WorldWideScience

Sample records for auf molecular imaging

  1. Contributions on biomedical imaging, with a side-look at molecular imaging; Beitraege zur biomedizinischen Bildgebung mit einem Seitenblick auf Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, G. (ed.)

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended as a brief introduction to the emerging scientific field of biomedical imaging. The breadth of the subject is shown and future fields of research are indicated, which hopefully will serve as a guide to the identification of starting points for the research in 'Biomedical and/or Molecular Imaging' at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health. The report starts with a brief sketch of the history. Then a - necessarily incomplete - list of research topics is presented. It is organized in two parts: the first one addresses medical imaging, and the second one is concerned with biological point aspects of the matter. (orig.) [German] In diesem Bericht sind einige Beitraege zum Gebiet 'Bildgebende Verfahren in Biologie und Medizin' zusammengestellt. Sie stammen saemtlich aus dem Institut fuer Biomathematik und Biometrie, IBB, am Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, GSF, in Muenchen/Neuherberg, und seinem engeren Umfeld. Ziel war es, zu sichten, was in und um diesen Themenkreis herum an Wissen und sonstiger Kompetenz hier vorhanden ist. Einige am IBB etablierte Gebiete wie Roentgen-Mammographie oder funktionelle Magnetresonanztherapie wurden ausgeblendet. Der Grund ist die Fokussierung auf ein nicht exakt definierbares, neues Gebiet der Bildgebung, das unter dem Namen 'Molecular Imaging' kursiert und derzeit Furore macht macht. (orig.)

  2. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  3. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. H. Oude; Nagengast, W. B.; Brouwers, A. H.; Schroder, C. P.; Hospers, G. A.; Lub-de Hooge, M. N.; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging of breast cancer can potentially be used for breast cancer screening, staging, restaging, response evaluation and guiding therapies. Techniques for molecular breast cancer imaging include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and radionuclide imaging with positron

  4. Nanoplatform-based molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    "Nanoplathform-Based Molecular Imaging provides rationale for using nanoparticle-based probes for molecular imaging, then discusses general strategies for this underutilized, yet promising, technology...

  5. Molecular Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovac, S.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging mass spectrometry (IMS is a recently developed method for direct determination of spatial distribution of biopolymers, preferably proteins on cell surface and tissues. Imaging mass spectrometry data are mainly based on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization- Time of Flight (MALDI TOF. The MALDI TOF based imaging mass spectrometry was applied for determination of changes in kidney tissue of sensitive mice after poisoning with aristolochic acid I. The second application presented here were changes in the gastric tissue in mice after infection with Helicobacter pylori, as a model of gastric cancer in humans caused by this pathogen microorganism. Molecular imaging mass spectrometry can be applied in medicine, mostly for identification of candidate biomarkers for malignant and non-malignant diseases. Furthermore, imaging MS has almost unlimited capacity in agriculture, food technology and biotechnology, e. g. for monitoring, process development and quality control of manufactured tissue of animal, plant and microbial origin.

  6. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  7. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  8. Molecular imaging in neurological diseases; Molekulare Bildgebung bei neurologischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimold, M.; Fougere, C. la [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Abteilung Nuklearmedizin und Klinische Molekulare Bildgebung, Department Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    In neurodegeneration and in neuro-oncology, the standard imaging procedure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), shows limited sensitivity and specificity. Molecular imaging with specific positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers allows various molecular targets and metabolic processes to be assessed and is thus a valuable adjunct to MRI. Two important examples are referred to here: amino acid transport for neuro-oncological issues, and the recently approved PET tracers for detecting amyloid depositions during the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. This review discusses the clinical relevance and indications for the following nuclear medicine imaging procedures: amyloid PET, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, and dopamine transporter (DaT)-SPECT for the diagnosis of dementia and the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, in addition to amino acid PET for the diagnosis of brain tumors and somatostatin receptor imaging in meningioma. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) weist als Standardverfahren bei neurodegenerativen und neuroonkologischen Fragestellungen eine eingeschraenkte Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet auf. Die nuklearmedizinische molekulare Bildgebung mit spezifischen Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)- und single-photon-emission-computed-tomography(SPECT)-Tracern ermoeglicht die Darstellung verschiedener molekularer Targets bzw. Stoffwechselprozesse und stellt damit eine wichtige Ergaenzung zur MRT dar. Hier sei exemplarisch auf die Darstellung des Aminosaeuretransports im Rahmen neuroonkologischer Fragestellungen verwiesen, sowie auf die bereits im praeklinischen Stadium der Alzheimer-Demenz nachweisbaren Amyloidablagerungen mit hierfuer seit Kurzem zugelassenen PET-Tracern. Dieser Uebersichtsbeitrag bespricht die klinische Bedeutung bzw. die Indikationen der folgenden nuklearmedizinischen Untersuchungsverfahren: der Amyloid-PET, der {sup 18}F

  9. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medecine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen Univ. (Netherlands); Bozzao, Alessandro [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. Rome (Italy); Bonanno, Elena [Univ. Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Biopathologoy and Diagnostic Imaging; Arca, Marcello [Univ. Rome (Italy). 1. Faculty of Medicine; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medecine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen Univ. (Netherlands); Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Signore, Alberto [Dept. of Nuclear Medecine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen Univ. (Netherlands); Univ. Rome (Italy). 2. Faculty of Medicine; Univ. of Rome (Italy). Medicina Nucleare Ospedale

    2010-12-15

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  10. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Bozzao, Alessandro; Bonanno, Elena; Arca, Marcello; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  11. Molecular breast imaging. An update; Molekulare Brustbildgebung. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K.; Helbich, T.H.; Magometschnigg, H.; Baltzer, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Molekulare Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Fueger, B. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Molekulare Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of molecular imaging is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. Molecular imaging using various techniques has recently become established in breast imaging. Currently molecular imaging techniques comprise multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRSI), nuclear imaging by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission mammography (PEM) and combinations of techniques (e.g. PET-CT and multiparametric PET-MRI). Recently, novel techniques for molecular imaging of breast tumors, such as sodium imaging ({sup 23}Na-MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRSI) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as specific radiotracers have been developed and are currently under investigation. It can be expected that molecular imaging of breast tumors will enable a simultaneous assessment of the multiple metabolic and molecular processes involved in cancer development and thus an improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring of response to treatment will become possible. (orig.) [German] Die molekulare Bildgebung zielt auf die Darstellung, Beschreibung und Quantifizierung biologischer, physiologischer und pathologischer Prozesse auf zellulaerer und molekularer Ebene ab. In den letzten Jahren hat sich die molekulare Bildgebung mit ihren verschiedenen Modalitaeten in der Brustdiagnostik etabliert. Die molekularen Brustbildgebung umfasst derzeit die multiparametrische(MP)-MRT mit funktioneller und morphologischer kontrastmittelverstaerkter MRT (KM-MRT), molekularer diffusionsgewichteter Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) und metabolischer Protonenspektroskopie ({sup 1}H-MRSI) sowie nuklearmedizinische Verfahren (brustspezifische Gammakamerabildgebung [BSGI], Positronenemissionstomographie [PET], PET

  12. Tumor Molecular Imaging with Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI can provide not only structural images using traditional imaging techniques but also functional and molecular information using many newly emerging imaging techniques. Over the past decade, the utilization of nanotechnology in MI has exhibited many significant advantages and provided new opportunities for the imaging of living subjects. It is expected that multimodality nanoparticles (NPs can lead to precise assessment of tumor biology and the tumor microenvironment. This review addresses topics related to engineered NPs and summarizes the recent applications of these nanoconstructs in cancer optical imaging, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radionuclide imaging. Key challenges involved in the translation of NPs to the clinic are discussed.

  13. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods: In this review, using keywords such as photoacoustic, optoacoustic, laser-ultrasound, thermoacoustic at databases such as PubMed and ISI, studies performed in the field of photoacoustic and related findings were evaluated. Results: Photoacoustic imaging, acquiring images with high contrast and desired resolution, provides an opportunity to perform physiologic and anatomic studies. Because this technique does not use ionizing radiation, it is not restricted by the limitation of the ionizing-based imaging systems therefore it can be used noninvasively to make images from cell, vessels, whole body imaging of the animal and distinguish tumor from normal tissue. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging is a new method in preclinical researches which can be used in various physiologic and anatomic studies. This method, because of application of non-ionizing radiation, may resolve limitation of radiation based method in diagnostic assessments.

  14. Advances in multimodal molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, Luigi; Gramanzini, Matteo; Gargiulo, Sara; Albanese, Sandra; Salvatore, Marco; Greco, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical molecular imaging is an emerging field. Improving the ability of scientists to study the molecular basis of human pathology in animals is of the utmost importance for future advances in all fields of human medicine. Moreover, the possibility of developing new imaging techniques or of implementing old ones adapted to the clinic is a significant area. Cardiology, neurology, immunology and oncology have all been studied with preclinical molecular imaging. The functional techniques of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in association with each other or with the anatomic reference provided by computed tomography (CT) as well as with anatomic and functional information provided by magnetic resonance (MR) have all been proficiently applied to animal models of human disease. All the above-mentioned imaging techniques have shown their ability to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in animal models of disease. The clinical translatability of most of the techniques motivates the ongoing study of their possible fields of application. The ability to combine two or more techniques allows obtaining as much information as possible on the molecular processes involved in pathologies, reducing the number of animals necessary in each experiment. Merging molecular probes compatible with various imaging technique will further expand the capability to achieve the best results.

  15. Nanodiamond imaging: a new molecular imaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex N; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-01-01

    A new molecular imaging approach is proposed that combines optical detection and magnetic field gradients to achieve high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Called Nanodiamond Imaging, this new modality images the location of nanodiamonds within a living organism. Since nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules and are nontoxic, Nanodiamond Imaging may become an important biomedical research tool with possible clinical application. A Nanodiamond Imaging system actually senses a particular type of defect in the nanodiamond called the nitrogen-vacancy center. A prototype system has been built that was tested by imaging an artificial target within a volume of chicken breast. The resolving power should be <100 µm with modest improvements, significantly finer than PET, SPECT, and in-vivo optical imaging. The sensitivity of the imaging system, taking into account foreseen improvements, should be better than a 10 nanomolar concentration of carbon atoms, referenced to a 1 mm(3) voxel volume and one second of measurement time (10 nM·mm(3)·Hz(-1/2))--a similar sensitivity to the other molecular imaging techniques, but with a stable, non-radioactive tracer.

  16. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jie (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Intelligent Medical Research Center

    2013-07-01

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  17. [Magnetic resonance tomography: potentials of molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Faber, Cornelius; Neuberger, Thomas; Köhler, Sascha; Stroh, Albrecht; Zimmer, Claus; Jakob, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging is "the in-vivo characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level" and allows the imaging of molecular abnormalities associated with diseases long before morphological changes can be detected. At present, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for molecular and cellular imaging is rapidly increasing. MRI is a very attractive candidate, since current MRI protocols already provide anatomic, functional, and biochemical information of excellent image quality and with high spatial resolution. Combining this high spatial resolution/high contrast imaging modality with specific MRI contrast imaging agents for molecular imaging is currently the focus of research in many laboratories worldwide. This paper summarizes the rationale for molecular MRI imaging and describes the basic features of modern molecular imaging strategies with MRI. Finally, a special focus is given to the growing field of applications, e.g., stem cell imaging, imaging of apoptosis, plaques, and other biological targets of interest.

  18. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  19. Molecular imaging with theranostic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-10-18

    Nanoparticles (NPs) offer diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities not available with small molecules or microscale tools. As the field of molecular imaging has emerged from the blending of molecular biology with medical imaging, NP imaging is increasingly common for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The term theranostic describes technology with concurrent and complementary diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. Although NPs have been FDA-approved for clinical use as transport vehicles for nearly 15 years, full translation of their theranostic potential is incomplete. However, NPs have shown remarkable success in the areas of drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging applications include image-guided resection, optical/photoacoustic imaging in vivo, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and thermoablative therapy. Diagnosis with NPs in molecular imaging involves the correlation of the signal with a phenotype. The location and intensity of NP signals emanating from a living subject indicate the disease area's size, stage, and biochemical signature. Therapy with NPs uses the image for resection or delivery of a small molecule or RNA therapeutic. Ablation of the affected area is also possible via heat or radioactivity. The ideal theranostic NP includes several features: (1) it selectively and rapidly accumulates in diseased tissue; (2) it reports biochemical and morphological characteristics of the area; (3) it delivers an effective therapeutic; and (4) it is safe and biodegrades with nontoxic byproducts. Such a system contains a central imaging core surrounded by small molecule therapeutics. The system targets via ligands such as IgG and is protected from immune scavengers by a cloak of protective polymer. Although no NP has achieved all of the above criteria, many NPs possess one or more of these features. While the most clinically translatable NPs have been used in the field of magnetic resonance imaging, other types in development are quickly

  20. Molecular Imaging with Theranostic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Nanoparticles offer diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities impossible with small molecules or micro-scale tools. As molecular biology merges with medical imaging to form the field of molecular imaging, nanoparticle imaging is increasingly common with both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The term theranostic indicates technology with concurrent and complementary diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. When performed with sub-micron materials, the field may be termed theranostic nanomedicine. Although nanoparticles have been FDA-approved for clinical use as transport vehicles for nearly 15 years, full translation of their theranostic potential is incomplete. Still, remarkable successes with nanoparticles have been realized in the areas of drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging applications include image-guided resection, optical/photoacoustic imaging in vivo, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and thermoablative therapy. Diagnosis with nanoparticles in molecular imaging involves correlating signal to a phenotype. The disease’s size, stage, and biochemical signature can be gleaned from the location and intensity of nanoparticle signal emanating from a living subject. Therapy with NP uses the image for resection or delivery of small molecule or RNA thererapeutic. Ablation of the affected area is also possible via heat or radioactivity. The ideal theranostic NP: (1) selectively and rapidly accumulates in diseased tissue, (2) reports biochemical and morphological characteristics of the area, (3) delivers a non-invasive therapeutic, and (4) is safe and biodegrades with non-toxic byproducts. Above is a schematic of such a system which contains a central imaging core (yellow) surrounded by small molecule therapeutics (red). The system targets via ligands such as IgG (pink) and is protected from immune scavengers by a cloak of protective polymer (green). While no nanoparticle has achieved all of the above features, many NPs do fulfill one

  1. Molecular Imaging: Current Status and Emerging Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific therapeutic treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use PET- or SPECT-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multimodality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and ultrasound imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies since they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and ultrasound modalities involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with ultrasound. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation such as endoscopes and microcatheters suggest that these molecular imaging modalities have numerous clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future. PMID:20541650

  2. Label-free molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  3. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  4. Molecular dynamics study on Au/Fe3O4 nanocomposites and their surface function toward amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jeffrey; Jiang, Xuchuan; Yu, Aibing

    2011-10-13

    The deposition of gold nanoparticles on the magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) surface is demonstrated through a molecular dynamics method. The simulated results show that an intermediate layer composed by such as a surfactant, polymer, or silica plays a key role in the formation of core/shell Fe(3)O(4)/Au nanostructures. The functional groups of the intermediate layer are crucial factors in depositing gold onto the Fe(3)O(4) surface via nonbonding interactions, in which the van der Waals and columbic forces will determine the strength of interaction toward the gold and iron oxide. Such interactions can affect the stability of the metal-coated nanocomposites and hence the functional properties. The nanocomposite is further investigated on the surface adsorption of amino acids (e.g., cysteine), which may be useful for functional exploration in biomedical applications.

  5. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  6. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  7. Recent development of nanoparticles for molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonghoon; Lee, Nohyun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-10-01

    Molecular imaging enables us to non-invasively visualize cellular functions and biological processes in living subjects, allowing accurate diagnosis of diseases at early stages. For successful molecular imaging, a suitable contrast agent with high sensitivity is required. To date, various nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for medical imaging modalities. In comparison with conventional probes, nanoparticles offer several advantages, including controllable physical properties, facile surface modification and long circulation time. In addition, they can be integrated with various combinations for multimodal imaging and therapy. In this opinion piece, we highlight recent advances and future perspectives of nanomaterials for molecular imaging. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  8. Anatomical and molecular imaging of skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hao Hong1, Jiangtao Sun1, Weibo Cai1,21Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 2University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer types. It is generally divided into two categories: melanoma (∼5% and nonmelanoma (∼95%, which can be further categorized into basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and some rare skin cancer types. Biopsy is still the gold standard for skin cancer evaluation in the clinic. Various anatomical imaging techniques have been used to evaluate different types of skin cancer lesions, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, high-frequency ultrasound, terahertz pulsed imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and some other recently developed techniques such as photoacoustic microscopy. However, anatomical imaging alone may not be sufficient in guiding skin cancer diagnosis and therapy. Over the last decade, various molecular imaging techniques (in particular single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography have been investigated for skin cancer imaging. The pathways or molecular targets that have been studied include glucose metabolism, integrin αvβ3, melanocortin-1 receptor, high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen, and several other molecular markers. Preclinical molecular imaging is thriving all over the world, while clinical molecular imaging has not lived up to the expectations because of slow bench-to-bedside translation. It is likely that this situation will change in the near future and molecular imaging will truly play an important role in personalized medicine of melanoma patients.Keywords: skin cancer, molecular imaging, melanoma, anatomical imaging, positron emission tomography, antibody

  9. Preclinical molecular imaging using PET and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gunter; Abolmaali, Nasreddin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging fundamentally changes the way we look at cancer. Imaging paradigms are now shifting away from classical morphological measures towards the assessment of functional, metabolic, cellular, and molecular information in vivo. Interdisciplinary driven developments of imaging methodology and probe molecules utilizing animal models of human cancers have enhanced our ability to non-invasively characterize neoplastic tissue and follow anti-cancer treatments. Preclinical molecular imaging offers a whole palette of excellent methodology to choose from. We will focus on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, since they provide excellent and complementary molecular imaging capabilities and bear high potential for clinical translation. Prerequisites and consequences of using animal models as surrogates of human cancers in preclinical molecular imaging are outlined. We present physical principles, values and limitations of PET and MRI as molecular imaging modalities and comment on their high potential to non-invasively assess information on hypoxia, angiogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, metabolism, and cell trafficking in preclinical cancer research.

  10. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  11. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Zusammenfassungen auf Deutsch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Patrut

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassungen auf Deutsch
    BRAIN. Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience
    GEHIRN. Breitenforschung in der Künstlichen Intelligenz und den Neurowissenschaften
    ISSN 2067-3957
    Band 1, Heft 4
    Oktober 2010: “ Herbst, 2010”
    www.brain.edusoft.ro
    Chefredakteur: Bogdan Pătruţ

  13. Zusammenfassungen auf Deutsch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Patrut

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassungen auf Deutsch
    BRAIN. Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience
    GEHIRN. Breitenforschung in der Künstlichen Intelligenz und den Neurowissenschaften
    ISSN 2067-3957
    Band 2, Heft 1
    Januar 2011
    www.brain.edusoft.ro
    Chefredakteur: Bogdan Pătruţ

  14. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing

  15. Molecular Imaging of Urogenital Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Steve Y.; Szabo, Zsolt; Morgan, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    There is an expanding and exciting repertoire of PET imaging radiotracers for urogenital diseases, particularly in prostate cancer, renal cell cancer, and renal function. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. With growing therapeutics options for the treatment of metastatic and advanced prostate cancer, improved functional imaging of prostate cancer beyond the limitations of conventional computed tomography (CT) and bone scan (BS) is becoming increasingly important for...

  16. "Molecular" MR imaging at high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang; Wang, Ping; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Dortch, Richard; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) have contributed considerably to clinical radiology, and a variety of MR techniques have been developed to evaluate pathological processes as well as normal tissue biology at the cellular and molecular level. However, in comparison to nuclear imaging, MRI has relatively poor sensitivity for detecting true molecular changes or for detecting the presence of targeted contrast agents, though these remain under active development. In recent years very high field (7T and above) MRI systems have been developed for human studies and these provide new opportunities and technical challenges for molecular imaging. We identify 5 types of intrinsic contrast mechanisms that do not require the use of exogenous agents but which can provide molecular and cellular information. We can derive information on tissue composition by (i) imaging different nuclei, especially sodium (ii) exploiting chemical shift differences as in MRS (iii) exploiting specific relaxation mechanisms (iv) exploiting tissue differences in the exchange rates of molecular species such as amides or hydroxyls and (v) differences in susceptibility. The increased signal strength at higher fields enables higher resolution images to be acquired, along with increased sensitivity to detecting subtle effects caused by molecular changes in tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  18. Zusammenfassungen auf Deutsch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Patrut

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassungen auf Deutsch
    BRAIN. Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience
    GEHIRN. Breitenforschung in der Künstlichen Intelligenz und den Neurowissenschaften
    ISSN 2067-3957
    Band 1, Heft 3
    Juli 2010: “Einen glücklichen Sommer 2010!”
    www.brain.edusoft.ro
    Chefredakteur: Bogdan Pătruţ

  19. Molecular and functional imaging of internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqi; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA), which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  20. Has molecular imaging delivered to drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Philip S.; Patel, Neel; McCarthy, Timothy J.

    2017-10-01

    Pharmaceutical research and development requires a systematic interrogation of a candidate molecule through clinical studies. To ensure resources are spent on only the most promising molecules, early clinical studies must understand fundamental attributes of the drug candidate, including exposure at the target site, target binding and pharmacological response in disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to quantitatively characterize these properties in small, efficient clinical studies. Specific benefits of molecular imaging in this setting (compared to blood and tissue sampling) include non-invasiveness and the ability to survey the whole body temporally. These methods have been adopted primarily for neuroscience drug development, catalysed by the inability to access the brain compartment by other means. If we believe molecular imaging is a technology platform able to underpin clinical drug development, why is it not adopted further to enable earlier decisions? This article considers current drug development needs, progress towards integration of molecular imaging into studies, current impediments and proposed models to broaden use and increase impact. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  1. Principles and basic concepts of molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Nicolas; Brader, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Advanced knowledge in molecular biology and new technological developments in imaging modalities and contrast agents calls for molecular imaging (MI) to play a major role in the near future in many human diseases (Weissleder and Mahmood Radiology 219:316-333, 2001). Imaging systems are providing higher signal-to-noise ratio and higher spatial and/or temporal resolution. New specific contrast agents offer the opportunity to drive new challenges for obtaining functional and biological information on tissue characteristics and tissue processes. All this information could be relevant for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment follow-up and to drive local therapies, enhancing local drug/gene delivery. The recent explosion of all these developments is a radical change of perspective in our imaging community because they could have a tremendous impact on our clinical practice and on teaching programs and they call for a more prominent multidisciplinary approach in this field of research.

  2. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  3. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  4. Molecular imaging: what can be used today

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, P L; de Korte, M A; Lub-de Hooge, M N; van Waarde, A; Koopmans, K P; Perik, P J; de Vries, Liesbeth

    2005-01-01

    Biochemical cellular targets and more general metabolic processes in cancer cells can be visualised. Extensive data are available on molecular imaging in preclinical models. However, innovative tracers move slowly to the clinic. This review provides information on the currently available methods of

  5. Molecular Imaging in Nanotechnology and Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Chrysafis; Pal, Suchetan; Rotter, Lara; Yang, Jiang; Kircher, Moritz F

    2017-06-01

    The fields of biomedical nanotechnology and theranostics have enjoyed exponential growth in recent years. The "Molecular Imaging in Nanotechnology and Theranostics" (MINT) Interest Group of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) was created in order to provide a more organized and focused forum on these topics within the WMIS and at the World Molecular Imaging Conference (WMIC). The interest group was founded in 2015 and was officially inaugurated during the 2016 WMIC. The overarching goal of MINT is to bring together the many scientists who work on molecular imaging approaches using nanotechnology and those that work on theranostic agents. MINT therefore represents scientists, labs, and institutes that are very diverse in their scientific backgrounds and areas of expertise, reflecting the wide array of materials and approaches that drive these fields. In this short review, we attempt to provide a condensed overview over some of the key areas covered by MINT. Given the breadth of the fields and the given space constraints, we have limited the coverage to the realm of nanoconstructs, although theranostics is certainly not limited to this domain. We will also focus only on the most recent developments of the last 3-5 years, in order to provide the reader with an intuition of what is "in the pipeline" and has potential for clinical translation in the near future.

  6. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    in living mice optically, observing the increase in Alexa750 fluorescence, and photoacoustically, using a dual wavelength imaging method. Results Active forms of both MMP2 and MMP-9 enzymes were found in FTC133 tumor homogenates, with MMP-9 detected in greater amounts. The molecular imaging agent......Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers...... for malignant thyroid lesions, in FTC133 thyroid tumors subcutaneously implanted in nude mice. The imaging agent used to visualize tumors was MMP activatable photoacoustic probe, Alexa750-CXeeeeXPLGLAGrrrrrXK-BHQ3. Cleavage of the MMP activatable agent was imaged after intratumoral and intravenous injections...

  7. Solid silica nanoparticles: applications in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshahi, Vahid; Soltani, Madjid

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica-based nanoparticles have been widely used for therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancer mainly through delivery of drugs, genes and contrast agents. Development of synthesis methods has provided the possibility of fabricating silica nanoparticles with different sizes in nanometer ranges as well as silica-based multimodal nanoparticles with many innovative properties and intriguing applications in biomedicine. The surface of silica particles facilitates different methods of surface modifications and allows conjugation of various biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. In this review, different methods of fabrication of silica and silica-based nanoparticles, their surface modification and the application of these nanoparticles in molecular imaging are discussed. Overall, the aim of this review is to address the development of silica and silica-based multifunctional nanoparticles that are introduced mainly for molecular imaging applications using optical, magnetic (MRI), X-ray (computed tomography) and multimodal imaging techniques. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Molecular optical imaging with radioactive probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical imaging (OI techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging have been widely used to track diseases in a non-invasive manner within living subjects. These techniques generally require bioluminescent and fluorescent probes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using radioactive probes for in vivo molecular OI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By taking the advantages of low energy window of light (1.2-3.1 eV, 400-1000 nm resulting from radiation, radionuclides that emit charged particles such as beta(+ and beta(- can be successfully imaged with an OI instrument. In vivo optical images can be obtained for several radioactive probes including 2-deoxy-2-[(18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([(18F]FDG, Na(18F, Na(131I, (90YCl(3 and a (90Y labeled peptide that specifically target tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies demonstrate generalizability of radioactive OI technique. It provides a new molecular imaging strategy and will likely have significant impact on both small animal and clinical imaging.

  9. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  10. Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah; Yoon, Joon-Kee; Dragulescu-Andrasi, Anca; Nielsen, Carsten; Tisma, Aleksandra; Bodapati, Sunil; Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yan, Xinrui; Chan, Carmel; Starcevic, Daniela; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers for malignant thyroid lesions, in FTC133 thyroid tumors subcutaneously implanted in nude mice. The imaging agent used to visualize tumors was MMP activatable photoacoustic probe, Alexa750-CXeeeeXPLGLAGrrrrrXK-BHQ3. Cleavage of the MMP activatable agent was imaged after intratumoral and intravenous injections in living mice optically, observing the increase in Alexa750 fluorescence, and photoacoustically, using a dual wavelength imaging method. Results Active forms of both MMP2 and MMP-9 enzymes were found in FTC133 tumor homogenates, with MMP-9 detected in greater amounts. The molecular imaging agent was determined to be activated by both enzymes in vitro, with MMP-9 being more efficient in this regard. Both optical and photoacoustic imaging showed significantly higher signal in tumors of mice injected with the active agent than in tumors injected with the control, non-activatable, agent. Conclusions With the combination of high spatial resolution and signal specificity, targeted photoacoustic imaging holds great promise as a noninvasive method for early diagnosis of follicular thyroid carcinomas. PMID:23349314

  11. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  12. Molecular Imaging in Synthetic Biology, and Synthetic Biology in Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Assaf A; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-06-01

    Biomedical synthetic biology is an emerging field in which cells are engineered at the genetic level to carry out novel functions with relevance to biomedical and industrial applications. This approach promises new treatments, imaging tools, and diagnostics for diseases ranging from gastrointestinal inflammatory syndromes to cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. As these cellular technologies undergo pre-clinical and clinical development, it is becoming essential to monitor their location and function in vivo, necessitating appropriate molecular imaging strategies, and therefore, we have created an interest group within the World Molecular Imaging Society focusing on synthetic biology and reporter gene technologies. Here, we highlight recent advances in biomedical synthetic biology, including bacterial therapy, immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. We then discuss emerging molecular imaging approaches to facilitate in vivo applications, focusing on reporter genes for noninvasive modalities such as magnetic resonance, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, bioluminescence, and radionuclear imaging. Because reporter genes can be incorporated directly into engineered genetic circuits, they are particularly well suited to imaging synthetic biological constructs, and developing them provides opportunities for creative molecular and genetic engineering.

  13. Molecular Breast Imaging Using Emission Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopan, O. [University of Florida; Gilland, D. [University of Florida; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Welch, Benjamin L. [Dilon Technologies

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Tour objective is to design a novel SPECT system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) and evaluate its performance. The limited angle SPECT system, or emission tomosynthesis, is designed to achieve 3D images of the breast with high spatial resolution/sensitivity. The system uses a simplified detector motion and is conducive to on-board biopsy and mult-modal imaging with mammography. Methods: The novel feature of the proposed gamma camera is a variable-angle, slant-hole (VASH) collimator, which is well suited for limited angle SPECT of a mildly compressed breast. The collimator holes change slant angle while the camera surface remains flush against the compression paddle. This allows the camera to vary the angular view ({+-}30{degrees}, {+-}45{degrees}) for tomographic imaging while keeping the camera close to the object for high spatial resolution and/or sensitivity. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed assuming a point source and isolated breast phantom. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast and SNR were measured. Results were compared to single-view, planar images and conventional SPECT. For both conventional SPECT and VASH, data were reconstructed using iterative algorithms. Finally, a proof-of-concept VASH collimator was constructed for experimental evaluation. Results: Measured spatial resolution/sensitivity with VASH showed good agreement with theory including depth-of-interaction (DOI) effects. The DOI effect diminished the depth resolution by approximately 2 mm. Increasing the slant angle range from {+-}30{degrees} to {+-}45{degrees} resulted in an approximately 1 mm improvement in the depth resolution. In the breast phantom images, VASH showed improved contrast and SNR over conventional SPECT and improved contrast over planar scintimmammography. Reconstructed images from the proof-of-concept VASH collimator demonstrated reasonable depth resolution capabilities using limited angle projection data. Conclusion: We

  14. Interruptibility-Detektierung auf Smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Krenz, David

    2016-01-01

    Der Fokus dieser Seminararbeit liegt auf der Thematik der Unterbrechbarkeit eines Smartphone Benutzers. Wann sollte man ihn auf neue Mitteilungen aufmerksam machen? Wie soll man ihn darauf aufmerksam machen? Es soll ein Eindruck und eine gewisse Übersicht in diesem Bereich geschaffen werden. Es werden Aspekte besprochen die Einfluss in das Konzept von solch Software haben. Es ist dabei wichtig die Psyche des Benutzers zu verstehen und mit einzubringen. Außerdem werden einige Ideen beziehungsw...

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of self-assembled monolayers of molecular switches on noble metal surfaces; Photoelektronenspektroskopie selbstorganisierter Adsorbatschichten aus molekularen Schaltern auf Edelmetalloberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Nils

    2012-09-12

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of butanethiolate (C4) on single crystalline Au(111) surfaces were prepared by adsorption from solution. The thermally activated desorption behaviour of the C4 molecules from the gold substrate was examined by qualitative thermal desorption measurements (TDM), through this a desorption temperature T{sub Des}=473 K could be determined. With this knowledge, it was possible to produce samples of very good surface quality, by thermal treatment T{sub Sample}image potential states. The reversible photo- and thermally activated isomerization of the molecular switch 3-(4-(4-Hexyl-phenylazo)-phenoxy)-propane-1-thiol (ABT), deposited by self-assembly from solution on Au(111), was examined using laser-based photoelectron spectroscopy. Differences in the molecular dipole moment characteristic for the trans and the cis isomer of ABT were observed via changes in the sample work function, accessible by detection of the threshold energy for photoemission. A quantitative

  16. Molecular imaging in Libman-Sacks endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Schaadt, Bente K; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2015-01-01

    cardiothoracic surgery and pathologic examinations showed characteristic morphology of Libman-Sacks vegetations. All microbiological examinations including blood cultures, microscopy, culture and 16s PCR of the valve were negative and the diagnosis of Libman-Sacks endocarditis was convincing. It is difficult...... to distinguish Libman-Sacks endocarditis from culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular imaging techniques are being used increasingly in cases of suspected IE but no studies have previously reported the use in patients with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In the present case, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT clearly...

  17. Molecular imaging of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Brian Jaeho; Mohamed, Mona Adel; Brašić, James Robert

    2017-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a condition with onset in early childhood characterized by marked deficits in interpersonal interactions and communication and by a restricted and repetitive range of interests and activities. This review points out key recent findings utilizing molecular imaging including magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and nuclear neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MRS indicates an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in high-functioning autism. Dysfunction of neurotransmitter and glucose metabolism has been demonstrated by PET and SPECT. Levels of serotonin synthesis in typically developing children are approximately twice those of adults; after the age of 5 years, levels decrease to those of adults. In contrast, levels of serotonin synthesis of children with ASD increase between ages 2 and 15 to 1.5-times adult values. The dopamine transporter is increased in the orbitofrontal cortex of men with ASD. The serotonin transporter is reduced in the brains of children, adolescents, and adults with ASD. Reduced serotonin receptors in the thalamus of adults with ASD are associated with communication difficulties. Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of people with ASD. Molecular imaging will provide the preliminary data for promising therapeutic interventions.

  18. Multimodality molecular imaging of disease progression in living ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    imaging techniques, (ii) radionuclide-based positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emitted computed tomography (SPECT), (iii) X-ray-based computed tomography (CT), (iv) magnetic resonance imaging. (MRI) and (v) ultrasound imaging (US). Functional molecular imaging requires an imaging probe that is ...

  19. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cell Transplantation in Myocardial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jaehoon; Yang, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has been heralded as a novel therapeutic option for cardiovascular disease. In vivo molecular imaging has emerged as an indispensible tool in investigating stem cell biology post-transplantation into the myocardium and in evaluating the therapeutic efficacy. This review highlights the features of each molecular imaging modality and discusses how these modalities have been applied to evaluate stem cell therapy.

  20. Molecular Theranostics: A Primer for the Imaging Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel Y.; Li, King C. P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A theranostic system integrates some form of diagnostic testing to determine the presence of a molecular target for which a specific drug is intended. Molecular imaging serves this diagnostic function and provides powerful means for noninvasively detecting disease. We briefly review the paradigms rooted in nuclear medicine and highlight recent advances in this field. We also explore how nanometersized complexes, called nanomedicines, present an excellent theranostic platform applicable to both drug discovery and clinical use. CONCLUSION For imagers, molecular theranostics represents a powerful emerging platform that intimately couples targeted therapeatic entities with noninvasive imaging that yields information on the presence of defined molecular targets before, during, and after cognate therapy. PMID:21785076

  1. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Francesco; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss about the role of new probes for molecular imaging in the evaluation of prostate cancer (PCa). This review focuses particularly on the role of new promising radiotracers for the molecular imaging with PET/computed tomography in the detection of PCa recurrence. The role of these new imaging techniques to guide lesion-target therapies and the potential application of these molecular probes as theranostics agents is discussed. Finally, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to castration in PCa and the maintenance of active androgen receptor are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: A Concise Synopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and continues to be a major public health problem. Imaging of prostate cancer remains particularly challenging owing to disease heterogeneity. Molecular imaging can provide unprecedented opportunities for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the development and natural progression of prostate cancer from a localized process to the hormone-refractory metastatic disease. Such understanding will be the key for targeted imaging and therapy and for predicting and evaluating treatment response and prognosis. In this article, we review briefly the contribution of multimodality molecular imaging methods for the in vivo characterization of the pathophysiology of prostate cancer.

  3. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  4. Nanoparticle imaging probes for molecular imaging with computed tomography and application to cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Ryan K.; Curtis, Tyler E.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Irimata, Lisa E.; McGinnity, Tracie L.; Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2017-03-01

    Precision imaging is needed to realize precision medicine in cancer detection and treatment. Molecular imaging offers the ability to target and identify tumors, associated abnormalities, and specific cell populations with overexpressed receptors. Nuclear imaging and radionuclide probes provide high sensitivity but subject the patient to a high radiation dose and provide limited spatiotemporal information, requiring combined computed tomography (CT) for anatomic imaging. Therefore, nanoparticle contrast agents have been designed to enable molecular imaging and improve detection in CT alone. Core-shell nanoparticles provide a powerful platform for designing tailored imaging probes. The composition of the core is chosen for enabling strong X-ray contrast, multi-agent imaging with photon-counting spectral CT, and multimodal imaging. A silica shell is used for protective, biocompatible encapsulation of the core composition, volume-loading fluorophores or radionuclides for multimodal imaging, and facile surface functionalization with antibodies or small molecules for targeted delivery. Multi-agent (k-edge) imaging and quantitative molecular imaging with spectral CT was demonstrated using current clinical agents (iodine and BaSO4) and a proposed spectral library of contrast agents (Gd2O3, HfO2, and Au). Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au nanoparticles were demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and specificity for the detection of breast microcalcifications by conventional radiography and CT in both normal and dense mammary tissue using murine models. Moreover, photon-counting spectral CT enabled quantitative material decomposition of the Au and calcium signals. Immunoconjugated Au@SiO2 nanoparticles enabled highly-specific targeting of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells for contrast-enhanced detection in model tumors.

  5. Cellular and Molecular Imaging Using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Michael T; Gilad, Assaf A

    2016-10-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a powerful new tool well suited for molecular imaging. This technology enables the detection of low concentration probes through selective labeling of rapidly exchanging protons or other spins on the probes. In this review, we will highlight the unique features of CEST imaging technology and describe the different types of CEST agents that are suited for molecular imaging studies, including CEST theranostic agents, CEST reporter genes, and CEST environmental sensors.

  6. Computational methods in molecular imaging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gunjan, Vinit Kumar; Venkatesh, C; Amarnath, M

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the experimental investigations that have been carried out on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (MRI & CT) images using state-of-the-art Computational Image processing techniques, and tabulates the statistical values wherever necessary. In a very simple and straightforward way, it explains how image processing methods are used to improve the quality of medical images and facilitate analysis. It offers a valuable resource for researchers, engineers, medical doctors and bioinformatics experts alike.

  7. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  8. Bilder auf der virtuellen Landkarte

    OpenAIRE

    Bove, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Ob Standorte von Kirchen in Deutschland, Schlössern und Rittergütern in Sachsen oder Mühlen in Brandenburg, ob hausnummerngenauer Nachweis von Wohnhäusern in der Dresdner Neustadt oder der Sammlungsorte von Kunstwerken – seit Sommer 2007 können die geografischen Bezüge der Aufnahmen aus der Bilddatenbank der Deutschen Fotothek komfortabel und übersichtlich auf Karten- und Satellitenbildern dargestellt werden.

  9. Nanomedicine: Perspective and promises with ligand-directed molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Dipanjan [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States)], E-mail: dipanjan@wustl.edu; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA (United States)], E-mail: scaruthers@cmrl.wustl.edu

    2009-05-15

    Molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery play an important role toward personalized medicine, which is the future of patient management. Of late, nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary area, which shows promises to understand the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The unprecedented potential of nanoplatforms for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases, have found application in every biomedical imaging modality. Biological and biophysical barriers are overcome by the integration of targeting ligands, imaging agents and therapeutics into the nanoplatform which allow for theranostic applications. In this article, we have discussed the opportunities and potential of targeted molecular imaging with various modalities putting a particular emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion-based platform technology.

  10. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, J R; Forsberg, F

    2010-08-01

    Molecular imaging of angiogenesis using contrast-enhanced ultrasound allows for functional, real-time, inexpensive imaging of angiogenesis. The addition of stabilized microbubbles as contrast agents greatly improves ultrasound signal to noise ratio/signal strength/image quality (up to 25 dB) and allows for imaging of angiogenic vasculature. In this article recent advances in the usage of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for molecular imaging of angiogenesis are reviewed. The usage of commercially available agents and correlations between their imaging parameters and molecular markers of angiogenesis are reviewed. Recent developments in ultrasound contrast agents targeted to angiogenic markers for both diagnosis and monitoring are discussed. Finally, a brief overview of the emerging field of chemotherapeutic-loaded agents, which can be used with ultrasound-triggered drug delivery, is provided.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the TMJ: Influence on therapy and inter-observer agreement of two radiologists; Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Kiefergelenkes: Einfluss auf Therapieentscheidung und Uebereinstimmung zweier Auswerter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.; Okweschokwu, S. [Radiologie Haydnhaus, Bonn (Germany); Greven, M. [Medeco Zahnklinik, Bonn (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of MRI of the temporomandibular joint on the therapeutic strategy in patients with craniomandibular disorders (internal derangement) and, furthermore, to analyze interobserver agreement for defined MRI criteria. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one unilateral and bilateral MRI examinations of 32 patients were enrolled. Therapeutic strategies before and after performance of the MRI were compared. Retrospectively, two radiologists independently analyzed the MR images for position of the disk, position of the condyle, signal intensity of the disk and bilaminar zone, osseous changes and several additional findings, using a check list. Agreement was tested by kappa statistics. Results: In 56% of the cases, changes of the therapeutic regimen were registered after MRI. Statistically significant agreement of the two observers was found for anterior position of the disk (kappa=0.44), transverse position of the disk (kappa=0.46) and position of the condyle (kappa=0.45). No significant agreement was found for signal intensity of the disk (kappa=0.14) or bilaminar zone (kappa=0.24), osseous changes (kappa=0.13) and the additional findings (kappa=0.29). Discussion: MRI has a measurable impact on the therapeutic approach to the internal derangement of the TMJ. The position of the disk and condyle can be reproducibly judged, while the signal intensity of the disk and bilaminar zone and the osseous changes are subject to wide observer variations. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Es sollte der Einfluss der MRT des Kiefergelenkes auf die Therapieentscheidung untersucht werden. Des Weiteren sollten Uebereinstimmungen zweier unabhaengiger Radiologen in der Beurteilung von Kiefergelenk MRT anhand definierter Kriterien bestimmt werden. Material und Methoden: 51 MR-Untersuchungen des Kiefergelenkes wurden ausgewertet. Bei diesen Patienten wurde das urspruengliche mit dem Behandlungskonzept nach MRT verglichen. Alle MRT wurden von zwei Radiologen ausgewertet. Die

  13. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2017-04-01

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative Methods for Molecular Diagnostic and Therapeutic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    This theme issue provides an overview on the basic quantitative methods, an in-depth discussion on the cutting-edge quantitative analysis approaches as well as their applications for both static and dynamic molecular diagnostic and therapeutic imaging.

  15. Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy: Theranostics for Personalized Patient Management

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Velikyan

    2012-01-01

    This theme issue presents current achievements in the development of radioactive agents, pre-clinical and clinical molecular imaging, and radiotherapy in the context of theranostics in the field of oncology.

  16. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers

  17. Pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: insights from molecular and metabolic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciccarelli, O.; Barkhof, F.; Bodini, B.; De Stefano, N.; Golay, X.; Nicolay, K; Pelletier, D.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Smith, S.A.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.M.; Stankoff, B.; Yousry, T.; Miller, D. H.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis induce the changes that underpin relapse-associated and progressive disability. Disease mechanisms can be investigated in preclinical models and patients with multiple sclerosis by molecular and metabolic imaging techniques. Many

  18. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells Therapy for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Chao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB, in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI. Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke.

  19. Glycoconjugate probes and targets for molecular imaging using magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraldes, C.F.G.C.; Djanashvili, K.; Peters, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, many research activities in medical diagnosis have been devoted to molecular imaging with MRI. A key issue is the evaluation of molecular targets that allow the early detection and characterization of diseases and the assessment of the effects of therapy. The majority of the current

  20. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  1. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information.

  2. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...... for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm...

  3. Applications of molecular MRI and optical imaging in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Mikhaylova, Maria; Li, Cong; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Glunde, Kristine; Pathak, Arvind P; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2010-06-01

    Some of the most exciting advances in molecular-functional imaging of cancer are occurring at the interface between chemistry and imaging. Several of these advances have occurred through the development of novel imaging probes that report on molecular pathways, the tumor micro-environment and the response of tumors to treatment; as well as through novel image-guided platforms such as nanoparticles and nanovesicles that deliver therapeutic agents against specific targets and pathways. Cancer cells have a remarkable ability to evade destruction despite the armamentarium of drugs currently available. While these drugs can destroy cancer cells, normal tissue toxicity is a major limiting factor, a problem further compounded by poor drug delivery. One major challenge for chemistry continues to be to eliminate cancer cells without damaging normal tissues. Here we have selected examples of MRI and optical imaging, to demonstrate how integrating imaging with novel probes can facilitate the successful treatment of this multifaceted disease.

  4. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  5. Chemistry and engineering of cyclodextrins for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing-Fu; Rogach, Andrey L; Wong, Wing-Tak

    2017-10-16

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are naturally occurring cyclic oligosaccharides bearing a basket-shaped topology with an "inner-outer" amphiphilic character. The abundance of hydroxyl groups enables CDs to be functionalized with multiple targeting ligands and imaging elements. The imaging time, and the payload of different imaging elements, can be tuned by taking advantage of the commercial availability of CDs with different sizes of the cavity. This review aims to offer an outlook of the chemistry and engineering of CDs for the development of molecular probes. Complexation thermodynamics of CDs, and the corresponding implications for probe design, are also presented with examples demonstrating the structural and physiochemical roles played by CDs in the full ambit of molecular imaging. We hope that this review not only offers a synopsis of the current development of CD-based molecular probes, but can also facilitate translation of the incremental advancements from the laboratory to real biomedical applications by illuminating opportunities and challenges for future research.

  6. The Role of Molecular Imaging in Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    The parallel development of molecular imaging and drug delivery allows the combination of therapeutic agents with imaging moieties, which facilitates visualisation of the drug delivery process and provides a realtime readout on the in vivo efficacy of a therapeutic agent. Although challenging, it is feasible to construct a highly versatile, multifunctional single 'theranostic' probe for quantitative molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery and controlled drug release to obtain an effective therapeutic response. Compared with conventional methods for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, molecular imaging has advantages such as substantially decreasing the workload and increasing the volume of more precise data with statistical relevance. More importantly, molecular imaging techniques bridge the gap between pre-clinical and clinical research to develop candidate drugs that have the optimal target specificity, pharmacodynamics and efficacy. With the advancement and integration of technology in various fields, diverse types of targeted imaging probe coupled with drug delivery potential have been developed. Preliminary data have demonstrated that it is feasible and promising to use these targeted carriers for simultaneous target imaging and drug delivery.

  7. Thermoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Kruger

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We have designed, constructed, and tested a thermoacoustic computed tomography (TCT scanner for imaging optical absorption in small animals in three dimensions. The device utilizes pulsed laser irradiation (680–1064 nm and a unique, 128-element transducer array. We quantified the isotropic spatial resolution of this scanner to be 0.35 mm. We describe a dual-wavelength subtraction technique for isolating optical dyes with TCT. Phantom experiments demonstrate that we can detect 5 fmol of a near-infrared dye (indocyanine green, ICG in a 1-ML volume using dual-wavelength subtraction. Initial TCT imaging in phantoms and in two sacrificed mice suggests that three-dimensional, optical absorption patterns in small animals can be detected with an order of magnitude better spatial resolution and an order of magnitude better low-contrast detectability in small animals when compared to fluorescence imaging or diffusion optical tomography.

  8. Imaging with MCP in molecular beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rodionov, I; Shilov, I

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of the fast molecular beam experiments is the measurement of differential cross sections of the most actual gas-phase reactions within a wide range of translational energies of reagents. For setting up such experiments the R and D Center 'Reagent' scientific group designed a series of particle and photon detectors. By way of complexity and historically these detectors place as follows:(1) 0D--one element scanning detectors; (2) 2D-position-sensitive detectors (PSD) based on microchannel plate; (3) 2D+T-time and position-sensitive detectors (TPSD); (4) 2D+2D+delta T-Multiparticle position-sensitive detectors (MTPSD); (5) 2D+T-the fluorescent photon TPSD with photocathodes. We report the development of the methods for particles and photons detection in the fast molecular beam experiments. The results of measurements on the basis of such detectors are also considered.

  9. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  10. Mitochondrial-Targeted Molecular Imaging in Cardiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to discuss the role of mitochondrion in cardiac function and disease. The mitochondrion plays a fundamental role in cellular processes ranging from metabolism to apoptosis. The mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging could potentially illustrate changes in global and regional cardiac dysfunction. The collective changes that occur in mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging probes have been widely explored and developed. As probes currently used in the preclinical setting still have a lot of shortcomings, the development of myocardial metabolic activity, viability, perfusion, and blood flow molecular imaging probes holds great potential for accurately evaluating the myocardial viability and functional reserve. The advantages of molecular imaging provide a perspective on investigating the mitochondrial function of the myocardium in vivo noninvasively and quantitatively. The molecular imaging tracers of single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography could give more detailed information on myocardial metabolism and restoration. In this study, series mitochondrial-targeted 99mTc-, 123I-, and 18F-labeled tracers displayed broad applications because they could provide a direct link between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac disease.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Ovarian Carcinoma Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    competition curve was then fitted by the Hill equation (GraphPad). A representative autoradiogram of a competition experiment for A549 tumor is...tomography imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor expression. J Nucl Med. In press 2006. 27. Goncalves M, Estieu-Gionnet K, Berthelot T, et al...muscle ( Equation 1). The ratio of integrated tumor uptake divided by tumor uptake was set as the y-axis. The ratio of integrated reference tissue

  13. Hybrid image potential states in molecular overlayers on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wella, Sasfan Arman; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Nana; Muttaqien, Fahdzi; Inagaki, Kouji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Hamamoto, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    The structural and electronic properties of naphthalene adsorbed on graphene are studied from first principles using the van der Waals density functional method. It is shown that naphthalene molecules are stabilized by forming a superstructure with the periodicity of (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 }) and a tilted molecular adsorption geometry on graphene, in good agreement with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Our results predict that image potential states (IPSs) are induced by intermolecular interaction on the naphthalene overlayer, hybridizing with the IPSs derived from graphene. The resultant hybrid IPSs are characterized by anisotropic effective mass reflecting the molecular structure of naphthalene. By means of STM simulations, we reveal that one of the hybrid IPSs manifests itself as an oval protrusion distinguishable from naphthalene molecular orbitals, which identifies the origin of an experimental STM image previously attributed to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of naphthalene.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  15. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Yoel [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases.

  16. Molecular imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A., E-mail: k.a.miles@bsms.ac.u [Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a quantitative technique that employs rapid sequences of CT images after bolus administration of intravenous contrast material to measure a range of physiological processes related to the microvasculature of tissues. By combining knowledge of the molecular processes underlying changes in vascular physiology with an understanding of the relationship between vascular physiology and CT contrast enhancement, DCE-CT can be redefined as a molecular imaging technique. Some DCE-CT derived parameters reflect tissue hypoxia and can, therefore, provide information about the cellular microenvironment. DCE-CT can also depict physiological processes, such as vasodilatation, that represent the physiological consequences of molecular responses to tissue hypoxia. To date the main applications have been in stroke and oncology. Unlike some other molecular imaging approaches, DCE-CT benefits from wide availability and ease of application along with the use of contrast materials and software packages that have achieved full regulatory approval. Hence, DCE-CT represents a molecular imaging technique that is applicable in clinical practice today.

  17. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Grimm, Jan; F Donati, Olivio; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. • Advanced imaging techniques allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions in prostate cancer. • MRI/PET, optical and Cerenkov imaging facilitate the translation of molecular biology. • Multiple compounds targeting PSMA expression are currently undergoing clinical translation. • Other targets (e.g., PSA, prostate-stem cell antigen, GRPR) are in development.

  18. MIPortal: A High Capacity Server for Molecular Imaging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha Pivovarov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of novel molecular tools in research and clinical medicine has created a need for more refined information management systems. This article describes the design and implementation of such a new information platform: the Molecular Imaging Portal (MIPortal. The platform was created to organize, archive, and rapidly retrieve large datasets using Web-based browsers as access points. The system has been implemented in a heterogeneous, academic research environment serving Macintosh, Unix, and Microsoft Windows clients and has been shown to be extraordinarily robust and versatile. In addition, it has served as a useful tool for clinical trials and collaborative multi-institutional small-animal imaging research.

  19. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  20. Molecular endoscopy for targeted imaging in the digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Wang, Thomas D

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopy uses optical imaging methods to investigate tissue in a non-destructive manner with high resolution over a broad range of wavelengths, thus providing a powerful tool to rapidly visualise mucosal surfaces in the digestive tract. Molecular imaging is an important advancement that has been clinically demonstrated for early cancer detection and guidance of therapy. With this approach, imaging can be used to observe expression patterns of molecular targets to improve understanding of key biological mechanisms that drive disease progression. Prototype devices that collect fluorescence for wide-field or microscopic images have been developed. Several targeting moieties, including enzyme-activatable probes, antibodies, peptides, and lectins, have been administered in preclinical and clinical imaging studies in vivo. These emerging technologies provide useful approaches to study molecular events in different signalling pathways, producing insights that could lead to improved interventions to prevent and treat gastrointestinal diseases. In this Review, we introduce the basic concepts that form the foundation for development of molecular endoscopy and summarise key results from preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare kardiovaskulaere MRT-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botnar, R.M. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Imaging Sciences; St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, H. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Noerenberg, D. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Radiology; and others

    2015-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  2. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ferritin as a reporter gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S.; Carson, A.; Kim, K.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging (PMI) of ferritin expressed in human melanoma cells (SK-24) was performed in vitro. Ferritin is a ubiquitously expressed protein which stores iron that can be detected by PA imaging, allowing ferritin to act as a reporter gene. To over-express ferritin, SK-24 cells were co-transfected with plasmid expressing Heavy chain ferritin (H-FT) and plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) using LipofectamineTM 2000. Non-transfected SK-24 cells served as a negative control. Fluorescent imaging of EGFP confirmed transfection and transgene expression in co-transfected cells. To detect iron accumulation in SK-24 cells, a focused high frequency ultrasonic transducer (60 MHz, f/1.5), synchronized to a pulsed laser (molecular imaging and basic science research.

  3. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, T.; El-Ali, H.H.; Skovgaard, D.

    2011-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However...... in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...... is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small...

  4. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Endres, Christopher J. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Foss, Catherine A. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Goddard, James S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; McKisson, John [JLAB; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland; Stolin, Alexander V. [West Virginia University; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Pomper, Martin G. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Endres, Christopher [Johns Hopkins University; Foss, Catherine [Johns Hopkins University; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins University; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins University; Goddard Jr, James Samuel [ORNL; Lee, Seung Joon [Jefferson Lab; McKisson, John [Jefferson Lab; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Stolin, Alexander [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Jefferson Lab; Pomper, Martin [Johns Hopkins University

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  6. Dendrimer-based contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2008-01-01

    The extensive adaptability of dendrimer-based contrast agents is ideal for the molecular imaging of organs and other target-specific locations. The ability of literally atom-by-atom modification on cores, interiors, and surface groups, permits the rational manipulation of dendrimer-based agents in order to optimize their physical characteristics, biodistribution, receptor-mediated targeting, and controlled release of the payload. Such modifications enable agents to localize preferentially to areas or organs of interest for facilitating target-specific imaging as well as assume excretion pathways that do not interfere with desired applications. Recent innovations in dendrimer research have increased agent directibility and new synthetic chemistry approaches have increased efficiency of production as well as led to the creation of novel dendrimer-based contrast agents. In addition, by taking advantage of the numerous attachment sites available on the surface of a single dendrimer molecule, new synthetic chemistry techniques have led to the development of multi-modality magnetic resonance, radionuclide, and fluorescence imaging agents for molecular imaging. Herein we discuss advances in dendrimer-based contrast agents for molecular imaging focusing mainly on the chemical design as applied to optical, magnetic resonance, computer tomography, radionuclide, and multi-modality imaging.

  7. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  8. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    approach in animal models using a the MRI- FMT imaging system (Task 5). A description of the primary accomplishments and ongoing efforts follows...guided fluorescence molecular tomography ( FMT ) of ( ) ( ) ( ) tBP k NTNTT etCBP kRktCRtC + − ∗    + ++= 12121 2 1 9 two fluorescent probes in...administration, mice were imaged for an hour at approximately two minutes per frame using an MR-coupled FMT system. The imaging system is a spectrometer

  9. Toward Molecular Imaging-Driven Drug Development in Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Munnink, Thijs H. Oude; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Nagengast, Wouter B.

    With current testing strategies, the number of novel targeted anticancer agents will exceed our drug selection capacity. Molecular imaging is a powerful additional tool that can assist us in selecting effective drugs and help patients benefit from targeted agents. Moreover, measurement of the

  10. Positron Emission Tomography Molecular Imaging in Late-Life Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Hirao, Kentaro; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging represents a bridge between basic and clinical neuroscience observations and provides many opportunities for translation and identifying mechanisms that may inform prevention and intervention strategies in late-life depression (LLD). Substantial advances in instrumentation and radiotracer chemistry have resulted in improved sensitivity and spatial resolution and the ability to study in vivo an increasing number of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and, importantly, neuropa...

  11. Application of molecular ultrasound for imaging integrin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Fabian; Gaetjens, Jessica; Palmowski, Moritz

    2011-02-01

    Stabilized microbubbles with a size between 1-5 µm are used as ultrasound contrast agents in the clinical routine. They have shown convincing results for the vascular characterization of tissues as well as in echocardiography. Due to their size, microbubbles strictly remain intravascular where they can be detected with high sensitivity and specificity. This qualifies them for intravascular molecular imaging. Many studies have been published reporting on the successful use of microbubbles conjugated to specific ligands for target identification in vivo. Among them, there are several promising examples on how to use molecular ultrasound for the imaging of integrin expression. This review provides an overview on the composition of ultrasound contrast agents that can be used for molecular imaging and their detection by ultrasound using destructive and non destructive methods. Furthermore, concrete examples are given on the use of molecular ultrasound to characterize integrin expression on vessels. These cover oncological applications where integrin targeted microbubbles were used to identify and characterize tumor angiogenesis and to assess tumor response to antiangiogenic drugs as well as to radiotherapy. In addition, increased accumulation of integrin targeted microbubbles was found during vascular reformation in ischemic tissues as well as in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. In summary, there is clear evidence from preclinical studies that integrin targeted ultrasound imaging is a valuable tool for the characterization of a broad spectrum of diseases. Thus, more efforts should be put into translating this promising technology into the clinics.

  12. Nanotechnology-Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    for breast cancer specimens that involve microcalcifications or nonpalpable masses and does not occur for palpable breast masses (Cabioglu et al...John V Frangioni. 2008. “Detection of Breast Cancer Microcalcifications Using a Dual-modality SPECT/NIR Fluorescent Probe.” Journal of the American...Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rebekah Drezek, Ph.D

  13. Intensitätsverteilung auf der Sonnenscheibe

    OpenAIRE

    Bräuhofer, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Intensitätsverteilung auf der Sonnenscheibe. Strahlungsgleichgewicht in den sichtbaren Fleckschichten. Diagramm. Entstehungszeit um 1935. Quelle: Zeitschrift für Astrophysik, Heft V, S. 318, Abb. 10 Signatur: Astr.-HGD-A-45

  14. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  15. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariya Cho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  16. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Neural Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Kevin R.

    Molecular imaging is a form of nanotechnology that enables the noninvasive examination of biological processes in vivo. Radiopharmaceutical agents are used to selectively target biochemical markers, which permits their detection and evaluation. Early visualization of molecular variations indicative of pathophysiological processes can aid in patient diagnoses and management decisions. Molecular imaging is performed by introducing molecular probes into the body. Molecular probes are often contrast agents that have been nanoengineered to selectively target and tether to molecules, enabling their radiologic identification. Ultrasound contrast agents have been demonstrated as an effective method of detecting perfusion at the tissue level. Through a nanoengineering process, ultrasound contrast agents can be targeted to specific molecules, thereby extending ultrasound's capabilities from the tissue to molecular level. Molecular ultrasound, or targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (TCEUS), has recently emerged as a popular molecular imaging technique due to its ability to provide real-time anatomical and functional information in the absence of ionizing radiation. However, molecular ultrasound represents a novel form of molecular imaging, and consequently remains largely preclinical. A review of the TCEUS literature revealed multiple preclinical studies demonstrating its success in detecting inflammation in a variety of tissues. Although, a gap was identified in the existing evidence, as TCEUS effectiveness for detection of neural inflammation in the spinal cord was unable to be uncovered. This gap in knowledge, coupled with the profound impacts that this TCEUS application could have clinically, provided rationale for its exploration, and use as contributory evidence for the molecular ultrasound body of literature. An animal model that underwent a contusive spinal cord injury was used to establish preclinical evidence of TCEUS to detect neural inflammation. Imaging was

  17. Molecular Imaging of Apoptosis: From Micro to Macro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Gang; Eden, Henry S.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is involved in numerous human conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemic damage, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer, and is often confused with other types of cell death. Therefore strategies that enable visualized detection of apoptosis would be of enormous benefit in the clinic for diagnosis, patient management, and development of new therapies. In recent years, improved understanding of the apoptotic machinery and progress in imaging modalities have provided opportunities for researchers to formulate microscopic and macroscopic imaging strategies based on well-defined molecular markers and/or physiological features. Correspondingly, a large collection of apoptosis imaging probes and approaches have been documented in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we mainly discuss microscopic imaging assays and macroscopic imaging probes, ranging in complexity from simple attachments of reporter moieties to proteins that interact with apoptotic biomarkers, to rationally designed probes that target biochemical changes. Their clinical translation will also be our focus. PMID:25825597

  18. Solarstrahlungsvorhersage auf der Basis numerischer Wettermodelle

    OpenAIRE

    Girodo, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurden Verfahren zur Vorhersage der solaren Einstrahlung zur Anwendung in der Solarenergie für einen Vorhersagehorizont bis zu 3 Tagen auf der Basis verschiedener numerischer Wettermodelle analysiert und weiterentwickelt. Dazu wurde das mesoskalige Modell MM5 systematisch auf die Verwendbarkeit zur Strahlungsmodellierung analysiert. Des Weiteren wurde eine im Vergleich dazu besser geeignete Vorhersage der Solarstrahlung vom europäischen Wetterdienst (ECMWF) in Bezug au...

  19. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  20. Embryonic stem cell biology: insights from molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Karim; Wu, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have therapeutic potential in disorders of cellular loss such as myocardial infarction, type I diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. ES cell biology in living subjects was largely poorly understood until incorporation of molecular imaging into the field. Reporter gene imaging works by integrating a reporter gene into ES cells and using a reporter probe to induce a signal detectable by normal imaging modalities. Reporter gene imaging allows for longitudinal tracking of ES cells within the same host for a prolonged period of time. This has advantages over postmortem immunohistochemistry and traditional imaging modalities. The advantages include expression of reporter gene is limited to viable cells, expression is conserved between generations of dividing cells, and expression can be linked to a specific population of cells. These advantages were especially useful in studying a dynamic cell population such as ES cells and proved useful in elucidating the biology of ES cells. Reporter gene imaging identified poor integration of differentiated ES cells transplanted into host tissue as well as delayed donor cell death as reasons for poor long-term survival in vivo. This imaging technology also confirmed that ES cells indeed have immunogenic properties that factor into cell survival and differentiation. Finally, reporter gene imaging improved our understanding of the neoplastic risk of undifferentiated ES cells in forming teratomas. Despite such advances, much remains to be understood about ES cell biology to translate this technology to the bedside, and reporter gene imaging will certainly play a key role in formulating this understanding.

  1. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauwens, Matthias [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Research School NUTRIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Royen, Bart van; Backes, Walter [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University, Research School CARIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to {sup 18}F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 18}F-fluorodopa and {sup 18}F-14(R,S)-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  2. MR molecular imaging of tumor vasculature and vascular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arvind P; Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2010-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and the ability of cancer cells to induce neovasculature continue to be a fascinating area of research. As the delivery network that provides substrates and nutrients, as well as chemotherapeutic agents to cancer cells, but allows cancer cells to disseminate, the tumor vasculature is richly primed with targets and mechanisms that can be exploited for cancer cure or control. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tumor vasculature, and the heterogeneity of response to targeting, make noninvasive imaging essential for understanding the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis, tracking vascular targeting, and detecting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies. With its noninvasive characteristics, exquisite spatial resolution and range of applications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have provided a wealth of functional and molecular information on tumor vasculature in applications spanning from "bench to bedside". The integration of molecular biology and chemistry to design novel imaging probes ensures the continued evolution of the molecular capabilities of MRI. In this review, we have focused on developments in the characterization of tumor vasculature with functional and molecular MRI. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular imaging and the neuropathologies of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, Paul; Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    The main motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are linked to degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) fibers, especially those innervating the putamen. This degeneration can be assessed in molecular imaging studies with presynaptic tracers such as [(18)F]-fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) and lig......The main motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are linked to degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) fibers, especially those innervating the putamen. This degeneration can be assessed in molecular imaging studies with presynaptic tracers such as [(18)F]-fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA......) and ligands for DA transporter ligands. However, the pathologies of PD are by no means limited to nigrostriatal loss. Results of post mortem and molecular imaging studies reveal parallel degenerations of cortical noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) innervations, which may contribute to affective...... with denervation upregulation, but there is an accelerated rate of DA receptor loss as the disease advances. Animal studies and post mortem investigations reveal changes in brain opioid peptide systems, but these are poorly documented in imaging studies of PD. Relatively minor changes in the binding sites for GABA...

  4. Development of molecular imaging method for manitoring estrogen receptor activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, W. S.; Jung, J. G.; Kang, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Kim, K. I.; O, H. J.; Jung, J. M.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, M. C. [Seoul Nation University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Estrogen receptor is expressed in 50-60% of the breast cancer and hormone therapy is effective for only ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, we need to know whether or not the ER is expressed in breast cancer before hormone therapy. So far, the method for monitoring ER positiveness in breast tissue is radioreceptor assay or immunohistochemistry which is invasive method due to tissue biopsy. In this study, we develop the molecular imaging method of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene as a reporter gene for monitoring ER activity. Because molecular imaging is evaluation method through the comparison between the image intensities obtained in vivo, molecular imaging method is noninvasive and easily quantitative. We constructed the recombinant plasmid (pERE-NIS) which NIS gene expression is controlled by estrogen response element (ERE) promoter. MCF-7, ER-expressing human breast cancer cell line, was transfected with pERE-NIS with lipofectamine (Invitrogen Co). When pERE-NIS transfected MCF-7 was treated with estradiol or tamoxifen, intracellular uptake of {sup 125}I was higher than those of non-treated. The activation of ERE by drug treatment was occurred and it was caused to expression of NIS gene. The degree of {sup 125}I uptake depend on treated drug concentration. However, in case of pERE-NIS transfected breast cancer which do not express ER, there was no response with drug treatment. Therefore, we can monitor ER functionality and the efficacy of drugs with this pERE-NIS reporter system.

  5. Molecular Imaging of VEGF Receptors in Graft Arteriosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiasheng; Razavian, Mahmoud; Tavakoli, Sina; Nie, Lei; Tellides, George; Backer, Joseph M.; Backer, Marina V.; Bender, Jeffrey R.; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling plays a key role in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, including graft arteriosclerosis (GA). GA is the major cause of late organ failure in cardiac transplantation. We used molecular near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging with an engineered Cy5.5-labeled single-chain VEGF tracer (scVEGF/Cy) to detect VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) and vascular remodeling in human coronary artery grafts by molecular imaging. Methods and Results VEGFR-specificity of probe uptake was shown by flow cytometry in endothelial cells. In severe combined immunodeficiency mice, transplantation of human coronary artery segments into the aorta followed by adoptive transfer of allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to significant neointima formation in the grafts over a period of 4 weeks. NIRF imaging of transplant recipients at 4 weeks demonstrated focal uptake of scVEGF/Cy in remodeling artery grafts. Uptake specificity was demonstrated using an inactive homologue of scVEGF/Cy. scVEGF/Cy uptake predominantly localized in the neointima of remodeling coronary arteries and correlated with VEGFR-1, but not VEGFR-2 expression. There was a significant correlation between scVEGF/Cy uptake and transplanted artery neointima area. Conclusions Molecular imaging of VEGF receptors may provide a non-invasive tool for detection of GA in solid organ transplantation. PMID:22723442

  6. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  7. Vasculitis: Molecular Imaging by Targeting the Inflammatory Enzyme Myeloperoxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Henry S.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Panizzi, Peter; Breckwoldt, Michael O.; Rodriguez, Elisenda; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Aikawa, Elena; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if a molecular imaging approach targeting the highly oxidative enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) can help noninvasively identify and confirm sites of vascular wall inflammation in a murine model of vasculitis. Materials and Methods: Animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care committee. Twenty-six mice were studied, including eight MPO-deficient and six sham-operated mice as controls. Vasculitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of Candida albicans water-soluble fraction (CAWS). Aortic root magnetic resonance imaging was performed after intravenous injection of the activatable MPO sensor (bis-5-hydroxytryptamide-diethylenetriaminepentatacetate gadolinium) (n = 23), referred to as MPO-Gd, or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 10). Seven mice were randomly assigned to receive either MPO-Gd or gadopentetate dimeglumine first. Aortic root specimens were collected for biochemical and histopathologic analyses to validate imaging findings. Statistical significance was calculated for contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) by using the paired t test. Results: In the aortic root, the mean MPO-Gd CNRs after agent injection (CNR = 28.1) were more than 2.5-fold higher than those of sham-operated mice imaged with MPO-Gd and vasculitis mice imaged with gadopentetate dimeglumine (CNR = 10.6) (P gadopentetate dimeglumine. Histopathologic and biochemical analyses for MPO and myeloid cells confirmed imaging findings. In MPO-deficient mice, injection of CAWS did not result in a vasculitis phenotype, implying a key role of the imaging target in disease cause. Conclusion: Molecular imaging targeting MPO can be a useful biomarker to noninvasively detect and confirm inflammation in vasculitis by using a murine model of Kawasaki disease. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11110040/-/DC1 PMID:22084204

  8. The Application of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound in Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Chung, Jin Haeung; Hwang, Sung Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Microbubble contrast agent for ultrasound imaging has come of age, adding entirely new capabilities to real time ultrasound imaging. These new ultrasound imaging techniques exploit the nonlinear echoes that result from the unique interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles, which are readily distinguishable from the echoes of tissues. Contrast enhanced ultrasound can be used to quantify both flow rate and relative vascular volume of the microvasculature in solid lesions or organs, which makes it possible for it to be one of the modalities in molecular imaging. Angiogenesis is one of the important processes contributing to new blood vessel growth that occurs in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. It is essential for spread and growth of malignant tumors. The advantages of contrast enhanced ultrasound are that it is a noninvasive method for observing tumor angiogenesis. Sonoporation utilizes the interaction of ultrasound with ultrasound contrast agents to temporarily permeabilized the cell membrane allowing for the uptake of DNA, drugs, and other therapeutic compounds from the extracellular environment. Thus, sonoporation is a promising drug delivery and gene therapy technique, limited only by lack of understanding regarding the biophysical mechanism that results in the cell membrane permeability change. In conclusion, ultrasound contrast agent could have a role not only in the molecular imaging field with the advantage of noninvasive quantification of angiogenesis, but also in the field of drug treatment of cells using sonoporation

  9. Imaging isodensity contours of molecular states with STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reecht, Gaël; Heinrich, Benjamin W.; Bulou, Hervé; Scheurer, Fabrice; Limot, Laurent; Schull, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    We present an improved way for imaging the density of states of a sample with a scanning tunneling microscope, which consists in mapping the surface topography while keeping the differential conductance (dI/dV) constant. When archetypical C60 molecules on Cu(111) are imaged with this method, these so-called iso-dI/dV maps are in excellent agreement with theoretical simulations of the isodensity contours of the molecular orbitals. A direct visualization and unambiguous identification of superatomic C60 orbitals and their hybridization is then possible.

  10. Molecular imaging of retinal endothelial injury in diabetic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Frimmel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Results indicate that molecular imaging can be used to detect subtle changes in the diabetic retina prior to the occurrence of irreversible pathology. Thus, ICAM-1 could serve as a diagnostic target in patients with diabetes. This study provides a proof of principle for non-invasive subclinical diagnosis in experimental diabetic retinopathy. Further development of this technology could improve management of diabetic complications.

  11. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow...

  12. The Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte M.; Jensen, Peter S.; Erritzoe, David

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a multimodality neuroimaging containing data from healthy volunteers and patients, acquired within the Lundbeck Foundation Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi) in Copenhagen, Denmark. The data is of particular relevance for neurobiological research questions rela...... currently contains blood and in some instances saliva samples from about 500 healthy volunteers and 300 patients with e.g., major depression, dementia, substance abuse, obesity, and impulsive aggression. Data continue to be added to the Cimbi database and biobank....

  13. Molecular imaging of proteins in tissues by mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Seeley, Erin H.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Imaging MS (IMS) is an emerging technology that permits the direct analysis and determination of the distribution of molecules in tissue sections. Biological molecules such as proteins, peptides, lipids, xenobiotics, and metabolites can be analyzed in a high-throughput manner with molecular specificity not readily achievable through other means. Tissues are analyzed intact and thus spatial localization of molecules within a tissue is preserved. Several studies are presented that focus on the ...

  14. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  15. Molecular imaging based on metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-07-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering is a powerful technique that can introduce various chemical groups to cellular glycan by treatment of unnatural monosaccharide. Particularly, this technique has enabled many challenging trials for molecular imaging in combination with click chemistry, which provides fast and specific chemical conjugation reaction of imaging probes to metabolically-modified live cells. This review introduces recent progress in molecular imaging based on the combination of these two cutting-edge techniques. First, these techniques showed promising results in specific tumor cell imaging for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The related researches showed the surface of tumor cells could be labeled with bioorthogonal chemical groups by metabolic glycoengineering, which can be further conjugated with fluorescence dyes or nanoparticles with imaging probes by click chemistry, in vitro and in vivo. This method can be applied to heterogeneous tumor cells regardless of genetic properties of different tumor cells. Furthermore, the amount of targeting moieties on tumor cells can be freely controlled externally by treatment of unnatural monosaccharide. Second, this sequential use of metabolic glycoengineering and click chemistry is also useful in cell tracking to monitor the localization of the inoculated therapeutic cells including chondrocytes and stem cells. This therapeutic cell-labeling technique provided excellent viability of chondrocytes and stem cells during the whole process in vitro and in vivo. It can provide long-term and safe therapeutic cell imaging compared to traditional methods. These overall studies demonstrate the great potential of metabolic glycoengineering and click chemistry in live cell imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC.

  17. Quantification and confocal imaging of protein specific molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Daniel M; Trache, Andreea; Ellis, E Ann; Stevenson, Derek; Holzenburg, Andreas; Meininger, Gerald A; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2006-09-01

    We have employed FITC--albumin as the protein template molecule in an aqueous phase molecular imprinted polymer (HydroMIP) strategy. For the first time, the use of a fluorescently labeled template is reported, with subsequent characterization of the smart material to show that the HydroMIP possesses a significant molecular memory in comparison to that of the nonimprinted control polymer (HydroNIP). The imaging of the FITC--albumin imprinted HydroMIP using confocal microscopy is described, with the in situ removal of the imprinted protein displayed in terms of observed changes in the fluorescence of the imprinted polymer, both before and after template elution (using a 10% SDS/10% AcOH (w/v) solution). We also report the imaging of a bovine hemoglobin (BHb) imprinted HydroMIP using two-photon confocal microscopy and describe the effects of template elution upon protein autofluorescence. The findings further contribute to the understanding of aqueous phase molecular imprinting protocols and document the use of fluorescence as a useful tool in template labeling/detection and novel imaging strategies.

  18. Molecular Imaging in Tracking Tumor Stem-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Xia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer remains a major public health problem in many countries. It was found to contain a subset of cancer stem cells (CSCs that are capable of proliferation and self-renewal, and differentiation into various types of cancer cells. CSCs often display characteristics of chemotherapy resistance and radiotherapy resistance. Numerous putative biomarkers of CSCs are currently identified including CD133, CD44, CD24, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase, and ABCG2. Interestingly, no single marker is exclusively expressed by CSCs. Thus, the various combinations of different biomarkers will be possible to identify CSCs, and considerable work is being done to recognize new ones. In order to demonstrate the mechanisms of resistance and response to therapy and predict the outcome as well as prognosis, the ways to track and identify CSCs will be extremely important. The technologies of molecular imaging will reveal mechanisms of cancer progression and provide visual targets for novel therapeutics. Limited studies were investigated on the detection of various types of CSCs by molecular imaging. Although the tracking of circulating CSCs is still hampered by technological challenges, personalized diagnosis and therapies of cancers are expected to be established based on increased understanding of molecular imaging of cancer stem-like cells biomarkers.

  19. UPAR targeted molecular imaging of cancers with small molecule-based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Chen, Seng; Zhang, Wanshu; Tu, Yufeng; Sun, Yao

    2017-10-15

    Molecular imaging can allow the non-invasive characterization and measurement of biological and biochemical processes at the molecular and cellular levels in living subjects. The imaging of specific molecular targets that are associated with cancers could allow for the earlier diagnosis and better treatment of diseases. Small molecule-based probes play prominent roles in biomedical research and have high clinical translation ability. Here, with an emphasis on small molecule-based probes, we review some recent developments in biomarkers, imaging techniques and multimodal imaging in molecular imaging and highlight the successful applications for molecular imaging of cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging tumor microscopic viscosity in vivo using molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimolina, Lyubov’ E.; Izquierdo, Maria Angeles; López-Duarte, Ismael; Bull, James A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Klapshina, Larisa G.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic viscosity plays an essential role in cellular biophysics by controlling the rates of diffusion and bimolecular reactions within the cell interior. While several approaches have emerged that have allowed the measurement of viscosity and diffusion on a single cell level in vitro, the in vivo viscosity monitoring has not yet been realized. Here we report the use of fluorescent molecular rotors in combination with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to image microscopic viscosity in vivo, both on a single cell level and in connecting tissues of subcutaneous tumors in mice. We find that viscosities recorded from single tumor cells in vivo correlate well with the in vitro values from the same cancer cell line. Importantly, our new method allows both imaging and dynamic monitoring of viscosity changes in real time in live animals and thus it is particularly suitable for diagnostics and monitoring of the progress of treatments that might be accompanied by changes in microscopic viscosity. PMID:28134273

  1. Nuclear Molecular and Theranostic Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sheikh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional nuclear medicine is rapidly being transformed by the evolving concepts in molecular imaging and theranostics. The utility of new approaches in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC diagnostics and therapy has not been fully appreciated. The clinical information, relevant to disease management and patient care, obtained by scintigraphy is still being underestimated. There has been a trend towards moving away from the use of radioactive iodine (RAI imaging in the management of the disease. This paradigm shift is supported by the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines (1. A more systematic and comprehensive understanding of disease pathophysiology and imaging methodologies is needed for optimal utilization of different imaging modalities in the management of DTC. There have been significant developments in radiotracer and imaging technology, clinically proven to contribute to the understanding of tumor biology and the clinical assessment of patients with DTC. The research and development in the field continues to evolve, with expected emergence of many novel diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. The role for nuclear imaging applications will continue to evolve and be reconfigured in the changing paradigm. This article aims to review the clinical uses and controversies surrounding the use of scintigraphy, and the information it can provide in assisting in the management and treatment of DTC.

  2. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    OpenAIRE

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging mo...

  3. Nanodiamond imaging: molecular imaging with optically detected spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2013-03-01

    Nanodiamond imaging is a new molecular imaging modality that takes advantage of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in nanodiamonds to image the distribution of nanodiamonds within a living organism with high sensitivity and high resolution. Nanodiamond is a nontoxic material that is easily conjugated to biomolecules, such that the distribution of nanodiamond within a living organism can be used to elicit physiological information. Unlike the tracers used in other molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), nanodiamonds are stable and thus allow longitudinal imaging of the same organism over a long time span. Unlike fluorescence-based molecular imaging that has a resolution degraded by photon scattering, the resolution of nanodiamond imaging is defined by the strength of a magnetic gradient. To form an image, a magnetic field-free region is created, such as exists halfway between two identical magnets with north poles facing each other. Optical excitation pumps the NVs into a bright fluorescence state, and microwaves transfer them to a dark state, but only for those NVs within the field-free region and resonant with the microwaves. By rastering the field-free region across the sample, the changes in fluorescence yield the nanodiamond concentration. Images of nanodiamond phantoms within chicken breast have been recorded with a prototype system. By modifying the nanodiamond particles and enhancing the imaging system, it should be possible to approach 100 μm resolution and to increase the sensitivity to a 10 nanomolar carbon concentration per root Hz in a mm3 voxel.

  4. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies : new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, G.; Conti, F.; Chianelli, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Dierckx, R. A.; Signore, A.

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of

  5. Hepatische Effekte von Wachstumshormon auf den Glukosestoffwechsel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufinatscha K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Untherapierter Wachstumshormonmangel im Erwachsenenalter (AGHD ist mit viszeraler Adipositas, Dyslipidämie, Insulinresistenz und Fettleber verbunden. Interessanterweise finden sich viele der AGHD-Merkmale auch bei Patienten mit metabolischem Syndrom. Die nichtalkoholische Fettlebererkrankung (NAFLD gilt als hepatische Manifestation des metabolischen Syndroms. In einigen Studien wurden bei Patienten mit NAFLD verminderte Konzentrationen von zirkulierendem IGF-1, dessen Synthese zu einem großen Teil durch Wachstumshormon (GH reguliert wird, beschrieben. Mäuse, welche eine hepatische Wachstumshormondefizienz aufweisen, zeigen zahlreiche phänotypische Charakteristika des metabolischen Syndroms, unter anderen auch eine Fettlebererkrankung. Dies legt einen Zusammenhang zwischen dem Wachstumshormon und der Entstehung einer NAFLD nahe. Ziel unserer Studie ist es, in einem Zellkulturmodell die Effekte des Wachstumshormons auf den intrazellulären Glukosestoffwechsel näher zu untersuchen. Im Detail sollen Auswirkungen einer verminderten Wachstumshormonrezeptorexpression auf den Insulinsignaltransduktionsweg, den Glykogengehalt und auf Schlüsselenzyme der Glukoneogenese untersucht werden. Präliminäre Daten zeigen, dass eine verminderte Wachstumshormonrezeptorexpression mit intrazellulären Veränderungen des hepatischen Glukosestoffwechsels verbunden ist. Die verminderte Insulinsensitivität könnte auf Alterationen im Insulinsignaltransduktionsweg und Änderungen der Glukoneogenese zurückzuführen sein. Diese präliminären Daten weisen darauf hin, dass Wachstumshormon einen direkten Einfluss auf den Glukosestoffwechsel in der Leber hat. Zudem legen sie nahe, dass Veränderungen im Wachstumshormonstoffwechsel einen wichtigen pathophysiologischen Mechanismus in der Entstehung der Fettlebererkrankung bei Patienten mit metabolischem Syndrom darstellen könnten. Der folgende Artikel soll einen kurzen Überblick über die Effekte von Wachstumshormon

  6. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Donati, Olivio F. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. (orig.)

  7. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Shrout, J. D. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Sweedler, J. V. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Farrand, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  8. Pipe Phantoms With Applications in Molecular Imaging and System Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiying; Herbst, Elizabeth B; Pye, Stephen D; Moran, Carmel M; Hossack, John A

    2017-01-01

    Pipe (vessel) phantoms mimicking human tissue and blood flow are widely used for cardiovascular related research in medical ultrasound. Pipe phantom studies require the development of materials and liquids that match the acoustic properties of soft tissue, blood vessel wall, and blood. Over recent years, pipe phantoms have been developed to mimic the molecular properties of the simulated blood vessels. In this paper, the design, construction, and functionalization of pipe phantoms are introduced and validated for applications in molecular imaging and ultrasound imaging system characterization. There are three major types of pipe phantoms introduced: 1) a gelatin-based pipe phantom; 2) a polydimethylsiloxane-based pipe phantom; and 3) the "Edinburgh pipe phantom." These phantoms may be used in the validation and assessment of the dynamics of microbubble-based contrast agents and, in the case of a small diameter tube phantom, for assessing imaging system spatial resolution/contrast performance. The materials and procedures required to address each of the phantoms are described.

  9. New aspects of molecular imaging in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Francesco; Castellucci, Paolo; Cerci, Juliano J; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays several new imaging modalities are available for investigating prostate cancer (PCa) such as magnet resonance imaging (MRI) in the form of whole body MRI and pelvic multiparametric MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) using choline as radiotracers. Nevertheless, these modalities proved sub-optimal accuracy for detecting PCa metastases, particularly in the recurrence setting. A new molecular probe targeting the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been recently developed for PET imaging. PSMA, the glutamate carboxypeptidase II, is a membrane bound metallo-peptidase over-expressed in PCa cells. It has been shown that PSMA based imaging offers higher tumor detection rate compared to choline PET/CT and radiological conventional imaging, especially at very low PSA levels during biochemical recurrence. In addition PSMA, as theranostics agent, allows both radiolabeling with diagnostic (e.g. 68Ga, 18F) or therapeutic nuclides (e.g. 177Lu, 225Ac). Initial results show that PSMA-targeted radioligand therapy can potentially delay disease progression in metastatic castrate-resistant PCa. Despite still investigational, the bombesin-based radiotracers and antagonist of gastrin releasing-peptide receptor (GRP) (RM2) and anti1-amino-3-18Ffluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F-FACBC) are emerging as possible alternatives for investigating PCa. Considering the wide diffusion of PCa in the Europe and the United States, the presence of these new diagnostic techniques able to detect the disease with high sensitivity and specificity might have a clinical impact on the management of patients. PET/CT imaging with new radiopharmaceuticals can implement the patient management identifying lesion(s) not detectable with conventional imaging procedures. In this review article will be discussed the most promising new PET radiopharmaceuticals (68Ga-PSMA-11, 18F-FACBC, 68Ga-RM2) available at the moment, focusing the attention on their accuracy and their impact on

  10. Entwicklung einer umweltgerechten Erdbestattungspraxis im Hinblick auf die Folgewirkungen auf Böden, Grundwasser und Atmosphäre

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Im Rahmen des von der Deutschen Bundesstiftung Umwelt geförderten Forschungsprojektes „Entwicklung einer umweltgerechten Erdbestattungspraxis im Hinblick auf die Folgewirkungen auf Böden, Grundwasser und Atmosphäre“ wurden deutschlandweit 19 Friedhöfe untersucht. Auf den Friedhöfen wurden Bohrstockkartierungen vorgenommen, Leitprofile angelegt und Monitoringstationen installiert. Zusätzlich wurden auf einem Ackerstandort künstliche Gräber angelegt, in denen ein Monitoring von Matrixpotentiale...

  11. Lanthanide Complexes in Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Sara; Tóth, Éva

    2017-06-21

    Lanthanide complexes have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, and today various imaging applications make use of their versatile magnetic and luminescence properties. In this minireview, we give insight into the mechanistic aspects that allow modulation of the relaxation or chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) features, and thus the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) efficiency of paramagnetic lanthanide chelates in order to create agents that are capable of providing an MRI response as a function of a specific biomarker. We focus on the detection of neurotransmitters, enzymatic activities, and amyloid peptides. We also describe two selected theranostic strategies: 1) a novel approach directed at monitoring drug release from liponanoparticles and 2) molecular or nanoparticle probes for the MRI visualization of photosensitizer delivery in photodynamic therapy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  13. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how...... the finite IC formation time affects charge transport through a molecule suspended between two electrodes. For a single-level model, an analytical treatment shows that the conductance is suppressed by a factor Z(2), where Z is the quasiparticle renormalization factor, compared to the static IC approximation...... that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels....

  14. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, positron emission tomography (PET, as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT, two-photon photoluminescence (TPL and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Hydrolytic Enzymes Using PET and SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Brian P; Price, Eric W; Phenix, Christopher P

    2017-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a large class of biological catalysts that play a vital role in a plethora of critical biochemical processes required to maintain human health. However, the expression and/or activity of these important enzymes can change in many different diseases and therefore represent exciting targets for the development of positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers. This review focuses on recently reported radiolabeled substrates, reversible inhibitors, and irreversible inhibitors investigated as PET and SPECT tracers for imaging hydrolytic enzymes. By learning from the most successful examples of tracer development for hydrolytic enzymes, it appears that an early focus on careful enzyme kinetics and cell-based studies are key factors for identifying potentially useful new molecular imaging agents.

  16. Mapping microbubble viscosity using fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Mohamedi, Graciela; Rademeyer, Paul; Owen, Joshua; Wu, Yilei; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J.; Stride, Eleanor; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are well established as highly effective contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. There remain, however, some significant challenges to fully realize the potential of microbubbles in advanced applications such as perfusion mapping, targeted drug delivery, and gene therapy. A key requirement is accurate characterization of the viscoelastic surface properties of the microbubbles, but methods for independent, nondestructive quantification and mapping of these properties are currently lacking. We present here a strategy for performing these measurements that uses a small fluorophore termed a “molecular rotor” embedded in the microbubble surface, whose fluorescence lifetime is directly related to the viscosity of its surroundings. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging to show that shell viscosities vary widely across the population of the microbubbles and are influenced by the shell composition and the manufacturing process. We also demonstrate that heterogeneous viscosity distributions exist within individual microbubble shells even with a single surfactant component. PMID:23690599

  17. Auf dem Weg zum universellen Quantencomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksch, Dieter; Calarco, Tommaso; Zoller, Peter

    2000-11-01

    Die Quantenmechanik eröffnet faszinierende Perspektiven für die Kommunikation und die Informationsverarbeitung. Um universell programmierbare Quantenrechner realisieren zu können bedarf es der Implementierung von Konzepten zur Quanteninformationsverarbeitung die sich auf eine große Anzahl von Qubits anwenden lassen.

  18. Beobachtungen auf Celebes und Sumatra, briefliche Mittheilung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carthaus, E.

    1899-01-01

    Auf meiner Reise nach der an der Westküste von Celebes gelegenen, in die Strasse von Makassar ausmündenden Palos-Bai machte ich während eines fast dreimonatlichen Aufenthaltes in dem östlich an dieselbe angrenzenden Gelände folgende, gewiss interessante Beobachtung: Obwohl nur einen

  19. Verpackungsproblem: Positionspapier zeigt auf, wie anpacken

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Dank verbesserter Analytik werden immer häufiger chemische Stoffe, die aus der Verpackung stammen, im Lebensmittel nachgewiesen. Ein Positionspapier, erarbeitet von Bio Suisse, FiBL und Fachleuten aus Handel und Industrie, zeigt nun auf, wie die Biobranche das Thema Rückstände durch Verpackungen von Lebensmitteln ganz grundsätzlich angehen muss.

  20. Einflüsse auf Husserl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ierna, Carlo; Luft, Sebastian; Wehrle, Maren

    2017-01-01

    Das vorliegende Kapitel setzt sich zum Ziel, die wichtigsten Einflüsse auf Edmund Husserls vor-transzendentale Philosophie darzustellen. Äußere Einflüsse spielen besonders in den Anfängen von Husserls Philosophie eine Rolle, in der späteren Weiterentwicklung der Phänomenologie zu einer

  1. Dual Modality Ultrasound-SPET Detector for Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pani, R., E-mail: roberto.pani@uniroma1.it [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Molecular Medicine, ' Sapienza' University, Rome (Italy); Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M.N. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Molecular Medicine, ' Sapienza' University, Rome (Italy); Bennati, P.; Fabbri, A. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); EDEMOM PhD School of Microelectronics, ' Roma Tre' University, Rome (Italy); Ridolfi, S.; Scafe, R. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Molecular Medicine, ' Sapienza' University, Rome (Italy); De Vincentis, G. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Radiological Science, ' Sapienza' University, Rome (Italy); Di Castro, E.; Polli, N.S.A.; Caratozzolo, M. [Dept. of Radiological Science, ' Sapienza' University, Rome (Italy); Mattioli, M.; Boccaccio, P. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Moschini, G. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Physics, University of Padua, Padua (Italy); Lanconelli, N.; Lo Meo, S.; Navarria, F. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Physics, ' Alma Mater Studiorum' University, Bologne (Italy); Sacco, D. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); I.S.P.E.S.L. Monteporzio, Rome (Italy); Cencelli, V.O. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Dept. of Physics, ' Roma Tre' University, Rome (Italy); Baroncelli, T. [I.N.F.N. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    We present an innovative compact dual-modality detector, which integrates an ultrasound probe with a scintigrafic {gamma}-camera for molecular imaging in medicine, in order to get both morphological and functional information in a single three-dimensional image. The scintigraphic detector consists of a 2x2 array of a multi-anode PMT Hamamatsu H8500-Mod8 and a 4.0 mm thick continuous LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystal equipped with four segment slant-hole collimators for single photon imaging (SPET). The collimator permits to recover the depth of a lesion by rotating around its vertical axis (z) without the need of rotating the camera around the investigated object. This detector can take advantage from being positioned close to the object and overcome the intrinsic limitations in spatial resolution arising from the geometry of SPET/CT gantry. The aim of this work is to describe preliminary phantom analysis and to provide a 3D US/SPET image.

  2. Ultrasound in Radiology: from Anatomic, Functional, Molecular Imaging to Drug Delivery and Image-Guided Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, ultrasound has expanded medical imaging well beyond the “traditional” radiology setting - a combination of portability, low cost and ease of use makes ultrasound imaging an indispensable tool for radiologists as well as for other medical professionals who need to obtain imaging diagnosis or guide a therapeutic intervention quickly and efficiently. Ultrasound combines excellent ability for deep penetration into soft tissues with very good spatial resolution, with only a few exceptions (i.e. those involving overlying bone or gas). Real-time imaging (up to hundreds and thousands frames per second) enables guidance of therapeutic procedures and biopsies; characterization of the mechanical properties of the tissues greatly aids with the accuracy of the procedures. The ability of ultrasound to deposit energy locally brings about the potential for localized intervention encompassing: tissue ablation, enhancing penetration through the natural barriers to drug delivery in the body and triggering drug release from carrier micro- and nanoparticles. The use of microbubble contrast agents brings the ability to monitor and quantify tissue perfusion, and microbubble targeting with ligand-decorated microbubbles brings the ability to obtain molecular biomarker information, i.e., ultrasound molecular imaging. Overall, ultrasound has become the most widely used imaging modality in modern medicine; it will continue to grow and expand. PMID:26200224

  3. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  4. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area.

  5. Tunable Molecular Logic Gates Designed for Imaging Released Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockow, Jessica L; Hettie, Kenneth S; Secor, Kristen E; Barman, Dipti N; Glass, Timothy E

    2015-08-03

    Tunable dual-analyte fluorescent molecular logic gates (ExoSensors) were designed for the purpose of imaging select vesicular primary-amine neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. ExoSensors are based on the coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold and rely on both neurotransmitter binding and the change in environmental pH associated with exocytosis to afford a unique turn-on fluorescence output. A pH-functionality was directly integrated into the fluorophore π-system of the scaffold, thereby allowing for an enhanced fluorescence output upon the release of labeled neurotransmitters. By altering the pH-sensitive unit with various electron-donating and -withdrawing sulfonamide substituents, we identified a correlation between the pKa of the pH-sensitive group and the fluorescence output from the activated fluorophore. In doing so, we achieved a twelvefold fluorescence enhancement upon evaluating the ExoSensors under conditions that mimic exocytosis. ExoSensors are aptly suited to serve as molecular imaging tools that allow for the direct visualization of only the neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demo...

  7. Graphene-based nanomaterials as molecular imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhaskar; Sung, Chu-Hsun; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) is a noninvasive, real-time visualization of biochemical events at the cellular and molecular level within tissues, living cells, and/or intact objects that can be advantageously applied in the areas of diagnostics, therapeutics, drug discovery, and development in understanding the nanoscale reactions including enzymatic conversions and protein-protein interactions. Consequently, over the years, great advancement has been made in the development of a variety of MI agents such as peptides, aptamers, antibodies, and various nanomaterials (NMs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes. Recently, graphene, a material popularized by Geim & Novoselov, has ignited considerable research efforts to rationally design and execute a wide range of graphene-based NMs making them an attractive platform for developing highly sensitive MI agents. Owing to their exceptional physicochemical and biological properties combined with desirable surface engineering, graphene-based NMs offer stable and tunable visible emission, small hydrodynamic size, low toxicity, and high biocompatibility and thus have been explored for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications as a promising alternative of traditional imaging agents. This review begins by describing the intrinsic properties of graphene and the key MI modalities. After which, we provide an overview on the recent advances in the design and development as well as physicochemical properties of the different classes of graphene-based NMs (graphene-dye conjugates, graphene-antibody conjugates, graphene-nanoparticle composites, and graphene quantum dots) being used as MI agents for potential applications including theranostics. Finally, the major challenges and future directions in the field will be discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Alternative screening for women with dense breasts: breast-specific gamma imaging (molecular breast imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Anna; Newel, Mary S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. Given mammography's limitations in evaluating dense breasts, examination with breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI)-also called molecular breast imaging (MBI)-has been proposed. We review the literature pertinent to the performance of BSGI in patients with dense breasts. CONCLUSION. Many studies have reported the sensitivity of BSGI in finding cancers even in dense breasts. However, BSGI has not yet been validated as an effective screening tool in large prospective studies. In addition, whole-body dose remains a significant concern.

  9. Molecular Imaging Of Metabolic Reprogramming In Mutant IDH Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra eViswanath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG. In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an oncometabolite, inhibits key α-KG- dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprogramming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprogramming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH cells and how this reprogramming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an "oncometabolite," inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  11. Non-invasive molecular imaging of prostate cancer lymph node metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Frédéric; Johnson, Mai; Wu, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Imaging in medicine has been classically based on the anatomical description of organs. In the past 15 years, new imaging techniques based on gene expression that characterize a pathological process have been developed. Molecular imaging is the use of such molecules to image cell-specific characteristics. Here, we review recent advances in molecular imaging, taking as our prime example lymph node (LN) metastasis in prostate cancer. We describe the new techniques and compare their accuracy in detecting LN metastasis in prostate cancer. We also present new molecular strategies for improving tumor detection using adenoviruses, molecular promoters and amplification systems. Finally, we present the concept of ‘in vivo pathology’, which envisages using molecular imaging to accurately localize metastatic lesions based on the molecular signature of the disease. PMID:19482514

  12. Structured illumination microscopy for vibrational molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Raman microscopy is a powerful tool for analytical imaging. The wavelength shift of Raman scattering corresponds to molecular vibrational energy. Therefore, we can access rich chemical information, such as distribution, concentration, and chemical environment of sample molecules. Despite these strengths of Raman microscopy, the spatial resolution has been a limiting factor for many practical applications. In this study, we developed a large-area, high-resolution Raman microscope by utilizing structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to overcome the spatial resolution limit. A structured line-illumination (SLI) Raman microscope was constructed. The structured illumination is introduced along the line direction by the interference of two line-shaped beams. In SIM, the spatial frequency mixing between structured illumination and Raman scattering from the sample allows access to the high spatial frequency information beyond the conventional cut-off. As a result, the FWHM of 40-nm fluorescence particle images showed a clear resolution enhancement in the line direction: 366 nm in LI and 199 nm in SLI microscope. Using the developed microscope, we successfully demonstrated high-resolution Raman imaging of various kinds of specimens, such as few-layer graphene, graphite, mouse brain tissue, and polymer nanoparticles. The high resolution Raman images showed the capability to extract original spectral features from the mixed Raman spectra of a multi-component sample because of the enhanced spatial resolution, which is advantageous in observing complex spectral features. The Raman microscopy technique reported here enables us to see the detailed chemical structures of chemical, biological, and medical samples with a spatial resolution smaller than 200 nm.

  13. Wirkung von Testosteron auf Haut und Haare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopera D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Testosteron – das wichtigste Androgen – wird ab der Adrenarche bei beiden Geschlechtern in mehr oder weniger großen Mengen gebildet. Die Bildung erfolgt bei Männern in den Hoden, bei Frauen in den Ovarien und bei beiden Geschlechtern in geringen Mengen in den Nebennieren. Im Blut zirkuliert es einerseits SHBG-gebunden, andererseits als wirksames und freies Testosteron, das auf die verschiedenen Organe eine unterschiedlich starke Wirkung ausübt. Es beeinflusst die Ausbildung des männlichen Phänotyps, den Aufbau der Muskelmasse, die Knochendichte sowie den Fett- und Zuckerstoffwechsel. Auf Haut und Hautanhangsgebilde hat Testosteron eine besondere Wirkung: Es stimuliert die Talgdrüsen (führt zu Seborrhö und reguliert das Haarwachstum.

  14. Wirkung von Testosteron auf Haut und Haare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopera D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Testosteron – das wichtigste Androgen – wird ab der Adrenarche bei beiden Geschlechtern in mehr oder weniger großen Mengen gebildet. Die Bildung erfolgt bei Männern in den Hoden, bei Frauen in den Ovarien und bei beiden Geschlechtern in geringen Mengen in den Nebennieren. Im Blut zirkuliert es einerseits SHBG-gebunden, andererseits als wirksames und freies Testosteron, das auf die verschiedenen Organe eine unterschiedlich starke Wirkung ausübt. Es beeinflusst die Ausbildung des männlichen Phänotyps, den Aufbau der Muskelmasse, die Knochendichte sowie den Fett- und Zuckerstoffwechsel. Auf Haut und Hautanhangsgebilde hat Testosteron eine besondere Wirkung: Es stimuliert die Talgdrüsen (führt zu Seborrhö und reguliert das Haarwachstum.

  15. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine allows tailoring of preventive or therapeutic interventions to avoid the expense and toxicity of futile treatment given to those who will not respond. Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease functionally and morphologically. PET is a sensitive molecular imaging technique with a major role in the precision medicine algorithm of patients with lung cancer. It contributes to the precision medicine of lung neoplasia by interrogating tumor heterogeneity throughout the body. It provides anatomofunctional insight during diagnosis, staging, and restaging of the disease. It is a biomarker of tumoral heterogeneity that helps direct selection of the most appropriate treatment, the prediction of early response to cytotoxic and cytostatic therapies, and is a prognostic biomarker in patients with lung cancer. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular imaging of proteins in tissues by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Erin H; Caprioli, Richard M

    2008-11-25

    Imaging MS (IMS) is an emerging technology that permits the direct analysis and determination of the distribution of molecules in tissue sections. Biological molecules such as proteins, peptides, lipids, xenobiotics, and metabolites can be analyzed in a high-throughput manner with molecular specificity not readily achievable through other means. Tissues are analyzed intact and thus spatial localization of molecules within a tissue is preserved. Several studies are presented that focus on the unique types of information obtainable by IMS, such as Abeta isoform distributions in Alzheimer's plaques, protein maps in mouse brain, and spatial protein distributions in human breast carcinoma. The analysis of a biopsy taken 100 years ago from a patient with amyloidosis illustrates the use of IMS with formalin-fixed tissues. Finally, the registration and correlation of IMS with MRI is presented.

  17. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F; van Brussel, Aram S A; van der Groep, Petra; Morsink, Folkert H M; Bult, Peter; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J

    2012-06-13

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  18. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  19. Hyperspectral molecular imaging of multiple receptors using immunolabeled plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekell, Kevin; Crow, Matthew J.; Marinakos, Stella; Ostrander, Julie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam

    2011-11-01

    This work presents simultaneous imaging and detection of three different cell receptors using three types of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). The size, shape, and composition-dependent scattering profiles of these NPs allow for a system of multiple distinct molecular markers using a single optical source. With this goal in mind, tags consisting of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor gold nanorods, anti-insulin-like growth factor 1-R silver nanospheres, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2Ab gold nanospheres were developed to monitor the expression of receptors commonly overexpressed by cancer cells. These labels were chosen because they scatter strongly in distinct spectral windows. A hyperspectral darkfield microspectroscopy system was developed to record the scattering spectra of cells labeled with these molecular tags. Simultaneous monitoring of multiple tags may lead to applications such as profiling of cell line immunophenotype and investigation of receptor signaling pathways. Single, dual, and triple tag experiments were performed to analyze NP tag specificity as well as their interactions. Distinct resonance peaks were observed in these studies, showing the ability to characterize cell lines using conjugated NPs. However, interpreting shifts in these peaks due to changes in a cellular dielectric environment may be complicated by plasmon coupling between NPs bound to proximal receptors and other coupling mechanisms due to the receptors themselves.

  20. Optical Molecular Imaging Frontiers in Oncology: The Pursuit of Accuracy and Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutting-edge technologies in optical molecular imaging have ushered in new frontiers in cancer research, clinical translation, and medical practice, as evidenced by recent advances in optical multimodality imaging, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI, and optical image-guided surgeries. New abilities allow in vivo cancer imaging with sensitivity and accuracy that are unprecedented in conventional imaging approaches. The visualization of cellular and molecular behaviors and events within tumors in living subjects is improving our deeper understanding of tumors at a systems level. These advances are being rapidly used to acquire tumor-to-tumor molecular heterogeneity, both dynamically and quantitatively, as well as to achieve more effective therapeutic interventions with the assistance of real-time imaging. In the era of molecular imaging, optical technologies hold great promise to facilitate the development of highly sensitive cancer diagnoses as well as personalized patient treatment—one of the ultimate goals of precision medicine.

  1. Multi-pinhole fluorescent x-ray computed tomography for molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tenta Sasaya; Naoki Sunaguchi; Kazuyuki Hyodo; Tsutomu Zeniya; Tetsuya Yuasa

    2017-01-01

    We propose a multi-pinhole fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (mp-FXCT) technique for preclinical molecular imaging that can provide the complete data necessary to produce 3-D tomographic images during anaesthesia...

  2. Nuclear molecular imaging of paragangliomas; Imagerie moleculaire nucleaire des paragangliomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, CHU de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-08-15

    Paragangliomas (PGL) are relatively rare neural crest tumors originating in the adrenal medulla (usually called pheochromocytoma), chemoreceptors (i.e., carotid and aortic bodies) or autonomic ganglia. These tumors are highly vascular, usually benign and slow-growing. PGL may occur as sporadic or familial entities, the latter mostly in association with germline mutations of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B, SDHC, SDHD, SDH5, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), ret proto-oncogene (RET), neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) (von Recklinghausen's disease), prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) genes and TMEM127. Molecular nuclear imaging has a central role in characterization of PGL and include: somatostatin receptor imaging ({sup 111}In, {sup 68}Ga), MIBG scintigraphy ({sup 131}I, {sup 123}I), {sup 18}F-dihydroxy-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET), and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET. The choice of the tracer is not yet fully established but the work-up of familial forms often require the combination of multiple approaches. (authors)

  3. Molecular Imaging Markers to Track Huntington's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; De Micco, Rosa; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, monogenic dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by repeat expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene. The accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, forming intranuclear inclusions, subsequently leads to degeneration of medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortical areas. Genetic testing can identify HD gene carriers before individuals develop overt cognitive, psychiatric, and chorea symptoms. Thus, HD gene carriers can be studied in premanifest stages to understand and track the evolution of HD pathology. While advances have been made, the precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HD are unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been employed to understand HD pathology in presymptomatic and symptomatic disease stages. PET imaging uses radioactive tracers to detect specific changes, at a molecular level, which could be used as markers of HD progression and to monitor response to therapeutic treatments for HD gene expansion carriers (HDGECs). This review focuses on available PET techniques, employed in cross-sectional and longitudinal human studies, as biomarkers for HD, and highlights future potential PET targets. PET studies have assessed changes in postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors, brain metabolism, microglial activation, and recently phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) as markers to track HD progression. Alterations in PDE10A expression are the earliest biochemical change identified in HD gene carriers up to 43 years before predicted symptomatic onset. Thus, PDE10A expression could be a promising marker to track HD progression from early premanifest disease stages. Other PET targets which have been less well investigated as biomarkers include cannabinoid, adenosine, and GABA receptors. Future longitudinal studies are required to fully validate these PET biomarkers for use to track disease progression from far-onset premanifest to manifest HD stages. PET imaging

  4. Optical molecular imaging of hypoxic breast cancer - From prospect to preclinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    van Brussel, A.S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Current imaging modalities for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring either lack sensitivity, specificity, make use of radiation and/or give images of limited resolution. Optical molecular imaging is a novel technique that detects light emitted by (breast)cancer-specific probes with a sensitive camera. As hypoxia is a common condition in solid tumors, proteins upregulated in hypoxic cells are of special interest as target for molecular imaging of breast cancer. In this thesis we revi...

  5. Tumor Endothelial Marker Imaging in Melanomas Using Dual-Tracer Fluorescence Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Turk, Mary-Jo; Hasan, Tayyaba; Stan, Radu V.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-specific endothelial markers available for intravascular binding are promising targets for new molecular therapies. In this study, a molecular imaging approach of quantifying endothelial marker concentrations (EMCI) is developed and tested in highly light-absorbing melanomas. The approach involves injection of targeted imaging tracer in conjunction with an untargeted tracer, which is used to account for nonspecific uptake and tissue optical property effects on measured targeted tracer concentrations. Procedures Theoretical simulations and a mouse melanoma model experiment were used to test out the EMCI approach. The tracers used in the melanoma experiments were fluorescently labeled anti-Plvap/PV1 antibody (plasmalemma vesicle associated protein Plvap/PV1 is a transmembrane protein marker exposed on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tumor vasculature) and a fluorescent isotype control antibody, the uptakes of which were measured on a planar fluorescence imaging system. Results The EMCI model was found to be robust to experimental noise under reversible and irreversible binding conditions and was capable of predicting expected overexpression of PV1 in melanomas compared to healthy skin despite a 5-time higher measured fluorescence in healthy skin compared to melanoma: attributable to substantial light attenuation from melanin in the tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of EMCI to quantify endothelial marker concentrations in vivo, an accomplishment that is currently unavailable through any other methods, either in vivo or ex vivo. PMID:24217944

  6. Die Wirkung von Alfacalcidol auf den Muskel, das neuromuskuläre System, auf die Sturzgefahr und auf Frakuren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schacht E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Muskelschwäche, neuromuskuläre Defizite, Gleichgewichts- und Gehstörungen sind Manifestationen einer Mobilitätsverschlechterung und erhöhen das Risiko von "intrinsischen" Stürzen. Stürze in höherem Alter brechen Knochen, die Furcht vor Stürzen vermindert das Selbstbewusstsein und körperliche Aktivitäten und dies initiiert einen "Circulus vitiosus". Frakturen werden auch als relevante Folge von Osteoporose angesehen, aber mehr als 90 % der Oberschenkelhalsfrakturen sind sturzbedingt. D-Hormon (1,25[OH]2D; Calcitriol, der aktive Vitamin-D-Metabolit, und sein Rezeptor (VDR spielen eine bedeutende Rolle bei der Muskelentwicklung. Höheres Alter ist signifikant assoziiert mit reduzierter VDR-Expression in menschlichem Skelettmuskelgewebe, genauso wie mit D-Hormon-abhängigen Veränderungen im Muskelfasertyp, Muskelzelldifferenzierung und -metabolismus. Eine positive Korrelation wurde zwischen der femoralen Muskelkraft und -funktion und Serumspiegeln von D-Hormon bei älteren Frauen und Männern gefunden. Diese Wechselwirkung wurde stark unterstützt durch die jüngst gefundene Tatsache, dass höhere D-Hormon-Spiegel im Serum bei älteren Frauen mit niedrigeren Sturzraten korreliert sind. Alle diese Resultate zusammen lassen vermuten, dass die altersassoziierte Zunahme der Stürze teilweise durch einen Abfall der D-Hormon-Spiegel und des VDR erklärbar ist. Eine eingeschränkte Nierenfunktion ist sehr nachteilig für die Aktivierung von D-Hormon und könnte in Zukunft zur Identifizierung von Patienten mit niederer Knochendichte und Muskelleistung, erhöhtem Sturzund Frakturrisiko führen. Die histochemische Klassifizierung basierend auf Muskelbiopsien offenbarte, dass eine sechsmonatige Behandlung mit 1 µg Alfacalcidol täglich die Zahl und den Durchmesser der "Fast Twitch Typ II A"-Fasern erhöht. Bei älteren osteopenischen Frauen war Calcitriol in der Lage, die Abnahme der physischen Performance zu verzögern. Eine signifikante

  7. Molecular Tension Probes for Imaging Forces at the Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Galior, Kornelia; Ma, Victor Pui-Yan; Salaita, Khalid

    2017-11-21

    Mechanical forces are essential for a variety of biological processes ranging from transcription and translation to cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation. Through the activation of mechanosensitive signaling pathways, cells sense and respond to physical stimuli from the surrounding environment, a process widely known as mechanotransduction. At the cell membrane, many signaling receptors, such as integrins, cadherins and T- or B-cell receptors, bind to their ligands on the surface of adjacent cells or the extracellular matrix (ECM) to mediate mechanotransduction. Upon ligation, these receptor-ligand bonds transmit piconewton (pN) mechanical forces that are generated, in part, by the cytoskeleton. Importantly, these forces expose cryptic sites within mechanosensitive proteins and modulate the binding kinetics (on/off rate) of receptor-ligand complexes to further fine-tune mechanotransduction and the corresponding cell behavior. Over the past three decades, two categories of methods have been developed to measure cell receptor forces. The first class is traction force microscopy (TFM) and micropost array detectors (mPADs). In these methods, cells are cultured on elastic polymers or microstructures that deform under mechanical forces. The second category of techniques is single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) including atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical or magnetic tweezers, and biomembrane force probe (BFP). In SMFS, the experimenter applies external forces to probe the mechanics of individual cells or single receptor-ligand complexes, serially, one bond at a time. Although these techniques are powerful, the limited throughput of SMFS and the nN force sensitivity of TFM have hindered further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction. In this Account, we introduce the recent advent of molecular tension fluorescence microscopy (MTFM) as an emerging tool for molecular imaging of receptor mechanics in living cells. MTFM probes are

  8. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W J M

    2011-12-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine techniques, by contrast, allow the in vivo detection in humans of different physiologic and pathologic phenomena and offer noninvasive tools to detect early pathophysiological changes before anatomical changes occur. In this review, we highlight the role of nuclear medicine in inflammation/infection with emphasis on molecular imaging for in vivo histological characterization of affected tissues for diagnostic purposes and follow-up of therapies. We also describe the clinical indications of all available radiopharmaceuticals in the light of the newly available guidelines.

  9. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, C.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the

  10. Introduction to the special issue on molecular imaging in radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humm, John L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is an evolving science that is concerned with the development of novel imaging probes and biomarkers that can be used to non-invasively image molecular and cellular processes. This special issue approaches molecular imaging in the context of radiation research, focusing on biomarkers and imaging methods that provide measurable signals that can assist in the quantification of radiation-induced effects of living systems at the physical, chemical and biological levels. The potential to image molecular changes in response to a radiation insult opens new and exciting opportunities for a more profound understanding of radiation biology, with the possibility of translation of these techniques to radiotherapy practice. This special issue brings together 14 reviews dedicated to the use of molecular imaging in the field of radiation research. The initial three reviews are introductory overviews of the key molecular imaging modalities: magnetic resonance, nuclear and optical. This is followed by 11 reviews each focusing on a specialist area within the field of radiation research. These include: hypoxia and perfusion, tissue metabolism, normal tissue injury, cell death and viability, receptor targeting and nanotechnology, reporter genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and biological dosimetry. Over the preceding decade, molecular imaging brought significant new advances to our understanding of every area of radiation biology. This special issue shows us these advances and points to the vibrant future of our field armed with these new capabilities.

  11. Application of Deep Learning in Automated Analysis of Molecular Images in Cancer: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Chen, Shihui; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations of biological procedures at molecular and/or cellular level, which is of great significance for early detection of cancer. In recent years, deep leaning has been widely used in medical imaging analysis, as it overcomes the limitations of visual assessment and traditional machine learning techniques by extracting hierarchical features with powerful representation capability. Research on cancer molecular images using deep learning techniques is also increasing dynamically. Hence, in this paper, we review the applications of deep learning in molecular imaging in terms of tumor lesion segmentation, tumor classification, and survival prediction. We also outline some future directions in which researchers may develop more powerful deep learning models for better performance in the applications in cancer molecular imaging. PMID:29114182

  12. Application of Deep Learning in Automated Analysis of Molecular Images in Cancer: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations of biological procedures at molecular and/or cellular level, which is of great significance for early detection of cancer. In recent years, deep leaning has been widely used in medical imaging analysis, as it overcomes the limitations of visual assessment and traditional machine learning techniques by extracting hierarchical features with powerful representation capability. Research on cancer molecular images using deep learning techniques is also increasing dynamically. Hence, in this paper, we review the applications of deep learning in molecular imaging in terms of tumor lesion segmentation, tumor classification, and survival prediction. We also outline some future directions in which researchers may develop more powerful deep learning models for better performance in the applications in cancer molecular imaging.

  13. Application of Deep Learning in Automated Analysis of Molecular Images in Cancer: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Chen, Shihui; Qin, Jing; Liu, Yong; Huang, Bingsheng; Chen, Hanwei

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations of biological procedures at molecular and/or cellular level, which is of great significance for early detection of cancer. In recent years, deep leaning has been widely used in medical imaging analysis, as it overcomes the limitations of visual assessment and traditional machine learning techniques by extracting hierarchical features with powerful representation capability. Research on cancer molecular images using deep learning techniques is also increasing dynamically. Hence, in this paper, we review the applications of deep learning in molecular imaging in terms of tumor lesion segmentation, tumor classification, and survival prediction. We also outline some future directions in which researchers may develop more powerful deep learning models for better performance in the applications in cancer molecular imaging.

  14. Lessons on sea; Lektionen auf See

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinhold, Nicole

    2013-11-15

    The offshore wind industry has collected a lot of painful experiences. Much of them could have been avoided if one would have heard a bit more on the voices from the neighborhood of offshore countries such as Denmark and the UK or from the oil and gas industry. [German] Die Offshore-Windkraftindustrie hat jede Menge schmerzhafte Erfahrungen gesammelt. Einiges haette man sich ersparen koenne, wenn man ein bisschen mehr auf Stimmen aus der Nachbarschaft in Offshore-Laendern wie Daenemark und Grossbritannien oder aus der Oel- und Gasindustrie gehoert haette.

  15. Macht auf das Tor! - Opens the gate!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudemir de Quadros

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Macht auf das Tor! (Abra o portão foi publicado, possivelmente, na primeira metade do século 20. Editado por Max Dirkschneider, Raimund Heuler e Felix Oberborbeck, apresenta músicas, rimas, piadas, jogos e canções.A edição apresentada nesse espaço é de um livro que pertence à família de Carolina Drebes, estudante do curso de Pedagogia do Centro Universitário Franciscano, Santa Maria/RS.

  16. Electronic Commerce auf lokalen Märkten

    OpenAIRE

    Schwickert, Axel C.; Lüders, René

    1999-01-01

    eCommerce, versteht man es als Business-to-Consumer-Beziehung, sollte nicht lediglich unter dem Gesichtspunkt des globalen Handels betrachtet werden. Besonders Markttransaktionen von privaten Haushalten bzgl. Konsumgütern bzw. Gütern des täglichen Bedarfs finden vorwiegend auf lokalen und physischen Märkten statt. Die Bundesbürger verwenden z. B. einen großen Teil ihres verfügbaren Einkommens zum Kauf von Lebensmitteln oder Kleidung, die sie in Kaufhäusern, Supermärkten oder im selbständigen ...

  17. Zum gotischen gen. pl. auf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grošelj

    1964-12-01

    Full Text Available Bekanntlich ist die got. Endung -ē eine Besonderheit, der in den übrigen germ. Sprachen nichts Vergleichbares gegenübersteht. Man nimmt wohl -allgemein an, dass es sich um eine innergot. Neuschöpfung handelt; auch ist eine idg. Endung des Gen. Pl. -ēm; linbelegt. Folgender Erklärungsversuch geht von der Annahme aus, dass die Triebkraft für dfese Neuschöpfupg in der Neigung zur Differenzierung des Maskulinums vom Femininum auf -ō (gibō : dagē zu suchen ist. Diese Neigung ist besonders im Nom. und Gen. bemerkbar.

  18. Molecular Imaging: A Useful Tool for the Development of Natural Killer Cell-Based Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadaran, Prakash; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a relatively new discipline that allows visualization, characterization, and measurement of the biological processes in living subjects, including humans, at a cellular and molecular level. The interaction between cancer cells and natural killer (NK) cells is complex and incompletely understood. Despite our limited knowledge, progress in the search for immune cell therapies against cancer could be significantly improved by dynamic and non-invasive visualization and tracking of immune cells and by visualization of the response of cancer cells to therapies in preclinical and clinical studies. Molecular imaging is an essential tool for these studies, and a multimodal molecular imaging approach can be applied to monitor immune cells in vivo, for instance, to visualize therapeutic effects. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of NK cells in cancer therapies and the preclinical and clinical usefulness of molecular imaging in NK cell-based therapies. Furthermore, we discuss different molecular imaging modalities for use with NK cell-based therapies, and their preclinical and clinical applications in animal and human subjects. Molecular imaging has contributed to the development of NK cell-based therapies against cancers in animal models and to the refinement of current cell-based cancer immunotherapies. Developing sensitive and reproducible non-invasive molecular imaging technologies for in vivo NK cell monitoring and for real-time assessment of therapeutic effects will accelerate the development of NK cell therapies.

  19. Molecular Imaging: A Useful Tool for the Development of Natural Killer Cell-Based Immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Gangadaran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a relatively new discipline that allows visualization, characterization, and measurement of the biological processes in living subjects, including humans, at a cellular and molecular level. The interaction between cancer cells and natural killer (NK cells is complex and incompletely understood. Despite our limited knowledge, progress in the search for immune cell therapies against cancer could be significantly improved by dynamic and non-invasive visualization and tracking of immune cells and by visualization of the response of cancer cells to therapies in preclinical and clinical studies. Molecular imaging is an essential tool for these studies, and a multimodal molecular imaging approach can be applied to monitor immune cells in vivo, for instance, to visualize therapeutic effects. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of NK cells in cancer therapies and the preclinical and clinical usefulness of molecular imaging in NK cell-based therapies. Furthermore, we discuss different molecular imaging modalities for use with NK cell-based therapies, and their preclinical and clinical applications in animal and human subjects. Molecular imaging has contributed to the development of NK cell-based therapies against cancers in animal models and to the refinement of current cell-based cancer immunotherapies. Developing sensitive and reproducible non-invasive molecular imaging technologies for in vivo NK cell monitoring and for real-time assessment of therapeutic effects will accelerate the development of NK cell therapies.

  20. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluorescent labeled (NIRF) tracers for detection of breast cancer. Thus far, only a few molecular imaging tracers have been taken to the clinic of which most are suitable for PET. My thesis describes the e...

  1. Drug Discovery by Molecular Imaging and Monitoring Therapy Response in Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Jeong, Ju Hye; Oh, Ji Min; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-07-27

    Molecular imaging allows a noninvasive assessment of biochemical and biological processes in living subjects. Treatment strategies for malignant lymphoma depend on histology and tumor stage. For the last two decades, molecular imaging has been the mainstay diagnostic test for the staging of malignant lymphoma and the assessment of response to treatment. This technology enhances our understanding of disease and drug activity during preclinical and clinical drug development. Here, we review molecular imaging applications in drug development, with an emphasis on oncology. Monitoring and assessing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies in preclinical or clinical models are essential and the multimodal molecular imaging approach may represent a new stage for pharmacologic development in cancer. Monitoring the progress of lymphoma therapy with imaging modalities will help patients. Identifying and addressing key challenges is essential for successful integration of molecular imaging into the drug development process. In this review, we highlight the general usefulness of molecular imaging in drug development and radionuclide-based reporter genes. Further, we discuss the different molecular imaging modalities for lymphoma therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications.

  2. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer: a step toward an individualized 'image and treat' strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...

  3. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer: a step toward an individualized 'image and treat' strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...... individual approaches to targeted therapy of HER2-positive breast cancers....

  4. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  5. Radiolabelled nanoparticles: novel classification of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshojaei, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Morales-Avila, Enrique; Ortiz-Reynoso, Mariana; Reyes-Perez, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been used for every single modality in the molecular imaging arena for imaging purposes. Synergic advantages can be explored when multiple molecular imaging modalities are combined with respect to single imaging modalities. Multifunctional nanoparticles have large surface areas, where multiple functional moieties can be incorporated, including ligands for site-specific targeting and radionuclides, which can be detected to create 3D images. Recently, radiolabeled nanoparticles with individual properties have attracted great interest regarding their use in multimodality tumor imaging. Multifunctional nanoparticles can combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for both target-specific diagnosis and the treatment of a given disease. The future of nanomedicine lies in multifunctional nanoplatforms that combine the diagnostic ability and therapeutic effects using appropriate ligands, drugs, responses and technological devices, which together are collectively called theranostic drugs. Co-delivery of radiolabeled nanoparticles is useful in multifunctional molecular imaging areas because it comprises several advantages based on nanoparticles architecture, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties.

  6. Tumor functional and molecular imaging utilizing ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Filme, die beflügeln : Einflüsse von Filmen auf die Reisemotivation, Raumwahrnehmung und Imagebildung

    OpenAIRE

    Siehl, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Populäre Filme, TV-Serien, Werbespots oder bekannte Filmfiguren haben einen enormen Einfluss auf das Image ihrer Schauplätze und auf unsere kulturräumlichen Vorstellungen. Erfolgreiche Filme erreichen ein Millionenpublikum und in der Folge dessen gewinnt Filmtourismus weltweit an Bedeutung. Filme haben sich zu einer Institution für den Tourismusmarkt entwickelt. Ein Grund liegt in der Gemeinsamkeit des Films und der Reise – beide entführen für eine gewisse Zeit aus dem Alltag heraus in eine W...

  8. MARS spectral molecular imaging of lamb tissue: data collection and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Aamir, R; Bateman, C.J.; Butler, A.P.H.; Butler, P.H.; Anderson, N.G.; Bell, S.T.; Panta, R.K.; Healy, J.L.; Mohr, J.L.; Rajendran, K.; Walsh, M.F.; Ruiter, N.de; Gieseg, S.P.; Woodfield, T.; Renaud, P.F.; Brooke, L.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Clyne, M.; Glendenning, R.; Bones, P.J.; Billinghurst, M.; Bartneck, C.; Mandalika, H.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Scott, N.; Nik, S.J.; Opie, A.; Janmale, T.; Tang, D.N.; Kim, D.; Doesburg, R.M.; Zainon, R.; Ronaldson, J.P.; Cook, N.J.; Smithies, D.J.; Hodge, K.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral molecular imaging is a new imaging technique able to discriminate and quantify different components of tissue simultaneously at high spatial and high energy resolution. Our MARS scanner is an x-ray based small animal CT system designed to be used in the diagnostic energy range (20 to 140 keV). In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the MARS scanner, equipped with the Medipix3RX spectroscopic photon-processing detector, to discriminate fat, calcium, and water in tissue. We present data collected from a sample of lamb meat including bone as an illustrative example of human tissue imaging. The data is analyzed using our 3D Algebraic Reconstruction Algorithm (MARS-ART) and by material decomposition based on a constrained linear least squares algorithm. The results presented here clearly show the quantification of lipid-like, water-like and bone-like components of tissue. However, it is also clear to us that better algorithms could extract more information of clinical interest from our data. Because we ...

  9. Molecular imaging of small animals with fluorescent proteins: from projection to multimodality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Gong, Hui; Fu, Jianwei; Quan, Guotao; Huang, Chuan; Luo, Qingming

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been widely adopted in cell research for protein trafficking and reporter gene expression studies, as well as to study other biological processes. However, biological tissue has high light scattering and high absorption coefficients of visible light; hence, using FPs in small animal imaging remains a challenge, especially when the FPs are located deep in the tissue. In small animals, fluorescence molecular imaging could potentially address this difficulty. We constructed fluorescence molecular imaging systems that have two modes: a planner mode (projection imaging) and a multimodality mode (fluorescence molecular tomography and micro-CT). The planner mode can provide projection images of a fluorophore in the whole body of a small animal, whereas three-dimensional information can be offered by multimodality mode. The planner imaging system works in the reflection mode and is designed to provide fast imaging. The multimodality imaging system is designed to allow quantification and three-dimensional localization of fluorophores. A nude mouse with a tumour targeted with a far-red FP, which is appropriate for in vivo imaging, was adopted to validate the two systems. The results indicate that the planner imaging system is probably suitable for high throughput molecular imaging, whereas the multimodality imaging system is fit for quantitative research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optical molecular imaging of hypoxic breast cancer - From prospect to preclinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, A.S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Current imaging modalities for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring either lack sensitivity, specificity, make use of radiation and/or give images of limited resolution. Optical molecular imaging is a novel technique that detects light emitted by (breast)cancer-specific probes with a

  11. Applications of the Preclinical Molecular Image in Biomedicine; Aplicaciones de la imagen Molecular Preclínica en Biomedicina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, M.; Bascuñana, P.; Fernández de la Rosa, R.; De Cristobal, J.; García-García, L.; Pozo, M.A.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular imaging is a broad platform, which provides valuable information about physiological and pathophysiological changes in living organisms by non-invasive methods. Depending on the used technique: anatomical, functional metabolic or molecular data could be assessed. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provides with functional and molecular data, and combined with Computerized Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MRI) with the multimodality equipment, it can be exponentially improved. Metabolic pathways and changes on the molecular and cellular level are target in molecular imaging cancer research. Tumour microenvironment, stroma and new vessels can be assessed by PET imaging. Additionally the visualization of functions and monitoring data of provided therapies could be obtained. The aim of the current review is to summarize principles and novel findings in molecular imaging specifically in PET and its application in preclinical cancer research. The theoretical background of techniques and main applications will be highlighted [Spanish] La imagen molecular aporta información muy valiosa, mediante métodos no invasivos, acerca de la fisiología de organismos vivos y sus cambios debidos a patologías. Dependiendo de la técnica utilizada se pueden obtener datos anatómicos, funcionales, metabólicos o moleculares. La Tomografía por Emisión de Positrones (PET) aporta datos metabólicos y moleculares con una alta sensibilidad, y en asociación con la Tomografía Computarizada (TC) o con Resonancia Magnética (RM), con la aparición de los nuevos equipos multimodalidad, las posibilidades de diagnóstico se incrementan exponencialmente. La imagen molecular en investigación oncológica presenta como objetivos principales identificar las diferentes vías metabólicas tumorales y sus cambios a nivel molecular y celular, el comportamiento del microentorno tumoral, aparición de nuevos vasos, estroma, etc. Además, es posible el análisis y cuantificación del

  12. A CZT-based blood counter for quantitative molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espagnet, Romain; Frezza, Andrea; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Hamel, Louis-André; Lechippey, Laëtitia; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Després, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Robust quantitative analysis in positron emission tomography (PET) and in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) typically requires the time-activity curve as an input function for the pharmacokinetic modeling of tracer uptake. For this purpose, a new automated tool for the determination of blood activity as a function of time is presented. The device, compact enough to be used on the patient bed, relies on a peristaltic pump for continuous blood withdrawal at user-defined rates. Gamma detection is based on a 20 × 20 × 15 mm3 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, read by custom-made electronics and a field-programmable gate array-based signal processing unit. A graphical user interface (GUI) allows users to select parameters and easily perform acquisitions. This paper presents the overall design of the device as well as the results related to the detector performance in terms of stability, sensitivity and energy resolution. Results from a patient study are also reported. The device achieved a sensitivity of 7.1 cps/(kBq/mL) and a minimum detectable activity of 2.5 kBq/ml for 18F. The gamma counter also demonstrated an excellent stability with a deviation in count rates inferior to 0.05% over 6 h. An energy resolution of 8% was achieved at 662 keV. The patient study was conclusive and demonstrated that the compact gamma blood counter developed has the sensitivity and the stability required to conduct quantitative molecular imaging studies in PET and SPECT.

  13. Near-infrared molecular probes for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Bloch, Sharon; Akers, Walter; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-04-01

    Cellular and tissue imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm is advantageous for in vivo imaging because of the low absorption of biological molecules in this region. This unit presents protocols for small animal imaging using planar and fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques. Included is an overview of NIR fluorescence imaging of cells and small animals using NIR organic fluorophores, nanoparticles, and multimodal imaging probes. The development, advantages, and application of NIR fluorescent probes that have been used for in vivo imaging are also summarized. The use of NIR agents in conjunction with visible dyes and considerations in selecting imaging agents are discussed. We conclude with practical considerations for the use of these dyes in cell and small animal imaging applications.

  14. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N = 6) or sham injury (N = 4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted.

  15. Molecular Imaging by Optically Detected Electron Spin Resonance of Nitrogen-Vacancies in Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2013-03-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demonstrating Optically-Detected Functional-Electron-Spin-Resonance-Imaging, OD-f-ESRI. By combining optical detection with magnetic resonance, nanodiamond imaging achieves high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. It is absent of the complications of ionizing radiation, and the cost should be similar to all-optical imaging. Because nanodiamond imaging is limited by the depth of optical penetration into tissue to depths of a few cm, nanodiamond imaging should open up new avenues of investigation for applications where high depth penetration is not required, such as in small-animal imaging, tumor margin imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping, and perhaps mammography.

  16. Metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy of InP on GaAs-substrates for the production of metamorphic high-frequency transistors; Metallorganische Molekularstrahlepitaxie von InP auf GaAS-Substraten fuer die Herstellung metamorpher Hochfrequenztransistoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.

    2001-12-01

    The present contribution is concerned with the highly lattice-mismatched growth of InP on GaAs-substrates by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) using TMIn and precracked phosphine as the source materials. Here the objective was to deposit device-suitable InP-layers with low surface roughness, dislocation density and electrical conductivity. Growth-optimization of InP on GaAs was carried out by applying a multitude of characterization methods, amongst others atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence spectroscopy and Hall-effect-measurements. In particular, for the first time the dependence of the surface morphology on the growth parameters was investigated systematically. A growth model was formulated in order to explain the corresponding observations. Furthermore, the influence of both the growth parameters and a post-growth anneal on the optical and structural properties of the deposited InP-layers was investigated. Finally AlInAs/GaInAs-HEMT-structures (High Electron Mobility Transistors) were deposited and processed for the first time on the InP buffer-layers optimized as described above, which demonstrated the device-suitability of the deposited InP/GaAs-heterostructures. All in all a contribution was achieved in solving the main problem for the implementation of InP-based devices on GaAs-substrates. The predestination of the growth-method MOMBE for highly lattice-mismatched systems was also demonstrated. (orig.)

  17. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained. PMID:23533377

  18. Investigating Atmospheric Oxidation with Molecular Dynamics Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, W. G.; Case, A. S.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Earth's atmosphere constitute trace gas species emitted primarily from the biosphere, and are the subject of inquiry for a variety of air quality and climate studies. Reactions intiated (primarily) by the hydroxyl radical (OH) lead to a myriad of oxygenated species (OVOCs), which in turn are prone to further oxidation. Investigations of the role that VOC oxidation plays in tropospheric chemistry have brought to light two troubling scenarios: (1) VOCs are responsible in part for the production of two EPA-regulated pollutants---tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol---and (2) the mechanistic details of VOC oxidation remain convoluted and poorly understood. The latter issue hampers the implementation of near-explicit atmospheric simulations, and large discrepancies in OH reactivity exist between measurements and models at present. Such discrepancies underscore the need for a more thorough description of VOC oxidation. Time-of-flight measurements and ion-imaging techniques are viable options for resolving some of the mechanistic and energetic details of VOC oxidation. Molecular beam studies have the advantage of foregoing unwanted bimolecular reactions, allowing for the characterization of specific processes which must typically compete with the complex manifold of VOC oxidation pathways. The focus of this work is on the unimolecular channels of organic peroxy radical intermediates, which are necessarily generated during VOC oxidation. Such intermediates may isomerize and decompose into distinct chemical channels, enabling the unambiguous detection of each pathway. For instance, a (1 + 1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) scheme may be employed to detect carbon monoxide generated from a particular unimolecular process. A number of more subtle mechanistic details may be explored as well. By varying the mean free path of the peroxy radicals in a flow tube, the role of collisional quenching in these unimolecular

  19. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Textsortenklassifikation auf der basus Kommunikativer Grundbedingungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Diewald

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Im folgenden wird versucht, eine Basisklassifikation von Textsorten zu entwerfen, die umfassend und nichtwillkürlich ist. Mit "umfassend" ist gemeint, daß nicht nur ein bestimmter Ausschnitt aus dem Spektrum möglicher Sprachverwendungen untersucht wird, sondern daß alle Vorkommen dominant sprachlicher Kommunikation, mit denen ein Sprecher normalerweise konfrontiert ist, einbezogen werden.1 Mit "nichtwillkürlich" ist zum einen gemeint, daß die Wahl der Klassifikationskriterien nicht beliebig, sondern aus relevanten, textexternen Faktoren ableitbar ist. 2 Zum anderen betrifft das Problem der Willkürlichkeit die Frage, ob ein Modell die schlüssige Zurückführung von Texteigenschaften auf entsprechende Klassifikationsmerkmale ermöglicht.

  1. Akzent auf die Standardsprachen: Regionale Spuren in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-José Kolly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Durch ihren fremdsprachlichen Akzent gibt eine Sprecherin ihre Herkunft, ihre Muttersprache preis. So werden die meisten Deutschschweizer beim Sprechen einer Fremdsprache als solche erkannt. Kann aber aufgrund dieses "Deutschschweizer" Akzents auch erkannt werden, aus welchem Dialektgebiet ein Sprecher stammt? Der vorliegende Beitrag stellt eine empirische Studie zur Perzeption dialektaler Akzente vor. Er beschäftigt sich mit dialektalen Akzenten im Standarddeutschen und im Französischen und zeigt mit quantitativen Methoden auf, dass dialektal bedingte Akzentunterschiede von native speakers durchaus wahrgenommen und lokalisiert werden können. Darüber hinaus und als Basis für die Auswertung des empirischen Teils leistet die vorliegende Arbeit eine Beschreibung und Kategorisierung der dialektalen Lautlandschaft der Schweiz sowie einen Ansatz zur Beschreibung der Aussprache des Französischen durch Schweizer Dialektsprecher.

  2. Half-time Tc-99m sestamibi imaging with a direct conversion molecular breast imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Carrie B; Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Weinmann, Amanda L; Lingineni, Ravi K; Carter, Rickey E; Rhodes, Deborah J; O'Connor, Michael K

    2014-01-15

    In an effort to reduce necessary acquisition time to perform molecular breast imaging (MBI), we compared diagnostic performance of MBI performed with standard 10-min-per-view acquisitions and half-time 5-min-per-view acquisitions, with and without wide beam reconstruction (WBR) processing. Eighty-two bilateral, two-view MBI studies were reviewed. Studies were performed with 300 MBq Tc-99 m sestamibi and a direct conversion molecular breast imaging (DC-MBI) system. Acquisitions were 10 min-per-view; the first half of each was extracted to create 5-min-per-view datasets, and WBR processing was applied.The 10-min-, 5-min-, and 5-min-per-view WBR studies were independently interpreted in a randomized, blinded fashion by two radiologists. Assessments of 1 to 5 were assigned; 4 and 5 were considered test positive. Background parenchymal uptake, lesion type, distribution of non-mass lesions, lesion intensity, and image quality were described. Considering detection of all malignant and benign lesions, 5 min-per-view MBI had lower sensitivity (mean of 70% vs. 85% (p ≤ 0.04) for two readers) and lower area under curve (AUC) (mean of 92.7 vs. 99.6, p ≤ 0.01) but had similar specificity (p = 1.0). WBR processing did not alter sensitivity, specificity, or AUC obtained at 5 min-per-view.Overall agreement in final assessment between 5-min-per-view and 10-min-per-view acquisition types was near perfect (κ = 0.82 to 0.89); however, fair to moderate agreement was observed for assessment category 3 (probably benign) (κ = 0.24 to 0.48). Of 33 malignant lesions, 6 (18%) were changed from assessment of 4 or 5 with 10-min-per-view MBI to assessment of 3 with 5-min-per-view MBI. Image quality of 5-min-per-view studies was reduced compared to 10-min-per-view studies for both readers (3.24 vs. 3.98, p < 0.0001 and 3.60 vs. 3.91, p < 0.0001). WBR processing improved image quality for one reader (3.85 vs. 3.24, p < 0.0001). Although similar

  3. Molecular Imaging : Computer Reconstruction and Practice - Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Imaging from Physical Principles to Computer Reconstruction and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects the lectures presented at the ninth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2006 and is dedicated to nuclear physics applications in molecular imaging. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of image reconstruction processing and management and illustrate the role of digital imaging in clinical practice. Medical computing and image reconstruction are introduced by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, relevant quality aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Several stages of the imaging process are specifically addressed, e.g. optimisation of data acquisition and storage, distributed computing, physiology and detector modelling, computer algorithms for image reconstruction and measurement in tomography applications, for both clinical and biomedical research applications. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehen...

  4. Towards molecular imaging and treatment of disease with radionuclides: the role of inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Phil

    2006-04-14

    Molecular imaging and radiotherapy using radionuclides is a rapidly expanding field of medicine and medical research. This article highlights the development of the role of inorganic chemistry in designing and producing the radiopharmaceuticals on which this interdisciplinary science depends.

  5. Neurobiological mechanisms of treatment resistant depression: Functional, structural and molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kwaasteniet, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigated the neurobiological mechanisms of TRD using functional, structural and molecular imaging studies. First the neurobiological mechanisms of MDD were investigated and revealed decreased functional connectivity between the ventral and dorsal network. Thereafter, structural

  6. Imaging Neuroinflammation after Stroke: Current Status of Cellular and Molecular MRI Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deddens, L.H.; Van Tilborg, G.A.F.; Mulder, W.J.M.; de Vries, H.E.; Dijkhuizen, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategies for studying the spatiotemporal profile of neuroinflammatory processes after stroke are increasingly being explored since the first reports appeared about a decade ago. These strategies most often employ (super)paramagnetic contrast

  7. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    tiny calcium deposits that 82 indicate changes within the breast possibly point- 83 ing to cancer . Microcalcifications especially are 84 usually...NUMBER A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0291 5c. PROGRAM...assistant were further trained in molecular imaging of breast cancer through seminars and workshops, and are currently conducting two research projects

  8. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  9. Der Einfluss der Digitalisierung auf die Organisation eines Unternehmens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Wolfram M.

    Die Digitalisierung schreitet mit großen Schritten voran. Dies wirkt sich nicht nur auf die Gesellschaft im Grundsatz, sondern auch auf das Verhalten der Kunden aus. Neue Kommunikationswege beschleunigen die Interaktion zwischen Unternehmen und Verbraucher. Im Vergleich mit großen Internetfirmen werden etablierte Dienstleistungsunternehmen - vom Energieversorger bis zu Versicherungen - stark unter Druck gesetzt, sich noch intensiver mit dem Kundenservice auseinanderzusetzen. Dies wird nur möglich sein, wenn sich die Organisationen entsprechend positionieren und sich frühzeitig auf die Veränderungen einstellen. Hieraus ergeben sich mehr Chancen als Risiken, zumal es nicht nur neue Prozesse, sondern auch neue Berufsbilder geben wird.

  10. Molecular targeted therapy in modern oncology: Imaging assessment of treatment response and toxicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; DiPiro, Pamela J.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Shinagare, Atul B. [Dept. of of Imaging, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Oncology is a rapidly evolving field with a shift toward personalized cancer treatment. The use of therapies targeted to the molecular features of individual tumors and the tumor microenvironment has become much more common. In this review, anti-angiogenic and other molecular targeted therapies are discussed, with a focus on typical and atypical response patterns and imaging manifestations of drug toxicities.

  11. Calix[4]arenes as Molecular Platforms in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schühle, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool in medical diagnosis. It uses non-ionizing radio-frequency radiation and produces images with excellent resolution. To increase the contrast, Gd(III)-containing compounds are applied leading to a brightening of the area of interest. The

  12. Molecular Cancer Imaging with Polymeric Nanoassemblies: From Tumor Detection to Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Peng; Wang, Fang; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Cabral, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Several imaging modalities have been widely applied for the detection of cancer and its pathological activity in combination with probes capable of improving the contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues. Biocompatible polymeric nanoassemblies have been developed for precise detection of malignant tumors by enhancing the selectivity and sensitivity of the imaging. Exploiting the compartmentalized structure of the nanoassemblies advantageously allows delivering both imaging and therapeutic agents for cancer multifunctional imaging and theranostics, i.e., the combination of therapy and diagnosis tool on a single platform. Thus, nanoassemblies have high potential not only for cancer molecular imaging but also for tracing nanoparticles in biological systems, studying their biological pathways, gathering pathological information, monitoring therapeutic effects, and guiding pinpoint therapies. In this review, polymeric nanoassemblies for optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, multifunctional imaging, and image-guided therapy, emphasizing their role in cancer diagnosis and theranostics are highlighted. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338877169

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared

  14. Lipid-based nanoparticles for contrast-enhanced MRI and molecular imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Willem J. M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; van Tilborg, Geralda A. F.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    In the field of MR imaging and especially in the emerging field of cellular and molecular MR imaging, flexible strategies to synthesize contrast agents that can be manipulated in terms of size and composition and that can be easily conjugated with targeting ligands are required. Furthermore, the

  15. Selection of optimal molecular targets for tumor-specific imaging in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, W.S. (Willemieke S.); A. Fariña-Sarasqueta (Arantza); M.C. Boonstra (M.); Prevoo, H.A. (Hendrica A.); C.F.M. Sier (Cornelis); J.S.D. Mieog (Sven); H. Morreau (Hans); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); P.J.K. Kuppen (P. J K); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); B.A. Bonsing (Bert); A.L. Vahrmeijer (Alexander L.); Swijnenburg, R.-J. (Rutger-Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDiscrimination of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from chronic pancreatitis (CP) or peritumoral inflammation is challenging, both at preoperative imaging and during surgery, but it is crucial for proper therapy selection. Tumor-specific molecular imaging aims to enhance this

  16. Molecular and Functional Imaging for Detection of Lymph Node Metastases in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansje Fortuin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on lymph node metastases is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of prostate cancer patients. Conventional anatomic imaging often fails to differentiate benign from metastatic lymph nodes. Pelvic lymph node dissection is an invasive technique and underestimates the extent of lymph node metastases. Therefore, there is a need for more accurate non-invasive diagnostic techniques. Molecular and functional imaging has been subject of research for the last decades, in this respect. Therefore, in this article the value of imaging techniques to detect lymph node metastases is reviewed. These techniques include scintigraphy, sentinel node imaging, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI and magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL. Knowledge on pathway and size of lymph node metastases has increased with molecular and functional imaging. Furthermore, improved detection and localization of lymph node metastases will enable (focal treatment of the positive nodes only.

  17. Spying on cancer: molecular imaging in vivo with genetically encoded reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Shimon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2005-01-01

    Genetically encoded imaging reporters introduced into cells and transgenic animals enable noninvasive, longitudinal studies of dynamic biological processes in vivo. The most common reporters include firefly luciferase (bioluminescence imaging), green fluorescence protein (fluorescence imaging), herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (positron emission tomography), and variants with enhanced spectral and kinetic properties. When cloned into promoter/enhancer sequences or engineered into fusion proteins, imaging reporters allow transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interactions, oncogenic transformation, cell trafficking, and targeted drug action to be spatiotemporally resolved in vivo. Spying on cancer with genetically encoded imaging reporters provides insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal.

  18. Molecular Probes for Imaging of Hypoxia in the Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Stephanie M.; Kim, Kwangho; Moore, Chauca E.; Uddin, Md Imam; Capozzi, Megan E.; Craft, Jason R.; Gary A Sulikowski; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia has been associated with retinal diseases which lead the causes of irreversible vision loss, including diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, technologies for imaging hypoxia in the retina are needed for early disease detection, monitoring of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic responses in the patient. Toward this goal, we developed two hypoxia-sensitive imaging agents based on nitroimidazoles which are capabl...

  19. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng-Yang; Lu, Qing; Huang, Bei-Jian; Xia, Han-Sheng; Yan, Li-Xia; Wang, Xi; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n=128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR]=10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR=5.112), and echogenic halo (OR=3.263, Pimaging features, especially retraction phenomenon, have a strong correlation with the molecular subtypes, expanding the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer subtypes with confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  1. Multimodality molecular imaging of disease progression in living ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-07

    Aug 7, 2011 ... ... events from single live cells to whole animals with high sensitivity and accurate quantification are discussed. Such approaches have immense potential to track progression of metastasis, immune cell trafficking, stem cell therapy, transgenic animals and even molecular interactions in living subjects.

  2. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    determine the depth of embedded tumor fragments in the excise tissue or surgical cavity. Pilot animal data with the Licor IRDye800CW-2DG imaging agent in...and the tumor immediately removed with adjacent normal tissue. All tissue were soaked for 5 – 20 minutes in a solution of Licor IRDye800CW-2DG and... Licor IRDye800CW-2DG, showing a cross section of the tumor mass. These images show a significant amount of non-specific uptake of the probe in

  3. Assessment of Residual Disease With Molecular Breast Imaging in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy: Association With Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menes, Tehillah S; Golan, Orit; Vainer, Gilead; Lerman, Hedva; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Klausner, Joseph; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer is an ongoing challenge of breast imaging. This study evaluates the accuracy of a novel dedicated system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) composed of the new generation of cadmium zinc telluride detectors in assessing residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy in patients with breast cancer. Clinical data, imaging, surgical, and pathological findings of 51 women with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were recorded. MBI findings were correlated with surgical pathology results. Accuracy of MBI in predicting complete pathological response and size of residual disease was assessed according to molecular subtypes. The size of the largest focus of uptake on MBI correlated with the largest dimension measured on pathology (r = 0.55; P < .001). This correlation was stronger for triple negative and HER2/neu positive subtypes (r = 0.92 and 0.62, respectively). Sixteen patients (31%) had complete pathological response. The sensitivity and specificity of MBI for detecting residual disease were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66-93) and 69% (95% CI, 42-88), respectively. For triple negative or HER2/neu positive disease the sensitivity and specificity were 88% (95% CI, 62-98) and 75% (95% CI, 43-93), respectively. The accuracy of MBI in assessing residual disease after neoadjuvant treatment might be related to the molecular subtype. Accuracy is highest in the triple negative and HER2/neu positive subtypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Live Cell Imaging and Measurements of Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, M.; Lacoste, J.; Swift, J.; Brown, C.

    2010-01-01

    w3-2 Live cell microscopy is becoming widespread across all fields of the life sciences, as well as, many areas of the physical sciences. In order to accurately obtain live cell microscopy data, the live specimens must be properly maintained on the imaging platform. In addition, the fluorescence light path must be optimized for efficient light transmission in order to reduce the intensity of excitation light impacting the living sample. With low incident light intensities the processes under study should not be altered due to phototoxic effects from the light allowing for the long term visualization of viable living samples. Aspects for maintaining a suitable environment for the living sample, minimizing incident light and maximizing detection efficiency will be presented for various fluorescence based live cell instruments. Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) is a technique that uses the intensity fluctuations within laser scanning confocal images, as well as the well characterized scanning dynamics of the laser beam, to extract the dynamics, concentrations and clustering of fluorescent molecules within the cell. In addition, two color cross-correlation RICS can be used to determine protein-protein interactions in living cells without the many technical difficulties encountered in FRET based measurements. RICS is an ideal live cell technique for measuring cellular dynamics because the potentially damaging high intensity laser bursts required for photobleaching recovery measurements are not required, rather low laser powers, suitable for imaging, can be used. The RICS theory will be presented along with examples of live cell applications.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Cancer with Nanoparticle-Based Theranostic Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yu Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although advancements in medical technology supporting cancer diagnosis and treatment have improved survival, these technologies still have limitations. Recently, the application of noninvasive imaging for cancer diagnosis and therapy has become an indispensable component in clinical practice. However, current imaging contrasts and tracers, which are in widespread clinical use, have their intrinsic limitations and disadvantages. Nanotechnologies, which have improved in vivo detection and enhanced targeting efficiency for cancer, may overcome some of the limitations of cancer diagnosis and therapy. Theranostic nanoparticles have great potential as a therapeutic model, which possesses the ability of their nanoplatforms to load targeted molecule for both imaging and therapeutic functions. The resulting nanosystem will likely be critical with the growth of personalized medicine because of their diagnostic potential, effectiveness as a drug delivery vehicle, and ability to oversee patient response to therapy. In this review, we discuss the achievements of modern nanoparticles with the goal of accurate tumor imaging and effective treatment and discuss the future prospects.

  6. Iron Oxide Nanoradiomaterials: Combining Nanoscale Properties with Radioisotopes for Enhanced Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pellico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of the size-dependent properties of nanomaterials with radioisotopes is emerging as a novel tool for molecular imaging. There are numerous examples already showing how the controlled synthesis of nanoparticles and the incorporation of a radioisotope in the nanostructure offer new features beyond the simple addition of different components. Among the different nanomaterials, iron oxide-based nanoparticles are the most used in imaging because of their versatility. In this review, we will study the different radioisotopes for biomedical imaging, how to incorporate them within the nanoparticles, and what applications they can be used for. Our focus is directed towards what is new in this field, what the nanoparticles can offer to the field of nuclear imaging, and the radioisotopes hybridized with nanomaterials for use in molecular imaging.

  7. Current perspectives in the use of molecular imaging to target surgical treatments for genitourinary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Francesco; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Gill, Inderbir S; Kaouk, Jihad H; Remzi, Mesut; Thompson, R Houston; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; van der Poel, Henk G; Fornara, Paolo; Rassweiler, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) entails the visualisation, characterisation, and measurement of biologic processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. Translating this technology to interventions in real-time enables interventional MI/image-guided surgery, for example, by providing better detection of tumours and their dimensions. To summarise and critically analyse the available evidence on image-guided surgery for genitourinary (GU) oncologic diseases. A comprehensive literature review was performed using PubMed and the Thomson Reuters Web of Science. In the free-text protocol, the following terms were applied: molecular imaging, genitourinary oncologic surgery, surgical navigation, image-guided surgery, and augmented reality. Review articles, editorials, commentaries, and letters to the editor were included if deemed to contain relevant information. We selected 79 articles according to the search strategy based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis criteria and the IDEAL method. MI techniques included optical imaging and fluorescent techniques, the augmented reality (AR) navigation system, magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. Experimental studies on the AR navigation system were restricted to the detection and therapy of adrenal and renal malignancies and in the relatively infrequent cases of prostate cancer, whereas fluorescence techniques and optical imaging presented a wide application of intraoperative GU oncologic surgery. In most cases, image-guided surgery was shown to improve the surgical resectability of tumours. Based on the evidence to date, image-guided surgery has promise in the near future for multiple GU malignancies. Further optimisation of targeted imaging agents, along with the integration of imaging modalities, is necessary to further enhance intraoperative GU oncologic surgery. Copyright © 2013

  8. Advancing Precision Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Chadwick L; Maly, Joseph J; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    PET with fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 (18F FDG-PET) is a meaningful biomarker for the detection, targeted biopsy, and treatment of lymphoma. This article reviews the evolution of 18F FDG-PET as a putative biomarker for lymphoma and addresses the current capabilities, challenges, and opportunities to enable precision medicine practices for lymphoma. Precision nuclear medicine is driven by new imaging technologies and methodologies to more accurately detect malignant disease. Although quantitative assessment of response is limited, such technologies will enable a more precise metabolic mapping with much higher definition image detail and thus may make it a robust and valid quantitative response assessment methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Eosinophilic cardiac disease: Molecular, clinical and imaging aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguéla, Pierre-Emmanuel; Iriart, Xavier; Acar, Philippe; Montaudon, Michel; Roudaut, Raymond; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilia may be responsible for cardiac injuries of widely varying severity, from acute myocarditis to endomyocardial fibrosis. In this review, we present both the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these lesions and their clinical and paraclinical aspects. Numerous aetiologies can lead to severe eosinophilia, but these are mainly represented by hypersensitivity reactions, rheumatological diseases and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Because cardiac involvement may be extremely severe, echocardiography should be always performed in the context of eosinophilia and appropriate therapeutics should be started rapidly in order to limit the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: Current Functional and Future Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise M Blanchet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are neural crest-derived tumors, arising either from chromaffin sympathetic tissue (in adrenal, abdominal, intra-pelvic or thoracic paraganglia or from parasympathetic tissue (in head and neck paraganglia. They have a specific cellular metabolism, with the ability to synthesize, store and secrete catecholamines (although most head and neck paragangliomas do not secrete any catecholamines. This disease is rare and also very heterogeneous, with various presentations (e.g., in regards to localization, multifocality, potential to metastasize, biochemical phenotype, and genetic background. With growing knowledge, notably about the pathophysiology and genetic background, guidelines are evolving rapidly. In this context, functional imaging is a challenge for the management of paragangliomas.Nuclear imaging has been used for exploring paragangliomas for the last three decades, with MIBG historically as the first-line exam. Tracers used in paragangliomas can be grouped in three different categories. Agents that specifically target catecholamine synthesis, storage, and secretion pathways include: 123 and 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123/131I-MIBG, 18F-fluorodopamine (18F-FDA, and 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA. Agents that bind somatostatin receptors include 111In-pentetreotide and 68Ga-labelled somatostatin analog peptides. The non-specific agent most commonly used in paragangliomas is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG. This review will first describe conventional scintigraphic exams that are used for imaging paragangliomas. In the second part we will emphasize the interest in new PET approaches (specific and non-specific, considering the growing knowledge about genetic background and pathophysiology, with the aim of understanding how tumors behave, and optimally adjusting imaging technique for each tumor type.

  11. Insight into the Molecular Imaging of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abishek Arora; Neeta Bhagat

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Earlier it was diagnosed only via clinical assessments and confirmed by postmortem brain histopathology. The development of validated biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease has given impetus to improve diagnostics and accelerate the development of new therapies. Functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), functional magnetic re...

  12. Strategies for molecular imaging dementia and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard J Schaller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bernhard J SchallerDepartment of Neurosurgery, University of Paris, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia represents a heterogeneous term that has evolved to describe the behavioral syndromes associated with a variety of clinical and neuropathological changes during continuing degenerative disease of the brain. As such, there lacks a clear consensus regarding the neuropsychological and other constituent characteristics associated with various cerebrovascular changes in this disease process. But increasing this knowledge has given more insights into memory deterioration in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other subtypes of dementia. The author reviews current knowledge of the physiological coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the light of state-of-the-art-imaging methods and its changes in dementia with special reference to Alzheimer’s disease. Different imaging techniques are discussed with respect to their visualizing effect of biochemical, cellular, and/or structural changes in dementia. The pathophysiology of dementia in advanced age is becoming increasingly understood by revealing the underlying basis of neuropsychological changes with current imaging techniques, genetic and pathological features, which suggests that alterations of (neurovascular regulatory mechanisms may lead to brain dysfunction and disease. The current view is that cerebrovascular deregulation is seen as a contributor to cerebrovascular pathologies, such as stroke, but also to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The better understanding of these (pathophysiological mechanisms may open an approach to new interventional strategies in dementia to enhance neurovascular repair and to protect neurovascular coupling.Keywords: imaging, cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular disease, neurovascular coupling

  13. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Congsen [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Janssen, Maurice H. M. [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  14. Construction of specific magnetic resonance imaging/optical dual-modality molecular probe used for imaging angiogenesis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuejie; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenbo

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to construct specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/optical dual-modality molecular probe. Tumor-bearing animal models were established. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe was construed by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified nano-Fe3O4 with specific targeted cyclopeptide GX1 and near-infrared fluorescent dyes Cy5.5. MRI/optical imaging effects of the probe were observed and the feasibility of in vivo double-modality imaging was discussed. It was found that, the double-modality probe was of high stability; tumor signal of the experimental group tended to be weak after injection of the probe, but rose to a level which was close to the previous level after 18 h (p > 0.05). We successively completed the construction of an ideal MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe which can selectively gather in gastric cancer is expected to be a novel probe used for diagnosing gastric cancer in the early stage.

  15. Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: a versatile platform for targeted molecular imaging, molecular diagnostics, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-10-18

    Advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of disease susceptibility coupled with prominent successes for molecular targeted therapies have resulted in an emerging strategy of personalized medicine. This approach envisions risk stratification and therapeutic selection based on an individual's genetic makeup and physiologic state (the latter assessed through cellular or molecular phenotypes). Molecularly targeted nanoparticles can play a key role in this vision through noninvasive assessments of molecular processes and specific cell populations in vivo, sensitive molecular diagnostics, and targeted delivery of therapeutics. A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle with a cross-linked dextran coating, or CLIO, is a powerful and illustrative nanoparticle platform for these applications. These structures and their derivatives support diagnostic imaging by magnetic resonance (MRI), optical, and positron emission tomography (PET) modalities and constitute a versatile platform for conjugation to targeting ligands. A variety of conjugation methods exist to couple the dextran surface to different functional groups; in addition, a robust bioorthogonal [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between 1,2,4,5-tetrazene (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) can conjugate nanoparticles to targeting ligands or label pretargeted cells. The ready availability of conjugation methods has given rise to the synthesis of libraries of small molecule modified nanoparticles, which can then be screened for nanoparticles with specificity for a specific cell type. Since most nanoparticles display their targeting ligands in a multivalent manner, a detailed understanding of the kinetics and affinity of a nanoparticle's interaction with its target (as determined by surface plasmon resonance) can yield functionally important insights into nanoparticle design. In this Account, we review applications of the CLIO platform in several areas relevant to the mission of personalized medicine. We demonstrate

  16. Imaging patterns predict patient survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma via machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macyszyn, Luke; Akbari, Hamed; Pisapia, Jared M; Da, Xiao; Attiah, Mark; Pigrish, Vadim; Bi, Yingtao; Pal, Sharmistha; Davuluri, Ramana V; Roccograndi, Laura; Dahmane, Nadia; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Biros, George; Wolf, Ronald L; Bilello, Michel; O'Rourke, Donald M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    MRI characteristics of brain gliomas have been used to predict clinical outcome and molecular tumor characteristics. However, previously reported imaging biomarkers have not been sufficiently accurate or reproducible to enter routine clinical practice and often rely on relatively simple MRI measures. The current study leverages advanced image analysis and machine learning algorithms to identify complex and reproducible imaging patterns predictive of overall survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma (GB). One hundred five patients with GB were first used to extract approximately 60 diverse features from preoperative multiparametric MRIs. These imaging features were used by a machine learning algorithm to derive imaging predictors of patient survival and molecular subtype. Cross-validation ensured generalizability of these predictors to new patients. Subsequently, the predictors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 29 new patients. Survival curves yielded a hazard ratio of 10.64 for predicted long versus short survivors. The overall, 3-way (long/medium/short survival) accuracy in the prospective cohort approached 80%. Classification of patients into the 4 molecular subtypes of GB achieved 76% accuracy. By employing machine learning techniques, we were able to demonstrate that imaging patterns are highly predictive of patient survival. Additionally, we found that GB subtypes have distinctive imaging phenotypes. These results reveal that when imaging markers related to infiltration, cell density, microvascularity, and blood-brain barrier compromise are integrated via advanced pattern analysis methods, they form very accurate predictive biomarkers. These predictive markers used solely preoperative images, hence they can significantly augment diagnosis and treatment of GB patients. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Molecularly imprinted polymer-coated quantum dots for multiplexed cell targeting and imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotopoulou, Maria; Salinas, Yolanda; Beyazit, Selim; Kunath, Stephanie; Duma, Luminita; Prost, Elise; Mayes, Andrew G.; Resmini, Marina; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Haupt, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Advanced tools for cell imaging are of great interest to detect, localize and quantify molecular biomarkers of cancer or infection. We describe a novel photopolymerization method to coat quantum dots (QDs) with polymer shells, in particular molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), using the visible light emitted from QDs excited by UV light. Fluorescent core-shell particles specifically recognizing glucuronic acid (GlcA) or N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) were prepared. Simultaneous multiplexed ...

  18. Targeting the treatment of drug abuse with molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, Wynne K. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: wynne@bnl.gov; Liebling, Courtney N.B.; Patel, Vinal; Dewey, Stephen L. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Although imaging studies in and of themselves have significant contributions to the study of human behavior, imaging in drug abuse has a much broader agenda. Drugs of abuse bind to molecules in specific parts of the brain in order to produce their effects. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a unique opportunity to track this process, capturing the kinetics with which an abused compound is transported to its site of action. The specific examples discussed here were chosen to illustrate how PET can be used to map the regional distribution and kinetics of compounds that may or may not have abuse liability. We also discussed some morphological and functional changes associated with drug abuse and different stages of recovery following abstinence. PET measurements of functional changes in the brain have also led to the development of several treatment strategies, one of which is discussed in detail here. Information such as this becomes more than a matter of academic interest. Such knowledge can provide the bases for anticipating which compounds may be abused and which may not. It can also be used to identify biological markers or changes in brain function that are associated with progression from drug use to drug abuse and also to stage the recovery process. This new knowledge can guide legislative initiatives on the optimal duration of mandatory treatment stays, promoting long-lasting abstinence and greatly reducing the societal burden of drug abuse. Imaging can also give some insights into potential pharmacotherapeutic targets to manage the reinforcing effects of addictive compounds, as well as into protective strategies to minimize their toxic consequences.

  19. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging is less likely to show all foci of ILC compared with IDC.

  20. Imaging Multi-Particle Atomic and Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, Allen [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Final Report for Grant Number: DE- FG02-10ER16146 This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms and molecules with photons and electrons. The duration of the grant was the 5 year period from 4/1/2010 – 10/31/2015. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 20 peer reviewed publications over these 5 years with 2 of the publications in Physical Review Letters and 1 in Nature; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B ...).

  1. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy in Small Animal Research: Applications in Molecular and Preclinical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM is a noninvasive multimodality technique that allows high-resolution imaging in mice. It is affordable, widely available, and portable. When it is coupled to Doppler ultrasound with color and power Doppler, it can be used to quantify blood flow and to image microcirculation as well as the response of tumor blood supply to cancer therapy. Target contrast ultrasound combines ultrasound with novel molecular targeted contrast agent to assess biological processes at molecular level. UBM is useful to investigate the growth and differentiation of tumors as well as to detect early molecular expression of cancer-related biomarkers in vivo and to monitor the effects of cancer therapies. It can be also used to visualize the embryological development of mice in uterus or to examine their cardiovascular development. The availability of real-time imaging of mice anatomy allows performing aspiration procedures under ultrasound guidance as well as the microinjection of cells, viruses, or other agents into precise locations. This paper will describe some basic principles of high-resolution imaging equipment, and the most important applications in molecular and preclinical imaging in small animal research.

  2. Molecular imaging of apoptosis in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare Bildgebung der Apoptose bei kardiovaskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, I.; Greschus, S.; Willinek, W.; Lohmaier, S.; Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik; Heverhagen, J.T. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik; Behe, M. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Wilhelm, K. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). FE Chirurgie

    2007-08-15

    Molecular imaging of functional parameters such as apoptosis (programmed cell death) in vivo opens new possibilities in clinical diagnostic and scientific research. Especially in the case of cardiovascular diseases that are mainly responsible for both morbidity and mortality in Western industrial nations, innovative non-invasive examination strategies are necessary for early diagnosis of these diseases. Since apoptosis unlike necrosis is present even after minor alterations of the microenvironment of cells and has been shown to be involved in a large number of cardiovascular diseases, there are currently several experimental studies underway with the goal of imaging apoptosis in vivo. The review discusses the basics of apoptosis in myocardial infarction, myocarditis, atherosclerosis, restenosis after angioplasty and stent implantation, currently used imaging techniques, achieved results, and future possibilities for molecular imaging of apoptosis. (orig.)

  3. Recent Advance of Biological Molecular Imaging Based on Lanthanide-Doped Upconversion-Luminescent Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzeng Min

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lanthanide-doped upconversion-luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs, which can be excited by near-infrared (NIR laser irradiation to emit multiplex light, have been proven to be very useful for in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging studies. In comparison with the conventionally used down-conversion fluorescence imaging strategies, the NIR light excited luminescence of UCNPs displays high photostability, low cytotoxicity, little background auto-fluorescence, which allows for deep tissue penetration, making them attractive as contrast agents for biomedical imaging applications. In this review, we will mainly focus on the latest development of a new type of lanthanide-doped UCNP material and its main applications for in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging and we will also discuss the challenges and future perspectives.

  4. Molecular Imaging to Identify Tumor Recurrence following Chemoradiation in a Hostile Surgical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T. Okusanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical biopsy of potential tumor recurrence is a common challenge facing oncologists, surgeons, and cancer patients. Imaging modalities have limited ability to accurately detect recurrent cancer in fields affected by previous surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. However, definitive tissue diagnosis is often needed to initiate treatment and to direct therapy. We sought to determine if a targeted fluorescent intraoperative molecular imaging technique could be applied in a clinical setting to assist a surgical biopsy in a “hostile” field. We describe the use of a folate-fluorescein conjugate to direct the biopsy of a suspected recurrent lung adenocarcinoma invading the mediastinum that had been previously treated with chemoradiation. We found that intraoperative imaging allowed the identification of small viable tumor deposits that were otherwise indistinguishable from scar and necrosis. Our operative observations were confirmed by histology, fluorescence microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate one possible application and clinical value of intraoperative molecular imaging.

  5. Systems Biology-Driven Hypotheses Tested In Vivo: The Need to Advancing Molecular Imaging Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Garima; Palombo, Alessandro; Grigioni, Mauro; La Monaca, Morena; D'Avenio, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Processing and interpretation of biological images may provide invaluable insights on complex, living systems because images capture the overall dynamics as a "whole." Therefore, "extraction" of key, quantitative morphological parameters could be, at least in principle, helpful in building a reliable systems biology approach in understanding living objects. Molecular imaging tools for system biology models have attained widespread usage in modern experimental laboratories. Here, we provide an overview on advances in the computational technology and different instrumentations focused on molecular image processing and analysis. Quantitative data analysis through various open source software and algorithmic protocols will provide a novel approach for modeling the experimental research program. Besides this, we also highlight the predictable future trends regarding methods for automatically analyzing biological data. Such tools will be very useful to understand the detailed biological and mathematical expressions under in-silico system biology processes with modeling properties.

  6. Preclinical and clinical applications of specific molecular imaging for HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Jianjing; Xu, Wengui; Wang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Precision medicine and personalized therapy are receiving increased attention, and molecular-subtype classification has become crucial in planning therapeutic schedules in clinical practice for patients with breast cancer. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is associated with high-grade breast tumors, high rates of lymph-node involvement, high risk of recurrence, and high resistance to general chemotherapy. Analysis of HER2 expression is highly important for doctors to identify patients who can benefit from trastuzumab therapy and monitor the response and efficacy of treatment. In recent years, significant efforts have been devoted to achieving specific and noninvasive HER2-positive breast cancer imaging in vivo. In this work, we reviewed existing literature on HER2 imaging in the past decade and summarized the studies from different points of view, such as imaging modalities and HER2-specific probes. We aimed to improve the understanding on the translational process in molecular imaging for HER2 breast cancer.

  7. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy in Small Animal Research: Applications in Molecular and Preclinical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, A.; Mancini, M.; Gargiulo, S; Gramanzini, M.; Claudio, P. P.; Brunetti, A; Salvatore, . M

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is a noninvasive multimodality technique that allows high-resolution imaging in mice. It is affordable, widely available, and portable. When it is coupled to Doppler ultrasound with color and power Doppler, it can be used to quantify blood flow and to image microcirculation as well as the response of tumor blood supply to cancer therapy. Target contrast ultrasound combines ultrasound with novel molecular targeted contrast agent to assess biological processes at ...

  8. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    4 hours followed by two washes in 50% methanol. Dried peptides were later dissolved in 0.1% formic acid for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Duplicate...FOLR1 protein is a folate receptor family member that binds folic acid and a number of reduced folic acid derivatives and transports 5...is to develop nanoparticle -based molecular imaging probes that can be used in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) as an ovarian cancer early

  9. Final Technical Report for SISGR: Ultrafast Molecular Scale Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Guest, Jeffrey R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Guisinger, Nathan P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Hla, Saw Wai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Schatz, George C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Seideman, Tamar [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Van Duyne, Richard P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-10

    The Northwestern-Argonne SISGR program utilized newly developed instrumentation and techniques including integrated ultra-high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-TERS/STM) and surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS) to advance the spatial and temporal resolution of chemical imaging for the study of photoinduced dynamics of molecules on plasmonically active surfaces. An accompanying theory program addressed modeling of charge transfer processes using constrained density functional theory (DFT) in addition to modeling of SE-FSRS, thereby providing a detailed description of the excited state dynamics. This interdisciplinary and highly collaborative research resulted in 62 publications with ~ 48% of them being co-authored by multiple SISGR team members. A summary of the scientific accomplishments from this SISGR program is provided in this final technical report.

  10. Nanodiamond molecular imaging with enhanced contrast and expanded field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Nanodiamond imaging is a new molecular imaging modality that takes advantage of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds to image a distribution of nanodiamonds with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Since nanodiamonds are nontoxic and are easily conjugated to biomolecules, nanodiamond imaging can potentially elicit physiological information from within a living organism. The position of the nanodiamonds is measured using optically detected electron spin resonance of the NVs. In a previous paper, we described a proof-of-principle nanodiamond imaging system with the ability to image in two dimensions over a 1×1 cm field of view and demonstrated imaging within scattering tissue. Here, we describe a second-generation nanodiamond imaging system with a field of view of 30×200 mm, and with three-dimensional imaging potential. The new system has a comparable spatial resolution of 1.2 mm FWHM and a sensitivity (in terms of the concentration of carbon atoms in a voxel) of 1.6 Hz, a 3-dB improvement relative to the old system. We show that imaging at 2.872 GHz versus imaging at 2.869 GHz offers a 1.73× improvement in sensitivity with only a 20% decrease in resolution and motivate this by describing the observed lineshape starting from the NV spin Hamiltonian.

  11. High-resolution, high sensitivity detectors for molecular imaging with radionuclides: The coded aperture option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusanno, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: francesco.cusanno@iss.infn.it; Cisbani, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Colilli, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fratoni, R. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Garibaldi, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Giuliani, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Gricia, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Lo Meo, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Lucentini, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Magliozzi, M.L. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Santavenere, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN gruppo Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Lanza, R.C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Majewski, S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, 23606 VA (United States); Cinti, M.N. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Pani, R. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Pellegrini, R. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Orsini Cancelli, V. [INFN Sezione Roma III, Rome (Italy); De Notaristefani, F. [INFN Sezione Roma III, Rome (Italy); Bollini, D. [INFN Sezione di Bologna , Bologna (Italy); Navarria, F. [INFN Sezione di Bologna , Bologna (Italy); Moschini, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)

    2006-12-20

    Molecular imaging with radionuclides is a very sensitive technique because it allows to obtain images with nanomolar or picomolar concentrations. This has generated a rapid growth of interest in radionuclide imaging of small animals. Indeed radiolabeling of small molecules, antibodies, peptides and probes for gene expression enables molecular imaging in vivo, but only if a suitable imaging system is used. Detecting small tumors in humans is another important application of such techniques. In single gamma imaging, there is always a well known tradeoff between spatial resolution and sensitivity due to unavoidable collimation requirements. Limitation of the sensitivity due to collimation is well known and affects the performance of imaging systems, especially if only radiopharmaceuticals with limited uptake are available. In many cases coded aperture collimation can provide a solution, if the near field artifact effect can be eliminated or limited. At least this is the case for 'small volumes' imaging, involving small animals. In this paper 3D-laminography simulations and preliminary measurements with coded aperture collimation are presented. Different masks have been designed for different applications showing the advantages of the technique in terms of sensitivity and spatial resolution. The limitations of the technique are also discussed.

  12. Molecular imaging using PET and SPECT for identification of breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Chen, Yao; Wu, Shuang; Song, Fahuan; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major disease with high morbidity and mortality in women. As a highly heterogeneous tumor, it contains different molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor 2-positive, and triple-negative subtypes. As each subtype has unique features, it may not be universal to the optimal treatment and expected response for individual patients. Therefore, it is critical to identify different breast cancer subtypes. Targeting subcellular levels, molecular imaging, especially PET and single photon emission computed tomography, has become a promising means to identify breast cancer subtypes and monitor treatment. Different biological processes between various subtypes, including changes correlated with receptor expression, cell proliferation, or glucose metabolism, have the potential for imaging with PET and single photon emission computed tomography radiopharmaceuticals. Receptor imaging, with radiopharmaceuticals targeting estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or human epidermal growth factor 2, is available to distinguish receptor-positive tumors from receptor-negative ones. Cell proliferation imaging with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine PET aids identification of luminal A and B subtypes on the basis of the correlation with the immunohistochemical biomarker Ki-67. Glucose metabolism imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET may have potential to discriminate triple-negative subtypes from others. With increasing numbers of novel radiopharmaceuticals, noninvasive molecular imaging will be applied widely for the identification of different subtypes and provide more in-vivo information on individualized management of breast cancer patients.

  13. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Liang, E-mail: shanli@mail.nih.gov; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine (United States); Menkens, Anne E. [National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, {approx}4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  14. Collective traffic control systems on motorways; Kollektive Verkehrsbeeinflussung auf Autobahnen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschfink, H. [Heusch (Dr.-Ing. H.) Boesefeldt (Dipl.-Ing. J.) Beratende Ingenieure fuer Verkehrstechnik und Datenverarbeitung GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The contribution describes direct and indirect traffic control measures. A general architecture of traffic control systems for motorways is outlined whose key requirement is the availability of current data. Intelligent methods of traffic flow analysis for data complementation and assessment are described. The key role of the computer center in the general architecture is stressed, and new developments in traffic jam management are outlined. [German] Schwerpunkt dieses Aufsatzes ist die Beschreibung direkter und indirekter Steuerungsmassnahmen im Rahmen kollektiver Verkehrsbeeinflussungsmassnahmen. Es wird eine generelle Architektur von Verkehrsbeeinflussungsanlagen auf Autobahnen skizziert, deren grundlegende Voraussetzung die Verfuegbarkeit aktueller Daten ist. Ausserdem werden intelligente Verkehrsflussanalyse-Verfahren zur Datenvervollstaendigung und -abschaetzung beschrieben. Es wird die tragende Rolle der Verkehrsrechnerzentrale innerhalb der Gesamtarchitektur beruecksichtigt und auf neuere Entwicklungen auf dem Gebiet des Staumanagements hingewiesen. (orig.)

  15. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  16. An Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique for the Molecular Characterization of Intraprostatic Dynamic Contrast Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Ménard

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological characterization of an individual patient's tumor by noninvasive imaging will have an important role in cancer care and clinical research if the molecular processes that underlie the image data are known. Spatial heterogeneity in the dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI is hypothesized to reflect variations in tumor angiogenesis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of precisely colocalizing DCE-MRI data with the genomic and proteomic profiles of underlying biopsy tissue using a novel MRI-guided biopsy technique in patients with prostate cancer.

  17. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, J. F.; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, Willem P Th M; Derksen, Patrick W B; van Diest, Paul J; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    PURPOSE: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. PROCEDURES: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  18. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, Jeroen F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338877169; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Derksen, Patrick W B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256054797; van Diest, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075281775; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. Procedures: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  19. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  20. Molecular MR imaging of fibrosis in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polášek, Miloslav; Yang, Y.; Schühle, D. T.; Yaseen, M. A.; Kim, Y. R.; Sung, Y. S.; Guimaraes, A. R.; Caravan, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Aug 14 (2017), č. článku 8114. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : fibrosis * molecular imaging * pancreatic cancer Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08838-6

  1. Precision medicine and molecular imaging: new targeted approaches toward cancer therapeutic and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mojtaba; Nabipour, Iraj; Omrani, Abdolmajid; Alipour, Zeinab; Assadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the importance and role of precision medicine and molecular imaging technologies in cancer diagnosis with therapeutics and diagnostics purposes. Precision medicine is progressively becoming a hot topic in all disciplines related to biomedical investigation and has the capacity to become the paradigm for clinical practice. The future of medicine lies in early diagnosis and individually appropriate treatments, a concept that has been named precision medicine, i.e. delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Molecular imaging is quickly being recognized as a tool with the potential to ameliorate every aspect of cancer treatment. On the other hand, emerging high-throughput technologies such as omics techniques and systems approaches have generated a paradigm shift for biological systems in advanced life science research. In this review, we describe the precision medicine, difference between precision medicine and personalized medicine, precision medicine initiative, systems biology/medicine approaches (such as genomics, radiogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics), P4 medicine, relationship between systems biology/medicine approaches and precision medicine, and molecular imaging modalities and their utility in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Accordingly, the precision medicine and molecular imaging will enable us to accelerate and improve cancer management in future medicine. PMID:28078184

  2. Translation of New Molecular Imaging Approaches to the Clinical Setting : Bridging the Gap to Implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Suzanne C; Venema, Clasina M; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Elias, Sjoerd G; Boellaard, Ronald; Hospers, Geke A.P.; Schröder, Carolina P; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging with PET is a rapidly emerging technique. In breast cancer patients, more than 45 different PET tracers have been or are presently being tested. With a good rationale, after development of the tracer and proven feasibility, it is of interest to evaluate whether there is a potential

  3. Click-Chemistry-Mediated Rapid Microbubble Capture for Acute Thrombus Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuantuan; Yuan, Chuxiao; Dai, Bingyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Mingxi; Feng, Zhenqiang; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Zhihong; Zhao, Ningwei; Gu, Ning; Yang, Fang

    2017-07-18

    Bioorthogonal coupling chemistry has been studied as a potentially advantageous approach for molecular imaging because it offers rapid, efficient, and strong binding, which might also benefit stability, production, and chemical conjugation. The inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction between a 1,2,4,5-tetrazine and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) is an example of a highly selective and rapid bioorthogonal coupling reaction that has been used successfully to prepare targeted molecular imaging probes. Here we report a fast, reliable, and highly sensitive approach, based on a two-step pretargeting bioorthogonal approach, to achieving activated-platelet-specific CD62p-targeted thrombus ultrasound molecular imaging. Tetrazine-modified microbubbles (tetra-MBs) could be uniquely and rapidly captured by subsequent click chemistry of thrombus tagged with a trans-cyclooctene-pretreated CD62p antibody. Moreover, such tetra-MBs showed great long-term stability under physiological conditions, thus offering the ability to monitor thrombus changes in real time. We demonstrated for the first time that a bioorthogonal targeting molecular ultrasound imaging strategy based on tetra-MBs could be a simple but powerful tool for rapid diagnosis of acute thrombosis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. New possibilities for molecular imaging and intervention in breast cancer and other female malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collarino, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The work described in this thesis shows new possibilities for molecular imaging in breast and vulvar cancer and demonstrates how to simultaneously encompass all current and future applications of nuclear medicine in female cancers. General introduction and outline of this thesis are reported in

  5. Biomolecular Imaging Mass Spectrometry : mapping molecular distributions in cells and tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altelaar, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) allows the investigation of both identity and localization of the molecular content directly from tissue sections, single cells and many other surfaces. To further develop the application of IMS, different approaches to IMS will be described in this thesis and the

  6. Mögliche Auswirkungen eines Brexit auf den deutschen Agrarhandel

    OpenAIRE

    Banse, Martin; Freund, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Als Folge des Brexit steht eine Neuausrichtung der Handelsbeziehungen zwischen dem Vereinigten Königreich mit der Europäischen Union ganz oben auf der politischen Agenda der britischen Regierung. Hiervon wären insbesondere auch die deutschen Agrar- und Nahrungsmittelmärkte betroffen, für die das Vereinigte Königreich (VK) einen bedeutsamen Handelspartner darstellt. Um die möglichen Auswirkungen eines Brexit auf die deutsche Agrar- und Nahrungsmittelindustrie abzuschätzen, wurde in dieser Stud...

  7. Target definition in salvage radiotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer: the role of advanced molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël eAmzalag

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvage radiotherapy (SRT represents the main treatment option for relapsing prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy (RP. Several open questions remain unanswered in terms of target volumes definition and delivered doses for SRT: the effective dose necessary to achieve biochemical control in the SRT setting may be different if the tumor recurrence is micro- or macroscopic. At the same time, irradiation of the prostatic bed only or of the whole pelvis will depend on the localization of the recurrence, local or loco-regional. In the theragnostic imaging era, molecular imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET constitutes a useful tool for clinicians to define the site of the recurrence, the extent of disease and individualize salvage treatments. The best option currently available in clinical routine is the combination of radiolabelled choline PET imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, associating the nodal and distant metastases identification based on PET and the local assessment by MRI. A new generation of targeted tracers, namely prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, show promising results, with a contrast superior to choline imaging and a higher detection rate even for low prostate specific antigen levels; validation studies are ongoing. Finally, imaging targeting bone remodeling using whole body SPECT-CT is a relevant complement to molecular/metabolic PET imaging when bone involvement is suspected.

  8. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Dang, Dan; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2017-01-01

    The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface) was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed. PMID:28117741

  9. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Dang, Dan; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2017-01-22

    The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface) was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed.

  10. Pushing the sensitivity envelope of lanthanide-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for molecular imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aime, Silvio; Castelli, Daniela Delli; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Gianolio, Eliana; Terreno, Enzo

    2009-07-21

    Contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arises from changes in the intensity of the proton signal of water between voxels (essentially, the 3D counterpart of pixels). Differences in intervoxel intensity can be significantly enhanced with chemicals that alter the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) intensity of the imaged spins; this alteration can occur by various mechanisms. Paramagnetic lanthanide(III) complexes are used in two major classes of MRI contrast agent: the well-established class of Gd-based agents and the emerging class of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents. A Gd-based complex increases water signal by enhancing the longitudinal relaxation rate of water protons, whereas CEST agents decrease water signal as a consequence of the transfer of saturated magnetization from the exchangeable protons of the agent. In this Account, we survey recent progress in both areas, focusing on how MRI is becoming a more competitive choice among the various molecular imaging methods. Compared with other imaging modalities, MRI is set apart by its superb anatomical resolution; however, its success in molecular imaging suffers because of its intrinsic insensitivity. A relatively high concentration of molecular agents (0.01-0.1 mM) is necessary to produce a local alteration in the water signal intensity. Unfortunately, the most desirable molecules for visualization in molecular imaging are present at much lower concentrations, in the nano- or picomolar range. Therefore, augmenting the sensitivity of MRI agents is key to the development of MR-based molecular imaging applications. In principle, this task can be tackled either by increasing the sensitivity of the reporting units, through the optimization of their structural and dynamic properties, or by setting up proper amplification strategies that allow the accumulation of a huge number of imaging reporters at the site of interest. For Gd-based agents, high sensitivities can be attained by exploiting a

  11. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  12. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo.

  13. Biomedical applications of functionalized hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles: focusing on molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2013-12-01

    Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs), with a large cavity inside each original mesoporous silica nanoparticle, have recently gained increasing interest owing to their tremendous potential for cancer imaging and therapy. The last several years have witnessed a rapid development in the engineering of functionalized HMSNs (i.e., f-HMSNs), with various types of inorganic functional nanocrystals integrated into the system for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this article, we summarize the recent progress in the design and biological applications of f-HMSNs, with a special emphasis on molecular imaging. Commonly used synthetic strategies for the generation of high quality HMSNs will be discussed in detail, followed by a systematic review of engineered f-HMSNs for optical, PET, MRI and ultrasound imaging in preclinical studies. Finally, we discuss the challenges and future research directions regarding the use of f-HMSNs for cancer imaging and therapy.

  14. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guanglei, E-mail: guangleizhang@bjtu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Computer and Information Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Wei [China Institute of Sport Science, Beijing 100061 (China); Luo, Jianwen, E-mail: luo-jianwen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-23

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  15. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, James, E-mail: james.bowsher@duke.edu; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yan, Susu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Roper, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  16. Der westliche Blick auf den Orient The Western Gaze on the Orient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Schrupp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Angesichts der aktuellen Debatten über den Islam zeigen Christina von Braun und Bettina Mathes die viele Jahrhunderte alte Interpretationsgeschichte des Orients aus westlicher Perspektive auf. In ihrem materialreichen Band schildern sie die historische und geografische Vielfalt des Phänomens „Islam“ und zeigen, wie westliches Selbstverständnis und Projektionen das Bild des Okzidents vom Orient seit langem und bis heute prägen – auch da, wo man es auf den ersten Blick nicht vermuten würde.In the face of current debates on the subject of Islam, Christina von Braun and Bettina Mathes point to the centuries-old history of interpreting the orient from the western perspective. The material-rich volume sketches the historical and geographical diversity of the phenomenon of “Islam,” showing how the western world has long taken for granted their projection of an image of the occidental orient and how these images persist, even where they might be least expected.

  17. Next Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH- 14-1-0192 TITLE: Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer...DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue

  18. Disease-Specific Target Gene Expression Profiling of Molecular Imaging Probes: Database Development and Clinical Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Wing-Chi Chan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging probes can target abnormal gene expression patterns in patients and allow early diagnosis of disease. For selecting a suitable imaging probe, the current Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD provides descriptive and qualitative information on imaging probe characteristics and properties. However, MICAD does not support linkage with the expression profiles of target genes. The proposed Disease-specific Imaging Probe Profiling (DIPP database quantitatively archives and presents the gene expression profiles of targets across different diseases, anatomic regions, and subcellular locations, providing an objective reference for selecting imaging probes. The DIPP database was validated with a clinical positron emission tomography (PET study on lung cancer and an in vitro study on neuroendocrine cancer. The retrieved records show that choline kinase beta and glucose transporters were positively and significantly associated with lung cancer among the targets of 11C-choline and [18F]fluoro-2- deoxy-2-D-glucose (FDG, respectively. Their significant overexpressions corresponded to the findings that the uptake rate of FDG increased with tumor size but that of 11C-choline remained constant. Validated with the in vitro study, the expression profiles of disease-associated targets can indicate the eligibility of patients for clinical trials of the treatment probe. A Web search tool of the DIPP database is available at http://www.polyu.edu.hk/bmi/dipp/.

  19. Illuminating necrosis: From mechanistic exploration to preclinical application using fluorescence molecular imaging with indocyanine green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Wang, Kun; Zeng, Chaoting; Chi, Chongwei; Shang, Wenting; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Fan, Yingfang; Yang, Jian; Xiang, Nan; Zeng, Ning; Zhu, Wen; Fang, Chihua; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Tissue necrosis commonly accompanies the development of a wide range of serious diseases. Therefore, highly sensitive detection and precise boundary delineation of necrotic tissue via effective imaging techniques are crucial for clinical treatments; however, no imaging modalities have achieved satisfactory results to date. Although fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) shows potential in this regard, no effective necrosis-avid fluorescent probe has been developed for clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that indocyanine green (ICG) can achieve high avidity of necrotic tissue owing to its interaction with lipoprotein (LP) and phospholipids. The mechanism was explored at the cellular and molecular levels through a series of in vitro studies. Detection of necrotic tissue and real-time image-guided surgery were successfully achieved in different organs of different animal models with the help of FMI using in house-designed imaging devices. The results indicated that necrotic tissue with a 0.6 mm diameter could be effectively detected with precise boundary definition. We believe that the new discovery and the associated imaging techniques will improve personalized and precise surgery in the near future. PMID:26864116

  20. Differential diagnosis of lung carcinoma with three-dimensional quantitative molecular vibrational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Hammoudi, Ahmad A.; Li, Fuhai; Thrall, Michael J.; Cagle, Philip T.; Chen, Yuanxin; Yang, Jian; Xia, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yubo; Massoud, Yehia; Wang, Zhiyong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2012-06-01

    The advent of molecularly targeted therapies requires effective identification of the various cell types of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Currently, cell type diagnosis is performed using small biopsies or cytology specimens that are often insufficient for molecular testing after morphologic analysis. Thus, the ability to rapidly recognize different cancer cell types, with minimal tissue consumption, would accelerate diagnosis and preserve tissue samples for subsequent molecular testing in targeted therapy. We report a label-free molecular vibrational imaging framework enabling three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition and quantitative analysis of cellular structures for identification of NSCLC cell types. This diagnostic imaging system employs superpixel-based 3-D nuclear segmentation for extracting such disease-related features as nuclear shape, volume, and cell-cell distance. These features are used to characterize cancer cell types using machine learning. Using fresh unstained tissue samples derived from cell lines grown in a mouse model, the platform showed greater than 97% accuracy for diagnosis of NSCLC cell types within a few minutes. As an adjunct to subsequent histology tests, our novel system would allow fast delineation of cancer cell types with minimum tissue consumption, potentially facilitating on-the-spot diagnosis, while preserving specimens for additional tests. Furthermore, 3-D measurements of cellular structure permit evaluation closer to the native state of cells, creating an alternative to traditional 2-D histology specimen evaluation, potentially increasing accuracy in diagnosing cell type of lung carcinomas.

  1. Molecular imaging of tumor invasion and metastases: the role of MRI†

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Thomas E.; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Turkbey, Baris; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2012-01-01

    The processes of tumor invasion and metastasis have been well characterized at the molecular level, and numerous biomarkers of tumor aggressiveness have been discovered. Molecular imaging offers the opportunity to depict specific cell markers relevant to tumor aggressiveness. Here, we describe the role of MRI in identifying tumor invasiveness and metastasis with reference to other methods. Target-specific molecular imaging probes for tumor invasiveness have been developed for positron emission tomography and optical imaging, but progress in MRI has been slower. For example, proteases associated with tumor invasion, such as specific matrix metalloproteinases or cathepsins, can be targeted in vivo using optical and positron emission tomography methods, but have not yet been successful with MRI. In addition, we describe the use of MRI to detect metastases. Novel MR contrast agents based on iron oxide and dendrimer nanomaterials allow for better characterization of tumor metastases. Organ-specific MR contrast agents are used to identify metastatic disease in the liver. Finally, diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI is discussed as an alternative offered by MRI that does not require the use of molecular probes to screen distant metastases. PMID:21793070

  2. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Cheol Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term “theranostics” was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging.

  3. Bioengineered probes for molecular magnetic resonance imaging in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Vivian; Jasanoff, Alan

    2012-08-15

    The development of molecular imaging probes has changed the nature of neurobiological research. Some of the most notable successes have involved the use of biological engineering techniques for the creation of fluorescent protein derivatives for optical imaging, but recent work has also led to a number of bioengineered probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the preeminent technique for noninvasive investigation of brain structure and function. Molecular MRI agents are beginning to be applied for experiments in the nervous system, where they have the potential to bridge from molecular to systems or organismic levels of analysis. Compared with canonical synthetic small molecule agents, biomolecular or semibiosynthetic MRI contrast agents offer special advantages due to their amenability to molecular engineering approaches, their properties in some cases as catalysts, and their specificity in targeting and ligand binding. Here, we discuss an expanding list of instances where biological engineering techniques have aided in the design of MRI contrast agents and reporter systems, examining both advantages and limitations of these types of probes for studies in the central nervous system.

  4. Nährwertkennzeichnung und ihr Einfluss auf das Verbraucherverhalten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Storcksdieck, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    , die an prominenter Stelle auf der Vorderseite der Verpackung angebracht werden. Neuere Forschung zeigt, dass die meisten Verbraucher in der Lage sind, solche Informationen korrekt zu verarbeiten, dass aber nur eine Minderheit der Verbraucher dies im Geschäft auch tut. Die entscheidende Frage der...

  5. "Jung sein heißt, auf der Spur sein ..."

    OpenAIRE

    Lämmermann, Godwin

    1987-01-01

    "Jung sein heißt, auf der Spur sein ..." : Beobachtungen zu empir. Unters. über d. Beziehung d. Jugend zu Religion u. Kirche. - In: Jugend in der Kirche zur Sprache bringen / Godwin Lämmermann ... (Hrsg.) - München : Kaiser, 1987. - S. 111-124

  6. Technological advances in Preclinical Molecular Imaging; Avances tecnológicos en Imagen Molecular Preclínica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña-Zalbidea, S.; Vaquero, J.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular imaging is undergoing an intense activity, mainly due to the availability of new detection and image reconstruction technologies, which in recent years have improved significantly both the resolution and sensitivity of these methods. The greatest potential for innovation comes from multimodality imaging, which combines information from more than one imaging technique and exploits the synergies between them. The main arguments in favour of these devices are the possibility of performing intrinsically registered scans in a minimum time and without moving the animal. Currently, the combination of PET and MRI as a hybrid imaging modality is receiving great attention and although its potential is clear, as it was with the PET/CT, this technology will have to overcome certain limitations and demonstrate its value for different applications. [Spanish] La imagen molecular es un área de investigación muy activa acelerada en los últimos años por la disponibilidad de nuevas tecnologías de detección y reconstrucción de imágenes. Estas innovaciones han permitido mejorar considerablemente tanto la resolución como la sensibilidad de las imágenes obtenidas sobre modelos preclínicos desarrollados en pequeños animales (ratón y rata principalmente). El mayor potencial de esta tecnología proviene de la imagen multimodalidad, que combina información de más de una técnica de imagen y explota las posibles sinergias entre ellas al integrar en una sola imagen “forma y función”. Los principales argumentos a favor de estos dispositivos multimodales son la posibilidad de hacer las exploraciones intrínsecamente registradas en un tiempo reducido, y sin necesidad de mover el animal entre diferentes equipos. De todas las posibles combinaciones la que está reclamando más la atención últimamente es la PET/IRM (tomografía por emisión de positrones e imagen de resonancia magnética), aunque de momento la PET/CT (tomografía por emisión de positrones y tomograf

  7. Development of new Molecular Imaging probes; Desarrollo de nuevas sondas de Imagen Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Vallejo, V.; Baz, Z.; Llop, J.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) are essential tools for the early diagnose of certain pathologies, and have been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of disease, the visualization of biological and physiological phenomena and in the process of drug development. PET and SPECT require the administration of a radiotracer (compound labelled with a radioactive nuclide) to the subject under investigation (patient, healthy volunteer or experimental animal). Due to their high sensitivity and their noninvasive nature, nuclear imaging techniques have a great potential. However, only a few radiotracers are currently routinely used in clinical diagnose. In contrast, new tracers suitable for the visualization of new targets or showing improved specificity, selectivity or pharmacokinetic properties are continuously designed, synthesized and assayed in the preclinical setting. Far from performing an exhaustive revision of the new radiotracers currently under development, this paper aims to collate recent advances related to the preparation of novel nuclear imaging probes, which have a significant scientific impact in terms of literature volume, and which could be translated to the clinical environment in the near future. First, peptides and nanoparticles (NPs) are discussed. Finally, antibody derivatives and the recently developed pretargeting strategy, which enables the visualization of tumours while lowering significantly the effective dose posed on the subject under investigation, will be briefly covered. [Spanish] Las técnicas de imagen nuclear, entre las que se encuentran la tomografía por emisión de positrones (PET) y la tomografía por emisión de fotón único (SPECT) son herramientas fundamentales no sólo en el entorno clínico diagnóstico, sino también para el estudio mecanístico de determinadas patologías, la visualización de procesos biol

  8. MDM2 Molecular Imaging for the Prediction of Chemotherapeutic Sensitivity in Human Breast Cancer Xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible use of mouse double-minute 2 (MDM2 molecular imaging to predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity in breast cancer xenografts (BCXs. MCF-7 cells were transfected with MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs, and MDM2 expression levels were determined by Western blotting. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in MCF-7 cells transfected with ASONs and treated with paclitaxel. BCXs were established in nude mice by injection of ASONs, and tumor volumes were measured after paclitaxel treatment. MDM2 ASONs were labeled with 99mTc to generate an MDM2 molecular probe, and MDM2 expression levels were evaluated by imaging and Western blotting. MDM2 ASONs downregulated MDM2 expression in a dose-dependent manner and increased the rate of paclitaxel-induced cell growth inhibition. Imaging of tumors revealed significant differences in the tumor to skeletal muscle (T/M ratio between groups. Tumor MDM2 protein expression was correlated with T/M ratios at 4 hours (R = .880 and 10 hours (R = .886. The effect of paclitaxel varied among nude mice bearing BCXs with different concentrations of ASONs, as shown by differences in tumor growth. MDM2 molecular imaging could be a promising method for predicting the sensitivity of BCXs to chemotherapy.

  9. Molecular imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors in graft arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiasheng; Razavian, Mahmoud; Tavakoli, Sina; Nie, Lei; Tellides, George; Backer, Joseph M; Backer, Marina V; Bender, Jeffrey R; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2012-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling plays a key role in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, including graft arteriosclerosis. Graft arteriosclerosis is the major cause of late organ failure in cardiac transplantation. We used molecular near-infrared fluorescent imaging with an engineered Cy5.5-labeled single-chain VEGF tracer (scVEGF/Cy) to detect VEGF receptors and vascular remodeling in human coronary artery grafts by molecular imaging. VEGF receptor specificity of probe uptake was shown by flow cytometry in endothelial cells. In severe combined immunodeficiency mice, transplantation of human coronary artery segments into the aorta followed by adoptive transfer of allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells led to significant neointima formation in the grafts over a period of 4 weeks. Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of transplant recipients at 4 weeks demonstrated focal uptake of scVEGF/Cy in remodeling artery grafts. Uptake specificity was demonstrated using an inactive homolog of scVEGF/Cy. scVEGF/Cy uptake predominantly localized in the neointima of remodeling coronary arteries and correlated with VEGF receptor-1 but not VEGF receptor-2 expression. There was a significant correlation between scVEGF/Cy uptake and transplanted artery neointima area. Molecular imaging of VEGF receptors may provide a noninvasive tool for detection of graft arteriosclerosis in solid organ transplantation.

  10. Ultrasound molecular imaging of secreted frizzled related protein-2 expression in murine angiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Tsuruta

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma is a biologically aggressive vascular malignancy with a high metastatic potential. In the era of targeted medicine, knowledge of specific molecular tumor characteristics has become more important. Molecular imaging using targeted ultrasound contrast agents can monitor tumor progression non-invasively. Secreted frizzled related protein 2 (SFRP2 is a tumor endothelial marker expressed in angiosarcoma. We hypothesize that SFRP2-directed imaging could be a novel approach to imaging the tumor vasculature. To develop an SFRP2 contrast agent, SFRP2 polyclonal antibody was biotinylated and incubated with streptavidin-coated microbubbles. SVR angiosarcoma cells were injected into nude mice, and when tumors were established the mice were injected intravenously with the SFRP2 -targeted contrast agent, or a control streptavidin-coated contrast agent. SFRP2 -targeted contrast agent detected tumor vasculature with significantly more signal intensity than control contrast agent: the normalized fold-change was 1.6 ± 0.27 (n = 13, p = 0.0032. The kidney was largely devoid of echogenicity with no significant difference between the control contrast agent and the SFRP2-targeted contrast agent demonstrating that the SFRP2-targeted contrast agent was specific to tumor vessels. Plotting average pixel intensity obtained from SFRP2-targeted contrast agent against tumor volume showed that the average pixel intensity increased as tumor volume increased. In conclusion, molecularly-targeted imaging of SFRP2 visualizes angiosarcoma vessels, but not normal vessels, and intensity increases with tumor size. Molecular imaging of SFRP2 expression may provide a rapid, non-invasive method to monitor tumor regression during therapy for angiosarcoma and other SFRP2 expressing cancers, and contribute to our understanding of the biology of SFRP2 during tumor development and progression.

  11. Imaging mass spectrometry: Molecular microscopy for the new age of biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry provides a powerful tool for monitoring and discovery of molecular processes in the spatial domain in tissues for research and practical applications in both biology and medicine. This technology directly measures molecular compounds in tissues without the use of target-specific reagents such as antibodies, is applicable to a wide variety of analytes, and can provide spatial resolutions below the single cell level. Importantly, it has paradigm shifting capabilities in clinical applications, especially for anatomic pathology. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  13. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-04-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  14. Assessment of clinical image quality in feline chest radiography with a needle-image plate (NIP) storage phosphor system. An approach to the evaluation of image quality in neonatal radiography; Untersuchungen zur Qualitaet von Thoraxaufnahmen bei Katzen mit einem auf einer Nadelstruktur basierenden Speicherfoliensystem. Modelluntersuchungen zur Bewertung der Bildqualitaet bei Neugeborenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, E.; Bosch, B.; Gaebler, K.; Succow, D.; Werrmann, A. [Klinik fuer Kleintiere, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Hirsch, W.; Sorge, I. [Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Gosch, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Is the image quality of thoracic radiographs of cats obtained with a needle-based storage phosphor (NIP) system superior to conventional (PIP) storage phosphor radiography? Is it possible to decrease the mAs by 50% with the NIP system without significant loss of information? Materials and Methods: From each of the 20 animals, three lateral radiographs were acquired. The assessment of the exposure level was based on the generated IgM-values. Images were acquired 1. with the NIP system and exposure settings equivalent to an IgM of 1.9, 2. with the PIP system and identical settings, and 3. with the NIP system and 50% of the mAs. Six blinded readers used a 5-step scale to assess the reproducibility of five anatomical structures and image noise sensation. Data were analysed using Visual Grading Characteristics Analysis (VGC). Results: While applying identical exposure values the NIP system for all features revealed superior ratings to those of the PIP system (AUC{sub VGC} values ranged from 0.81 for ''cardiac silhouette'' to 0.92 for ''trachea''). Even when reducing mAs by 50% in the NIP images all features were rated better compared with the PIP images and original settings (AUC{sub VGC} values ranged from 0.60 for ''cardiac silhouette'' to 0.74 for ''trachea'' and ''caudal thoracic field''). Conclusion: The NIP system demonstrates clearly better image quality compared to the reference PIP system. A dose reduction of 50% seems to be possible without relevant detraction from image quality. The results obtained in the animal model are valid for simulating conditions in neonatal radiological practise. (orig.)

  15. Justifying molecular images in cell biology textbooks: From constructions to primary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpente, Norberto

    2016-02-01

    For scientific claims to be reliable and productive they have to be justified. However, on the one hand little is known on what justification precisely means to scientists, and on the other the position held by philosophers of science on what it entails is rather limited; for justifications customarily refer to the written form (textual expressions) of scientific claims, leaving aside images, which, as many cases from the history of science show are relevant to this process. The fact that images can visually express scientific claims independently from text, plus their vast variety and origins, requires an assessment of the way they are currently justified and in turn used as sources to justify scientific claims in the case of particular scientific fields. Similarly, in view of the different nature of images, analysis is required to determine on what side of the philosophical distinction between data and phenomena these different kinds of images fall. This paper historicizes and documents a particular aspect of contemporary life sciences research: the use of the molecular image as vehicle of knowledge production in cell studies, a field that has undergone a significant shift in visual expressions from the early 1980s onwards. Focussing on textbooks as sources that have been overlooked in the historiography of contemporary biomedicine, the aim is to explore (1) whether the shift of cell studies, entailing a superseding of the optical image traditionally conceptualised as primary data, by the molecular image, corresponds with a shift of justificatory practices, and (2) to assess the role of the molecular image as primary data. This paper also explores the dual role of images as teaching resources and as resources for the construction of knowledge in cell studies especially in its relation to discovery and justification. Finally, this paper seeks to stimulate reflection on what kind of archival resources could benefit the work of present and future epistemic

  16. Optical Molecular Imaging of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression to Improve Detection of Oral Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Nitin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of noninvasive molecular imaging approaches has the potential to improve management of cancer. Methods: In this study, we demonstrate the potential of noninvasive topical delivery of an epidermal growth factor-Alexa 647 (EGF-Alexa 647 conjugate to image changes in epidermal growth factor receptor expression associated with oral neoplasia. We report a series of preclinical analyses to evaluate the optical contrast achieved after topical delivery of EGF-Alexa 647 in a variety of model systems, including cells, three-dimensional tissue cultures, and intact human tissue specimens using wide-field and high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Data were collected from 17 different oral cancer patients: eight pairs of normal and abnormal biopsies and nine resected tumors were examined. Results: The EGF-dye conjugate can be uniformly delivered throughout the oral epithelium with a penetration depth exceeding 500 µm and incubation time of less than 30 minutes. After EGF-Alexa 647 incubation, the presence of oral neoplasia is associated with a 1.5- to 6.9-fold increase in fluorescence contrast compared with grossly normal mucosa from the same patient with both wide-field and high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Conclusions: Results illustrate the potential of EGF-targeted fluorescent agents for in vivo molecular imaging, a technique that may aid in the diagnosis and characterization of oral neoplasia and allow real-time detection of tumor margins.

  17. Enhanced imaging resolution in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography by multispectral excitation method (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) is a promising method for the quantitative evaluation of the metabolic process of fluorescent agents in body. However, the resolution is limited due to the ill-posed nature of fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and the high absorption and scattering of the fluorescent light in biological tissues. In this paper, the resolution of DFMT is improved by multispectral excitation method. Firstly, the imaged object with varied fluorescent concentrations at different time points is excited by several excitation lights with different wavelengths, and the fluorescent images are collected. Secondly, the individual FMT images at different time points are respectively reconstructed, and independent component analysis (ICA) is employed to decompose the fluorescent targets. The independent components (ICs) and corresponding spectrum courses (SCs) which obtained from ICA represent the spatial structures and spectral variations of the fluorescent targets, respectively. Thirdly, the ICs and SCs are combined to quantitatively recover the concentrations of individual fluorescent targets. Finally, the metabolic parameters and DFMT images are obtained by fitting the FMT images of each fluorescent targets at different time points into a two compartment model. Numerical simulations are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the resolution of DFMT is significantly improved. The metabolic curves can be correctly recovered even when the edge-edge-distance of the fluorescent targets is less than 0.1 cm.

  18. A tale of two photons: radioluminescence and its application in molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratx, Guillem

    2017-02-01

    Optical and ionizing radiation are two physical ways in which we can probe the living world. Until recently, these forms of radiation were used in distinct imaging and therapeutic applications—radiation therapy, photodynamic therapy, X-ray imaging, and diffuse optical tomography, to name a few. It has now been recognized that physical phenomena in which ionizing radiation and light are inherently coupled may provide powerful new capabilities for imaging and treating diseases. This presentation will review the physics and applications of radioluminescence, with a particular focus on molecular imaging. One such method, X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), uses narrow kilovolt X-ray beams to stimulate optical emissions from biologically targeted radioluminescent nanoparticles, thus providing high-resolution images even deep in tissue. A different phenomenon, Cherenkov luminescence, can also be harnessed to localize radiopharmaceuticals in vivo, allowing surgeons to visualize the molecular status of the tissues they are resecting. Recent progress towards routine implantation of these methods will be reviewed and sources of endogenous radioluminescence signal will be discussed.

  19. Breaching Biological Barriers: Protein Translocation Domains as Tools for Molecular Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Franc

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of a cell presents a significant barrier for the delivery of many molecular imaging reagents into cells at target sites in the body. Protein translocation domains (PTDs are peptides that breach this barrier. Conjugation of PTDs to imaging agents can be utilized to facilitate the delivery of these agents through the cell wall, and in some cases, into the cell nucleus, and have potential for in vitro and in vivo applications. PTD imaging conjugates have included small molecules, peptides, proteins, DNA, metal chelates, and magnetic nanoparticles. The full potential of the use of PTDs in novel in vivo molecular probes is currently under investigation. Cells have been labeled in culture using magnetic nanoparticles derivatized with a PTD and monitored in vivo to assess trafficking patterns relative to cells expressing a target antigen. In vivo imaging of PTD-mediated gene transfer to cells of the skin has been demonstrated in living animals. Here we review several natural and synthetic PTDs that have evolved in the quest for easier translocation across biological barriers and the application of these peptide domains to in vivo delivery of imaging agents.

  20. Mapping Molecular Function to Biological Nanostructure: Combining Structured Illumination Microscopy with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (SIM + FLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Görlitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a new microscope integrating super-resolved imaging using structured illumination microscopy (SIM with wide-field optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM to provide optical mapping of molecular function and its correlation with biological nanostructure below the conventional diffraction limit. We illustrate this SIM + FLIM capability to map FRET readouts applied to the aggregation of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 in Cos 7 cells following ligand stimulation and to the compaction of DNA during the cell cycle.

  1. Single-molecule femtochemistry: molecular imaging at the space-time limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-01-28

    Through a combination of light and electron probes, it may be possible to record single-molecule dynamics with simultaneous sub-Ångstrom spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution. Single-molecule femtochemistry is becoming a realistic prospect through a melding of laser spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. The paper by Lee et al. in this issue of ACS Nano takes a significant step toward chemical imaging at the space-time limit of chemical processes. By imaging electroluminescence spectra of single porphyrin molecules with submolecular resolution, the authors extract the implicit femtosecond dynamics of the coupled electron orbital-molecular skeletal motion triggered by a reduction-oxidation scattering process.

  2. From protein-protein interaction to therapy response: Molecular imaging of heat shock proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Gang [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Rd, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484 (United States); Chen Xiaoyuan [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Rd, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484 (United States)], E-mail: shawchen@stanford.edu

    2009-05-15

    HSP70 promoter-driven gene therapy and inhibition of HSP90 activity with small molecule inhibitors are two shining points in a newly developed cohort of cancer treatment. For HSP70 promoters, high efficiency and heat inducibility within a localized region make it very attractive to clinical translation. The HSP90 inhibitors exhibit a broad spectrum of anticancer activities due to the downstream effects of HSP90 inhibition, which interfere with a wide range of signaling processes that are crucial for the malignant properties of cancer cells. In this review article, we summarize exciting applications of newly emerged molecular imaging techniques as they relate to HSP, including protein-protein interactions of HSP90 complexes, therapeutic response of tumors to HSP90 inhibitors, and HSP70 promoters-controlled gene therapy. In the HSPs context, molecular imaging is expected to play a vital role in promoting drug development and advancing individualized medicine.

  3. Image-charge-induced localization of molecular orbitals at metal-molecule interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, M.; Thygesen, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    -conjugated molecular wire in contact with a metal surface. We find that image charge effects pull the frontier molecular orbitals toward the metal surface, while orbitals with higher or lower energy are pushed away. This affects both the size of the energetic image charge shifts and the coupling of the individual......Quasiparticle (QP) wave functions, also known as Dyson orbitals, extend the concept of single-particle states to interacting electron systems. Here we employ many-body perturbation theory in the GW approximation to calculate the QP wave functions for a semiempirical model describing a pi...... orbitals to the metal substrate. Full diagonalization of the QP equation and, to some extent, self-consistency in the GW self-energy, is important to describe the effect, which is not captured by standard density functional theory or Hartree-Fock. These results should be important for the understanding...

  4. The Changing Face of Vascular Interventional Radiology: The Future Role of Pharmacotherapies and Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, Charles R., E-mail: crtapping@doctors.org.uk; Bratby, Mark J., E-mail: mark.bratby@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals, John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    Interventional radiology has had to evolve constantly because there is the ever-present competition and threat from other specialties within medicine, surgery, and research. The development of new technologies, techniques, and therapies is vital to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and to ensure its continued success in the future. In part, this change will be due to improved chronic disease prevention altering what we treat and in whom. The most important of these strategies are the therapeutic use of statins, Beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and substances that interfere with mast cell degeneration. Molecular imaging and therapeutic strategies will move away from conventional techniques and nano and microparticle molecular technology, tissue factor imaging, gene therapy, endothelial progenitor cells, and photodynamic therapy will become an important part of interventional radiology of the future. This review looks at these new and exciting technologies.

  5. Metal-Organic Framework-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery and Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wen; Chu, Cheng-Chao; Liu, Gang; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J

    2015-10-07

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are a unique class of hybrid porous materials built from metal ions and organic linkers, have attracted significant research interest in recent years. Compared with conventional porous materials, MOFs exhibit a variety of advantages, including a large surface area, a tunable pore size and shape, an adjustable composition and structure, biodegradability, and versatile functionalities, which enable MOFs to perform as promising platforms for drug delivery, molecular imaging, and theranostic applications. In this article, the recent research progress related to nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) is summarized with a focus on synthesis strategies and drug delivery, molecular imaging, and theranostic applications. The future challenges and opportunities of NMOFs are also discussed in the context of translational medical research. More effort is warranted to develop clinically translatable NMOFs for various applications in nanomedicine. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Harnessing Integrative Omics to Facilitate Molecular Imaging of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Martin; de Boer, H. Rudolf; Hooge, Marjolijn N. Lub-de; van Vugt, Marcel A.T.M.; de Vries, Elisabeth G.E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a growing problem worldwide. The cause of death in cancer patients is often due to treatment-resistant metastatic disease. Many molecularly targeted anticancer drugs have been developed against 'oncogenic driver' pathways. However, these treatments are usually only effective in properly selected patients. Resistance to molecularly targeted drugs through selective pressure on acquired mutations or molecular rewiring can hinder their effectiveness. This review summarizes how molecular imaging techniques can potentially facilitate the optimal implementation of targeted agents. Using the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family as a model in (pre)clinical studies, we illustrate how molecular imaging may be employed to characterize whole body target expression as well as monitor drug effectiveness and the emergence of tumor resistance. We further discuss how an integrative omics discovery platform could guide the selection of 'effect sensors' - new molecular imaging targets - which are dynamic markers that indicate treatment effectiveness or resistance. PMID:28638489

  7. Magnetic resonance-coupled fluorescence tomography scanner for molecular imaging of tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott C; Pogue, Brian W; Springett, Roger; Leussler, Christoph; Mazurkewitz, Peter; Tuttle, Stephen B; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L; Jiang, Shudong S; Dehghani, Hamid; Paulsen, Keith D

    2008-06-01

    A multichannel spectrally resolved optical tomography system to image molecular targets in small animals from within a clinical MRI is described. Long source/detector fibers operate in contact mode and couple light from the tissue surface in the magnet bore to 16 spectrometers, each containing two optical gratings optimized for the near infrared wavelength range. High sensitivity, cooled charge coupled devices connected to each spectrograph provide detection of the spectrally resolved signal, with exposure times that are automated for acquisition at each fiber. The design allows spectral fitting of the remission light, thereby separating the fluorescence signal from the nonspecific background, which improves the accuracy and sensitivity when imaging low fluorophore concentrations. Images of fluorescence yield are recovered using a nonlinear reconstruction approach based on the diffusion approximation of photon propagation in tissue. The tissue morphology derived from the MR images serves as an imaging template to guide the optical reconstruction algorithm. Sensitivity studies show that recovered values of indocyanine green fluorescence yield are linear to concentrations of 1 nM in a 70 mm diameter homogeneous phantom, and detection is feasible to near 10 pM. Phantom data also demonstrate imaging capabilities of imperfect fluorophore uptake in tissue volumes of clinically relevant sizes. A unique rodent MR coil provides optical fiber access for simultaneous optical and MR data acquisition of small animals. A pilot murine study using an orthotopic glioma tumor model demonstrates optical-MRI imaging of an epidermal growth factor receptor targeted fluorescent probe in vivo.

  8. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Li; Dan Dang; Lianqing Liu; Ning Xi; Yuechao Wang

    2017-01-01

    The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used ...

  9. Pediatric radiological diagnostics in suspected child abuse; Kinderradiologische Diagnostik bei Verdacht auf Kindesmisshandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfurt, C.; Schmidt, U. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Rechtsmedizin, Medizinische Fakultaet, Dresden (Germany); Hahn, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Abteilung Kinderradiologie, Institut und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Dresden (Germany); Roesner, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinderchirurgie, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Advanced and specialized radiological diagnostics are essential in the case of clinical suspicion of pediatric injuries to the head, thorax, abdomen, and extremities when there is no case history or when ''battered child syndrome'' is assumed on the basis of inadequate trauma. In particular, the aim of this sophisticated diagnostic procedure is the detection of lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) in order to initiate prompt medical treatment. If diagnostic imaging shows typical findings of child abuse, accurate documented evidence of the diagnostic results is required to prevent further endangerment of the child's welfare. (orig.) [German] Klinisch diagnostizierte Verletzungen an Kopf, Thorax, Abdomen oder Extremitaeten eines Kindes bei scheinbar leerer Anamnese oder Angabe eines inadaequaten Traumas erfordern beim Verdacht auf ein Battered-Child-Syndrom eine erweiterte und spezialisierte radiologische Diagnostik. Diese soll insbesondere im Bereich des ZNS Verletzungsfolgen erfassen, um therapeutische Massnahmen einleiten zu koennen. Bei typischen, auf eine Misshandlung hinweisenden radiologischen Befunden ist eine praezise beweissichere Befunddokumentation erforderlich, um eine weitere Kindeswohlgefaehrdung zu vermeiden. (orig.)

  10. The Transferrin Receptor: A Potential Molecular Imaging Marker for Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Högemann-Savellano

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of differences between the molecular properties of cancer and normal tissue has the potential to enhance the detection of tumors. Because overexpression of endogenous transferrin receptor (TfR has been qualitatively described for various cancers and is presumably due to malignant transformation of cells, TfR may represent a suitable target for application of molecular imaging technologies to increase detection of smaller tumors. In the work reported here, investigation into the biology of this receptor using electron microscopy has demonstrated that iron oxide particles targeted to TfR are internalized and accumulate in lysosomal vesicles within cells. Biochemical analysis of the interaction of imaging probes with cells overexpressing the TfR demonstrated that the extent of accumulation, and therefore probe efficacy, is dependent on the nature of the chemical cross-link between transferrin and the iron oxide particle. These data were utilized to design and synthesize an improved imaging probe. Experiments demonstrate that the novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI probe is sensitive enough to detect small differences in endogenous TfR expression in human cancer cell lines. Quantitative measurement of TfR overexpression in a panel of 27 human breast cancer patients demonstrated that 74% of patient cancer tissues overexpressed the TfR and that the sensitivity of the new imaging agent was suitable to detect TfR overexpression in greater than 40% of these cases. Based on a biochemical and cell biological approach, these studies have resulted in the synthesis and development of an improved MRI probe with the best in vitro and in vivo imaging properties reported to date.

  11. Multimodal chemical imaging of molecular messengers in emerging Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nameera F; Dunham, Sage J B; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Shrout, Joshua D; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Bohn, Paul W

    2015-10-07

    Two label-free molecular imaging techniques, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), are combined for in situ characterization of the spatiotemporal distributions of quinolone metabolites and signaling molecules in communities of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Dramatic molecular differences are observed between planktonic and biofilm modes of growth for these bacteria. We observe patterned aggregation and a high abundance of N-oxide quinolines in early biofilms and swarm zones of P. aeruginosa, while the concentrations of these secreted components in planktonic cells and agar plate colonies are below CRM and SIMS detection limits. CRM, in conjunction with principal component analysis (PCA) is used to distinguish between the two co-localized isomeric analyte pairs 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO)/2-heptyl-3-hydroxyquinolone (PQS) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonylquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO)/2-nonyl-hydroxyquinolone (C9-PQS) based on differences in their vibrational fingerprints, illustrating how the technique can be used to guide tandem-MS and tandem-MS imaging analysis. Because N-oxide quinolines are ubiquitous and expressed early in biofilms, these analytes may be fundamentally important for early biofilm formation and the growth and organization of P. aeruginosa microbial communities. This study underscores the advantages of using multimodal molecular imaging to study complex biological systems.

  12. Imaging and measuring the molecular force of lymphoma pathological cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a new technology to visualize the cellular topography and quantify the molecular interactions at nanometer spatial resolution. In this work, AFM was used to image the cellular topography and measure the molecular force of pathological cells from B-cell lymphoma patients. After the fluorescence staining, cancer cells were recognized by their special morphological features and then the detailed topography was visualized by AFM imaging. The AFM images showed that cancer cells were much rougher than healthy cells. CD20 is a surface marker of B cells and rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. To measure the CD20-rituximab interaction forces, the polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker was used to link rituximab onto the AFM tip and the verification experiments of the functionalized probe indicated that rituximab molecules were successfully linked onto the AFM tip. The CD20-rituximab interaction forces were measured on about 20 pathological cells and the force measurement results indicated the CD20-rituximab binding forces were mainly in the range of 110-120 pN and 130-140 pN. These results can improve our understanding of the topography and molecular force of lymphoma pathological cells. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Association Between Imaging Characteristics and Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingxiang; Ma, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer can be divided into four major molecular subtypes based on the expression of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HER2 status, and molecular proliferation rate (Ki67). In this study, we sought to investigate the association between breast cancer subtype and radiological findings in the Chinese population. Medical records of 300 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database: the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The imaging characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. The molecular subtypes of breast cancer were classified into four types: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 overexpressed (HER2), and basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between the subtype (dependent variable) and mammography or 15 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators (independent variables). Luminal A and B subtypes were commonly associated with "clustered calcification distribution," "nipple invasion," or "skin invasion" (P cancers showed association with persistent enhancement in the delayed phase on MRI and "clustered calcification distribution" on mammography (P breast tumor, which are potentially useful tools in the diagnosis and subtyping of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MMP-13 In-Vivo Molecular Imaging Reveals Early Expression in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaün, Mathieu; Peng, Jing; Hensley, Harvey H.; Roder, Navid; Flieder, Douglas B.; Houlle-Crépin, Solène; Abramovici-Roels, Olivia; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Thiberville, Luc; Clapper, Margie L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and may serve as potential targets for the development of bioactivable probes for molecular imaging. Objective To characterize and monitor the activity of MMPs during the progression of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods K-rasLSL-G12D mice were imaged serially during the development of adenocarcinomas using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and a probe specific for MMP-2, -3, -9 and -13. Lung tumors were identified using FMT and MRI co-registration, and the probe concentration in each tumor was assessed at each time-point. The expression of Mmp2, -3, -9, -13 was quantified by qRT-PCR using RNA isolated from microdissected tumor cells. Immunohistochemical staining of overexpressed MMPs in animals was assessed on human lung tumors. Results In mice, 7 adenomas and 5 adenocarcinomas showed an increase in fluorescent signal on successive FMT scans, starting between weeks 4 and 8. qRT-PCR assays revealed significant overexpression of only Mmp-13 in mice lung tumors. In human tumors, a high MMP-13 immunostaining index was found in tumor cells from invasive lesions (24/27), but in none of the non-invasive (0/4) (p=0.001). Conclusion MMP-13 is detected in early pulmonary invasive adenocarcinomas and may be a potential target for molecular imaging of lung cancer. PMID:26193700

  15. Multiscale BerEp4 Molecular Imaging of Microtumor Phantoms: Toward Theranostics for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Dasgeb

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC, the most common cancer in humans, appears macroscopically and microscopically similar to many other skin lesions, which makes differential diagnosis difficult. We are developing an approach for quantitative molecular imaging of BerEP4, a transmembrane biomarker for BCC, with the goal of increasing the precision and accuracy of diagnosis. This pilot study was conducted to assess the affinity and selectivity of BerEp4 antibody and assess its possible use in designing theranostic probes for BCC. We provide evidence that our photon-counting fluorescence macrodetection system can recover specific signal increases from a film/pellet phantom. Additionally, we show that a two-photon excited fluorescence /backscatter confocal microscopy system can image BerEP4 antibody/antigen complex on the surface of BerEP4-expressing cancer cells in three dimensions. Based on the initial results, BerEP4 seems to be a promising biomarker for molecular imaging of BCC. To prepare BerEP4 for eventual theranostic use, we examined the feasibility of a combined macro-/micro-optical approach to imaging BCC with various histologies. These optical methods, endowed with the ability to monitor treatment in real time, may open an opportunity for noninvasive diagnosis, treatments, and follow-up.

  16. Farbe bekennen – Grüne Bibliotheken auf die Tagesordnung! Vortrag auf dem 103. Deutschen Bibliothekartag, Bremen, 5. Juni 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hauke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Was in vielen Ländern bereits im Alltag der Bibliotheken verankert ist, beginnt in Deutschland erst sehr zaghaft: Das Verantwortungsbewusstsein von Bibliotheken für die ökologische Bildung der Gesellschaft und die Konsequenzen daraus für die Bibliothekspraxis. Es ist höchste Zeit, in der deutschen Bibliothekslandschaft publik zu machen, was eine „Grüne Bibliothek“ sein kann – bezogen auf das Gebäude, die Ausstattung, das Management, die Services für die Nutzer. Anhand einer Checkliste wird gezeigt, wie Bibliotheken mit einem „grünen“ Konzept nicht nur selbst etwas für die ökologische Nachhaltigkeit tun können, sondern auch wie sie als Multiplikatoren in den Kommunen, Hochschulen und bei anderen Trägern Einfluss auf das ökologische Verhalten nehmen und damit einen wichtigen Beitrag für unsere Gesellschaft leisten. Bringing environmental awareness to libraries does not necessarily imply huge financial efforts or a big budget. Ecological sustainability is an undervalued aspect of the marketing strategy for libraries which has more impact on clients and on stakeholders than one would expect. Small steps in going green can make a big impact for the library’s image. Little financial input can produce an important marketing outcome. Activities in this field can be developed in cooperation with unpaid partners like non-governmental organisations (NGOs, Friends of the Library groups, library suppliers and, last but not least, the library users. A checklist on how to go green gives an overview of important aspects in planning, construction, and library operations in order to introduce the first “green footsteps”.

  17. Microscopic lymph node tumor burden quantified by macroscopic dual-tracer molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Barth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node biopsy (LNB) is employed in many cancer surgeries to identify metastatic disease and stage the cancer, yet morbidity and diagnostic delays associated with LNB could be avoided if non-invasive imaging of nodal involvement was reliable. Molecular imaging has potential in this regard; however, variable delivery and nonspecific uptake of imaging tracers has made conventional approaches ineffective clinically. A method of correcting for non-specific uptake with injection of a second untargeted tracer is presented, allowing tumor burden in lymph nodes to be quantified. The approach was confirmed in an athymic mouse model of metastatic human breast cancer targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, a cell surface receptor overexpressed by many cancers. A significant correlation was observed between in vivo (dual-tracer) and ex vivo measures of tumor burden (r = 0.97, p < 0.01), with an ultimate sensitivity of approximately 200 cells (potentially more sensitive than conventional LNB). PMID:25344739

  18. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of Gold Nanoparticles as Potential Molecular Probes for Light-Based Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Gopal Rayavarapu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods with optical extinction bands within the “optical imaging window.” The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging techniques. Further, we have conjugated these gold nanoparticles to a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to HER2 overexpressing SKBR3 breast carcinoma cells. The bioconjugation protocol uses noncovalent modes of binding based on a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of the antibody and the gold surface. We discuss various aspects of the synthesis and bioconjugation protocols and the characterization results of the functionalized nanoparticles. Some proposed applications of these potential molecular probes in the field of biomedical imaging are also discussed.

  19. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, A., E-mail: daphne3h-aya@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohsuka, S. [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a {sup 137}Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources ({sup 22}Na [511 keV], {sup 137}Cs [662 keV], and {sup 54}Mn [834 keV]).

  20. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cell Transplantation for Liver Diseases: Monitoring, Clinical Translation, and Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplantation has been investigated to rescue experimental liver failure and is promising to offer an alternative therapy to liver transplantation for liver diseases treatment. Several clinical studies in this field have been carried out, but the therapeutic benefit of this treatment is still controversial. A major obstacle to developing stem cell therapies in clinic is being able to visualize the cells in vivo. Imaging modalities allow optimization of delivery, detecting cell survival and functionality by in vivo monitoring these transplanted graft cells. Moreover, theranostic imaging is a brand new field that utilizes nanometer-scale materials to glean diagnostic insight for simultaneous treatment, which is very promising to improve stem cell-based therapy for treatment of liver diseases. The aim of this review was to summarize the various imaging tools that have been explored with advanced molecular imaging probes. We also outline some recent progress of preclinical and clinical studies of liver stem cells transplantation. Finally, we discuss theranostic imaging for stem cells transplantation for liver dysfunction and future opportunities afforded by theranostic imaging.

  1. Molecular Imaging of Colorectal Tumors by Targeting Colon Cancer Secreted Protein-2 (CCSP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeil Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A versatile biomarker for detecting colonic adenoma and colon cancer has yet to be developed. Colon cancer secreted protein-2 (CCSP-2 is a protein specifically expressed and secreted in colon adenomas and cancers. We developed a fluorescent imaging method based on CCSP-2 targeting for a more sensitive and specific detection of colorectal tumors. CCSP-2 expression was evaluated in human colon adenoma and colorectal specimens. Anti–CCSP-2 antibody was labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye, FPR-675, and molecular imaging of surgical human colorectal tumors was performed. Immunohistochemistry identified CCSP-2 expression in 87.0% of colorectal cancer specimens and 89.5% of colon adenoma specimens. Fluorescence imaging of surgical human colon specimens after spraying treatment with the probe permitted a clear distinction of cancer from paired normal colon tissue (target-to-background ratio, 4.09 ± 0.42; P < .001. CCSP-2 targeting imaging was also evaluated in patient-derived colon cancer xenograft mouse and liver metastasis murine models. CCSP-2–positive colon cancer xenografts and liver metastases were visualized by near-infrared fluorescence imaging after intravenous injection of the probe, which showed significantly higher fluorescence. Our results show that CCSP-2 is a promising marker for colorectal tumor detection in clinical settings and that a CCSP-2–targeting molecular imaging strategy might improve the diagnosis of colorectal tumors in metastatic or recurrent cancers and aid in early colonoscopic detection of premalignant lesions.

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticle-micelles (ION-micelles for sensitive (molecular magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas W E Starmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs are a promising nanoplatform for contrast-enhanced MRI. Recently, magnetic particle imaging (MPI was introduced as a new imaging modality, which is able to directly visualize magnetic particles and could serve as a more sensitive and quantitative alternative to MRI. However, MPI requires magnetic particles with specific magnetic properties for optimal use. Current commercially available iron oxide formulations perform suboptimal in MPI, which is triggering research into optimized synthesis strategies. Most synthesis procedures aim at size control of iron oxide nanoparticles rather than control over the magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ION platform for sensitive MPI and MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS: IONs were synthesized using a thermal-decomposition method and subsequently phase-transferred by encapsulation into lipidic micelles (ION-Micelles. Next, the material and magnetic properties of the ION-Micelles were analyzed. Most notably, vibrating sample magnetometry measurements showed that the effective magnetic core size of the IONs is 16 nm. In addition, magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS measurements were performed. MPS is essentially zero-dimensional MPI and therefore allows to probe the potential of iron oxide formulations for MPI. ION-Micelles induced up to 200 times higher signal in MPS measurements than commercially available iron oxide formulations (Endorem, Resovist and Sinerem and thus likely allow for significantly more sensitive MPI. In addition, the potential of the ION-Micelle platform for molecular MPI and MRI was showcased by MPS and MRI measurements of fibrin-binding peptide functionalized ION-Micelles (FibPep-ION-Micelles bound to blood clots. CONCLUSIONS: The presented data underlines the potential of the ION-Micelle nanoplatform for sensitive (molecular MPI and warrants further investigation of the Fib

  3. In vivo 3D molecular imaging with BIRDS at high spatiotemporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Daniel; de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic signals which emanate from complexes between paramagnetic lanthanide III ions (e.g., Tm3+) and macrocyclic chelates (e.g., 1,4,7,10-tetramethyl 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate, or DOTMA4−) are sensitive to physiology (e.g., temperature and/or pH). Because non-exchanging protons from these lanthanide-based macrocyclic agents have relaxation times on the order of a few milliseconds, rapid data acquisition is possible with chemical shift imaging (CSI). Thus Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS) which originate from non-exchanging protons of these paramagnetic agents, but exclude water proton detection, can allow molecular imaging. Previous 2D CSI experiments with such lanthanide-based macrocyclics allowed acquisition from ~12 µL voxels in rat brain within 5 minutes using rectangular encoding of k-space. Because cubical encoding of k-space in 3D for whole brain coverage increases CSI acquisition time to several tens of minutes or more, a faster CSI technique is required for BIRDS to be of practical use. Here we demonstrate a CSI acquisition method to improve 3D molecular imaging capabilities with lanthanide-based macrocyclics. Using TmDOTMA−, we show datasets from a 20×20×20 mm3 field-of-view with voxels of ~1 µL effective volume acquired within 5 minutes (at 11.7T) for temperature mapping. By employing reduced spherical encoding with Gaussian weighting (RESEGAW) instead of cubical encoding of k-space, a significant increase in CSI signal is obtained. In vitro and in vivo 3D CSI data with TmDOTMA−, and presumably similar lanthanide-based macrocyclics, suggest that acquisition using RESEGAW can be used for high spatiotemporal molecular mapping with BIRDS. PMID:23881869

  4. A systematic review of lessons learned from PET molecular imaging research in atypical parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios [Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    To systematically review the previous studies and current status of positron emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging research in atypical parkinsonism. MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus electronic databases were searched for articles published until 29th March 2016 and included brain PET studies in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). Only articles published in English and in peer-reviewed journals were included in this review. Case-reports, reviews, and non-human studies were excluded. Seventy-seven PET studies investigating the dopaminergic system, glucose metabolism, microglial activation, hyperphosphorilated tau, opioid receptors, the cholinergic system, and GABA{sub A} receptors in PSP, MSA, and CBS patients were included in this review. Disease-specific patterns of reduced glucose metabolism have shown higher accuracy than dopaminergic imaging techniques to distinguish between parkinsonian syndromes. Microglial activation has been found in all forms of atypical parkinsonism and reflects the known distribution of neuropathologic changes in these disorders. Opioid receptors are decreased in the striatum of PSP and MSA patients. Subcortical cholinergic dysfunction was more severe in MSA and PSP than Parkinson's disease patients although no significant changes in cortical cholinergic receptors were seen in PSP with cognitive impairment. GABA{sub A} receptors were decreased in metabolically affected cortical and subcortical regions in PSP patients. PET molecular imaging has provided valuable insight for understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical parkinsonism. Changes at a molecular level occur early in the course of these neurodegenerative diseases and PET imaging provides the means to aid differential diagnosis, monitor disease progression, identify of novel targets for pharmacotherapy, and monitor response to new treatments. (orig.)

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D/AUF1 interacts with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In an attempt to characterize the interaction occurring between cellular proteins and hnRNP L, yeast two-hybrid screening was conducted using a HeLa cDNA library. Some of the cDNA clones were found to harbour a partial human hnRNP D/AUF1 cDNA (GeneBank accession number NM_031369). In this study, we ...

  6. Der Einfluss von Phlorizin auf den programmierten Zelltod von Erythrozyten

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Anja Doris

    2013-01-01

    Erythrozyten sind in der Lage, suizidalen Zelltod zu betreiben. Von einigen Substanzen ist bereits bekannt, dass sie die sogenannte Eryptose beeinflussen. Beispiele dafür sind Quecksilber, Monensin, Benzethonium und Oridonin, welche zu den Stimulatoren der Eryptose gehören. Blebbistatin, Koffein und Endothelin, gehören zu den Inhibitoren. In dieser Studie sollte untersucht werden, welchen Einfluss Phlorizin auf den Ablauf des suizidalen Zelltodes von Erythrozyten hat. Es wurde belegt, dass si...

  7. Der Anspruch eines neuen Blicks auf den russischen Kulturraum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marchetta

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Die Monographie zur Filmgeschichte der Sowjetunion und Rußlands erhebt den Anspruch, die erste und aktuellste Gesamtdarstellung des „sowjetischen und russischen Films“ zu sein. Durch ein Überblenden von Innenperspektive und Außenperspektive versucht das international und interdisziplinär besetzte Autor/-innenteam um Christine Engel am Beispiel der Entwicklung des Filmgeschehens einen anderen, neuen Blick auf den russischen Kulturraum.

  8. Wirkungen von Psychopharmaka auf das Lärmerleben

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Hans-Peter (Prof. Dr.); Kohnen, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In allgemeinpsychologischen Lärmexperimenten ist eine monotone Beziehung zwischen physikalischer Lautstärke und erlebter Lautheit bestens abgesichert. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird gezeigt, daß diese Beziehung unter Medikationsbedingungen nicht gilt. In einem 3 X 3 X 2-faktoriellen Versuchsplan mit den Faktoren physikalische Lautstärke (weißes Rauschen in 76, 79 und 82 dB), Medikation (Tranquilizer, Plazebo, Stimulizer) und (niedere bzw. hohe) Ansprechbarkeit auf Medikamente beurteilten ins...

  9. Erfolgsfaktor Payment - Der Einfluss der Zahlungsverfahren auf Ihren Umsatz

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Ernst; Breitschaft, Markus; Krabichler, Thomas; Wittmann, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Haben Sie sich auch schon gefragt, wie viele Kunden in Webshops den Kaufvorgang abbrechen, weil sie nicht die richtigen Zahlungsverfahren angeboten bekommen? Aber welche Kombination von Bezahlverfahren verspricht insgesamt den größten Erfolg? Diesen Fragen ist ibi research an der Universität Regensburg zusammen mit dem Partnerkonsortium des E-Commerce-Leitfadens auf den Grund gegangen. Mehr als 1.300 Endkunden haben sich an der Umfrage beteiligt. Ihnen wurden verschiedene realitätsnahe Si...

  10. Nanoporöses Aluminiumoxid als funktionale Beschichtung auf Biomaterialien

    OpenAIRE

    Pedimonte, Birgit Joana

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterialien im Hartgewebekontakt setzen unterschiedliche Eigenschaften, wie hohe mechanische Stabilität bei geringem Reibungsverlust, eine gute Anbindung in das Empfängergewebe und einen hemmenden Einfluss auf die Bildung von Biofilmen, voraus. Insbesondere Beschichtungen welche eine gezielte Modifikation von topologischen, mechanischen und chemischen Oberflächeneigenschaften bewirken, haben sich als aussichtsreich erwiesen, um eine stabile Knochen/Implantat Anbindung herzustellen. Nanostr...

  11. Die Schweiz auf dem Weg zu einer tiefgreifenden Dekarbonisierung

    OpenAIRE

    Betschart, Mario; Füssler, Jürg; Iten, Rolf; Bertschmann, Damaris; Thalmann, Philippe; Vielle, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Die Schweiz kann ihre CO2-Emissionen aus dem Energieverbrauch bis zum Jahr 2050 um 4 Tonnen pro Einwohner reduzieren und damit die Vorgaben des international angestrebten Ziels einer globalen Klimaerwärmung von 2°C einhalten. Eine detaillierte Analyse mit ver-schiedenen Szenarien im Rahmen des Deep Decarbonization Pathways Projects konnte auf-zeigen, dass die damit verbundenen Kosten für die Wirtschaft verkraftbar sind.

  12. Fluorescence circadian imaging reveals a PDF-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nunes, José Manuel; Rosbash, Michael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-30

    Circadian locomotor behaviour is controlled by a pacemaker circuit composed of clock-containing neurons. To interrogate the mechanistic relationship between the molecular clockwork and network communication critical to the operation of the Drosophila circadian pacemaker circuit, we established new fluorescent circadian reporters that permit single-cell recording of transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms in brain explants and cultured neurons. Live-imaging experiments combined with pharmacological and genetic manipulations demonstrate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) amplifies the molecular rhythms via time-of-day- and activity-dependent upregulation of transcription from E-box-containing clock gene promoters within key pacemaker neurons. The effect of PDF on clock gene transcription and the known role of PDF in enhancing PER/TIM stability occur via independent pathways downstream of the PDF receptor, the former through a cAMP-independent mechanism and the latter through a cAMP-PKA dependent mechanism. These results confirm and extend the mechanistic understanding of the role of PDF in controlling the synchrony of the pacemaker neurons. More broadly, our results establish the utility of the new live-imaging tools for the study of molecular-neural interactions important for the operation of the circadian pacemaker circuit.

  13. Molecular imaging of cannabis leaf tissue with MeV-SIMS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenčič, Boštjan; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Kovačec, Eva; Regvar, Marjana; Siketić, Zdravko; Vavpetič, Primož; Rupnik, Zdravko; Bučar, Klemen; Kelemen, Mitja; Kovač, Janez; Pelicon, Primož

    2016-03-01

    To broaden our analytical capabilities with molecular imaging in addition to the existing elemental imaging with micro-PIXE, a linear Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer for MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) was constructed and added to the existing nuclear microprobe at the Jožef Stefan Institute. We measured absolute molecular yields and damage cross-section of reference materials, without significant alteration of the fragile biological samples during the duration of measurements in the mapping mode. We explored the analytical capability of the MeV-SIMS technique for chemical mapping of the plant tissue of medicinal cannabis leaves. A series of hand-cut plant tissue slices were prepared by standard shock-freezing and freeze-drying protocol and deposited on the Si wafer. We show the measured MeV-SIMS spectra showing a series of peaks in the mass area of cannabinoids, as well as their corresponding maps. The indicated molecular distributions at masses of 345.5 u and 359.4 u may be attributed to the protonated THCA and THCA-C4 acids, and show enhancement in the areas with opened trichome morphology.

  14. Molecular imaging of cannabis leaf tissue with MeV-SIMS method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenčič, Boštjan, E-mail: bostjan.jencic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, Luka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); M4I, Maastricht University, Peter Debijelaan 25A, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Dept. of Biology, Večna pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kovačec, Eva; Regvar, Marjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Dept. of Biology, Večna pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Siketić, Zdravko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Vavpetič, Primož; Rupnik, Zdravko; Bučar, Klemen; Kelemen, Mitja; Kovač, Janez; Pelicon, Primož [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-03-15

    To broaden our analytical capabilities with molecular imaging in addition to the existing elemental imaging with micro-PIXE, a linear Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer for MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) was constructed and added to the existing nuclear microprobe at the Jožef Stefan Institute. We measured absolute molecular yields and damage cross-section of reference materials, without significant alteration of the fragile biological samples during the duration of measurements in the mapping mode. We explored the analytical capability of the MeV-SIMS technique for chemical mapping of the plant tissue of medicinal cannabis leaves. A series of hand-cut plant tissue slices were prepared by standard shock-freezing and freeze-drying protocol and deposited on the Si wafer. We show the measured MeV-SIMS spectra showing a series of peaks in the mass area of cannabinoids, as well as their corresponding maps. The indicated molecular distributions at masses of 345.5 u and 359.4 u may be attributed to the protonated THCA and THCA-C4 acids, and show enhancement in the areas with opened trichome morphology.

  15. Controlled aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for the development of molecular magnetic resonance imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, B A; Haag, M A; Stoldt, C R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0427 (United States); Serkova, N J [Department of Anesthesiology, Biomedical MRI/MRS Cancer Center Core, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Shroyer, K R [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)], E-mail: conrad.stoldt@colorado.edu

    2008-07-02

    A method for synthesizing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) multi-nanoparticle aggregates as molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents is described. The approach utilizes organic acid/base interactions in the colloid to induce highly controllable nanoparticle aggregation. Monodisperse aggregates with diameters as large as 100 nm are synthesized by manipulating the interfacial surface chemistry of the SPIO nanoparticles in tetrahydrofuran solvent. Subsequent phospholipid micelle encapsulation yields micellar multi-SPIO (mmSPIO) aggregates with enhanced T{sub 2} relaxivity (368.0 s{sup -1} mmol{sup -1} Fe) as compared to micellar single particle SPIO (302.0 s{sup -1} mmol{sup -1} Fe). mmSPIO conjugated to anti-CA125 monoclonal antibodies were incubated with ovarian carcinoma cell lines to demonstrate targeted in vitro molecular MRI, resulting in a 66% shortening in T{sub 2} time for CA125 positive NIH:OVCAR-3 cells and a less than 3% change in T{sub 2} time for CA125 negative SK-OV-3 cells. The controllable aggregation of mmSPIO shows potential for the development of molecular MRI contrast agents with optimal sizes for specific diagnostic imaging applications.

  16. Laser Coulomb Explosion Imaging of molecular dynamics in CO2 molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Francois; Bocharova, Irina; Litvinyuk, Igor; Sanderson, Joseph; Karimi, Reza

    2009-05-01

    Molecular structure dynamics and dissociation pathways of CO2 molecule initiated by interaction with strong laser field were investigated by Laser Coulomb Explosion Imaging (LCEI) technique. Momentum imaging of ions in tree-body fragmentation break-up channels O^++C^++O^+ (1,1,1) and O^2++C^2++O^2+ (2,2,2) was used to determine full geometry of CO2 ionic states before explosion. Varying laser pulse length from sub-7 fs to 200 fs at the same laser field intensity we were able to follow the evolution of the molecular structure and observe dramatic change in total kinetic energy of O^2++C^2++O^2+ channel with increasing pulse length. We observed significantly bent structure of parent ion and low kinetic energy of the (2,2,2) channel for long pulses, compared to the very close to linear geometry, and very high kinetic energy for sub-7 fs laser pulse. This observation supports the idea that a phenomenon known as enhanced ionization takes place for CO2 molecule with the same mechanism as in hydrogen molecule. It also lets us put temporal and spatial limits on this process, and in the future, probing molecular structure within the critical distance range, establish connection between changing geometry and dissociation pathways.

  17. Impairment of retrograde neuronal transport in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy demonstrated by molecular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of our study was to utilize a molecular imaging technology based on the retrograde axonal transport mechanism (neurography, to determine if oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects retrograde axonal transport in an animal model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice (n = 8/group were injected with a cumulative dose of 30 mg/kg oxaliplatin (sufficient to induce neurotoxicity or dextrose control injections. Intramuscular injections of Tetanus Toxin C-fragment (TTc labeled with Alexa 790 fluorescent dye were done (15 ug/20 uL in the left calf muscles, and in vivo fluorescent imaging performed (0-60 min at baseline, and then weekly for 5 weeks, followed by 2-weekly imaging out to 9 weeks. Tissues were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: With sham treatment, TTc transport causes fluorescent signal intensity over the thoracic spine to increase from 0 to 60 minutes after injection. On average, fluorescence signal increased 722%+/-117% (Mean+/-SD from 0 to 60 minutes. Oxaliplatin treated animals had comparable transport at baseline (787%+/-140%, but transport rapidly decreased through the course of the study, falling to 363%+/-88%, 269%+/-96%, 191%+/-58%, 121%+/-39%, 75%+/-21% with each successive week and stabilizing around 57% (+/-15% at 7 weeks. Statistically significant divergence occurred at approximately 3 weeks (p≤0.05, linear mixed-effects regression model. Quantitative immuno-fluorescence histology with a constant cutoff threshold showed reduced TTc in the spinal cord at 7 weeks for treated animals versus controls (5.2 Arbitrary Units +/-0.52 vs 7.1 AU +/-1.38, p0.56, T-test. CONCLUSION: We show-for the first time to our knowledge-that neurographic in vivo molecular imaging can demonstrate imaging changes in a model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Impaired retrograde neural transport is suggested to be an important part of the pathophysiology of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  18. Image-based evaluation of the molecular events underlying HC11 mammary epithelial cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Zhang, Renshu; Zhang, Wanghai; Lee, Edward; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Snyderwine, Elizabeth G; Wang, Paul C

    2008-11-15

    We have developed an image-based technique for signal pathway analysis, target validation, and compound screening related to mammary epithelial cell differentiation. This technique used the advantages of optical imaging and the HC11-Lux model system. The HC11-Lux cell line is a subclone of HC11 mammary epithelial cells transfected stably with a luciferase construct of the beta-casein gene promoter (p-344/-1betac-Lux). The promoter activity was imaged optically in real time following lactogenic induction. The imaging signal intensity was closely correlated with that measured using a luminometer following protein extraction (R=0.99, Pdifferentiation. The imaging studies showed that treatment of the cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF), AG490 (JAK2-specific inhibitor), and LY294002 (PI3K-specific inhibitor) blocked lactogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PD98059 (MEK-specific inhibitor) could reverse EGF-mediated differentiation arrest. These results indicate that these pathways are essential in cell differentiation. This simple, sensitive, and reproducible technique permits visualization and real-time evaluation of the molecular events related to milk protein production. It can be adopted for high-throughput screening of small molecules for their effects on mammary epithelial cell growth, differentiation, and carcinogenesis.

  19. Molecular cardiac PET besides FDG viability imaging; Molekulare Kardiale PET jenseits der FDG-Vitalitaetsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, O.; Burchert, W. [Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Molekulare Bildgebung, Herz- und Diabetszentrum NRW

    2009-06-15

    Molecular cardiac non F-18-FDG PET is currently based on perfusion imaging. It is of excellent diagnostic accuracy to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and superior to perfusion SPECT. There is also evidence for its incremental prognostic value. The unique feature of PET to measure myocardial perfusion in absolute terms and in short time periods define its impact on cardiac imaging enabling both the evaluation of early changes in CAD and the accurate characterization of multivessel disease. Currently, all available PET perfusion tracers in Europe are cyclotron products. Rb-82, a generator product, is the most frequently employed perfusion tracer in the United States and cyclotron independent. This tracer has the potential to become an alternative in Europe soon. Nowadays, PET systems are manufactured as hybrid PET-CT scanners. In oncology, hybrid imaging revealed, that the combination of functional and morphological imaging is superior to the single components. In cardiology, the integration of perfusion PET imaging with CT calcium scoring and CT anatomy of the coronary arteries represents a similar constellation. Atherosclerotic plaque evaluation by combined PET-CT technique will be one of the most promising future applications with a potential immense impact on prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of CAD in the future. (orig.)

  20. Molecular imaging of HPMA copolymers: visualizing drug delivery in cell, mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2010-02-17

    N-(2-Hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers and their drug conjugates are some of the most intensively investigated drug delivery systems for over 30years. Some of the HPMA copolymer drug conjugates have entered clinical trials. Various molecular imaging technologies have been used to investigate the mechanism of drug delivery with HPMA copolymers. Fluorescence imaging has been used for the study of the process of intracellular drug delivery, including cell binding, subcellular trafficking and intracellular fate, of HPMA copolymers and drug conjugates. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear medicine, including gamma-scintigraphy, SPECT and PET, have been used for the non-invasive visualization of pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and drug targeting efficiency of HPMA copolymers in animal models. gamma-Scintigraphy has been used to study HPMA copolymer drug conjugates in human patients. The application of imaging technologies in the study of HPMA copolymers and properties of the copolymers demonstrated by imaging is summarized in this review. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  2. Atomic force microscopy: High resolution dynamic imaging of cellular and molecular structure in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Douglas J; Quinn, Anthony S; Rand, Jacob H; Jena, Bhanu P

    2013-10-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), invented in 1986, and a member of the scanning probe family of microscopes, offers the unprecedented ability to image biological samples unfixed and in a hydrated environment at high resolution. This opens the possibility to investigate biological mechanisms temporally in a heretofore unattainable resolution. We have used AFM to investigate: (1) fundamental issues in cell biology (secretion) and, (2) the pathological basis of a human thrombotic disease, the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These studies have incorporated the imaging of live cells at nanometer resolution, leading to discovery of the "porosome," the universal secretory portal in cells, and a molecular understanding of membrane fusion from imaging the interaction and assembly of proteins between opposing lipid membranes. Similarly, the development of an in vitro simulacrum for investigating the molecular interactions between proteins and lipids has helped define an etiological explanation for APS. The prime importance of AFM in the success of these investigations will be presented in this manuscript, as well as a discussion of the limitations of this technique for the study of biomedical samples. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  4. A DICOM-based 2nd generation Molecular Imaging Data Grid implementing the IHE XDS-i integration profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jasper; Zhang, Jianguo; Park, Ryan; Dagliyan, Grant; Liu, Brent; Huang, H K

    2012-07-01

    A Molecular Imaging Data Grid (MIDG) was developed to address current informatics challenges in archival, sharing, search, and distribution of preclinical imaging studies between animal imaging facilities and investigator sites. This manuscript presents a 2nd generation MIDG replacing the Globus Toolkit with a new system architecture that implements the IHE XDS-i integration profile. Implementation and evaluation were conducted using a 3-site interdisciplinary test-bed at the University of Southern California. The 2nd generation MIDG design architecture replaces the initial design's Globus Toolkit with dedicated web services and XML-based messaging for dedicated management and delivery of multi-modality DICOM imaging datasets. The Cross-enterprise Document Sharing for Imaging (XDS-i) integration profile from the field of enterprise radiology informatics was adopted into the MIDG design because streamlined image registration, management, and distribution dataflow are likewise needed in preclinical imaging informatics systems as in enterprise PACS application. Implementation of the MIDG is demonstrated at the University of Southern California Molecular Imaging Center (MIC) and two other sites with specified hardware, software, and network bandwidth. Evaluation of the MIDG involves data upload, download, and fault-tolerance testing scenarios using multi-modality animal imaging datasets collected at the USC Molecular Imaging Center. The upload, download, and fault-tolerance tests of the MIDG were performed multiple times using 12 collected animal study datasets. Upload and download times demonstrated reproducibility and improved real-world performance. Fault-tolerance tests showed that automated failover between Grid Node Servers has minimal impact on normal download times. Building upon the 1st generation concepts and experiences, the 2nd generation MIDG system improves accessibility of disparate animal-model molecular imaging datasets to users outside a molecular

  5. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Susu, E-mail: susu.yan@duke.edu; Tough, MengHeng [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Cheng, Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  6. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-11-01

    To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom(TM)), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole region-of-interest imaging

  7. Characterization of TCP-1 probes for molecular imaging of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonglin; Gray, Brian D; Barber, Christy; Bernas, Michael; Cai, Minying; Furenlid, Lars R; Rouse, Andrew; Patel, Charmi; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Liang, Rongguang; Gmitro, Arthur F; Witte, Marlys H; Pak, Koon Y; Woolfenden, James M

    2016-10-10

    Molecular probes capable of detecting colorectal cancer (CRC) are needed for early CRC diagnosis. The objective of this study was to characterize c[CTPSPFSHC]OH (TCP-1), a small peptide derived from phage display selection, for targeting human CRC xenografts using technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled TCP-1 and fluorescent cyanine-7 (Cy7)-labeled form of the peptide (Cy7-TCP-1). (99m)Tc-TCP-1 was generated by modifying TCP-1 with succinimidyl-6-hydrazino-nicotinamide (S-HYNIC) followed by radiolabeling. In vitro saturation binding experiments were performed for (99m)Tc-TCP-1 in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. SCID mice with human HCT116 cancer xenografts were imaged with (99m)Tc-TCP-1 or control peptide using a small-animal SPECT imager: Group I (n=5) received no blockade; Group II (n=5) received a blocking dose of non-radiolabeled TCP-1. Group III (n=5) were imaged with (99m)Tc-labeled control peptide (inactive peptide). SCID mice with human PC3 prostate cancer xenografts (Group IV, n=5) were also imaged with (99m)Tc-TCP-1. Eight additional SCID mice bearing HCT116 xenografts in dorsal skinfold window chambers (DSWC) were imaged by direct positron imaging of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and fluorescence microscopy of Cy7-TCP-1. In vitro(99m)Tc-HYNIC-TCP-1 binding assays on HCT 116 cells indicated a mean Kd of 3.04±0.52nM. In cancer xenografts, (99m)Tc-TCP-1 radioactivity (%ID/g) was 1.01±0.15 in the absence of blockade and was reduced to 0.26±0.04 (PTCP-1 or HCT116 tumors with inactive peptide. Cy7-TCP-1 activity localized not only in metabolically active tumors, as defined by (18)F-FDG imaging, but also in peritumoral microvasculature. In conclusion, TCP-1 probes may have a distinct targeting mechanism with high selectivity for CRC and tumor-associated vasculature. Molecular imaging with TCP-1 probes appears promising to detect malignant colorectal lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Imaging to Predict Response to Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Leguerney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular magnetic resonance imaging targeted to an endothelial integrin involved in neoangiogenesis was compared to DCE-US and immunochemistry to assess the early response of three different therapeutic agents in renal cell carcinoma. Human A498 renal cells carcinoma was subcutaneously inoculated into 24 nude mice. Mice received either phosphate-buffered saline solution, sunitinib, everolimus, or bevacizumab during 4 days. DCE-US and molecular MRI targeting αvβ3 were performed at baseline and 4 days after treatment initiation. PI, AUC, relaxation rate variations ΔR2⁎, and percentage of vessels area quantified on CD31-stained microvessels were compared. Significant decreases were observed for PI and AUC parameters measured by DCE-US for bevacizumab group as early as 4 days, whereas molecular αvβ3-targeted MRI was able to detect significant changes in both bevacizumab and everolimus groups. Percentage of CD31-stained microvessels was significantly correlated with DCE-US parameters, PI (R=0.87, p=0.0003 and AUC (R=0.81, p=0.0013. The percentage of vessel tissue area was significantly reduced (p<0.01 in both sunitinib and bevacizumab groups. We report an early detection of neoangiogenesis modification after induction of targeted therapies, using DCE-US or αvβ3-targeted MRI. We consider these outcomes should encourage clinical trial developments to further evaluate the potential of this molecular MRI technique.

  9. Spatiotemporal Imaging of Chemical Reactions: Making Molecular Movies with Femtosecond X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budarz, J. M.; Minitti, M. P.; Kirrander, A.; Hastings, J. B.; Weber, P. M.

    2015-03-01

    The study of ultrafast reaction dynamics of molecular systems has benefited from the rapid development of spectroscopic and imaging techniques that follow their temporal evolution on a sub-picosecond time scale. More complete understanding of molecular behavior, however, is expected to arise from a full observation of electronic and nuclear motions during reactions. Our recent experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have allowed us to develop and implement a method wherein the ultrafast reaction dynamics of molecules in dilute gases (4 Torr) are captured by time-resolved X-ray scattering. Using a pump-probe scheme with 267 nm excitation laser and 8.3 keV X-ray probe pulses, we performed a series of measurements on the interatomic positions at variable delay times to produce a `molecular movie.' In our experiments, 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) is prepared on an excited state surface, causing the molecule to accelerate down several potential energy surfaces coupled by conical intersections, to open into 1,3,5-hexatriene within 80 fs. The resulting `movie' has been supplemented with molecular trajectory calculations to separate the multiple pathways the excited molecule takes toward the open ring. In this talk, the experimental methods and designs that made these experiments possible will be presented together with the first results describing the photochemical reaction dynamics of CHD.

  10. Facile Fabrication of Animal-Specific Positioning Molds For Multi-modality Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Oh, Ji Eun; Woo, Seung Tae [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    Recently multi-modal imaging system has become widely adopted in molecular imaging. We tried to fabricate animal-specific positioning molds for PET/MR fusion imaging using easily available molding clay and rapid foam. The animal-specific positioning molds provide immobilization and reproducible positioning of small animal. Herein, we have compared fiber-based molding clay with rapid foam in fabricating the molds of experimental animal. The round bottomed-acrylic frame, which fitted into microPET gantry, was prepared at first. The experimental mice was anesthetized and placed on the mold for positioning. Rapid foam and fiber-based clay were used to fabricate the mold. In case of both rapid foam and the clay, the experimental animal needs to be pushed down smoothly into the mold for positioning. However, after the mouse was removed, the fabricated clay needed to be dried completely at 60 .deg. C in oven overnight for hardening. Four sealed pipe tips containing [{sup 18}F]FDG solution were used as fiduciary markers. After injection of [{sup 18}F]FDG via tail vein, microPET scanning was performed. Successively, MRI scanning was followed in the same animal. Animal-specific positioning molds were fabricated using rapid foam and fiber-based molding clay for multimodality imaging. Functional and anatomical images were obtained with microPET and MRI, respectively. The fused PET/MR images were obtained using freely available AMIDE program. Animal-specific molds were successfully prepared using easily available rapid foam, molding clay and disposable pipet tips. Thanks to animal-specific molds, fusion images of PET and MR were co-registered with negligible misalignment.

  11. Recent Advances of Activatable Molecular Probes Based on Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles in Sensing and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Molecular probes that change their signals in response to the target of interest have a critical role in fundamental biology and medicine. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) have recently emerged as a new generation of purely organic photonic nanoagents with desirable properties for biological applications. In particular, tunable optical properties of SPNs allow them to be developed into photoluminescence, chemiluminescence, and photoacoustic probes, wherein SPNs usually serve as the energy donor and internal reference for luminescence and photoacoustic probes, respectively. Moreover, facile surface modification and intraparticle engineering provide the versatility to make them responsive to various biologically and pathologically important substances and indexes including small‐molecule mediators, proteins, pH and temperature. This article focuses on recent advances in the development of SPN‐based activatable molecular probes for sensing and imaging. The designs and applications of these probes are discussed in details, and the present challenges to further advance them into life science are also analyzed. PMID:28638783

  12. Optical molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy part 2: Integrated x-ray and fluorescence molecular tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junwei; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Wang, Zhiqun; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2017-09-01

    Differentiating tumor from its surrounding soft tissues is challenging for x-ray computed tomography (CT). Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can directly localize the internal tumors targeted with specific fluorescent probes. A FMT system was developed and integrated onto a CT-guided irradiator to improve tumor localization for image-guided radiation. The FMT system was aligned orthogonal to the cone-beam CT onboard our previously developed image-guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART). Through rigorous physical registration, the onboard CT provides accurate surface contour which is used to generate three-dimensional mesh for FMT reconstruction. During FMT experiments, a point laser source perpendicular to the rotating axis was used to excite the internal fluorophores. The normalized optical images from multiple projection angles were adopted for tomographic reconstruction. To investigate the accuracy of the FMT in locating the tumor and recovering its volume, in vivo experiments were conducted on two breast cancer models: MDA-MB-231 cancer xenograft on nude mice and 4T1 cancer xenograft on white mice. Both cancer cell lines overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). A novel fluorescent poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticle conjugated with anti-EGFR was intravenously injected to specifically target the breast cancer cells. Another ex vivo experiment on a mouse bearing a surgically implanted Indocyanine Green-containing glass tube was conducted, to additionally validate the precision of FMT-guided radiation therapy. The FMT can accurately localize the single-nodule breast tumors actively targeted with fluorescent nanoparticles with localization error FMT and CT. The reconstructed tumor volume in FMT was significantly correlated with that in the iodinated contrast-enhanced CT (R2 = 0.94, P FMT was able to guide focal radiation delivery with submillimeter accuracy. Using the tumor-targeting fluorescent probes, the i

  13. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  14. Molecular images and vibrational spectroscopy of sorbic acid with the scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas P. E.; Kirk, Michael D.; Quate, Calvin F.

    1987-06-01

    Images of sorbic acid molecules absorbed onto graphite have been taken with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in liquid helium. Molecular clusters were clearly observed, as was the atomic structure of the graphite substrate. The molecules were seen to diffuse across the substrate at a rate of about 1 Å/min. When dI/dV vs V was measured with the STM probe directly over a sorbic acid molecule, a well-defined spectrum of peaks was obtained whose energies corresponded to the vibrational resonances of the molecule. Large changes in the spectra occurred if the tip was moved a lateral distance of 5 Å.

  15. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    experimentally due to the insoluble nature of amyloid fibrils. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions between 13 aromatic amyloid imaging agents, entailing 4 different organic scaffolds, and a model of an amyloid fibril. Clustering analysis combined with free energy......Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures...

  16. Der Einfluss der Expertise auf das Antwortverhalten in Delphi-Studien : ein Hypothesentest

    OpenAIRE

    Blind, Knut; Cuhls, Kerstin

    2001-01-01

    'Basierend auf den Ergebnissen von Delphi'98, einer Delphi-Studie zur globalen Entwicklung von Wissenschaft und Technik im Auftrag des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF), wurde der Einfluss der Expertise der beteiligten Experten auf das Antwortverhalten getestet. Eine erste Hypothese, dass Experten mit geringem Expertenwissen mit geringerer Wahrscheinlichkeit an der zweiten Befragungsrunde teilnehmen, konnte für die Mehrheit der zwölf Technikfelder bestätigt werden. Auf Basis...

  17. Entwicklung und Optimierung eines biotechnologischen Prozesses zur Herstellung mikrobieller Rhamnolipide auf Basis nachwachsender Rohstoffe

    OpenAIRE

    Leitermann, Frank Paul

    2008-01-01

    Im Fokus dieser Arbeit steht die Entwicklung und Optimierung eines biotechnologischen Prozesses zur Herstellung von Rhamnolipiden auf Basis von nachwachsenden Rohstoffen. Ein Schwerpunkt lag hierbei auf der Entwicklung und Evaluierung einer Standardprozessführung, sowie eines auf einem Parallelbioreaktor basierenden, effizienten Screening-Systems. Ein Produk­tions­stammvergleich wurde durchgeführt. Zur Produktanalyse sollte FTIR-Spektroskopie als alternative Analysemethode eingesetzt werden.

  18. E-Commerce. Auswirkungen auf den Bucheinzelhandel. Mit Ergebnissen der zweiten Branchenumfrage in der Region Franken

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Axel

    2008-01-01

    2004 erschienen mit E-Commerce. Auswirkungen auf den Bucheinzelhandel die Ergebnisse einer empirischen Studie des Forschungsprojekts Electronic Publishing und E-Commerce im Buchhandel, welche die Auswirkungen des elektronischen Handels auf die Strukturen des Buchhandels untersuchten. Die Studie wurde 2007 wiederholt, um aus den Veränderungen Erkenntnisse über die Etablierung des elektronischen Handels im Bucheinzelhandel zu gewinnen. Die hier vorliegenden Ergebnisse zeigen auf, wie sich die E...

  19. Effekte spezifischer Interventionen im Sportunterricht auf die exekutiven Funktionen von Primarschulkindern

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Mirko; Jäger, Katja; Roebers, Claudia M.; Conzelmann, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Einleitung Die Annahme, dass Sport nicht nur positive Effekte auf die körperliche Gesundheit, sondern auch auf die kognitive Leistung haben kann, konnte anhand experimenteller Studien mit Erwachsenen weitgehend bestätigt werden. Ob dieselben Effekte auch bei Kindern und Jugendlichen vorzufinden sind, kann mit Blick auf die mangelnde empirische Evidenz in dieser Altersgruppe kaum zufriedenstellend beantwortet werden (Chang et al., 2012). Will man zudem der Frage nach den Wirkmechanismen nac...

  20. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-06-12

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

  1. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis with nanoparticle-based fluorinated MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palekar, Rohun U; Jallouk, Andrew P; Lanza, Gregory M; Pan, Hua; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    As atherosclerosis remains one of the most prevalent causes of patient mortality, the ability to diagnose early signs of plaque rupture and thrombosis represents a significant clinical need. With recent advances in nanotechnology, it is now possible to image specific molecular processes noninvasively with MRI, using various types of nanoparticles as contrast agents. In the context of cardiovascular disease, it is possible to specifically deliver contrast agents to an epitope of interest for detecting vascular inflammatory processes, which serve as predecessors to atherosclerotic plaque development. Herein, we review various applications of nanotechnology in detecting atherosclerosis using MRI, with an emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoparticles and fluorine imaging, along with theranostic prospects of nanotechnology in cardiovascular disease.

  2. Molecular and functional imaging of invasion and metastasis: windows into the metastatic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinopoulos, Ioannis; Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2010-01-01

    The ability of cancer cells to invade, metastasize, and form distant colonies, is one of the key characteristics that confers lethality to cancer. Metastatic cancer cells typically become refractory to treatment. The metastatic cascade is a multi-step process that is governed by events within the cancer cell, the tumor microenvironment, and the distant environments that are invaded and colonized by the cancer cells. Noninvasive imaging techniques are facilitating a close examination of the stepwise journey of the cancer cell from the primary tumor to the distant metastatic site. Here we have discussed the metastatic process, and how molecular and functional imaging of cancer are providing new insights into the metastatic cascade that can be exploited for treatment of metastatic disease.

  3. Current Perspectives on In Vivo Noninvasive Tracking of Extracellular Vesicles with Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Gangadaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and preclinical in vivo tracking of extracellular vesicles (EVs are a crucial tool for the development and optimization of EV-based diagnosis and treatment. EVs have gained interest due to their unique properties that make them excellent candidates for biological applications. Noninvasive in vivo EV tracking has allowed marked progress towards elucidating the mechanisms and functions of EVs in real time in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize several molecular imaging methods that deal with EVs derived from different cells, which have allowed investigations of EV biodistribution, as well as their tracking, delivery, and tumor targeting, to determine their physiological functions and to exploit imaging-derived information for EV-based theranostics.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals: nanoparticles like multi-functional systems for the obtaining in vivo of molecular images; Radiofarmacos: nanoparticulas como sistemas multifuncionales para la obtencion in vivo de imagenes moleculares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G.; Ramirez de la Cruz, F. M.; Ocampo G, B. E.; Morales A, E.; Santos C, C. L.; Mendoza S, A. N., E-mail: guillermina.ferro@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The techniques of obtaining direct or indirect molecular images detect and register the space-temporary distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biological, diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The advanced techniques of image like the nuclear magnetic resonance, the single photon emission computed tomography, the positron emission tomography and the images of optic fluorescence have been used successfully to detect these processes. On the other hand, the utility of the nanoparticles for any application is dependent of the physicochemical properties that present, being possible to modify their surface when making them react with different biomolecules what allows the formation of conjugates with specific molecular recognition. The joint of various protein molecules, peptides or oligonucleotides to the surface of a nanoparticle produce a multi-functional system able to increase the multivalent joints from the nanoparticles-biomolecules to their receivers for the obtaining of molecular images in vivo. The peptides stimulate, regulate or inhibit numerous functions of the life, acting mainly as information transmitters and activity coordinators of several tissues in the organism. The receivers of regulator peptides are over represented in numerous types of cancer cells and they are protein structures. These receivers have been used as white molecular of marked peptides, to locate primary malignant tumors and their metastasis, using the diagnostic techniques of molecular image mentioned above, which consist basically on the radio peptides use and conjugated peptides to fluoro chromes, to metallic nanoparticles and nano crystals. A summary of the work is presented carried out by the personnel of the Radio-active Materials and Chemistry Departments of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares in this field. (Author)

  5. Exploration of target molecules for molecular imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashikawa, Kei; Akada, Naoki; Yagi, Katsuharu [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Watanabe, Keiko; Kamino, Shinichiro; Kanayama, Yousuke; Hiromura, Makoto [Multiple Molecular Imaging Research Laboratory, RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Enomoto, Shuichi, E-mail: senomoto@pharm.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Multiple Molecular Imaging Research Laboratory, RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could discriminate each inflamed area of IBD model mice clearly. {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could not discriminate the difference of pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors expression was different by pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors would be new target molecules for IBD imaging. -- Abstract: Molecular imaging technology is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the efficacy evaluation of various drug therapies for it. However, it is difficult to elucidate directly the relationships between the responsible molecules and IBD using existing probes. Therefore, the development of an alternative probe that is able to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism and provide information on the appropriate guidelines for treatment is earnestly awaited. In this study, we investigated pathognomonic molecules in the intestines of model mice. The accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in the inflamed area of the intestines of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)- or indomethacin (IND)-induced IBD model mice was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and autoradiography to confirm the inflamed area. The results suggested that the inflammation was selectively induced in the colons of mice by the administration of DSS, whereas it was induced mainly in the ilea and the proximal colons of mice by the administration of IND. To explore attractive target molecules for the molecular imaging of IBD, we evaluated the gene expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors in the inflamed area of the intestines of both model mice. We found that the expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly increased during the progression of IBD, whereas the expression levels were decreased as the mucosa began to heal. In particular, the expression levels of these molecules had already changed before the symptoms of IBD appeared. In

  6. Untersuchungen zu kumulativen psychischen und physiologischen Effekten des fliegenden Personals auf der Kurzstrecke

    OpenAIRE

    Niederl, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    Die fliegerische Tätigkeit auf der Kurzstrecke in der zivilen Luftfahrt unterliegt arbeitsspezifischen Belastungsfaktoren, die sich in wesentlichen Punkten von denen auf der Langstrecke unterscheiden. Eine hohe Arbeitsbelastung auf der Kurzstrecke ist mit vielen Starts und Landungen am Tag verbunden. Neben der Anzahl der Flugabschnitte können auch lange Flugdienstzeiten und/oder unregelmäßige Arbeitszeiten sowie der Zeitdruck während der Einsätze auf der Kurzstrecke zur Belastung für Cockpitb...

  7. Dissoziation von Sauerstoffmolekülen auf der Al(111) Oberfläche

    OpenAIRE

    Behler, J.

    2004-01-01

    Die Dissoziation von Sauerstoffmolekülen auf der Al(111) Oberfläche ist eine wichtige Modellreaktion für die Adsorption einfacher Moleküle auf Metalloberflächen. Zahlreiche Experimente haben gezeigt, dass die anfängliche Haftwahrscheinlichkeit thermischer Sauerstoffmoleküle beim Auftreffen auf die Al(111) Oberfläche nur etwa ein Prozent beträgt. Eine einfache Erklärung wäre die Existenz von Energiebarrieren auf dem Dissoziationsweg, die nur von Molekülen höherer kinetischer Energie überwunden...

  8. Multimodal Genetic Approach for Molecular Imaging of Vasculature in a Mouse Model of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suero-Abreu, Giselle A; Aristizábal, Orlando; Bartelle, Benjamin B; Volkova, Eugenia; Rodríguez, Joe J; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a genetic approach for in vivo multimodal molecular imaging of vasculature in a mouse model of melanoma. We used a novel transgenic mouse, Ts-Biotag, that genetically biotinylates vascular endothelial cells. After inoculating these mice with B16 melanoma cells, we selectively targeted endothelial cells with (strept)avidinated contrast agents to achieve multimodal contrast enhancement of Tie2-expressing blood vessels during tumor progression. This genetic targeting system provided selective labeling of tumor vasculature and showed in vivo binding of avidinated probes with high specificity and sensitivity using microscopy, near infrared, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. We further demonstrated the feasibility of conducting longitudinal three-dimensional (3D) targeted imaging studies to dynamically assess changes in vascular Tie2 from early to advanced tumor stages. Our results validated the Ts-Biotag mouse as a multimodal targeted imaging system with the potential to provide spatio-temporal information about dynamic changes in vasculature during tumor progression.

  9. Advanced contrast nanoagents for photoacoustic molecular imaging, cytometry, blood test and photothermal theranostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Kim, Jin-Woo; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Various nanoparticles have raised significant interest over the past decades for their unique physical and optical properties and biological utilities. Here we summarize the vast applications of advanced nanoparticles with a focus on carbon nanotube (CNT)-based or CNT-catalyzed contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging, cytometry and theranostics applications based on the photothermal (PT) effect. We briefly review the safety and potential toxicity of the PA/PT contrast nanoagents, while showing how the physical properties as well as multiple biological coatings change their toxicity profiles and contrasts. We provide general guidelines needed for the validation of a new molecular imaging agent in living subjects, and exemplify these guidelines with single-walled CNTs targeted to αvβ3, an integrin associated with tumor angiogenesis, and golden carbon nanotubes targeted to LYVE-1, endothelial lymphatic receptors. An extensive review of the potential applications of advanced contrast agents is provided, including imaging of static targets such as tumor angiogenesis receptors, in vivo cytometry of dynamic targets such as circulating tumor cells and nanoparticles in blood, lymph, bones and plants, methods to enhance the PA and PT effects with transient and stationary bubble conjugates, PT/PA Raman imaging and multispectral histology. Finally, theranostic applications are reviewed, including the nanophotothermolysis of individual tumor cells and bacteria with clustered nanoparticles, nanothrombolysis of blood clots, detection and purging metastasis in sentinel lymph nodes, spectral hole burning and multiplex therapy with ultrasharp rainbow nanoparticles. PMID:22025336

  10. Anatomical image-guided fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction using kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhao, Yue; Fite, Brett Z.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Li, Changqing

    2017-05-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an important in vivo imaging modality to visualize physiological and pathological processes in small animals. However, FMT reconstruction is ill-posed and ill-conditioned due to strong optical scattering in deep tissues, which results in poor spatial resolution. It is well known that FMT image quality can be improved substantially by applying the structural guidance in the FMT reconstruction. An approach to introducing anatomical information into the FMT reconstruction is presented using the kernel method. In contrast to conventional methods that incorporate anatomical information with a Laplacian-type regularization matrix, the proposed method introduces the anatomical guidance into the projection model of FMT. The primary advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require segmentation of targets in the anatomical images. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the proposed approach's feasibility. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed kernel method can separate two FMT targets with an edge-to-edge distance of 1 mm and is robust to false-positive guidance and inhomogeneity in the anatomical image. For the phantom experiments with two FMT targets, the kernel method has reconstructed both targets successfully, which further validates the proposed kernel method.

  11. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn(2+) ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics.

  12. Targeted Molecular Imaging in Adrenal Disease—An Emerging Role for Metomidate PET-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif A. Mendichovszky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal lesions present a significant diagnostic burden for both radiologists and endocrinologists, especially with the increasing number of adrenal ‘incidentalomas’ detected on modern computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. A key objective is the reliable distinction of benign disease from either primary adrenal malignancy (e.g., adrenocortical carcinoma or malignant forms of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PPGL or metastases (e.g., bronchial, renal. Benign lesions may still be associated with adverse sequelae through autonomous hormone hypersecretion (e.g., primary aldosteronism, Cushing’s syndrome, phaeochromocytoma. Here, identifying a causative lesion, or lateralising the disease to a single adrenal gland, is key to effective management, as unilateral adrenalectomy may offer the potential for curing conditions that are typically associated with significant excess morbidity and mortality. This review considers the evolving role of positron emission tomography (PET imaging in addressing the limitations of traditional cross-sectional imaging and adjunctive techniques, such as venous sampling, in the management of adrenal disorders. We review the development of targeted molecular imaging to the adrenocortical enzymes CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 with different radiolabeled metomidate compounds. Particular consideration is given to iodo-metomidate PET tracers for the diagnosis and management of adrenocortical carcinoma, and the increasingly recognized utility of 11C-metomidate PET-CT in primary aldosteronism.

  13. Imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis according to molecular subtype: association with breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Chang, Jung Min; Shin, Sung Ui; Chu, A Jung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) according to molecular subtype and to determine whether the molecular subtype affects breast cancer detection on DBT. This was an institutional review board--approved study with a waiver of informed consent. DBT findings of 288 invasive breast cancers were reviewed according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. Detectability of breast cancer was quantified by the number of readers (0-3) who correctly detected the cancer in an independent blinded review. DBT features and the cancer detectability score according to molecular subtype were compared using Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance. Of 288 invasive cancers, 194 were hormone receptor (HR)-positive, 48 were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive and 46 were triple negative breast cancers. The most common DBT findings were irregular spiculated masses for HR-positive cancer, fine pleomorphic or linear branching calcifications for HER2 positive cancer and irregular masses with circumscribed margins for triple negative breast cancers (p Cancer detectability on DBT was not significantly different according to molecular subtype (p = 0.213) but rather affected by tumour size, breast density and presence of mass or calcifications. Breast cancers showed different imaging features according to molecular subtype; however, it did not affect the cancer detectability on DBT. Advances in knowledge: DBT showed characteristic imaging features of breast cancers according to molecular subtype. However, cancer detectability on DBT was not affected by molecular subtype of breast cancers.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  15. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J M; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; McDonnell, Liam A; Velders, Aldrik H; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2017-01-01

    Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear medicine. In this study a bimodal (or rather, hybrid) tracer that contains both a fluorescent dye and a chelate was used to evaluate the existence of a direct link between mass spectrometry (MS) and in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging findings using fluorescence and radioisotopes. At the same time, the hybrid label was used to determine whether the use of a single isotope label would allow for MS-based diagnostics. A hybrid label that contained both a DTPA chelate (that was coordinated with either 165Ho or 111In) and a Cy5 fluorescent dye was coupled to the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) targeting peptide Ac-TZ14011 (hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011). This receptor targeting tracer was used to 1) validate the efficacy of (165Ho-based) mass-cytometry in determining the receptor affinity via comparison with fluorescence-based flow cytometry (Cy5), 2) evaluate the microscopic binding pattern of the tracer in tumor cells using both fluorescence confocal imaging (Cy5) and LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho), 3) compare in vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) after intravenous administration of hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011 in tumor-bearing mice. Finally, LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho) was linked to fluorescence-based analysis of excised tissue samples (Cy5). Analysis with both mass-cytometry and flow cytometry revealed a similar receptor affinity, respectively 352 ± 141 nM and 245 ± 65 nM (p = 0.08), but with a much lower detection sensitivity for the first modality. In vitro LA-ICP-MS imaging (165Ho) enabled clear discrimination between CXCR4 positive and negative cells, but fluorescence microscopy was required to determine the intracellular distribution. In

  16. p16(INK4A positively regulates p21(WAF1 expression by suppressing AUF1-dependent mRNA decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda H Al-Khalaf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: p16(INK4a and p21(WAF1 are two independent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors encoded by the CDKN2A and CDKN1A genes, respectively. p16(INK4a and p21(WAF1 are similarly involved in various anti-cancer processes, including the regulation of the critical G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle, senescence and apoptosis. Therefore, we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the link between these two important tumor suppressor proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown here that the p16(INK4a protein positively controls the expression of p21(WAF1 in both human and mouse cells. p16(INK4a stabilizes the CDKN1A mRNA through negative regulation of the mRNA decay-promoting AUF1 protein. Immunoprecipitation of AUF1-associated RNAs followed by quantitative RT-PCR indicated that endogenous AUF1 binds to the CDKN1A mRNA in a p16(INK4A-dependent manner. Furthermore, while AUF1 down-regulation increased the expression level of the CDKN1A mRNA, the concurrent knockdown of AUF1 and CDKN2A, using specific silencing RNAs, restored the normal expression of the gene. Moreover, we used EGFP reporter fused to the CDKN2A AU-rich element (ARE to demonstrate that p16(INK4A regulation of the CDKN1A mRNA is AUF1- and ARE-dependent. Furthermore, ectopic expression of p16(INK4A in p16(INK4A-deficient breast epithelial MCF-10A cells significantly increased the level of p21(WAF1, with no effect on cell proliferation. In addition, we have shown direct correlation between p16(INK4a and p21(WAF1 levels in various cancer cell lines. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that p16(INK4a stabilizes the CDKN1A mRNA in an AUF1-dependent manner, and further confirm the presence of a direct link between the 2 important cancer-related pathways, pRB/p16(INK4A and p14(ARF/p53/p21(WAF1.

  17. Meta-analysis of molecular imaging of serotonin transporters in major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewski, Gregor; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Kranz, Georg S; Cumming, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The success of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors has lent support to the monoamine theory of major depressive disorder (MDD). This issue has been addressed in a number of molecular imaging studies by positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography of serotonin reuptake sites (5-HTT) in the brain of patients with MDD, with strikingly disparate conclusions. Our meta-analysis of the 18 such studies, totaling 364 MDD patients free from significant comorbidities or medication and 372 control subjects, revealed reductions in midbrain 5-HTT (Hedges' g=−0.49; 95% CI: (−0.84, −0.14)) and amygdala (Hedges' g=−0.50; 95% CI: (−0.78, −0.22)), which no individual study possessed sufficient power to detect. Only small effect sizes were found in other regions with high binding (thalamus: g=−0.24, striatum: g=−0.32, and brainstem g=−0.22), and no difference in the frontal or cingulate cortex. Age emerged as an important moderator of 5-HTT availability in MDD, with more severe reductions in striatal 5-HTT evident with greater age of the study populations (Pdepression and 5-HTT reductions in the amygdala (P=0.01). Thus, molecular imaging findings indeed reveal widespread reductions of ∼10% in 5-HTT availability in MDD, which may predict altered spatial–temporal dynamics of serotonergic neurotransmission. PMID:24802331

  18. Controlled Fabrication and High-Resolution Imaging of Molecular-Scale Three-Terminal Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Douglas R.; Johnston, Danvers E.; Guiton, Beth S.; Park, T.-H.; Therien, M. J.; Davies, Peter K.; Bonnell, Dawn A.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2007-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges to developing molecular-scale three terminal devices is to precisely fabricate and monitor the formation of the nanometer-scale electrodes (nanogaps). Recently, electromigrated nanogaps have been developed which provide sufficient gate-coupling to produce such devices. We have developed a technique for forming electromigrated nanogaps in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in order to monitor their formation with high-resolution imaging in real time. The technique relies on computer-controlled electromigration using feedback to produce the nanogaps at room temperature. This TEM imaging allows us to monitor the dynamics of the device evolution, where the gaps remain ordered and clear of residue during the process. Using this technique, we find clear visual evidence for the importance of joule heating in the formation of electromigrated nanogaps. These electrodes can also be directly used in the construction of three terminal nanometer-scale devices. Our results have implications on the development of a wide range of novel molecular-scale devices. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NIRT Grant No. 0304531 and MRSEC award DMR05-20020).

  19. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment for precision medicine and theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Chen, Zhihang; Jin, Jiefu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2014-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from cancer and their associated conditions and treatments continue to extract a heavy social and economic global burden despite the transformative advances in science and technology in the twenty-first century. In fact, cancer incidence and mortality are expected to reach pandemic proportions by 2025, and costs of managing cancer will escalate to trillions of dollars. The inability to establish effective cancer treatments arises from the complexity of conditions that exist within tumors, the plasticity and adaptability of cancer cells coupled with their ability to escape immune surveillance, and the co-opted stromal cells and microenvironment that assist cancer cells in survival. Stromal cells, although destroyed together with cancer cells, have an ever-replenishing source that can assist in resurrecting tumors from any residual cancer cells that may survive treatment. The tumor microenvironment landscape is a continually changing landscape, with spatial and temporal heterogeneities that impact and influence cancer treatment outcome. Importantly, the changing landscape of the tumor microenvironment can be exploited for precision medicine and theranostics. Molecular and functional imaging can play important roles in shaping and selecting treatments to match this landscape. Our purpose in this review is to examine the roles of molecular and functional imaging, within the context of the tumor microenvironment, and the feasibility of their applications for precision medicine and theranostics in humans. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The application of multimodal molecular imaging in the diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-bao GAO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the value of multimodal molecular imaging in the diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. Methods Five patients with probable DLB received detailed clinical data collection, neuropsychological tests, head MRI examination, 11C-methyl-N-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl-tropane (11C-β-CFT PET, 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PIB PET and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG PET examination. Results Cognitive dysfunction and visual hallucinations were prominent symptoms in patients with DLB. 11C-β-CFT PET showed that the radioactive uptake significantly reduced in bilateral putamen and caudate nuclei. 11C-PIB PET showed increased radioactive retention in bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex with various degrees. 18F-FDG PET showed glucose hypometabolism in bilateral parietal and occipital cortex. Conclusions Multimodal molecular imaging greatly improves the specificity of clinical diagnosis of DLB, and it is expected to achieve accurate diagnosis before death. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.01.009

  1. Ultrasound molecular imaging of acute cardiac transplantation rejection using nanobubbles targeted to T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Chen, Yihan; Wang, Guohua; Lv, Qing; Yang, Yali; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Pingyu; Liu, Jie; Xie, Yu; Zhang, Li; Xie, Mingxing

    2018-02-08

    Clinical surveillance of acute heart transplantation rejection requires repeated invasive endomyocardial biopsies and noninvasive diagnostic techniques are desperately needed. It is acknowledged that T lymphocyte infiltration is the central process of acute rejection. We hypothesized that ultrasound molecular imaging with T lymphocyte-targeted nanobubbles could be used to detect acute rejection in heart transplantation. In this study, nanobubbles bearing anti-CD3 antibody (NB CD3 ) or isotype antibody (NB con ) were prepared and characterized. There was significant adhesion of NB CD3 to T lymphocytes compared with NB con in vitro. The signal intensity of the adherent NB CD3 was significantly higher than that of the NB con in allograft rats, but not significantly different in isograft rats. Furthermore, the signal intensity of NB CD3 in allograft rats was significantly higher than that in isograft rats, indicating more T lymphocyte infiltration in allograft rats compared with isograft rats. These results were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry examination, and the signal intensity of NB CD3 was positively correlated with the number of T lymphocytes in allograft rats. In summary, ultrasound molecular imaging with T lymphocyte-targeted nanobubbles can detect T lymphocyte infiltration in acute rejection and could be used as a noninvasive method in acute rejection detection after cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of MRI in suspected inner ear malformations; Stellenwert der MRT bei Verdacht auf Innenohrmissbildung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S.; Juettemann, S.; Amaya, B. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Rasinski, C.; Bloching, M. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenkrankheiten; Koenig, E. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenkrankheiten

    2003-12-01

    Purpose: This is a prospective analysis of the value of MRI in suspected inner ear malformations. Materials and Methods: In 50 patients (43 children and young adults, 7 adults) with suspected inner ear malformation MRI (1.5 T) was performed. In addition, 42 of these patients underwent CT. For the analysis of the inner ear structures, the constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence with 0.7 mm slice thickness was used. Functional tests revealed a sensorineural hearing loss or deafness in 82 temporal bones (TB) and a combined hearing loss in 4 TB. The hearing loss was unilateral in 14 patients. MRI and CT findings were compared. Results: Imaging findings were normal in 58 TB. The pathological findings included inner ear malformations (35 TB), inflammatory changes (4 TB), partial obliteration of labyrinth (2 TB) and congenital aural atresia (1 TB). An isolated absence of the cochlear nerve (1 TB) could only be found by MRI. In the remaining cases, an inner ear malformation was diagnosed by MRI and CT with the same confidence but MRI was superior in displaying the fine details. Conclusions: MRI will become the method of choice in the diagnosis of inner ear malformations. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Das Ziel der Arbeit bestand in einer prospektiven Analyse des Stellenwertes der MRT bei Verdacht auf eine Innenohrmissbildung. Material und Methodik: 50 Patienten (43 Kinder und Jugendliche, 7 Erwachsene) mit dringendem Verdacht auf eine Innenohrmissbildung erhielten eine MRT-Untersuchung (1,5 T), bei 42 dieser Patienten wurde auch eine CT durchgefuehrt. Bei der Beurteilung der Innenohrstrukturen kam die CISS-Sequenz mit einer Schichtdicke von 0,7 mm zur Anwendung. Durch Funktionstests wurde an 82 Schlaefenbeinen (SB) eine Innenohrhoerstoerung und an 4 SB eine kombinierte Hoerstoerung diagnostiziert. 14 Patienten hatten eine einseitige Hoerstoerung. MRT- und CT-Ergebnisse wurden verglichen. Ergebnisse: Einen bildgebenden Normalbefund wiesen 58 SB auf. Folgende

  3. Molecular imaging in patients with mood disorders: a review of PET findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiaozhen [Zhejiang University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Department of Psychiatry, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Liu, Weibo; Li, Huichun [Zhejiang University, Department of Psychiatry, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Hong [Zhejiang University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Mood disorders are chronic, recurrent psychiatric disorders with high morbidity rates that cause severe disability. Researchers have used molecular imaging extensively in studies of mood disorders. In this article, we concisely and selectively review the major findings of positron emission tomography studies of patients with mood disorders. Specifically, we describe findings from cerebral blood flow, cerebral glucose/oxygen metabolism, and radioligand studies in both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations. Patients with mood disorders have mood-correlated regional metabolism changes and molecular abnormalities in several neurotransmitter systems. Although the findings of these studies are not completely consistent and confounding factors, including drug effects and specific methodology, should be strictly controlled, these results reveal the pathophysiology of mood disorders and aid the development of novel treatment approaches for mood disorders. Future positron emission tomography research will benefit greatly from the development of better radioligands to simultaneously identify multiple neurotransmitter systems in the specific brain region and the integration of more detecting methods in specifying the neurobiological predictors of treatment response in patients with mood disorders. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in underlying mood disorders will result in aetiological diagnosis and individualization of treatment of these disorders. (orig.)

  4. Der Tempel des Chnum der 18. Dyn. auf Elephantine

    OpenAIRE

    Bommas, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die Rekonstruktion des Chnumtempels der 18. Dyn. auf Elephantine aufgrund der in späteren Bauwerken sekundär verbauten oder vor Ort frei herumliegenden Architekturfragmente. Ausser einem in der Mitte der 90-er Jahre erschienenen Vorbericht ist über den Chnumtempel der 18. Dyn. nie zuvor umfassend geforscht worden. Da aus verschiedenen Gründen Ausgrabungen, die zur Gewinnung des Grundrisses hätten führen können, bis in das Jahr 2000 nicht durchgeführt wurden, s...

  5. Naturliche Stadtformen. Mariout, Szenen des Verfalls oder Hoffnung auf Erhaltung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Aref

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alexandrias Stadttausdehnung ist groesstenteils festgelegt worden durch zwei Naturelemente: das Mittelmeer und den Mariout See. Erholung und Tourismus konzentriert sich an Alexandrias Mittelmeerkueste, waehrend Industrie und Abwassergraeben um den Mariout See gelegen sind. Trotz vieler Plaene und Strategien, den See zu erhalten, haben Stadtaussdehnung, industrielle Verschmutzung und Abwasser einem sehr negatives Einfluss auf das Oekosystem des Sees. Auserdem hat sich der See waehrend der letzen Jahrzente wegen der Landanschemmungen aus dieser ueberbevoelkerten Grossstadt dramatisch verkleinert. Das Essay debattiert die sehr schwierige Frage: welches ist die Zukunft des Sees?Und wie kann man ein Gleichgewicht finden zwischen der Erhaltung des Oekosystems und der notwendingen Stadtendwicklung?

  6. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Expression for Endometrial Receptivity Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Yihan; Yan, Fei; Han, Xiaohua; Wu, Junru; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound (US) molecular imaging by examining the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) on uterus vascular endothelium was applied to evaluate the endometrial receptivity. Methods: VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) and the control UCA (without VEGFR2) were prepared and characterized. Adhesion experiment in vitro was performed with mouse microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3) and the ratio of the number of UCA to that of cells at the same field was compared. In vivo study, randomized boluses of targeted or control UCA were injected into the animals of non-pregnancy (D0), pregnancy on day 2 (D2) and day 4 (D4), respectively. Sonograms were acquired by an ultrasound equipment with a 40-MHz high-frequency transducer (Vevo 2100; VisualSonics, Toronto, Canada). The ultrasonic imaging signals were quantified as the video intensity amplitudes generated by the attachment of VEGFR2-targeted UCA. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays were used for confirmation of VEGFR2 expression. Results: Our results showed that VEGFR2-targeted UCA could bind to bEnd.3 cells with significantly higher affinity than the control UCA (9.8 ± 1.0 bubbles/cell versus 0.7 ± 0.3 bubbles/cell, P 0.05). Moreover, D4 mice showed the highest video intensity amplitude, indicating the highest VEGFR2 expression when compared with D2 and D0 mice (P < 0.01). This was further confirmed by our immunoblotting and immunofluorescence experiments. Conclusion: Ultrasound molecular imaging with VEGFR2-targeted UCA may be used for noninvasive evaluation of endometrial receptivity in murine models. PMID:25553109

  7. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  8. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  9. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: luminal B molecular subtype is associated with enhancement dynamics at MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J; Yoon, Sora C; Silber, James I

    2014-11-01

    To investigate associations between breast cancer molecular subtype and semiautomatically extracted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features. Imaging and genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas and the Cancer Imaging Archive for 48 patients with breast cancer from four institutions in the United States were used in this institutional review board approval-exempt study. Computer vision algorithms were applied to extract 23 imaging features from lesions indicated by a breast radiologist on MR images. Morphologic, textural, and dynamic features were extracted. Molecular subtype was determined on the basis of genomic analysis. Associations between the imaging features and molecular subtype were evaluated by using logistic regression and likelihood ratio tests. The analysis controlled for the age of the patients, their menopausal status, and the orientation of the MR images (sagittal vs axial). There is an association (P = .0015) between the luminal B subtype and a dynamic contrast material-enhancement feature that quantifies the relationship between lesion enhancement and background parenchymal enhancement. Cancers with a higher ratio of lesion enhancement rate to background parenchymal enhancement rate are more likely to be luminal B subtype. The luminal B subtype of breast cancer is associated with MR imaging features that relate the enhancement dynamics of the tumor and the background parenchyma.

  10. Targeting Amino Acid Metabolism for Molecular Imaging of Inflammation Early After Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Bankstahl, Jens P; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Acute tissue inflammation after myocardial infarction influences healing and remodeling and has been identified as a target for novel therapies. Molecular imaging holds promise for guidance of such therapies. The amino acid (11)C-methionine is a clinically approved agent which is thought to accumulate in macrophages, but not in healthy myocytes. We assessed the suitability of positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-methionine for imaging post-MI inflammation, from cell to mouse to man. Uptake assays demonstrated 7-fold higher (11)C-methionine uptake by polarized pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages over anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes (p<0.001). C57Bl/6 mice (n=27) underwent coronary artery ligation or no surgery. Serial (11)C-methionine PET was performed 3, 5 and 7d later. MI mice exhibited a perfusion defect in 32-50% of the left ventricle (LV). PET detected increased (11)C-methionine accumulation in the infarct territory at 3d (5.9±0.9%ID/g vs 4.7±0.9 in remote myocardium, and 2.6±0.5 in healthy mice; p<0.05 and <0.01 respectively), which declined by d7 post-MI (4.3±0.6 in infarct, 3.4±0.8 in remote; p=0.03 vs 3d, p=0.08 vs healthy). Increased (11)C-methionine uptake was associated with macrophage infiltration of damaged myocardium. Treatment with anti-integrin antibodies (anti-CD11a, -CD11b, -CD49d; 100µg) lowered macrophage content by 56% and (11)C-methionine uptake by 46% at 3d post-MI. A patient study at 3d after ST-elevation MI and early reperfusion confirmed elevated (11)C-methionine uptake in the hypoperfused myocardial region. Targeting of elevated amino acid metabolism in pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages enables PET imaging-derived demarcation of tissue inflammation after MI. (11)C-methionine-based molecular imaging may assist in the translation of novel image-guided, inflammation-targeted regenerative therapies.

  11. Excitation-resolved multispectral method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescent molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    Imaging of the pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, owing to the ill-posed nature of the FMT inverse problem, the relatively low quality of the parametric images makes it difficult to investigate the different metabolic processes of the fluorescent targets with small distances. An excitation-resolved multispectral DFMT method is proposed; it is based on the fact that the fluorescent targets with different concentrations show different variations in the excitation spectral domain and can be considered independent signal sources. With an independent component analysis method, the spatial locations of different fluorescent targets can be decomposed, and the fluorescent yields of the targets at different time points can be recovered. Therefore, the metabolic process of each component can be independently investigated. Simulations and phantom experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed excitation-resolved multispectral method can effectively improve the reconstruction accuracy of the parametric images in DFMT.

  12. Mechanistic molecular imaging of cardiac cell therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiujun; Fan, Weiwei; Cao, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Cell-based myocardial regeneration has emerged as a promising therapeutic option for ischemic heart disease, though not yet at the level of routine clinical utility. Despite the encouraging results from initial preclinical studies that have demonstrated improved function and reduced infarct size of the ischemic myocardium following several candidate cell transplantation, the beneficial effects and molecular mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy are still unclear in clinical applications to date, and much remains to be optimized. To improve engraftment, accurate methods are required for tracking cell fate and quantifying functional outcome. In the present review, we summarized the current status and challenges of cardiac cell therapy for ischemic heart disease and discussed the strengths and limitations of currently available in vivo imaging techniques with special focus on the newly developed multimodality approaches for assessing the efficacy of engrafted donor cells. We also addressed the hurdles these imaging modalities are facing, including issues regarding immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of transplanted stem cells, and provided some the future perspectives on stem cell imaging.

  13. A Silicon SPECT System for Molecular Imaging of the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Fritz, Mark A; McDonald, Benjamin S; Durko, Heather L; Furenlid, Lars R; Wilson, Donald W; Peterson, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the feasibility of using silicon double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs) for SPECT imaging of the activity distribution of iodine-125 using a 300-micrometer thick detector. Based on this experience, we now have developed fully customized silicon DSSDs and associated readout electronics with the intent of developing a multi-pinhole SPECT system. Each DSSD has a 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm active area and is 1 mm thick. The strip pitch is 59 micrometers, and the readout of the 1024 strips on each side gives rise to a detector with over one million pixels. Combining four high-resolution DSSDs into a SPECT system offers an unprecedented space-bandwidth product for the imaging of single-photon emitters. The system consists of two camera heads with two silicon detectors stacked one behind the other in each head. The collimator has a focused pinhole system with cylindrical-shaped pinholes that are laser-drilled in a 250 μm tungsten plate. The unique ability to collect projection data at two magnifications simultaneously allows for multiplexed data at high resolution to be combined with lower magnification data with little or no multiplexing. With the current multi-pinhole collimator design, our SPECT system will be capable of offering high spatial resolution, sensitivity and angular sampling for small field-of-view applications, such as molecular imaging of the mouse brain.

  14. In Situ Molecular Imaging of the Biofilm and Its Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Szymanski, Craig J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Cao, B.; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Molecular mapping of live biofilms at submicron resolution presents a grand challenge. Here, we present the first chemical mapping results of biofilm extracellular polymeric sub-stance (EPS) components in biofilms using correlative imaging be-tween super resolution florescence microscopy and liquid time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model organism. Heavy metal anions chro-mate (Cr2O72-) consisting of chromium Cr (VI) was a model envi-ronmental stressor used to treat the biofilms. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be spatially im-aged. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments are found to respond af-ter the biofilm is treated with Cr (VI), leading to biofilm dispersion. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environ-ment are observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibit riboflavin production. The Cr (VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr (III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for mechanistic insight of microbial community processes and communications using in situ imaging mass spectrometry and superresolution optical micros-copy.

  15. Radiation protection in image installations Preclinical Molecular; Protección radiológica en instalaciones de Imagen Molecular Preclínica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martí-Climent, J.M.; Collantes, M.; Prieto, E.; Morán, V.; Ecay, M.; Peñuelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    The preclinical image includes several molecular imaging techniques using ionizing radiation, particularly the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the positron emission tomography (PET) and the autoradiographic image. Each technique uses different probes which allow imaging of a variety of metabolic processes. Sometimes they are used together with X-ray equipment which can obtain anatomical images. Consequently, research performed in preclinical molecular imaging facilities should be done in a context in which radiation protection is applied. Within radiological risks to the staff operating such facilities, the irradiation produced to hands due to the administration of radiotracers and to animals manipulation should be of major concern; therefore training and shielding are important. The design of the radioactive facility will be determined by the various activities undertaken. In particular, it will depend on the various preclinical molecular imaging techniques that would be developed and on the functional relationship that the facility has with the institution in which it is placed; particularly the animal housing facility and radiopharmacy unit. [Spanish] La imagen preclínica engloba distintas técnicas de imagen molecular que utilizan radiaciones ionizantes, destacando la tomografía por emisión de fotón único (SPECT), la tomografía de emisión de positrones (PET) y la imagen autorradiográfica. Cada una de ellas utiliza distintas sondas que permiten obtener imágenes de una gran variedad de procesos metabólicos. En ocasiones se emplean junto a equipos de rayos X que permiten obtener imágenes anatómicas. En consecuencia, la investigación en las instalaciones de imagen molecular preclínica deberá realizarse en un contexto en el que se aplique la protección radiológica. De entre los riesgos radiológicos del personal que opera este tipo de instalaciones destaca la irradiación de las manos producida tanto por la administración de los

  16. The Use of Radiation Detectors in Medicine: The Future of Molecular Imaging and Multimodality Imaging: Advantages and Technological Challenges (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late ’70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this series of three lectures I will try to present how high energy physics and medical imaging development have both benefited by t...

  17. Emerging clinical applications of PET based molecular imaging in oncology: the promising future potential for evolving personalized cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana K Dhingra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the potential of advanced applications of functional molecular imaging in assessing tumor biology and cellular characteristics with emphasis on positron emission tomography (PET applications with both 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG and non-FDG tracers. The inherent heterogeneity of cancer cells with their varied cellular biology and metabolic and receptor phenotypic expression in each individual patient and also intra-and inter-lesionally in the same individual mandates for transitioning from a generalized "same-size-fits-all" approach to personalized medicine in oncology. The past two decades have witnessed improvement of oncological imaging through CT, MR imaging, PET, subsequent movement through hybrid or fusion imaging with PET/CT and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT-CT, and now toward the evolving PET/MR imaging. These recent developments have proven invaluable in enhancing oncology care and have the potential to help image the tumor biology at the cellular level, followed by providing a tailored treatment. Molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics or Radiomics, biology-driven interventional radiology and theranostics, all hold immense potential to serve as a guide to give "start and stop" treatment for a patient on an individual basis. This will likely have substantial impact on both treatment costs and outcomes. In this review, we bring forth the current trends in molecular imaging with established techniques (PET/CT, with particular emphasis on newer molecules (such as amino acid metabolism and hypoxia imaging, somatostatin receptor based imaging, and hormone receptor imaging and further potential for FDG. An introductory discussion on the novel hybrid imaging techniques such as PET/MR is also made to understand the futuristic trends.

  18. Molecular Imaging Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Spontaneous Nasal Tumors in Canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Tyler J. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Deveau, Michael A. [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Kubicek, Lyndsay [Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); White, Pamela [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chappell, Richard J. [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Forrest, Lisa J. [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert, E-mail: rjeraj@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy can inform and guide treatment management. Most studies have so far focused on assessing a single imaging biomarker. The goal of this study was to explore a number of different molecular imaging biomarkers as surrogates of resistance to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with spontaneous sinonasal tumors were treated with accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy, receiving either 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy each or 10 fractions of 5.0 Gy each to the gross tumor volume. Patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-, fluorothymidine (FLT)-, and Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM)-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging before therapy and FLT and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging during therapy. In addition to conventional maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) measurements, imaging metrics providing response and spatiotemporal information were extracted for each patient. Progression-free survival was assessed according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumor. The prognostic value of each imaging biomarker was evaluated using univariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analysis was also performed but was restricted to 2 predictor variables due to the limited number of patients. The best bivariable model was selected according to pseudo-R{sup 2}. Results: The following variables were significantly associated with poor clinical outcome following radiation therapy according to univariable analysis: tumor volume (P=.011), midtreatment FLT SUV{sub mean} (P=.018), and midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.006). Large decreases in FLT SUV{sub mean} from pretreatment to midtreatment were associated with worse clinical outcome (P=.013). In the bivariable model, the best 2-variable combination for predicting poor outcome was high midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.022) in

  19. Microultrasound Molecular Imaging of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in a Mouse Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Rychak

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency microultrasound imaging of tumor progression in mice enables noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging at excellent spatial and temporal resolution, although microultrasonography alone does not offer molecular scale data. In the current study, we investigated the use of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents bearing targeting ligands specific for molecular markers of tumor angiogenesis using high-frequency microultrasound imaging. A xenograft tumor model in the mouse was used to image vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2 expression with microbubbles conjugated to an anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody or an isotype control. Microultrasound imaging was accomplished at a center frequency of 40 MHz, which provided lateral and axial resolutions of 40 and 90 μm, respectively. The B-mode (two-dimensional mode acoustic signal from microbubbles bound to the molecular target was determined by an ultrasound-based destruction-subtraction scheme. Quantification of the adherent microbubble fraction in nine tumor-bearing mice revealed significant retention of VEGFR-2-targeted microbubbles relative to control-targeted microbubbles. These data demonstrate that contrast-enhanced microultrasound imaging is a useful method for assessing molecular expression of tumor angiogenesis in mice at high resolution.

  20. Einflüsse vergesellschaftender Faktoren auf posttraditionale Vergemeinschaftungsformen am Beispiel der eSport-Szene

    OpenAIRE

    Schmuck, André; Schmuck, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    "Dieses Paper stellt Erkenntnisse vor, die im Rahmen einer empirischen Untersuchung der 'eSport-Szene' gewonnen werden konnten. Einerseits werden Einflüsse und Auswirkungen gesellschaftlicher Wandlungs- und Veränderungsprozesse (Technisierung, Kommerzialisierung, Wettbewerb) auf posttraditionale Vergemeinschaftungsformen und auf die sozialen Beziehungen involvierter Akteure dargestellt. Andererseits werden daraus ableitbare Überlegungen zum Beitrag technikzentrierter jugendkultureller Szenen ...

  1. Radiogenomics of Glioblastoma: Machine Learning-based Classification of Molecular Characteristics by Using Multiparametric and Multiregional MR Imaging Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickingereder, Philipp; Bonekamp, David; Nowosielski, Martha; Kratz, Annekathrin; Sill, Martin; Burth, Sina; Wick, Antje; Eidel, Oliver; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Radbruch, Alexander; Debus, Jürgen; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Jones, David; Pfister, Stefan; Wick, Wolfgang; von Deimling, Andreas; Bendszus, Martin; Capper, David

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association of multiparametric and multiregional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features with key molecular characteristics in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Materials and Methods Retrospective data evaluation was approved by the local ethics committee, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Preoperative MR imaging features were correlated with key molecular characteristics within a single-institution cohort of 152 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Preoperative MR imaging features (n = 31) included multiparametric (anatomic and diffusion-, perfusion-, and susceptibility-weighted images) and multiregional (contrast-enhancing regions and hyperintense regions at nonenhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging) information with histogram quantification of tumor volumes, volume ratios, apparent diffusion coefficients, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and intratumoral susceptibility signals. Molecular characteristics determined included global DNA methylation subgroups (eg, mesenchymal, RTK I "PGFRA," RTK II "classic"), MGMT promoter methylation status, and hallmark copy number variations (EGFR, PDGFRA, MDM4, and CDK4 amplification; PTEN, CDKN2A, NF1, and RB1 loss). Univariate analyses (voxel-lesion symptom mapping for tumor location, Wilcoxon test for all other MR imaging features) and machine learning models were applied to study the strength of association and discriminative value of MR imaging features for predicting underlying molecular characteristics. Results There was no tumor location predilection for any of the assessed molecular parameters (permutation-adjusted P > .05). Univariate imaging parameter associations were noted for EGFR amplification and CDKN2A loss, with both demonstrating increased Gaussian-normalized relative cerebral blood volume and Gaussian-normalized relative cerebral blood flow values (area under the receiver operating characteristics curve: 63

  2. Isoflavone und Soja haben keine Wirkung auf die Knochendichte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burckhardt P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavone sind eine Untergruppe von östrogenähnlichen Pflanzensteroiden, welche sich vor allem in Sojaprodukten finden. Es wird ihnen eine östrogenähnliche, knochenschützende Wirkung zugeschrieben. Aber die genaue Analyse der wissenschaftlichen Literatur ergibt, dass abgesehen von den Tierversuchen nur wenige klinische Versuche mit diesen Substanzen als kontrollierte, randomisierte Studien durchgeführt worden sind. Dabei wurden positive Teilresultate hochgespielt. Wissenschaftliche Metaanalysen dieser Versuche kamen eindeutig zum Schluss, dass Soja und Isoflavone keine Wirkung auf die Knochendichte aufzeigen. Es hat sich aber ergeben, dass Equol, das von bestimmten Bakterien im Darm aus dem Isoflavon Daidzein gebildet wird, die Substanz ist, welche am meisten mit den Östrogen-Rezeptoren beta bindet, und dass nur ca. 30 % der Frauen zur Equol-Bildung befähigt sind, in Asien aber 50 %. Deswegen wurden auch mit Equol klinische Versuche durchgeführt, und zwar bei Frauen, die kein Equol bilden konnten. Aber wiederum blieben die Resultate negativ bezüglich einer Wirkung auf die Knochendichte. Es muss daher geschlossen werden, dass Isoflavone und Equol in der Prävention und Therapie der Osteoporose wirkungslos sind.

  3. Isovlavone und Soja haben keine Wirkung auf die Knochendichte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burckhardt P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavone sind eine Untergruppe von östrogenähnlichen Pflanzensteroiden, welche sich vor allem in Sojaprodukten finden. Es wird ihnen eine östrogenähnliche, knochenschützende Wirkung zugeschrieben. Aber die genaue Analyse der wissenschaftlichen Literatur ergibt, dass abgesehen von den Tierversuchen nur wenige klinische Versuche mit diesen Substanzen als kontrollierte, randomisierte Studien durchgeführt worden sind. Dabei wurden positive Teilresultate hochgespielt. Wissenschaftliche Metaanalysen dieser Versuche kamen eindeutig zum Schluss, dass Soja und Isoflavone keine Wirkung auf die Knochendichte aufzeigen. Es hat sich aber ergeben, dass Equol, das von bestimmten Bakterien im Darm aus dem Isoflavon Daidzein gebildet wird, die Substanz ist, welche am meisten mit den Östrogen-Rezeptoren beta bindet, und dass nur ca. 30 % der Frauen zur Equol-Bildung befähigt sind, in Asien aber 50 %. Deswegen wurden auch mit Equol klinische Versuche durchgeführt, und zwar bei Frauen, die kein Equol bilden konnten. Aber wiederum blieben die Resultate negativ bezüglich einer Wirkung auf die Knochendichte. Es muss daher geschlossen werden, dass Isoflavone und Equol in der Prävention und Therapie der Osteoporose wirkungslos sind.

  4. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  5. Einfluss von Mykorrhizapilzen und assoziativen Bakterien auf die Bioverfügbarkeit von Nähr- und Schadelementen bei Kulturpflanzen auf Schwermetall belasteten Böden

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Celia

    2008-01-01

    In Freiland- und Gefäßversuchen sollten Aufnahme der Schwermetalle (SM) und Wuchsverhalten an Kulturpflanzen im Hinblick auf die Wirkung von arbuskulären Mykorrhizapilzen (AM) Glomus intraradices, des Bakterienstammes Pseudomonas fluorescens (RA56) und als Dualinokulation auf Schwermetall belasteten Böden untersucht werden. Als Versuchspflanzen wurden Mais (Zea maize L.) und Weidelgras (Lolium multiflorum L.) und zusätzlich die Sonnenblume (Helianthus annuus L.) in Gefäßversuchen eingesetzt...

  6. Sodium and T1rho MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2006-11-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1rho relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1rho, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1rho relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1rho relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1rho in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1rho dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1rho relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1rho data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models

  7. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G.; Torres G, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gonzalez V, A. [UAEM, Facultad de Medicina, Toluca (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de [INCMNSZ, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non Hodgkin's Iymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 prepared from Iyophilized kits, and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. Whole-body images were acquired at different times after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC or {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities > 95 %. Regions of interest (ROls) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust the biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3 {+-} 0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h and the mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv. Results showed that after administration of 7 GBq of {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to whole body would be 0.7 Gy (0.1 mGy/MBq) which is the indicated dose for non Hodgkin's Iymphome therapies. (Author)

  8. ING4 inhibits the translation of proto-oncogene MYC by interacting with AUF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meiling; Pan, Chunyang; Zhang, Lantian; Ding, Chenhong; Chen, Fei; Wang, Qinwan; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xin

    2013-06-05

    The ING4 tumor suppressor plays a significant role in various cancer-related cellular processes. AUF1 affects the stability and/or translation of multiple mRNAs via binding to an AU-rich element in the 3'-untranslated regions. In this study, we identify AUF1 as a novel and direct binding partner of ING4. mRNP immunoprecipitation assays indicated that ING4, AUF1 and MYC mRNA present in the same mRNP complex. ING4 suppressed MYC protein expression without altering MYC mRNA levels, and abolished the cell proliferation induced by AUF1 in K562 cells. These results suggest that ING4 may regulate MYC translation by its association with AUF1. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonlinear contrast enhancement in photoacoustic molecular imaging with gold nanosphere encapsulated nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Lombardo, Michael; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Pelivanov, Ivan; Perez, Camilo; Xia, Jinjun; Matula, Thomas; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A composite contrast agent, a nanoemulsion bead with assembled gold nanospheres at the interface, is proposed to improve the specific contrast of photoacoustic molecular imaging. A phase transition in the bead's core is induced by absorption of a nanosecond laser pulse with a fairly low laser fluence (˜3.5 mJ/cm2), creating a transient microbubble through dramatically enhanced thermal expansion. This generates nonlinear photoacoustic signals with more than 10 times larger amplitude compared to that of a linear agent with the same optical absorption. By applying a differential scheme similar to ultrasound pulse inversion, more than 40 dB contrast enhancement is demonstrated with suppression of background signals.

  10. Nonlinear contrast enhancement in photoacoustic molecular imaging with gold nanosphere encapsulated nanoemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Lombardo, Michael; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Perez, Camilo; Xia, Jinjun; Matula, Thomas; Pozzo, Danilo; O' Donnell, Matthew [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, and Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Pelivanov, Ivan [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, and Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); International Laser Center, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-20

    A composite contrast agent, a nanoemulsion bead with assembled gold nanospheres at the interface, is proposed to improve the specific contrast of photoacoustic molecular imaging. A phase transition in the bead's core is induced by absorption of a nanosecond laser pulse with a fairly low laser fluence (∼3.5 mJ/cm{sup 2}), creating a transient microbubble through dramatically enhanced thermal expansion. This generates nonlinear photoacoustic signals with more than 10 times larger amplitude compared to that of a linear agent with the same optical absorption. By applying a differential scheme similar to ultrasound pulse inversion, more than 40 dB contrast enhancement is demonstrated with suppression of background signals.

  11. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  12. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  13. p16INK4Ainduces senescence and inhibits EMT through microRNA-141/microRNA-146b-5p-dependent repression of AUF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2017-03-01

    Senescence and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes are under the control of common tumor suppressor proteins, EMT transcription factors, and microRNAs. However, the molecular mechanisms that coordinate the functional link between senescence and EMT are still elusive. We have shown here that p16 INK4A -related induction of senescence is mediated through miR-141 and miR-146b-5p. These two microRNAs are up-regulated in aging human fibroblast and epithelial cells. Furthermore, miR-141 and miR146b-5p trigger cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and induce senescence in primary human fibroblasts and breast cancer cells in the presence and absence of p16 INK4A . Like p16 INK4A -induced senescence, miR-141/miR146b-5p-related senescence is not associated with secretory phenotype, and is mediated through the RNA binding protein AUF1. We have further demonstrated that p16 INK4A and its downstream miRNA targets inhibit EMT through suppressing the EMT inducer ZEB1 in an AUF1-dependent manner. Indeed, AUF1 binds the mRNA of this gene leading to increase in its level. These results indicate that p16 INK4A controls both senescence and EMT through repressing EMT-related transcription factor via miR-141/miR146b-5p and their target AUF1. This sheds more light on the molecular basis of the tumor suppressive functions of p16 INK4A , which represses both the proliferative and the migratory/invasive capacities of cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Label-free molecular imaging of bacterial communities of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nameera; Polisetti, Sneha; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Dunham, Sage J. B.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms, such as those formed by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are complex, matrix enclosed, and surface-associated communities of cells. Bacteria that are part of a biofilm community are much more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than their free-floating counterparts. P. aeruginosa biofilms are associated with persistent and chronic infections in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and HIV-AIDS. P. aeruginosa synthesizes and secretes signaling molecules such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which are implicated in quorum sensing (QS), where bacteria regulate gene expression based on population density. Processes such as biofilms formation and virulence are regulated by QS. This manuscript describes the powerful molecular imaging capabilities of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in conjunction with multivariate statistical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of signaling molecules, secondary metabolites and virulence factors in biofilm communities of P. aeruginosa. Our observations reveal that the laboratory strain PAO1C synthesizes and secretes 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxides and 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinolones in high abundance, while the isogenic acyl homoserine lactone QS-deficient mutant (ΔlasIΔrhlI) strain produces predominantly 2-alkyl-quinolones during biofilm formation. This study underscores the use of CRM, along with traditional biological tools such as genetics, for studying the behavior of microbial communities at the molecular level.

  15. In Vivo Optical Molecular Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity following Celecoxib Therapy for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul A. Sheth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an optical molecular imaging approach to measure the efficacy of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib on tumor growth rate through its effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity. A xenograft model of colorectal cancer was generated in nude mice, which were then randomized to receive celecoxib versus vehicle. MMP activity was measured by an enzyme-activatable optical molecular probe. A novel genetically engineered mouse (GEM model of colorectal cancer was also used to assess celecoxib's effect on MMP activity, which was measured by quantitative fluorescence colonoscopy. Subcutaneously implanted xenograft tumors were 84% (SD 20.2% smaller in volume in the treatment group versus the control group. Moreover, treated animals exhibited only a 7.6% (SEM 9% increase in MMP activity versus 106% (SEM 8% for untreated animals. There was an apparent linear relationship (r = .91 between measured MMP activity and tumor growth rate. Finally, in the GEM model experiment, treated murine tumors remained relatively unchanged in volume and MMP activity; however, untreated tumors grew significantly and showed an increase in MMP activity. This method may provide for the improved identification of patients for whom COX-2 inhibition therapy is indicated by allowing one to balance the patient's cardiovascular risk with the cancer's responsiveness to celecoxib.

  16. Molecular imaging of aquaglycero-aquaporins: its potential for cancer characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuriko; Furukawa, Takako; Obata, Takayuki; Saga, Tsuneo

    2013-01-01

    Aquaglycero-aquaporins (agAQPs) are one of the water channel proteins located in the cell membrane that transport not only water but also some small solutes such as glycerol. Since agAQPs are involved in cancer proliferation and malignancy, it might be possible to utilize them as new targets for cancer molecular imaging. In this study, we investigated whether agAQPs can be specifically targeted by using [(14)C]-labeled glycerol ([(14)C]glycerol), which passes through agAQPs. In the in vitro experiments, comparing the cancer cell lines with different expression levels of AQP3 and AQP9, major agAQPs known to be expressed in cancers, and examining the effect of their inhibitors on these cells, the expression of AQP3 and AQP9 in cell lines was shown to be closely related to [(14)C]glycerol uptake. When [(14)C]glycerol was injected into tumor-bearing mice, Spearman's rank coefficient analysis revealed that radioactivity levels in tumor and in plasma were mutually correlated only in tumors expressing agAQPs at a high level. These results indicate the possibility of using agAQPs as new targets to characterize cancer using radiolabeled glycerol as a molecular probe.

  17. Molecular imaging analysis of Rab GTPases in the regulation of phagocytosis and macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and macropinocytosis, actin-dependent endocytic pathways that mediate the uptake of particles and fluid, respectively, are fundamental routes that enable cells to sample their environment, eliminate pathogens and endogenous cell debris, and contribute to immunoprotection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. These processes require a well-organized network of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane transport, which are spatiotemporally regulated by small GTPases. The Rab family of small GTPases, which functions as molecular switches, plays central roles in intracellular membrane trafficking. Although multiple Rab proteins are localized to phagosomes and regulate phagosome maturation, the precise role of each Rab family member in Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytosis is not fully characterized. Recently, we revealed that Rab35 and Rab20 are important regulators of phagosome formation and maturation, respectively. This review summarizes the functional implication of these Rab GTPases during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in macrophages. Currently, compared with our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of receptor-mediated endocytosis including phagocytosis, the molecular components and signaling cascades of macropinocytosis remain poorly elucidated. Our time-lapse imaging showed that several Rab GTPases are sequentially recruited to the membrane of macropinosomes. Based on our observations, these findings regarding the spatiotemporal localization of Rab GTPases during macropinocytosis are introduced.

  18. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  19. Effect of Molecular Chain Structure on Fracture Mechanical Properties of Aeronautical Polymethyl Methacrylate Using Extended Digital Image Correlation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to investigate the fracture mechanical properties of aeronautical polymethyl methacrylate, which has been treated with directional tensile technology. Because of the special processing of directional polymethyl methacrylate, the molecular chain structures are different in different directions. The mechanical properties depend on the specific molecular chain structures. We use extended digital image correlation to measure the displacement field near the tip of the crack when the cracks grow in different directions in directional polymethyl methacrylate. We then tested the critical load for different specimens and analyzed the fracture morphology of the different specimens. Thanks to the experimental results, a molecular chain model of directional polymethyl methacrylate could be established. The analysis results using the molecular chain model are consistent with the experiments, which confirms the reliability of the molecular chain model.

  20. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  1. Molecular Imaging on the Cerebral Pathological Damage Target of Ketamine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Hong-jie1,2;HU Shu1;JIA Shao-wei1;GAO Zhou1;WANG Tong3;ZHAO Zheng-qin1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the cerebral pathological damage target which result from abusing ketamine through molecular imaging techniques, 20 cases of ketamine dependent patients looking for treatment at the Peking University Shenzhen Hospital and 31 healthy volunteers were included in this study, all of them got brain SPECT DAT imaging. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0. The bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen of healthy volunteers were roughly equally large, and the radioactive distribution of DAT in healthy volunteers were uniform and symmetrical. The bilateral corpora striatum showed typical “panda eyes” pattern. But the bilateral corpora striatum of ketamine dependent patients got smaller in shape, got disorders in pattern, and the radioactive distribution of DAT reduced or defected or even got disturbance and with much more non-specific radioactive. The V, m and Ra of bilateral corpora striatum in ketamine dependent patients were (21.03±3.15) cm3, (22.08±3.31) g and (5.37±1.08) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than the healthy volunteers (p<0.01. The cerebral pathological damage target which resulted from abusing ketamine was similar to those of compound codeine phosphate antitussive solution dependence, heroin dependence and MDMA dependence, all of these psychoactive substances damaged the function of DAT.

  2. MRI-guided fiber-based fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical atherosclerosis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoqiang; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frederic

    2014-09-01

    Multi-modal imaging combining fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) with MRI could provide information in these two modalities as well as optimize the recovery of functional information with MR-guidance. Here, we present a MRI-guided FMT system. An optical probe was designed consisting of a fiber plate on the top and bottom sides of the animal bed, respectively. In experiment, animal was installed between the two plates. Mounting fibers on each plate, transmission measuring could be conducted from both sides of the animal. Moreover, an accurate fluorescence reconstruction was achieved with MRI-derived anatomical guidance. The sensitivity of the FMT system was evaluated with a phantom showing that with long fibers, it was sufficient to detect 10nM Cy5.5 solution with ~28.5 dB in the phantom. The system was eventually used to image MMP activity involved in atherosclerosis with two ATX mice and two control mice. The reconstruction results were in agreement with ex vivo measurement.

  3. Renal water molecular diffusion characteristics in healthy native kidneys: assessment with diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the characteristics of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetic resonance (MR imaging in healthy native kidneys. METHODS: Seventy-three patients without chronic kidney disease underwent DTI-MRI with spin echo-echo planar (SE-EPI sequences accompanied by an array spatial sensitivity encoding technique (ASSET. Cortical and medullary mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD, AD and RD, fractional anisotropy (FA and primary, secondary and tertiary eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, λ3 were analysed in both kidneys and in different genders. RESULTS: Cortical MD, λ2, λ3, and RD values were higher than corresponding medullary values. The cortical FA value was lower than the medullary FA value. Medullary λ1 and RD values in the left kidney were lower than in the right kidney. Medullary λ2, and λ3 values in women were higher than those in men. Medullary FA values in women were lower than those in men. Medullary FA (r = 0.351, P = 0.002 and λ1 (r = 0.277, P = 0.018 positively correlated with eGFR. Medullary FA (r = -0.25, P = 0.033 negatively correlated with age. CONCLUSIONS: Renal water molecular diffusion differences exist in human kidneys and genders. Age and eGFR correlate with medullary FA and primary eigenvalue.

  4. Assessment of Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis with Three-Dimensional Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Streeter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI with ultrasonography relies on microbubble contrast agents (MCAs adhering to a ligand-specific target for applications such as characterizing tumor angiogenesis. It is projected that ultrasonic (US MI can provide information about tumor therapeutic response before the detection of phenotypic changes. One of the limitations of preclinical US MI is that it lacks a comprehensive field of view. We attempted to improve targeted MCA visualization and quantification by performing three-dimensional (3D MI of tumors expressing αvβ3 integrin. Volumetric acquisitions were obtained with a Siemens Sequoia system in cadence pulse sequencing mode by mechanically stepping the transducer elevationally across the tumor in 800-micron increments. MI was performed on rat fibrosarcoma tumors (n = 8 of similar sizes using MCAs conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptide targeted to αvβ3 integrin. US MI and immunohistochemical analyses show high microbubble targeting variability, suggesting that individual two-dimensional (2D acquisitions risk misrepresenting more complex heterogeneous tissues. In 2D serial studies, where it may be challenging to image the same plane repeatedly, misalignments as small as 800 microns can introduce substantial error. 3D MI, including volumetric analysis of inter- and intra-animal targeting, provides a thorough way of characterizing angiogenesis and will be a more robust assessment technique for the future of MI.

  5. Assessment of molecular imaging of angiogenesis with three-dimensional ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Jason E; Gessner, Ryan C; Tsuruta, James; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) with ultrasonography relies on microbubble contrast agents (MCAs) adhering to a ligand-specific target for applications such as characterizing tumor angiogenesis. It is projected that ultrasonic (US) MI can provide information about tumor therapeutic response before the detection of phenotypic changes. One of the limitations of preclinical US MI is that it lacks a comprehensive field of view. We attempted to improve targeted MCA visualization and quantification by performing three-dimensional (3D) MI of tumors expressing αvβ3 integrin. Volumetric acquisitions were obtained with a Siemens Sequoia system in cadence pulse sequencing mode by mechanically stepping the transducer elevationally across the tumor in 800-micron increments. MI was performed on rat fibrosarcoma tumors (n  =  8) of similar sizes using MCAs conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptide targeted to αvβ3 integrin. US MI and immunohistochemical analyses show high microbubble targeting variability, suggesting that individual two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions risk misrepresenting more complex heterogeneous tissues. In 2D serial studies, where it may be challenging to image the same plane repeatedly, misalignments as small as 800 microns can introduce substantial error. 3D MI, including volumetric analysis of inter- and intra-animal targeting, provides a thorough way of characterizing angiogenesis and will be a more robust assessment technique for the future of MI.

  6. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Eric A; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  7. Cardiac MRI in suspected myocarditis; MRT des Herzens bei Verdacht auf Myokarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, O.; Oberholzer, K.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologie der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Mohrs, O. [Klinik fuer Radiologie der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Cardioangiologisches Centrum Bethanien, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of ECG-gated breath-hold MRI in diagnosing acute myocardidits. Material and methods: Cardiac MRI was performed on 21 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis. ECG-gated breath-hold T2-weighted images with fat suppression were acquired in 3 standard views. T1-weighted imaging (FLASH) was performed 10 min after IV administration of Gd-DTPA. Laboratory data included creatine kinase, troponin T and serological tests, ECG findings and echocardiography. Imaging findings were retrospectively compared to the discharge diagnoses. Signal alterations were semiquantitatively classified. Results: Acute myocarditis was diagnosed in 9 patients and cardiac sarcoidosis in 2 patients. Late enhancement was observed in 4 patients with acute myocarditis and in both patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. Semiquantitative evaluation revealed 9 true positive, 9 true negative, 1 false positive and 2 false negative results. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI has the potential to detect acute myocarditis and to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis. Late enhancement of Gd-DTPA can be found in both viral myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Beurteilung des diagnostischen Potenzials der MRT des Herzens bei Verdacht auf akute Myokarditis. Material und Methoden: 21 konsekutive Patienten mit Verdacht auf Myokarditis wurden mit einem standardisierten Protokoll untersucht. Zunaechst wurden T{sub 2}-gewichtete, EKG-getriggerte fettsupprimierte Sequenzen in den 3 Standardebenen angefertigt. 10 Minuten nach intravenoeser Injektion von GD-DTPA wurden T{sub 1}-gewichtete TurboFLASH-Sequenzen angefertigt. Von allen Patienten wurden EKG, Echokardiographie und die Laborbefunde einschliesslich Creatinin-Kinase, Troponin T und der Infektionsserologie protokolliert. Das Ausmass der Signalveraenderungen im MRT wurde semiquantitativ klassifiziert. Die Ergebnisse der MRT wurden retrospektiv mit den Entlassungsdiagnosen korreliert. Ergebnisse: Bei 9 Patienten lag nach

  8. Recent Advances in Molecular Imaging of Premalignant Gastrointestinal Lesions and Future Application for Early Detection of Barrett Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang Hyun; Han, Na Young; Kwon, Chang Il; Lee, Hoo Keun; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time. This focused review series introduces high-resolution imaging modalities that are being evaluated preclinically and clinically for the detection of early GI cancers, especially Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging. In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging. PMID:24570878

  9. Advances in serological, imaging techniques and molecular diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Ali; Karanis, Panagiotis; Fallahi, Shirzad

    2018-01-12

    Toxoplasmosis is worldwide distributed zoonotic infection disease with medical importance in immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and congenitally infected newborns. Having basic information on the traditional and new developed methods is essential for general physicians and infectious disease specialists for choosing a suitable diagnostic approach for rapid and accurate diagnosis of the disease and, consequently, timely and effective treatment. We conducted English literature searches in PubMed from 1989 to 2016 using relevant keywords and summarized the recent advances in diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was most used method in past century. Recently advanced ELISA-based methods including chemiluminescence assays (CLIA), enzyme-linked fluorescence assay (ELFA), immunochromatographic test (ICT), serum IgG avidity test and immunosorbent agglutination assays (ISAGA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity. Recent studies using recombinant or chimeric antigens and multiepitope peptides method demonstrated very promising results to development of new strategies capable of discriminating recently acquired infections from chronic infection. Real-time PCR and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) are two recently developed PCR-based methods with high sensitivity and specificity and could be useful to early diagnosis of infection. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and ultrasonography could be useful, although their results might be not specific alone. This review provides a summary of recent developed methods and also attempts to improve their sensitivity for diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Serology, molecular and imaging technologies each has their own advantages and limitations which can certainly achieve definitive diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by combining these diagnostic techniques.

  10. Molecular imaging of neutropilin-1 receptor using photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Minsong; Liu, Bo; Miller, Kathy D.; Guo, Lili

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to develop and test a molecular probe that can detect the expression of neutropilin-1 receptor (NPR-1) in vivo using fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: NPR-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and some breast cancer cells, and binds to vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF165, a growth factor associated with pathological tumor angiogenesis. This receptor is coexpressed with VEGFR2 and shown to enhance the binding of VEGF165; therefore, it has the potential to be used as a marker of angiogenic activity and targeted for therapy. Material and Methods: A peptide specific to NPR-1 receptor was synthesized and conjugated to a NIR fluorochrome (IRDye800CW) and was intravenously injected into mice with breast tumors (MCF7VEGF). Probe kinetics was monitored in vivo via near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) within an optical imager for up to 72 hours within the tumor and compared to other organs (liver, muscle) for binding specificity. A multivariate fitting algorithm was used to spectrally deconvolve the IRDye800CW from endogenous hemoglobin signature (hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation). Results: Dynamics of the NIR fluorescence signal within the first hour after injection indicates specific binding compared to muscle, with an average tumor-to-muscle ration of 2.00 (+/- 0.27). Spectral analysis clearly indentified the presence of the NPR-1 probe. Based on calibration data, the average tumor concentration from both NIRF and PCT-S was measured to be ~200-300nM. Conclusion: These preliminary results show the capability of PCT to image an exogenous probe in vivo in addition to its hemoglobin state.

  11. Grouping of Metastatic Thyroid Carcinoma by Molecular Imaging Features to Allow for Individualized Treatment, with Emphasis on the TENIS Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Parghane, Rahul Vithalrao

    2016-09-01

    The process of radioiodine ((131)I) refractoriness, dedifferentiation, and development of thyroglobulin elevation and negative iodine scintigraphy (TENIS) syndrome in metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) could be viewed as a disease continuum rather than a single event or an all-or-none phenomenon. In this report, the important role of molecular functional imaging in systematically exploring the disease biology and course of metastatic DTC is presented. Making this role the base, this report proposes a novel clinical classification for TENIS syndrome using molecular functional imaging. Such an endeavor, in our view, would aid in classification into subgroups and development of an individualized treatment strategy for patients with metastatic DTC. Case illustrations are presented that substantiate this viewpoint, including the value of combined assessment in selected cases and the requirement of a multipronged treatment approach for certain case scenarios. In addition to multiple other considerations, we believe that molecular functional imaging-based characterization of metastatic lesions could evolve as an important determinant for defining the optimal treatment strategy in patients with metastatic DTC, making the clinical management more rational and scientific. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  12. Interrogating tumor metabolism and tumor microenvironments using molecular positron emission tomography imaging. Theranostic approaches to improve therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Orit; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging technology that is becoming increasingly important for the measurement of physiologic, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at cellular and molecular levels in patients with cancer. Formation, development, and aggressiveness of tumor involve a number of molecular pathways, including intrinsic tumor cell mutations and extrinsic interaction between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Currently, evaluation of these processes is mainly through biopsy, which is invasive and limited to the site of biopsy. Ongoing research on specific target molecules of the tumor and its microenvironment for PET imaging is showing great potential. To date, the use of PET for diagnosing local recurrence and metastatic sites of various cancers and evaluation of treatment response is mainly based on [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG), which measures glucose metabolism. However, [(18)F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer and does not give enough insight into tumor biology and/or its vulnerability to potential treatments. Hence, there is an increasing need for the development of selective biologic radiotracers that will yield specific biochemical information and allow for noninvasive molecular imaging. The possibility of cancer-associated targets for imaging will provide the opportunity to use PET for diagnosis and therapy response monitoring (theranostics) and thus personalized medicine. This article will focus on the review of non-[(18)F]FDG PET tracers for specific tumor biology processes and their preclinical and clinical applications.

  13. Image analysis, methanogenic activity measurements, and molecular biological techniques to monitor granular sludge from EGSB reactors fed with oleic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, M.A.; Roest, de K.; Stams, A.J.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Amaral, A.L.; Pons, M.N.; Ferreira, E.C.; Mota, M.; Alves, M.

    2003-01-01

    Morphological changes in anaerobic granular sludge fed with increasing loads of oleic acid were quantified by image analysis. The combination of this technique with data on-the accumulation of adsorbed long chain fatty acid and with the molecular characterization of microbial community gave insight

  14. Man-made mineral fibres - effects on morphology of the lung; Pulmonale Reaktionsmuster auf kuenstliche Mineralfasern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Respondek, M. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Krankenanstalten Bergmannsheil -Universitaetsklinik-, Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Wiethege, T. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Krankenanstalten Bergmannsheil -Universitaetsklinik-, Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Mueller, K.M. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Krankenanstalten Bergmannsheil -Universitaetsklinik-, Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    1995-12-01

    Epidemiological and animal experimental studies of the fibrogenic and carcinogenic properties of natural mineral fibres in human lungs resulted in the development of man-made mineral fibres as substitutes for asbestos containing material. To evaluate the fibrogenic and neoplastic potency of man-made mineral fibres, rockwool fibres were investigated in an in vivo model. Wistar rats received a single intratracheal instillation of 2 ml rockwool fibres suspension (10 mg/ml buffered saline) into the right lung. The animals were sacrificed after a period of one day up to 730 days after instillation. The lungs were investigated by histomorphological, immunohistochemical, physical-analytical and molecular genetic techniques. Within the first 14 days after intratracheal instillation of fibres an exsudative, but unspecific stage of a diffuse alveolar damage could be documented. In the following observation time we found a different active proliferating phase with hyperplasia and metaplasia of bronchial and alveolar surface epithelial cells, granuloma formation and a different predominance of inflammatory cells. During the whole observation time an abundant clearance function of the macrophages was found. We could demonstrate a reduction of the medium fibre length due to fibre breakage from 18 {mu}m at the beginning to 7 {mu}m 730 days after instillation. Immunohistochemical and molecular genetic investigations to define the role of the tumor suppressor gene p53 did not provide references to a p53 gene mutation in the gene locus examined. However, a P53 protein accumulation points to a fibre induced damage of individual cells. According to our results, the man-made rockwool fibres have a weaker fibrogenic potential than crocidolite which was investigated in previous studies. Tumors could not be documented during the observation time of 730 days. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Zur Bewertung einer moeglichen fibrogenen und neoplastischen Potenz der kuenstlichen Mineralfasern wurden

  15. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center; Imagen molecular an investigation biomedica. La Unidad de Imagen Molecular del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-07-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  16. Toward ultrasound molecular imaging with phase-change contrast agents: an in vitro proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S; Streeter, Jason E; Mullin, Lee B; Matsunaga, Terry O; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs), which normally consist of nanoscale or microscale droplets of liquid perfluorocarbons in an encapsulating shell, can be triggered to undergo a phase transition to the highly echogenic gaseous state upon the input of sufficient acoustic energy. As a result of the subsequent volumetric expansion, a number of unique applications have emerged that are not possible with traditional ultrasound microbubble contrast agents. Although many studies have explored the therapeutic aspects of the PCCA platform, few have examined the potential of PCCAs for molecular imaging purposes. In this study, we demonstrate a PCCA-based platform for molecular imaging using α(v)β(3)-targeted nanoscale PCCAs composed of low-boiling-point perfluorocarbons. In vitro, nanoscale PCCAs adhered to target cells, could be activated and imaged with a clinical ultrasound system and produced a six-fold increase in image contrast compared with non-targeted control PCCAs and a greater than fifty-fold increase over baseline. Data suggest that low-boiling-point nanoscale PCCAs could enable future ultrasound-based molecular imaging techniques in both the vascular and extravascular spaces. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prognostic value of molecular and imaging biomarkers in patients with supratentorial glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Riva, Marco; Raneri, Fabio; Pessina, Federico [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Olivari, Laura; Rossi, Marco; Alfieri, Tommaso [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Soffietti, Riccardo; Ruda, Roberta [University and City of Health and Science Hospital, Neuro-Oncology, Turin (Italy); Piccardo, Arnoldo [Galliera Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Genova (Italy); Bizzi, Alberto [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Fernandes, Bethania [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Simonelli, Matteo; Zucali, Paolo Andrea [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Radiology Department, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    We evaluated the relationship between {sup 11}C-methionine PET ({sup 11}C-METH PET) findings and molecular biomarkers in patients with supratentorial glioma who underwent surgery. A consecutive series of 109 patients with pathologically proven glioma (64 men, 45 women; median age 43 years) referred to our Institution from March 2012 to January 2015 for tumour resection and who underwent preoperative {sup 11}C-METH PET were analysed. Semiquantitative evaluation of the {sup 11}C-METH PET images included SUVmax, region of interest-to-normal brain SUV ratio (SUVratio) and metabolic tumour volume (MTV). Imaging findings were correlated with disease outcome in terms of progression-free survival (PFS), and compared with other clinical biological data, including IDH1 mutation status, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT promoter methylation. The patients were monitored for a mean period of 16.7 months (median 13 months). In all patients, the tumour was identified on {sup 11}C-METH PET. Significant differences in SUVmax, SUVratio and MTV were observed in relation to tumour grade (p < 0.001). IDH1 mutation was found in 49 patients, 1p/19q codeletion in 58 patients and MGMT promoter methylation in 74 patients. SUVmax and SUVratio were significantly inversely correlated with the presence of IDH1 mutation (p < 0.001). Using the 2016 WHO classification, SUVmax and SUVratio were significantly higher in patients with primary glioblastoma (IDH1-negative) than in those with other diffuse gliomas (p < 0.001). Relapse or progression was documented in 48 patients (median PFS 8.7 months). Cox regression analysis showed that SUVmax and SUVratio, tumour grade, tumour type on 2016 WHO classification, IDH1 mutation status, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT promoter methylation were significantly associated with PFS. None of these factors was found to be an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. {sup 11}C-METH PET parameters are significantly correlated with histological grade and IDH1

  18. Molecular imaging of alkaloids in khat (Catha edulis) leaves with MeV-SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenčič, Boštjan; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Vavpetič, Primož; Rupnik, Zdravko; Bučar, Klemen; Vencelj, Matjaž; Kelemen, Mitja; Matsuo, Jiro; Kusakari, Masakazu; Siketić, Zdravko; Al-Jalali, Muhammad A.; Shaltout, Abdallah; Pelicon, Primož

    2017-08-01

    Imaging Mass Spectroscopy (IMS) is a unique research tool providing localization and identification of a wide range of biomolecules as essential data to understand biochemical processes in living organisms. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with high-energy heavy ions (MeV-SIMS) is emerging as a promising IMS technique for chemical imaging of biological tissue. We measured the molecular mass spatial distributions in leaves of khat (Catha edulis). Khat is a natural drug plant, native to eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In these countries, fresh leaves are being chewed by significant part of population. It was reported that 80% of the adult population in Yemen chew the khat leaves. The main stimulating effects of khat are induced by a monoamine alkaloid called cathinone. During leaf ageing, cathinone is further metabolised to cathine and norephedrine. Earlier studies identified the alkaloids in khat, however little is known on their spatial distribution, reflecting the biosynthesis and accumulation in the tissue. Chemical mapping of alkaloids on cross-sections of khat leaves by MeV-SIMS was done at JSI by a pulsed 5.8 MeV 35Cl6+ beam, focused to a diameter of 15 μm, using a linear time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer with a mass resolution of 500. In addition, measurements of MeV-SIMS mass spectra were performed at Kyoto University by a continuous broad beam of 6 MeV 63Cu4+ ions at an orthogonal TOF spectrometer with a high mass resolution of 11,000. Sections of leaves were analysed and mass spectra obtained at both MeV-SIMS setups were compared. Tissue-level distributions of detected alkaloids are presented and discussed.

  19. Novel {sup 111}In-labelled bombesin analogues for molecular imaging of prostate tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, M. de; Bernard, H.F.; Krenning, E.P.; Jong, M. de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erion, J.L. [Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); BioSynthema Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Schmidt, M.A. [Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Pharmacia Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Srinivasan, A. [Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Waser, B.; Reubi, J.C. [University of Berne, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2007-08-15

    It has been shown that some primary human tumours and their metastases, including prostate and breast tumours, overexpress gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. Bombesin (BN) is a neuropeptide with a high affinity for these GRP receptors. We demonstrated successful scintigraphic visualisation of BN receptor-positive tumours in preclinical studies using the radiolabelled BN analogue [{sup 111}In-DTPA-Pro{sup 1},Tyr{sup 4}]BN. However, the receptor affinity as well as the serum stability of this analogue leave room for improvement. Therefore new {sup 111}In-labelled BN analogues were synthesised and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The receptor affinity of the new BN analogues was tested on human GRP receptor-expressing prostate tumour xenografts and rat colon sections. Analogues with high receptor affinity (low nM range) were selected for further evaluation. Incubation in vitro of GRP receptor-expressing rat CA20948 and human PC3 tumour cells with the {sup 111}In-labelled analogues resulted in rapid receptor-mediated uptake and internalisation. The BN analogue with the best receptor affinity and in vitro internalisation characteristics, Cmp 3 ([{sup 111}In-DTPA-ACMpip{sup 5},Tha{sup 6},{beta}Ala{sup 11},Tha{sup 13},Nle{sup 14}]BN(5-14)), was tested in vivo in biodistribution studies using rats bearing GRP receptor-expressing CA20948 tumours, and nude mice bearing human PC3 xenografts. Injection of {sup 111}In-labelled Cmp 3 in these animals showed high, receptor-mediated uptake in receptor-positive organs and tumours which could be visualised using planar gamma camera and microSPECT/CT imaging. With their enhanced receptor affinity and their rapid receptor-mediated internalisation in vitro and in vivo, the new BN analogues, and especially Cmp 3, are promising candidates for use in diagnostic molecular imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy of GRP receptor-expressing cancers. (orig.)

  20. Radiopharmacological evaluation of (18)F-labeled phosphatidylserine-binding peptides for molecular imaging of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Melinda; Perreault, Amanda; Kapty, Janice; Richter, Susan; Foerster, Christian; Bergman, Cody; Way, Jenilee; Mercer, John; Wuest, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Radiolabeled phosphatidylserine (PS)-binding peptides represent an innovative strategy for molecular imaging of apoptosis with positron emission tomography (PET). The goal of this study was the radiopharmacological evaluation of radiolabeled peptides for their binding to PS on apoptotic cancer cells, involving metabolic stability, cellular uptake, biodistribution, and dynamic PET imaging experiments. Binding of peptides LIKKPF, PGDLSR, FBz-LIKKPF, FBz-PGDLSR, FBAM-CLIKKPF and FBAM-CPGDLSR to PS was analyzed in a newly developed radiometric binding assay using (64)Cu-labeled wild-type annexin-V as radiotracer. Radiolabeling of most potent peptides with fluorine-18 was carried out with thiol-selective prosthetic group [(18)F]FBAM to give [(18)F]FBAM-CLIKKPF and [(18)F]FBAM-CPGDLSR. [(18)F]FBAM-labeled peptides were studied in camptothecin-induced apoptotic human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells, and in a murine EL4 tumor model of apoptosis using dynamic PET imaging and biodistribution. Peptides LIKKPF and PGDLSR inhibited binding of (64)Cu-labeled annexin-V to immobilized PS in the millimolar range (IC50 10-15 mM) compared to annexin-V (45 nM). Introduction of FBAM prosthetic group slightly increased inhibitory potencies (FBAM-CLIKKPF: IC50 = 1 mM; FBAM-CPGDLSR: IC50 = 6 mM). Radiolabeling succeeded in good radiochemical yields of 50-54% using a chemoselective alkylation reaction of peptides CLIKKPF and CPGDLSR with [(18)F]FBAM. In vivo metabolic stability studies in mice revealed 40-60% of intact peptides at 5 min p.i. decreasing to 25% for [(18)F]FBAM-CLIKKPF and less than 5% for [(18)F]FBAM-CPGDLSR at 15 min p.i.. Cell binding of [(18)F]FBAM-CLIKKPF in drug-treated Jurkat cells was significantly higher compared to untreated cells, but this was not observed for [(18)F]FBAM-CPGDLSR. Dynamic PET imaging experiments showed that baseline uptake of [(18)F]FBAM-CLIKKPF in EL4 tumors was higher (SUV(5min) 0.46, SUV(60min) 0.13) compared to [(18)F]FBAM-CPGDLSR (SUV(5min) 0

  1. The inflammatory/cancer-related IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop includes AUF1 and maintains the active state of breast myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrayani, Siti-Fauziah; Al-Harbi, Bothaina; Al-Ansari, Mysoon M; Silva, Gabriela; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-07-05

    The IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop links inflammation to cancer and maintains cells at a transformed state. Similarly, cancer-associated myofibroblats remains active even in absence of cancer cells. However, the molecular basis of this sustained active state remains elusive. We have shown here that breast cancer cells and IL-6 persistently activate breast stromal fibroblasts through the stimulation of the positive IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB feedback loop. Transient neutralization of IL-6 in culture inhibited this signaling circuit and reverted myofibrobalsts to a normalized state, suggesting the implication of the IL-6 autocrine feedback loop as well. Importantly, the IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB pro-inflammatory circuit was also active in cancer-associated fibroblasts isolated from breast cancer patients. Transient inhibition of STAT3 by specific siRNA in active fibroblasts persistently reduced the level of the RNA binding protein AUF1, blocked the loop and normalized these cells. Moreover, we present clear evidence that AUF1 is also part of this positive feedback loop. Interestingly, treatment of breast myofibroblasts with caffeine, which has been previously shown to persistently inhibit active breast stromal fibroblasts, blocked the positive feedback loop through potent and sustained inhibition of STAT3, AKT, lin28B and AUF1. These results indicate that the IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop includes AUF1 and is responsible for the sustained active status of cancer-associated fibroblasts. We have also shown that normalizing myofibroblasts, which could be of great therapeutic value, is possible through the inhibition of this procarcinogenic circuit.

  2. Glioma FMISO PET/MR Imaging Concurrent with Antiangiogenic Therapy: Molecular Imaging as a Clinical Tool in the Burgeoning Era of Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Link, Jeanne M.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Cha, Soonmee

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a focused overview of the current use of positron emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging in the burgeoning era of personalized medicine in the treatment of patients with glioma. Specifically, we demonstrate the utility of PET imaging as a tool for personalized diagnosis and therapy by highlighting a case series of four patients with recurrent high grade glioma who underwent 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET/MR (magnetic resonance) imaging through the course of antiangiogenic therapy. Three distinct features were observed from this small cohort of patients. First, the presence of pseudoprogression was retrospectively associated with the absence of hypoxia. Second, a subgroup of patients with recurrent high grade glioma undergoing bevacizumab therapy demonstrated disease progression characterized by an enlarging nonenhancing mass with newly developed reduced diffusion, lack of hypoxia, and preserved cerebral blood volume. Finally, a reduction in hypoxic volume was observed concurrent with therapy in all patients with recurrent tumor, and markedly so in two patients that developed a nonenhancing reduced diffusion mass. This case series demonstrates how medical imaging has the potential to influence personalized medicine in several key aspects, especially involving molecular PET imaging for personalized diagnosis, patient specific disease prognosis, and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:28536391

  3. Molecular Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Stably Expressing Human PET Reporter Genes After Zinc Finger Nuclease-Mediated Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfs, Esther; Holvoet, Bryan; Ordovas, Laura; Breuls, Natacha; Helsen, Nicky; Schönberger, Matthias; Raitano, Susanna; Struys, Tom; Vanbilloen, Bert; Casteels, Cindy; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Van Laere, Koen; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Deroose, Christophe M

    2017-10-01

    Molecular imaging is indispensable for determining the fate and persistence of engrafted stem cells. Standard strategies for transgene induction involve the use of viral vectors prone to silencing and insertional mutagenesis or the use of nonhuman genes. Methods: We used zinc finger nucleases to induce stable expression of human imaging reporter genes into the safe-harbor locus adeno-associated virus integration site 1 in human embryonic stem cells. Plasmids were generated carrying reporter genes for fluorescence, bioluminescence imaging, and human PET reporter genes. Results: In vitro assays confirmed their functionality, and embryonic stem cells retained differentiation capacity. Teratoma formation assays were performed, and tumors were imaged over time with PET and bioluminescence imaging. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the application of genome editing for targeted integration of human imaging reporter genes in human embryonic stem cells for long-term molecular imaging. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  4. Molecular Imaging of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 After Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Derlin, Thorsten; Haghikia, Arash; Napp, L Christian; Wang, Yong; Ross, Tobias L; Schäfer, Andreas; Tillmanns, Jochen; Wester, Hans J; Wollert, Kai C; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2015-12-01

    An assay for molecular imaging of myocardial CXCR4 expression was evaluated, in order to obtain mechanistic insights noninvasively based on quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has emerged as a therapeutic target after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), because of its role in inflammatory and progenitor cell recruitment. PET with the specific CXCR4 ligand, gallium-68 ((68)Ga)-pentixafor, was performed in mice (n = 53) and compared with ex vivo autoradiography, immunohistochemistry, and left ventricular flow cytometry. In addition, 12 patients were imaged at 2 to 8 days after AMI. In mice, (68)Ga-pentixafor identified regional CXCR4 upregulation in the infarct region, peaking at 3 days (infarct/remote [I/R] ratio 1.5 ± 0.2 at 3 days vs. 1.2 ± 0.3 at 7 days; p = 0.03), corresponding to a flow cytometry-based peak of CD45+ leukocytes and immunohistochemical detection of CD68+ macrophages and Ly6G+ granulocytes. Blockade with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 abolished the signal. No specific uptake was found in sham-operated or control animals. Long-term treatment with oral enalapril attenuated the CXCR4 signal (I/R 1.2 ± 0.2 at 3 days and 1.0 ± 0.0.1 at 7 days; p = 0.01 vs. untreated). Patients showed variable degrees of CXCR4 upregulation in the infarct region. No single clinical parameter allowed for prediction of CXCR4 signal strength. At multivariate analysis, a combination of infarct size and time after reperfusion predicted the CXCR4 infarct signal (rmultiple = 0.73; p = 0.03). Infarct signal in the myocardium was paralleled by elevated pentixafor uptake in bone marrow (r = 0.61; p = 0.04), which highlighted systemic interactions. Targeted PET imaging with (68)Ga-pentixafor identifies the global and regional CXCR4 expression pattern in myocardium and systemic organs. CXCR4 upregulation after AMI coincides with inflammatory cell infiltration, but shows interindividual variability in patients. This may have implications for

  5. Fetal and maternal absorbed dose estimates for positron-emitting molecular imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-09-01

    -generation computational models can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to pregnant women and the embryo/fetus undergoing PET/CT imaging procedures. This work also contributes to a better understanding of the absorbed dose distribution in the fetus. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  7. Unmasking Silent Endothelial Activation in the Cardiovascular System Using Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliere, Julie; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara; Choudhury, Robin P; Quenault, Aurélien; Le Béhot, Audrey; Delage, Christine; Chauveau, Dominique; Schanstra, Joost P; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Vivien, Denis; Gauberti, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial activation is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases, acting either as a cause or a consequence of organ injury. To date, we lack suitable methods to measure endothelial activation in vivo. In the present study, we developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method allowing non-invasive endothelial activation mapping in the vasculature of the main organs affected during cardiovascular diseases. In clinically relevant contexts in mice (including systemic inflammation, acute and chronic kidney diseases, diabetes mellitus and normal aging), we provided evidence that this method allows detecting endothelial activation before any clinical manifestation of organ failure in the brain, kidney and heart with an exceptional sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrated that diabetes mellitus induces chronic endothelial cells activation in the kidney and heart. Moreover, aged mice presented activated endothelial cells in the kidneys and the cerebrovasculature. Interestingly, depending on the underlying condition, the temporospatial patterns of endothelial activation in the vascular beds of the cardiovascular system were different. These results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting silent endothelial activation occurring in conditions associated with high cardiovascular risk using molecular MRI.

  8. Mass spectrometry imaging: Towards mapping the elemental and molecular composition of the rhizosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veličković, Dušan; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2017-06-01

    This short review will discuss and provide perspective into the utilization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) in studying the rhizosphere. It also serves to compliment the multi-omic focused review by White et al. in this journal issue, as MSI is capable of elucidating chemical distributions within samples of interest in an in situ fashions, and thus can provide spatial context to MS omics data in complementary experimental endeavors. The majority of reported MSI-based studies of plant-microbe interactions have focused on the phyllosphere and ‘associated rhizosphere’ (e.g., material that is not removed during harvesting), as sample preparation for these in situ analyses tends to be a limiting factor. These studies have provided valuable insight into the spatial arrangement of proteins, peptides, lipids, and other metabolites within these systems. We intend for this short review to be a primer about the history of MSI and its role in plant-microbe analysis. Along the way we reference many comprehensive reviews for the interested reader. Lastly, we offer a perspective on the future of MSI and its use in understanding the molecular transformations beyond what we coined as the ‘associated rhizosphere’ to the rest of rhizosphere zone and into the bulk soil.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  10. Development of patient-specific molecular imaging phantoms using a 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, J I; Long, C; Rushforth, D; Chittenden, S J; Cummings, C; Flux, G D

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate rapid prototyping technology for the production of patient-specific, cost-effective liquid fillable phantoms directly from patient CT data. Liver, spleen, and kidney volumes were segmented from patient CT data. Each organ was converted to a shell and filling holes and leg supports were added using computer aided design software and prepared for printing. Additional fixtures were added to the liver to allow lesion inserts to be fixed within the structure. Phantoms were printed from an ultraviolet curable photopolymer using polyjet technology on an Objet EDEN 500V 3D printer. The final print material is a clear solid acrylic plastic which is watertight, rigid, and sufficiently durable to withstand multiple assembly and scanning protocols. Initial scans of the phantoms have been performed with Tc-99m SPECT and F-18 PET/CT. The organ geometry showed good correspondence with anatomical references. The methodology developed can be generally applied to other anatomical or geometrical phantoms for molecular imaging.

  11. Advances in Molecular Imaging of Locally Delivered Targeted Therapeutics for Central Nervous System Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Umberto; Marnell, Christopher S.; Chang, Raymond; Cho, William C.; Ting, Richard; Maachani, Uday B.; Souweidane, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to the recent advances in the development of chemotherapeutics, the morbidity and mortality of many cancers has decreased significantly. However, compared to oncology in general, the field of neuro-oncology has lagged behind. While new molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics have emerged, the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) renders systemic delivery of these clinical agents suboptimal. To circumvent the BBB, novel routes of administration are being applied in the clinic, ranging from intra-arterial infusion and direct infusion into the target tissue (convection enhanced delivery (CED)) to the use of focused ultrasound to temporarily disrupt the BBB. However, the current system depends on a “wait-and-see” approach, whereby drug delivery is deemed successful only when a specific clinical outcome is observed. The shortcomings of this approach are evident, as a failed delivery that needs immediate refinement cannot be observed and corrected. In response to this problem, new theranostic agents, compounds with both imaging and therapeutic potential, are being developed, paving the way for improved and monitored delivery to central nervous system (CNS) malignancies. In this review, we focus on the advances and the challenges to improve early cancer detection, selection of targeted therapy, and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy, brought forth by the development of these new agents. PMID:28208698

  12. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  13. Advances in Molecular Imaging of Locally Delivered Targeted Therapeutics for Central Nervous System Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Tosi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the recent advances in the development of chemotherapeutics, the morbidity and mortality of many cancers has decreased significantly. However, compared to oncology in general, the field of neuro-oncology has lagged behind. While new molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics have emerged, the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB renders systemic delivery of these clinical agents suboptimal. To circumvent the BBB, novel routes of administration are being applied in the clinic, ranging from intra-arterial infusion and direct infusion into the target tissue (convection enhanced delivery (CED to the use of focused ultrasound to temporarily disrupt the BBB. However, the current system depends on a “wait-and-see” approach, whereby drug delivery is deemed successful only when a specific clinical outcome is observed. The shortcomings of this approach are evident, as a failed delivery that needs immediate refinement cannot be observed and corrected. In response to this problem, new theranostic agents, compounds with both imaging and therapeutic potential, are being developed, paving the way for improved and monitored delivery to central nervous system (CNS malignancies. In this review, we focus on the advances and the challenges to improve early cancer detection, selection of targeted therapy, and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy, brought forth by the development of these new agents.

  14. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vergara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx. The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%–78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50 and PLA2 activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with 67Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming.

  15. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Michael; Stock, Lorenz G; Traxler, Lukas; Leclercq, Laurent; Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot; Cottet, Hervé; Stutz, Hanno; Ebner, Andreas

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vivo targeted molecular magnetic resonance imaging of free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy within mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Saunders, D; Carrizales, J; Lupu, F; Silasi-Mansat, R; Ehrenshaft, M; Mason, R P

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We present a method for in vivo observation of free radical events within murine diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study reports on in vivo imaging of protein/lipid radicals using molecular MRI (mMRI) and immuno-spin trapping (IST) in diabetic cardiac muscle. To detect free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy, streptozotocin (STZ)-exposed mice were given 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and administered an anti-DMPO probe (biotin-anti-DMPO antibody-albumin-Gd-DTPA). For controls, non-diabetic mice were given DMPO (non-disease control), and administered an anti-DMPO probe; or diabetic mice were given DMPO but administered a non-specific IgG contrast agent instead of the anti-DMPO probe. DMPO administration started at 7 weeks following STZ treatment for 5 days, and the anti-DMPO probe was administered at 8 weeks for MRI detection. MRI was used to detect a significant increase (p radicals in cardiac tissue than non-diabetic mice.

  17. Role of Artificial Intelligence Techniques (Automatic Classifiers) in Molecular Imaging Modalities in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascianelli, Silvia; Scialpi, Michele; Amici, Serena; Forini, Nevio; Minestrini, Matteo; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Sinzinger, Helmut; Schillaci, Orazio; Palumbo, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a very active Computer Science research field aiming to develop systems that mimic human intelligence and is helpful in many human activities, including Medicine. In this review we presented some examples of the exploiting of AI techniques, in particular automatic classifiers such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Classification Tree (ClT) and ensemble methods like Random Forest (RF), able to analyze findings obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) scans of patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases, in particular Alzheimer's Disease. We also focused our attention on techniques applied in order to preprocess data and reduce their dimensionality via feature selection or projection in a more representative domain (Principal Component Analysis - PCA - or Partial Least Squares - PLS - are examples of such methods); this is a crucial step while dealing with medical data, since it is necessary to compress patient information and retain only the most useful in order to discriminate subjects into normal and pathological classes. Main literature papers on the application of these techniques to classify patients with neurodegenerative disease extracting data from molecular imaging modalities are reported, showing that the increasing development of computer aided diagnosis systems is very promising to contribute to the diagnostic process.

  18. Image reconstruction of fluorescent molecular tomography based on the tree structured Schur complement decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jiajun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inverse problem of fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT often involves complex large-scale matrix operations, which may lead to unacceptable computational errors and complexity. In this research, a tree structured Schur complement decomposition strategy is proposed to accelerate the reconstruction process and reduce the computational complexity. Additionally, an adaptive regularization scheme is developed to improve the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Methods The global system is decomposed level by level with the Schur complement system along two paths in the tree structure. The resultant subsystems are solved in combination with the biconjugate gradient method. The mesh for the inverse problem is generated incorporating the prior information. During the reconstruction, the regularization parameters are adaptive not only to the spatial variations but als