rapid sequences of CT images after bolus administration of intravenous contrast material to measure a range of physiological processes related to the microvasculature of tissues. By combining knowledge of the molecular processes underlying changes in vascular physiology with an understanding of the relationship between vascular physiology and CT contrast enhancement, DCE-CT can be redefined as a molecular imaging technique. Some DCE-CT derived parameters reflect tissue hypoxia and can, therefore, provide information about the cellular microenvironment. DCE-CT can also depict physiological processes, such as vasodilatation, that represent the physiological consequences of molecular responses to tissue hypoxia. To date the main applications have been in stroke and oncology. Unlike some other molecular imaging approaches, DCE-CT benefits from wide availability and ease of application along with the use of contrast materials and software packages that have achieved full regulatory approval. Hence, DCE-CT represents a molecular imaging technique that is applicable in clinical practice today.

  4. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Yoel [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases.

  5. MIPortal: A High Capacity Server for Molecular Imaging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha Pivovarov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of novel molecular tools in research and clinical medicine has created a need for more refined information management systems. This article describes the design and implementation of such a new information platform: the Molecular Imaging Portal (MIPortal. The platform was created to organize, archive, and rapidly retrieve large datasets using Web-based browsers as access points. The system has been implemented in a heterogeneous, academic research environment serving Macintosh, Unix, and Microsoft Windows clients and has been shown to be extraordinarily robust and versatile. In addition, it has served as a useful tool for clinical trials and collaborative multi-institutional small-animal imaging research.

  6. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  7. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  8. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare kardiovaskulaere MRT-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botnar, R.M. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Imaging Sciences; St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, H. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Noerenberg, D. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Radiology; and others

    2015-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  9. Simultaneous molecular and anatomical imaging of the mouse in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Meadors, A Ken; Silverman, Robert W; Cherry, Simon R

    2002-12-21

    Non-invasive imaging technologies are opening up new windows into mouse biology. We have developed a mouse imaging system that integrates positron emission tomography (PET) with x-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing simultaneous anatomic and molecular imaging in vivo with the potential for precise registration of the two image volumes. The x-ray system consists of a compact mini-focal x-ray tube and an amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector with a low-noise CMOS readout. The PET system uses planar arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillator coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. We describe the design of this dual-modality imaging system and show, for the first time, simultaneously acquired PET and CT images in a phantom and in mice.

  10. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  11. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Joshi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research.

  12. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  13. Hepatische Effekte von Wachstumshormon auf den Glukosestoffwechsel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufinatscha K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Untherapierter Wachstumshormonmangel im Erwachsenenalter (AGHD ist mit viszeraler Adipositas, Dyslipidämie, Insulinresistenz und Fettleber verbunden. Interessanterweise finden sich viele der AGHD-Merkmale auch bei Patienten mit metabolischem Syndrom. Die nichtalkoholische Fettlebererkrankung (NAFLD gilt als hepatische Manifestation des metabolischen Syndroms. In einigen Studien wurden bei Patienten mit NAFLD verminderte Konzentrationen von zirkulierendem IGF-1, dessen Synthese zu einem großen Teil durch Wachstumshormon (GH reguliert wird, beschrieben. Mäuse, welche eine hepatische Wachstumshormondefizienz aufweisen, zeigen zahlreiche phänotypische Charakteristika des metabolischen Syndroms, unter anderen auch eine Fettlebererkrankung. Dies legt einen Zusammenhang zwischen dem Wachstumshormon und der Entstehung einer NAFLD nahe. Ziel unserer Studie ist es, in einem Zellkulturmodell die Effekte des Wachstumshormons auf den intrazellulären Glukosestoffwechsel näher zu untersuchen. Im Detail sollen Auswirkungen einer verminderten Wachstumshormonrezeptorexpression auf den Insulinsignaltransduktionsweg, den Glykogengehalt und auf Schlüsselenzyme der Glukoneogenese untersucht werden. Präliminäre Daten zeigen, dass eine verminderte Wachstumshormonrezeptorexpression mit intrazellulären Veränderungen des hepatischen Glukosestoffwechsels verbunden ist. Die verminderte Insulinsensitivität könnte auf Alterationen im Insulinsignaltransduktionsweg und Änderungen der Glukoneogenese zurückzuführen sein. Diese präliminären Daten weisen darauf hin, dass Wachstumshormon einen direkten Einfluss auf den Glukosestoffwechsel in der Leber hat. Zudem legen sie nahe, dass Veränderungen im Wachstumshormonstoffwechsel einen wichtigen pathophysiologischen Mechanismus in der Entstehung der Fettlebererkrankung bei Patienten mit metabolischem Syndrom darstellen könnten. Der folgende Artikel soll einen kurzen Überblick über die Effekte von Wachstumshormon

  14. Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors for Radio-Molecular Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of low-noise CMOS image sensors for radio-molecular imaging. The development is described in two directions: firstly, from the technology point of view to reduce the pixel noise level, and secondly from the design point of view to reduce the pixel readout circuit

  15. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  16. Molecular imaging of apoptosis: from micro to macro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Gang; Eden, Henry S; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is involved in numerous human conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemic damage, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer, and is often confused with other types of cell death. Therefore strategies that enable visualized detection of apoptosis would be of enormous benefit in the clinic for diagnosis, patient management, and development of new therapies. In recent years, improved understanding of the apoptotic machinery and progress in imaging modalities have provided opportunities for researchers to formulate microscopic and macroscopic imaging strategies based on well-defined molecular markers and/or physiological features. Correspondingly, a large collection of apoptosis imaging probes and approaches have been documented in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we mainly discuss microscopic imaging assays and macroscopic imaging probes, ranging in complexity from simple attachments of reporter moieties to proteins that interact with apoptotic biomarkers, to rationally designed probes that target biochemical changes. Their clinical translation will also be our focus.

  17. The next few years: nuclear medicine and molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eil, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital Mortimer Street, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    Nuclear medicine in the future will be integrated in best practice in diagnosis, staging and re-staging of disease, treatment monitoring and indeed specific new therapy. Routine multi modality imaging has clearly arrived whilst some image fusion is still required. Intra and inter modality special registration is in progress. The impact of image fusion especially PET/CT on radiotherapy planning will be major. There are major developments in therapy and especially the treatment of lymphoma with new tracers such as yttrium-90 and iodine 131 labelled anti-CD monoclonal antibodies. New registered tracers are impacting. Cancer profiling will be improved with molecular phenotype with biopsy and imaging and organ staging via imaging technology. (N.C.)

  18. Der westliche Blick auf den Orient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Schrupp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Angesichts der aktuellen Debatten über den Islam zeigen Christina von Braun und Bettina Mathes die viele Jahrhunderte alte Interpretationsgeschichte des Orients aus westlicher Perspektive auf. In ihrem materialreichen Band schildern sie die historische und geografische Vielfalt des Phänomens „Islam“ und zeigen, wie westliches Selbstverständnis und Projektionen das Bild des Okzidents vom Orient seit langem und bis heute prägen – auch da, wo man es auf den ersten Blick nicht vermuten würde.

  19. Imaging of Isotopically Enhanced Molecular Targeting Agents Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, J N

    2004-02-19

    The goal of this project is to develop experimental and computational protocols to use SIMS to image the chemical composition of biological samples, focusing on optimizing sample preparation protocols and developing multivariate data analysis methods. Our results on sample preparation, molecular imaging, and multivariate analysis have been presented at several meeting abstracts (UCRL151797ABS, UCRL151797ABSREV1, UCRL151426ABS, UCRL201277, UCRL154757). A refereed paper describing our results for sample preparation and molecular imaging of various endogenous biomolecules as well as the mutagen PhIP has been accepted for publication (UCRL-JC-151797). We are also preparing two additional papers describing our multivariate analysis methods to analyze spectral data. As these papers have not been submitted, their content is included in this final report.

  20. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  1. Pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: insights from molecular and metabolic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Bodini, Benedetta; De Stefano, Nicola; Golay, Xavier; Nicolay, Klaas; Pelletier, Daniel; Pouwels, Petra J W; Smith, Seth A; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Stankoff, Bruno; Yousry, Tarek; Miller, David H

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis induce the changes that underpin relapse-associated and progressive disability. Disease mechanisms can be investigated in preclinical models and patients with multiple sclerosis by molecular and metabolic imaging techniques. Many insights have been gained from such imaging studies: persisting inflammation in the absence of a damaged blood-brain barrier, activated microglia within and beyond lesions, increased mitochondrial activity after acute lesions, raised sodium concentrations in the brain, increased glutamate in acute lesions and normal-appearing white matter, different degrees of demyelination in different patients and lesions, early neuronal damage in grey matter, and early astrocytic proliferation and activation in lesions and white matter. Clinical translation of molecular and metabolic imaging and extension of these techniques will enable the assessment of novel drugs targeted at these disease mechanisms, and have the potential to improve health outcomes through the stratification of patients for treatments.

  2. Embryonic stem cell biology: insights from molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Karim; Wu, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have therapeutic potential in disorders of cellular loss such as myocardial infarction, type I diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. ES cell biology in living subjects was largely poorly understood until incorporation of molecular imaging into the field. Reporter gene imaging works by integrating a reporter gene into ES cells and using a reporter probe to induce a signal detectable by normal imaging modalities. Reporter gene imaging allows for longitudinal tracking of ES cells within the same host for a prolonged period of time. This has advantages over postmortem immunohistochemistry and traditional imaging modalities. The advantages include expression of reporter gene is limited to viable cells, expression is conserved between generations of dividing cells, and expression can be linked to a specific population of cells. These advantages were especially useful in studying a dynamic cell population such as ES cells and proved useful in elucidating the biology of ES cells. Reporter gene imaging identified poor integration of differentiated ES cells transplanted into host tissue as well as delayed donor cell death as reasons for poor long-term survival in vivo. This imaging technology also confirmed that ES cells indeed have immunogenic properties that factor into cell survival and differentiation. Finally, reporter gene imaging improved our understanding of the neoplastic risk of undifferentiated ES cells in forming teratomas. Despite such advances, much remains to be understood about ES cell biology to translate this technology to the bedside, and reporter gene imaging will certainly play a key role in formulating this understanding.

  3. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauwens, Matthias [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Research School NUTRIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Royen, Bart van; Backes, Walter [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University, Research School CARIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to {sup 18}F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 18}F-fluorodopa and {sup 18}F-14(R,S)-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  4. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  5. Engineering imaging probes and molecular machines for nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sheng; Cradick, Thomas J; Ma, Yan; Dai, Zhifei; Bao, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging field that integrates nanotechnology, biomolecular engineering, life sciences and medicine; it is expected to produce major breakthroughs in medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Due to the size-compatibility of nano-scale structures and devices with proteins and nucleic acids, the design, synthesis and application of nanoprobes, nanocarriers and nanomachines provide unprecedented opportunities for achieving a better control of biological processes, and drastic improvements in disease detection, therapy, and prevention. Recent advances in nanomedicine include the development of functional nanoparticle based molecular imaging probes, nano-structured materials as drug/gene carriers for in vivo delivery, and engineered molecular machines for treating single-gene disorders. This review focuses on the development of molecular imaging probes and engineered nucleases for nanomedicine, including quantum dot bioconjugates, quantum dot-fluorescent protein FRET probes, molecular beacons, magnetic and gold nanoparticle based imaging contrast agents, and the design and validation of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) for gene targeting. The challenges in translating nanomedicine approaches to clinical applications are discussed.

  6. Imprints of Molecular Clouds in Radio Continuum Images

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2012-01-01

    We show radio continuum images of several molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy and report the presence of dark features that coincide with dense molecular clouds. Unlike infrared dark clouds, these features which we call "radio dark clouds" are produced by a deficiency in radio continuum emission from molecular clouds that are embedded in a bath of UV radiation field or synchrotron emitting cosmic ray particles. The contribution of the continuum emission along different pathlengths results in dark features that trace embedded molecular clouds. The new technique of identifying cold clouds can place constraints on the depth and the magnetic field of molecular clouds when compared to those of the surrounding hot plasma radiating at radio wavelengths. The study of five molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy, Sgr A, Sgr B2, radio Arc, the snake filament and G359.75-0.13 demonstrate an anti--correlation between the distributions of radio continuum and molecular line and dust emission. Radio dark clouds are iden...

  7. Beobachtungen auf Celebes und Sumatra, briefliche Mittheilung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carthaus, E.

    1899-01-01

    Auf meiner Reise nach der an der Westküste von Celebes gelegenen, in die Strasse von Makassar ausmündenden Palos-Bai machte ich während eines fast dreimonatlichen Aufenthaltes in dem östlich an dieselbe angrenzenden Gelände folgende, gewiss interessante Beobachtung: Obwohl nur einen verhältnissmässi

  8. High field MR imaging: magnetic field interactions of aneurysm clips, coronary artery stents and iliac artery stents with a 3.0 Tesla MR system; Hochfeld-Magnetresonanztomographie: Magnetische Anziehungs- und Rotationskraefte auf metallische Implantate bei 3,0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Schmiedel, A.; Hackenbroch, M.; Hofer, U.; Urbach, H.; Traeber, F.; Schild, H. [Radiologische Univ. Bonn (Germany); Maintz, D. [Radiologische Univ. Muenster (Germany); Pavlidis, C. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Univ. Bonn (Germany); Hoeher, M. [Medizinische Univ. II Ulm (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    der auf sie wirkenden magnetischen Anziehungs- und Rotationskraefte an einem 3,0-Tesla-MRT-System. Methode: Es wurden 53 metallische Implantate (14 intrakranielle Aneurysmaclips, 19 Koronararterien- sowie 20 Iliakalarterienstents) an einem 3,0-Tesla-MRT-System (Gyroscan Intera 3.0 T, Philips) untersucht. Die Bestimmung der auf die Implantate im statischen Magnetfeld wirkenden Translationskraefte F{sub z} erfolgte mithilfe des Fadentests ueber die Messung der Deflektionswinkels {beta}. Die Evaluierung der Rotationskraft F{sub rot} erfolgte qualitativ mit einer 5-Punkte-Graduierung (Grad 0: keine Rotationskraft, Grad 4: starke Rotationskraft). Ergebnisse: Bei 52 von 53 getesteten Implantaten blieb die Translationskraft F{sub z} unterhalb der auf das jeweilige Implantat wirkenden Gravitationskraft ({beta}: 0-21 , F{sub z}: 0-3,8 mN). Bei keinem dieser 52 Implantate wurde eine Rotation relativ zum Magnetfeld B{sub 0} (Rotationskraft Grad 0/4) beobachtet. Bei einem Implantat, einem Iliakalarterienstent aus Edelstahl (Zenith, Fa. Cook), wurde ein Deflektionswinkel {beta} von 88 gemessen, entsprechend einer Translationskraft F{sub z} von 299 mN, die dem 29fachen der auf das Implantat wirkenden Gravitationskraft entspricht. Hierzu konkordant zeigten sich in der qualitativen Evaluierung deutliche auf diesen Stent wirkende Rotationskraefte Grad 4/4. (orig.)

  9. Contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-11-01

    The cellular immune response plays an important role in almost every major form of cardiovascular disease. The ability to image the key aspects of the immune response in the clinical setting could be used to improve diagnostic information, to provide important prognostic or risk information, and to customize therapy according to disease phenotype. Accordingly, targeted imaging probes for assessing inflammation have been developed for essentially all forms of medical imaging. Molecular imaging of inflammation with contrast ultrasound relies on the detection of targeted microbubble or other gas-filled particle contrast agents. These agents are confined to the vascular space and, hence, have been targeted to either activated leucocytes or endothelial cell adhesion molecules that are upregulated in inflammation and mediate leucocyte recruitment and adhesion. This review focuses on the inflammation-targeting strategies for ultrasound contrast agents and how they have been matched to cardiovascular disease states such as myocardial ischaemia, infarction, atherosclerosis, transplant rejection, and arteriogenesis.

  10. Ultrafast Molecular Imaging by Laser Induced Electron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Cornaggia, Christian; Saugout, Sébastien; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2010-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structure of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time-scale using the Laser Induced Electron Diffraction, LIED, technique [T. Zuo \\textit{et al.}, Chem. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{259}, 313 (1996)]. We present numerical results obtained for the CO$_2$ molecule using a single active electron model. The molecular geometry (bond-lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  11. Quantification and confocal imaging of protein specific molecularly imprinted polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, DM; Trache, A; Ellis, EA; Stevenson, D.; Holzenburg, A.; Meininger, GA; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2006-01-01

    We have employed FITC-albumin as the protein template molecule in an aqueous phase molecular imprinted polymer (HydroMIP) strategy. For the first time, the use of a fluorescently labelled template is reported, with subsequent characterisation of the smart material to show that the HydroMIP possess a significant molecular memory in comparison to that of the nonimprinted control polymer (HydroNIP). The imaging of the FITC-albumin imprinted HydroMIP using confocal microscopy is described, with t...

  12. Nuclear molecular imaging with nanoparticles: radiochemistry, applications and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou, D S; Pickett, J E; Thorek, D L J

    2015-10-01

    Molecular imaging provides considerable insight into biological processes for greater understanding of health and disease. Numerous advances in medical physics, chemistry and biology have driven the growth of this field in the past two decades. With exquisite sensitivity, depth of detection and potential for theranostics, radioactive imaging approaches have played a major role in the emergence of molecular imaging. At the same time, developments in materials science, characterization and synthesis have led to explosive progress in the nanoparticle (NP) sciences. NPs are generally defined as particles with a diameter in the nanometre size range. Unique physical, chemical and biological properties arise at this scale, stimulating interest for applications as diverse as energy production and storage, chemical catalysis and electronics. In biomedicine, NPs have generated perhaps the greatest attention. These materials directly interface with life at the subcellular scale of nucleic acids, membranes and proteins. In this review, we will detail the advances made in combining radioactive imaging and NPs. First, we provide an overview of the NP platforms and their properties. This is followed by a look at methods for radiolabelling NPs with gamma-emitting radionuclides for use in single photon emission CT and planar scintigraphy. Next, utilization of positron-emitting radionuclides for positron emission tomography is considered. Finally, recent advances for multimodal nuclear imaging with NPs and efforts for clinical translation and ongoing trials are discussed.

  13. Imaging molecular shapes with molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions from core hole ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, C. S.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate, for a class of molecules containing a single heavy atom, the striking result that molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions resulting from core-level ionization can be used to obtain three-dimensional images of the target molecule at low photoelectron energies. We demonstrate this finding with the results of theoretical calculations on methane, ammonia and water.

  14. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ozawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs, biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  15. Ratiometric Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging for Methylmercury Detection in Living Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Sheng; Ma, Ying; Lin, Jing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Yueqing; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Peng

    2017-02-22

    Photoacoustic molecular imaging is an emerging and promising diagnostic tool for heavy metal ions detection. Methylmercury (MeHg(+) ) is one of the most potent neurotoxins, which damages the brain and nervous system of human beings through fish consumption. The development of a selective and sensitive method for MeHg(+) detection is highly desirable. In this Communication, we develope a chemoselective photoacoustic sensor (LP-hCy7) composed of the liposome (LP) and MeHg(+) -responsive near-infrared (NIR) cyanine dye (hCy7) for MeHg(+) detection within living subjects, such as zebrafish and mouse. The as-prepared LP-hCy7 nanoprobe displays unique dual-shift NIR absorbance peaks and produces a normalized turn-on response after the reaction of MeHg(+) and hCy7 through a mercury-promoted cyclization reaction. The absorbance intensities of LP-hCy7 nanoprobe at 690 and 860 nm are decreased and increased, respectively. The ratiometric photoacoustic signal (PA860/PA690) is noticeably increased in the presence of MeHg(+) . These findings not only provide a ratiometric photoacoustic molecular imaging probe for the detection of metal ions in vivo, but also provides a tool for spectroscopic photoacoustic molecular imaging.

  16. A "liaison dangereuse" between AUF1/hnRNPD and the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawal, Mohamad; Armstrong, Florence; Ollier, Severine; Dupont, Henri; Touriol, Christian; Monsarrat, Bernard; Delsol, Georges; Payrastre, Bernard; Morello, Dominique

    2006-10-15

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) is a chimeric protein expressed in a subset of cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) for which constitutive expression represents a key oncogenic event. The ALK signaling pathway is complex and probably involves functional redundancy between various signaling substrates of ALK. Despite numerous studies on signaling mediators, the molecular mechanisms contributing to the distinct oncogenic features of NPM-ALK remain incompletely understood. The search for additional interacting partners of NPM-ALK led to the discovery of AUF1/hnRNPD, a protein implicated in AU-rich element (ARE)-directed mRNA decay. AUF1 was immunoprecipitated with ALK both in ALCL-derived cells and in NIH3T3 cells stably expressing NPM-ALK or other X-ALK fusion proteins. AUF1 and NPM-ALK were found concentrated in the same cytoplasmic foci, whose formation required NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase activity. AUF1 was phosphorylated by ALK in vitro and was hyperphosphorylated in NPM-ALK-expressing cells. Its hyperphosphorylation was correlated with increased stability of several AUF1 target mRNAs encoding key regulators of cell proliferation and with increased cell survival after transcriptional arrest. Thus, AUF1 could function in a novel pathway mediating the oncogenic effects of NPM-ALK. Our data establish an important link between oncogenic kinases and mRNA turnover, which could constitute a critical aspect of tumorigenesis.

  17. PET-based molecular nuclear neuro-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Ho [Gil Medical Center, Gachon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear neuro-imaging in CNS drug discovery and development can be divided into four categories that are clearly inter-related. (1) Neuroreceptor mapping to examine the involvement of specific neurotransmitter system in CNS diseases, drug occupancy characteristics and perhaps examine mechanisms of action;(2) Structural and spectroscopic imaging to examine morphological changes and their consequences;(3) Metabolic mapping to provide evidence of central activity and CNS fingerprinting the neuroanatomy of drug effects;(4) Functional mapping to examine disease-drug interactions. In addition, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents could be achieved by modifying stem cells to release specific drugs at the site of transplantation('stem cell pharmacology'). Future exploitation of stem cell biology, including enhanced release of therapeutic factors through genetic stem cell engineering might thus constitute promising pharmaceutical approaches to treating diseases of the nervous system. With continued improvements in instrumentation, identification of better imaging probes by innovative chemistry, molecular nuclear neuro-imaging promise to play increasingly important roles in disease diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Advancing Molecular Therapies through In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton McCaffrey

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective development of therapeutics that target the molecular basis of disease is dependent on testing new therapeutic moieties and delivery strategies in animal models of human disease. Accelerating the analyses of these models and improving their predictive value through whole animal imaging methods, which provide data in real time and are sensitive to the subtle changes, are crucial for rapid advancement of these approaches. Modalities based on optics are rapid, sensitive, and accessible methods for in vivo analyses with relatively low instrumentation costs. In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI is one of these optically based imaging methods that enable rapid in vivo analyses of a variety of cellular and molecular events with extreme sensitivity. BLI is based on the use of light-emitting enzymes as internal biological light sources that can be detected externally as biological indicators. BLI has been used to test spatio-temporal expression patterns of both target and therapeutic genes in living laboratory animals where the contextual influences of whole biological systems are preserved. BLI has also been used to analyze gene delivery, immune cell therapies, and the in vivo efficacy of inhibitory RNAs. New tools for BLI are being developed that will offer greater flexibility in detection and analyses. BLI can be used to accelerate the evaluation of experimental therapeutic strategies and whole body imaging offers the opportunity of revealing the effects of novel approaches on key steps in disease processes.

  19. Nuclear Molecular and Theranostic Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sheikh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional nuclear medicine is rapidly being transformed by the evolving concepts in molecular imaging and theranostics. The utility of new approaches in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC diagnostics and therapy has not been fully appreciated. The clinical information, relevant to disease management and patient care, obtained by scintigraphy is still being underestimated. There has been a trend towards moving away from the use of radioactive iodine (RAI imaging in the management of the disease. This paradigm shift is supported by the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines (1. A more systematic and comprehensive understanding of disease pathophysiology and imaging methodologies is needed for optimal utilization of different imaging modalities in the management of DTC. There have been significant developments in radiotracer and imaging technology, clinically proven to contribute to the understanding of tumor biology and the clinical assessment of patients with DTC. The research and development in the field continues to evolve, with expected emergence of many novel diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. The role for nuclear imaging applications will continue to evolve and be reconfigured in the changing paradigm. This article aims to review the clinical uses and controversies surrounding the use of scintigraphy, and the information it can provide in assisting in the management and treatment of DTC.

  20. Photoacoustic molecular imaging for in vivo liver iron quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarinelli, Federica; Carmona, Fernando; Regoni, Maria; Arosio, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    A recent study showed that ferritin is a suitable endogenous contrast agent for photoacoustic molecular imaging in cultured mammalian cells. We have therefore tested whether this imaging technique can be used for in vivo quantification of iron in mouse livers. To verify this hypothesis, we used multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) to image albino CD1 mice before and after experimental iron loading. Postmortem assays showed that the iron treatment caused a 15-fold increase in liver iron and a 40-fold increase in liver ferritin levels, while in vivo longitudinal analysis using MSOT revealed just a 1.6-fold increase in the ferritin/iron photoacoustic signal in the same animals. We conclude that MSOT can monitor changes in ferritin/iron levels in vivo, but its sensitivity is much lower than that of ex vivo iron assays.

  1. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Donati, Olivio F. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. (orig.)

  2. Auf der Suche nach dem Unendlichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, G.; Lillestøl, E.; Sellevåg, I.

    This book is a German translation by C. Ascheron and J. Urbahn, of "The search for infinity: solving the mysteries of the universe", published in 1994. Diese Buch beschreibt anschaulich die Meilensteine, die der Mensch seit der Antike auf der Suche nach dem Unendlichen erreicht und hinter sich gelassen hat. Es enthält Kurzbiographien der wichtigsten Forscher, verständlich geschriebene Texte sowie Erläuterungen der entscheidenen Fachtermini.

  3. An introduction to molecular imaging in radiation oncology: a report by the AAPM Working Group on Molecular Imaging in Radiation Oncology (WGMIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munley, Michael T; Kagadis, George C; McGee, Kiaran P; Kirov, Assen S; Jang, Sunyoung; Mutic, Sasa; Jeraj, Robert; Xing, Lei; Bourland, J Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is the direct or indirect noninvasive monitoring and recording of the spatial and temporal distribution of in vivo molecular, genetic, and/or cellular processes for biochemical, biological, diagnostic, or therapeutic applications. Molecular images that indicate the presence of malignancy can be acquired using optical, ultrasonic, radiologic, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance techniques. For the radiation oncology physicist in particular, these methods and their roles in molecular imaging of oncologic processes are reviewed with respect to their physical bases and imaging characteristics, including signal intensity, spatial scale, and spatial resolution. Relevant molecular terminology is defined as an educational assist. Current and future clinical applications in oncologic diagnosis and treatment are discussed. National initiatives for the development of basic science and clinical molecular imaging techniques and expertise are reviewed, illustrating research opportunities in as well as the importance of this growing field.

  4. Molecular Imaging of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Mancini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by intimal plaques of the arterial vessels that develop slowly and, in some cases, may undergo spontaneous rupture with subsequent heart attack or stroke. Currently, noninvasive diagnostic tools are inadequate to screen atherosclerotic lesions at high risk of acute complications. Therefore, the attention of the scientific community has been focused on the use of molecular imaging for identifying vulnerable plaques. Genetically engineered murine models such as ApoE−/− and ApoE−/−Fbn1C1039G+/− mice have been shown to be useful for testing new probes targeting biomarkers of relevant molecular processes for the characterization of vulnerable plaques, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, P-selectin, and integrins, and for the potential development of translational tools to identify high-risk patients who could benefit from early therapeutic interventions. This review summarizes the main animal models of vulnerable plaques, with an emphasis on genetically altered mice, and the state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging strategies. PMID:27618031

  5. Molecular imaging in traditional Chinese medicine therapy for neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zefeng; Wan, Haitong; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    With the speeding tendency of aging society, human neurological disorders have posed an ever increasing threat to public health care. Human neurological diseases include ischemic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury, which are induced by impairment or specific degeneration of different types of neurons in central nervous system. Currently, there are no more effective treatments against these diseases. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is focused on, which can provide new strategies for the therapy in neurological disorders. TCM, including Chinese herb medicine, acupuncture, and other nonmedication therapies, has its unique therapies in treating neurological diseases. In order to improve the treatment of these disorders by optimizing strategies using TCM and evaluate the therapeutic effects, we have summarized molecular imaging, a new promising technology, to assess noninvasively disease specific in cellular and molecular levels of living models in vivo, that was applied in TCM therapy for neurological diseases. In this review, we mainly focus on applying diverse molecular imaging methodologies in different TCM therapies and monitoring neurological disease, and unveiling the mysteries of TCM.

  6. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Shrout, J. D. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Sweedler, J. V. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Farrand, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  7. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  8. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew; Register, Janna; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  9. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, positron emission tomography (PET, as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT, two-photon photoluminescence (TPL and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  10. Die Wirkung von Alfacalcidol auf den Muskel, das neuromuskuläre System, auf die Sturzgefahr und auf Frakuren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schacht E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Muskelschwäche, neuromuskuläre Defizite, Gleichgewichts- und Gehstörungen sind Manifestationen einer Mobilitätsverschlechterung und erhöhen das Risiko von "intrinsischen" Stürzen. Stürze in höherem Alter brechen Knochen, die Furcht vor Stürzen vermindert das Selbstbewusstsein und körperliche Aktivitäten und dies initiiert einen "Circulus vitiosus". Frakturen werden auch als relevante Folge von Osteoporose angesehen, aber mehr als 90 % der Oberschenkelhalsfrakturen sind sturzbedingt. D-Hormon (1,25[OH]2D; Calcitriol, der aktive Vitamin-D-Metabolit, und sein Rezeptor (VDR spielen eine bedeutende Rolle bei der Muskelentwicklung. Höheres Alter ist signifikant assoziiert mit reduzierter VDR-Expression in menschlichem Skelettmuskelgewebe, genauso wie mit D-Hormon-abhängigen Veränderungen im Muskelfasertyp, Muskelzelldifferenzierung und -metabolismus. Eine positive Korrelation wurde zwischen der femoralen Muskelkraft und -funktion und Serumspiegeln von D-Hormon bei älteren Frauen und Männern gefunden. Diese Wechselwirkung wurde stark unterstützt durch die jüngst gefundene Tatsache, dass höhere D-Hormon-Spiegel im Serum bei älteren Frauen mit niedrigeren Sturzraten korreliert sind. Alle diese Resultate zusammen lassen vermuten, dass die altersassoziierte Zunahme der Stürze teilweise durch einen Abfall der D-Hormon-Spiegel und des VDR erklärbar ist. Eine eingeschränkte Nierenfunktion ist sehr nachteilig für die Aktivierung von D-Hormon und könnte in Zukunft zur Identifizierung von Patienten mit niederer Knochendichte und Muskelleistung, erhöhtem Sturzund Frakturrisiko führen. Die histochemische Klassifizierung basierend auf Muskelbiopsien offenbarte, dass eine sechsmonatige Behandlung mit 1 µg Alfacalcidol täglich die Zahl und den Durchmesser der "Fast Twitch Typ II A"-Fasern erhöht. Bei älteren osteopenischen Frauen war Calcitriol in der Lage, die Abnahme der physischen Performance zu verzögern. Eine signifikante

  11. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demo...

  12. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Contreras, Ricardo; Vaca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore) at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area. PMID:21876785

  13. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area.

  14. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Photoacoustic ...upon request). Aim 2) Prioritize ovarian cancer-associated surface proteins for their utility as molecular photoacoustic imaging targets and

  15. Near-infrared dyes for molecular probes and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patonay, Gabor; Beckford, Garfield; Strekowski, Lucjan; Henary, Maged; Kim, Jun Seok; Crow, Sidney

    2009-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been used both as an analytical tool as molecular probes and in in vitro or in vivo imaging of individual cells and organs. The NIR region (700-1100 nm) is ideal with regard to these applications due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. NIR dyes are also useful in studying binding characteristics of large biomolecules, such as proteins. Throughout these studies, different NIR dyes have been evaluated to determine factors that control binding to biomolecules, including serum albumins. Hydrophobic character of NIR dyes were increased by introducing alkyl and aryl groups, and hydrophilic moieties e.g., polyethylene glycols (PEG) were used to increase aqueous solubility. Recently, our research group introduced bis-cyanines as innovative NIR probes. Depending on their microenvironment, bis-cyanines can exist as an intramolecular dimer with the two cyanines either in a stacked form, or in a linear conformation in which the two subunits do not interact with each other. In this intramolecular H-aggregate, the chromophore has a low extinction coefficient and low fluorescence quantum yield. Upon addition of biomolecules, the H-and D- bands are decreased and the monomeric band is increased, with concomitant increase in fluorescence intensity. Introduction of specific moieties into the NIR dye molecules allows for the development of physiological molecular probes to detect pH, metal ions and other parameters. Examples of these applications include imaging and biomolecule characterizations. Water soluble dyes are expected to be excellent candidates for both in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells and organs.

  16. Macht auf das Tor! - Opens the gate!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudemir de Quadros

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Macht auf das Tor! (Abra o portão foi publicado, possivelmente, na primeira metade do século 20. Editado por Max Dirkschneider, Raimund Heuler e Felix Oberborbeck, apresenta músicas, rimas, piadas, jogos e canções.A edição apresentada nesse espaço é de um livro que pertence à família de Carolina Drebes, estudante do curso de Pedagogia do Centro Universitário Franciscano, Santa Maria/RS.

  17. Arbeit auf dem Höllengrund

    OpenAIRE

    Hayer, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Lars von Triers filmisches Werk erzählt immer wieder von der menschlichen Aneignung der Natur. Wo sich Bilder der Ursprünglichkeit hervortun, sind sie zugleich Teil einer künstlichen und künstlerischen Kulisse. Sei es in DOGVILLE (2003), wo die Gebirgslandschaft um das gleichnamige Dorf lediglich über ein theatralisches Setting imaginierbar wird, oder in MELANCHOLIA (2011), worin die schwermütige Somnambulin Justine (Kirsten Dunst) nachts im Licht des Mondes auf einer Wiese liegt und für den ...

  18. Zum gotischen gen. pl. auf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grošelj

    1964-12-01

    Full Text Available Bekanntlich ist die got. Endung -ē eine Besonderheit, der in den übrigen germ. Sprachen nichts Vergleichbares gegenübersteht. Man nimmt wohl -allgemein an, dass es sich um eine innergot. Neuschöpfung handelt; auch ist eine idg. Endung des Gen. Pl. -ēm; linbelegt. Folgender Erklärungsversuch geht von der Annahme aus, dass die Triebkraft für dfese Neuschöpfupg in der Neigung zur Differenzierung des Maskulinums vom Femininum auf -ō (gibō : dagē zu suchen ist. Diese Neigung ist besonders im Nom. und Gen. bemerkbar.

  19. Blütenvielfalt auf dem Acker

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Früher zierten zahlreiche Blüten die Äcker. Heute sind die Äcker weitgehend blütenarm. Damit fehlt den Blütenbesuchern die Nahrungsquelle und den Landwirten die Blütenbestäuber. Blütenvielfalt bietet darüber hinaus noch viele weitere Vorteile - auch für den Landwirt. Das Merkblatt will Mut machen, wieder mehr Blüten- und Artenvielfalt auf den Acker zu bringen. Es liefert dem Landwirt dazu viele Ideen und Entscheidungshilfen.

  20. Molecular and Ionized Hydrogen in 30 Doradus. I. Imaging Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Sherry C C; Matzner, Christopher D; Pellegrini, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first fully calibrated H$_2$, 1-0 S(1) image of the entire 30 Doradus nebula. The observations were conducted using the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager on the CTIO 4-meter Blanco Telescope. Together with a NEWFIRM Br$\\gamma$ image of 30 Doradus, our data reveal the morphologies of the warm molecular gas and ionized gas in 30 Doradus. The brightest H$_2$-emitting area, which extends from the northeast to the southwest of R136, is a photodissociation region viewed face-on, while many clumps and pillar features located at the outer shells of 30 Doradus are photodissociation regions viewed edge-on. Based on the morphologies of H$_2$, Br$\\gamma$, $^{12}$CO, and 8$\\mu$m emission, the H$_2$ to Br$\\gamma$ line ratio and Cloudy models, we find that the H$_2$ emission is formed inside the photodissociation regions of 30 Doradus, 2 - 3 pc to the ionization front of the HII region, in a relatively low-density environment $<$ 10$^4$ cm$^{-3}$. Comparisons with Br$\\gamma$, 8$\\mu$m, and CO emissi...

  1. Molecular Imaging Of Metabolic Reprogramming In Mutant IDH Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra eViswanath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG. In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an oncometabolite, inhibits key α-KG- dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprogramming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprogramming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH cells and how this reprogramming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  2. A Review of Tumor Specific Imaging Methods: A Glance at the Use of Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oghabian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Conventional imaging modalities of CT, MRI, ultrasound, radionuclide, and even metabolic PET are insensitive to reveal tumor and metastasis of less than few millimeters containing not much fewer than 500,000 cells. At this size, a tu-mor has effectively undergone about 20 cell dou-blings, and is sufficiently stuffed with gene defects and likely to metastasize. New techniques generally known as molecular imaging lead to a patient-specific approach based on physiologic, antigenic, molecular, and genetic disease markers. In this article, Current and the near term trends and techniques in early de-tection of cancer using gene specific, cell specific, or even patient specific approaches are summarized. A number of markers are used for cancer imaging. Anatomic markers show cell morphology defects at the sub-10-µm level on CT, MRI, and OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography. These techniques often fail to provide accurate and basic information necessary to manage the patient’s disease such as true metastatic extent. Functional markers use dynamic features, such as capillary leak (using ICG, IndoCyanine Green, lymphatic transport (by colloid, or Tc-Sestamibi, blood oxygenation, and blood flow. The features provide signal by a bulk phenomenon, and hence are still insensitive. More specifically, anti-genic probes, such as targeted antibodies have been demonstrated effectively in vivo for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as PSMA in the pros-tate cancer, CEA in colorectal cancer, and HER-2/neu in breast cancer. Metabolic probes accumulate at the site of a specific metabolic activity, and rely on imag-ing agents involving certain enzymatic pathways or transport functions of the cell. Examples are 18FDG (18F-fluoroDeoxyGlucose in PET and 11C-thymidine. Recent spectroscopy techniques do not need such labeled probes. The common method for in-vivo spectroscopy is MRSI (Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy that can

  3. Rückblick auf eine gelungene Tagung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Kaiser-Müller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Am 7. und 8. Mai 2015 fand die 45. Jahrestagung des Studienkreises Rundfunk und Geschichte e.V., in Kooperation mit der Zeitschrift MEDIENIMPULSE, in Wien statt. Hier gibt es einen Rückblick auf die Tagung "Geschichte(n, Repräsentationen, Fiktionen – Medienarchive als Gedächtnis- und Erinnerungsorte". Im siebenten Wiener Gemeindebezirk, gleich hinter dem Museumsquartier, befindet sich 'Das Depot', das uns einen wunderbaren Rahmen für diese so gut besuchte Tagung bot. Thematisch begab sich die Konferenz in das weit verzweigte und diskursiv stark nachgefragte Feld der Medienarchive. Welche inhaltlich-technologischen Lösungen finden Archive für die Herausforderungen der digitalen Welt? Welchen Stellenwert haben neue, netzbasierte Speicherkulturen? Wer sind die Gatekeeper in den Archiven, und sind deren Kriterien noch zeitgemäß und funktional? Wie kann die Zugänglichkeit zu Archivmaterialien für Wissenschaftler und andere Nutzergruppen erleichtert werden? Uwe Breitenborn blickt auf die 45. Jahrestagung des Studienkreises Rundfunk und Geschichte e.V. zurück: http://rundfunkundgeschichte.de/bericht-jahrestagung-2015-in-wien/

  4. Positive Effekte von NSAR auf den Gastrointestinaltrakt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ein protektiver Effekt von nichtsteroidalen Antirheumatika (NSAR auf die Tumorentstehung im Kolon wird in diversen präklinischen, epidemiologischen und auch randomisierten Arbeiten postuliert. Der Hauptwirkungsmechanismus von NSAR wird der Hemmung der Prostaglandinsynthese über die Cyclooxygenasen (COX zugeschrieben. Es existieren aber auch COX-unabhängige Mechanismen. Hier wollen wir einen Überblick über die Studienlage mit Aspirin, Sulindac und COX-2-Hemmern im Hinblick auf die Entstehung von Adenomen und Kolorektalkarzinomen geben. Die Wirkung dieser Substanzen ist besonders für Patienten mit familiärer Disposition relevant, aber auch für Patienten, die NSAR oder Aspirin aufgrund anderer Indikationen einnehmen. Es bestehen Abhängigkeiten von Dosis und Zeit sowie Interaktionen mit speziellen Mutationen (BRAF, PI3K und der zellulären COX-2-Expression. Beim Lynch-Syndrom ist die Wirksamkeit von Aspirin letztlich nicht sicher und eine multinationale klinische Studie mit 5-Aminosalizylsäure (Mesalazin wurde vom europäischen TRANSCAN-Programm gefördert.

  5. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  6. [Molecular imaging of histamine receptors in the human brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Manabu; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Brain histamine is involved in a wide range of physiological functions such as regulation of sleep-wake cycle, arousal, appetite control, cognition, learning and memory mainly through the 4 receptor subtypes: H1, H2, H3 and H4. Neurons producing histamine, histaminergic neurons, are exclusively located in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus and are transmitting histamine to almost all regions of the brain. Roles of brain histamine have been studied using animals including knock-out mice and human subjects. For clinical studies, molecular imaging technique such as positron emission tomography (PET), with ligands such as [11C]doxepin and [11C]pyrilamine, has been a useful tool. A series of clinical studies on histamine H1 antagonists, or antihistamines, have demonstrated that antihistamines can be classified into sedative, mildly-sedative and non-sedative drugs according to their blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, showing apparent clinical usefulness regarding QOL, work efficiency and traffic safety of allergic patients. PET has also been used for elucidation of aging effects and pathophysiological roles of histaminergic nervous system in various neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and depression, where H1 receptor binding potentials were lower than age-matched healthy controls. It has been also demonstrated that brain histamine functions as an endogenous anti-epileptic. In addition, H3 receptors are located in the presynaptic sites of not only histaminergic nerves but also in other nervous systems such as serotonergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic systems, and to be regulating secretion of various neurotransmitters. Nowadays, H3 receptors have been thought to be a new target of drug treatment of various neuropsychiatric disorders. There are still many research topics to be investigated regarding molecular imaging of histamine and histamine receptors. The authors hope that this line of research contributes

  7. Novel fluorescence molecular imaging of chemotherapy-induced intestinal apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Galit; Shirvan, Anat; Grimberg, Hagit; Reshef, Ayelet; Yogev-Falach, Merav; Cohen, Avi; Ziv, Ilan

    2009-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced enteropathy (CIE) is one of the most serious complications of anticancer therapy, and tools for its early detection and monitoring are highly needed. We report on a novel fluorescence method for detection of CIE, based on molecular imaging of the related apoptotic process. The method comprises systemic intravenous administration of the ApoSense fluorescent biomarker (N,N'-didansyl-L-cystine DDC) in vivo and subsequent fluorescence imaging of the intestinal mucosa. In the reported proof-of-concept studies, mice were treated with either taxol+cyclophosphamide or doxil. DDC was administered in vivo at various time points after drug administration, and tracer uptake by ileum tissue was subsequently evaluated by ex vivo fluorescent microscopy. Chemotherapy caused marked and selective uptake of DDC in ileal epithelial cells, in correlation with other hallmarks of apoptosis (i.e., DNA fragmentation and Annexin-V binding). Induction of DDC uptake occurred early after chemotherapy, and its temporal profile was parallel to that of the apoptotic process, as assessed histologically. DDC may therefore serve as a useful tool for detection of CIE. Future potential integration of this method with fluorescent endoscopic techniques, or development of radio-labeled derivatives of DDC for emission tomography, may advance early diagnosis and monitoring of this severe adverse effect of chemotherapy.

  8. Nuclear molecular imaging of paragangliomas; Imagerie moleculaire nucleaire des paragangliomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, CHU de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-08-15

    Paragangliomas (PGL) are relatively rare neural crest tumors originating in the adrenal medulla (usually called pheochromocytoma), chemoreceptors (i.e., carotid and aortic bodies) or autonomic ganglia. These tumors are highly vascular, usually benign and slow-growing. PGL may occur as sporadic or familial entities, the latter mostly in association with germline mutations of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B, SDHC, SDHD, SDH5, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), ret proto-oncogene (RET), neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) (von Recklinghausen's disease), prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) genes and TMEM127. Molecular nuclear imaging has a central role in characterization of PGL and include: somatostatin receptor imaging ({sup 111}In, {sup 68}Ga), MIBG scintigraphy ({sup 131}I, {sup 123}I), {sup 18}F-dihydroxy-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET), and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET. The choice of the tracer is not yet fully established but the work-up of familial forms often require the combination of multiple approaches. (authors)

  9. Radiation-Force Assisted Targeting Facilitates Ultrasonic Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhao

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic molecular imaging employs contrast agents, such as microbubbles, nanoparticles, or liposomes, coated with ligands specific for receptors expressed on cells at sites of angiogenesis, inflammation, or thrombus. Concentration of these highly echogenic contrast agents at a target site enhances the ultrasound signal received from that site, promoting ultrasonic detection and analysis of disease states. In this article, we show that acoustic radiation force can be used to displace targeted contrast agents to a vessel wall, greatly increasing the number of agents binding to available surface receptors. We provide a theoretical evaluation of the magnitude of acoustic radiation force and show that it is possible to displace micron-sized agents physiologically relevant distances. Following this, we show in a series of experiments that acoustic radiation force can enhance the binding of targeted agents: The number of biotinylated microbubbles adherent to a synthetic vessel coated with avidin increases as much as 20-fold when acoustic radiation force is applied; the adhesion of contrast agents targeted to αvβ3 expressed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells increases 27-fold within a mimetic vessel when radiation force is applied; and finally, the image signal-to-noise ratio in a phantom vessel increases up to 25 dB using a combination of radiation force and a targeted contrast agent, over use of a targeted contrast agent alone.

  10. Molecular imaging, part 1: apertures into the landscape of genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghva, Alexander; Kim, Paul E; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2010-04-01

    Conventional imaging paradigms rely on the detection of anatomical changes in disease that are preceded by molecular genetic changes that go otherwise undetected. With the advent of molecular imaging, it will be possible to detect these changes prior to the manifestation of disease. Molecular imaging is the amalgamation of molecular biology and imaging technology that was spawned by parallel advances in the two fields. Fundamental to this technique is the ability to directly image biological processes that precede the anatomical changes detected by conventional imaging techniques. The two main strategies for imaging of biologic processes are direct and indirect imaging techniques. Direct techniques use molecules that have specific affinities for targets of interest that can be radiolabeled or otherwise detected on imaging. Indirect imaging uses reporter genes that are coexpressed with therapeutic proteins or other proteins of interest to image vector-transfected cells. Optical imaging and nanotechnology paradigms will also prove to be important additions to the imaging armamentarium. The first installment of this two-part series on molecular imaging seeks to demonstrate basic principles and illustrative examples for the uninitiated neophyte to this field.

  11. Design of optimal collimation for dedicated molecular breast imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a functional imaging technique that uses specialized small field-of-view gamma cameras to detect the preferential uptake of a radiotracer in breast lesions. MBI has potential to be a useful adjunct method to screening mammography for the detection of occult breast cancer. However, a current limitation of MBI is the high radiation dose (a factor of 7-10 times that of screening mammography) associated with current technology. The purpose of this study was to optimize the gamma camera collimation with the aim of improving sensitivity while retaining adequate resolution for the detection of sub-10-mm lesions. Square-hole collimators with holes matched to the pixilated cadmium zinc telluride detector elements of the MBI system were designed. Data from MBI patient studies and parameters of existing dual-head MBI systems were used to guide the range of desired collimator resolutions, source-to-collimator distances, pixel sizes, and collimator materials that were examined. General equations describing collimator performance for a conventional gamma camera were used in the design process along with several important adjustments to account for the specialized imaging geometry of the MBI system. Both theoretical calculations and a Monte Carlo model were used to measure the geometric efficiency (or sensitivity) and resolution of each designed collimator. Results showed that through optimal collimation, collimator sensitivity could be improved by factors of 1.5-3.2, while maintaining a collimator resolution of either {<=}5 or {<=}7.5 mm at a distance of 3 cm from the collimator face. These gains in collimator sensitivity permit an inversely proportional drop in the required dose to perform MBI.

  12. Molecular Imaging Markers to Track Huntington's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; De Micco, Rosa; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, monogenic dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by repeat expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene. The accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, forming intranuclear inclusions, subsequently leads to degeneration of medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortical areas. Genetic testing can identify HD gene carriers before individuals develop overt cognitive, psychiatric, and chorea symptoms. Thus, HD gene carriers can be studied in premanifest stages to understand and track the evolution of HD pathology. While advances have been made, the precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HD are unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been employed to understand HD pathology in presymptomatic and symptomatic disease stages. PET imaging uses radioactive tracers to detect specific changes, at a molecular level, which could be used as markers of HD progression and to monitor response to therapeutic treatments for HD gene expansion carriers (HDGECs). This review focuses on available PET techniques, employed in cross-sectional and longitudinal human studies, as biomarkers for HD, and highlights future potential PET targets. PET studies have assessed changes in postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors, brain metabolism, microglial activation, and recently phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) as markers to track HD progression. Alterations in PDE10A expression are the earliest biochemical change identified in HD gene carriers up to 43 years before predicted symptomatic onset. Thus, PDE10A expression could be a promising marker to track HD progression from early premanifest disease stages. Other PET targets which have been less well investigated as biomarkers include cannabinoid, adenosine, and GABA receptors. Future longitudinal studies are required to fully validate these PET biomarkers for use to track disease progression from far-onset premanifest to manifest HD stages. PET imaging

  13. Molecular Imaging Markers to Track Huntington’s Disease Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; De Micco, Rosa; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, monogenic dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by repeat expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene. The accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, forming intranuclear inclusions, subsequently leads to degeneration of medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortical areas. Genetic testing can identify HD gene carriers before individuals develop overt cognitive, psychiatric, and chorea symptoms. Thus, HD gene carriers can be studied in premanifest stages to understand and track the evolution of HD pathology. While advances have been made, the precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HD are unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been employed to understand HD pathology in presymptomatic and symptomatic disease stages. PET imaging uses radioactive tracers to detect specific changes, at a molecular level, which could be used as markers of HD progression and to monitor response to therapeutic treatments for HD gene expansion carriers (HDGECs). This review focuses on available PET techniques, employed in cross-sectional and longitudinal human studies, as biomarkers for HD, and highlights future potential PET targets. PET studies have assessed changes in postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors, brain metabolism, microglial activation, and recently phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) as markers to track HD progression. Alterations in PDE10A expression are the earliest biochemical change identified in HD gene carriers up to 43 years before predicted symptomatic onset. Thus, PDE10A expression could be a promising marker to track HD progression from early premanifest disease stages. Other PET targets which have been less well investigated as biomarkers include cannabinoid, adenosine, and GABA receptors. Future longitudinal studies are required to fully validate these PET biomarkers for use to track disease progression from far-onset premanifest to manifest HD stages. PET

  14. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use.

  15. Imaging in arthritis: quantifying effects of therapeutic intervention using MRI and molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Marco A; Barbieri, Francesca; Zampogna, Giuseppe; Camellino, Dario; Paparo, Francesco; Parodi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-05

    Modern imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in assessing the course of arthritis and in permitting measurement of response to treatment as part of the follow-up of patients. They include ultrasonography (US), MRI, PET/CT, and biofluorescence. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, clinical evaluation is significantly less sensitive than either US or MRI in detecting synovitis. As a result, imaging is a useful alternative to achieving proper assessment of disease activity. The different areas in which the new imaging techniques could help practicing rheumatologists and internal physicians include the following: early and differential diagnosis of arthritis, evaluation of disease activity, prognosis, assessment of treatment efficacy, assessment of remission, and evaluation of subclinical disease. MRI is probably the best imaging method to study disease activity in RA, because it can study all the joints with similar efficacy, has been sufficiently standardised, and yields data on inflammation that can be quantified. Different methods, developed to score synovitis activity, are increasingly used in clinical trials. The main application of PET/CT in rheumatology is the diagnosis and follow-up of large vessel vasculitis. More recently, also RA disease activity has been evaluated, allowing a panoramic view of the patient. Molecular imaging studies molecular and cellular processes in intact living organisms in a non-invasive fashion. In fluorescence, dyes, that emit light upon excitation by a light source and are read by a camera, can be used to show inflamed areas where neoangiogenesis, vasodilatation, and increased vessel permeability are present. These dyes can be coupled with different compounds including antibodies and drugs.

  16. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer: a step toward an individualized 'image and treat' strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...... individual approaches to targeted therapy of HER2-positive breast cancers.......HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...

  17. Translational applications of molecular imaging in cardiovascular disease and stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Tao, Hongyan; Zhao, Shihua; He, Zuo-Xiang; Li, Zongjin

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Molecular imaging techniques provide valuable information at cellular and molecular level, as opposed to anatomical and structural layers acquired from traditional imaging modalities. More specifically, molecular imaging employs imaging probes which interact with specific molecular targets and therefore makes it possible to visualize biological processes in vivo. Molecular imaging technology is now progressing towards preclinical and clinical application that gives an integral and comprehensive guidance for the investigation of cardiovascular disease. In addition, cardiac stem cell therapy holds great promise for clinical translation. Undoubtedly, combining stem cell therapy with molecular imaging technology will bring a broad prospect for the study and treatment of cardiac disease. This review will focus on the progresses of molecular imaging strategies in cardiovascular disease and cardiac stem cell therapy. Furthermore, the perspective on the future role of molecular imaging in clinical translation and potential strategies in defining safety and efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapies will be discussed.

  18. Molecular Images in Organic Chemistry: Assessment of Understanding in Aromaticity, Symmetry, Spectroscopy, and Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Hermanson, Jim

    2006-01-01

    When students take General Chemistry there are substantially fewer molecular images than they will encounter in Organic Chemistry. The molecular images Organic Chemistry students see in their textbooks are ones that use dashes and wedges to represent 2D and semi 3D views, ball and spoke, ball and wire, and structural formulas, to name just a few.…

  19. Perspectives in molecular imaging through translational research, human medicine, and veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Clifford R; Garg, Predeep

    2014-01-01

    The concept of molecular imaging has taken off over the past 15 years to the point of the renaming of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) and Journals (European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) and offering of medical fellowships specific to this area of study. Molecular imaging has always been at the core of functional imaging related to nuclear medicine. Even before the phrase molecular imaging came into vogue, radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals were developed that targeted select physiological processes, proteins, receptor analogs, antibody-antigen interactions, metabolites and specific metabolic pathways. In addition, with the advent of genomic imaging, targeted genomic therapy, and theranostics, a number of novel radiopharmaceuticals for the detection and therapy of specific tumor types based on unique biological and cellular properties of the tumor itself have been realized. However, molecular imaging and therapeutics as well as the concept of theranostics are yet to be fully realized. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the translational approaches to targeted molecular imaging with application to some naturally occurring animal models of human disease.

  20. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  1. A Molecular Imaging Approach to Mercury Sensing Based on Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Molecular Clamp Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianni; Zeng, Qingbin; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-14

    Mercury pollution, in the form of mercury ions (Hg(2+)), is a major health and environmental hazard. Commonly used sensors are invasive and limited to point measurements. Fluorescence-based sensors do not provide depth resolution needed to image spatial distributions. Herein we report a novel sensor capable of yielding spatial distributions by MRI using hyperpolarized (129)Xe. A molecular clamp probe was developed consisting of dipyrrolylquinoxaline (DPQ) derivatives and twocryptophane-A cages. The DPQ derivatives act as cation receptors whereas cryptophane-A acts as a suitable host molecule for xenon. When the DPQ moiety interacts with mercury ions, the molecular clamp closes on the ion. Due to overlap of the electron clouds of the two cryptophane-A cages, the shielding effect on the encapsulated Xe becomes important. This leads to an upfield change of the chemical shift of the encapsulated Xe. This sensor exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity toward the mercury ion. This mercury-activated hyperpolarized (129)Xe-based chemosensor is a new concept method for monitoring Hg(2+) ion distributions by MRI.

  2. Nanophysik: Wärmeübertrag auf der Nanometerskala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Achim

    2006-01-01

    Gegen Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts waren die grundlegenden Prozesse des Wärmeaustauschs verstanden. Die Gesetze dienten dann als Grundlage für die Quantenmechanik. Doch gelten diese Gesetze auch auf der Nanometerskala? In den 1970er-Jahren wurde eine Theorie für den Wärmeübertrag im atomaren Bereich entwickelt. Physiker der Universität Oldenburg überprüften deren Vorhersagen und stießen dabei auf signifikante Abweichungen, welche auf einen Zusammenbruch der klassischen, makroskopischen Elektrodynamik hindeuten.

  3. Near-infrared operating lamp for intraoperative molecular imaging of a mediastinal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Near-Infrared (NIR) intraoperative molecular imaging is a new diagnostic modality utilized during cancer surgery for the identification of tumors, metastases and lymph nodes. Surgeons typically use headlamps during an operation to increase visible light; however, these light sources are not adapted to function simultaneously with NIR molecular imaging technology. Here, we design a NIR cancelling headlamp and utilize it during surgery to assess whether intraoperative molecular imagi...

  4. AUF1/hnRNP D is a novel protein partner of the EBER1 noncoding RNA of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2012-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells express two noncoding RNAs called EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) 1 and EBER2. Despite their high abundance in the nucleus (about 10(6) copies), the molecular function of these noncoding RNAs has remained elusive. Here, we report that the insertion into EBER1 of an RNA aptamer that binds the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein allows the isolation of EBER1 and associated protein partners. By combining MS2-mediated selection with stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and analysis by mass spectrometry, we identified AUF1 (AU-rich element binding factor 1)/hnRNP D (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D) as an interacting protein of EBER1. AUF1 exists as four isoforms generated by alternative splicing and is best known for its role in destabilizing mRNAs upon binding to AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3' untranslated region (UTR). Using UV crosslinking, we demonstrate that predominantly the p40 isoform of AUF1 interacts with EBER1 in vivo. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that EBER1 can compete for the binding of the AUF1 p40 isoform to ARE-containing RNA. Given the high abundance of EBER1 in EBV-positive cells, EBER1 may disturb the normal homeostasis between AUF1 and ARE-containing mRNAs or compete with other AUF1-interacting targets in cells latently infected by EBV.

  5. Investigations on the usefulness of CEACAMs as potential imaging targets for molecular imaging purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Heine

    Full Text Available Members of the carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs family are the prototype of tumour markers. Classically they are used as serum markers, however, CEACAMs could serve as targets for molecular imaging as well.In order to test the anti CEACAM monoclonal antibody T84.1 for imaging purposes, CEACAM expression was analysed using this antibody. Twelve human cancer cell lines from different entities were screened for their CEACAM expression using qPCR, Western Blot and FACS analysis. In addition, CEACAM expression was analyzed in primary tumour xenografts of these cells. Nine of 12 tumour cell lines expressed CEACAM mRNA and protein when grown in vitro. Pancreatic and colon cancer cell lines showed the highest expression levels with good correlation of mRNA and protein level. However, when grown in vivo, the CEACAM expression was generally downregulated except for the melanoma cell lines. As the CEACAM expression showed pronounced expression in FemX-1 primary tumours, this model system was used for further experiments. As the accessibility of the antibody after i.v. application is critical for its use in molecular imaging, the binding of the T84.1 monoclonal antibody was assessed after i.v. injection into SCID mice harbouring a FemX-1 primary tumour. When applied i.v., the CEACAM specific T84.1 antibody bound to tumour cells in the vicinity of blood vessels. This binding pattern was particularly pronounced in the periphery of the tumour xenograft, however, some antibody binding was also observed in the central areas of the tumour around blood vessels. Still, a general penetration of the tumour by i.v. application of the anti CEACAM antibody could not be achieved despite homogenous CEACAM expression of all melanoma cells when analysed in tissue sections. This lack of penetration is probably due to the increased interstitial fluid pressure in tumours caused by the absence of functional lymphatic vessels.

  6. MARS spectral molecular imaging of lamb tissue: data collection and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Aamir, R; Bateman, C.J.; Butler, A.P.H.; Butler, P.H.; Anderson, N.G.; Bell, S.T.; Panta, R.K.; Healy, J.L.; Mohr, J.L.; Rajendran, K.; Walsh, M.F.; Ruiter, N.de; Gieseg, S.P.; Woodfield, T.; Renaud, P.F.; Brooke, L.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Clyne, M.; Glendenning, R.; Bones, P.J.; Billinghurst, M.; Bartneck, C.; Mandalika, H.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Scott, N.; Nik, S.J.; Opie, A.; Janmale, T.; Tang, D.N.; Kim, D.; Doesburg, R.M.; Zainon, R.; Ronaldson, J.P.; Cook, N.J.; Smithies, D.J.; Hodge, K.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral molecular imaging is a new imaging technique able to discriminate and quantify different components of tissue simultaneously at high spatial and high energy resolution. Our MARS scanner is an x-ray based small animal CT system designed to be used in the diagnostic energy range (20 to 140 keV). In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the MARS scanner, equipped with the Medipix3RX spectroscopic photon-processing detector, to discriminate fat, calcium, and water in tissue. We present data collected from a sample of lamb meat including bone as an illustrative example of human tissue imaging. The data is analyzed using our 3D Algebraic Reconstruction Algorithm (MARS-ART) and by material decomposition based on a constrained linear least squares algorithm. The results presented here clearly show the quantification of lipid-like, water-like and bone-like components of tissue. However, it is also clear to us that better algorithms could extract more information of clinical interest from our data. Because we ...

  7. Radiolabelled nanoparticles: novel classification of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshojaei, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Morales-Avila, Enrique; Ortiz-Reynoso, Mariana; Reyes-Perez, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been used for every single modality in the molecular imaging arena for imaging purposes. Synergic advantages can be explored when multiple molecular imaging modalities are combined with respect to single imaging modalities. Multifunctional nanoparticles have large surface areas, where multiple functional moieties can be incorporated, including ligands for site-specific targeting and radionuclides, which can be detected to create 3D images. Recently, radiolabeled nanoparticles with individual properties have attracted great interest regarding their use in multimodality tumor imaging. Multifunctional nanoparticles can combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for both target-specific diagnosis and the treatment of a given disease. The future of nanomedicine lies in multifunctional nanoplatforms that combine the diagnostic ability and therapeutic effects using appropriate ligands, drugs, responses and technological devices, which together are collectively called theranostic drugs. Co-delivery of radiolabeled nanoparticles is useful in multifunctional molecular imaging areas because it comprises several advantages based on nanoparticles architecture, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties.

  8. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  10. Molecular Strong Field Ionization viewed with Photoelectron Velocity Map Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Peter

    In this thesis, work is presented on molecular strong-field ionization, during which an electron is removed from polyatomic molecules in the presence of strong laser fields. This is a process which is the basis of a number of experimental techniques to uncover electronic dynamics in atoms and molecules on the femtosecond and attosecond timescale. 'Strong' refers to an electric field strength which leads to a response from the system which can not be modeled perturbatively. These fields can be easily produced in the focus of femtosecond laser radiation, as is done in this work. With the use of velocity map imaging of the photoelectron in coincidence with the fragment ion, multiple ionization--dissociation pathways can be distinguished. It is shown that as opposed to early attempts to model the process, multiple low-lying states are populated in the ion, and also the signatures of multielectron dynamics are revealed. By changing the laser pulse duration from 30 fs to below 10 fs, control is demonstrated over which quantum states of the ion are populated. It is also shown that for pulses shorter than 10 fs (which is a timescale below the shortest vibrational period in molecules), ionization pathways that involve motion of the nuclei are almost completely shut off. Finally, the origin of electrons with step model is proposed for creating the electrons: the first step is population transfer to high-lying excited states of the neutral molecule by the laser field; the second step is ionization. Different ionization mechanisms are examined and their viability is checked against available data.

  11. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained.

  12. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  13. Molecular Imaging : Computer Reconstruction and Practice - Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Imaging from Physical Principles to Computer Reconstruction and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects the lectures presented at the ninth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2006 and is dedicated to nuclear physics applications in molecular imaging. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of image reconstruction processing and management and illustrate the role of digital imaging in clinical practice. Medical computing and image reconstruction are introduced by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, relevant quality aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Several stages of the imaging process are specifically addressed, e.g. optimisation of data acquisition and storage, distributed computing, physiology and detector modelling, computer algorithms for image reconstruction and measurement in tomography applications, for both clinical and biomedical research applications. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehen...

  14. Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Molecular Orbitals during Ultrafast Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sann, H.; Havermeier, T.; Müller, C.; Kim, H.-K.; Trinter, F.; Waitz, M.; Voigtsberger, J.; Sturm, F.; Bauer, T.; Wallauer, R.; Schneider, D.; Weller, M.; Goihl, C.; Tross, J.; Cole, K.; Wu, J.; Schöffler, M. S.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Jahnke, T.; Simon, M.; Dörner, R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the temporal evolution of molecular frame angular distributions of Auger electrons emitted during ultrafast dissociation of HCl following a resonant single-photon excitation. The electron emission pattern changes its shape from that of a molecular σ orbital to that of an atomic p state as the system evolves from a molecule into two separated atoms.

  15. Whole-body MR imaging in children with suspected osteonecrosis after intensive chemotherapy: preliminary results; Ganzkoerper-MRT bei Kindern mit Verdacht auf Osteonekrose nach intensiver Chemotherapie: Erste Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, M.; Stenzel, M.; Darge, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Girschick, H.; Schlegel, P.G. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Kinderklinik

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: use of multidrug chemotherapy poses the risk of avascular osseous necroses in children. Depiction of the whole body, including clinically non-apparent sites is mandatory for starting early and proper treatment, including surgical approaches in lesions near the joints. We analyzed the value of whole-body MRI in the detection of osteonecrosis, (1) in relation to conventional X-ray imaging and clinical symptoms, (2) using different MRI sequences, (3) with follow-up examinations. Materials and methods: 5 patients suffering from an oncological disease, 13 to 16 years old (3 x ALL, 1 x medulloblastoma, 1 x CML), and recently developing bone pain were examined with X-ray imaging of the particular region and a whole-body MRI (T2w TIRM, T1w TSE sequences, pre- and post-contrast GD-DTPA, including fat suppression techniques). Neck/thorax/abdomen/pelvis, and upper and lower extremities were acquired in the coronal plane, and the feet in sagittal orientation. 4 of 5 patients had at least one follow-up examination (in the mean after 10 {+-} 4 months). Results: none of the initial X-ray images revealed an abnormal finding. The whole-body MRI showed in 4 of 5 children bone marrow lesions compatible with osteonecrosis. The locations were around the knee joints (n = 3) and the tibiae/ankle joints (n = 4). In addition to the symptomatic sites, MRI revealed additional lesions at the following sites: humerus (n = 5), hip joints (n = 4), knee joints (n = 6), ankle joints (n = 4). The size varied from small focal lesions to lesions measuring 90% of the whole transverse diameter of the bone. The lesions were able to be detected most easily with heavily T2-weighted (TIRM) sequences, and the diagnosis was most easily established using the non-enhanced TSE T1-weighted sequences. As a consequence of the results of the whole-body MRI, all patients with lesions compatible with osteonecrosis received symptomatic (n = 2) or specific (n = 2) therapy. In the follow-up examinations, a

  16. Imaging Molecular Structure and Dynamics utilizing X-ray Free-Electron-Laser Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Imaging controlled molecules with ultrashort x- ray pulses from free-electron lasers enables the recording of “molecular movies”, i.e., snapshots of molecules at work, with spatial (picometer) and temporal (femtosecond) atomic resolution.

  17. Towards molecular imaging and treatment of disease with radionuclides: the role of inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Phil

    2006-04-14

    Molecular imaging and radiotherapy using radionuclides is a rapidly expanding field of medicine and medical research. This article highlights the development of the role of inorganic chemistry in designing and producing the radiopharmaceuticals on which this interdisciplinary science depends.

  18. Gold nanoflowers for 3D volumetric molecular imaging of tumors by photoacoustic tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Jiang[1,4; Zijian Deng[2,4; Dan Yang[3; Xin Deng[1; Qi Li[1; Yinlin Sha[3; Changhui Li[2; Dongsheng Xu[1

    2015-01-01

    By binding molecular probes that target tumor cells, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with superior characteristics have shown great potential in tumor molecular imaging studies. The non-invasive, high-resolution, and three-dimensional imaging of the targeted AuNPs within the tumor is desirable for both diagnosis and therapy. In this study, gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) are presented as a novel contrast agent for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). By binding to folic acid, the molecular probe, the tail-vein injected AuNFs concentrated within the tumor site in mice; this was clearly visualized by three-dimensional (3D) PAT imaging. In addition, toxicity assay proved that AuNFs were harmless to living cells and animals. Our results demonstrate that AuNFs have great potential in tumor molecular imaging.

  19. Optical molecular imaging for detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadhi Thekkek; Sharmila Anandasabapathy; Rebecca Richards-Kortum

    2011-01-01

    Recent advancements in the endoscopic imaging of Barrett's esophagus can be used to probe a wide range of optical properties that are altered with neoplastic progression.This review summarizes relevant changes in optical properties as well as imaging approaches that measures those changes.Wide-field imaging approaches include narrow-band imaging that measures changes in light scattering and absorption,and autofluorescence imaging that measure changes in endogenous fluorophores.High-resolution imaging approaches include optical coherence tomography,endocytoscopy,confocal microendoscopy,and high-resolution microendoscopy.These technologies,some coupled with an appropriate contrast agent,can measure differences in glandular morphology,nuclear morphology,or vascular alterations associated with neoplasia.Advances in targeted contrast agents are further discussed.Studies that have explored these technologies are highlighted;as are the advantages and limitations of each.

  20. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    administration , mice were imaged for an hour at approximately two minutes per frame using an MR-coupled FMT system. The imaging system is a spectrometer...approach in animal models using a the MRI- FMT imaging system (Task 5). A description of the primary accomplishments and ongoing efforts follows...amount of fluorescence signal originating from bound vs. unbound targeted drug in the tissue will depending on the elapsed time from administration

  1. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how...

  2. Molecular Cancer Imaging with Polymeric Nanoassemblies: From Tumor Detection to Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Peng; Wang, Fang; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Cabral, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Several imaging modalities have been widely applied for the detection of cancer and its pathological activity in combination with probes capable of improving the contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues. Biocompatible polymeric nanoassemblies have been developed for precise detection of malignant tumors by enhancing the selectivity and sensitivity of the imaging. Exploiting the compartmentalized structure of the nanoassemblies advantageously allows delivering both imaging and therapeutic agents for cancer multifunctional imaging and theranostics, i.e., the combination of therapy and diagnosis tool on a single platform. Thus, nanoassemblies have high potential not only for cancer molecular imaging but also for tracing nanoparticles in biological systems, studying their biological pathways, gathering pathological information, monitoring therapeutic effects, and guiding pinpoint therapies. In this review, polymeric nanoassemblies for optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, multifunctional imaging, and image-guided therapy, emphasizing their role in cancer diagnosis and theranostics are highlighted.

  3. U-SPECT-II: An Ultra-High-Resolution Device for Molecular Small-Animal Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Ramakers, R.M.; Branderhorst, W.; Krah, J.O.; Ji, C.; Staelens, S.G.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new rodent SPECT system (U-SPECT-II) that enables molecular imaging of murine organs down to resolutions of less than half a millimeter and high-resolution total-body imaging. Methods: The U-SPECT-II is based on a triangular stationary detector set-up, an XYZ stage that moves the animal

  4. A liposomal system for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of molecular targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, WJM; Strijkers, GJ; Griffioen, AW; van Bloois, L; Molema, G; Storm, G; Koning, GA; Nicolay, K

    2004-01-01

    Pegylated paramagnetic and fluorescent immunoliposomes were designed to enable the parallel detection of the induced expression of molecular markers on endothelial cells with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence microscopy. MRI is capable of three-dimensional noninvasive imaging of opaq

  5. Molecular imaging for theranostics in gastroenterology: one stone to kill two birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang Hyun; Kown, Chang-Il; Park, Jong Min; Lee, Hoo Geun; Han, Na Young; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-09-01

    Molecular imaging in gastroenterology has become more feasible with recent advances in imaging technology, molecular genetics, and next-generation biochemistry, in addition to advances in endoscopic imaging techniques including magnified high-resolution endoscopy, narrow band imaging or autofluorescence imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. These developments have the potential to serve as "red flag" techniques enabling the earlier and accurate detection of mucosal abnormalities (such as precancerous lesions) beyond biomarkers, virtual histology of detected lesions, and molecular targeted therapy-the strategy of "one stone to kill two or three birds"; however, more effort should be done to be "blue ocean" benefit. This review deals with the introduction of Raman spectroscopy endoscopy, imaging mass spectroscopy, and nanomolecule development for theranostics. Imaging of molecular pathological changes in cells/tissues/organs might open the "royal road" to either convincing diagnosis of diseases that otherwise would only be detected in the advanced stages or novel therapeutic methods targeted to personalized medicine.

  6. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluoresc

  7. Molecular and Functional Imaging for Detection of Lymph Node Metastases in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansje Fortuin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on lymph node metastases is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of prostate cancer patients. Conventional anatomic imaging often fails to differentiate benign from metastatic lymph nodes. Pelvic lymph node dissection is an invasive technique and underestimates the extent of lymph node metastases. Therefore, there is a need for more accurate non-invasive diagnostic techniques. Molecular and functional imaging has been subject of research for the last decades, in this respect. Therefore, in this article the value of imaging techniques to detect lymph node metastases is reviewed. These techniques include scintigraphy, sentinel node imaging, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI and magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL. Knowledge on pathway and size of lymph node metastases has increased with molecular and functional imaging. Furthermore, improved detection and localization of lymph node metastases will enable (focal treatment of the positive nodes only.

  8. Molecular and functional imaging for detection of lymph node metastases in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, Ansje; Rooij, Maarten de; Zamecnik, Patrik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Barentsz, Jelle

    2013-07-03

    Knowledge on lymph node metastases is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of prostate cancer patients. Conventional anatomic imaging often fails to differentiate benign from metastatic lymph nodes. Pelvic lymph node dissection is an invasive technique and underestimates the extent of lymph node metastases. Therefore, there is a need for more accurate non-invasive diagnostic techniques. Molecular and functional imaging has been subject of research for the last decades, in this respect. Therefore, in this article the value of imaging techniques to detect lymph node metastases is reviewed. These techniques include scintigraphy, sentinel node imaging, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI) and magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL). Knowledge on pathway and size of lymph node metastases has increased with molecular and functional imaging. Furthermore, improved detection and localization of lymph node metastases will enable (focal) treatment of the positive nodes only.

  9. A DR-WFOI fusion system for the real-time molecular imaging in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Bi; Xiaochun Xu; Lei Xi; Shaoqun Zeng; Qingming Luo

    2008-01-01

    Digital radiography (DR) and whole-body fluorescent optical imaging (WFOI) have been widely applied in the field of molecular imaging, with the advantages in tissues and functional imaging. The integration of them contributes to the development and discovery of medicine. We introduce an equipment, performance of which is better than that of another molecular imaging system manufactured by Kodak Corp. It can take real-time small animal imaging in vivo, with lower cost and shorter development cycle on the LabVIEW platform. At last, a paradigm experiment on a nude mouse with green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic tumor is given to present a real-time DR-WFOI fusion simultaneous image.

  10. Air flow-assisted ionization imaging mass spectrometry method for easy whole-body molecular imaging under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhigang; He, Jiuming; Chen, Yi; He, Jingjing; Gong, Tao; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhang, Ruiping; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Lv, Haining; Ma, Shuanggang; Fu, Zhaodi; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yu, Shishan; Abliz, Zeper

    2013-03-01

    Whole-body molecular imaging is able to directly map spatial distribution of molecules and monitor its biotransformation in intact biological tissue sections. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), a label-free molecular imaging method, can be used to image multiple molecules in a single measurement with high specificity. Herein, a novel easy-to-implement, whole-body IMS method was developed with air flow-assisted ionization in a desorption electrospray ionization mode. The developed IMS method can effectively image molecules in a large whole-body section in open air without sample pretreatment, such as chemical labeling, section division, or matrix deposition. Moreover, the signal levels were improved, and the spatial assignment errors were eliminated; thus, high-quality whole-body images were obtained. With this novel IMS method, in situ mapping analysis of molecules was performed in adult rat sections with picomolar sensitivity under ambient conditions, and the dynamic information of molecule distribution and its biotransformation was provided to uncover molecular events at the whole-animal level. A global view of the differential distribution of an anticancer agent and its metabolites was simultaneously acquired in whole-body rat and model mouse bearing neuroglioma along the administration time. The obtained drug distribution provided rich information for identifying the targeted organs and predicting possible tumor spectrum, pharmacological activity, and potential toxicity of drug candidates.

  11. Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction: Inversion of Photoelectron Spectra for Molecular Orbital Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R; Peters, M; Nguyen-Dang, T T; Atabek, O; Charron, E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of imaging molecular orbitals from photoelectron spectra obtained via Laser Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED) in linear molecules. This is an extension of our work published recently in Physical Review A \\textbf{94}, 023421 (2016) to the case of the HOMO-1 orbital of the carbon dioxide molecule. We show that such an imaging technique has the potential to image molecular orbitals at different internuclear distances in a sub-femtosecond time scale and with a resolution of a fraction of an Angstr\\"om.

  12. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  13. High-order harmonic spectroscopy for molecular imaging of polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, M; Faccialà, D; De Silvestri, S; Vozzi, C; Stagira, S

    2014-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation is a powerful and sensitive tool for probing atomic and molecular structures, combining in the same measurement an unprecedented attosecond temporal resolution with a high spatial resolution, of the order of the angstrom. Imaging of the outermost molecular orbital by high-order harmonic generation has been limited for a long time to very simple molecules, like nitrogen. Recently we demonstrated a technique that overcame several of the issues that have prevented the extension of molecular orbital tomography to more complex species, showing that molecular imaging can be applied to a triatomic molecule like carbon dioxide. Here we report on the application of such technique to nitrous oxide (N2O) and acetylene (C2H2). This result represents a first step towards the imaging of fragile compounds, a category which includes most of the fundamental biological molecules.

  14. Cloud basierte IEC 61131 Steuerungsdienste auf Basis von Webtechnologien

    OpenAIRE

    Stiller, Michael; Heidrich, Mike; Langmann, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Industrie 4.0 bzw. IIoT stützt sich auf eine CPS zentrier­ten Automatisierungsstruktur. Damit ist nicht mehr aus­geschlossen, dass künftig zeit- und einsatzkritische Funk­tionen in eine Industrial Cloud ausgelagert werden. Grund dafür sind die Anforderungen aus Industrie 4.0, nach denen die Produktion der Zukunft auf selbstorgani­sierenden und wandelbaren Systemen basiert. Um auch in die prozessnahen Ebenen (Steuerung, Regelung) on­line und mit höchster Flexibilität eingreifen zu können, muss...

  15. Arzneimitteltherapie: Relevante Interaktionen und (negative Effekte auf den Knochen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woschnagg H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dieses Review ist das Ergebnis einer Medline-Recherche. Demnach erscheinen die Auswirkungen der Genußgifte Alkohol, Nikotin und Kaffee auf den Knochen eher nachteilig zu sein. Nicht gering ist die Anzahl der Medikamente, die den Vitamin D-Stoffwechsel beeinflussen. Eine Androgenentzugstherapie beeinflußt den Knochenstoffwechsel negativ, Thyroxin hat diesen Effekt nur in einer deutlich suppressiv wirksamen Dosierung. Protonenpumpenhemmer verbessern die Resorption der Bisphosphonate sehr, Hydrochlorothiazide verhindern den renalen Kalziumverlust. Manche Statine und intermittierend verabreichte Nitrate scheinen ebenfalls günstige Auswirkungen auf den Knochen zu haben.

  16. Ein neuartiges Kochsystem auf Basis der Dünnschicht-Verdampfung

    OpenAIRE

    Weinzierl, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Ende 1998 wurde ein Kochsystem präsentiert, das nach dem Prinzip der Dünnschicht-Verdampfung arbeitet. Das System besteht aus einem Whirlpool und dem eigentlichen Kochgefäß, einem kegelförmigen Dünnschicht-Verdampfer. Die Würze wird im Whirlpool gesammelt und dann im Kreislauf über die Heizfläche gepumpt. Dabei wird sie zunächst auf Kochtemperatur erwärmt und dann für die Kochzeit zirkuliert. Im Anschluss an die Kochzeit folgt die Whirlpoolrast zur Heißtrubabscheidung. Auf dem Weg zum Platten...

  17. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    determine the depth of embedded tumor fragments in the excise tissue or surgical cavity. Pilot animal data with the Licor IRDye800CW-2DG imaging agent in...and the tumor immediately removed with adjacent normal tissue. All tissue were soaked for 5 – 20 minutes in a solution of Licor IRDye800CW-2DG and... Licor IRDye800CW-2DG, showing a cross section of the tumor mass. These images show a significant amount of non-specific uptake of the probe in

  18. Molecular imaging of brain tumors personal experience and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Bernhard J; Cornelius, Jan F; Sandu, Nora; Buchfelder, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Non-invasive energy metabolism measurements in brain tumors in vivo are now performed widely as molecular imaging by positron emission tomography. This capability has developed from a large number of basic and clinical science investigations that have cross fertilized one another. Apart from precise anatomical localization and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Most importantly, molecular imaging represents a key-technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols that may later be applied to human patients. Common clinical indications for molecular imaging of primary brain tumors therefore contain (i) primary brain tumor diagnosis, (ii) identification of the metabolically most active brain tumor reactions (differentiation of viable tumor tissue from necrosis), and (iii) prediction of treatment response by measurement of tumor perfusion, or ischemia. The key-question remains whether the magnitude of biochemical alterations demonstrated by molecular imaging reveals prognostic value with respect to survival. Molecular imaging may identify early disease and differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Moreover, an early identification of treatment effectiveness could influence patient management by providing objective criteria for evaluation of therapeutic strategies for primary brain tumors. Specially, its novel potential to visualize metabolism and signal transduction to gene expression is used in reporter gene assays to trace the location and temporal level of expression of therapeutic and endogenous genes. The authors present here illustrative data of PET imaging: the thymidine kinase gene expression in experimentally transplanted F98 gliomas in cat brain indicates, that [(18)F]FHBG visualizes cells expressing TK-GFP gene in transduced gliomas as well as quantities and localizes transduced

  19. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  20. Molecular probes for nonlinear optical imaging of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Charier, Sandrine; Moreaux, Laurent; Mertz, Jerome

    2001-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) are nonlinear optical (NLO) phenomena that scale with excitation intensity squared, and hence give rise to an intrinsic 3-dimensional resolution when used in microscopic imaging. TPEF microscopy has gained widespread popularity in the biology community whereas SHG microscopy promises to be a powerful tool because of its sensitivity to local asymmetry. We have implemented an approach toward the design of NLO-probes specifically adapted for SHG and/or TPEF imaging of biological membranes. Our strategy is based on the design of nanoscale amphiphilic NLO-phores. We have prepared symmetrical bolaamphiphilic fluorophores combining very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections in the visible red region and affinity for cellular membranes. Their incorporation and orientation in lipid membranes can be monitored via TPEF anisotropy. We have also prepared amphiphilic push-pull chromophores exhibiting both large TPA cross-sections and very large first hyperpolarizabilities in the near-IR region. These NLO-probes have proved to be particularly useful for imaging of biological membranes by simultaneous SHG and TPEF microscopy and offer attractive prospects for real-time imaging of fundamental biological processes such as adhesion, fusion or reporting of membrane potentials.

  1. Towards imaging of ultrafast molecular dynamics using FELs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouzee, A.; Johnsson, P.; Rading, L.; Siu, W.; Huismans, Y.; Duesterer, S.; Redlin, H.; Tavella, F.; Stojanovic, N.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Lepine, F.; Holland, D. M. P.; Schlathölter, Thomas; Hoekstra, R.; Fukuzawa, H.; Ueda, K.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Hundertmark, A.

    2013-01-01

    The dissociation dynamics induced by a 100 fs, 400 nm laser pulse in a rotationally cold Br-2 sample was characterized by Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) using a time-delayed extreme ultra-violet (XUV) FEL pulse, obtained from the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). The momentum distribution of

  2. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia;Imagerie moleculaire de l'hypoxie tumorale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Maire, J.P.; Trouette, R. [Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Oncologie Medicale et de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Fernandez, P.; Allard, M. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, AP-HP, Oncologie-radiotherapie, 94 - Creteil (France); Eimer, S. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Anatomopathologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Tourdias, T. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Neuroradiologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Loiseau, H. [CHU de Bordeaux, Clinique universitaire de Neurochirurgie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A.; Fernandez, P.; Allard, M.; Maire, J.P.; Eimer, S.; Tourdias, T.; Loiseau, H. [Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France)

    2009-12-15

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the {sup 18}Fluoromisonidazole PET ([{sup 18}F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [{sup 18}F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  3. Laser induced electron diffraction: a tool for molecular orbital imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2012-01-01

    We explore the laser-induced ionization dynamics of N2 and CO2 molecules subjected to a few-cycle, linearly polarized, 800\\,nm laser pulse using effective two-dimensional single active electron time-dependent quantum simulations. We show that the electron recollision process taking place after an initial tunnel ionization stage results in quantum interference patterns in the energy resolved photo-electron signals. If the molecule is initially aligned perpendicular to the field polarization, the position and relative heights of the associated fringes can be related to the molecular geometrical and orbital structure, using a simple inversion algorithm which takes into account the symmetry of the initial molecular orbital from which the ionized electron is produced. We show that it is possible to extract inter-atomic distances in the molecule from an averaged photon-electron signal with an accuracy of a few percents.

  4. Der westliche Blick auf den Orient The Western Gaze on the Orient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Schrupp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Angesichts der aktuellen Debatten über den Islam zeigen Christina von Braun und Bettina Mathes die viele Jahrhunderte alte Interpretationsgeschichte des Orients aus westlicher Perspektive auf. In ihrem materialreichen Band schildern sie die historische und geografische Vielfalt des Phänomens „Islam“ und zeigen, wie westliches Selbstverständnis und Projektionen das Bild des Okzidents vom Orient seit langem und bis heute prägen – auch da, wo man es auf den ersten Blick nicht vermuten würde.In the face of current debates on the subject of Islam, Christina von Braun and Bettina Mathes point to the centuries-old history of interpreting the orient from the western perspective. The material-rich volume sketches the historical and geographical diversity of the phenomenon of “Islam,” showing how the western world has long taken for granted their projection of an image of the occidental orient and how these images persist, even where they might be least expected.

  5. Photoactive molecules for applications in molecular imaging and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Xing, Bengang

    2010-08-01

    Photoactive technology has proven successful for non-invasive regulation of biological activities and processes in living cells. With the light-directed generation of biomaterials or signals, mechanisms in cell biology can be investigated at the molecular level with spatial and temporal resolution. In this tutorial review, we aim to introduce the important applications of photoactive molecules for elucidating cell biology on aspects of protein engineering, fluorescence labelling, gene regulation and cell physiological functions.

  6. Homing peptide guiding optical molecular imaging for the diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-feng; Pang, Jian-zhi; Liu, Jie-hao; Zhao, Yang; Jia, Xing-you; Li, Jun; Liu, Reng-xin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Zi-qiang; Yan, San-hua; Luo, Jun-qian; Zhang, Xiao-lei

    2014-11-01

    Background: The limitations of primary transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBt) have led the residual tumors rates as high as 75%. The intraoperative fluorescence imaging offers a great potential for improving TURBt have been confirmed. So we aim to distinguish the residual tumors and normal mucosa using fluorescence molecular imaging formed by conjugated molecule of the CSNRDARRC bladder cancer homing peptide with fluorescent dye. The conjugated molecule was abbreviated FIuo-ACP. In our study, we will research the image features of FIuo-ACP probe targeted bladder cancer for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Methods: After the FIuo-ACP probe was synthetized, the binding sites, factors affecting binding rates, the specificity and the targeting of Fluo-ACP labeled with bladder cancer cells were studied respectively by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), immunofluorescence and multispectral fluorescence ex vivo optical molecular imaging system. Results: The binding sites were located in nucleus and the binding rates were correlated linearly with the dose of probe and the grade of pathology. Moreover, the probe has a binding specificity with bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Tumor cells being labeled by the Fluo-ACP, bright green spots were observed under LSCM. The tissue samples and tumor cells can be labeled and identified by fluorescence microscope. Optical molecular imaging of xenograft tumor tissues was exhibited as fluorescent spots under EMCCD. Conclusion: The CSNRDARRC peptides might be a useful bladder cancer targeting vector. The FIuo-ACP molecular probe was suitable for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo.

  7. Advances of Molecular Imaging for Monitoring the Anatomical and Functional Architecture of the Olfactory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintong; Bi, Anyao; Gao, Quansheng; Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Kunzhu; Liu, Zhiguo; Gao, Tang; Zeng, Wenbin

    2016-01-20

    The olfactory system of organisms serves as a genetically and anatomically model for studying how sensory input can be translated into behavior output. Some neurologic diseases are considered to be related to olfactory disturbance, especially Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and so forth. However, it is still unclear how the olfactory system affects disease generation processes and olfaction delivery processes. Molecular imaging, a modern multidisciplinary technology, can provide valid tools for the early detection and characterization of diseases, evaluation of treatment, and study of biological processes in living subjects, since molecular imaging applies specific molecular probes as a novel approach to produce special data to study biological processes in cellular and subcellular levels. Recently, molecular imaging plays a key role in studying the activation of olfactory system, thus it could help to prevent or delay some diseases. Herein, we present a comprehensive review on the research progress of the imaging probes for visualizing olfactory system, which is classified on different imaging modalities, including PET, MRI, and optical imaging. Additionally, the probes' design, sensing mechanism, and biological application are discussed. Finally, we provide an outlook for future studies in this field.

  8. Die Energiesicherheit Europas in Bezug auf Erdgas und die Auswirkungen einer Kartellbildung im Gassektor

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer, Luis-Martín

    2011-01-01

    Die Dissertation untersucht die aktuelle Sicherheit der europaeischen Erdgasversorgung. Sie beruecksichtigt zudem die moeglichen Auswirkungen einer Kartellbildung auf die europaeische Gasversorgungssicherheit. Die Arbeit besteht aus einer detaillierten empirischen Studie und darauf aufbauender Szenarioanalyse. Hierzu wird auf den Interdependenzansatz von Robert O. Keohane und Joseph Nye zurueckgegriffen. Zur Darstellung des komplexen Themenbereichs wird auf die Darstellungspraxis der Dichten ...

  9. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for physiological and molecular imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Pan, Hua; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we review the use of non-nephrotoxic perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (PFC NPs) for noninvasive detection and therapy of kidney diseases, and we provide a synopsis of other related literature pertinent to their anticipated clinical application. Recent reports indicate that PFC NPs allow for quantitative mapping of kidney perfusion and oxygenation after ischemia-reperfusion injury with the use of a novel multinuclear (1)H/(19)F magnetic resonance imaging approach. Furthermore, when conjugated with targeting ligands, the functionalized PFC NPs offer unique and quantitative capabilities for imaging inflammation in the kidney of atherosclerotic ApoE-null mice. In addition, PFC NPs can facilitate drug delivery for treatment of inflammation, thrombosis, and angiogenesis in selected conditions that are comorbidities for kidney failure. The excellent safety profile of PFC NPs with respect to kidney injury positions these nanomedicine approaches as promising diagnostic and therapeutic candidates for treating and following acute and chronic kidney diseases.

  10. Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: Current Functional and Future Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise M Blanchet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are neural crest-derived tumors, arising either from chromaffin sympathetic tissue (in adrenal, abdominal, intra-pelvic or thoracic paraganglia or from parasympathetic tissue (in head and neck paraganglia. They have a specific cellular metabolism, with the ability to synthesize, store and secrete catecholamines (although most head and neck paragangliomas do not secrete any catecholamines. This disease is rare and also very heterogeneous, with various presentations (e.g., in regards to localization, multifocality, potential to metastasize, biochemical phenotype, and genetic background. With growing knowledge, notably about the pathophysiology and genetic background, guidelines are evolving rapidly. In this context, functional imaging is a challenge for the management of paragangliomas.Nuclear imaging has been used for exploring paragangliomas for the last three decades, with MIBG historically as the first-line exam. Tracers used in paragangliomas can be grouped in three different categories. Agents that specifically target catecholamine synthesis, storage, and secretion pathways include: 123 and 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123/131I-MIBG, 18F-fluorodopamine (18F-FDA, and 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA. Agents that bind somatostatin receptors include 111In-pentetreotide and 68Ga-labelled somatostatin analog peptides. The non-specific agent most commonly used in paragangliomas is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG. This review will first describe conventional scintigraphic exams that are used for imaging paragangliomas. In the second part we will emphasize the interest in new PET approaches (specific and non-specific, considering the growing knowledge about genetic background and pathophysiology, with the aim of understanding how tumors behave, and optimally adjusting imaging technique for each tumor type.

  11. Insight into the Molecular Imaging of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Earlier it was diagnosed only via clinical assessments and confirmed by postmortem brain histopathology. The development of validated biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease has given impetus to improve diagnostics and accelerate the development of new therapies. Functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides a means of detecting and characterising the regional changes in brain blood flow, metabolism, and receptor binding sites that are associated with Alzheimer's disease. Multimodal neuroimaging techniques have indicated changes in brain structure and metabolic activity, and an array of neurochemical variations that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Radiotracer-based PET and SPECT potentially provide sensitive, accurate methods for the early detection of disease. This paper presents a review of neuroimaging modalities like PET, SPECT, and selected imaging biomarkers/tracers used for the early diagnosis of AD. Neuroimaging with such biomarkers and tracers could achieve a much higher diagnostic accuracy for AD and related disorders in the future. PMID:26880871

  12. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-01

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  13. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-06

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  14. Enhancing contrast and quantitation by spatial frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging with fluorescent contrast agents is highly sensitive for molecular imaging but is limited in depth to a few centimeters below the skin. Planar fluorescence imaging with full-field, uniform illumination and scientific camera image capture provides a portable and robust configuration for real-time, sensitive fluorescence detection with scalable resolution, but is inherently surface weighted and therefore limited in depth to a few millimeters. At the NIR region (700-1000 nm), tissue absorption and autofluorescence are relatively reduced, increasing depth penetration and reducing background signal, respectively. Optical imaging resolution scales with depth, limiting microscopic resolution with multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography to skin and peri-tumoral tissues are not uniform, varying in thickness and color, complicating subsurface fluorescence measurements. Diffuse optical imaging methods have been developed that better quantify optical signals relative to faster full-field planar reflectance imaging, but require long scan times, complex instrumentation, and reconstruction algorithms. Here we report a novel strategy for rapid measurement of subsurface fluorescence using structured light illumination to improve quantitation of deep-seated fluorescence molecular probe accumulation. This technique, in combination with highly specific, tumor-avid fluorescent molecular probes, will easily integrate noninvasive diagnostics for superficial cancers and fluorescence guided surgery.

  15. Einfluss von DNA-Variationen auf die koronare Herzerkrankung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drexel H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Erkenntnisse aus Familien- oder Zwillingsstudien lassen auf einen hohen genetischen Hintergrund der koronaren Herzerkrankung (KHK schließen. Seit einiger Zeit versucht man mittels intensiver Forschung, die genetischen Faktoren, welche das kardiovaskuläre Risiko beeinflussen, zu identifizieren. Aufgrund der hohen Frequenz der KHK in der Bevölkerung spielen hierbei Mendel’sche Erkrankungen, wie die familiäre Hypercholesterinämie, nur eine untergeordnete Rolle. Anhand der Ergebnisse aus Kopplungs- und Assoziationsstudien sind bisher zahlreiche DNA-Polymorphismen in Kandidatengenen als potenzielle genetische Risikofaktoren für die KHK vorgeschlagen worden. Die möglichen Auswirkungen dieser Polymorphismen auf das Erkrankungsrisiko werden in der Literatur allerdings meist kontrovers diskutiert. Metaanalysen haben gezeigt, dass DNA-Polymorphismen der Gene für Apolipoprotein E, Cholesteryl Ester Transfer-Protein, Faktor V, Prothrombin und Adiponektin einen signifikanten Zusammenhang mit der KHK aufweisen. Die jüngste Entwicklung von technischen Verfahren für die Hochdurchsatzgenotypisierung sowie die wachsende Kenntnis um die Strukturierung des Genoms in Haplotypen eröffnete der Forschung neue Möglichkeiten für die Ermittlung des genetischen Einflusses auf die KHK. Infolgedessen konnten mehrere unabhängig durchgeführte genomweite Assoziationsstudien den chromosomalen Abschnitt 9p21 erstmalig als genetischen Modulator für die KHK identifizieren. Die genaue Wirkweise dieser in der Region 9p21 lokalisierten DNA-Variationen auf die Entstehung der KHK ist bis dato allerdings unbekannt. Zukünftige technologische Entwicklungen, wie das "next generation sequencing", werden innerhalb absehbarer Zeit die Forschung über den Zusammenhang zwischen genetischer Variabilität und der KHK weiter maßgeblich beeinflussen. Durch dieses Wissen wird es uns gelingen, das KHK-Risiko besser abschätzen zu können und neue Therapien auf Personen mit hohem

  16. Nanotechnology-Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    37ºC water bath and then cut on a disposable cutting board using a 5 mm punch biopsy in order to maintain size consistency. At least two punch...the be z- uist Sampl information ges of HER . Each se , the first im rentially lab eased signa e. This is ssue in the ion depth. een at...tive tissue oshells for 5 image repres 5 μm. 50 µm p by ssues ction m) in f the focal er of thus , one e, or es ents 11

  17. [Positron emission tomography: diagnostic imaging on a molecular level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemann, K; Wyss, M; Wergin, M; Bley, C Rohrer; Ametamay, S; Bruehlmeier, M; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2004-08-01

    In human medicine positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern diagnostic imaging method. In the present paper we outline the physical principles of PET and give an overview over the main clinic fields where PET is being used, such as neurology, cardiology and oncology. Moreover, we present a current project in veterinary medicine (in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute and the University Hospital Zurich), where a hypoxia tracer is applied to dogs and cats suffering from spontaneous tumors. Finally new developments in the field of PET were discussed.

  18. Recent Advance of Biological Molecular Imaging Based on Lanthanide-Doped Upconversion-Luminescent Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzeng Min

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lanthanide-doped upconversion-luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs, which can be excited by near-infrared (NIR laser irradiation to emit multiplex light, have been proven to be very useful for in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging studies. In comparison with the conventionally used down-conversion fluorescence imaging strategies, the NIR light excited luminescence of UCNPs displays high photostability, low cytotoxicity, little background auto-fluorescence, which allows for deep tissue penetration, making them attractive as contrast agents for biomedical imaging applications. In this review, we will mainly focus on the latest development of a new type of lanthanide-doped UCNP material and its main applications for in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging and we will also discuss the challenges and future perspectives.

  19. Photoactive Lipid-Gold Nanoconstructs for Molecular Imaging and Photo-Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Arash

    The ubiquitous presence of porphyrins in nature is a testament to their versatility and utility. This thesis examines the utility of novel synthetic porphyrin derivatives, metallo-pyrolipid, as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) contrast agents for molecular imaging and monitoring of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Chapter 2 illustrates the refinement and optimization of manganese-pyrolipid gold nanoparticles for optical imaging of endothelial growth factor receptor overexpression in early stage lung cancer. In chapter 3, the use of palladium-pyrolipid gold nanoparticles as a new platform for SERS reporting photosensitizers is presented, allowing for real-time PDT and molecular imaging. These nanoparticles are demonstrated to be promising as photobleaching-dependent SERS reporting agents for PDT dosimetry. It is my hope that the studies presented in this thesis will set the stage for the development of simple and multifunctional SERS agents for medical imaging and therapeutic-use relevant to current unmet needs in medicine.

  20. Molecular Imaging to Identify Tumor Recurrence following Chemoradiation in a Hostile Surgical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T. Okusanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical biopsy of potential tumor recurrence is a common challenge facing oncologists, surgeons, and cancer patients. Imaging modalities have limited ability to accurately detect recurrent cancer in fields affected by previous surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. However, definitive tissue diagnosis is often needed to initiate treatment and to direct therapy. We sought to determine if a targeted fluorescent intraoperative molecular imaging technique could be applied in a clinical setting to assist a surgical biopsy in a “hostile” field. We describe the use of a folate-fluorescein conjugate to direct the biopsy of a suspected recurrent lung adenocarcinoma invading the mediastinum that had been previously treated with chemoradiation. We found that intraoperative imaging allowed the identification of small viable tumor deposits that were otherwise indistinguishable from scar and necrosis. Our operative observations were confirmed by histology, fluorescence microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate one possible application and clinical value of intraoperative molecular imaging.

  1. Nonlinear optical molecular imaging enables metabolic redox sensing in tissue-engineered constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2011-07-01

    Tissue-engineered constructs require noninvasive monitoring of cellular viability prior to implantation. In a preclinical study on human Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent (EVPOME) constructs, nonlinear optical molecular imaging was employed to extract morphological and functional information from intact constructs. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence images were acquired using endogenous fluorescence from cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The images were analyzed to report quantitatively on tissue structure and metabolism (redox ratio). Both thickness variations over time and cell distribution variations with depth were identified, while changes in redox were quantified. Our results show that nonlinear optical molecular imaging has the potential to visualize and quantitatively monitor the growth and viability of a tissue-engineered construct over time.

  2. Molecular imaging of apoptosis in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare Bildgebung der Apoptose bei kardiovaskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, I.; Greschus, S.; Willinek, W.; Lohmaier, S.; Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik; Heverhagen, J.T. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik; Behe, M. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Wilhelm, K. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). FE Chirurgie

    2007-08-15

    Molecular imaging of functional parameters such as apoptosis (programmed cell death) in vivo opens new possibilities in clinical diagnostic and scientific research. Especially in the case of cardiovascular diseases that are mainly responsible for both morbidity and mortality in Western industrial nations, innovative non-invasive examination strategies are necessary for early diagnosis of these diseases. Since apoptosis unlike necrosis is present even after minor alterations of the microenvironment of cells and has been shown to be involved in a large number of cardiovascular diseases, there are currently several experimental studies underway with the goal of imaging apoptosis in vivo. The review discusses the basics of apoptosis in myocardial infarction, myocarditis, atherosclerosis, restenosis after angioplasty and stent implantation, currently used imaging techniques, achieved results, and future possibilities for molecular imaging of apoptosis. (orig.)

  3. Emerging Themes in Image Informatics and Molecular Analysis for Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-07-11

    Pathology is essential for research in disease and development, as well as for clinical decision making. For more than 100 years, pathology practice has involved analyzing images of stained, thin tissue sections by a trained human using an optical microscope. Technological advances are now driving major changes in this paradigm toward digital pathology (DP). The digital transformation of pathology goes beyond recording, archiving, and retrieving images, providing new computational tools to inform better decision making for precision medicine. First, we discuss some emerging innovations in both computational image analytics and imaging instrumentation in DP. Second, we discuss molecular contrast in pathology. Molecular DP has traditionally been an extension of pathology with molecularly specific dyes. Label-free, spectroscopic images are rapidly emerging as another important information source, and we describe the benefits and potential of this evolution. Third, we describe multimodal DP, which is enabled by computational algorithms and combines the best characteristics of structural and molecular pathology. Finally, we provide examples of application areas in telepathology, education, and precision medicine. We conclude by discussing challenges and emerging opportunities in this area.

  4. Justifying molecular images in cell biology textbooks: From constructions to primary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpente, Norberto

    2016-02-01

    For scientific claims to be reliable and productive they have to be justified. However, on the one hand little is known on what justification precisely means to scientists, and on the other the position held by philosophers of science on what it entails is rather limited; for justifications customarily refer to the written form (textual expressions) of scientific claims, leaving aside images, which, as many cases from the history of science show are relevant to this process. The fact that images can visually express scientific claims independently from text, plus their vast variety and origins, requires an assessment of the way they are currently justified and in turn used as sources to justify scientific claims in the case of particular scientific fields. Similarly, in view of the different nature of images, analysis is required to determine on what side of the philosophical distinction between data and phenomena these different kinds of images fall. This paper historicizes and documents a particular aspect of contemporary life sciences research: the use of the molecular image as vehicle of knowledge production in cell studies, a field that has undergone a significant shift in visual expressions from the early 1980s onwards. Focussing on textbooks as sources that have been overlooked in the historiography of contemporary biomedicine, the aim is to explore (1) whether the shift of cell studies, entailing a superseding of the optical image traditionally conceptualised as primary data, by the molecular image, corresponds with a shift of justificatory practices, and (2) to assess the role of the molecular image as primary data. This paper also explores the dual role of images as teaching resources and as resources for the construction of knowledge in cell studies especially in its relation to discovery and justification. Finally, this paper seeks to stimulate reflection on what kind of archival resources could benefit the work of present and future epistemic

  5. Assessment of clinical image quality in feline chest radiography with a needle-image plate (NIP) storage phosphor system. An approach to the evaluation of image quality in neonatal radiography; Untersuchungen zur Qualitaet von Thoraxaufnahmen bei Katzen mit einem auf einer Nadelstruktur basierenden Speicherfoliensystem. Modelluntersuchungen zur Bewertung der Bildqualitaet bei Neugeborenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, E.; Bosch, B.; Gaebler, K.; Succow, D.; Werrmann, A. [Klinik fuer Kleintiere, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Hirsch, W.; Sorge, I. [Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Gosch, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Is the image quality of thoracic radiographs of cats obtained with a needle-based storage phosphor (NIP) system superior to conventional (PIP) storage phosphor radiography? Is it possible to decrease the mAs by 50% with the NIP system without significant loss of information? Materials and Methods: From each of the 20 animals, three lateral radiographs were acquired. The assessment of the exposure level was based on the generated IgM-values. Images were acquired 1. with the NIP system and exposure settings equivalent to an IgM of 1.9, 2. with the PIP system and identical settings, and 3. with the NIP system and 50% of the mAs. Six blinded readers used a 5-step scale to assess the reproducibility of five anatomical structures and image noise sensation. Data were analysed using Visual Grading Characteristics Analysis (VGC). Results: While applying identical exposure values the NIP system for all features revealed superior ratings to those of the PIP system (AUC{sub VGC} values ranged from 0.81 for ''cardiac silhouette'' to 0.92 for ''trachea''). Even when reducing mAs by 50% in the NIP images all features were rated better compared with the PIP images and original settings (AUC{sub VGC} values ranged from 0.60 for ''cardiac silhouette'' to 0.74 for ''trachea'' and ''caudal thoracic field''). Conclusion: The NIP system demonstrates clearly better image quality compared to the reference PIP system. A dose reduction of 50% seems to be possible without relevant detraction from image quality. The results obtained in the animal model are valid for simulating conditions in neonatal radiological practise. (orig.)

  6. Molecular targeting of angiogenesis for imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brack, Simon S.; Neri, Dario [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (Switzerland); Dinkelborg, Ludger M. [Research Laboratories of Schering AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the proliferation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is an underlying process in many human diseases, including cancer, blinding ocular disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. The ability to selectively target and interfere with neovascularisation would potentially be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of angiogenesis-related diseases. This review presents the authors' views on some of the most relevant markers of angiogenesis described to date, as well as on specific ligands which have been characterised in pre-clinical animal models and/or clinical studies. Furthermore, we present an overview on technologies which are likely to have an impact on the way molecular targeting of angiogenesis is performed in the future. (orig.)

  7. Imaging Multi-Particle Atomic and Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, Allen [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Final Report for Grant Number: DE- FG02-10ER16146 This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms and molecules with photons and electrons. The duration of the grant was the 5 year period from 4/1/2010 – 10/31/2015. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 20 peer reviewed publications over these 5 years with 2 of the publications in Physical Review Letters and 1 in Nature; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B ...).

  8. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h.

  9. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  10. Low molecular weight Neutral Boron Dipyrromethene (Bodipy) dyads for fluorescence-based neural imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dan; Benniston, Andrew C.; Clift, Sophie; Baisch, Ulrich; Steyn, Jannetta; Everitt, Nicola; Andras, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The neutral low molecular weight julolidine-based borondipyrromethene (Bodipy) dyads JULBD and MJULBD were used for fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging of neurons in the crab stomatogastric ganglion. The fluorescence modulation of the dyads mirrors alterations in the membrane potential of the imaged neurons. The toxicity of the dyes towards the neurons is related to their structure in that methyl groups at the 3,5 positions results in reduced toxic effects.

  11. Phenoxide-bridged Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probes for Molecular Imaging of Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Clear, Kasey J.; Harmatys, Kara M.; Rice, Douglas R.; Wolter, William R.; Suckow, Mark A.; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is involved in many pathological conditions, and there is a need for clinical and preclinical imaging agents that can target and report cell death. One of the best known biomarkers of cell death is exposure of the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. Synthetic zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn2BDPA) coordination complexes are known to selectively recognize PS-rich membranes and act as cell death molecular imaging agents. However, there...

  12. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  13. Efficient Radioisotope Energy Transfer by Gold Nanoclusters for Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Sun, Conroy; Stafford, Jason H; Koh, Ai Leen; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zhen; Cui, Bianxiao; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2015-08-26

    Beta-emitting isotopes Fluorine-18 and Yttrium-90 are tested for their potential to stimulate gold nanoclusters conjugated with blood serum proteins (AuNCs). AuNCs excited by either medical radioisotope are found to be highly effective ionizing radiation energy transfer mediators, suitable for in vivo optical imaging. AuNCs synthesized with protein templates convert beta-decaying radioisotope energy into tissue-penetrating optical signals between 620 and 800 nm. Optical signals are not detected from AuNCs incubated with Technetium-99m, a pure gamma emitter that is used as a control. Optical emission from AuNCs is not proportional to Cerenkov radiation, indicating that the energy transfer between the radionuclide and AuNC is only partially mediated by Cerenkov photons. A direct Coulombic interaction is proposed as a novel and significant mechanism of energy transfer between decaying radionuclides and AuNCs.

  14. Pediatric radiological diagnostics in suspected child abuse; Kinderradiologische Diagnostik bei Verdacht auf Kindesmisshandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfurt, C.; Schmidt, U. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Rechtsmedizin, Medizinische Fakultaet, Dresden (Germany); Hahn, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Abteilung Kinderradiologie, Institut und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Dresden (Germany); Roesner, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinderchirurgie, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Advanced and specialized radiological diagnostics are essential in the case of clinical suspicion of pediatric injuries to the head, thorax, abdomen, and extremities when there is no case history or when ''battered child syndrome'' is assumed on the basis of inadequate trauma. In particular, the aim of this sophisticated diagnostic procedure is the detection of lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) in order to initiate prompt medical treatment. If diagnostic imaging shows typical findings of child abuse, accurate documented evidence of the diagnostic results is required to prevent further endangerment of the child's welfare. (orig.) [German] Klinisch diagnostizierte Verletzungen an Kopf, Thorax, Abdomen oder Extremitaeten eines Kindes bei scheinbar leerer Anamnese oder Angabe eines inadaequaten Traumas erfordern beim Verdacht auf ein Battered-Child-Syndrom eine erweiterte und spezialisierte radiologische Diagnostik. Diese soll insbesondere im Bereich des ZNS Verletzungsfolgen erfassen, um therapeutische Massnahmen einleiten zu koennen. Bei typischen, auf eine Misshandlung hinweisenden radiologischen Befunden ist eine praezise beweissichere Befunddokumentation erforderlich, um eine weitere Kindeswohlgefaehrdung zu vermeiden. (orig.)

  15. Oxidative degradation of industrial wastewater using spray deposited TiO2/Au:Fe2O3 bilayered thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadik, M A; Shinde, S S; Pathan, H M; Rajpure, K Y; Bhosale, C H

    2014-12-01

    The Fe2O3, Au:Fe2O3, TiO2/Fe2O3 and TiO2/Au:Fe2O3 thin films are successfully prepared by the spray pyrolysis technique at an optimised substrate temperature of 400 °C and 470 °C, respectively onto amorphous and F:SnO2 coated glass substrates. The effect of TiO2 layer onto photoelectrochemical (PEC), structural, optical and morphological properties of Fe2O3, Au:Fe2O3, TiO2/Fe2O3 and TiO2/Au:Fe2O3 thin films is studied. The PEC characterization shows that, maximum values of short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are (Isc = 185 μA and Voc = 450 mV) are at 38 nm thickness of TiO2. Deposited films are polycrystalline with a rhombohedral and anatase crystal structure having (104) preferred orientation. SEM and AFM images show deposited thin films are compact and uniform with seed like grains. The photocatalytic activities of the large surface area (64 cm(2)) TiO2/Au:Fe2O3 thin film photocatalysts were evaluated by photoelectrocatalytic degradation of industrial wastewater under sunlight light irradiation. The results show that the TiO2/Au:Fe2O3 thin film photocatalyst exhibited about 87% and 94% degradation of pollutant in sugarcane and textile industrial wastewater, respectively. The significant reduction in COD and BOD values from 95 mg/L to 13 mg/L and 75 mg/L to 11 mg/L, respectively was also observed.

  16. Molecular Imaging Approaches to the Evaluation of Infectious Diseases- A Prospective Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED ABSTRACT Molecular imaging, primarily defined as nuclear ...preclinically using reengineered pathogens containing nuclear or optical bioreporters. Use of the bioreporters will establish the tissue burden of...nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) fusion virus has resulted in a stable expression system which remains intake in vitro and in vivo through multiple

  17. Biomolecular Imaging Mass Spectrometry : mapping molecular distributions in cells and tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altelaar, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) allows the investigation of both identity and localization of the molecular content directly from tissue sections, single cells and many other surfaces. To further develop the application of IMS, different approaches to IMS will be described in this thesis and the spe

  18. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Study of a Thermal Expansion Coefficient: Ti Bulk with an Elastic Minimum Image Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakup Hundur; Rainer Hippler; Ziya B. Güven(c)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Linear thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of Ti bulk is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation.The elastic minimum image convention of periodic boundary conditions is introduced to allow the bulk to adjust its size according to the new fixed temperature. The TEC and the specific heat of Ti are compared to the available theoretical and experimental data.

  20. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes.

  1. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  2. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guanglei, E-mail: guangleizhang@bjtu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Computer and Information Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Wei [China Institute of Sport Science, Beijing 100061 (China); Luo, Jianwen, E-mail: luo-jianwen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-23

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  3. Farbe bekennen – Grüne Bibliotheken auf die Tagesordnung! Vortrag auf dem 103. Deutschen Bibliothekartag, Bremen, 5. Juni 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hauke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Was in vielen Ländern bereits im Alltag der Bibliotheken verankert ist, beginnt in Deutschland erst sehr zaghaft: Das Verantwortungsbewusstsein von Bibliotheken für die ökologische Bildung der Gesellschaft und die Konsequenzen daraus für die Bibliothekspraxis. Es ist höchste Zeit, in der deutschen Bibliothekslandschaft publik zu machen, was eine „Grüne Bibliothek“ sein kann – bezogen auf das Gebäude, die Ausstattung, das Management, die Services für die Nutzer. Anhand einer Checkliste wird gezeigt, wie Bibliotheken mit einem „grünen“ Konzept nicht nur selbst etwas für die ökologische Nachhaltigkeit tun können, sondern auch wie sie als Multiplikatoren in den Kommunen, Hochschulen und bei anderen Trägern Einfluss auf das ökologische Verhalten nehmen und damit einen wichtigen Beitrag für unsere Gesellschaft leisten. Bringing environmental awareness to libraries does not necessarily imply huge financial efforts or a big budget. Ecological sustainability is an undervalued aspect of the marketing strategy for libraries which has more impact on clients and on stakeholders than one would expect. Small steps in going green can make a big impact for the library’s image. Little financial input can produce an important marketing outcome. Activities in this field can be developed in cooperation with unpaid partners like non-governmental organisations (NGOs, Friends of the Library groups, library suppliers and, last but not least, the library users. A checklist on how to go green gives an overview of important aspects in planning, construction, and library operations in order to introduce the first “green footsteps”.

  4. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  5. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, James, E-mail: james.bowsher@duke.edu; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yan, Susu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Roper, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  6. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo.

  7. Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer with Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Lutz, Amelie M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2013-01-01

    While there is an increasing role of ultrasound for breast cancer screening in patients with dense breast, conventional anatomical-ultrasound lacks sensitivity and specificity for early breast cancer detection. In this study we assessed the potential of molecular-ultrasound imaging, using clinically-translatable vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR2)-targeted microbubbles (MBVEGFR2), to improve the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in earlier detection of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul). In vivo binding specificity studies (n=26 tumors) showed that ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P95% of cases and highly agreed between each other (ICC=0.98; 95% CI, 97, 99). These results suggest that VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging allows highly accurate detection of DCIS and breast cancer in transgenic mice and may be a promising approach for early breast cancer detection in women. PMID:23328585

  8. Ratiometric and near-infrared molecular probes for the detection and imaging of zinc ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol, Priya; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2007-03-05

    The detection and imaging of Zn2+ in biological samples are of paramount interest owing to the role of this cation in physiological functions. This is possible only with molecular probes that specifically bind to Zn2+ and result in changes in emission properties. A "turn-on" emission or shift in the emission color upon binding to Zn2+ should be ideal for in vivo imaging. In this context, ratiometric and near-IR probes are of particular interest. Therefore, in the area of chemosensors or molecular probes, the design of fluorophores that allow ratiometric sensing or imaging in the near-IR region is attracting the attention of chemists. The purpose of this Focus Review is to highlight recent developments in this area and stress the importance of further research for future applications.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Bacterial Infections in vivo: The Discrimination between Infection and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Eggleston

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging by definition is the visualization of molecular and cellular processes within a given system. The modalities and reagents described here represent a diverse array spanning both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Innovations in probe design and technologies would greatly benefit therapeutic outcomes by enhancing diagnostic accuracy and assessment of acute therapy. Opportunistic pathogens continue to pose a worldwide threat, despite advancements in treatment strategies, which highlights the continued need for improved diagnostics. In this review, we present a summary of the current clinical protocol for the imaging of a suspected infection, methods currently in development to optimize this imaging process, and finally, insight into endocarditis as a model of infectious disease in immediate need of improved diagnostic methods.

  10. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine techniqu

  11. Auf den Schultern von Riesen und Zwergen Einsteins unvollendete Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Renn, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Dies ist die Geschichte von Einsteins unvollendeter Revolution, einer tiefgreifenden Veränderung unserer Begriffe von Raum, Zeit, Materie und Strahlung. Diese Revolution begann in Einsteins Wunderjahr 1905, wurde durch seine allgemeine Relativitätstheorie aus dem Jahre 1915 fortgesetzt und wirkt in den heutigen Versuchen der Wissenschaft, die Entstehung und das Schicksal des Universums zu verstehen, weiter. Vor dem Hintergrund einer historischen Theorie des wissenschaftlichen Fortschritts wird Einsteins bis heute nicht abgeschlossene Revolution als das Ergebnis einer langfristigen Entwicklung des Wissens verständlich. Anhand der spannenden Geschichte von Einsteins Entdeckungen wird nachvollziehbar, warum große Denker wie Einstein weiter gesehen haben als ihre Vorgänger. Sie standen nicht nur auf den Schultern von Riesen, also den wissenschaftlichen Leistungen einzelner großer Vorgänger wie Newton, sondern auch auf den Schultern von "Zwergen", dem wissenschaftlichen Wissen, dem technischen Wissen, und d...

  12. Die Auswirkung von Tageszeit, Schlafentzug und Messwiederholung auf langsame Augenfolgebewegungen

    OpenAIRE

    Mänz, Constantin

    2005-01-01

    Fragestellung Hauptziel dieser Arbeit war es den Einfluss von Tageszeit, Schlafentzug und Messwiederholung auf langsame Augenfolgebewegungen, Reaktionszeit, subjektive Wachheit und Stimmung zu untersuchen. Methodik 12 gesunde Frauen und Männer wurden an 4 aufeinanderfolgenden Tagen untersucht. Zur Erfassung des Wiederholungseinflusses wurde an den ersten 3 Tagen zu gleichen Uhrzeiten (9, 11, 13 Uhr) gemessen. Im Anschluss daran wurden tageszeitlicher und Schlafentzugseinfluss währen...

  13. Effect of molecular organization on the image histograms of polarization SHG microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Artigas, David

    2012-10-01

    Based on its polarization dependency, second harmonic generation (PSHG) microscopy has been proven capable to structurally characterize molecular architectures in different biological samples. By exploiting this polarization dependency of the SHG signal in every pixel of the image, average quantitative structural information can be retrieved in the form of PSHG image histograms. In the present study we experimentally show how the PSHG image histograms can be affected by the organization of the SHG active molecules. Our experimental scenario grounds on two inherent properties of starch granules. Firstly, we take advantage of the radial organization of amylopectin molecules (the SHG source in starch) to attribute shifts of the image histograms to the existence of tilted off the plane molecules. Secondly, we use the property of starch to organize upon hydration to demonstrate that the degree of structural order at the molecular level affects the width of the PSHG image histograms. The shorter the width is the more organized the molecules in the sample are, resulting in a reliable method to measure order. The implication of this finding is crucial to the interpretation of PSHG images used for example in tissue diagnostics.

  14. Enhancing in vivo tumor boundary delineation with structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging and spatial gradient mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Miller, Jessica P.; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Achilefu, Samuel; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence imaging, in combination with tumor-avid near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes, provides high specificity and sensitivity for cancer detection in preclinical animal models, and more recently, assistance during oncologic surgery. However, conventional camera-based fluorescence imaging techniques are heavily surface-weighted such that surface reflection from skin or other nontumor tissue and nonspecific fluorescence signals dominate, obscuring true cancer-specific signals and blurring tumor boundaries. To address this challenge, we applied structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging (SIFMI) in live animals for automated subtraction of nonspecific surface signals to better delineate accumulation of an NIR fluorescent probe targeting α4β1 integrin in mice bearing subcutaneous plasma cell xenografts. SIFMI demonstrated a fivefold improvement in tumor-to-background contrast when compared with other full-field fluorescence imaging methods and required significantly reduced scanning time compared with diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging. Furthermore, the spatial gradient mapping enhanced highlighting of tumor boundaries. Through the relatively simple hardware and software modifications described, SIFMI can be integrated with clinical fluorescence imaging systems, enhancing intraoperative tumor boundary delineation from the uninvolved tissue.

  15. Illuminating necrosis: From mechanistic exploration to preclinical application using fluorescence molecular imaging with indocyanine green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Wang, Kun; Zeng, Chaoting; Chi, Chongwei; Shang, Wenting; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Fan, Yingfang; Yang, Jian; Xiang, Nan; Zeng, Ning; Zhu, Wen; Fang, Chihua; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-11

    Tissue necrosis commonly accompanies the development of a wide range of serious diseases. Therefore, highly sensitive detection and precise boundary delineation of necrotic tissue via effective imaging techniques are crucial for clinical treatments; however, no imaging modalities have achieved satisfactory results to date. Although fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) shows potential in this regard, no effective necrosis-avid fluorescent probe has been developed for clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that indocyanine green (ICG) can achieve high avidity of necrotic tissue owing to its interaction with lipoprotein (LP) and phospholipids. The mechanism was explored at the cellular and molecular levels through a series of in vitro studies. Detection of necrotic tissue and real-time image-guided surgery were successfully achieved in different organs of different animal models with the help of FMI using in house-designed imaging devices. The results indicated that necrotic tissue with a 0.6 mm diameter could be effectively detected with precise boundary definition. We believe that the new discovery and the associated imaging techniques will improve personalized and precise surgery in the near future.

  16. Differential diagnosis of lung carcinoma with three-dimensional quantitative molecular vibrational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Hammoudi, Ahmad A.; Li, Fuhai; Thrall, Michael J.; Cagle, Philip T.; Chen, Yuanxin; Yang, Jian; Xia, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yubo; Massoud, Yehia; Wang, Zhiyong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2012-06-01

    The advent of molecularly targeted therapies requires effective identification of the various cell types of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Currently, cell type diagnosis is performed using small biopsies or cytology specimens that are often insufficient for molecular testing after morphologic analysis. Thus, the ability to rapidly recognize different cancer cell types, with minimal tissue consumption, would accelerate diagnosis and preserve tissue samples for subsequent molecular testing in targeted therapy. We report a label-free molecular vibrational imaging framework enabling three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition and quantitative analysis of cellular structures for identification of NSCLC cell types. This diagnostic imaging system employs superpixel-based 3-D nuclear segmentation for extracting such disease-related features as nuclear shape, volume, and cell-cell distance. These features are used to characterize cancer cell types using machine learning. Using fresh unstained tissue samples derived from cell lines grown in a mouse model, the platform showed greater than 97% accuracy for diagnosis of NSCLC cell types within a few minutes. As an adjunct to subsequent histology tests, our novel system would allow fast delineation of cancer cell types with minimum tissue consumption, potentially facilitating on-the-spot diagnosis, while preserving specimens for additional tests. Furthermore, 3-D measurements of cellular structure permit evaluation closer to the native state of cells, creating an alternative to traditional 2-D histology specimen evaluation, potentially increasing accuracy in diagnosing cell type of lung carcinomas.

  17. A virtualized infrastructure for molecular imaging research using a data grid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jasper; Dagliyan, Grant; Liu, Brent

    2009-02-01

    The animal-to-researcher workflow in many of today's small animal imaging center is burdened with proprietary data limitations, inaccessible back-up methods, and imaging results that are not easily viewable across campus. Such challenges decrease the amount of scans performed per day at the center and requires researchers to wait longer for their images and quantified results. Furthermore, data mining at the small animal imaging center is often limited to researcher names and date-labelled archiving hard-drives. To gain efficiency and reliable access to small animal imaging data, such a center needs to move towards an integrated workflow with file format normalization services, metadata databases, expandable archiving infrastructure, and comprehensive user interfaces for query / retrieval tools - achieving all in a cost-effective manner. This poster presentation demonstrates how grid technology can support such a molecular imaging and small animal imaging research community to bridge the needs between imaging modalities and clinical researchers. Existing projects have utilized the Data Grid in PACS tier 2 backup solutions, where fault-tolerance is a high priority, as well as imagingbased clinical trials where data security and auditing are primary concerns. Issues to be addressed include, but are not limited to, novel database designs, file format standards, virtual archiving and distribution workflows, and potential grid computing for 3-D reconstructions, co-registration, and post-processing analysis.

  18. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  19. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Biological Gene Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Cancer Therapy: Beyond Viral Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Nguyen, Vu H. [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, California(United States)

    2010-04-15

    Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonarrival biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.

  1. Molecular Probes for Imaging the Sigma-2 Receptor: In Vitro and In Vivo Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenbo; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Mach, Robert H

    2017-02-08

    The sigma-2 (σ2) receptor has been validated as a biomarker of the proliferative status of solid tumors. Therefore, radiotracers having a high affinity and high selectivity for σ2 receptors have the potential to assess the proliferative status of human tumors using noninvasive imaging techniques such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Since the σ2 receptor has not been cloned, the current knowledge of this receptor has relied on receptor binding studies with the radiolabeled probes and investigation of the effects of the σ2 receptor ligands on tumor cells. The development of the σ2 selective fluorescent probes has proven to be useful for studying subcellular localization and biological functions of the σ2 receptor, for revealing pharmacological properties of the σ2 receptor ligands, and for imaging cell proliferation. Preliminary clinical imaging studies with [(18)F]ISO-1, a σ2 receptor probe, have shown promising results in cancer patients. However, the full utility of imaging the σ2 receptor status of solid tumors in the diagnosis and prediction of cancer therapeutic response will rely on elucidation of the functional role of this protein in normal and tumor cell biology.

  2. Tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbitals with a two-color multicycle laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a scheme for tomographic reconstruction of asymmetric molecular orbitals based on high-order harmonic generation with a two-color multicycle laser field. It is shown that by adjusting the relative phase of the two fields, the returning electrons can be forced to recollide from one direction for all the orientations of molecules. Thus the reconstruction of the asymmetric orbitals can be carried out with multicycle laser field. This releases the stringent requirement of a single-cycle pulse with a stabilized and controllable carrier-envelop phase for the tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbitals.

  3. Breaching Biological Barriers: Protein Translocation Domains as Tools for Molecular Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Franc

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of a cell presents a significant barrier for the delivery of many molecular imaging reagents into cells at target sites in the body. Protein translocation domains (PTDs are peptides that breach this barrier. Conjugation of PTDs to imaging agents can be utilized to facilitate the delivery of these agents through the cell wall, and in some cases, into the cell nucleus, and have potential for in vitro and in vivo applications. PTD imaging conjugates have included small molecules, peptides, proteins, DNA, metal chelates, and magnetic nanoparticles. The full potential of the use of PTDs in novel in vivo molecular probes is currently under investigation. Cells have been labeled in culture using magnetic nanoparticles derivatized with a PTD and monitored in vivo to assess trafficking patterns relative to cells expressing a target antigen. In vivo imaging of PTD-mediated gene transfer to cells of the skin has been demonstrated in living animals. Here we review several natural and synthetic PTDs that have evolved in the quest for easier translocation across biological barriers and the application of these peptide domains to in vivo delivery of imaging agents.

  4. Molecular recognition imaging using tuning fork-based transverse dynamic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Manuel; Adamsmaier, Stefan [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Zanten, Thomas S. van [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Chtcheglova, Lilia A. [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Manzo, Carlo [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Duman, Memed [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mayer, Barbara [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Ebner, Andreas [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Moertelmaier, Manuel; Kada, Gerald [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, 4040 Linz (Austria); Garcia-Parajo, Maria F. [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Hinterdorfer, Peter, E-mail: peter.hinterdorfer@jku.at [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Kienberger, Ferry [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate simultaneous transverse dynamic force microscopy and molecular recognition imaging using tuning forks as piezoelectric sensors. Tapered aluminum-coated glass fibers were chemically functionalized with biotin and anti-lysozyme molecules and attached to one of the prongs of a 32 kHz tuning fork. The lateral oscillation amplitude of the tuning fork was used as feedback signal for topographical imaging of avidin aggregates and lysozyme molecules on mica substrate. The phase difference between the excitation and detection signals of the tuning fork provided molecular recognition between avidin/biotin or lysozyme/anti-lysozyme. Aggregates of avidin and lysozyme molecules appeared as features with heights of 1-4 nm in the topographic images, consistent with single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging. Recognition events between avidin/biotin or lysozyme/anti-lysozyme were detected in the phase image at high signal-to-noise ratio with phase shifts of 1-2{sup o}. Because tapered glass fibers and shear-force microscopy based on tuning forks are commonly used for near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), these results open the door to the exciting possibility of combining optical, topographic and biochemical recognition at the nanometer scale in a single measurement and in liquid conditions.

  5. Molecular PET Imaging of Cyclophosphamide Induced Apoptosis with 18F-ML-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel small-molecular apoptotic PET imaging probe, 18F-ML-8 with a malonate motif structure, is presented and discussed. After study, the small tracer that belongs to a member of ApoSense family is proved to be capable of imaging merely apoptotic regions in the CTX treated tumor-bearing mice. The experimental result is further confirmed by in vitro cell binding assays and TUNEL staining assay. As a result, 18F-ML-8 could be used for noninvasive visualization of apoptosis induced by antitumor chemotherapy.

  6. Molecular imaging of hypoxia in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Connie [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); St Thomas' Hospital, Imaging 2, London (United Kingdom); Blower, Philip J. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Imaging Chemistry and Biology, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J.R. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Clinical PET Imaging Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the commonest cancer worldwide but survival remains poor with a high risk of relapse, particularly after nonsurgical treatment. Hypoxia is present in a variety of solid tumours, including NSCLC. It is associated with treatment resistance and a poor prognosis, although when recognised may be amenable to different treatment strategies. Thus, noninvasive assessment of intratumoral hypoxia could be used to stratify patients for modification of subsequent treatment to improve tumour control. Molecular imaging approaches targeting hypoxic cells have shown some early success in the clinical setting. This review evaluates the evidence for hypoxia imaging using PET in NSCLC and explores its potential clinical utility. (orig.)

  7. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  8. Wirksamkeit der Aromatherapie auf Agitation und agitiertes Verhalten bei dementen Patienten: Systematische Literaturübersicht

    OpenAIRE

    Kummer, Carola; Jossen, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Problembeschreibung: Die Prävalenz von Demenz belief sich im Jahr 2010 weltweit auf 35,6 Millionen Menschen. Neben den Hauptsymptomen der Demenz können Reizbarkeit, Angst, Enthemmung und Agitation auftreten. Fast die Hälfte aller Menschen mit Demenz zeigen monatlich Agitation und agitiertes Verhalten auf. Medikamentöse Therapien weisen oft eine begrenzte Wirkung auf und sind mit Risiken und unerwünschten Wirkungen verbunden. Gefragt sind daher nichtmedikamentöse Therapien. Somit erlange...

  9. The Changing Face of Vascular Interventional Radiology: The Future Role of Pharmacotherapies and Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, Charles R., E-mail: crtapping@doctors.org.uk; Bratby, Mark J., E-mail: mark.bratby@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals, John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    Interventional radiology has had to evolve constantly because there is the ever-present competition and threat from other specialties within medicine, surgery, and research. The development of new technologies, techniques, and therapies is vital to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and to ensure its continued success in the future. In part, this change will be due to improved chronic disease prevention altering what we treat and in whom. The most important of these strategies are the therapeutic use of statins, Beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and substances that interfere with mast cell degeneration. Molecular imaging and therapeutic strategies will move away from conventional techniques and nano and microparticle molecular technology, tissue factor imaging, gene therapy, endothelial progenitor cells, and photodynamic therapy will become an important part of interventional radiology of the future. This review looks at these new and exciting technologies.

  10. Multimodal Molecular Mass Spectrometry Imaging : Development and Applications in Plant Biology and Forensic Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Porta, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of new analytical platforms for molecular mass spectrometry imaging and their applications in plant biology and forensic toxicology. So far, in drug metabolism or forensic toxicology, liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection is the technique of choice for analyzing drugs and metabolites in complex biological samples. LC-MS remains however challenging, because the development of appropriate sample preparation requires complex and time-consu...

  11. Molecular imaging for assessment of mesenchymal stem cells mediated breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Liang; Wang, Yuebing; He, Ningning; Wang, Di; Zhao, Qianjie; Feng, Guowei; Su, Weijun; Xu, Yang; Han, Zhongchao; Kong, Deling; Cheng, Zhen; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2014-06-01

    The tumor tropism of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) makes them an excellent delivery vehicle used in anticancer therapy. However, the exact mechanisms of MSCs involved in tumor microenvironment are still not well defined. Molecular imaging technologies with the versatility in monitoring the therapeutic effects, as well as basic molecular and cellular processes in real time, offer tangible options to better guide MSCs mediated cancer therapy. In this study, an in situ breast cancer model was developed with MDA-MB-231 cells carrying a reporter system encoding a double fusion (DF) reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase (Fluc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In mice breast cancer model, we injected human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUC-MSCs) armed with a triple fusion (TF) gene containing the herpes simplex virus truncated thymidine kinase (HSV-ttk), renilla luciferase (Rluc) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) into tumor on day 13, 18, 23 after MDA-MB-231 cells injection. Bioluminescence imaging of Fluc and Rluc provided the real time monitor of tumor cells and hUC-MSCs simultaneously. We found that tumors were significantly inhibited by hUC-MSCs administration, and this effect was enhanced by ganciclovir (GCV) application. To further demonstrate the effect of hUC-MSCs on tumor cells in vivo, we employed the near infrared (NIR) imaging and the results showed that hUC-MSCs could inhibit tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis to a certain degree. In conclusion, hUC-MSCs can inhibit breast cancer progression by inducing tumor cell death and suppressing angiogenesis. Moreover, molecular imaging is an invaluable tool in tracking cell delivery and tumor response to hUC-MSCs therapies as well as cellular and molecular processes in tumor.

  12. The Transferrin Receptor: A Potential Molecular Imaging Marker for Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Högemann-Savellano

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of differences between the molecular properties of cancer and normal tissue has the potential to enhance the detection of tumors. Because overexpression of endogenous transferrin receptor (TfR has been qualitatively described for various cancers and is presumably due to malignant transformation of cells, TfR may represent a suitable target for application of molecular imaging technologies to increase detection of smaller tumors. In the work reported here, investigation into the biology of this receptor using electron microscopy has demonstrated that iron oxide particles targeted to TfR are internalized and accumulate in lysosomal vesicles within cells. Biochemical analysis of the interaction of imaging probes with cells overexpressing the TfR demonstrated that the extent of accumulation, and therefore probe efficacy, is dependent on the nature of the chemical cross-link between transferrin and the iron oxide particle. These data were utilized to design and synthesize an improved imaging probe. Experiments demonstrate that the novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI probe is sensitive enough to detect small differences in endogenous TfR expression in human cancer cell lines. Quantitative measurement of TfR overexpression in a panel of 27 human breast cancer patients demonstrated that 74% of patient cancer tissues overexpressed the TfR and that the sensitivity of the new imaging agent was suitable to detect TfR overexpression in greater than 40% of these cases. Based on a biochemical and cell biological approach, these studies have resulted in the synthesis and development of an improved MRI probe with the best in vitro and in vivo imaging properties reported to date.

  13. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part II. In Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Swine with PET/CT and MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To quantitatively determine the limit of detection of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after cardiac cell therapy (CCT) in swine by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with cell prelabeling. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the institutional administrative panel on laboratory animal care. Seven swine received 23 intracardiac cell injections that contained control MSC and cell mixtures of MSC expressing a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene (MSC-TF) and bearing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) (MSC-TF-NP) or NP alone. Clinical MR imaging and PET reporter gene molecular imaging were performed after intravenous injection of the radiotracer fluorine 18-radiolabeled 9-[4-fluoro-3-(hydroxyl methyl) butyl] guanine ((18)F-FHBG). Linear regression analysis of both MR imaging and PET data and nonlinear regression analysis of PET data were performed, accounting for multiple injections per animal. Results MR imaging showed a positive correlation between MSC-TF-NP cell number and dephasing (dark) signal (R(2) = 0.72, P = .0001) and a lower detection limit of at least approximately 1.5 × 10(7) cells. PET reporter gene imaging demonstrated a significant positive correlation between MSC-TF and target-to-background ratio with the linear model (R(2) = 0.88, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.523) and the nonlinear model (R(2) = 0.99, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.273) and a lower detection limit of 2.5 × 10(8) cells. Conclusion The authors quantitatively determined the limit of detection of MSC after CCT in swine by using clinical PET reporter gene imaging and clinical MR imaging with cell prelabeling. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. MMP-13 In-Vivo Molecular Imaging Reveals Early Expression in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Salaün

    Full Text Available Several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are overexpressed in lung cancer and may serve as potential targets for the development of bioactivable probes for molecular imaging.To characterize and monitor the activity of MMPs during the progression of lung adenocarcinoma.K-rasLSL-G12D mice were imaged serially during the development of adenocarcinomas using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and a probe specific for MMP-2, -3, -9 and -13. Lung tumors were identified using FMT and MRI co-registration, and the probe concentration in each tumor was assessed at each time-point. The expression of Mmp2, -3, -9, -13 was quantified by qRT-PCR using RNA isolated from microdissected tumor cells. Immunohistochemical staining of overexpressed MMPs in animals was assessed on human lung tumors.In mice, 7 adenomas and 5 adenocarcinomas showed an increase in fluorescent signal on successive FMT scans, starting between weeks 4 and 8. qRT-PCR assays revealed significant overexpression of only Mmp-13 in mice lung tumors. In human tumors, a high MMP-13 immunostaining index was found in tumor cells from invasive lesions (24/27, but in none of the non-invasive (0/4 (p=0.001.MMP-13 is detected in early pulmonary invasive adenocarcinomas and may be a potential target for molecular imaging of lung cancer.

  15. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3-Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Wilson, Katheryne E; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T-cell coregulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor, and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an IHC analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients.

  16. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  17. Molecular imaging of plaques in coronary arteries with PET and SPECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Hua SUN; Hairil Rashmizal; Lei XU

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease remains a major cause of mortality. Presence of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary artery is responsible for lu-men stenosis which is often used as an indicator for determining the severity of coronary artery disease. However, the degree of coronary lumen stenosis is not often related to compromising myocardial blood flow, as most of the cardiac events that are caused by atherosclerotic plaques are the result of vulnerable plaques which are prone to rupture. Thus, identification of vulnerable plaques in coronary arteries has become increas-ingly important to assist identify patients with high cardiovascular risks. Molecular imaging with use of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has fulfilled this goal by providing functional information about plaque activity which enables accurate assessment of plaque stability. This review article provides an overview of diagnostic applications of molecular imaging tech-niques in the detection of plaques in coronary arteries with PET and SPECT. New radiopharmaceuticals used in the molecular imaging of coro-nary plaques and diagnostic applications of integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI in coronary plaques are also discussed.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Kentaro; Pontone, Gregory M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are very common in neurodegenerative diseases and are a major contributor to disability and caregiver burden. There is accumulating evidence that NPS may be a prodrome of neurodegenerative diseases and are associated with functional decline. The medications used to treat these symptoms in younger patients are not very effective in patients with neurodegenerative disease and may have serious side effects. An understanding of the neurobiology of NPS is critical for the development of more effective intervention strategies. Targeting these symptoms may also have implications for prevention of cognitive or motor decline. Molecular brain imaging represents a bridge between basic and clinical observations and provides many opportunities for translation from animal models and human post-mortem studies to in vivo human studies. Molecular brain imaging studies in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are reviewed with a primary focus on positron emission tomography studies of NPS. Future directions for the field of molecular imaging in AD and PD to understand the neurobiology of NPS will be discussed. PMID:25446948

  19. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer using an actively targeted conjugated polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasundaram G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghayathri Balasundaram,1,* Chris Jun Hui Ho,1,* Kai Li,2 Wouter Driessen,3 US Dinish,1 Chi Lok Wong,1 Vasilis Ntziachristos,3 Bin Liu,2 Malini Olivo1,41Bio-Optical Imaging Group, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC, 2Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR, Singapore; 3Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Center Munich, Neuherberg, Germany; 4School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Conjugated polymers (CPs are upcoming optical contrast agents in view of their unique optical properties and versatile synthetic chemistry. Biofunctionalization of these polymer-based nanoparticles enables molecular imaging of biological processes. In this work, we propose the concept of using a biofunctionalized CP for noninvasive photoacoustic (PA molecular imaging of breast cancer. In particular, after verifying the PA activity of a CP nanoparticle (CP dots in phantoms and the targeting efficacy of a folate-functionalized version of the same (folate-CP dots in vitro, we systemically administered the probe into a folate receptor-positive (FR+ve MCF-7 breast cancer xenograft model to demonstrate the possible application of folate-CP dots for imaging FR+ve breast cancers in comparison to CP dots with no folate moieties. We observed a strong PA signal at the tumor site of folate-CP dots-administered mice as early as 1 hour after administration as a result of the active targeting of the folate-CP dots to the FR+ve tumor cells but a weak PA signal at the tumor site of CP-dots-administered mice as a result of the passive accumulation of the probe by enhanced permeability and retention effect. We also observed that folate-CP dots produced ~4-fold enhancement in the PA signal in the tumor, when compared to CP dots. These observations demonstrate the great potential of this active-targeting CP to be used

  20. Application of Machine Learning tools to recognition of molecular patterns in STM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksov, Artem; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu; Higashibayashi, Shuhei; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Kalinin, Sergei; Sumpter, Bobby

    The ability to utilize individual molecules and molecular assemblies as data storage elements has motivated scientist for years, concurrent with the continuous effort to shrink a size of data storage devices in microelectronics industry. One of the critical issues in this effort lies in being able to identify individual molecular assembly units (patterns), on a large scale in an automated fashion of complete information extraction. Here we present a novel method of applying machine learning techniques for extraction of positional and rotational information from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of π-bowl sumanene molecules on gold. We use Markov Random Field (MRF) model to decode the polar rotational states for each molecule in a large scale STM image of molecular film. We further develop an algorithm that uses a convolutional Neural Network combined with MRF and input from density functional theory to classify molecules into different azimuthal rotational classes. Our results demonstrate that a molecular film is partitioned into distinctive azimuthal rotational domains consisting typically of 20-30 molecules. In each domain, the ``bowl-down'' molecules are generally surrounded by six nearest neighbor molecules in ``bowl-up'' configuration, and the resultant overall structure form a periodic lattice of rotational and polar states within each domain. Research was supported by the US Department of Energy.

  1. Nonlinear microrheology and molecular imaging to map microscale deformations of entangled DNA networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Anderson, Rae

    We use active microrheology coupled to single-molecule fluorescence imaging to elucidate the microscale dynamics of entangled DNA. DNA naturally exists in a wide range of lengths and topologies, and is often confined in cell nucleui, forming highly concentrated and entangled biopolymer networks. Thus, DNA is the model polymer for understanding entangled polymer dynamics as well as the crowded environment of cells. These networks display complex viscoelastic properties that are not well understood, especially at the molecular-level and in response to nonlinear perturbations. Specifically, how microscopic stresses and strains propagate through entangled networks, and what molecular deformations lead to the network stress responses are unknown. To answer these important questions, we optically drive a microsphere through entangled DNA, perturbing the system far from equilibrium, while measuring the resistive force the DNA exerts on the bead during and after bead motion. We simultaneously image single fluorescent-labeled DNA molecules throughout the network to directly link the microscale stress response to molecular deformations. We characterize the deformation of the network from the molecular-level to the mesoscale, and map the stress propagation throughout the network. We further study the impact of DNA length (11 - 115 kbp) and topology (linear vs ring DNA) on deformation and propagation dynamics, exploring key nonlinear features such as tube dilation and power-law relaxation.

  2. Use of aerosol route to fabricate positively charged Au/Fe3O4 Janus nanoparticles as multifunctional nanoplatforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong

    2016-10-01

    Gold (Au)-decorated iron oxide (Fe3O4), Au/Fe3O4, Janus nanoparticles were fabricated via the continuous route for aerosol Au incorporation with Fe3O4 domains synthesized in an aqueous medium as multifunctional nanoplatforms. The fabricated nanoparticles were subsequently exposed to 185-nm UV light to generate positive charges on Au surfaces, and their activities were tested in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, gene-delivery and photothermal therapy. No additional polymeric coatings of the Janus particles also had a unique ability to suppress inflammatory responses in macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide, which may be due to the absence of amine groups.

  3. High-Resolution Imaging of Molecular Gas and Dust in the Antennae (NGC 4038/39) Super Giant Molecular Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C D; Madden, S C; Charmandaris, V

    2000-01-01

    We present new aperture synthesis CO maps of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39) obtained with the Caltech Millimeter Array. These sensitive images show molecular emission associated with the two nuclei and a partial ring of star formation to the west of NGC 4038, as well as revealing the large extent of the extra-nuclear region of star formation (the ``overlap region''), which dominates the CO emission from this system. The largest molecular complexes have masses of 3-6x10^8 M_sun, typically an order of magnitude larger than the largest structures seen to date in more quiescent galaxy disks. The extremely red luminous star clusters identified previously with HST are well-correlated with the CO emission, which supports the conclusion that they are highly embedded young objects rather than old globular clusters. There is an excellent correlation between the CO emission and the 15 micron emission seen with ISO, particularly for the brightest regions. The most massive complexes in the overlap region have similar [NeIII]/...

  4. mRNA decay factor AUF1 binds the internal ribosomal entry site of enterovirus 71 and inhibits virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available AU-rich element binding factor 1 (AUF1 has a role in the replication cycles of different viruses. Here we demonstrate that AUF1 binds the internal ribosome entry site (IRES of enterovirus 71 (EV71 and negatively regulates IRES-dependent translation. During EV71 infection, AUF1 accumulates in the cytoplasm where viral replication occurs, whereas AUF1 localizes predominantly in the nucleus in mock-infected cells. AUF1 knockdown in infected cells increases IRES activity and synthesis of viral proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that AUF1 interacts with the EV71 IRES to negatively regulate viral translation and replication.

  5. Relationship between magnetic resonance imaging and molecular pathology in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-bin; TANG Kai; ZHANG Wei; YAN Wei; YOU Gang; LI Shao-wu; ZHANG Long; HUANG Yan-jie; JIANG Tao

    2011-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the diagnosis,characterization and clinical management of GBM.The diagnosis and treatment of GBM is largely guided by histopathology and immunohistochemistry.This study aimed to identify the relationship between magnetic resonance features and molecular pathology of GBM.Methods MRI images of 43 glioblastoma patients were collected.Four imaging features,degree of edema,contrast tumor enhanced/T2 ratio,multiple lesions and tumor across the midline,were selected to identify their relationship with P53,Ki-67 and O6-methylguanine-DNA methltransferase (MGMT) expression in patients with GBM.The relationship between imaging features and molecular pathology was studied by chi-square test using the software SPSS 13.0.Results High expression of P53 was found correlated with low contrast tumor enhanced/T2 ratio,low expression of Ki-67 was correlated with multiple lesions and high expression of KI-67 may be related with tumor across the midline,low expression of MGMT was correlated with edema.Conclusion Some MRI features such as the degree of edema,contrast tumor enhanced/T2 ratio,multiple lesions and tumor acrossing the midline are correlated with P53,Ki-67 and MGMT of GBM.

  6. [Consideration on molecular imaging technology as a tool for drug research and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Kazuyoshi; Nishimura, Shintaro

    2009-03-01

    Molecular imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are known as powerful tools for clinical diagnosis in neurology, oncology and so on. As applications to new drug research and development, there are three methodologies which are PK (Pharmacokinetics study), PD (Pharmacodynamic study), and efficacy study. When we use these methodologies for the drug research, we must consider construction of technological environment (tracer, animal model, imaging analysis software, and clinical database) and regulatory environment for GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) and GCP (Good Clinical Practice) level. Additionally, concept of microdosing and exploratory clinical study was proposed in western countries and the guidance on microdosing study was also announced by Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry on June 3rd 2008. However they may be still in learning phase, we must meet with complexity, high cost, and indigestion. To promote molecular imaging technology into the drug research, integration of the scientists between academia and industry is important because it needs much type of the advanced technologies and skills.

  7. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  8. Pushing CT and MR Imaging to the Molecular Level for Studying the “Omics”: Current Challenges and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ming Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, medical imaging has made the transition from anatomical imaging to functional and even molecular imaging. Such transition provides a great opportunity to begin the integration of imaging data and various levels of biological data. In particular, the integration of imaging data and multiomics data such as genomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and pharmacogenomics may open new avenues for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. However, to promote imaging-omics integration, the practical challenge of imaging techniques should be addressed. In this paper, we describe key challenges in two imaging techniques: computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and then review existing technological advancements. Despite the fact that CT and MRI have different principles of image formation, both imaging techniques can provide high-resolution anatomical images while playing a more and more important role in providing molecular information. Such imaging techniques that enable single modality to image both the detailed anatomy and function of tissues and organs of the body will be beneficial in the imaging-omics field.

  9. The role of MRI in suspected inner ear malformations; Stellenwert der MRT bei Verdacht auf Innenohrmissbildung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S.; Juettemann, S.; Amaya, B. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Rasinski, C.; Bloching, M. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenkrankheiten; Koenig, E. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenkrankheiten

    2003-12-01

    Purpose: This is a prospective analysis of the value of MRI in suspected inner ear malformations. Materials and Methods: In 50 patients (43 children and young adults, 7 adults) with suspected inner ear malformation MRI (1.5 T) was performed. In addition, 42 of these patients underwent CT. For the analysis of the inner ear structures, the constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence with 0.7 mm slice thickness was used. Functional tests revealed a sensorineural hearing loss or deafness in 82 temporal bones (TB) and a combined hearing loss in 4 TB. The hearing loss was unilateral in 14 patients. MRI and CT findings were compared. Results: Imaging findings were normal in 58 TB. The pathological findings included inner ear malformations (35 TB), inflammatory changes (4 TB), partial obliteration of labyrinth (2 TB) and congenital aural atresia (1 TB). An isolated absence of the cochlear nerve (1 TB) could only be found by MRI. In the remaining cases, an inner ear malformation was diagnosed by MRI and CT with the same confidence but MRI was superior in displaying the fine details. Conclusions: MRI will become the method of choice in the diagnosis of inner ear malformations. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Das Ziel der Arbeit bestand in einer prospektiven Analyse des Stellenwertes der MRT bei Verdacht auf eine Innenohrmissbildung. Material und Methodik: 50 Patienten (43 Kinder und Jugendliche, 7 Erwachsene) mit dringendem Verdacht auf eine Innenohrmissbildung erhielten eine MRT-Untersuchung (1,5 T), bei 42 dieser Patienten wurde auch eine CT durchgefuehrt. Bei der Beurteilung der Innenohrstrukturen kam die CISS-Sequenz mit einer Schichtdicke von 0,7 mm zur Anwendung. Durch Funktionstests wurde an 82 Schlaefenbeinen (SB) eine Innenohrhoerstoerung und an 4 SB eine kombinierte Hoerstoerung diagnostiziert. 14 Patienten hatten eine einseitige Hoerstoerung. MRT- und CT-Ergebnisse wurden verglichen. Ergebnisse: Einen bildgebenden Normalbefund wiesen 58 SB auf. Folgende

  10. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of Gold Nanoparticles as Potential Molecular Probes for Light-Based Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Gopal Rayavarapu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods with optical extinction bands within the “optical imaging window.” The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging techniques. Further, we have conjugated these gold nanoparticles to a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to HER2 overexpressing SKBR3 breast carcinoma cells. The bioconjugation protocol uses noncovalent modes of binding based on a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of the antibody and the gold surface. We discuss various aspects of the synthesis and bioconjugation protocols and the characterization results of the functionalized nanoparticles. Some proposed applications of these potential molecular probes in the field of biomedical imaging are also discussed.

  11. Preanalytical considerations in detection of colorectal cancer in blood serum using Raman molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treado, Patrick J.; Stewart, Shona D.; Smith, Aaron; Kirschner, Heather; Post, Christopher; Overholt, Bergein F.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Raman Molecular Imaging (RMI) is an effective technique to evaluate human tissue, cells and bodily fluids, including blood serum for disease diagnosis. ChemImage Corporation, in collaboration with clinicians, has been engaged in development of an in vitro diagnostic Raman assay focused on CRC detection. The Raman Assay for Colorectal Cancer (RACC) exploits the high specificity of Raman imaging to distinguish diseased from normal dried blood serum droplets without additional reagents. Pilot Study results from testing of hundreds of biobank patient samples have demonstrated that RACC detects CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. However, expanded clinical trials, which are ongoing, are revealing a host of important preanalytical considerations associated with sample collection, sample storage and stability, sample shipping, sample preparation and sample interferents, which impact detection performance. Results from recent clinical studies will be presented.

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticle-micelles (ION-micelles for sensitive (molecular magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas W E Starmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs are a promising nanoplatform for contrast-enhanced MRI. Recently, magnetic particle imaging (MPI was introduced as a new imaging modality, which is able to directly visualize magnetic particles and could serve as a more sensitive and quantitative alternative to MRI. However, MPI requires magnetic particles with specific magnetic properties for optimal use. Current commercially available iron oxide formulations perform suboptimal in MPI, which is triggering research into optimized synthesis strategies. Most synthesis procedures aim at size control of iron oxide nanoparticles rather than control over the magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ION platform for sensitive MPI and MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS: IONs were synthesized using a thermal-decomposition method and subsequently phase-transferred by encapsulation into lipidic micelles (ION-Micelles. Next, the material and magnetic properties of the ION-Micelles were analyzed. Most notably, vibrating sample magnetometry measurements showed that the effective magnetic core size of the IONs is 16 nm. In addition, magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS measurements were performed. MPS is essentially zero-dimensional MPI and therefore allows to probe the potential of iron oxide formulations for MPI. ION-Micelles induced up to 200 times higher signal in MPS measurements than commercially available iron oxide formulations (Endorem, Resovist and Sinerem and thus likely allow for significantly more sensitive MPI. In addition, the potential of the ION-Micelle platform for molecular MPI and MRI was showcased by MPS and MRI measurements of fibrin-binding peptide functionalized ION-Micelles (FibPep-ION-Micelles bound to blood clots. CONCLUSIONS: The presented data underlines the potential of the ION-Micelle nanoplatform for sensitive (molecular MPI and warrants further investigation of the Fib

  13. Molecular imaging of potential bone metastasis from differentiated thyroid cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arasho Belachew

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Molecular imaging of the spine is a rarely used diagnostic method for which only a few case reports exist in the literature. Here, to the best of our knowledge we present the first case of a combination of molecular imaging by single photon emission computer tomography and positron emission tomography used in post-operative spinal diagnostic assessment. Case presentation We present the case of a 50-year-old Caucasian woman experiencing progressive spinal cord compression caused by a vertebral metastasis of a less well differentiated thyroid cancer. Following tumor resection and vertebral stabilization, total thyroidectomy was performed revealing follicular thyroid carcinoma pT2 pNxM1 (lung, bone. During follow-up our patient underwent five radioiodine therapy procedures (5.3 to 5.7 GBq each over a two-year period. Post-therapeutic I-131 scans showed decreasing uptake in multiple Pulmonary metastases. However, following an initial decrease, stimulated thyroglobulin remained at pathologically increased levels, indicating further neoplastic activity. F18 Fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, which was performed in parallel, showed remaining hypermetabolism in the lungs but no hypermetabolism of the spinal lesions correlating with the stable neurological examinations. While on single photon emission computer tomography images Pulmonary hyperfixation of I-131 disappeared (most likely indicating dedifferentiation, there was persistent spinal hyperfixation at the operated level and even higher fixation at the spinal process of L3. Based on the negative results of the spinal F18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, a decision was made not to operate again on the spine since our patient was completely asymptomatic and the neurological risk seemed to be too high. During further follow-up our patient remained neurologically stable. Conclusions Molecular imaging by F18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography helps

  14. A systematic review of lessons learned from PET molecular imaging research in atypical parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios [Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    To systematically review the previous studies and current status of positron emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging research in atypical parkinsonism. MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus electronic databases were searched for articles published until 29th March 2016 and included brain PET studies in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). Only articles published in English and in peer-reviewed journals were included in this review. Case-reports, reviews, and non-human studies were excluded. Seventy-seven PET studies investigating the dopaminergic system, glucose metabolism, microglial activation, hyperphosphorilated tau, opioid receptors, the cholinergic system, and GABA{sub A} receptors in PSP, MSA, and CBS patients were included in this review. Disease-specific patterns of reduced glucose metabolism have shown higher accuracy than dopaminergic imaging techniques to distinguish between parkinsonian syndromes. Microglial activation has been found in all forms of atypical parkinsonism and reflects the known distribution of neuropathologic changes in these disorders. Opioid receptors are decreased in the striatum of PSP and MSA patients. Subcortical cholinergic dysfunction was more severe in MSA and PSP than Parkinson's disease patients although no significant changes in cortical cholinergic receptors were seen in PSP with cognitive impairment. GABA{sub A} receptors were decreased in metabolically affected cortical and subcortical regions in PSP patients. PET molecular imaging has provided valuable insight for understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical parkinsonism. Changes at a molecular level occur early in the course of these neurodegenerative diseases and PET imaging provides the means to aid differential diagnosis, monitor disease progression, identify of novel targets for pharmacotherapy, and monitor response to new treatments. (orig.)

  15. The role of molecular dipole orientation in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and implications for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Mikael P; Lew, Matthew D; Backer, Adam S; Sahl, Steffen J; Moerner, W E

    2014-03-17

    Numerous methods for determining the orientation of single-molecule transition dipole moments from microscopic images of the molecular fluorescence have been developed in recent years. At the same time, techniques that rely on nanometer-level accuracy in the determination of molecular position, such as single-molecule super-resolution imaging, have proven immensely successful in their ability to access unprecedented levels of detail and resolution previously hidden by the optical diffraction limit. However, the level of accuracy in the determination of position is threatened by insufficient treatment of molecular orientation. Here we review a number of methods for measuring molecular orientation using fluorescence microscopy, focusing on approaches that are most compatible with position estimation and single-molecule super-resolution imaging. We highlight recent methods based on quadrated pupil imaging and on double-helix point spread function microscopy and apply them to the study of fluorophore mobility on immunolabeled microtubules.

  16. Beratung auf Facebook und Twitter? Wie virtuelle Beratungsangebote auf die neuen Leitmedien reagieren können

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Thiery

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Facebook und Twitter erleben aktuell einen enormen Zulauf. Beide konkurrieren um die Vorherrschaft als Leitmedium des WEB 2.0. Mit ihrem Angebotsmix sind sie nicht nur für die Mehrheit der Internetnutzer attraktiv, sie prägen darüber hinaus die Nutzungsgewohnheiten, die sich in Form einer spezifischen „Internetkultur“ etablieren. Zudem forcieren die Leitmedien technische Trends wie beispielsweise das „mobile computing“. Der Artikel beschäftigt sich mit der Frage, welche Auswirkungen diese Entwicklungen auf die professionellen Onlineberatungsangebote hat und wie ihnen begegnet werden kann.

  17. Isovlavone und Soja haben keine Wirkung auf die Knochendichte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burckhardt P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavone sind eine Untergruppe von östrogenähnlichen Pflanzensteroiden, welche sich vor allem in Sojaprodukten finden. Es wird ihnen eine östrogenähnliche, knochenschützende Wirkung zugeschrieben. Aber die genaue Analyse der wissenschaftlichen Literatur ergibt, dass abgesehen von den Tierversuchen nur wenige klinische Versuche mit diesen Substanzen als kontrollierte, randomisierte Studien durchgeführt worden sind. Dabei wurden positive Teilresultate hochgespielt. Wissenschaftliche Metaanalysen dieser Versuche kamen eindeutig zum Schluss, dass Soja und Isoflavone keine Wirkung auf die Knochendichte aufzeigen. Es hat sich aber ergeben, dass Equol, das von bestimmten Bakterien im Darm aus dem Isoflavon Daidzein gebildet wird, die Substanz ist, welche am meisten mit den Östrogen-Rezeptoren beta bindet, und dass nur ca. 30 % der Frauen zur Equol-Bildung befähigt sind, in Asien aber 50 %. Deswegen wurden auch mit Equol klinische Versuche durchgeführt, und zwar bei Frauen, die kein Equol bilden konnten. Aber wiederum blieben die Resultate negativ bezüglich einer Wirkung auf die Knochendichte. Es muss daher geschlossen werden, dass Isoflavone und Equol in der Prävention und Therapie der Osteoporose wirkungslos sind.

  18. Molecular imaging of cannabis leaf tissue with MeV-SIMS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenčič, Boštjan; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Kovačec, Eva; Regvar, Marjana; Siketić, Zdravko; Vavpetič, Primož; Rupnik, Zdravko; Bučar, Klemen; Kelemen, Mitja; Kovač, Janez; Pelicon, Primož

    2016-03-01

    To broaden our analytical capabilities with molecular imaging in addition to the existing elemental imaging with micro-PIXE, a linear Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer for MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) was constructed and added to the existing nuclear microprobe at the Jožef Stefan Institute. We measured absolute molecular yields and damage cross-section of reference materials, without significant alteration of the fragile biological samples during the duration of measurements in the mapping mode. We explored the analytical capability of the MeV-SIMS technique for chemical mapping of the plant tissue of medicinal cannabis leaves. A series of hand-cut plant tissue slices were prepared by standard shock-freezing and freeze-drying protocol and deposited on the Si wafer. We show the measured MeV-SIMS spectra showing a series of peaks in the mass area of cannabinoids, as well as their corresponding maps. The indicated molecular distributions at masses of 345.5 u and 359.4 u may be attributed to the protonated THCA and THCA-C4 acids, and show enhancement in the areas with opened trichome morphology.

  19. Molecular imaging of cannabis leaf tissue with MeV-SIMS method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenčič, Boštjan, E-mail: bostjan.jencic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, Luka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); M4I, Maastricht University, Peter Debijelaan 25A, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Dept. of Biology, Večna pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kovačec, Eva; Regvar, Marjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Dept. of Biology, Večna pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Siketić, Zdravko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Vavpetič, Primož; Rupnik, Zdravko; Bučar, Klemen; Kelemen, Mitja; Kovač, Janez; Pelicon, Primož [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-03-15

    To broaden our analytical capabilities with molecular imaging in addition to the existing elemental imaging with micro-PIXE, a linear Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer for MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) was constructed and added to the existing nuclear microprobe at the Jožef Stefan Institute. We measured absolute molecular yields and damage cross-section of reference materials, without significant alteration of the fragile biological samples during the duration of measurements in the mapping mode. We explored the analytical capability of the MeV-SIMS technique for chemical mapping of the plant tissue of medicinal cannabis leaves. A series of hand-cut plant tissue slices were prepared by standard shock-freezing and freeze-drying protocol and deposited on the Si wafer. We show the measured MeV-SIMS spectra showing a series of peaks in the mass area of cannabinoids, as well as their corresponding maps. The indicated molecular distributions at masses of 345.5 u and 359.4 u may be attributed to the protonated THCA and THCA-C4 acids, and show enhancement in the areas with opened trichome morphology.

  20. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis Using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Conjugated Microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Qin, Bin; Chen, Xucai; Wagner, William R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging of angiogenesis receptors could provide a sensitive and clinically useful method for detecting neovascularization such as occurs in malignant tumors, and responses to anti-angiogenic therapies for such tumors. We tested the hypothesis that microbubbles (MB) tagged with human VEGF121 (MBVEGF) bind to the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) in vitro and angiogenic endothelium in vivo, and that this specific binding can be imaged on a clinical ultrasound system. In this work, targeted adhesion of MBVEGF was evaluated in vitro using a parallel plate flow system containing adsorbed recombinant human KDR. There was more adhesion of MBVEGF to KDR-coated plates when the amount of VEGF121 on each MB or KDR density on the plate was increased. MBVEGF adhesion to KDR-coated plates decreased with increasing wall shear rate. On intravital microscopic imaging of bFGF-stimulated rat cremaster muscle, there was greater microvascular adhesion of MBVEGF compared to that of isotype IgG-conjugated control MB (MBCTL). To determine if MBVEGF could be used to ultrasonically image angiogenesis, ultrasound imaging was performed in mice bearing squamous cell carcinoma after intravenous injection of MBVEGF. Ultrasound videointensity enhancement in tumor was significantly higher for MBVEGF (17.3±9.7 dB) compared to MBCTL (3.8±4.4 dB, n=6, ptumor angiogenesis and could be extended to other applications such as molecular monitoring of therapeutic angiogenesis or anti-angiogenic therapies in cardiovascular disease or cancer. PMID:28165246

  1. Molecular cardiac PET besides FDG viability imaging; Molekulare Kardiale PET jenseits der FDG-Vitalitaetsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, O.; Burchert, W. [Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Molekulare Bildgebung, Herz- und Diabetszentrum NRW

    2009-06-15

    Molecular cardiac non F-18-FDG PET is currently based on perfusion imaging. It is of excellent diagnostic accuracy to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and superior to perfusion SPECT. There is also evidence for its incremental prognostic value. The unique feature of PET to measure myocardial perfusion in absolute terms and in short time periods define its impact on cardiac imaging enabling both the evaluation of early changes in CAD and the accurate characterization of multivessel disease. Currently, all available PET perfusion tracers in Europe are cyclotron products. Rb-82, a generator product, is the most frequently employed perfusion tracer in the United States and cyclotron independent. This tracer has the potential to become an alternative in Europe soon. Nowadays, PET systems are manufactured as hybrid PET-CT scanners. In oncology, hybrid imaging revealed, that the combination of functional and morphological imaging is superior to the single components. In cardiology, the integration of perfusion PET imaging with CT calcium scoring and CT anatomy of the coronary arteries represents a similar constellation. Atherosclerotic plaque evaluation by combined PET-CT technique will be one of the most promising future applications with a potential immense impact on prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of CAD in the future. (orig.)

  2. Impairment of retrograde neuronal transport in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy demonstrated by molecular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of our study was to utilize a molecular imaging technology based on the retrograde axonal transport mechanism (neurography, to determine if oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects retrograde axonal transport in an animal model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice (n = 8/group were injected with a cumulative dose of 30 mg/kg oxaliplatin (sufficient to induce neurotoxicity or dextrose control injections. Intramuscular injections of Tetanus Toxin C-fragment (TTc labeled with Alexa 790 fluorescent dye were done (15 ug/20 uL in the left calf muscles, and in vivo fluorescent imaging performed (0-60 min at baseline, and then weekly for 5 weeks, followed by 2-weekly imaging out to 9 weeks. Tissues were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: With sham treatment, TTc transport causes fluorescent signal intensity over the thoracic spine to increase from 0 to 60 minutes after injection. On average, fluorescence signal increased 722%+/-117% (Mean+/-SD from 0 to 60 minutes. Oxaliplatin treated animals had comparable transport at baseline (787%+/-140%, but transport rapidly decreased through the course of the study, falling to 363%+/-88%, 269%+/-96%, 191%+/-58%, 121%+/-39%, 75%+/-21% with each successive week and stabilizing around 57% (+/-15% at 7 weeks. Statistically significant divergence occurred at approximately 3 weeks (p≤0.05, linear mixed-effects regression model. Quantitative immuno-fluorescence histology with a constant cutoff threshold showed reduced TTc in the spinal cord at 7 weeks for treated animals versus controls (5.2 Arbitrary Units +/-0.52 vs 7.1 AU +/-1.38, p0.56, T-test. CONCLUSION: We show-for the first time to our knowledge-that neurographic in vivo molecular imaging can demonstrate imaging changes in a model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Impaired retrograde neural transport is suggested to be an important part of the pathophysiology of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  3. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Human CD276 Expression-Modulated Murine Ovarian Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Amelie M.; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Drescher, Charles W.; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Willmann, Jürgen K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a mouse ovarian cancer model that allows modulating the expression levels of human vascular targets in mouse xenograft tumors and to test whether expression of CD276 during tumor angiogenesis can be visualized by molecularly targeted ultrasound in vivo. Materials and Methods CD276-expressing MS-1 mouse endothelial cells were engineered and used for co-injection with 2008 human ovarian cancer cells for subcutaneous xenograft tumor induction in 15 nude mice. Fourteen control mice were injected with 2008 cells only. After confirming their binding specificity in flow chamber cell attachment studies, anti CD276 antibody-functionalized contrast microbubbles were used for in vivo CD276-targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. Results CD276-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P=0.006) in mixed MS1/2008 tumors compared to control tumors. Compared to control microbubbles the ultrasound signal using CD276-targeted microbubbles was significantly higher (P=0.002) and blocking with purified anti-CD276 antibody significantly decreased (P=0.0096) the signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors. Immunofluorescence analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed higher quantitative immunofluorescence signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors than in control 2008 only tumors, but showed not significantly different (P=0.54) microvessel density. Conclusion Our novel small animal model allows for modulating the expression of human tumor-associated vascular endothelial imaging targets in a mouse host and these expression differences can be visualized non-invasively by ultrasound molecular imaging. The animal model can be applied to other human vascular targets and may facilitate the preclinical development of new imaging probes such as microbubbles targeted at human vascular markers not expressed in mice. PMID:24389327

  4. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer.

  5. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Susu, E-mail: susu.yan@duke.edu; Tough, MengHeng [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Cheng, Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  6. Einflüsse vergesellschaftender Faktoren auf posttraditionale Vergemeinschaftungsformen am Beispiel der eSport-Szene

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    "Dieses Paper stellt Erkenntnisse vor, die im Rahmen einer empirischen Untersuchung der 'eSport-Szene' gewonnen werden konnten. Einerseits werden Einflüsse und Auswirkungen gesellschaftlicher Wandlungs- und Veränderungsprozesse (Technisierung, Kommerzialisierung, Wettbewerb) auf posttraditionale Vergemeinschaftungsformen und auf die sozialen Beziehungen involvierter Akteure dargestellt. Andererseits werden daraus ableitbare Überlegungen zum Beitrag technikzentrierter jugendkultureller Szenen ...

  7. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  8. Characterization of TCP-1 probes for molecular imaging of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonglin; Gray, Brian D; Barber, Christy; Bernas, Michael; Cai, Minying; Furenlid, Lars R; Rouse, Andrew; Patel, Charmi; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Liang, Rongguang; Gmitro, Arthur F; Witte, Marlys H; Pak, Koon Y; Woolfenden, James M

    2016-10-10

    Molecular probes capable of detecting colorectal cancer (CRC) are needed for early CRC diagnosis. The objective of this study was to characterize c[CTPSPFSHC]OH (TCP-1), a small peptide derived from phage display selection, for targeting human CRC xenografts using technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled TCP-1 and fluorescent cyanine-7 (Cy7)-labeled form of the peptide (Cy7-TCP-1). (99m)Tc-TCP-1 was generated by modifying TCP-1 with succinimidyl-6-hydrazino-nicotinamide (S-HYNIC) followed by radiolabeling. In vitro saturation binding experiments were performed for (99m)Tc-TCP-1 in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. SCID mice with human HCT116 cancer xenografts were imaged with (99m)Tc-TCP-1 or control peptide using a small-animal SPECT imager: Group I (n=5) received no blockade; Group II (n=5) received a blocking dose of non-radiolabeled TCP-1. Group III (n=5) were imaged with (99m)Tc-labeled control peptide (inactive peptide). SCID mice with human PC3 prostate cancer xenografts (Group IV, n=5) were also imaged with (99m)Tc-TCP-1. Eight additional SCID mice bearing HCT116 xenografts in dorsal skinfold window chambers (DSWC) were imaged by direct positron imaging of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and fluorescence microscopy of Cy7-TCP-1. In vitro(99m)Tc-HYNIC-TCP-1 binding assays on HCT 116 cells indicated a mean Kd of 3.04±0.52nM. In cancer xenografts, (99m)Tc-TCP-1 radioactivity (%ID/g) was 1.01±0.15 in the absence of blockade and was reduced to 0.26±0.04 (PTCP-1 or HCT116 tumors with inactive peptide. Cy7-TCP-1 activity localized not only in metabolically active tumors, as defined by (18)F-FDG imaging, but also in peritumoral microvasculature. In conclusion, TCP-1 probes may have a distinct targeting mechanism with high selectivity for CRC and tumor-associated vasculature. Molecular imaging with TCP-1 probes appears promising to detect malignant colorectal lesions.

  9. Development of a High-Throughput Molecular Imaging-Based Orthotopic Hepatocellular Carcinoma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gloria L; van den Bosch, Maurice A; Kim, Young I; Katzenberg, Regina; Willmann, Juergen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Hofmann, Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a novel orthotopic rat hepatocellular (HCC) model and have assessed the ability to use bioluminescence imaging (BLI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasound for early tumor detection and monitoring of disease progression.  Briefly, rat HCC cells were stably transfected with click beetle red as a reporter gene for BLI. Tumor cells were injected under direct visualization into the left or middle lobe of the liver in 37 rats. In six animals, serial PET, BLI, and ultrasound imaging were performed at 10-time points in 28 days. The remainder of the animals underwent PET imaging at 14 days. Tumor implantation was successful in 34 of 37 animals (91.9%). In the six animals that underwent serial imaging, tumor formation was first detected with BLI on Day 4 with continued increase through Day 21, and hypermetabolic activity on PET was first noted on Days 14-15 with continued increase through Day 28. PET activity was seen on Day 14 in the 28 other animals that demonstrated tumor development. Anatomic tumor formation was detected with ultrasound at Days 10-12 with continued growth through Day 28. The first metastases were detected by PET after Day 24.        We have successfully developed and validated a novel orthotopic HCC small animal model that permits longitudinal assessment of change in tumor size using molecular imaging techniques. BLI is the most sensitive imaging method for detection of early tumor formation and growth. This model permits high-throughput in vivo evaluation of image-guided therapies.

  10. Time slicing in 3D momentum imaging of the hydrogen molecular ion photo-fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, N.; Kaya, G.; Pham, F. V.; Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Photo-fragmentation of the hydrogen molecular ion was investigated with 800 nm, 50 fs laser pulses by employing a time slicing 3D imaging technique that enables the simultaneous measurement of all three momentum components which are linearly related with the pixel position and slicing time. This is done for each individual product particle arriving at the detector. This mode of detection allows us to directly measure the three-dimensional fragment momentum vector distribution without having to rely on mathematical reconstruction methods, which additionally require the investigated system to be cylindrically symmetric. We experimentally reconstruct the laser-induced photo-fragmentation of the hydrogen molecular ion. In previous experiments, neutral molecules were used as a target, but in this work, performed with molecular ions, the initial vibrational level populations are well-defined after electron bombardment, which facilitates the interpretation. We show that the employed time-slicing technique allows us to register the fragment momentum distribution that reflects the initial molecular states with greater detail, revealing features that were concealed in the full time-integrated distribution on the detector.

  11. Dissociation Dynamics and Molecular Imaging of Methane following Photoionization at the Carbon K-Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. B.; Landers, A. L.; Trevisan, C.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M. S.; Doerner, R.; Bocharova, I.; Sturm, F.; McCurdy, C. W.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th.

    2012-06-01

    We have used Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) to measure the momenta of the photoelectron and the molecular fragments arising from the dissociation of methane following core photoionization and subsequent Auger decay. We present results here that show (1) the full 3-D imaging of the molecule by the molecular frame photoelectron angular distribution; (2) the numerous dissociation pathways emerging from the unstable di- and tri-cations; (3) the dynamics associated with Jahn-Teller distortions in the breakdown of axial recoil behavior, where protons are only ejected along ground-state bond axes under certain conditions; and (4) the use of symmetries to improve statistics associated with measurements of this type. These results are compared with and interpreted through the use of Compex Kohn variational calculations.

  12. Diffractive imaging of a molecular rotational wavepacket with femtosecond Megaelectronvolt electron pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jie; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Centurion, Martin; Wang, Xijie

    2015-01-01

    Imaging changes in molecular geometries on their natural femtosecond timescale with sub-Angstrom spatial precision is one of the critical challenges in the chemical sciences, since the nuclear geometry changes determine the molecular reactivity. For photoexcited molecules, the nuclear dynamics determine the photoenergy conversion path and efficiency. We performed a gas-phase electron diffraction experiment using Megaelectronvolt (MeV) electrons, where we captured the rotational wavepacket dynamics of nonadiabatically laser-aligned nitrogen molecules. We achieved an unprecedented combination of 100 fs root-mean-squared (RMS) temporal resolution and sub-Angstrom (0.76 {\\AA}) spatial resolution that makes it possible to resolve the position of the nuclei within the molecule. In addition, the diffraction patterns reveal the angular distribution of the molecules, which changes from prolate (aligned) to oblate (anti-aligned) in 300 fs. Our results demonstrate a significant and promising step towards making atomical...

  13. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry: spatial molecular analysis to enable a new age of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan M; Norris, Jeremy L; Caprioli, Richard M

    2014-07-31

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) combines the sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometry with spatial analysis to provide a new dimension for histological analyses to provide unbiased visualization of the arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. As such, MALDI IMS has the capability to become a powerful new molecular technology for the biological and clinical sciences. In this review, we briefly describe several applications of MALDI IMS covering a range of molecular weights, from drugs to proteins. Current limitations and challenges are discussed along with recent developments to address these issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez.

  14. Simultaneous molecular imaging of EGFR and HER2 using hyperspectral darkfield microscopy and immunotargeted nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew J.; Marinakos, Stella; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam P.

    2009-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) contribute to the regulation of cell proliferation, and when jointly over-expressed are associated with several types of cancer. The ability to monitor both receptors simultaneously results in a more accurate indicator of degree of cancerous activity than either receptor alone. Plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) show promise as a potential EGFR and HER2 biomarker over alternatives such as fluorophores and quantum dots, which are limited by their cytotoxicity and photobleaching. To observe immunolabeled NPs bound to receptor-expressing cells, our past experiments were conducted using a novel optical darkfield microspectroscopy system. We implemented an epi-illumination darkfield broadband light train, which allows for darkfield analysis of live cells in culture with enhanced NP contrast. Under this setup, molecularly specific binding of NPs immunolabeled with anti-EGFR was confirmed. We have since adapted our darkfield setup, which previously only obtained spectral information from a line imaging spectrometer, to incorporate hyperspectral imaging capabilities, allowing widefield data acquisition within seconds. The new system has been validated through observation of shifts in the peak wavelength of scattering by gold NPs on silanated cover glasses using several immersion media. Peak resonant scattering wavelengths match well with that predicted by Mie theory. We will further demonstrate the potential of the system with simultaneous molecular imaging of multiple receptors in vitro using labeled EGFR+/HER2+ SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells with anti-EGFR immunolabeled gold nanospheres and anti-HER2 immunolabeled gold nanorods, with each scattering in different spectral windows. Additional trials will be performed to demonstrate molecularly specific binding using EGFR+/HER2- MDA-MB-468 and HER2+/EGFR- MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells.

  15. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  16. Isomerism in benzyl-DOTA derived bifunctional chelators: implications for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Katherine M; Woods, Mark

    2015-02-18

    The bifunctional chelator IB-DOTA has found use in a range of biomedical applications given its ability to chelate many metal ions, but in particular the lanthanide(III) ions. Gd(3+) in particular is of interest in the development of new molecular imaging agents for MRI and is highly suitable for chelation by IB-DOTA. Given the long-term instability of the aryl isothiocyanate functional group we have used the more stable nitro derivative (NB-DOTA) to conduct a follow-up study of some of our previous work on the coordination chemistry of chelates of these BFCs. Using a combination of NMR and HPLC to study the Eu(3+) and Yb(3+) chelates of NB-DOTA, we have demonstrated that this ligand will produce two discrete regioisomeric chelates at the point at which the metal ion is introduced into the BFC. These regioisomers are defined by the position of the benzylic substituent on the macrocyclic ring: adopting an equatorial position either at the corner or the side of the [3333] ring conformation. These regioisomers are incapable of interconversion and are distinct, separate structures with different SAP/TSAP ratios. The side isomer exhibits an increased population of the TSAP isomer, pointing to more rapid water exchange kinetics in this regioisomer. This has potential ramifications for the use of these two regioisomers of Gd(3+)-BFC chelates in MRI applications. We have also found that, remarkably, there is little or no freedom of rotation about the first single bond extending from the macrocyclic ring to the benzylic substituent. Since this is the linkage through which the chelate is conjugated to the remainder of the molecular imaging probe, this result implies that there may be reduced local rotation of the Gd(3+) chelate within a molecular imaging probe. This implies that this type of BFC could exhibit higher relaxivities than other types of BFC.

  17. Early detection of breast cancer: a molecular optical imaging approach using novel estrogen conjugate fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Shubhadeep; Jose, Iven

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen induced proliferation of mutant cells is widely understood to be the one of major risk determining factor in the development of breast cancer. Hence determination of the Estrogen Receptor[ER] status is of paramount importance if cancer pathogenesis is to be detected and rectified at an early stage. Near Infrared Fluorescence [NIRf] Molecular Optical Imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to monitor bio-molecular changes in living subjects. We discuss pre-clinical results in our efforts to develop an optical imaging diagnostic modality for the early detection of breast cancer. We have successfully carried out the synthesis and characterization of a novel target-specific NIRf dye conjugate aimed at measuring Estrogen Receptor[ER] status. The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of Indocyanine Green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1,1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5-carboxylic acid, sodium salt. In-vitro studies regarding specific binding and endocytocis of the dye performed on ER+ve [MCF-7] and control [MDA-MB-231] adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines clearly indicated nuclear localization of the dye for MCF-7 as compared to plasma level staining for MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells showed ~4.5-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity compared to MDA-MB-231. A 3-D mesh model mimicking the human breast placed in a parallel-plate DOT Scanner is created to examine the in-vivo efficacy of the dye before proceeding with clinical trials. Photon migration and florescence flux intensity is modeled using the finite-element method with the coefficients (quantum yield, molar extinction co-efficient etc.) pertaining to the dye as obtained from photo-physical and in-vitro studies. We conclude by stating that this lipophilic dye can be potentially used as a target specific exogenous contrast agent in molecular optical imaging for early detection of breast cancer.

  18. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  19. The effect of aging on atherosclerotic plaque inflammation and molecular calcification: A PET CT imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Simonsen, Jane Angel;

    cardiovascular risk factors were prospectively assessed by 18F-FDG (inflammation) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF) (molecular calcification) PET CT imaging. Global aortic uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-NaF was determined semi-quantitatively by calculating the average blood pool corrected standardized uptake value (cSUV......) [Mean SUVAORTA - Mean SUVBLOOD POOL]. Furthermore, the average maximum 18F-NaF cSUV was determined in the coronary arteries. Calculating regression and correlation coefficients summarized the data. Results: A quadratic relationship was observed between aging and aortic 18F-FDG avidity. A second order...

  20. Imaging Polyatomic Molecules in Three Dimensions Using Molecular Frame Photoelectron Angular Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. B.; Trevisan, C. S.; Schöffler, M. S.; Jahnke, T.; Bocharova, I.; Kim, H.; Ulrich, B.; Wallauer, R.; Sturm, F.; Rescigno, T. N.; Belkacem, A.; Dörner, R.; Weber, Th.; McCurdy, C. W.; Landers, A. L.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for determining the full three-dimensional molecular-frame photoelectron angular distribution in polyatomic molecules using methane as a prototype. Simultaneous double Auger decay and subsequent dissociation allow measurement of the initial momentum vectors of the ionic fragments and the photoelectron in coincidence, allowing full orientation by observing a three-ion decay pathway, (H+, H+, CH2+). We find the striking result that at low photoelectron energies the molecule is effectively imaged by the focusing of photoelectrons along bond directions.

  1. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  2. Imaging Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer With X-ray Activated Nano-Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    shot-noise limited detection" was assumed to be too low to detect. To calculate the molar concentration, we assumed a spherical 10 nm diameter...Kandarakis et al. !a" Minimum weight concentration !in mg/ml" vs dose !Gy". !b" Minimum molar concentration !in M" vs dose !Gy". a b c d FIG. 5. Agar imaging...Contrast agents: X-ray contrast agents and molecular imaging—A contradiction ?,” Handb Exp Pharmacol 185, 167–175 񓟸#. 3R. Weissleder and M. J. Pittet

  3. CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral fluorescence imaging for DNA molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nan; Cheung, Kawai; Wong, Hiu Tong; Ho, Derek

    2014-10-31

    Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  4. The use of anatomical information for molecular image reconstruction algorithms: Attention/Scatter correction, motion compensation, and noise reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Se Young [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    PET and SPECT are important tools for providing valuable molecular information about patients to clinicians. Advances in nuclear medicine hardware technologies and statistical image reconstruction algorithms enabled significantly improved image quality. Sequentially or simultaneously acquired anatomical images such as CT and MRI from hybrid scanners are also important ingredients for improving the image quality of PET or SPECT further. High-quality anatomical information has been used and investigated for attenuation and scatter corrections, motion compensation, and noise reduction via post-reconstruction filtering and regularization in inverse problems. In this article, we will review works using anatomical information for molecular image reconstruction algorithms for better image quality by describing mathematical models, discussing sources of anatomical information for different cases, and showing some examples.

  5. In-vivo human brain molecular imaging with a brain-dedicated PET/MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang Hee; Son, Young Don; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Hang Keun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Yoon; Ogawa, Seiji; Kim, Young Bo

    2013-02-01

    Advances in the new-generation of ultra-high-resolution, brain-dedicated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) systems have begun to provide many interesting insights into the molecular dynamics of the brain. First, the finely delineated structural information from ultra-high-field MRI can help us to identify accurate landmark structures, thereby making it easier to locate PET activation sites that are anatomically well-correlated with metabolic or ligand-specific organs in the neural structures in the brain. This synergistic potential of PET/MRI imaging is discussed in terms of neuroscience and neurological research from both translational and basic research perspectives. Experimental results from the hippocampus, thalamus, and brainstem obtained with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile are used to demonstrate the potential of this new brain PET/MRI system.

  6. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-06-12

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

  7. Development of a Confocal Optical System Design for Molecular Imaging Applications of Biochip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel confocal optical system design and a dual laser confocal scanner have been developed to meet the requirements of highly sensitive detection of biomolecules on microarray chips, which is characterized by a long working distance (wd>3.0 mm, high numerical aperture (NA=0.72, and only 3 materials and 7 lenses used. This confocal optical system has a high scanning resolution, an excellent contrast and signal-to-noise ratio, and an efficiency of collected fluorescence of more than 2-fold better than that of other commercial confocal biochip scanners. The scanner is as equally good for the molecular imaging detection of enclosed biochips as for the detection of biological samples on a slide surface covered with a cover-slip glass. Some applications of gene and protein imagings using the dual laser confocal scanner are described.

  8. Universal Molecular Scaffold for Facile Construction of Multivalent and Multimodal Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Yongkang; Xiang, Guangya; Ma, Xiang; Hui, Wenqi; Ouyang, Qin; Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-03-16

    Multivalent and multimodal imaging probes are rapidly emerging as powerful chemical tools for visualizing various biochemical processes. Herein, we described a bifunctional chelator (BFC)-based scaffold that can be used to construct such promising probes concisely. Compared to other reported similar scaffolds, this new BFC scaffold demonstrated two major advantages: (1) significantly simplified synthesis due to the use of this new BFC that can serve as chelator and linker simultaneously; (2) highly efficient synthesis rendered by using either click chemistry and/or total solid-phase synthesis. In addition, the versatile utility of this molecular scaffold has been demonstrated by constructing several multivalent/multimodal imaging probes labeled with various radioisotopes, and the resulting radiotracers demonstrated substantially improved in vivo performance compared to the two individual monomeric counterparts.

  9. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eHabuchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the super-resolution microscopy. I discuss the applications of super-resolution microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-nanotechnology.

  10. Molecular breast imaging: First results from Italian-National-Institute-of-Health clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Santanvenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Cinti, M. N.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Simonetti, G.; Schillaci, O.; Del Vecchio, S.; Salvatore, M.; Majewski, S.; De Vincentis, G.; Scopinaro, F.

    2007-02-01

    Dedicated high resolution detectors are needed for detection of small tumors by molecular imaging with radionuclides. Absorptive collimation are typically used for imaging single photon emitters, but it results in a strong reduction in efficiency. Systems based on electronic collimation offer higher efficiency but they are complex and expensive. In case of scintimammography, dual-head detectors increase sensitivity and cancel out the dependence of the lesion depth. In the system presented here, pixellated scintillator arrays (NaI:Tl) were coupled to arrays of PSPMT's, HPK H8500 Flat Panel. A dual-head detector having field of view of 100×100 mm 2 and 150×200 mm 2 were designed and built. The electronic system allows readout of all the anode pad signals. First clinical trials, performed in the framework of the Scintimammography project of Italian National Institute of Health and University of Tor Vergata in Rome, and University of Naples, are presented.

  11. Sodium and T1rho MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2006-11-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1rho relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1rho, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1rho relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1rho relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1rho in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1rho dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1rho relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1rho data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models

  12. Exploration of target molecules for molecular imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashikawa, Kei; Akada, Naoki; Yagi, Katsuharu [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Watanabe, Keiko; Kamino, Shinichiro; Kanayama, Yousuke; Hiromura, Makoto [Multiple Molecular Imaging Research Laboratory, RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Enomoto, Shuichi, E-mail: senomoto@pharm.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Multiple Molecular Imaging Research Laboratory, RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could discriminate each inflamed area of IBD model mice clearly. {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could not discriminate the difference of pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors expression was different by pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors would be new target molecules for IBD imaging. -- Abstract: Molecular imaging technology is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the efficacy evaluation of various drug therapies for it. However, it is difficult to elucidate directly the relationships between the responsible molecules and IBD using existing probes. Therefore, the development of an alternative probe that is able to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism and provide information on the appropriate guidelines for treatment is earnestly awaited. In this study, we investigated pathognomonic molecules in the intestines of model mice. The accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in the inflamed area of the intestines of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)- or indomethacin (IND)-induced IBD model mice was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and autoradiography to confirm the inflamed area. The results suggested that the inflammation was selectively induced in the colons of mice by the administration of DSS, whereas it was induced mainly in the ilea and the proximal colons of mice by the administration of IND. To explore attractive target molecules for the molecular imaging of IBD, we evaluated the gene expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors in the inflamed area of the intestines of both model mice. We found that the expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly increased during the progression of IBD, whereas the expression levels were decreased as the mucosa began to heal. In particular, the expression levels of these molecules had already changed before the symptoms of IBD appeared. In

  13. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  14. Advanced contrast nanoagents for photoacoustic molecular imaging, cytometry, blood test and photothermal theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Kim, Jin-Woo; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2011-01-01

    Various nanoparticles have raised significant interest over the past decades for their unique physical and optical properties and biological utilities. Here we summarize the vast applications of advanced nanoparticles with a focus on carbon nanotube (CNT)-based or CNT-catalyzed contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging, cytometry and theranostics applications based on the photothermal (PT) effect. We briefly review the safety and potential toxicity of the PA/PT contrast nanoagents, while showing how the physical properties as well as multiple biological coatings change their toxicity profiles and contrasts. We provide general guidelines needed for the validation of a new molecular imaging agent in living subjects, and exemplify these guidelines with single-walled CNTs targeted to α(v) β(3) , an integrin associated with tumor angiogenesis, and golden carbon nanotubes targeted to LYVE-1, endothelial lymphatic receptors. An extensive review of the potential applications of advanced contrast agents is provided, including imaging of static targets such as tumor angiogenesis receptors, in vivo cytometry of dynamic targets such as circulating tumor cells and nanoparticles in blood, lymph, bones and plants, methods to enhance the PA and PT effects with transient and stationary bubble conjugates, PT/PA Raman imaging and multispectral histology. Finally, theranostic applications are reviewed, including the nanophotothermolysis of individual tumor cells and bacteria with clustered nanoparticles, nanothrombolysis of blood clots, detection and purging metastasis in sentinel lymph nodes, spectral hole burning and multiplex therapy with ultrasharp rainbow nanoparticles.

  15. Sodium Iodide Symporter for Nuclear Molecular Imaging and Gene Therapy: From Bedside to Bench and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Cheol Ahn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging, defined as the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms, can be obtained by various imaging technologies, including nuclear imaging methods. Imaging of normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid cancer, and treatment of thyroid cancer with radioiodine rely on the expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS in these cells. NIS is an intrinsic membrane protein with 13 transmembrane domains and it takes up iodide into the cytosol from the extracellular fluid. By transferring NIS function to various cells via gene transfer, the cells can be visualized with gamma or positron emitting radioisotopes such as Tc-99m, I-123, I-131, I-124 and F-18 tetrafluoroborate, which are accumulated by NIS. They can also be treated with beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides, such as I-131, Re-186, Re-188 and At-211, which are also accumulated by NIS. This article demonstrates the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of NIS as a radionuclide-based reporter gene for trafficking cells and a therapeutic gene for treating cancers.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals: nanoparticles like multi-functional systems for the obtaining in vivo of molecular images; Radiofarmacos: nanoparticulas como sistemas multifuncionales para la obtencion in vivo de imagenes moleculares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G.; Ramirez de la Cruz, F. M.; Ocampo G, B. E.; Morales A, E.; Santos C, C. L.; Mendoza S, A. N., E-mail: guillermina.ferro@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The techniques of obtaining direct or indirect molecular images detect and register the space-temporary distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biological, diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The advanced techniques of image like the nuclear magnetic resonance, the single photon emission computed tomography, the positron emission tomography and the images of optic fluorescence have been used successfully to detect these processes. On the other hand, the utility of the nanoparticles for any application is dependent of the physicochemical properties that present, being possible to modify their surface when making them react with different biomolecules what allows the formation of conjugates with specific molecular recognition. The joint of various protein molecules, peptides or oligonucleotides to the surface of a nanoparticle produce a multi-functional system able to increase the multivalent joints from the nanoparticles-biomolecules to their receivers for the obtaining of molecular images in vivo. The peptides stimulate, regulate or inhibit numerous functions of the life, acting mainly as information transmitters and activity coordinators of several tissues in the organism. The receivers of regulator peptides are over represented in numerous types of cancer cells and they are protein structures. These receivers have been used as white molecular of marked peptides, to locate primary malignant tumors and their metastasis, using the diagnostic techniques of molecular image mentioned above, which consist basically on the radio peptides use and conjugated peptides to fluoro chromes, to metallic nanoparticles and nano crystals. A summary of the work is presented carried out by the personnel of the Radio-active Materials and Chemistry Departments of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares in this field. (Author)

  17. Cardiac MRI in suspected myocarditis; MRT des Herzens bei Verdacht auf Myokarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, O.; Oberholzer, K.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologie der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Mohrs, O. [Klinik fuer Radiologie der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Cardioangiologisches Centrum Bethanien, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of ECG-gated breath-hold MRI in diagnosing acute myocardidits. Material and methods: Cardiac MRI was performed on 21 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis. ECG-gated breath-hold T2-weighted images with fat suppression were acquired in 3 standard views. T1-weighted imaging (FLASH) was performed 10 min after IV administration of Gd-DTPA. Laboratory data included creatine kinase, troponin T and serological tests, ECG findings and echocardiography. Imaging findings were retrospectively compared to the discharge diagnoses. Signal alterations were semiquantitatively classified. Results: Acute myocarditis was diagnosed in 9 patients and cardiac sarcoidosis in 2 patients. Late enhancement was observed in 4 patients with acute myocarditis and in both patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. Semiquantitative evaluation revealed 9 true positive, 9 true negative, 1 false positive and 2 false negative results. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI has the potential to detect acute myocarditis and to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis. Late enhancement of Gd-DTPA can be found in both viral myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Beurteilung des diagnostischen Potenzials der MRT des Herzens bei Verdacht auf akute Myokarditis. Material und Methoden: 21 konsekutive Patienten mit Verdacht auf Myokarditis wurden mit einem standardisierten Protokoll untersucht. Zunaechst wurden T{sub 2}-gewichtete, EKG-getriggerte fettsupprimierte Sequenzen in den 3 Standardebenen angefertigt. 10 Minuten nach intravenoeser Injektion von GD-DTPA wurden T{sub 1}-gewichtete TurboFLASH-Sequenzen angefertigt. Von allen Patienten wurden EKG, Echokardiographie und die Laborbefunde einschliesslich Creatinin-Kinase, Troponin T und der Infektionsserologie protokolliert. Das Ausmass der Signalveraenderungen im MRT wurde semiquantitativ klassifiziert. Die Ergebnisse der MRT wurden retrospektiv mit den Entlassungsdiagnosen korreliert. Ergebnisse: Bei 9 Patienten lag nach

  18. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  19. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J.M.; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J.B.; van Bemmel, Margaretha E.M.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Velders, Aldrik H.; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear medicine. In this study a bimodal (or rather, hybrid) tracer that contains both a fluorescent dye and a chelate was used to evaluate the existence of a direct link between mass spectrometry (MS) and in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging findings using fluorescence and radioisotopes. At the same time, the hybrid label was used to determine whether the use of a single isotope label would allow for MS-based diagnostics. Methods: A hybrid label that contained both a DTPA chelate (that was coordinated with either 165Ho or 111In) and a Cy5 fluorescent dye was coupled to the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) targeting peptide Ac-TZ14011 (hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011). This receptor targeting tracer was used to 1) validate the efficacy of (165Ho-based) mass-cytometry in determining the receptor affinity via comparison with fluorescence-based flow cytometry (Cy5), 2) evaluate the microscopic binding pattern of the tracer in tumor cells using both fluorescence confocal imaging (Cy5) and LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho), 3) compare in vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) after intravenous administration of hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011 in tumor-bearing mice. Finally, LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho) was linked to fluorescence-based analysis of excised tissue samples (Cy5). Results: Analysis with both mass-cytometry and flow cytometry revealed a similar receptor affinity, respectively 352 ± 141 nM and 245 ± 65 nM (p = 0.08), but with a much lower detection sensitivity for the first modality. In vitro LA-ICP-MS imaging (165Ho) enabled clear discrimination between CXCR4 positive and negative cells, but fluorescence microscopy was required to determine the

  20. Rapid Classification of Imaged Objects Using Molecular Factor and Multivariate Optical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Megan Renee

    Unique algorithm development is vital for the success of novel instrumentation. Our lab has focused on the design of imaging systems based on molecular factor and multivariate optical computing. A simulation-driven design approach was utilized to develop a multimode infrared imaging system for chemical contrast enhancement. This infrared thermal imaging system is based on molecular factor (MFC) and lockin computing methods. MFC was accomplished with filter elements made of thin organic films deposited on IR-transparent substrates and allows a system response to be tuned to a specific analyte. Unique algorithms were written in-house using MatLabRTM (The Mathworks, Natick, MA). The algorithms used a lock-in computing technique to amplify the diffuse re ectance signal, which is only a few percent of the total signal. Intensive thin film studies were conducted to understand the effects of films on fabric to improve our simulation-driven design approach. A prototype instrument has been validated through the production of a real setup. We have shown that it is able to detect trace amounts of blood diluted in water (as small as 1:100) on fabric as well as differentiate blood from common false positives of other blood detection methods (i.e., luminol). The second imaging system was designed for the differentiation of phytoplankton species in the ocean. Multivariate optical computing (MOC) was applied to the uorescence excitation spectra of individual phytoplankton cells to design multivariate optical elements (MOEs). MOEs are filters fabricated to mimic linear discriminants analysis (LDA) results based on plankton spectroscopy. The imaging system uses these MOEs housed in a filter wheel to produce "streak" images of phytoplankton as they flow past a CCD camera, with each streak having the appearance of a barcode whose intensities are related to scores of the plankton spectra on linear discriminant functions. Algorithms for this system have been designed to automatically

  1. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  2. 124Iodine: A Longer-Life Positron Emitter Isotope—New Opportunities in Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lucio Cascini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 124Iodine (124I with its 4.2 d half-life is particularly attractive for in vivo detection and quantification of longer-term biological and physiological processes; the long half-life of 124I is especially suited for prolonged time in vivo studies of high molecular weight compounds uptake. Numerous small molecules and larger compounds like proteins and antibodies have been successfully labeled with 124I. Advances in radionuclide production allow the effective availability of sufficient quantities of 124I on small biomedical cyclotrons for molecular imaging purposes. Radioiodination chemistry with 124I relies on well-established radioiodine labeling methods, which consists mainly in nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution reactions. The physical characteristics of 124I permit taking advantages of the higher PET image quality. The availability of new molecules that may be targeted with 124I represents one of the more interesting reasons for the attention in nuclear medicine. We aim to discuss all iodine radioisotopes application focusing on 124I, which seems to be the most promising for its half-life, radiation emissions, and stability, allowing several applications in oncological and nononcological fields.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells: Tracking Survival, Biodistribution, Tumorigenicity, and Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gu, Wen-Yi Chen, Jay Gu, Paul Burridge, Joseph C. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Being able to self-renew and differentiate into virtually all cell types, both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have exciting therapeutic implications for myocardial infarction, neurodegenerative disease, diabetes, and other disorders involving irreversible cell loss. However, stem cell biology remains incompletely understood despite significant advances in the field. Inefficient stem cell differentiation, difficulty in verifying successful delivery to the target organ, and problems with engraftment all hamper the transition from laboratory animal studies to human clinical trials. Although traditional histopathological techniques have been the primary approach for ex vivo analysis of stem cell behavior, these postmortem examinations are unable to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in real time and in vivo. Fortunately, the advent of molecular imaging has led to unprecedented progress in understanding the fundamental behavior of stem cells, including their survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity in the targeted tissues of interest. This review summarizes various molecular imaging technologies and how they have advanced the current understanding of stem cell survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity.

  4. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  5. Molecular imaging in patients with mood disorders: a review of PET findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiaozhen [Zhejiang University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Department of Psychiatry, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Liu, Weibo; Li, Huichun [Zhejiang University, Department of Psychiatry, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Hong [Zhejiang University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Mood disorders are chronic, recurrent psychiatric disorders with high morbidity rates that cause severe disability. Researchers have used molecular imaging extensively in studies of mood disorders. In this article, we concisely and selectively review the major findings of positron emission tomography studies of patients with mood disorders. Specifically, we describe findings from cerebral blood flow, cerebral glucose/oxygen metabolism, and radioligand studies in both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations. Patients with mood disorders have mood-correlated regional metabolism changes and molecular abnormalities in several neurotransmitter systems. Although the findings of these studies are not completely consistent and confounding factors, including drug effects and specific methodology, should be strictly controlled, these results reveal the pathophysiology of mood disorders and aid the development of novel treatment approaches for mood disorders. Future positron emission tomography research will benefit greatly from the development of better radioligands to simultaneously identify multiple neurotransmitter systems in the specific brain region and the integration of more detecting methods in specifying the neurobiological predictors of treatment response in patients with mood disorders. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in underlying mood disorders will result in aetiological diagnosis and individualization of treatment of these disorders. (orig.)

  6. Phenoxide-Bridged Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probes for Molecular Imaging of Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clear, Kasey J; Harmatys, Kara M; Rice, Douglas R; Wolter, William R; Suckow, Mark A; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary; Smith, Bradley D

    2016-02-17

    Cell death is involved in many pathological conditions, and there is a need for clinical and preclinical imaging agents that can target and report cell death. One of the best known biomarkers of cell death is exposure of the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. Synthetic zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn2BDPA) coordination complexes are known to selectively recognize PS-rich membranes and act as cell death molecular imaging agents. However, there is a need to improve in vivo imaging performance by selectively increasing target affinity and decreasing off-target accumulation. This present study compared the cell death targeting ability of two new deep-red fluorescent probes containing phenoxide-bridged Zn2BDPA complexes. One probe was a bivalent version of the other and associated more strongly with PS-rich liposome membranes. However, the bivalent probe exhibited self-quenching on the membrane surface, so the monovalent version produced brighter micrographs of dead and dying cells in cell culture and also better fluorescence imaging contrast in two living animal models of cell death (rat implanted tumor with necrotic core and mouse thymus atrophy). An (111)In-labeled radiotracer version of the monovalent probe also exhibited selective cell death targeting ability in the mouse thymus atrophy model, with relatively high amounts detected in dead and dying tissue and low off-target accumulation in nonclearance organs. The in vivo biodistribution profile is the most favorable yet reported for a Zn2BDPA complex; thus, the monovalent phenoxide-bridged Zn2BDPA scaffold is a promising candidate for further development as a cell death imaging agent in living subjects.

  7. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  8. Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for tumor cell imaging based on gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shan; Wu, Chen; Dai, Yue; Hou, Pingfu; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2016-12-15

    Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for intracellular GSH sensing was designed. As an alternative to "always on" nanoprobe, activatable imaging nanoprobes which are designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to the targets have attracted more and more attention. In this paper, we designed a novel activatable molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanoprobe for tumor cell recognization based on a MRI signal variation induced by the distance change between T1 and T2 contrast agents (CAs) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). To achieve this aim, carboxyl group functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and polyethylene glycol-coated gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3) NPs as T2 and T1 MRI CA were connected by cystamine which contains a disulfide linkage. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were introduced for their characterizations. The formation of Fe3O4-cystamine-Gd2O3 (Fe3O4-SS-Gd2O3) nanocomplex resulted in a quenched T1 signal due to the near proximity of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs to Fe3O4 NPs and a "light-up" T1 signal with the cleavage of disulfide bond in the presence of GSH. These results provide not only an easy way to realize MRI of tumor cells based on the overexpressed intracellular GSH level, but also a new insight for the design of activatable MRI nanoprobe.

  9. The Use of Radiation Detectors in Medicine: The Future of Molecular Imaging and Multimodality Imaging: Advantages and Technological Challenges (3/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late ’70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this series of three lectures I will try to present how high energy physics and medical imaging development have both benefited by t...

  10. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  11. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of bone formation and resorption using fluorescence molecular tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, F M; Stuker, F; Weigt, C; Kuhn, G; Koch, K; Schulte, F A; Ripoll, J; Rudin, M; Müller, R

    2013-02-01

    Bone research often focuses on anatomical imaging of the bone microstructure, but in order to gain better understanding in how bone remodeling is modulated through interventions also bone formation and resorption processes should be investigated. With this in mind, the purpose of this study was to establish a longitudinal in vivo imaging approach of bone formation and resorption using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). In this study the reproducibility, accuracy and sensitivity of FMT for bone imaging were assessed by performing longitudinal measurements with FMT and comparing it to in vivo micro-computed tomography on a set of control mice, and mice in which load-adaptation was induced in the sixth caudal vertebra. The precision error for FMT measurements, expressed as coefficient of variation, was smaller than 16%, indicating acceptable reproducibility. A correlation was found between bone resorption measured with FMT and bone resorption rate measured with in vivo micro-computed tomography only over the first 14days (R=0.81, pbone formation measured with FMT and bone formation rate measured with in vivo micro-CT. Bone formation measured by FMT was 89-109% greater (pBone resorption was 5-8% lower, but did not reach a significant difference between groups, indicating moderate sensitivity for FMT. In conclusion, in vivo FMT in mouse tail bones is feasible but needs to be optimized for monitoring load adaptation in living mice.

  12. The use of molecular imaging combined with genomic techniques to understand the heterogeneity in cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, R; Ganeshan, B; Irshad, S; Lawler, K; Eisenblätter, M; Milewicz, H; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Miles, K; Ellis, P; Groves, A; Punwani, S; Ng, T

    2014-06-01

    Tumour heterogeneity has, in recent times, come to play a vital role in how we understand and treat cancers; however, the clinical translation of this has lagged behind advances in research. Although significant advancements in oncological management have been made, personalized care remains an elusive goal. Inter- and intratumour heterogeneity, particularly in the clinical setting, has been difficult to quantify and therefore to treat. The histological quantification of heterogeneity of tumours can be a logistical and clinical challenge. The ability to examine not just the whole tumour but also all the molecular variations of metastatic disease in a patient is obviously difficult with current histological techniques. Advances in imaging techniques and novel applications, alongside our understanding of tumour heterogeneity, have opened up a plethora of non-invasive biomarker potential to examine tumours, their heterogeneity and the clinical translation. This review will focus on how various imaging methods that allow for quantification of metastatic tumour heterogeneity, along with the potential of developing imaging, integrated with other in vitro diagnostic approaches such as genomics and exosome analyses, have the potential role as a non-invasive biomarker for guiding the treatment algorithm.

  13. In Situ Molecular Imaging of the Biofilm and Its Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Szymanski, Craig; Fredrickson, James; Shi, Liang; Cao, Bin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Molecular mapping of live biofilms at submicron resolution presents a grand challenge. Here, we present the first chemical mapping results of biofilm extracellular polymeric sub-stance (EPS) components in biofilms using correlative imaging be-tween super resolution florescence microscopy and liquid time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model organism. Heavy metal anions chro-mate (Cr2O72-) consisting of chromium Cr (VI) was a model envi-ronmental stressor used to treat the biofilms. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be spatially im-aged. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments are found to respond af-ter the biofilm is treated with Cr (VI), leading to biofilm dispersion. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environ-ment are observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibit riboflavin production. The Cr (VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr (III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for mechanistic insight of microbial community processes and communications using in situ imaging mass spectrometry and superresolution optical micros-copy.

  14. A Silicon SPECT System for Molecular Imaging of the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Fritz, Mark A; McDonald, Benjamin S; Durko, Heather L; Furenlid, Lars R; Wilson, Donald W; Peterson, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the feasibility of using silicon double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs) for SPECT imaging of the activity distribution of iodine-125 using a 300-micrometer thick detector. Based on this experience, we now have developed fully customized silicon DSSDs and associated readout electronics with the intent of developing a multi-pinhole SPECT system. Each DSSD has a 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm active area and is 1 mm thick. The strip pitch is 59 micrometers, and the readout of the 1024 strips on each side gives rise to a detector with over one million pixels. Combining four high-resolution DSSDs into a SPECT system offers an unprecedented space-bandwidth product for the imaging of single-photon emitters. The system consists of two camera heads with two silicon detectors stacked one behind the other in each head. The collimator has a focused pinhole system with cylindrical-shaped pinholes that are laser-drilled in a 250 μm tungsten plate. The unique ability to collect projection data at two magnifications simultaneously allows for multiplexed data at high resolution to be combined with lower magnification data with little or no multiplexing. With the current multi-pinhole collimator design, our SPECT system will be capable of offering high spatial resolution, sensitivity and angular sampling for small field-of-view applications, such as molecular imaging of the mouse brain.

  15. Molecular imaging of cyclooxygenase-2 in canine transitional cell carcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md Jashim; Bartges, Joseph W; Callens, Amanda; Legendre, Alfred M; Rathore, Kusum; Wright, Laura; Carter, Amanda; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2013-05-01

    The enzyme COX-2 is induced at high levels in tumors but not in surrounding normal tissues, which makes it an attractive target for molecular imaging of cancer. We evaluated the ability of novel optical imaging agent, fluorocoxib A to detect urinary bladder canine transitional cell carcinomas (K9TCC). Here, we show that fluorocoxib A uptake overlapped with COX-2 expression in primary K9TCC cells in vitro. Using subcutaneously implanted primary K9TCC in athymic mice, we show specific uptake of fluorocoxib A by COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenograft tumors in vivo. Fluorocoxib A uptake by COX-2-expressing xenograft tumors was blocked by 70% (P dogs diagnosed with TCC. Fluorocoxib A specifically detected COX-2-expressing K9TCC during cystoscopy in vivo but was not detected in normal urothelium. Taken together, our findings show that fluorocoxib A selectively bound to COX-2-expressing primary K9TCC cells in vitro, COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenografts tumors in nude mice, and heterogeneous canine TCC during cystoscopy in vivo. Spontaneous cancers in companion animals offer a unique translational model for evaluation of novel imaging and therapeutic agents using primary cancer cells in vitro and in heterogeneous cancers in vivo.

  16. Characterization of preclinical models of prostate cancer using PET-based molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloli, Sara; Moresco, Rosa M.; Picchio, Maria [Scientific Institute H San Raffaele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); IBFM, CNR, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Jachetti, Elena [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Cancer Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy Program, Milan (Italy); University of Vita-Salute, San Raffaele Institute, Fellowship of the Doctorate School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Valtorta, Silvia [Scientific Institute H San Raffaele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Fellowship of the Doctorate School of Molecular Medicine, Milan (Italy); Freschi, Massimo [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Pathological Anatomy Unit, Milan (Italy); Michelini, Rodrigo Hess; Bellone, Matteo [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Cancer Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy Program, Milan (Italy); Fazio, Ferruccio [Scientific Institute H San Raffaele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice spontaneously develop hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer (PC) that potentially resembles the human pathological condition. The aim of the study was to validate PET imaging as a reliable tool for in vivo assessment of disease biology and progression in TRAMP mice using radioligands routinely applied in clinical practice: [{sup 18}F]FDG and [{sup 11}C]choline. Six TRAMP mice were longitudinally evaluated starting at week 11 of age to visualize PC development and progression. The time frame and imaging pattern of PC lesions were subsequently confirmed on an additional group of five mice. PET and [{sup 18}F]FDG allowed detection of PC lesions starting from 23 weeks of age. [{sup 11}C]Choline was clearly taken up only by TRAMP mice carrying neuroendocrine lesions, as revealed by post-mortem histological evaluation. PET-based molecular imaging represents a state-of-the-art tool for the in vivo monitoring and metabolic characterization of PC development, progression and differentiation in the TRAMP model. (orig.)

  17. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence.

  18. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  19. Molecular Imaging Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Spontaneous Nasal Tumors in Canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Tyler J. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Deveau, Michael A. [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Kubicek, Lyndsay [Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); White, Pamela [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chappell, Richard J. [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Forrest, Lisa J. [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert, E-mail: rjeraj@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy can inform and guide treatment management. Most studies have so far focused on assessing a single imaging biomarker. The goal of this study was to explore a number of different molecular imaging biomarkers as surrogates of resistance to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with spontaneous sinonasal tumors were treated with accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy, receiving either 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy each or 10 fractions of 5.0 Gy each to the gross tumor volume. Patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-, fluorothymidine (FLT)-, and Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM)-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging before therapy and FLT and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging during therapy. In addition to conventional maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) measurements, imaging metrics providing response and spatiotemporal information were extracted for each patient. Progression-free survival was assessed according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumor. The prognostic value of each imaging biomarker was evaluated using univariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analysis was also performed but was restricted to 2 predictor variables due to the limited number of patients. The best bivariable model was selected according to pseudo-R{sup 2}. Results: The following variables were significantly associated with poor clinical outcome following radiation therapy according to univariable analysis: tumor volume (P=.011), midtreatment FLT SUV{sub mean} (P=.018), and midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.006). Large decreases in FLT SUV{sub mean} from pretreatment to midtreatment were associated with worse clinical outcome (P=.013). In the bivariable model, the best 2-variable combination for predicting poor outcome was high midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.022) in

  20. Microultrasound Molecular Imaging of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in a Mouse Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Rychak

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency microultrasound imaging of tumor progression in mice enables noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging at excellent spatial and temporal resolution, although microultrasonography alone does not offer molecular scale data. In the current study, we investigated the use of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents bearing targeting ligands specific for molecular markers of tumor angiogenesis using high-frequency microultrasound imaging. A xenograft tumor model in the mouse was used to image vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2 expression with microbubbles conjugated to an anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody or an isotype control. Microultrasound imaging was accomplished at a center frequency of 40 MHz, which provided lateral and axial resolutions of 40 and 90 μm, respectively. The B-mode (two-dimensional mode acoustic signal from microbubbles bound to the molecular target was determined by an ultrasound-based destruction-subtraction scheme. Quantification of the adherent microbubble fraction in nine tumor-bearing mice revealed significant retention of VEGFR-2-targeted microbubbles relative to control-targeted microbubbles. These data demonstrate that contrast-enhanced microultrasound imaging is a useful method for assessing molecular expression of tumor angiogenesis in mice at high resolution.

  1. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references).

  2. Current status of multimodal molecular imaging of prostate cancer; Multimodale molekulare Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms - aktueller Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2009-06-15

    Prostate carcinoma is the most common life-threatening cancer affecting men in the western world. In Germany about 40 600 new cases have to be expected each year. The mortality is around 10%. The major goals of pretherapeutic imaging are to determine the local extent of prostate carcinoma in terms of intraprostate localisation, extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), tumour infiltration into neurovascular bundles, and if this has taken place, into surrounding tissues and organs in the small pelvis, detection of loco-regional metastases via the lymph nodes and if this so, of distant metastases. Exact pretherapeutic diagnosis and staging are essential, because the tumour treatment must be selected in strict dependence on clinical tumour stage and risk profile. Both anatomic and functional molecular imaging of prostate carcinoma have advanced significantly in recent years. When there are problems with diagnosis, e.g. when prostate punch biopsies are negative while the suspicion of prostate carcinoma persists, C-11/F-18 choline PET/CT and MRI/MRS may be helpful in localising the carcinoma, revealing how the carcinoma relates to the surrounding intra- and extraprostatic structures and organs, and making a targeted repeat biopsy possible. Lymphotropic contrast agents are highly promising for accurate nodal staging of prostate carcinoma, but are not yet available for routine clinical use. In these circumstances, the sensitivity of nodal staging with the widely available imaging modalities remains difficult. There has been particularly substantial progress in the localisation of local relapse, which can be imaged with contrast-enhanced C-11-choline PET/CT and MRI in most cases when PSA is considerably below 1 ng/ml. F-18-fluoride PET/CT has proved accurate in the diagnosis of skeletal metastases from prostate carcinoma. (orig.)

  3. Market analysis offshore wind energy; Marktanalyse Windenergie auf See

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    will implement against the background of high Investment volumes and technical challenges each but usually only a manageable number of projects in Europe per year. The various legal requirements in the area of offshore wind energy, and in particular planning, Licensing and network side should be further coordinated and more interlinked. Considerations are also European regulations and the support systems of our European neighbors. [German] Der Nordsee kommt im Vergleich zur Ostsee aufgrund des verfuegbaren Flaechenangebots ein deutlich groesseres Potenzial zu. Im Vergleich zur Nordsee liegen die erschliessbaren Potenziale der Ostsee allerdings deutlich kuestennaeher, was nicht nur beim Netzanschluss sondern auch beim Bau und Betrieb der Anlagen Effizienzvorteile haben kann. Noch ist unklar, ob die verfuegbaren Flaechen im Kuestenmeer der Ostsee in relevanten Groessenordnung erweitert werden koennen. Der entsprechende Raumplanungsprozess wurde im Jahr 2014 durch Mecklenburg-Vorpommern angestossen. Die Analyse der im Bundesfachplan Offshore festgelegten Cluster, die der Offshore-Netzentwicklungsplan in Zonen fuer die Nord- und Ostsee (1-5) strukturiert, zeigt, dass zumindest in der Ausbauphase bis 2025, ggf. auch bis 2030 die kuestennaeheren Zonen 1 und 2 in Nord- und Ostsee ein ausreichendes Flaechenpotential bieten und zugleich im Hinblick auf einen effizienten und strukturierten Netzausbau erschlossen werden sollten. Der Ausbaupfad bis 2020 ermoeglicht die von der Industrie in Aussicht gestellten Kostendegressionen in Hoehe von ueber 30 Prozent. Die bereits heute erkennbaren Kostensenkungen muessen insofern im Rahmen der Erarbeitung des Ausschreibungsdesigns beruecksichtigt werden. Dies gilt auch fuer die Frage eines optimalen Park- und Anlagendesigns aus energiewirtschaftlicher Sicht. Neben jeweils projektinternen Schwierigkeiten auf Netz- wie auf Windparkseite liegen erhebliche Schnittstellenprobleme zwischen Windpark und Netzanschluss. Dies liegt u.a. an den

  4. MR分子探针与分子成像的研究进展%Progress in magnetic molecular probes and molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵阳; 彭景; 张雪宁

    2015-01-01

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) has been the research focus of molecular imaging, which realizes the change from traditional and nonspecific physical imaging to targeted molecular imaging. By introduction of corresponding molecular probes, and acquiring information of both the anatomical and biological information of the targeted object, mMRI provides a kind of new research method for fundamental research, earlier diagnosis and treatment of disease. In this review, we aimed to detail the features and recent progress of magnetic molecular probes and review the latest mMRI technology and development, in order to provide useful reference for basic and clinical research.%MR分子成像是在传统MR成像基础上引入相应的分子探针,从而将传统的非特异性物理成像转变为特异性分子成像,以同时获得被检对象的解剖及生物学信息。MR分子成像的出现为基础研究、疾病的诊断及治疗提供了一种全新的研究和检查方法,目前已成为分子成像领域的研究热点和重要内容。针对MR分子成像的技术特点,结合当前MR 分子探针及成像研究的最新进展,对MR 分子成像的新方法及最新成果进行简要综述,从而为相关基础及临床研究提供参考与指导。

  5. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G.; Torres G, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gonzalez V, A. [UAEM, Facultad de Medicina, Toluca (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de [INCMNSZ, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non Hodgkin's Iymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 prepared from Iyophilized kits, and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. Whole-body images were acquired at different times after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC or {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities > 95 %. Regions of interest (ROls) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust the biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3 {+-} 0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h and the mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv. Results showed that after administration of 7 GBq of {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to whole body would be 0.7 Gy (0.1 mGy/MBq) which is the indicated dose for non Hodgkin's Iymphome therapies. (Author)

  6. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  7. Nonlinear contrast enhancement in photoacoustic molecular imaging with gold nanosphere encapsulated nanoemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Lombardo, Michael; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Perez, Camilo; Xia, Jinjun; Matula, Thomas; Pozzo, Danilo; O' Donnell, Matthew [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, and Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Pelivanov, Ivan [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, and Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); International Laser Center, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-20

    A composite contrast agent, a nanoemulsion bead with assembled gold nanospheres at the interface, is proposed to improve the specific contrast of photoacoustic molecular imaging. A phase transition in the bead's core is induced by absorption of a nanosecond laser pulse with a fairly low laser fluence (∼3.5 mJ/cm{sup 2}), creating a transient microbubble through dramatically enhanced thermal expansion. This generates nonlinear photoacoustic signals with more than 10 times larger amplitude compared to that of a linear agent with the same optical absorption. By applying a differential scheme similar to ultrasound pulse inversion, more than 40 dB contrast enhancement is demonstrated with suppression of background signals.

  8. Collimator design for a dedicated molecular breast imaging-guided biopsy system: Proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy L.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a dedicated nuclear medicine breast imaging modality that employs dual-head cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to functionally detect breast cancer. MBI has been shown to detect breast cancers otherwise occult on mammography and ultrasound. Currently, a MBI-guided biopsy system does not exist to biopsy such lesions. Our objective was to consider the utility of a novel conical slant-hole (CSH) collimator for rapid (<1 min) and accurate monitoring of lesion position to serve as part of a MBI-guided biopsy system. Methods: An initial CSH collimator design was derived from the dimensions of a parallel-hole collimator optimized for MBI performed with dual-head CZT gamma cameras. The parameters of the CSH collimator included the collimator height, cone slant angle, thickness of septa and cones of the collimator, and the annular areas exposed at the base of the cones. These parameters were varied within the geometric constraints of the MBI system to create several potential CSH collimator designs. The CSH collimator designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The model included a breast compressed to a thickness of 6 cm with a 1-cm diameter lesion located 3 cm from the collimator face. The number of particles simulated was chosen to represent the count density of a low-dose, screening MBI study acquired with the parallel-hole collimator for 10 min after a {approx}150 MBq (4 mCi) injection of Tc-99m sestamibi. The same number of particles was used for the CSH collimator simulations. In the resulting simulated images, the count sensitivity, spatial resolution, and accuracy of the lesion depth determined from the lesion profile width were evaluated. Results: The CSH collimator design with default parameters derived from the optimal parallel-hole collimator provided 1-min images with error in the lesion depth estimation of 1.1 {+-} 0.7 mm and over 21 times the lesion count sensitivity relative to 1-min images

  9. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  10. The IMAGE project: methodological issues for the molecular genetic analysis of ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraone Stephen V

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic mechanisms involved in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are being studied with considerable success by several centres worldwide. These studies confirm prior hypotheses about the role of genetic variation within genes involved in the regulation of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmission in susceptibility to ADHD. Despite the importance of these findings, uncertainties remain due to the very small effects sizes that are observed. We discuss possible reasons for why the true strength of the associations may have been underestimated in research to date, considering the effects of linkage disequilibrium, allelic heterogeneity, population differences and gene by environment interactions. With the identification of genes associated with ADHD, the goal of ADHD genetics is now shifting from gene discovery towards gene functionality – the study of intermediate phenotypes ('endophenotypes'. We discuss methodological issues relating to quantitative genetic data from twin and family studies on candidate endophenotypes and how such data can inform attempts to link molecular genetic data to cognitive, affective and motivational processes in ADHD. The International Multi-centre ADHD Gene (IMAGE project exemplifies current collaborative research efforts on the genetics of ADHD. This European multi-site project is well placed to take advantage of the resources that are emerging following the sequencing of the human genome and the development of international resources for whole genome association analysis. As a result of IMAGE and other molecular genetic investigations of ADHD, we envisage a rapid increase in the number of identified genetic variants and the promise of identifying novel gene systems that we are not currently investigating, opening further doors in the study of gene functionality.

  11. Zur Notwendigkeit der Bestimmung einer auf Digitale Medien fokussierten Medienkompetenz und Medienbildung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Zorn

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Die neuartigen Herausforderungen an Bildung aufgrund der Digitalen Medien erfordern einen theoretischen Rahmen, der Prinzipien und Spezifika der Digitalen Medien berücksichtigt. Darauf zielt dieser Beitrag. Er wird dazu zunächst skizzieren, worin die Spezifika Digitaler Medien liegen, um danach zu analysieren ob, wie und in welchen Kontexten diese von der Medienpädagogik aufgegriffen werden. Dazu werden verschiedene Perspektiven der Medienpädagogik einer Analyse unterzogen: Perspektiven auf Medienkompetenz, Medienbildung und Medienliteralität. Aufbauend auf dem zu ziehenden Fazit, dass die technologischen Grundlagen und spezifischen Herausforderungen der Digitalen Medien bislang in Bildungskonzepten wenig berücksichtigt sind, werden im zweiten Abschnitt die Bildungsrelevanzen und -potenziale einer solchen Perspektive herausgearbeitet, um als Konsequenz auf die Bedeutungen von «Digitaler Medienkompetenz» und die Notwendigkeit einer Konzeption einer speziell auf Digitale Medien ausgerichteten «Digitalen Medienbildung» zu argumentieren.

  12. Moessbauer investigation of Au/Fe alloys with giant magnetoresistence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, G.; Deriu, A. E-mail: antonio.deriu@fis.unipr.it; Moya, J.; Angeli, E.; Bisero, D.; Da Re, A.; Ronconi, F.; Spizzo, F.; Vavassori, P.; Baricco, M.; Bosco, E

    2004-05-01

    Rapidly quenched ribbon samples and sputtered granular films of AuFe alloys with giant magnetoresistance behaviour were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The structural and magnetic characteristics of the two kinds of samples are discussed and compared.

  13. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  14. X-ray Birefringence Imaging of Materials with Anisotropic Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Benjamin A; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R; Kariuki, Benson M; Harris, Kenneth D M; Dolbnya, Igor P; Collins, Stephen P; Sutter, John P

    2015-02-05

    The X-ray birefringence imaging (XBI) technique, reported very recently, is a sensitive tool for spatially resolved mapping of the local orientational properties of anisotropic materials. In this paper, we report the first XBI measurements on materials that undergo anisotropic molecular dynamics. Using incident linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to the Br K-edge, the X-ray birefringence is dictated by the orientational properties of the C-Br bonds in the material. We focus on two materials (urea inclusion compounds containing 1,8-dibromooctane and 1,10-dibromodecane guest molecules) for which the reorientational dynamics of the brominated guest molecules (and hence the reorientational dynamics of the C-Br bonds) are already well characterized by other experimental techniques. The XBI results demonstrate clearly that, for the anisotropic molecular dynamics in these materials, the effective X-ray optic axis for the X-ray birefringence phenomenon is the time-averaged resultant of the orientational distribution of the C-Br bonds.

  15. Label-free molecular imaging of bacterial communities of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nameera; Polisetti, Sneha; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Dunham, Sage J. B.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms, such as those formed by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are complex, matrix enclosed, and surface-associated communities of cells. Bacteria that are part of a biofilm community are much more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than their free-floating counterparts. P. aeruginosa biofilms are associated with persistent and chronic infections in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and HIV-AIDS. P. aeruginosa synthesizes and secretes signaling molecules such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which are implicated in quorum sensing (QS), where bacteria regulate gene expression based on population density. Processes such as biofilms formation and virulence are regulated by QS. This manuscript describes the powerful molecular imaging capabilities of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in conjunction with multivariate statistical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of signaling molecules, secondary metabolites and virulence factors in biofilm communities of P. aeruginosa. Our observations reveal that the laboratory strain PAO1C synthesizes and secretes 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxides and 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinolones in high abundance, while the isogenic acyl homoserine lactone QS-deficient mutant (ΔlasIΔrhlI) strain produces predominantly 2-alkyl-quinolones during biofilm formation. This study underscores the use of CRM, along with traditional biological tools such as genetics, for studying the behavior of microbial communities at the molecular level.

  16. Gefahrenfall und Entempirisierung. Anmerkungen zur Unterscheidung literarischer Akteure und Personen mit Bezug auf Oliver Jahraus’ Replik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David-Christopher Assmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Anmerkungen zur Unterscheidung literarischer Akteure und Personen mit Bezug auf Oliver Jahraus’ Replik. Die Replik setzt die seit der ersten Ausgabe von Textpraxis geführte Diskussion um eine Neufokussierung der systemtheoretischen Literaturwissenschaft fort. David-Christopher Assmann antwortet auf Oliver Jahraus’ Kritik an der Unterscheidung von Akteuren und Personen im Literatursystem, die jener in Ausgabe #3 in die Debatte eingeführt hat.

  17. Influence of combustion air guidance on solid matter burnout and on pollutant emissions in grid incinerators; Einfluss der Verbrennungsluftfuehrung auf den Feststoffabbrand und auf das Schadstoffverhalten bei der Hausmuellverbrennung auf dem Rost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsinger, H.; Seifert, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie

    2003-07-01

    The contribution investigates the influence of combustion air guidance strategies on process optimisation. In particular, it is investigated if efficient burnout correlates with low pollutant emissions and if the effects are similar or contrary for the different process goals. (orig.) [German] Der Einfluss von Brennstoffqualitaeten, der Ofengeometrie sowie von Feuerungsbetriebsparametern auf die Bildungsraten von Schadstoffen wie PCDD/F und NO{sub x} und auf die Transferraten von Schwermetallen, Chlor- und Schwefelverbindungen aus dem Brennstoffbett ins Rauchgas ist zur Zeit nur ungenuegend bekannt. Besonders die Frage, wie die primaere Forderung nach moeglichst vollstaendigem Ausbrand von Rauchgas und Rostasche mit weiteren Zielen wie niedrige Bildungsraten von Schadstoffen und Inertisierung der Rostasche korreliert, zeigt den Bedarf umfassender systematischer Untersuchungen auf. Im Rahmen dieses Beitrags soll als Beispiel fuer Modifikationen des Verbrennungsprozesses der Einfluss unterschiedlicher Verbrennungsluftfuehrungen auf die aufgefuehrten Optimierungsziele vorgestellt werden. Insbesondere soll der Frage nachgegangen werden, ob ein effizienter Ausbrand mit niedrigen Schadstoffbildungsraten korreliert und ob zwischen den Zielgroessen gleiche oder kontraere Wirkungen auftreten. (orig.)

  18. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Eric A.; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  19. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett’s esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Bennett; Hiroshi; Mashimo

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and sur-veillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of highrisk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus.

  20. Thyroid, brain and mood modulation in affective disorder: insights from molecular research and functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; London, E D; Silverman, D H; Rasgon, N; Kirchheiner, J; Whybrow, P C

    2003-11-01

    The efficacy resulting from adjunctive use of supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine has emerged as a promising approach to therapy and prophylaxis for refractory mood disorders. Most patients with mood disorders who receive treatment with supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine have normal peripheral thyroid hormone levels, and also respond differently to the hormone and tolerate it better than healthy individuals and patients with primary thyroid diseases. Progress in molecular and functional brain imaging techniques has provided a new understanding of these phenomena, illuminating the relationship between thyroid function, mood modulation and behavior. Thyroid hormones are widely distributed in the brain and have a multitude of effects on the central nervous system. Notably many of the limbic system structures where thyroid hormone receptors are prevalent have been implicated in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. The influence of the thyroid system on neurotransmitters (particularly serotonin and norepinephrine), which putatively play a major role in the regulation of mood and behavior, may contribute to the mechanisms of mood modulation. Recent functional brain imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with [ (18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose demonstrated that thyroid hormone treatment with levothyroxine affects regional brain metabolism in patients with hypothyroidism and bipolar disorder. Theses studies confirm that thyroid hormones are active in modulating metabolic function in the mature adult brain, and provide intriging neuroanatomic clues that may guide future research.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: An In Vivo Molecular Imaging Biomarker for Parkinson’s Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosella Ciurleo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta which leads to dysfunction of cerebral pathways critical for the control of movements. The diagnosis of PD is based on motor symptoms, such as bradykinesia, akinesia, muscular rigidity, postural instability, and resting tremor, which are evident only after the degeneration of a significant number of dopaminergic neurons. Currently, a marker for early diagnosis of PD is still not available. Consequently, also the development of disease-modifying therapies is a challenge. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a quantitative imaging technique that allows in vivo measurement of certain neurometabolites and may produce biomarkers that reflect metabolic dysfunctions and irreversible neuronal damage. This review summarizes the abnormalities of cerebral metabolites found in MRS studies performed in patients with PD and other forms of parkinsonism. In addition, we discuss the potential role of MRS as in vivo molecular imaging biomarker for early diagnosis of PD and for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

  2. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions: Beyond energy level alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how the finite IC formation time affects charge transport through a molecule suspended between two electrodes. For a single-level model, an analytical treatment shows that the conductance is suppressed by a factor Z2, where Z is the quasiparticle renormalization factor, compared to the static IC approximation. We show that Z can be expressed either in terms of the plasma frequency of the electrode or as the overlap between electrode wave functions corresponding to an empty and filled level, respectively. First-principles GW calculations for benzene-diamine connected to gold electrodes show that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels.

  3. Molecular Imaging on the Cerebral Pathological Damage Target of Ketamine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Hong-jie1,2;HU Shu1;JIA Shao-wei1;GAO Zhou1;WANG Tong3;ZHAO Zheng-qin1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the cerebral pathological damage target which result from abusing ketamine through molecular imaging techniques, 20 cases of ketamine dependent patients looking for treatment at the Peking University Shenzhen Hospital and 31 healthy volunteers were included in this study, all of them got brain SPECT DAT imaging. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0. The bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen of healthy volunteers were roughly equally large, and the radioactive distribution of DAT in healthy volunteers were uniform and symmetrical. The bilateral corpora striatum showed typical “panda eyes” pattern. But the bilateral corpora striatum of ketamine dependent patients got smaller in shape, got disorders in pattern, and the radioactive distribution of DAT reduced or defected or even got disturbance and with much more non-specific radioactive. The V, m and Ra of bilateral corpora striatum in ketamine dependent patients were (21.03±3.15) cm3, (22.08±3.31) g and (5.37±1.08) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than the healthy volunteers (p<0.01. The cerebral pathological damage target which resulted from abusing ketamine was similar to those of compound codeine phosphate antitussive solution dependence, heroin dependence and MDMA dependence, all of these psychoactive substances damaged the function of DAT.

  4. Renal water molecular diffusion characteristics in healthy native kidneys: assessment with diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the characteristics of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetic resonance (MR imaging in healthy native kidneys. METHODS: Seventy-three patients without chronic kidney disease underwent DTI-MRI with spin echo-echo planar (SE-EPI sequences accompanied by an array spatial sensitivity encoding technique (ASSET. Cortical and medullary mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD, AD and RD, fractional anisotropy (FA and primary, secondary and tertiary eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, λ3 were analysed in both kidneys and in different genders. RESULTS: Cortical MD, λ2, λ3, and RD values were higher than corresponding medullary values. The cortical FA value was lower than the medullary FA value. Medullary λ1 and RD values in the left kidney were lower than in the right kidney. Medullary λ2, and λ3 values in women were higher than those in men. Medullary FA values in women were lower than those in men. Medullary FA (r = 0.351, P = 0.002 and λ1 (r = 0.277, P = 0.018 positively correlated with eGFR. Medullary FA (r = -0.25, P = 0.033 negatively correlated with age. CONCLUSIONS: Renal water molecular diffusion differences exist in human kidneys and genders. Age and eGFR correlate with medullary FA and primary eigenvalue.

  5. Biomarker, Molecular, and Technologic Advances in Urologic Pathology, Oncology, and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Carla L; Harik, Lara R; Cohen, Cynthia; Osunkoya, Adeboye O

    2017-04-01

    Urologic pathology is evolving rapidly. Emerging trends include the expanded diagnostic utility of biomarkers and molecular testing, as well as adapting to the plethora of technical advances occurring in genitourinary oncology, surgical practice, and imaging. We illustrate those trends by highlighting our approach to the diagnostic workup of a few selected disease entities that pathologists may encounter, including newly recognized subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and prostate cancer, some of which harbor a distinctive chromosomal translocation, gene loss, or mutation. We illustrate applications of immunohistochemistry for differential diagnosis of needle core renal biopsies, intraductal carcinoma of the prostate, and amyloidosis and cite encouraging results from early studies using targeted gene expression panels to predict recurrence after prostate cancer surgery. At our institution, pathologists are working closely with urologic surgeons and interventional radiologists to explore the use of intraoperative frozen sections for margins and nerve sparing during robotic prostatectomy, to pioneer minimally invasive videoscopic inguinal lymphadenectomy, and to refine image-guided needle core biopsies and cryotherapy of prostate cancer as well as blue-light/fluorescence cystoscopy. This collaborative, multidisciplinary approach enhances clinical management and research, and optimizes the care of patients with urologic disorders.

  6. Molecular imaging of neutropilin-1 receptor using photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Minsong; Liu, Bo; Miller, Kathy D.; Guo, Lili

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to develop and test a molecular probe that can detect the expression of neutropilin-1 receptor (NPR-1) in vivo using fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: NPR-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and some breast cancer cells, and binds to vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF165, a growth factor associated with pathological tumor angiogenesis. This receptor is coexpressed with VEGFR2 and shown to enhance the binding of VEGF165; therefore, it has the potential to be used as a marker of angiogenic activity and targeted for therapy. Material and Methods: A peptide specific to NPR-1 receptor was synthesized and conjugated to a NIR fluorochrome (IRDye800CW) and was intravenously injected into mice with breast tumors (MCF7VEGF). Probe kinetics was monitored in vivo via near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) within an optical imager for up to 72 hours within the tumor and compared to other organs (liver, muscle) for binding specificity. A multivariate fitting algorithm was used to spectrally deconvolve the IRDye800CW from endogenous hemoglobin signature (hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation). Results: Dynamics of the NIR fluorescence signal within the first hour after injection indicates specific binding compared to muscle, with an average tumor-to-muscle ration of 2.00 (+/- 0.27). Spectral analysis clearly indentified the presence of the NPR-1 probe. Based on calibration data, the average tumor concentration from both NIRF and PCT-S was measured to be ~200-300nM. Conclusion: These preliminary results show the capability of PCT to image an exogenous probe in vivo in addition to its hemoglobin state.

  7. Development of a novel molecular sensor for imaging estrogen receptor-coactivator protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madryn C Lake

    Full Text Available Anti-estrogens, in particular tissue selective anti-estrogens, have been the bedrock of adjuvant therapy for patients with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positive breast cancer. Though current therapies have greatly enhanced patient prognosis, there continues to be an impetus for the development of improved anti-estrogens. ERα is a nuclear receptor transcription factor which activates gene expression through the recruitment of transcriptional coactivator proteins. The SRC family of coactivators, which includes AIB1, has been shown to be of particular importance for ERα mediated transcription. ERα-AIB1 interactions are indicative of gene expression and are inhibited by anti-estrogen treatment. We have exploited the interaction between ERα and AIB1 as a novel method for imaging ERα activity using a split luciferase molecular sensor. By producing a range of ERα ligand binding domain (ER-LBD and AIB1 nuclear receptor interacting domain (AIB-RID N- and C-terminal firefly luciferase fragment fusion proteins, constructs which exhibited more than a 10-fold increase in luciferase activity with E2 stimulation were identified. The specificity of the E2-stimulated luciferase activity to ERα-AIB1 interaction was validated through Y537S and L539/540A ER-LBD fusion protein mutants. The primed nature of the split luciferase assay allowed changes in ERα activity, with respect to the protein-protein interactions preceding transcription, to be assessed soon after drug treatment. The novel assay split luciferase detailed in this report enabled modulation of ERα activity to be sensitively imaged in vitro and in living subjects and potentially holds much promise for imaging the efficacy of novel ERα specific therapies.

  8. GoldMag nanoparticles with core/shell structure: characterization and application in MR molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Song; Zou Liguang, E-mail: kxyjzy@yahoo.cn; Zhang Dong; Pang Xin; Yang Hua [Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology (China); Xu Ying [Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Base for Drug Clinical Trial (China)

    2011-09-15

    GoldMag is a kind of bi-functional nanoparticle, composed of a gold nanoshell and an iron oxide core. GoldMag combines the antibody immobilization property of gold nanoshell with the superparamagnetic feature of the iron oxide core. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG was immobilized on the surface of GoldMag to synthesize GoldMag-IgG in a single-step process. Transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, zeta potential analysis, dynamic light scattering, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were employed to characterize the nanostructures and the spectroscopic and magnetic properties of GoldMag and GoldMag-IgG. The antibody encapsulation efficiency of GoldMag was measured as 58.7%, and the antibody loading capacity was 88 {mu}g IgG per milligram of GoldMag. The immunoactivity of GoldMag-IgG was estimated to be 43.3% of that of the original IgG. The cytotoxicity of GoldMag was assessed by MTT assay, which showed that it has only little influence on human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells. MR imaging of different concentrations of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, GoldMag, and GoldMag-IgG showed that 3 {mu}g/mL of nanoparticles could significantly affect the MRI signal intensity of GRE T2*WI. The results demonstrate that GoldMag nanoparticles can be effectively conjugated with biomacromolecules and possess great potential for MR molecular imaging.

  9. GoldMag nanoparticles with core/shell structure: characterization and application in MR molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Zou, Liguang; Zhang, Dong; Pang, Xin; Yang, Hua; Xu, Ying

    2011-09-01

    GoldMag is a kind of bi-functional nanoparticle, composed of a gold nanoshell and an iron oxide core. GoldMag combines the antibody immobilization property of gold nanoshell with the superparamagnetic feature of the iron oxide core. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG was immobilized on the surface of GoldMag to synthesize GoldMag-IgG in a single-step process. Transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, zeta potential analysis, dynamic light scattering, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were employed to characterize the nanostructures and the spectroscopic and magnetic properties of GoldMag and GoldMag-IgG. The antibody encapsulation efficiency of GoldMag was measured as 58.7%, and the antibody loading capacity was 88 μg IgG per milligram of GoldMag. The immunoactivity of GoldMag-IgG was estimated to be 43.3% of that of the original IgG. The cytotoxicity of GoldMag was assessed by MTT assay, which showed that it has only little influence on human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells. MR imaging of different concentrations of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, GoldMag, and GoldMag-IgG showed that 3 μg/mL of nanoparticles could significantly affect the MRI signal intensity of GRE T2*WI. The results demonstrate that GoldMag nanoparticles can be effectively conjugated with biomacromolecules and possess great potential for MR molecular imaging.

  10. Conspectus revisited: Bestandesentwicklung über Conspectusvergabe auf Exemplarniveau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Lutterer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Im Allgemeinen dient das in den USA entwickelte Conspectusverfahren dazu, die Sammelintensität von Bibliotheken hinsichtlich des jeweiligen Spezialisierungsgrads einzelner Sammelgebiete zu beschreiben. Häufig geschieht dies auch in Zusammenhang mit der Entwicklung von Approval Plans. An der Zentral- und Hochschulbibliothek Luzern wurde hierbei ein etwas anderer Weg begangen. Im Rahmen eines über zwölf Jahre angelegten Projektes wurde für jedes einzelne erworbene Medium eine Klassifikation im Rahmen des Conspectus vorgenommen. Ergebnisse dieser Studie werden vorgestellt. Damit ergibt sich ein differenzierterer Blick auf das Conspectusverfahren sowie eine Klärung zur Relevanz und Leistungskraft von Fachprofilen. A conspectus is used to describe the collection strength of a library in terms of the respective degree of specialization of its collections. This often happens in combination with the development of approval plans. At the Central and University Library Lucerne in Switzerland a somewhat different approach was used. In a project lasting twelve years each individual item acquired was classified in accordance with the conspectus. The results of this study will be presented. A much more differentiated view of the conspectus is one of the results, as well as a clarification of the relevance and performance of collection profiles.

  11. 分子影像学教学体系构建探讨%On Molecular Imaging Teaching System Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈多芳

    2014-01-01

    分子影像学是一门新兴的交叉学科,已经成为现代生命科学研究最重要的技术手段之一,代表了未来医学影像发展的方向。本文针对分子影像学特点,结合我校生命科学技术学院在分子影像学领域的研究成果以及与医院的合作基础,在教学内容、教学模式以及考评方式等方面展开研究,将生命科学与信息学科和临床医学交叉,建立分子影像学教学体系,为培养理工医复合型分子影像学人才奠定基础。%Molecular imaging is an emerging interdisciplinary, has become one of the most important techniques of modern life sciences, medical imaging represents the direction of future development. In this paper, molecular imaging features, com-bined with research in Life Science and Technology in the field of molecular imaging as well as the basis for cooperation with our university hospital, a study in teaching content, teaching models and evaluation methods, the life science and information science and clinical cross, build molecular imaging teaching system, laying the foundation for training medical complex poly-technic molecular imaging professionals.

  12. Etiologic subtypes of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder : Brain imaging, molecular genetic and environmental factors and the dopamine hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanson, James M.; Kinsbourne, Marcel; Nigg, Joel; Lanphear, Bruce; Stefanatos, Gerry A.; Volkow, Nora; Taylor, Eric; Casey, B. J.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Wadhwa, Pathik D.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple theories of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been proposed, but one that has stood the test of time is the dopamine deficit theory. We review the narrow literature from recent brain imaging and molecular genetic studies that has improved our understanding of the role of

  13. Characterization of water molecular state in in-vivo thick tissues using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, So Hyun

    Structural changes in water molecules are related to physiological, anatomical and pathological properties of tissues. Near infrared (NIR) optical absorption methods are sensitive to water; however, detailed characterization of water in thick tissues is difficult to achieve because subtle spectral shifts can be obscured by multiple light scattering. In the NIR, a water absorption peak is observed around 975 nm. The precise NIR peak's shape and position are highly sensitive to water molecular disposition. A bound water index (BWI) was developed that quantifies the spectral shift and shape changes observed in tissue water absorption spectra measured by broadband diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). DOSI quantitatively measures light absorption and scattering spectra in cm-deep tissues and therefore reveals bound water spectral shifts. BWI as a water state index was validated by comparing broadband DOSI to MRI and a conductivity cell using bound water phantoms. Non-invasive BWI measurements of malignant and normal tissues in 18 subjects showed a significantly higher fraction of free water in malignant tissues (pbreast cancer patients. The BWI and ADC correlated (R=0.8, p=<0.01) and both parameters decreased with increasing bulk water content in cancer tissues. Although BWI and ADC are positively correlated in vivo, BWI appears to be more sensitive to free water in the extracellular matrix while ADC reflects increased tumor cellularity. The relationship between ADC, BWI and bulk water concentration suggests that both parameters have potential for assessing tumor histopathological grade. My results confirm the importance of water as a critical tissue component that can potentially provide unique insight into the molecular pathophysiology of cancer.

  14. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center; Imagen molecular an investigation biomedica. La Unidad de Imagen Molecular del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-07-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  15. Library synthesis, screening, and discovery of modified Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) probe for enhanced molecular imaging of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaunt, Adam J; Harmatys, Kara M; Wolter, William R; Suckow, Mark A; Smith, Bradley D

    2014-04-16

    Zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn-BDPA) coordination complexes selectively target the surfaces of dead and dying mammalian cells, and they have promise as molecular probes for imaging cell death. A necessary step toward eventual clinical imaging applications is the development of next-generation Zn-BDPA complexes with enhanced affinity for the cell death membrane biomarker, phosphatidylserine (PS). This study employed an iterative cycle of library synthesis and screening, using a novel rapid equilibrium dialysis assay, to discover a modified Zn-BDPA structure with high and selective affinity for vesicles containing PS. The lead structure was converted into a deep-red fluorescent probe and its targeting and imaging performance was compared with an unmodified control Zn-BDPA probe. The evaluation process included a series of FRET-based vesicle titration studies, cell microscopy experiments, and rat tumor biodistribution measurements. In all cases, the modified probe exhibited comparatively higher affinity and selectivity for the target membranes of dead and dying cells. The results show that this next-generation deep-red fluorescent Zn-BDPA probe is well suited for preclinical molecular imaging of cell death in cell cultures and animal models. Furthermore, it should be possible to substitute the deep-red fluorophore with alternative reporter groups that enable clinically useful, deep-tissue imaging modalities, such as MRI and nuclear imaging.

  16. Molecular line emission in NGC1068 imaged with ALMA. I An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Burillo, S; Usero, A; Aalto, S; Krips, M; Viti, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Hunt, L K; Schinnerer, E; Baker, A J; Casasola, F Boone V; Colina, L; Costagliola, F; Eckart, A; Fuente, A; Henkel, C; Labiano, A; Martin, S; Marquez, I; Muller, S; Planesas, P; Almeida, C Ramos; Spaans, M; Tacconi, L J; van der Werf, P P

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We have used ALMA to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3) and CS(7-6)) and their underlying continuum emission in the central r ~ 2kpc of NGC1068 with spatial resolutions ~ 0.3"-0.5" (~ 20-35pc). Molecular line and dust continuum emissions are detected from a r ~ 200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), from the 2.6kpc-diameter bar region, and from the r ~ 1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. Most of the emission in HCO+, HCN and CS stems from the CND. Molecular line ratios show dramatic order-of-magnitude changes inside the CND that are correlated with the UV/X-ray illumination by the AGN, betraying ongoing feedback. The gas kinematics from r ~ 50pc out to r ~ 400pc reveal a massive (M_mol ~ 2.7 (+0.9, -1.2) x 10^7 Msun) outflow in all molec...

  17. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA : I. An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Viti, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Schinnerer, E.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Casasola, V.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Labiano, A.; Martín, S.; Márquez, I.; Muller, S.; Planesas, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Spaans, M.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We aim to understand if and how gas accretion can self-regulate. Methods

  18. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA. I. An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Viti, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Schinnerer, E.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Casasola, V.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Labiano, A.; Martín, S.; Márquez, I.; Muller, S.; Planesas, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Spaans, M.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We aim to understand if and how gas accretion can self-regulate. Methods

  19. Novel molecular imaging approach for subclinical detection of iritis and evaluation of therapeutic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Sun, Dawei; Schering, Alexander; Nakao, Shintaro; Zandi, Souska; Liu, Ping; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2010-07-01

    There is an urgent need for early diagnosis in medicine, whereupon effective treatments could prevent irreversible tissue damage. Acute anterior chamber inflammation is the most common form of uveitis and a major cause of vision loss. The proximity of the iris vasculature to the light-permeable cornea and its involvement in ocular inflammation make it an ideal target for noninvasive molecular imaging. To accomplish this, carboxylated fluorescent microspheres (MSs) were conjugated with recombinant P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 and systemically injected in endotoxin-induced uveitic animals. MS adhesion in the microcirculation of the anterior and posterior chamber was visualized by intravital microscopy and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. In iritic animals, significantly higher numbers of recombinant P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1-conjugated MSs adhered to the endothelium (P = 0.03) matching the increase in leukocyte adhesion. Conjugated MSs specifically interacted with firmly adhering leukocytes, allowing quantification of the endogenous immune response. Topical eye drop treatment with dexamethasone (P < 0.01) or cyclosporine A (P < 0.01) significantly lowered MS adhesion in iris vessels. Surprisingly, topical dexamethasone significantly reduced MS interaction in the fundus vessels (P < 0.01), while cyclosporine A did not. In vivo MS accumulation preceded clinical signs of anterior uveitis and leukocyte adhesion in iris vasculature. This work introduces noninvasive subclinical detection of endothelial injury in the iris vasculature, providing a unique opportunity for quantifying vascular injury and immune response in vivo.

  20. Role of Artificial Intelligence Techniques (Automatic Classifiers) in Molecular Imaging Modalities in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascianelli, Silvia; Scialpi, Michele; Amici, Serena; Forini, Nevio; Minestrini, Matteo; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Sinzinger, Helmut; Schillaci, Orazio; Palumbo, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a very active Computer Science research field aiming to develop systems that mimic human intelligence and is helpful in many human activities, including Medicine. In this review we presented some examples of the exploiting of AI techniques, in particular automatic classifiers such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Classification Tree (ClT) and ensemble methods like Random Forest (RF), able to analyze findings obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) scans of patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases, in particular Alzheimer's Disease. We also focused our attention on techniques applied in order to preprocess data and reduce their dimensionality via feature selection or projection in a more representative domain (Principal Component Analysis - PCA - or Partial Least Squares - PLS - are examples of such methods); this is a crucial step while dealing with medical data, since it is necessary to compress patient information and retain only the most useful in order to discriminate subjects into normal and pathological classes. Main literature papers on the application of these techniques to classify patients with neurodegenerative disease extracting data from molecular imaging modalities are reported, showing that the increasing development of computer aided diagnosis systems is very promising to contribute to the diagnostic process.

  1. Signatures of infall motions in the images of the molecular emission of G31 HMC

    CERN Document Server

    Mayen-Gijon, J M; Osorio, M; Rodriguez, L F; Lizano, S; Gomez, J F; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C

    2013-01-01

    Although gravitational collapse is supposed to play an essential role in the star formation process, infall motions have been always elusive to detect. So far, only a few observational signatures have been commonly used to claim for the presence of infall. Often these features consist in either "blue-asymmetries" or absorption at red-shifted velocities (e.g., inverse P-Cygni profiles). Both signatures are based only on the shape of the line profile and they do not guarantee by themselves the presence of dominant infall motions. More robust "mapping signatures" can be obtained from images that angularly resolve the infalling gas. Here we present VLA observations of the ammonia inversion transitions (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), (5,5), and (6,6) towards the hot molecular core (HMC) near G31.41+0.31 that show the signatures of protostellar infall theoretically predicted by Anglada et al. (1991). The intensity of the ammonia emission is compact and sharply increases towards the centre in the blue-shifted velocity channel ...

  2. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  3. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  4. Molecular imaging of neuroinflammation in preclinical rodent models using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Sara; Coda, Anna R; Panico, Mariarosaria; Gramanzini, Matteo; Moresco, Rosa M; Chalon, Sylvie; Pappatà, Sabina

    2017-03-01

    Neuroinflammation (NI) is an adaptive response to different noxious stimuli, involving microglia, astrocytes and peripheral immune cells. NI is a hallmark of several acute and chronic diseases of central nervous system (CNS) and contributes to both damage and repair of CNS tissue. Interventional or genetically modified rodent models mimicking human neuropathologies may provide valuable insights on basic mechanisms of NI, but also for improving the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) allows to investigate noninvasively the inflammatory response in CNS of rodent models at a molecular level, validating innovative probes for early diagnosis, and characterizing the time course of neuroinflammatory changes and their relationship with disease progression, as well as the effects of experimental treatments with high translational potential. In particular, recent efforts of preclinical PET field are intended to develop specific and selective radiotracers that target the activation of innate immune system in CNS. Here, we have reviewed the state of art for PET in relevant rodent models of acute and chronic neuropathologies associated with NI, with particular regard on imaging of activated microglia and astrocytes.

  5. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  6. Image reconstruction of fluorescent molecular tomography based on the tree structured Schur complement decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jiajun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inverse problem of fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT often involves complex large-scale matrix operations, which may lead to unacceptable computational errors and complexity. In this research, a tree structured Schur complement decomposition strategy is proposed to accelerate the reconstruction process and reduce the computational complexity. Additionally, an adaptive regularization scheme is developed to improve the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Methods The global system is decomposed level by level with the Schur complement system along two paths in the tree structure. The resultant subsystems are solved in combination with the biconjugate gradient method. The mesh for the inverse problem is generated incorporating the prior information. During the reconstruction, the regularization parameters are adaptive not only to the spatial variations but also to the variations of the objective function to tackle the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Results Simulation results demonstrate that the strategy of the tree structured Schur complement decomposition obviously outperforms the previous methods, such as the conventional Conjugate-Gradient (CG and the Schur CG methods, in both reconstruction accuracy and speed. As compared with the Tikhonov regularization method, the adaptive regularization scheme can significantly improve ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Conclusions The methods proposed in this paper can significantly improve the reconstructed image quality of FMT and accelerate the reconstruction process.

  7. Interest of silver and gold metallization for molecular SIMS and SIMS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcorte, A.; Bertrand, P.

    2004-06-01

    The metallization procedure, recently proposed for signal improvement in organic secondary ion mass spectrometry (metal assisted-SIMS or MetA-SIMS), has been quantitatively evaluated for Irganox 1010 and polystyrene fragment and quasimolecular ions. In addition to gold, we investigate the effect of silver evaporation as a sample treatment prior to static SIMS analysis. Ion yields and yield enhancement factors are compared for Ag and Au-metallized molecular films, pristine coatings on silicon and sub-monolayers of the same molecules adsorbed on silver and gold. The results are sample-dependent but, as an example, the yield enhancement calculated for metallized polymer additive (Irganox 1010) films with respect to untreated coatings is larger than two orders of magnitude for the quasimolecular ion and a factor between 1 and 10 for characteristic fragments. The interest of the method for imaging SIMS applications is illustrated by the study of a non-uniform coating of polystyrene oligomers on a 100 μm polypropylene film.

  8. Herschel-SPIRE Imaging Spectroscopy of Molecular Gas in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenetzky, J; Rangwala, N; Maloney, P; Bradford, M; Wilson, C D; Bendo, G J; Baes, M; Boselli, A; Cooray, A; Isaak, K G; Lebouteiller, V; Madden, S; Panuzzo, P; Schirm, M R P; Spinoglio, L; Wu, R

    2012-01-01

    We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 microns) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J=4-3 to J=13-12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled ~ 3 x 3 arcminute map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of 12CO, 13CO, [CI], [NII], HCN, and HCO+ in emission, along with OH+, H2O+ and HF in absorption and H2O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by 12CO and 13CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer (~ 500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of 13CO (and [CI]) is new and indicates that [CI] may be tracing different gas than 12CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of th...

  9. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vergara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx. The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%–78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50 and PLA2 activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with 67Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming.

  10. Advances in Molecular Imaging of Locally Delivered Targeted Therapeutics for Central Nervous System Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Tosi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the recent advances in the development of chemotherapeutics, the morbidity and mortality of many cancers has decreased significantly. However, compared to oncology in general, the field of neuro-oncology has lagged behind. While new molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics have emerged, the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB renders systemic delivery of these clinical agents suboptimal. To circumvent the BBB, novel routes of administration are being applied in the clinic, ranging from intra-arterial infusion and direct infusion into the target tissue (convection enhanced delivery (CED to the use of focused ultrasound to temporarily disrupt the BBB. However, the current system depends on a “wait-and-see” approach, whereby drug delivery is deemed successful only when a specific clinical outcome is observed. The shortcomings of this approach are evident, as a failed delivery that needs immediate refinement cannot be observed and corrected. In response to this problem, new theranostic agents, compounds with both imaging and therapeutic potential, are being developed, paving the way for improved and monitored delivery to central nervous system (CNS malignancies. In this review, we focus on the advances and the challenges to improve early cancer detection, selection of targeted therapy, and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy, brought forth by the development of these new agents.

  11. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy. PMID:25749473

  12. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  13. In vivo targeted molecular magnetic resonance imaging of free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy within mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Saunders, D; Carrizales, J; Lupu, F; Silasi-Mansat, R; Ehrenshaft, M; Mason, R P

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We present a method for in vivo observation of free radical events within murine diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study reports on in vivo imaging of protein/lipid radicals using molecular MRI (mMRI) and immuno-spin trapping (IST) in diabetic cardiac muscle. To detect free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy, streptozotocin (STZ)-exposed mice were given 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and administered an anti-DMPO probe (biotin-anti-DMPO antibody-albumin-Gd-DTPA). For controls, non-diabetic mice were given DMPO (non-disease control), and administered an anti-DMPO probe; or diabetic mice were given DMPO but administered a non-specific IgG contrast agent instead of the anti-DMPO probe. DMPO administration started at 7 weeks following STZ treatment for 5 days, and the anti-DMPO probe was administered at 8 weeks for MRI detection. MRI was used to detect a significant increase (p radicals in cardiac tissue than non-diabetic mice.

  14. Lipid-shelled vehicles: engineering for ultrasound molecular imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Katherine W; Borden, Mark A; Zhang, Hua

    2009-07-21

    Ultrasound pressure waves can map the location of lipid-stabilized gas micro-bubbles after their intravenous administration in the body, facilitating an estimate of vascular density and microvascular flow rate. Microbubbles are currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration as ultrasound contrast agents for visualizing opacification of the left ventricle in echocardiography. However, the interaction of ultrasound waves with intravenously-injected lipid-shelled particles, including both liposomes and microbubbles, is a far richer field. Particles can be designed for molecular imaging and loaded with drugs or genes; the mechanical and thermal properties of ultrasound can then effect localized drug release. In this Account, we provide an overview of the engineering of lipid-shelled microbubbles (typical diameter 1000-10 000 nm) and liposomes (typical diameter 65-120 nm) for ultrasound-based applications in molecular imaging and drug delivery. The chemistries of the shell and core can be optimized to enhance stability, circulation persistence, drug loading and release, targeting to and fusion with the cell membrane, and therapeutic biological effects. To assess the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of these particles, we incorporated positron emission tomography (PET) radioisotopes on the shell. The radionuclide (18)F (half-life approximately 2 h) was covalently coupled to a dipalmitoyl lipid, followed by integration of the labeled lipid into the shell, facilitating short-term analysis of particle pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the lipid molecule. Alternately, labeling a formed particle with (64)Cu (half-life 12.7 h), after prior covalent incorporation of a copper-chelating moiety onto the lipid shell, permits pharmacokinetic study of particles over several days. Stability and persistence in circulation of both liposomes and microbubbles are enhanced by long acyl chains and a poly(ethylene glycol) coating. Vascular targeting has been demonstrated with

  15. In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Cathepsin and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity Discriminates between Arthritic and Osteoarthritic Processes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline A. Vermeij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA are serologically and clinically distinctive, but at the local level, both diseases have many molecular pathways in common. In vivo molecular imaging can unravel the local pathologic processes involved in both diseases. In this study, we investigated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP and cathepsin activity during cartilage destruction, in an RA and an OA mouse model, using biophotonic imaging of substrate-based probes. Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA or destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM were imaged using near-infrared fluorescent probes, activated by several cathepsins or MMPs. Fluorescence signal intensity was compared to synovial gene expression, histology, and cartilage staining of a neoepitope of aggrecan cleaved by MMPs with the amino acids DIPEN. Increased cathepsin and MMP activity was seen during CIA, whereas the DMM model only showed increased MMP activity. DIPEN expression was seen only during CIA. A possible explanation can be differences in gene expressions; MMP3 and -13, known to produce DIPEN neoepitopes, were upregulated in the CIA model, whereas MMP12, known to be involved in elastin degradation and chemokine inhibition, was upregulated in the DMM model. Thus, molecular imaging showed no cathepsin activity at the time of cartilage damage in the DMM model, whereas both cathepsins and MMPs are active in the CIA model during disease progression.

  16. Synthese von analogen Filtern auf einer rekonfigurierbaren Hardware-Architektur mittels eines Genetischen Algorithmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Trendelenburg

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Rekonfigurierbare Analog-Arrays (FPAAs sind der Versuch, die Vorteile der aus der digitalen Welt bekannten FPGAs (Flexibilität, Entwurfsgeschwindigkeit auch für analoge Anwendungen verfügbar zu machen. Aufgrund der Vielfalt der analogen Schaltungstechnik ist die Abbildung von vorgegebenen Schaltungskonzepten auf eine FPAA-Architektur nicht immer einfach lösbar.

    Diese Arbeit stellt einen neuen Ansatz für die Synthese von Filtern auf einer FPAA-Architektur für zeitkontinuierliche Analogfilter mittels eines Genetischen Algorithmus (GA vor. Anhand eines Matlab-Modells des FPAA, das eine gute übereinstimmung mit Simulationen des FPAA auf Transistorebene aufweist, wurde gezeigt, dass eine große Vielzahl verschiedener Filterstrukturen auf dieser Architektur dargestellt werden kann. Daraufhin wurde ein Genetischer Algorithmus entwickelt, der es erlaubt, aus einer gegebenen Filterspezifikation Konfigurationsdatensätze zu synthetisieren, die den gewünschten Filter auf die FPAA-Architektur abbilden.

  17. Measuring changes in chemistry, composition, and molecular structure within hair fibers by infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojin; Senak, Laurence; Moore, David J.

    2011-05-01

    Spatially resolved infrared (IR) and Raman images are acquired from human hair cross sections or intact hair fibers. The full informational content of these spectra are spatially correlated to hair chemistry, anatomy, and structural organization through univariate and multivariate data analysis. Specific IR and Raman images from untreated human hair describing the spatial dependence of lipid and protein distribution, protein secondary structure, lipid chain conformational order, and distribution of disulfide cross-links in hair protein are presented in this study. Factor analysis of the image plane acquired with IR microscopy in hair sections, permits delineation of specific micro-regions within the hair. These data indicate that both IR and Raman imaging of molecular structural changes in a specific region of hair will prove to be valuable tools in the understanding of hair structure, physiology, and the effect of various stresses upon its integrity.

  18. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Figure 3A). Moreover, because our analysis of pNBS1 (phosphorylated Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein, also known as nibrin) foci indicated that...in combination, in NSCLC and identify molecular predictors of response. Figure 22. Gene expression in different tumors treated with SAHA and 5AZ... SAHA (HDAC inhibitor) and 5-Aza-citidine (DNMT inhibitor) treatment. We expected the treatment would activate expression of a panel of genes which

  19. Use of Radioiodinated Peptide Arg-Arg-Leu Targeted to Neovascularization as well as Tumor Cells in Molecular Tumor Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Lu; Ping Yan; Rong-fu Wang; Meng Liu; Ming-ming Yu; Chun-li Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore a tumor peptide imaging agent Arginine-Arginine-Leucine (Tyr-Cys-Gly-Gly-Arg-Arg-Leu-Gly-Gly-Cys,tripeptide RRL [tRRL]) that targeted to tumor cells and tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDECs) and primarily investigate the possible relationship between tRRL and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2).Methods:The tRRL sequence motif was identified as a tumor molecular marker specifically binding to TDECs.Tyrosine was conjugated to the amino terminal of RRL (Cys-Gly-Gly-Arg-Arg-Leu-Gly-Gly-Cys) for labeling with radionuclide iodine-131 (131I-tRRL).The uptake ability and molecular binding of tRRL to tumor cells and angiogenic endothelium were studied using flow cytometry and radioactivity counter in vitro.Whether VEGFR-2 is the binging site of tRRL was investigated.Biodistribution and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of 131I-tRRL were used to evaluate the effectiveness of this new imaging agent to visualize varied tumor xenografts in nude mice.Results:In vitro cellular uptake experiments revealed that tRRL could not only adhere to tumor angiogenic endothelial cells but also largely accumulate in malignant tumor cells.VEGFR-2,which is highly expressed on TDECs,was probably not the solely binding ligand for tRRL targeted to tumor angiogenic endothelium.131I-tRRL mainly accumulated in tumors in vivo,not other organs at 24 h after injection.SPECT imaging with 131I-tRRL clearly visualized tumors in nude mice,especially at 24 h.Conclusion:Radioiodinated tRRL offers a noninvasive nuclear imaging method for functional molecular imaging of tumors targeted to neovascularization,and may be a promising candidate for tumor radioimmunotherapeutic carrier.

  20. Establishment of clonal MIN-O transplant lines for molecular imaging via lentiviral transduction & in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, David L; Chen, Jane Qian; Cherry, Simon R; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2012-01-01

    As the field of molecular imaging evolves and increasingly is asked to fill the discovery and validation space between basic science and clinical applications, careful consideration should be given to the models in which studies are conducted. The MIN-O mouse model series is an established in vivo model of human mammary precancer ductal carcinoma in situ with progression to invasive carcinoma. This series of transplant lines is propagated in vivo and experiments utilizing this model can be completed in non-engineered immune intact FVB/n wild type mice thereby modeling the tumor microenvironment with biological relevance superior to traditional tumor cell xenografts. Unfortunately, the same qualities that make this and many other transplant lines more biologically relevant than standard cell lines for molecular imaging studies present a significant obstacle as somatic genetic re-engineering modifications common to many imaging applications can be technically challenging. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient lentiviral transduction of cell slurries derived from precancerous MIN-O lesions, in vitro culture of "MIN-O-spheres" derived from single cell clones, and the subsequent transplantation of these spheres to produce transduced sublines suitable for optical imaging applications. These lines retain the physiologic and pathologic properties, including multilineage differentiation, and complex microanatomic interaction with the host stroma characteristic of the MIN-O model. We also present the in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical analysis of serial transplantation of one such subline and detail the progressive multifocal loss of the transgene in successive generations.

  1. Establishment of clonal MIN-O transplant lines for molecular imaging via lentiviral transduction & in vitro culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Boucher

    Full Text Available As the field of molecular imaging evolves and increasingly is asked to fill the discovery and validation space between basic science and clinical applications, careful consideration should be given to the models in which studies are conducted. The MIN-O mouse model series is an established in vivo model of human mammary precancer ductal carcinoma in situ with progression to invasive carcinoma. This series of transplant lines is propagated in vivo and experiments utilizing this model can be completed in non-engineered immune intact FVB/n wild type mice thereby modeling the tumor microenvironment with biological relevance superior to traditional tumor cell xenografts. Unfortunately, the same qualities that make this and many other transplant lines more biologically relevant than standard cell lines for molecular imaging studies present a significant obstacle as somatic genetic re-engineering modifications common to many imaging applications can be technically challenging. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient lentiviral transduction of cell slurries derived from precancerous MIN-O lesions, in vitro culture of "MIN-O-spheres" derived from single cell clones, and the subsequent transplantation of these spheres to produce transduced sublines suitable for optical imaging applications. These lines retain the physiologic and pathologic properties, including multilineage differentiation, and complex microanatomic interaction with the host stroma characteristic of the MIN-O model. We also present the in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical analysis of serial transplantation of one such subline and detail the progressive multifocal loss of the transgene in successive generations.

  2. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  3. Characterization of low molecular weight alkoxylated polymers using long column SFC/MS and an image analysis based quantitation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, J David; Marapane, Suresh B; Jordan, Glenn T; Clair, B David

    2002-10-01

    The utility of low viscosity mobile phases and long chromatographic columns for complex polymer analysis is demonstrated. We use long column supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) to characterize a variety of complex, low molecular weight polymers. When quantitative analysis is desired, the resulting three-dimensional (time, intensity, and mass-to-charge ratio [m/z]) data are converted to images. Custom image analysis software is used to detect and integrate peaks in arbitrarily defined regions of the time-m/z map. These integrated peak volumes can be used to quantitate distinct component classes of the polymer mixtures.

  4. Recent Advances in Nanoparticle-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Biosensing, Molecular Imaging and Drug Release Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Tzu Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET may be regarded as a “smart” technology in the design of fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. Recently, a variety of nanoparticles that include quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, polymer, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and upconversion nanoparticles have been employed to modulate FRET. Researchers have developed a number of “visible” and “activatable” FRET probes sensitive to specific changes in the biological environment that are especially attractive from the biomedical point of view. This article reviews recent progress in bringing these nanoparticle-modulated energy transfer schemes to fruition for applications in biosensing, molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  5. The application of surgical navigation system using optical molecular imaging technology in orthotopic breast cancer and metastasis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Zhang, Qian; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Du, Yang; Tian, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Currently, it has been an international focus on intraoperative precise positioning and accurate resection of tumor and metastases. The methods such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role in preoperative accurate diagnosis. However, most of them are inapplicable for intraoperative surgery. We have proposed a surgical navigation system based on optical molecular imaging technology for intraoperative detection of tumors and metastasis. This system collects images from two CCD cameras for real-time fluorescent and color imaging. For image processing, the template matching algorithm is used for multispectral image fusion. For the application of tumor detection, the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1-luc, which shows highly metastasis, was used for tumor model establishment and a model of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expressing breast cancer. The tumor-bearing nude mice were given tail vein injection of MMP 750FAST (PerkinElmer, Inc. USA) probe and imaged with both bioluminescence and fluorescence to assess in vivo binding of the probe to the tumor and metastases sites. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumor and metastasis. As a result, one tumor can be observed visually in vivo. However liver metastasis has been detected under surgical navigation system and all were confirmed by histology. This approach helps surgeons to find orthotopic tumors and metastasis during intraoperative resection and visualize tumor borders for precise positioning. Further investigation is needed for future application in clinics.

  6. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2014-10-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ~70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using

  7. Molecular imaging, an innovative methodology for whole-body profiling of endocrine disrupter action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Diego; Rando, Gianpaolo; Ciana, Paolo; Maggi, Adriana

    2008-12-01

    Endocrine disrupters (EDs) are environment and food contaminants known to alter metabolic functions of mammals by interfering with specific endocrine pathways. Many EDs act on steroid hormone target cells by interacting with intracellular receptors (IRs) like estrogen receptors, androgen receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors; other receptors may be engaged. IRs are ligand-operated transcription factors acting in concert with general or cell-specific coregulators. The newly acquired awareness on the panoply of IR functions has increased the concern on potential, unsought, harmful effects of EDs on human health and has questioned the capability of currently available methodologies to identify and study EDs in the environment and in the food chain. Indeed, current in vivo and in vitro methodologies restrict the analysis to very specific organs or cell systems, with obvious limitations in predicting the systemic metabolic consequences of ED exposure. The emphasis recently laid by Regulatory Authorities, including European Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods, on the generation of in vitro model systems for toxicological analyses discouraged the development of models suitable to envision the whole spectrum of ED body actions required when studying compounds acting through IRs. Molecular imaging now provides the opportunity to quantify ED effects in living organisms enabling, for the first time, to acquire a full comprehension of the systemic effects of acute and prolonged exposure to EDs, solving the issue of the potential harm due to repeated low-dose exposure. The systems here reviewed are of unquestionable toxicological relevance and need to be taken into consideration to improve the methodology currently available and in use.

  8. Epithelial cell biocompatibility of silica nanospheres for contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriaco, Fernanda; Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Ernesto [Institute of Clinical Physiology, Bioengineering Division, National Research Council (Italy); Ragusa, Andrea [National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-NANO (Italy); Sbenaglia, Enzo Antonio; Dipaola, Lucia [Institute of Clinical Physiology, Bioengineering Division, National Research Council (Italy); Casciaro, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.casciaro@cnr.it [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica (CNR-IFC) c/o Campus Universitario Ecotekne, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Nanosized particles are receiving increasing attention as future contrast agents (CAs) for ultrasound (US) molecular imaging, possibly decorated on its surface with biological recognition agents for targeted delivery and deposition of therapeutics. In particular, silica nanospheres (SiNSs) have been demonstrated to be feasible in terms of contrast enhancement on conventional US systems. In this work, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of SiNSs on breast cancer (MCF-7) and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells employing NSs with sizes ranging from 160 to 330 nm and concentration range of 1.5-5 mg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated in terms of size, dose and time dependence, performing the MTT reduction assay with coated and uncoated SiNSs. Whereas uncoated SiNSs caused a variable significant decrease in cell viability on both cell lines mainly depending on size and exposure time, PEGylated SiNSs (SiNSs-PEG) exhibit a high level of biocompatibility. In fact, after 72-h incubation, viability of both cell types was above the cutoff value of 70 % at concentration up to 5 mg/mL. We also investigated the acoustical behavior of coated and uncoated SiNSs within conventional diagnostic US fields in order to determine a suitable configuration, in terms of particle size and concentration, for their employment as targetable CAs. Our results indicate that the employment of SiNSs with diameters around 240 nm assures the most effective contrast enhancement even at the lowest tested concentration, coupled with the possibility of targeting all tumor tissues, being the SiNSs still in a size range where reticuloendothelial system trapping effect is relatively low.

  9. An imaging flow cytometric method for measuring cell division history and molecular symmetry during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filby, Andrew; Perucha, Esperanza; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Chana, Prabhjoat; Heck, Susanne; Lord, Graham M; Davies, Derek

    2011-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important mechanism for generating cellular diversity, however, techniques for measuring the distribution of fate-regulating molecules during mitosis have been hampered by a lack of objectivity, quantitation, and statistical robustness. Here we describe a novel imaging flow cytometric approach that is able to report a cells proliferative history and cell cycle position using dye dilution, pH3, and PI staining to then measure the spatial distribution of fluorescent signals during mitosis using CCD-derived imagery. Using Jurkat cells, resolution of the fluorescently labeled populations was comparable to traditional PMT based cytometers thus eliminating the need to sort cells with specific division histories for microscopy. Subdividing mitotic stages by morphology allowed us to determine the time spent in each cell cycle phase using mathematical modeling approaches. Furthermore high sample throughput allowed us to collect statistically relevant numbers of cells without the need to use blocking agents that artificially enrich for mitotic events. The fluorescent imagery was used to measure PKCζ protein and EEA-1+ endosome distribution during different mitotic phases in Jurkat cells. While telophase cells represented the favorable population for measuring asymmetry, asynchronously dividing cells spent approximately 43 seconds in this stage, explaining why they were present at such low frequencies. This necessitated the acquisition of large cell numbers. Interestingly we found that PKCζ was inherited asymmetrically in 2.5% of all telophasic events whereas endosome inheritance was significantly more symmetrical. Furthermore, molecular polarity at early mitotic phases was a poor indicator of asymmetry during telophase highlighting that, though rare, telophasic events represented the best candidates for asymmetry studies. In summary, this technique combines the spatial information afforded by fluorescence microscopy with the statistical

  10. Effect of menstrual cycle phase on background parenchymal uptake on molecular breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy Lynn; Vachon, Celine M.; O’Connor, Michael K.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bartley, Adam C.; Rhodes, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The level of Tc-99m sestamibi uptake within normal fibroglandular tissue on molecular breast imaging (MBI), termed background parenchymal uptake (BPU), has been anecdotally observed to fluctuate with menstrual cycle. Our objective was to assess the impact of menstrual cycle phase on BPU appearance. Materials and Methods Premenopausal volunteers who reported regular menstrual cycles and no exogenous hormone use were recruited to undergo serial MBI exams during the follicular and luteal phase. A study radiologist, blinded to cycle phase, categorized BPU as either photopenic, minimal-mild, moderate, or marked. Change in BPU with cycle phase was determined as well as correlations of BPU with mammographic density and hormone levels. Results Among 42 analyzable participants, high BPU (moderate or marked) was observed more often in luteal phase compared to follicular (p = 0.016). BPU did not change with phase in 30 of 42 (71%) and increased in the luteal phase compared to follicular in 12 (29%). High BPU was more frequent in dense breasts compared to non-dense breasts at both the luteal phase (58% [15/26] vs. 13% [2/16], p= 0.004) and follicular phase (35% [9/26] vs. 6% [1/16], p=0.061). Spearman’s correlation coefficients did not show any correlation of BPU with hormone levels measured at either cycle phase, and suggested a weak correlation between change in BPU and changes in estrone and estradiol between phases. Conclusion We observed variable effects of menstrual cycle on BPU among our cohort of premenopausal women, however, when high BPU was observed, it was most frequently seen during the luteal phase compared to follicular phase, and in women with dense breasts compared to non-dense breasts. PMID:26112057

  11. Different molecular signatures in magnetic resonance imaging-staged facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tasca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is one of the most common muscular dystrophies and is characterized by a non-conventional genetic mechanism activated by pathogenic D4Z4 repeat contractions. By muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI we observed that T2-short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR sequences identify two different conditions in which each muscle can be found before the irreversible dystrophic alteration, marked as T1-weighted sequence hyperintensity, takes place. We studied these conditions in order to obtain further information on the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective wasting of single muscles or muscle groups in this disease. METHODS: Histopathology, gene expression profiling and real time PCR were performed on biopsies from FSHD muscles with different MRI pattern (T1-weighted normal/T2-STIR normal and T1-weighted normal/T2-STIR hyperintense. Data were compared with those from inflammatory myopathies, dysferlinopathies and normal controls. In order to validate obtained results, two additional FSHD samples with different MRI pattern were analyzed. RESULTS: Myopathic and inflammatory changes characterized T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles, at variance with T2-STIR normal muscles. These two states could be easily distinguished from each other by their transcriptional profile. The comparison between T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles and inflammatory myopathy muscles showed peculiar changes, although many alterations were shared among these conditions. CONCLUSIONS: At the single muscle level, different stages of the disease correspond to the two MRI patterns. T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles are more similar to inflammatory myopathies than to T2-STIR normal FSHD muscles or other muscular dystrophies, and share with them upregulation of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. Our data suggest that selective inflammation, together with perturbation in biological processes such as neoangiogenesis

  12. 分子成像与肿瘤靶向治疗%Molecular imaging and tumor targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙夕林; 韩兆国; 吴泳仪; 申宝忠

    2016-01-01

    肿瘤关键分子靶点的异常表达(表达水平和表达状态)与分子靶向治疗反应、治疗效果及预后密切相关。因此,精准评价肿瘤关键分子表达水平和表达状态,无论在肿瘤分子靶向治疗开展前、过程中以及治疗后均显得尤为关键。分子成像可以无创、实时而全面地对肿瘤关键靶点的表达水平及表达状态进行定性、定量研究,对筛选优势人群、指导治疗、判断预后具有重大意义。本文简述基于不同分子探针的分子成像技术在肿瘤靶向治疗过程中的应用,对比分析分子成像在靶向治疗中的价值,以期有益于新型治疗策略的开发。%The abnormal expression (level and status) of the key molecular targets of tumors is related to molecular targeted therapy response, effect, and prognosis. Therefore, the expression level and status of key molecular targets of tumors must be accurately evalu-ated, regardless of the status before, during, and after receiving targeted therapy. Molecular imaging is a non-invasive method used for qualitative and quantitative research on key molecular targets of tumor in vivo and in real-time. This technique is also employed to screen treatment beneficiaries, guide therapy, and evaluate prognosis. This paper reviews the application progress of molecular imag-ing using various probes in cancer targeted therapy. The clinical value of molecular imaging in tumor targeted therapy is further ana-lyzed to promote the development of novel targeted therapy for tumors.

  13. Das Menschenrecht auf Bildung und der Schutz vor Diskriminierung : Exklusionsrisiken und Inklusionschancen

    OpenAIRE

    Motakef, Mona

    2006-01-01

    Das Recht auf Bildung ist nicht nur ein eigenständiges Menschenrecht, sondern auch ein zentrales Instrument, um den Menschenrechten zur Geltung zu verhelfen. Als Empowerment Right hat es eine wichtige Bedeutung für die Befähigung von Menschen, sich für die eigenen Rechte einzusetzen und sich im solidarischen Einsatz für die Menschenrechte anderer zu engagieren. Die Studie erklärt die normativen Grundlagen des Menschenrechts auf Bildung und erläutert die menschenrechtlichen Strukturelemente, d...

  14. Spin glass transition in canonical AuFe alloys: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Li, Yong-Feng; Liu, Gui-Bin; Zhu, Yan

    2012-05-01

    Although spin glass transitions have long been observed in diluted magnetic alloys, e.g. AuFe and CuMn alloys, previous numerical studies are not completely consistent with the experiment results. The abnormal critical exponents of the alloys remain still puzzling. By employing parallel tempering algorithm with finite-size scaling analysis, we investigated the phase transitions in canonical AuFe alloys. Our results strongly support that spin glass transitions occur at finite temperatures in the alloys. The calculated critical exponents agree well with those obtained from experiments.

  15. 6410 Pfeifengraswiesen auf kalkreichem Boden, torfigen und tonig-schluffigen Böden (Molinion caeruleae)

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Urs; Frank, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Planare bis montane Pfeifengraswiesen kommen auf basen- bis kalkreichen sowie sauren, feuchten bzw. wechselfeuchten Standorten vor. Sie sind i.d.R. durch extensive einschürige späte Mahd (Streumahd) auf ungedüngten Standorten entstanden. Die Pfeifengraswiesen entwickeln sich aufgrund ihrer Nährstoffarmut im Gegensatz zu den gedüngten Feuchtwiesen erst spät im Jahr. Es kommt zur Ausbildung eines ausgeprägten Frühjahrsaspektes ohne Dominanz des Gewöhnlichen Pfeifengrases (Molinia caerulea). Oft...

  16. Simulations of the flipping images and microparameters of molecular orientations in liquids according to the molecule string model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Na; Zhao Xing-Yu; Zhang Li-Li; Huang Yi-Neng

    2012-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of liquids is one of the fundamental problems in liquid physics,and it is also one of the key issues to understand the glass transition mechanism.It will undoubtedly provide enlightenment on understanding and calculating the relaxation dynamics if the molecular orientation flipping images and relevant microparameters of liquids are studied.In this paper,we first give five microparameters to describe the individual molecular string (MS) relaxation based on the dynamical Hamiltonian of the MS model,and then simulate the images of individual MS ensemble,and at the same time calculate the parameters of the equilibrium state.The results show that the main molecular orientation flipping image in liquids (including supercooled liquid) is similar to the random walk.In addition,two pairs of the parameters are equal,and one can be ignored compared with the other.This conclusion will effectively reduce the difficulties in calculating the individual MS relaxation based on the single-molecule orientation flipping rate of the general Glauber type,and the computer simulation time of interaction MS relaxation.Moreover,the conclusion is of reference significance for solving and simulating the multi-state MS model.

  17. Die Wirkung von Kundenbindungsmaßnahmen auf das Einkaufsverhalten im Einzelhandel: Treueprogramme versus Kundenkarten im deutschen Lebensmitteleinzelhandel

    OpenAIRE

    Ziehe, Nikola; Stoll, Raina

    2010-01-01

    Die vorliegende empirische Studie soll zeigen, wie sich Bonusprogramme, speziell Treueprogramme und Kundenkarten, auf das Einkaufsverhalten von Konsumenten im deutschen Lebensmitteleinzelhandel auswirken. Die Studie wurde von Bachelorstudenten des Studiengangs Business Administration der Fachhochschule Düsseldorf durchgeführt. Die Ergebnisse der Studie beruhen auf zwei verschiedenen Untersuchungsteilen: Einerseits hat eine mündliche Befragung der Konsumenten im Lebensmitteleinzelhandelsgeschä...

  18. REAL-TIME DETECTION OF SURVIVIN mRNA EXPRESSION IN CERVICAL CANCER CELL LINES USING MOLECULAR BEACON IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Ruifang; He Dalin; Xue Yan; Wang Shu; Xie Li; Zhao Jun; Wang Xinyang; Yang Lili

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression of survivin mRNA in cervical cancer cell lines using molecular beacon imaging technology. Methods Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa and SiHa) and human fetal lung fibroblast HFL-I were cultured in vitro. After adding 100 nmol/L survivin mRNA molecular beacon, the fluorescent signals were observed under fluorescent microscope. The expressions of survivin in cervical cancer cells and HFL-I cell were examined by immunocytochemical streptravidin-biothin peroxidase (SP) assay at the same time. Results Two kinds of survivin mRNA molecular beacon, with different color fluorescence, had strong fluorescent signal in cervical cancer cell lines, and the signal in SiHa cell line was stronger, but these signals were not found in HFL-I ; Immunocytochemical staining of positive survivin was located in the cytoplasm of cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa, whereas, no expression of survivin was detected in HFL-I cell line. Conclusion The technology of molecular beacon imaging can be used to detect the expression of survivin mRNA in viable cells successfully, and may provide a new approach to the diagnosis of early stage cervical cancer and the following-up in the clinic.

  19. Molecular component distribution imaging of living cells by multivariate curve resolution analysis of space-resolved Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    Label-free Raman microspectroscopy combined with a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis can be a powerful tool for studying a wide range of biomedical molecular systems. The MCR with the alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, which retrieves the pure component spectra from complicatedly overlapped spectra, has been successfully applied to in vivo and molecular-level analysis of living cells. The principles of the MCR-ALS analysis are reviewed with a model system of titanium oxide crystal polymorphs, followed by two examples of in vivo Raman imaging studies of living yeast cells, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Due to the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm used in the MCR-ALS analysis, the spectral information derived from this technique is just ready for physical and/or chemical interpretations. The corresponding concentration profiles provide the molecular component distribution images (MCDIs) that are vitally important for elucidating life at the molecular level, as stated by Schroedinger in his famous book, "What is life?" Without any a priori knowledge about spectral profiles, time- and space-resolved Raman measurements of a dividing fission yeast cell with the MCR-ALS elucidate the dynamic changes of major cellular components (lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides) during the cell cycle. The MCR-ALS technique also resolves broadly overlapped OH stretch Raman bands of water, clearly indicating the existence of organelle-specific water structures in a living budding yeast cell.

  20. The accumulation mechanism of the hypoxia imaging probe “FMISO” by imaging mass spectrometry: possible involvement of low-molecular metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yukari; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shingo; Numata, Yoshito; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been widely used as a hypoxia imaging probe for diagnostic positron emission tomography (PET). FMISO is believed to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules after reduction of its nitro group. However, its detailed accumulation mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the chemical forms of FMISO and their distributions in tumours using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), which visualises spatial distribution of chemical compositions based on molecular masses in tissue sections. Our radiochemical analysis revealed that most of the radioactivity in tumours existed as low-molecular-weight compounds with unknown chemical formulas, unlike observations made with conventional views, suggesting that the radioactivity distribution primarily reflected that of these unknown substances. The IMS analysis indicated that FMISO and its reductive metabolites were nonspecifically distributed in the tumour in patterns not corresponding to the radioactivity distribution. Our IMS search found an unknown low-molecular-weight metabolite whose distribution pattern corresponded to that of both the radioactivity and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. This metabolite was identified as the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO. We showed that the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO is involved in FMISO accumulation in hypoxic tumour tissues, in addition to the conventional mechanism of FMISO covalent binding to macromolecules. PMID:26582591

  1. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA. II. The chemistry of the dense molecular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, S.; García-Burillo, S.; Fuente, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Usero, A.; Henkel, C.; Eckart, A.; Martin, S.; Spaans, M.; Muller, S.; Combes, F.; Krips, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Casasola, V.; Costagliola, F.; Marquez, I.; Planesas, P.; van der Werf, P. P.; Aalto, S.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Tacconi, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We present a detailed analysis of Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Bands 7 and 9 data of CO, HCO+, HCN, and CS, augmented with Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) data of the ~200 pc circumnuclear disc (CND) and the ~1.3 kpc starburst ring (SB ring) of NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy. We aim to determine the physical characteristics of the dense gas present in the CND, and to establish whether the different line intensity ratios we find within the CND, as well as between the CND and the SB ring, are due to excitation effects (gas density and temperature differences) or to a different chemistry. Methods: We estimate the column densities of each species in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We then compute large one-dimensional, non-LTE radiative transfer grids (using RADEX) by using only the CO transitions first, and then all the available molecules to constrain the densities, temperatures, and column densities within the CND. We finally present a preliminary set of chemical models to determine the origin of the gas. Results: We find that, in general, the gas in the CND is very dense (>105 cm-3) and hot (T> 150 K), with differences especially in the temperature across the CND. The AGN position has the lowest CO/HCO+, CO/HCN, and CO/CS column density ratios. The RADEX analyses seem to indicate that there is chemical differentiation across the CND. We also find differences between the chemistry of the SB ring and some regions of the CND; the SB ring is also much colder and less dense than the CND. Chemical modelling does not succeed in reproducing all the molecular ratios with one model per region, suggesting the presence of multi-gas phase components. Conclusions: The LTE, RADEX, and chemical analyses all indicate that more than one gas-phase component is necessary to uniquely fit all the available molecular ratios within the CND. A higher number of molecular transitions at the ALMA resolution is necessary to

  2. A matter of collection and detection for intraoperative and noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging: To see or not to see?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M., E-mail: Eva.Sevick@uth.tmc.edu [Center for Molecular Imaging, The Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Although fluorescence molecular imaging is rapidly evolving as a new combinational drug/device technology platform for molecularly guided surgery and noninvasive imaging, there remains no performance standards for efficient translation of “first-in-humans” fluorescent imaging agents using these devices. Methods: The authors employed a stable, solid phantom designed to exaggerate the confounding effects of tissue light scattering and to mimic low concentrations (nM–pM) of near-infrared fluorescent dyes expected clinically for molecular imaging in order to evaluate and compare the commonly used charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems employed in preclinical studies and in human investigational studies. Results: The results show that intensified CCD systems offer greater contrast with larger signal-to-noise ratios in comparison to their unintensified CCD systems operated at clinically reasonable, subsecond acquisition times. Conclusions: Camera imaging performance could impact the success of future “first-in-humans” near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent studies.

  3. Oligomerization of Paramagnetic Substrates Result in Signal Amplification and Can be Used for MR Imaging of Molecular Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Bogdanov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has evolved into a sophisticated, noninvasive imaging modality capable of high-resolution anatomical and functional characterization of transgenic animals. To expand the capabilities MRI, we have developed a novel MR signal amplification (MRamp strategy based on enzyme-mediated polymerization of paramagnetic substrates into oligomers of higher magnetic relaxivity. The substrates consist of chelated gadolinium covalently bound to phenols, which then serve as electron donors during enzymatic hydrogen peroxide reduction by peroxidase. The converted monomers undergo rapid condensation into paramagnetic oligomers leading to a threefold increase in atomic relaxivity (R1/Gd. The observed relaxivity changes are largely due to an increase in the rotational correlation time τr of the lanthanide. Three applications of the developed system are demonstrated: (1 imaging of nanomolar amounts of an oxidoreductase (peroxidase; (2 detection of a model ligand using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay format; and (3 imaging of E-selectin on the surface of endothelial cells probed for with an anti-E-selectin – peroxidase conjugate. The development of “enzyme sensing” probes is expected to have utility for a number of applications including in vivo detection of specific molecular targets. One particular advantage of the MRamp technique is that the same paramagnetic substrate can be potentially used to identify different molecular targets by attaching enzymes to various antibodies or other target-seeking molecules.

  4. Intraparticle Molecular Orbital Engineering of Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles as Amplified Theranostics for in Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yan; Fang, Yuan; Miao, Qingqing; Zhen, Xu; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-04-26

    Optical theranostic nanoagents that seamlessly and synergistically integrate light-generated signals with photothermal or photodynamic therapy can provide opportunities for cost-effective precision medicine, while the potential for clinical translation requires them to have good biocompatibility and high imaging/therapy performance. We herein report an intraparticle molecular orbital engineering approach to simultaneously enhance photoacoustic brightness and photothermal therapy efficacy of semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) for in vivo imaging and treatment of cancer. The theranostic SPNs have a binary optical component nanostructure, wherein a near-infrared absorbing semiconducting polymer and an ultrasmall carbon dot (fullerene) interact with each other to induce photoinduced electron transfer upon light irradiation. Such an intraparticle optoelectronic interaction augments heat generation and consequently enhances the photoacoustic signal and maximum photothermal temperature of SPNs by 2.6- and 1.3-fold, respectively. With the use of the amplified SPN as the theranostic nanoagent, it permits enhanced photoacoustic imaging and photothermal ablation of tumor in living mice. Our study thus not only introduces a category of purely organic optical theranostics but also highlights a molecular guideline to amplify the effectiveness of light-intensive imaging and therapeutic nanosystems.

  5. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Molecular Distributions in Cultured Neurons and Their Processes: Comparative Analysis of Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kevin R.; Li, Zhen; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-11-01

    Neurons often exhibit a complex chemical distribution and topography; therefore, sample preparation protocols that preserve structures ranging from relatively large cell somata to small neurites and growth cones are important factors in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging studies. Here, SIMS was used to investigate the subcellular localization of lipids and lipophilic species in neurons from Aplysia californica. Using individual neurons cultured on silicon wafers, we compared and optimized several SIMS sampling approaches. After an initial step to remove the high salt culturing media, formaldehyde, paraformaldehyde, and glycerol, and various combinations thereof, were tested for their ability to achieve cell stabilization during and after the removal of extracellular media. These treatments improved the preservation of cellular morphology as visualized with SIMS imaging. For analytes >250 Da, coating the cell surface with a 3.2 nm-thick gold layer increased the ion intensity; multiple analytes previously not observed or observed at low abundance were detected, including intact cholesterol and vitamin E molecular ions. However, once a sample was coated, many of the lower molecular mass (cell stabilization with glycerol and 4 % paraformaldehyde. The sample preparation methods described here enhance SIMS imaging of processes of individual cultured neurons over a broad mass range with enhanced image contrast.

  6. Progresses in molecular imaging of prostate cancer%前列腺癌的分子影像学进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范校周; 郭燕丽

    2013-01-01

    前列腺癌是严重威胁男性健康的疾病.分子影像学的出现,从一个全新角度为前列腺癌的早期诊断与治疗提供了可能,新的前列腺癌标志物也不断出现.本文对当前分子影像学技术,包括核素显像、MRI、超声和光学技术在前列腺癌诊治中的应用进展进行回顾.%Prostate cancer is a serious threat to male health, and the development of molecular imaging provides the possibility for early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer from a new perspective. With the emerging markers of prostate cancer, the current modalities of molecular imaging, including radionuclide imaging, MRI, ultrasound and optical imaging in diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer were reviewed in this article.

  7. In Vivo Molecular Imaging to Diagnose and Subtype Tumors through Receptor-Targeted Optically Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Koyama

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging of cell surface receptors can potentially diagnose tumors based on their distinct expression profiles. Using multifilter spectrally resolved optical imaging with three fluorescently labeled antibodies, we simultaneously imaged three different cell surface receptors to distinguish tumor types noninvasively. We selected tumors overexpressing different subtypes of EGFR receptor: HER-1 (A431 and HER-2 (NIH3T3/HER2+, or interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit receptor (IL-2Rα; SP2/Tac. After tumor establishment, a cocktail of three fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies was injected: cetuximab-Cy5 (targeting HER-1, trastuzumab-Cy7 (HER-2, daclizumab-AIexaFluor700 (IL-2Ra. Optical fluorescence imaging was performed after 24 hours with both a red filter set and three successive filter sets (yellow, red, deep red. Spectrally resolved imaging of 10 mice clearly distinguished A431, NIH3T3/HER2+, SP2-Tac tumors based on their distinct optical spectra. Three-filter sets significantly increased the signal-to-background ratio compared to a single-filter set by reducing the background signal, thus significantly improving the differentiation of each of the receptors targeted (P < .022. In conclusion, following multifilter spectrally resolved imaging, different tumor types can be simultaneously distinguished and diagnosed in vivo. Multiple filter sets increase the signal-to-noise ratio by substantially reducing the background signal, may allow more optical dyes to be resolved within the narrow limits of the near-infrared spectrum.

  8. Near-field infrared imaging of molecular changes in cholesteryl oleate by free electron laser infrared ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Tatsuhiro; Goto, Kazuya; Inouye, Yasushi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    We have applied infrared near-field scanning optical microscopy (IR-NSOM) to enable evaluation of detailed molecular changes in cholesteryl oleate, a primary cause of arteriosclerosis. In our IR-NSOM, a wide wavelength range of 2.9-6.7 μm is achieved by use of an optical parametric amplifier and an apertured cantilever. IR irradiation from a free-electron laser (FEL) tuned to a 5.75 μm wavelength induced molecular structural changes and caused cholesteryl oleate to decompose to cholesterol and fatty acids in the FEL irradiated areas. The IR-NSOM images at two different wavelengths, 5.75 and 5.3 μm, with a 2 μm apertured cantilever probe successfully identified areas of molecular change in cholesteryl oleate beyond the diffraction limit of IR microspectroscopy. In-depth molecular structure changes were also evaluated by the IR-NSOM and we demonstrated that the FEL irradiation induced subsurface molecular structure changes throughout cholesteryl oleate in the irradiated areas.

  9. Basic pathologies of neurodegenerative dementias and their relevance for state-of-the-art molecular imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Rising life-expectancy in the modern society has resulted in a rapidly growing prevalence of dementia, particularly of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dementia turns into one of the most common age-related disorders with deleterious consequences for the concerned patients and their relatives, as well as worrying effects on the socio-economic systems. These facts justify strengthened scientific efforts to identify the pathologic origin of dementing disorders, to improve diagnosis, and to interfere therapeutically with the disease progression. In the recent years, remarkable progress has been made concerning the identification of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders. Growing evidence indicates that a common basis of many neurodegenerative dementias can be found in increased production, misfolding and pathological aggregation of proteins, such as ss-amyloid, tau protein, a-synuclein, or the recently described ubiquitinated TDP-43. This progressive insight in pathological processes is paralleled by the development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the exact contribution or mechanism of different pathologies with regard to the development of disease is not yet sufficiently clear. Considerable overlap of pathologies has been documented in different types of clinically defined dementias post mortem, and it has been difficult to correlate post mortem histopathology data with disease-expression during life. Molecular imaging procedures may play a valuable role to circumvent this limitation. In general, methods of molecular imaging have recently experienced an impressive advance, with numerous new and improved technologies emerging. These exciting tools may play a key role in the future regarding the evaluation of pathomechanisms, preclinical evaluation of new diagnostic procedures in animal models, selection of patients for clinical trials, and therapy monitoring. In this overview, molecular key pathologies, which are currently

  10. Surface enhanced raman scattering on tardigrada - Towards monitoring and imaging molecular structures in live cryptobiotic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Harald; Møbjerg, Nadja; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans which are able to survive extreme physical and chemical conditions by entering a stress tolerant state called cryptobiosis. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind cryptobiosis are still poorly understood. We show that surface enhanced Raman scattering su....... This opens new avenues for exploring cryptobiosis by studying molecular changes in live cryptobiotic organisms....

  11. [Heinz von zur Mühlen. Auf den Spuren einiger revlaer Firmen und Familien] / Paul Kaegbein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaegbein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Arvustus: Heinz von zur Mühlen. Auf den Spuren einiger revlaer Firmen und Familien. In : Buch und Bildung im Baltikum. Münster : LIT, 2005, lk. 527-541. Pika tänava majade omanikest alates 17. sajandist - perekonnad Koch, Meyer, Kluge, Ströhm, Wassermann, Glehn, Eggers, Koppelson, Weiss. Nii loob autor pildi Tallinna "firmade ajaloost"

  12. Die von Dr. F. Kopstein auf den Molukken und einigen benachbarten Inseln gesammelten Froschlurche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, R.

    1930-01-01

    Im Vergleich zu der Reptilien-Ausbeute Kopstein's (1926, S. 71) sind die von ihm auf den Molukken und einigen benachbarten Eilanden während der Jahre 1922/24 zusammengebrachten Amphibien naturgemäss wesentlich artenärmer. Durch mehrere bemerkenswerte Neunachweise und zwei fiir die Wissenschaft neue

  13. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Enhanced (NIR-FE) Molecular Imaging of Live Cells on Gold Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Welsher, Kevin; Chen, Zhuo; Robinson, Joshua T; Wang, Hailiang; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Low quantum yields of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores have limited their capabilities as imaging probes in a transparent, low background imaging window. Here for the first time we reported near-infrared fluorescence enhance (NIR-FE) cell imaging using nanostructured Au substrate, which was employed as a general platform for both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and organic fluorescent labels in the NIR region. Fluorescence intensity, as well as cell targeting specificity, was greatly improved by this novel imaging technique. With NIR-FE imaging, we were able to image SWNT-stained cells at short exposure time of 300ms, and push the detectable limit of SWNT staining of cells down to an ultralow concentration of ~50 pM. Further, different degrees of fluorescence enhancement for endocytosed, intracellular SWNTs vs. nanotubes on the cell membrane at the cell/gold interface were observed, suggesting the possibility of using this technique to track the transmembrane behavior of NIR fluorophores.

  14. Introduction to the physics of molecular imaging with radioactive tracers in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Farncombe, Troy; Beekman, Freek J

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances have greatly enhanced the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of radioactive tracers in living animals. this article introduces the physics of imaging behind the imaging methods. The article first discusses the selection of the radiation emitted from the tracer and then the process of tomographic reconstruction or how 3D images are made from imaging around the outside of the animal. The technique of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in which the detection of one X-ray or gamma ray at a time is employed for image formation is then described. Finally, positron emission tomography (PET) which relies on the simultaneous detection of the pair of gamma-rays formed when the positron annihilates is presented.

  15. Superparamagnetic Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles: one-pot synthesis, biofunctionalization and toxicity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariti, A.; Desai, P.; Maddirala, S. K. Y.; Ercal, N.; Katti, K. V.; Liang, X.; Nath, M.

    2014-09-01

    Superparamagnetic Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional nanoparticles have been synthesized using a single step hot-injection precipitation method. The synthesis involved using Fe(CO)5 as iron precursor and HAuCl4 as gold precursor in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid. Oleylamine helps in reducing Au3+ to Au0 seeds which simultaneously oxidizes Fe(0) to form Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional nanoparticles. Triton® X-100 was employed as a highly viscous solvent to prevent agglomeration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Detailed characterization of these nanoparticles was performed by using x-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, Mössbauer and magnetometry studies. To evaluate these nanoparticles’ applicability in biomedical applications, L-cysteine was attached to the Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles and cytotoxicity of Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles was tested using CHO cells by employing MTS assay. L-cysteine modified Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were qualitatively characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy; and quantitatively using acid ninhydrin assay. Investigations reveal that that this approach yields Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional nanoparticles with an average particle size of 80 nm. Mössbauer studies indicated the presence of Fe in Fe3+ in A and B sites (tetrahedral and octahedral, respectively) and Fe2+ in B sites (octahedral). Magnetic measurements also indicated that these nanoparticles were superparamagnetic in nature due to Fe3O4 region. The saturation magnetization for the bifunctional nanoparticles was observed to be ˜74 emu g-1, which is significantly higher than the previously reported Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Mössbauer studies indicated that there was no significant Fe(0) impurity that could be responsible for the superparamagnetic nature of these nanoparticles. None of the investigations showed any presence of other impurities such as Fe2O3 and FeOOH. These Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional

  16. Engineering agatoxin, a cystine-knot peptide from spider venom, as a molecular probe for in vivo tumor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystine-knot miniproteins, also known as knottins, have shown great potential as molecular scaffolds for the development of targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. For this purpose, previous protein engineering efforts have focused on knottins based on the Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor (EETI from squash seeds, the Agouti-related protein (AgRP neuropeptide from mammals, or the Kalata B1 uterotonic peptide from plants. Here, we demonstrate that Agatoxin (AgTx, an ion channel inhibitor found in spider venom, can be used as a molecular scaffold to engineer knottins that bind with high-affinity to a tumor-associated integrin receptor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rational loop-grafting approach to engineer AgTx variants that bound to αvβ3 integrin with affinities in the low nM range. We showed that a disulfide-constrained loop from AgRP, a structurally-related knottin, can be substituted into AgTx to confer its high affinity binding properties. In parallel, we identified amino acid mutations required for efficient in vitro folding of engineered integrin-binding AgTx variants. Molecular imaging was used to evaluate in vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of an engineered AgTx knottin compared to integrin-binding knottins based on AgRP and EETI. Knottin peptides were chemically synthesized and conjugated to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Integrin-binding AgTx, AgRP, and EETI knottins all generated high tumor imaging contrast in U87MG glioblastoma xenograft models. Interestingly, EETI-based knottins generated significantly lower non-specific kidney imaging signals compared to AgTx and AgRP-based knottins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we demonstrate that AgTx, a knottin from spider venom, can be engineered to bind with high affinity to a tumor-associated receptor target. This work validates AgTx as a viable molecular scaffold for protein engineering, and further demonstrates the promise of using

  17. EXPLORER: Changing the molecular imaging paradigm with total-body PET/CT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Jones, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the highest sensitivity technique for human whole-body imaging studies. However, current clinical PET scanners do not make full use of the available signal, as they only permit