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Sample records for auditory canal cholesteatoma

  1. First Branchial Cleft Fistula Associated with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi fakhim, Shahin; Naderpoor, Masoud; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoosh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal. Case Report: This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection. Conclusion: It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear. PMID:25320705

  2. First branchial cleft fistula associated with external auditory canal stenosis and middle ear cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi Fakhim, Shahin; Naderpoor, Masoud; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoosh

    2014-10-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal. This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection. It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear.

  3. First Branchial Cleft Fistula Associated with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

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    shahin abdollahi fakhim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal.   Case Report: This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection.   Conclusion:  It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear.

  4. Clinical characteristics of keratosis obturans and external auditory canal cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Jung, Young Hoon; Oh, Jeong-Hoon

    2015-02-01

    Keratosis obturans (KO) and external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC) have been considered separate entities. While the disorders are distinct, they share many overlapping characteristics, making a correct diagnosis difficult. In the present study, we compared their clinical characteristics and radiological features to clarify the diagnostic criteria. Retrospective case series. Academic medical center. The clinical data of 23 cases of EACC and KO were retrospectively reviewed. The following clinical characteristics were compared between the 2 groups: sex, age, onset of symptoms, follow-up period, audiometric results, and imaging findings on temporal bone computed tomography including bilaterality, location, and the presence of extension to adjacent tissue. The mean age of the EACC group was significantly older than that of the KO group. All of the cases of EACC occurred unilaterally, and bilateral occurrences of KO were observed in 4 of 9 cases. All of the lesions in the KO group were circumferential, and no lesion in the EACC group invaded the superior canal wall. No significant differences in symptoms, such as acute otalgia, otorrhea, and hearing loss, were noted between the 2 groups. The incidence of conductive hearing impairment more than 10 dB was higher in the KO group than in the EACC group. Thus, KO and EACC are 2 distinct disease entities that share common features in clinical characteristics except for predominant age and bilaterality. Conservative treatment with meticulous cleaning of the lesion was successful in most cases with a long-term follow-up. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  5. Fibrous Dysplasia of the Temporal Bone with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Secondary Cholesteatoma.

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    Liu, Yu-Hsi; Chang, Kuo-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a slowly progressive benign fibro-osseous disease, rarely occurring in temporal bones. In these cases, most bony lesions developed from the bony part of the external auditory canals, causing otalgia, hearing impairment, otorrhea, and ear hygiene blockade and probably leading to secondary cholesteatoma. We presented the medical history of a 24-year-old woman with temporal monostotic fibrous dysplasia with secondary cholesteatoma. The initial presentation was unilateral conductive hearing loss. A hard external canal tumor contributing to canal stenosis and a near-absent tympanic membrane were found. Canaloplasty and type I tympanoplasty were performed, but the symptoms recurred after 5 years. She received canal wall down tympanomastoidectomy with ossciculoplasty at the second time, and secondary cholesteatoma in the middle ear was diagnosed. Fifteen years later, left otorrhea recurred again and transcanal endoscopic surgery was performed for middle ear clearance. Currently, revision surgeries provide a stable auditory condition, but her monostotic temporal fibrous dysplasia is still in place.

  6. First branchial cleft sinus presenting with cholesteatoma and external auditory canal atresia.

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    Yalçin, Sinasi; Karlidağ, Turgut; Kaygusuz, Irfan; Demirbağ, Erhan

    2003-07-01

    First branchial cleft abnormalities are rare. They may involve the external auditory canal and middle ear. We describe a 6-year-old girl with congenital external auditory canal atresia, microtia, and cholesteatoma of mastoid and middle ear in addition to the first branchial cleft abnormalities. Clinical features of the patient are briefly described and the embryological relationship between first branchial cleft anomaly and external auditory canal atresia is discussed. The surgical management of these lesions may be performed, both the complete excision of the sinus and reconstructive otologic surgery.

  7. Spontaneous external auditory canal cholesteatoma in a young male: Imaging findings and differential diagnoses

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    Yashant Aswani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cholesteatoma is a non-neoplastic lesion of the petrous temporal bone commonly described as “skin in the wrong place.” It typically arises within the middle ear cavity, may drain externally via tympanic membrane (mural type, or may originate in the external auditory canal (EAC. The latter type is rarely encountered and typically affects the elderly. EAC cholesteatoma poses diagnostic challenges because it has numerous differential diagnoses. The present case describes a 19-year-old male who presented with gradually progressive diminution of hearing in a previously naïve right ear since 8 months. A soft tissue attenuation lesion confined to the right EAC with erosion of the canal on computed tomography prompted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The lesion showed restricted diffusion on MRI. Thus, a diagnosis of spontaneous EAC cholesteatoma was established. The case elucidates the rarity of spontaneous EAC cholesteatoma in a young male. In addition, it describes the role of imaging to detect, delineate the extent, and characterize lesions of petrous temporal bone. The case also discusses common differential diagnoses of EAC cholesteatoma, as well as the importance of diffusion weighted imaging in EAC cholesteatoma similar to its middle ear counterpart.

  8. A comparison of patterns of disease extension in keratosis obturans and external auditory canal cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnabe, Akihiro; Hara, Mariko; Hasegawa, Masayo; Matsuzawa, Shingo; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the different pathways of progression to the middle ear in keratosis obturans (KO) and external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC). Retrospective case review. Referral hospital otolaryngology department. Patients with KO or EACC and middle ear disease who underwent surgical management were included. Four ears of 4 patients (mean age, 41.25 yr) were the KO group, and 5 ears of 4 patients (mean age, 49.5 yr) were the EACC group. Intraoperative findings of the middle ear cavity were investigated in KO and EACC groups. In the KO group, 3 patients had a perforated tympanic membrane and cholesteatoma in the tympanic cavity. The other patient had preoperative right facial palsy. Removal of the keratin plug revealed an adherent tympanic membrane. In intraoperative findings, the tympanic segment of the fallopian canal was found to be eroded because of inflammation. No case initially progressed to the mastoid cavity. Four patients had external auditory canal cholesteatoma with middle ear disease. In EACC group, all patients had initial progression to the mastoid cavity. KO tends to progress initially to the tympanic cavity via a diseased tympanic membrane. EACC tends to progress to the mastoid cavity via destruction of the posterior bony canal. This is the first report to investigate differences in pathway of progression to the middle ear cavity in these 2 diseases.

  9. External auditory canal cholesteatoma and keratosis obturans: the role of imaging in preventing facial nerve injury.

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    McCoul, Edward D; Hanson, Matthew B

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to compare the clinical characteristics of external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC) with those of a similar entity, keratosis obturans (KO). We also sought to identify those aspects of each disease that may lead to complications. We identified 6 patients in each group. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of bony erosion and the proximity of disease to vital structures. All 6 patients in the EACC group had their diagnosis confirmed by computed tomography (CT), which demonstrated widening of the bony external auditory canal; 4 of these patients had critical erosion of bone adjacent to the facial nerve. Of the 6 patients with KO, only 2 had undergone CT, and neither exhibited any significant bony erosion or expansion; 1 of them developed osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and adjacent temporomandibular joint. Another patient manifested KO as part of a dermatophytid reaction. The essential component of treatment in all cases of EACC was microscopic debridement of the ear canal. We conclude that EACC may produce significant erosion of bone with exposure of vital structures, including the facial nerve. Because of the clinical similarity of EACC to KO, misdiagnosis is possible. Temporal bone imaging should be obtained prior to attempts at debridement of suspected EACC. Increased awareness of these uncommon conditions is warranted to prompt appropriate investigation and prevent iatrogenic complications such as facial nerve injury.

  10. A Rare Case Report and Literature Review of External Auditory Canal Cholesteatoma with Circumferential Destruction of Canal Wall Exposing Facial Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leison Maharjan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available External auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC is a rare condition with an estimated incidence of 1.2 per 1000 new otological patients. It is often mistaken with keratosis obturans. We discuss an extensive primary EACC with an aural polyp in a male which was managed by modified radical mastoidectomy.

  11. Radiation-induced external ear canal cholesteatoma-like disease

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    Ishihara, Akiko; Okuno, Hideji; Noguchi, Keisuke; Komatsuzaki, Atsushi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-06-01

    Three cases of cholesteatoma-like disease in the ear canals after radiation therapy for head and neck tumor were reported. Effect of irradiation on bone and soft tissue including skin brings about pathological reaction to the external ear canal as well. Two types of disease resembling cholesteatomas have been recognized: keratosis obturans (KO) and external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC). KO appears to be derived from disease of canal skin involved with keratinization, creating a widning of the canal. EACC, on the other hand, seems to develop in the disease of bony canal where a localized absorption of its bone with invasion of squamous epithelium takes place. (author)

  12. Transcanal endoscopic resection for leiomyoma of the external auditory canal and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ryoukichi; Tateda, Masaru; Okoshi, Akira; Morita, Shinkichi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Hashimoto, Sho

    2016-02-01

    Leiomyoma usually originates from the uterus and alimentary tract, but in extremely rare cases leiomyoma can appear in the external auditory canal. Here we present a 37-year-old man with right auricular fullness. Preoperative findings suggested benign tumor or cholesteatoma in the right external auditory canal. We performed total resection using an endoauricular approach with transcanal endoscopic ear surgery. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry examination confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma of external auditory canal. Leiomyoma arising from soft tissue, including that in the external auditory canal, is classified into two types: that from the arrectores pilorum muscles and that from the muscle coats of blood vessels. Only four cases of leiomyoma of external auditor canal have been published in the English literature. The other four cases demonstrated vascular leiomyomas. This is the first report of leiomyoma of the EAC arising from arrectores pilorum muscles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Masses and disease entities of the external auditory canal: Radiological and clinical correlation

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    White, R.D., E-mail: richard.white3@nhs.net [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Ananthakrishnan, G. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); McKean, S.A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Brunton, J.N. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Hussain, S.S.M. [Department of Otolaryngology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Sudarshan, T.A. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    A wide spectrum of disease entities can affect the external auditory canal (EAC). This review describes the normal anatomy of the EAC. Congenital abnormalities, infections, neoplasms, and miscellaneous conditions, such as cholesteatoma and acquired stenosis, are shown with reference to clinical relevance and management. Cases have been histologically confirmed, where relevant. The EAC is frequently imaged - for example, on cross-sectional imaging of the brain - and this review should stimulate radiologists to include it as an important area for review.

  14. Narrow, duplicated internal auditory canal

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    Ferreira, T. [Servico de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Avenida Torrado da Silva, 2801-951, Almada (Portugal); Shayestehfar, B. [Department of Radiology, UCLA Oliveview School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Lufkin, R. [Department of Radiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2003-05-01

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) constitutes a relative contraindication to cochlear implantation because it is associated with aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve or its cochlear branch. We report an unusual case of a narrow, duplicated IAC, divided by a bony septum into a superior relatively large portion and an inferior stenotic portion, in which we could identify only the facial nerve. This case adds support to the association between a narrow IAC and aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The normal facial nerve argues against the hypothesis that the narrow IAC is the result of a primary bony defect which inhibits the growth of the vestibulocochlear nerve. (orig.)

  15. Bilateral duplication of the internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weon, Young Cheol; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Sung Kyu; Koo, Ja-Won

    2007-01-01

    Duplication of the internal auditory canal is an extremely rare temporal bone anomaly that is believed to result from aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. We report bilateral duplication of the internal auditory canal in a 28-month-old boy with developmental delay and sensorineural hearing loss. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation on temporal bone CT findings of cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kun Won; Lee, Nam Joon; Kang, Eun Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1989-01-01

    Cholesteatomas are thought to result from ingrowth of keratinizing squamous epithelium from external ear to middle ear. The cholesteatomas are usually diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs, otoscopy, and plain radiograms. But various view points are emphasized radiologically before operation, leading to examine by computed tomography (CT), especially in complicated cases. We retrospectively reviewed the CT findings of cholesteatomas in 25 surgically proven cases during the period from May, 1983 to Aug, 1988. The results were as follows: 1. Most cholesteatomas showed soft tissue mass and bony erosion of ossicles (88%), attic wall and mastoid antrum (84%) on temporal bone CT scan. 2. The CT members of cholesteatomas ranged from 25 to 50 HU (avg. 33 HU). 3. Involved sites were attic (16%), antrum (28%), and both attic and antrum (56%). Other sites were middle ear cavity and external auditory canal. 4. Extra-tympanomastoid extension of cholesteatoma was intracranial abscess (8%), exposure of dural sinus (8%), and extension along with neck (4%)

  17. External auditory canal carcinoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Ueda, Yoshihisa; Kurita, Tomoyuki; Nakashima, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    External auditory canal (EAC) carcinomas are relatively rare conditions lack on established treatment strategy. We analyzed a treatment modalities and outcome in 32 cases of EAC squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1980 and 2008. Subjects-17 men and 15 women ranging from 33 to 92 years old (average: 66) were divided by Arriaga's tumor staging into 12 T1, 5 T2, 6 T3, and 9 T4. Survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Disease-specific 5-year survival was 100% for T1, T2, 44% for T3, and 33% for T4. In contrast to 100% 5-year survival for T1+T2 cancer, the 5-year survival for T3+T4 cancer was 37% with high recurrence due to positive surgical margins. The first 22 years of the 29 years surveyed, we performed surgery mainly, and irradiation or chemotherapy was selected for early disease or cases with positive surgical margins as postoperative therapy. During the 22-years, 5-year survival with T3+T4 cancer was 20%. After we started superselective intra-arterial (IA) rapid infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy in 2003, we achieved negative surgical margins for advanced disease, and 5-year survival for T3+T4 cancer rise to 80%. (author)

  18. Carcinoma of the middle ear and external auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, S.S.; Kim, J.A.; Goodchild, N.; Constable, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with malignant tumors of the middle ear and external auditory canal (EAC) were observed at the University of Virginia Hospital from 1956 through 1980. Of 27 patients with carcinoma, 21 had squamous cell carcinoma, 4 had basal cell carcinoma and 2 had adenoid cystic carcinoma. The 27 patients with carcinoma are reviewed with regard to clinical presentation, treatment modality, results and complications. The majority (67%) of patients had a history of chronic ear drainage, 22% had a previous mastoidectomy or polypectomy and 7% had an associated cholesteatoma. Eighty percent of patients with carcinoma limited to EAC were alive and well at 5 years, compared to 43% of patients with involvement of the middle ear. Fifty-six percent of patients without invasion of the petrous bone were alive at 5 years compared to only 20% of patients with petrous bone involvement. The data strongly suggest that survival depends on the extent of disease. The corrected disease free 5 year survival rates were 14% for patients who had surgery alone and 50% for those who had surgery and radiotherapy. Of the three patients with advanced disease who received radiotherapy alone, none survived five years

  19. Nodular Fasciitis of External Auditory Canal

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    Jihyun Ahn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nodular fasciitis is a pseudosarcomatous reactive process composed of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, and it is most common in the upper extremities. Nodular fasciitis of the external auditory canal is rare. To the best of our knowledge, less than 20 cases have been reported to date. We present a case of nodular fasciitis arising in the cartilaginous part of the external auditory canal. A 19-year-old man complained of an auricular mass with pruritus. Computed tomography showed a 1.7 cm sized soft tissue mass in the right external auditory canal, and total excision was performed. Histologic examination revealed spindle or stellate cells proliferation in a fascicular and storiform pattern. Lymphoid cells and erythrocytes were intermixed with tumor cells. The stroma was myxoid to hyalinized with a few microcysts. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, but not for desmin, caldesmon, CD34, S-100, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and cytokeratin. The patient has been doing well during the 1 year follow-up period.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Koehler, P.R.; Millen, S.J.; Shaffer, K.A.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with exclusively or predominantly intracanalicular neuromas and 5 with presumably normal internal auditory canals were examined with prototype 1.4- or 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. MR images showed the 7th and 8th cranial nerves in the internal auditory canal. The intracanalicular neuromas had larger diameter and slightly greater signal strength than the nerves. Early results suggest that minimal enlargement of the nerves can be detected even in the internal auditory canal

  1. CT of the external auditory canal: Correlation with clinical otoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, L.; Hawke, M.; Leekam, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    CT is the modality of choice in the assessment of external auditory canal abnormalities. Disorders of the complex structures within the ear that may be difficult to define clinically are well visualized on high-resolution CT. This exhibit illustrates various external auditory canal abnormalities and correlates these with color illustrations from clinical otoscopy. Congenital lesions of the external auditory canal - microtia, temporo-bandibular joint herniation, and fistulas - and various acquired lesions - traumatic, inflammatory, and neoplastic - are reviewed in this exhibit

  2. Cancer of the external auditory canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop, Mette; Grøntved, Aksel

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of surgery for cancer of the external auditory canal and relate this to the Pittsburgh staging system used both on squamous cell carcinoma and non-squamous cell carcinoma. DESIGN: Retrospective case series of all patients who had surgery between 1979 and 2000....... Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 2-148 months). Data on age, sex, symptoms, TNM status, histopathological diagnosis, surgery, adjunctive therapy, sequelae, recurrence, and status at follow-up were obtained. SETTING: An ear, nose, and throat department in an ambulatory and hospitalized care center....... PATIENTS: Ten women and 10 men with previously untreated primary cancer. Median age at diagnosis was 67 years (range, 31-87 years). Survival data included 18 patients with at least 2 years of follow-up or recurrence. INTERVENTION: Local canal resection or partial temporal bone resection. MAIN OUTCOME...

  3. Fascin expression in cholesteatoma: correlation with destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease.

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    Binnetoglu, A; Sari, M; Baglam, T; Erbarut Seven, I; Yumusakhuylu, A C; Topuz, M F; Batman, C

    2015-08-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein found in cell membrane protrusions and increases cell motility. The expression of fascin in epithelial neoplasms has been described only recently. No data are available concerning the role of this protein in invasive cholesteatoma. Thus, we investigated the expression of fascin in cholesteatoma tissue and the relationship between fascin expression and intraoperative evaluation of the destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease. Cholesteatoma specimens of 28 patients and external auditory canal (EAC) skin specimens of the same patients (as the control group) were collected from mastoidectomies. Immunohistochemical technique was used to investigate the fascin expression in all cholesteatoma tissues and EAC skin specimens. Immunohistochemical staining was assessed semiquantitatively based on the thickness of epithelium. SPSS software version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was performed to statistically analyse the relationships between fascin expression and intraoperative evaluation destruction of ossicular chain and extent of the disease. Immunohistochemically, there was no or very low fascin expression observed in normal epithelial cells of EAC skin, while expressed in cholesteatoma tissue. Also, fascin expression in cholesteatoma tissues was significantly correlated with destruction of ossicular chain and extent of the disease. Fascin expression is usually found in cholesteatoma epithelium and is correlated with destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease. Considering all of the correlations between the clinical and histopathological findings, 'fascin immunoexpression scoring' may be used for histological grading of cholesteatoma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia and mastoiditis: a case report

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    Abdel-Aziz Mosaad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cholesteatoma may be expected in abnormally developed ear, it may cause bony erosion of the middle ear cleft and extend to the infratemporal fossa. We present the first case of congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in a patient with congenital aural atresia that has been complicated with acute mastoiditis. Case presentation A sixteen year old Egyptian male patient presented with congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia complicated with acute mastoiditis. Two weeks earlier, the patient suffered pain necessitating hospital admission, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a soft tissue mass in the right infratemporal fossa. On presentation to our institute, Computerized tomography was done as a routine, it proved the diagnosis of mastoiditis, pure tone audiometry showed an air-bone gap of 60 dB. Cortical mastoidectomy was done for treatment of mastoiditis, removal of congenital cholesteatoma was carried out with reconstruction of external auditory canal. Follow-up of the patient for 2 years and 3 months showed a patent, infection free external auditory canal with an air-bone gap has been reduced to 35db. One year after the operation; MRI was done and it showed no residual or recurrent cholesteatoma. Conclusions Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in cases of congenital aural atresia can be managed safely even if it was associated with mastoiditis. It is an original case report of interest to the speciality of otolaryngology.

  5. Internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis: imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Jimenez, Johanna; Roa, Jose Luis; Figuero A, Ramon E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in a patient with a diagnosis of internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis. To describe the embryological development of the IAC structures and the natural history of IAC stenosis. Methods: A 4 year old girl presents with sensorineural hearing loss and bilateral recurrent otitis media. The temporal bone CT shows diminished left IAC diameter (less than 2 mm), right IAC absence and normal inner ear structures. These findings are pathognomonic for left IAC stenosis. The MR findings include left IAC stenosis and IAC neural structures absence secondary to aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve on each IAC . Results: Hypoplasia/aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve in association with IAC stenosis is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss, as it is a relative contraindication for cochlear implant placement. Conclusions: IAC stenosis and vestibulocochlear nerve hypoplasia/aplasia must be excluded as an etiology of sensorineural hearing loss. The diagnosis can be made by CT and MR.

  6. Internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis: Imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz J, Johanna; Roa, Jose L; Figueroa Ramon E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in a patient with a diagnosis of internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis. To describe the embryological development of the IAC structures and the natural history of IAC stenosis. Methods: A 4 year old girl presents with sensorineural hearing loss and bilateral recurrent otitis media. The temporal bone CT shows diminished left IAC diameter (less than 2 mm), right IAC absence and normal inner ear structures. These findings are pathognomonic for left IAC stenosis. The MR findings include left IAC stenosis and IAC neural structures absence secondary to aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve on each IAC. Results: Hypoplasia/aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve in association with IAC stenosis is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss, as it is a relative contraindication for cochlear implant placement. Conclusions: IAC stenosis and vestibulocochlear nerve hypoplasia/aplasia must be excluded as an etiology of sensorineural hearing loss. The diagnosis can be made by CT and MR.

  7. Management of Acquired Atresia of the External Auditory Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Yılmaz, Taner; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Kuşçu, Oğuz; Sözen, Tevfik; Jafarov, Shamkal

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate surgical techniques and their relationship to postoperative success rate and hearing outcomes in acquired atresia of the external auditory canal. In this article, 24 patients with acquired atresia of the external auditory canal were retrospectively evaluated regarding their canal status, hearing, and postoperative success. Acquired stenosis occurs more commonly in males with a male: female ratio of 2-3:1; it seems to be a disorder affecting young adults. Previous ear surgery (13 patients, 54.2%) and external ear trauma (11 patients, 45.8%) were the main etiological factors of acquired ear canal stenosis. Mastoidectomy (12/13) and traffic accidents (8/11) comprise the majority of these etiological factors. Endaural incision is performed in 79.2% and postauricular incision for 20.8% of cases during the operation. As types of surgical approach, transcanal (70.8%), transmastoid (20.8%), and combined (8.4%) approaches are chosen. The atretic plate is generally located at the bony-cartilaginous junction (37.5%) and in the cartilaginous canal (33.3%); the bony canal is involved in a few cases only. Preserved healthy canal skin, split- or full-thickness skin grafts, or pre- or postauricular skin flaps are used to line the ear canal, but preserved healthy canal skin is preferred. The results of surgery are generally satisfactory, and complications are few if surgical principles are followed.

  8. The osseous external auditory canal : Surgery, shape, and sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, E.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis describes three aspects of the osseous external auditory canal (OEAC) which are related to each other: Surgery of the OEAC, the shape of the OEAC and the perceived sound quality due to the resonance function of the OEAC. Several aspects of the surgical intervention (Canalplasty) in

  9. Pneumocystis jirovecii infection of the external auditory canal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nonspecific symptoms of otorrhoea, otalgia, hearing loss, vertigo and tinnitus. Clinical findings include a mass in the external auditory canal and occasional otitis media. Destruction of the ossicles and sclerosis of the mastoid air cells, extensive bony erosion, and extension into the middle cranial fossa are rare complications.

  10. External auditory canal leech: a rare case report of paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leeches are blood sucking organism feed on human blood. While human bites are common, they rarely cause human internal infestation. We describe a rare case of a parasitic leech infestation of the External Auditory Canal (EAC). A two month old child presented to the Emergency department with a seven day history of ...

  11. Epidermoid carcinoma of the external auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Rodriguez, Javier; Llerena Suarez, Jose Angel; Campis Cruz, Hipolito Amable

    2009-01-01

    A 43 years-old, urban, male patient assists the consultation of Otolaryngology with a long evolving otorrhea (around two years), receiving several treatments against the external otitis he suffered. With those antecedents and what we found when examining him, we decided to take a sample (biopsy) of the area, diagnosing an epidermoid carcinoma of the left external canal, an infrequent pathology in our settings

  12. Dislocation of the incus into the external auditory canal after mountain-biking accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T; Kono, Y; Fukuoka, Y; Yamamoto, H; Saito, H

    2001-01-01

    We report a rare case of incus dislocation to the external auditory canal after a mountain-biking accident. Otoscopy showed ossicular protrusion in the upper part of the left external auditory canal. CT indicated the disappearance of the incus, and an incus-like bone was found in the left external auditory canal. There was another bony and board-like structure in the attic. During the surgery, a square-shaped bony plate (1 x 1 cm) was found in the attic. It was determined that the bony plate had fallen from the tegmen of the attic. The fracture line in the posterosuperior auditory canal extending to the fossa incudis was identified. According to these findings, it was considered that the incus was pushed into the external auditory canal by the impact of skull injury through the fractured posterosuperior auditory canal, which opened widely enough for incus dislocation. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Anteverted internal auditory canal as an inner ear anomaly in patients with craniofacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Heureux-Lebeau, Bénédicte; Saliba, Issam

    2014-09-01

    Craniofacial microsomia involves structure of the first and second branchial arches. A wide range of ear anomalies, affecting external, middle and inner ear, has been described in association with this condition. We report three cases of anteverted internal auditory canal in patients presenting craniofacial microsomia. This unique internal auditory canal orientation was found on high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones. This internal auditory canal anomaly is yet unreported in craniofacial anomalies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul

    2001-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  15. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul [Sungkyunkwan Univ., School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  16. Malignant transformation from benign papillomatosis of the external auditory canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Mohammed S; Crawford, Mairi; White, Sharon J; Hussain, Syed Shah Musheer

    2012-06-01

    Report a case of malignant transformation of benign ear canal papillomatosis to malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the temporal bone. A 73-year-old with papillomata involving the posterior and inferior walls of the right external auditory canal (EAC), which subsequently transformed into SCC. Radical mastoidectomy and excision of the tumor and then radical radiotherapy. Loco-regional disease control. Recovery of facial nerve function. Approximately 20 months post-treatment, the patient remains disease free. No recovery of facial nerve function. Malignant transformation of a benign EAC papilloma to SCC of the temporal bone has not been reported previously. The association of human papillomavirus with temporal bone SCC has been reported in small number of studies with human papillomavirus subtypes 16 and 18 isolated in a high proportion of cases. With the increased availability in genotyping, the question over whether there should be further genetic analysis of benign lesions to assess their susceptibility to malignant transformation has merit.

  17. Labyrinthine Artery Aneurysm as an Internal Auditory Canal Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Rodney C.; Konia, Thomas; Brunberg, James

    2013-01-01

    We present the first case report of a labyrinthine artery aneurysm masquerading as an internal auditory canal tumor. A 72-year-old woman presented with sudden onset right facial paralysis, facial pain, hearing loss, and vertigo. She demonstrated dense right-sided facial paralysis involving all branches of the facial nerve, left beating horizontal nystagmus, and anacusis of the right ear. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast demonstrated a 6 × 7 mm peripherally enhancing lesion with lack o...

  18. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of External Auditory Canal: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Aarani; Jayakumar, Krishnannair L L

    2017-07-20

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of mesenchymal origin. Primary synovial sarcoma of the ear is extremely rare and to date only two cases have been published in English medical literature. Though the tumor is reported to have an aggressive nature, early diagnosis and treatment may improve the outcome. Here, we report a rare case of synovial sarcoma of the external auditory canal in an 18-year-old male who was managed by chemotherapy and referred for palliation due to tumor progression.

  19. Carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfreundner, Leo; Schwager, Konrad; Willner, Jochen; Baier, Kurt; Bratengeier, Klaus; Brunner, Franz Xaver; Flentje, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate therapeutic modalities used at our institutions regarding local control, disease-free survival and actuarial survival in carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear, in an attempt to provide guidelines for therapy. Methods and Materials: A series of 27 patients with carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear treated between 1978 and 1997 in our institutions were analyzed with particular reference to tumor size and its relation to surrounding tissues, patterns of neck node involvement, surgical procedures, and radiation techniques employed. Clinical endpoints were freedom from local failure, overall survival, and disease-free survival. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range 0.1-17.9 years). Results: Treatment by surgery and radiotherapy resulted in an overall 5-year survival rate of 61%. According to the Pittsburgh classification, the actuarial 5-year survival rate for early disease (T1 and T2 tumors) was 86%, for T3 tumors 50%, and T4 stages 41%. Patients with tumors limited to the external auditory canal had a 5-year survival rate of 100%, patients with tumor invasion of the temporal bone 63%, and patients with tumor infiltration beyond the temporal bone 38%. The rate of freedom from local recurrence was 50% at 5 years. Unresectability by dural and cerebral infiltration, and treatment factors such as complete resection or resection with tumor beyond surgical margins are of prognostic relevance. All patients with dural invasion died within 2.2 years. The actuarial 5-year survival rate of patients with complete tumor resection was 100%, but 66% in patients with tumor beyond surgical margins. 192 Iridium high-dose-rate (HDR) afterloading brachytherapy based on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT)-treatment planning was an effective tool in management of local recurrences following surgery and a full course of external beam radiotherapy. Conclusion: Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy adapted to stage

  20. Quantitative analysis of cholesteatoma using high resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shigeru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Iinuma, Toshitaka.

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-three cases of adult cholesteatoma, including 52 cases of pars flaccida type cholesteatoma and 21 of pars tensa type cholesteatoma, were examined using high resolution computed tomography, in both axial (lateral semicircular canal plane) and coronal sections (cochlear, vestibular and antral plane). These cases were classified into two subtypes according to the presence of extension of cholesteatoma into the antrum. Sixty cases of chronic otitis media with central perforation (COM) were also examined as controls. Various locations of the middle ear cavity were measured in terms of size in comparison with pars flaccida type cholesteatoma, pars tensa type cholesteatoma and COM. The width of the attic was significantly larger in both pars flaccida type and pars tensa type cholesteatoma than in COM. With pars flaccida type cholesteatoma there was a significantly larger distance between the malleus and lateral wall of the attic than with COM. In contrast, the distance between the malleus and medial wall of the attic was significantly larger with pars tensa type cholesteatoma than with COM. With cholesteatoma extending into the antrum, regardless of the type of cholesteatoma, there were significantly larger distances than with COM at the following sites: the width and height of the aditus ad antrum, and the width, height and anterior-posterior diameter of the antrum. However, these distances were not significantly different between cholesteatoma without extension into the antrum and COM. The hitherto demonstrated qualitative impressions of bone destruction in cholesteatoma were quantitatively verified in detail using high resolution computed tomography. (author)

  1. Current diagnosis of tumors developed in the internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignaud, J.; Doyon, D.

    1988-01-01

    The introduction of CT scan and, more recently, magnetic resonance imaging, has radically changed the diagnostic approach to tumors developed in the internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle. CT scan with intravenous injection visualizes tumors lying in the cerebellopontine angle. Magnetic resonance imaging, especially using gadolinium, is a very accurate means for diagnosing tumors of both the auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle [fr

  2. Ectopic external auditory canal and ossicular formation in the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supakul, Nucharin [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Kralik, Stephen F. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Ho, Chang Y. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Riley Children' s Hospital, MRI Department, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Ear abnormalities in oculo-auricular-vertebral spectrum commonly present with varying degrees of external and middle ear atresias, usually in the expected locations of the temporal bone and associated soft tissues, without ectopia of the external auditory canal. We present the unique imaging of a 4-year-old girl with right hemifacial microsomia and ectopic location of an atretic external auditory canal, terminating in a hypoplastic temporomandibular joint containing bony structures with the appearance of auditory ossicles. This finding suggests an early embryological dysfunction involving Meckel's cartilage of the first branchial arch. (orig.)

  3. [A case of Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K; Arai, E; Kobayashi, T; Takasaka, T

    1992-12-01

    Since the advent of antibiotics, otogenic complications have decreased considerably. However, incomplete antibiotic therapy has altered the clinical course of middle ear disease so as to be more insidious. This paper reports a case of Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma. A 48-year-old man visited our hospital presenting with a 4-day history of right otorrhea and a tender swelling in the right neck. Physical examination showed a febrile patient (38.8 degrees C) with right facial paresis and trismus. A hyperemic, hard and tender swelling was observed in his right neck from the lateral cervical to the mental region. The tympanic membrane was invisible because of granulation and swelling of the posterior wall of the external auditory canal. Intravenous clindamycin and ceftazidime therapy was started immediately. A CT-scan revealed a diffuse shadow with bony destruction in the right mastoid cortex. Extensive abscess formation was also found in the right sternocleidomastoid muscle, in the anterior neck and in the posterior neck. He was diagnosed as having Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma. Radical mastoidectomy and drainage of the neck abscess was performed on the third day under general anesthesia. The mastoid cavity was found to be filled with pus and cholesteatoma debris. A small area of defective bone was found at the mastoid tip, through which there were communications between the mastoid cavity and the abscesses in the neck. Bony destruction was also found in the horizontal and vertical portion of the facial canal. Bacteroides and three kinds of gram-negative rods were cultured from the mastoid cavity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. External auditory canal atresia of probable congenital origin in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Piaia, T; Bertolini, G; De Lorenzi, D

    2007-04-01

    A nine-month-old Labrador retriever was referred to the Clinica Veterinaria Privata San Marco because of frequent headshaking and downward turning of the right ear. Clinical examination revealed that there was no external acoustic meatus in the right ear. Computed tomography confirmed that the vertical part of the right auditory canal ended blindly, providing a diagnosis of external auditory canal atresia. Cytological examination and culture of fluid from the canal and the bulla revealed only aseptic cerumen; for this reason, it was assumed that the dog was probably affected by a congenital developmental deformity of the external auditory canal. Reconstructive surgery was performed using a "pull-through" technique. Four months after surgery the cosmetic and functional results were satisfactory.

  5. Defining the Limits of Endoscopic Access to Internal Auditory Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Adam; Hamiter, Mickie; Cosetti, Maura

    2016-12-01

    To quantify surgical access to the internal auditory canal (IAC) using an exclusively endoscopic transcanal approach (EETA) and investigate surgically relevant relationships with neurovascular and osseous landmarks of the temporal bone. Anatomical dissection of two paired temporal bones and 15 unpaired temporal bones was performed using an exclusively endoscopic approach to IAC. The dissection proceeded until the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) could be accessed. Following dissection, all the specimens were subjected to computed tomography (CT) imaging. Anatomage InVivo5 software was used to analyze the CT scans and record measurements. CPA access and visualization of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve were achieved in all specimens. The mean distances from the carotid artery, jugular bulb, and middle fossa to the surgical opening (or fundostomy) of IAC were 4.1±1.5, 6.4±2.5, and 5.5±1.9 mm, respectively. The mean cross-sectional areas of the fundostomy and tympanic ring were 30.8±10.4 and 67.7±11.3 mm2. The mean distances from the osteo-cartilaginous junction and tympanic ring to the porus acusticus were 29±2.6 and 21±2.3 mm, respectively. Transcanal access to the entire IAC can be safely achieved using an exclusively endoscopic approach. Generous removal of the cochlear promontory can be accomplished while a safe distance is maintained from key neurovascular structures. EETA to IAC offers a minimally invasive alternative to patients without serviceable hearing for intrameatal and medial IAC tumors. Increased knowledge of crucial anatomical relationships involved in this approach will facilitate acceptance and utilization.

  6. Hearing loss and enlarged internal auditory canal in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Saturnino; Domínguez, M Jesús; Cervera, Javier; Suárez, Alicia; Bueno, Antonio; Bartolomé, Margarita; López, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Among the temporal bone abnormalities that can be found in the etiological study of paediatric sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) by imaging techniques, those related to the internal auditory canal (IAC) are the least frequent. The most prevalent of these abnormalities that is associated with SNHL is stenotic IAC due to its association with cochlear nerve deficiencies. Less frequent and less concomitant with SNHL is the finding of an enlarged IAC (>8mm). Retrospective and descriptive review of clinical associations, imaging, audiological patterns and treatment of 9 children with hearing loss and enlarged IAC in the period 1999 to 2012. Two groups of patients are described. The first, without association with vestibulocochlear dysplasias, consisted of: 2 patients with SNHL without other temporal bone or systemic abnormalities, one with bilateral mixed HL from chromosome 18q deletion, one with a genetic X-linked DFN3 hearing loss, one with unilateral hearing loss in neurofibromatosis type 2 with bilateral acoustic neuroma, and one with unilateral hearing loss with cochlear nerve deficiency. The second group, with association with vestibulocochlear dysplasias, was comprised of: one patient with moderate bilateral mixed hearing loss in branchio-oto-renal syndrome, one with profound unilateral SNHL with recurrent meningitis, and another with profound bilateral SNHL with congenital hypothyroidism. The presence of an enlarged IAC in children can be found in different clinical and audiological settings with relevancies that can range from life-threatening situations, such as recurrent meningitis, to isolated hearing loss with no other associations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal: computed tomography findings in six cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Fabio Mota; Paes Junior, Ademar Jose de Oliveira; Tornin, Olger de Souza; Souza, Ricardo Pires de

    2005-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the role of computed tomography in the assessment of deep extension of squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal. Materials and methods: in the period between May 1995 and December 2003 six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal were submitted to computed tomography scan at 'Hospital Heliopolis', Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, including axial and coronal slices with soft tissue and bone algorithms. Results: thickening of the soft tissue of the external auditory canal was seen in all patients, bone erosion and invasion of the middle ear in five (83.3%), invasion of the mastoid and parotid gland in four (66.7%), invasion of the temporomandibular joint in three (50%), and invasion of the middle cranial fossa, carotid canal and cervical lymph node enlargement in two (33.3%) patients. Conclusion: assessment of deep extension of squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal using computed tomography is useful for clinical staging of the disease allowing better therapeutic planning for these patients. (author)

  8. Adult-onset juvenile xanthogranuloma of the external auditory canal: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Joon Ho; Kim, Jae Kyun; Seo, Gi Young; Choi, Woo Sun; Byun, Jun Soo; Lee, Woong Jae; Lee, Tae Jin [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Na Ra [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a benign, spontaneously regressing lesion that usually occurs during the first year of life, but may also occur in adulthood. Although the most common presentation of JXG is the cutaneous lesion, it can also manifest in various visceral organs. JXG of the external auditory canal is extremely rare, and there have been only a few reports of those cases in the English literature. In this study, we present a case of pathologically proven JXG that occurred in the external auditory canal with a symptomatic clinical presentation.

  9. Narrow duplicated internal auditory canal: radiological findings and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Oezguen Ilhan; Cakmakci, Handan; Men, Sueleyman; Erdag, Taner Kemal

    2005-01-01

    Narrow duplicated internal auditory canal (IAC) is a rare malformation of the temporal bone that is associated with ipsilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss. This may be an isolated finding or a part of a syndrome. Radiological examination should demonstrate aplasia or hypoplasia of the neural components of the narrow IAC, to guide the surgical approach. We report a 7-year-old boy with Klippel-Feil syndrome with a narrow double IAC with no sensorineural hearing loss but with conductive hearing loss. In this patient, the IAC consisted of two separate narrow bony canals clearly seen on 3D temporal bone CT and one nerve that was delineated on MRI. The contralateral external auditory canal was stenotic and the ossicles were dysplastic. (orig.)

  10. Cholesteatoma labyrinthine fistula: prevalence and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosito, Letícia P Schmidt; Canali, Inesângela; Teixeira, Adriane; Silva, Mauricio Noschang; Selaimen, Fábio; Costa, Sady Selaimen da

    2018-03-09

    Labyrinthine fistula is one of the most common complications associated with cholesteatoma. It represents an erosive loss of the endochondral bone overlying the labyrinth. Reasons for cholesteatoma-induced labyrinthine fistula are still poorly understood. Evaluate patients with cholesteatoma, in order to identify possible risk factors or clinical findings associated with labyrinthine fistula. Secondary objectives were to determine the prevalence of labyrinthine fistula in the study cohort, to analyze the role of computed tomography and to describe the hearing results after surgery. This retrospective cohort study included patients with an acquired middle ear cholesteatoma in at least one ear with no prior surgery, who underwent audiometry and tomographic examination of the ears or surgery at our institution. Hearing results after surgery were analyzed according to the labyrinthine fistula classification and the employed technique. We analyzed a total of 333 patients, of which 9 (2.7%) had labyrinthine fistula in the lateral semicircular canal. In 8 patients, the fistula was first identified on image studies and confirmed at surgery. In patients with posterior epitympanic and two-route cholesteatomas, the prevalence was 5.0%; and in cases with remaining cholesteatoma growth patterns, the prevalence was 0.6% (p=0.16). In addition, the prevalence ratio for labyrinthine fistula between patients with and without vertigo was 2.1. Of patients without sensorineural hearing loss before surgery, 80.0% remained with the same bone conduction thresholds, whereas 20.0% progressed to profound hearing loss. Of patients with sensorineural hearing loss before surgery, 33.33% remained with the same hearing impairment, whereas 33.33% showed improvement of the bone conduction thresholds' Pure Tone Average. Labyrinthine fistula must be ruled out prior to ear surgery, particularly in cases of posterior epitympanic or two-route cholesteatoma. Computed tomography is a good diagnostic

  11. Giant cholesteatoma: case and literature review' report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes, Leonardo Mendes Acatauassú

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cholesteatomas are cystic lesions encased by stratified squamous epithelium, filled for keratin. They are classified in congenital, about of 2-5% and acquired, which are subdivided in primary formed from a tympanic retraction and secondary, originated from epithelium migration through a tympanic perforation. They are tumeurs with an expansive capacity and of bone lysis being able to invade adjacent structures. Case Report: This work reports the case of ONV, 23 years old from Macapá/Amapá. In august 2007, he/she appeared to attendance with a case history of right chronic otorrhea, he/she also reported meningitis and progressive right peripherica facial paralysis. The mastoid tomography demonstrated an hypodense image with density of soft tissues filling the middle ear, destructing the ossicular chain, semicircular canals, cochlea and extending until next to the proximal portion of the internal auditory meatus. He/she was referred to surgery. During the trans-operative it is evidenced an extensive destruction of the cortical layer of the mastoid, which was obstructed by a mass of an yellow coloration, fetid and of the consistent aspect. After the lesion is removed it is verified the presence of fistulae of high debit with posterior fossa. It was proceeded with the fistulae closing with a bone wax and temporal muscle shred. The patient remained confined during 15 days in use wide antimicrobial schema. Currently, it is find in regular accompaniment and in a good general state. Final Comments: This work aims to call attention to the rigorous complications of these pathologies , which despite to be common and to be a benign tumoral lesion can bring severe sequelae to the patient, in the event of the diagnosis and treatment not to be prematurely performed.

  12. The cochlear nerve canal and internal auditory canal in children with normal cochlea but cochlear nerve deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Fei; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Zhenchang [Dept. of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)], e-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com; Mo, Lingyan [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)

    2013-04-15

    Background: There is an increasing frequency of requests for cochlear implantation (CI) in deaf children and more detailed image information is necessary for selecting appropriate candidates. Cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) is a contraindication to CI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the integrity of the cochlear nerve. The abnormalities of the cochlear nerve canal (CNC) and internal auditory canal (IAC) have been reported to be associated with CND. Purpose: To correlate CNC manifestation, size, and IAC diameter on high-resolution CT (HRCT) with CND diagnosed by MRI in children. Material and Methods: HRCT images from 35 sensorineurally deaf children who had normal cochlea but bilateral or unilateral CND diagnosed by MRI were studied retrospectively. The CNC and IAC manifestation and size were assessed and correlated with CND. Results: CND was diagnosed by MRI in 54/70 ears (77.1%). Thirty-two ears had an absent cochlear nerve (59.3%), while 22 ears had a small cochlear nerve (40.7%). The CNC diameter was <1.5 mm in 36 ears (66.7%). The CNC diameter ranged between 1.5 and 2.0 mm in seven ears (13.0%) and was >2.0 mm in 11 ears (20.4%). The IAC diameter was <3.0 mm in 25 ears (46.3%) and >3.0 mm in 29 ears (53.7%). Conclusion: The hypoplastic CNC might be more highly indicative of CND than that of a narrow IAC.

  13. The cochlear nerve canal and internal auditory canal in children with normal cochlea but cochlear nerve deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Fei; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Zhenchang; Mo, Lingyan

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing frequency of requests for cochlear implantation (CI) in deaf children and more detailed image information is necessary for selecting appropriate candidates. Cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) is a contraindication to CI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the integrity of the cochlear nerve. The abnormalities of the cochlear nerve canal (CNC) and internal auditory canal (IAC) have been reported to be associated with CND. Purpose: To correlate CNC manifestation, size, and IAC diameter on high-resolution CT (HRCT) with CND diagnosed by MRI in children. Material and Methods: HRCT images from 35 sensorineurally deaf children who had normal cochlea but bilateral or unilateral CND diagnosed by MRI were studied retrospectively. The CNC and IAC manifestation and size were assessed and correlated with CND. Results: CND was diagnosed by MRI in 54/70 ears (77.1%). Thirty-two ears had an absent cochlear nerve (59.3%), while 22 ears had a small cochlear nerve (40.7%). The CNC diameter was 2.0 mm in 11 ears (20.4%). The IAC diameter was 3.0 mm in 29 ears (53.7%). Conclusion: The hypoplastic CNC might be more highly indicative of CND than that of a narrow IAC

  14. [The application of vibrant sound bridge in microtia whose reconstructive external auditory canal occurred atresia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shouqin; Gong, Shusheng; Han, Demin; Chen, Shubin; Li, Yi; Ma, Xiaobo; Liu, Haihong

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effect of vibrant sound bridge implantation in microtia whose reconstructive external auditory canal occurred atresia. Three cases (2 males and 1 female) of microtia had underwent hearing reconstruction operation (Include the external ear canal reconstructive surgery and tympanoplasty). The age ranged from 15 to 18 years and the average age was 17 years. All the 3 cases suffered from conductive hearing loss with the air-bone gap ranging from 51.6 to 65.0 dB HL and the average value being 56. 3 dB HL. All the 3 cases underwent vibrant sound bridge implantation, including the floating mass transducer implanted in the head of stapes in 2 cases and in the niche of round window in 1 case. The postoperative hearing level improved from 21.6 to 52.5 dB HL with an average of 32.2 dB HL. There were no complications such as vertigo, tinnitus and facial paralysis. Through vibrant sound bridge implantation, the hearing level of microtia whose reconstructive external auditory canal occurred atresia was improved effectively.

  15. Rapidly Growing Chondroid Syringoma of the External Auditory Canal: Report of a Rare Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Petousis, Aristotelis; Karakostas, Euthimios; Simantirakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Chondroid syrinoma of the external auditory canal is an extremely rare benign neoplasm representing the cutaneous counterpart of pleomorphic adenoma of salivary glands. Less than 35 cases have been reported in the international literature. Case Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old male in whom a rapidly growing, well-circumscribed tumor arising from the external auditory canal was presented. Otoscopy revealed a smooth, nontender lesion covered by normal skin that almost obstructs the external auditory meatus. MRI was performed to define the extension of the lesion. It confirmed the presence of a 1.5 × 0.8 cm T2 high-signal intensity lesion in the superior and posterior wall of EAC without signs of bone erosion. The patient underwent complete resection of the tumor. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination. Conclusion. Although chondroid syringoma is extremely rare, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an aural polyp. Chondroid syringomas are usually asymptomatic, slow-growing, single benign tumors in subcutaneous or intradermal location. In our case, the new information is that this benign tumor could present also as a rapidly growing lesion, arising the suspicion for malignancy. PMID:21941560

  16. Rapidly Growing Chondroid Syringoma of the External Auditory Canal: Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vasileiadis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chondroid syrinoma of the external auditory canal is an extremely rare benign neoplasm representing the cutaneous counterpart of pleomorphic adenoma of salivary glands. Less than 35 cases have been reported in the international literature. Case Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old male in whom a rapidly growing, well-circumscribed tumor arising from the external auditory canal was presented. Otoscopy revealed a smooth, nontender lesion covered by normal skin that almost obstructs the external auditory meatus. MRI was performed to define the extension of the lesion. It confirmed the presence of a 1.5×0.8 cm T2 high-signal intensity lesion in the superior and posterior wall of EAC without signs of bone erosion. The patient underwent complete resection of the tumor. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination. Conclusion. Although chondroid syringoma is extremely rare, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an aural polyp. Chondroid syringomas are usually asymptomatic, slow-growing, single benign tumors in subcutaneous or intradermal location. In our case, the new information is that this benign tumor could present also as a rapidly growing lesion, arising the suspicion for malignancy.

  17. Surgical Procedures for External Auditory Canal Carcinoma and the Preservation of Postoperative Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Hoshikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the external auditory canal (EAC is an unusual head and neck malignancy. The pathophysiology of these tumors is different from other skin lesions because of their anatomical and functional characteristics. Early-stage carcinoma of the EAC can be generally cured by surgical treatment, and reconstruction of the EAC with a tympanoplasty can help to retain hearing, thus improving the patients’ quality of life. In this study, we present two cases of early-stage carcinoma of the EAC treated by canal reconstruction using skin grafts after lateral temporal bone resection. A rolled-up skin graft with a temporal muscle flap was useful for keeping the form and maintaining the postoperative hearing. An adequate size of the skin graft and blood supply to the graft bed are important for achieving a successful operation.

  18. Needle in the external auditory canal: an unusual complication of inferior alveolar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Leandro; Ramalho, Sara; Gerós, Sandra; Ferreira, Edite Coimbra; Faria e Almeida, António; Condé, Artur

    2014-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block is used to anesthetize the ipsilateral mandible. The most commonly used technique is one in which the anesthetic is injected directly into the pterygomandibular space, by an intraoral approach. The fracture of the needle, although uncommon, can lead to potentially serious complications. The needle is usually found in the pterygomandibular space, although it can migrate and damage adjacent structures, with variable consequences. The authors report an unusual case of a fractured needle, migrating to the external auditory canal, as a result of an inferior alveolar nerve block. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Narrow Internal Auditory Canal with Duplication in a Patient with Congenital Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Hye Won; Yu, Hye On; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Gi Hyeon [Chung-Ang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) with duplication is a rare anomaly of the temporal bone. It is associated with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve may cause the hearing loss. We present an unusual case of an isolated narrow IAC with duplication that was detected by a CT scan. In this case, the IAC was divided by a bony septum into an empty stenotic inferoposterior portion and a large anterosuperior portion containing the facial nerve that was clearly delineated on MRI.

  20. The effect of patient positioning on MR imaging of the internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, D.L.; Czervionke, L.F.; Yu, S.; Ho, P.S.P.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Identification of individual cranial nerves and complete exclusion of tumor in the internal auditory canal may be difficult with MR, especially in imperfectly positioned patients. MR studies of the temporal bones in patients and in normal volunteers positioned non-rotated or canted were correlated with corresponding cryomicrotomic sections. Especially in axial images, oblique sectioning of cranial nerves VII and VIII may cause difficulty in identifying individual nerves. A combination of axial and coronal short TR and TE images can be used to confidently exclude intracanalicular tumor in most cases. (orig.)

  1. Ceruminous Adenoma of the External Auditory Canal: A Case Report with Imaging and Pathologic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Psillas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceruminous adenomas are benign tumors that are rare in humans and present with a nonspecific symptomatology. The treatment of choice is surgical excision. We present an 87-year-old woman who presented with a reddish, tender, round, soft mass of the outer third of the inferior wall of the left external auditory canal, discharging a yellowish fluid upon pressure. Coincidentally, due to her poor general condition, this patient also showed symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media, parotitis, and cervical lymphadenopathy, such as otorrhea, through a ruptured tympanic membrane and swelling of the parotid gland and cervical lymph nodes. The external auditory canal lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia, utilizing a transmeatal approach. The pathological diagnosis was ceruminous gland adenoma. The tumor was made of tubular and cystic structures and embedded in a fibrous, focally hyalinized stroma. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of two distinct cell populations. The luminal cells expressed keratin 7, while peripheral (basal cells expressed keratins 5/6, S100 protein, and p63. The apocrine gland-related antigen GCDFP-15 was focally expressed by tumor cells. The postoperative course was uneventful and at the 2-year follow-up no recurrence of the ceruminous adenoma was noted.

  2. CT and MR imaging of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear and internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, Jan W.; Offeciers, Erwin F.; Foer, Bert de; Govaerts, Paul; Kuhweide, Rudy; Somers, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The embryology of the inner ear must be known as many of the inner ear malformations present as a result of the arrest during the various stages of embryology. These malformations are described in this 'embryologic' perspective and specific names for certain malformations are no longer used. Both CT and MR can be used to look at inner ear malformations but often both techniques are complementary. However, CT is preferred when associated middle- or external ear malformations must be excluded. Magnetic resonance is preferred when subtle changes in the membranous labyrinth or abnormalities of the nerves in the internal auditory canal must be visualised. The CT and MR technique must however be adapted as more and more subtle congenital malformations can only be seen when the right technique is used. The heavily T2-weighted gradient-echo or fast spin-echo MR techniques are mandatory if malformations of the inner ear must be excluded. The purpose of this paper is to describe the techniques used to study these patients and to give an overview of the most frequent and important congenital malformations which can be found in the inner ear and internal auditory canal/cerebellopontine angle

  3. Congenital external auditory canal atresia and stenosis: temporal bone CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Bum Soo; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Young Joo; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Kyu Ho; Park, Shi Nae [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) findings of atresia and stenosis of the external auditory canal (EAC), and to describe associated abnormalities in surrounding structures. We retrospectively reviewed the axial and coronal CT images of the temporal bone in 15 patients (M:F=8:7;mean age, 15.8 years) with 16 cases of EAC atresia (unilateral n=11, bilateral n=1) and EAC stenosis (unilateral n=3). Associated abnormalities of the EAC, tympanic cavity, ossicles, mastoid air cells, eustachian tube, facial nerve course, mandibular condyle and condylar fossa, sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb, and the base of the middle cranial fossa were evaluated. Thirteen cases of bony EAC atresia (one bilateral), with an atretic bony plate, were noted, and one case of unilateral membranous atresia, in which a soft tissue the EAC. A unilateral lesion occurred more frequently on the right temporal bone (n=8, 73%). Associated abnormalities included a small tympanic cavity (n=8, 62%), decreased mastoid pneumatization (n=8, 62%), displacement of the mandibular condyle and the posterior wall of the condylar fossa (n=7, 54%), dilatation of the Eustachian tube (n=7, 54%), and inferior displacement of the temporal fossa base (n=8, 62%). Abnormalities of ossicles were noted in the malleolus (n=12, 92%), incus (n=10, 77%) and stapes (n=6, 46%). The course of the facial nerve was abnormal in four cases, and abnormality of the auditory canal was noted in one. Among three cases of EAC stenosis, ossicular aplasia was observed in one, and in another the location of the mandibular condyle and condylar fossa was abnormal. In the remaining case there was no associated abnormality. Atresia of the EAC is frequently accompanied by abnormalities of the middle ear cavity, ossicles, and adjacent structures other than the inner ear. For patients with atresia and stenosis of this canal, CT of the temporal bone is essentially helpful in evaluating these associated abnormalities.

  4. Duplication of the External Auditory Canal: Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudakos, John K.; Blioskas, Sarantis; Psillas, George; Vital, Victor; Markou, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, surgical treatment, and outcome of 2 patients with first branchial cleft anomaly. The first case was an 8-year-old girl presented with an elastic lesion located in the left infra-auricular area, in close relation with the lobule, duplicating the external auditory canal. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion, appearing as a rather well-circumscribed mass within the left parotid gland and duplicating the ear canal. A superficial parotidectomy was subsequently performed, with total excision of the cyst. The second patient was a 15-year-old girl presented with a congenital fistula of the right lateral neck. At superficial parotidectomy, a total excision of the fistula was performed. During the operation the tract was recorded to lay between the branches of the facial nerve, extending with a blind ending canal parallel to the external acoustic meatus. Conclusively, first branchial cleft anomalies are rare malformations with cervical, parotid, or auricular clinical manifestations. Diagnosis of first branchial cleft lesions is achieved mainly through careful physical examination. Complete surgical excision with wide exposure of the lesion is essential in order to achieve permanent cure and avoid recurrence. PMID:23213587

  5. Duplication of the External Auditory Canal: Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Goudakos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, surgical treatment, and outcome of 2 patients with first branchial cleft anomaly. The first case was an 8-year-old girl presented with an elastic lesion located in the left infra-auricular area, in close relation with the lobule, duplicating the external auditory canal. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion, appearing as a rather well-circumscribed mass within the left parotid gland and duplicating the ear canal. A superficial parotidectomy was subsequently performed, with total excision of the cyst. The second patient was a 15-year-old girl presented with a congenital fistula of the right lateral neck. At superficial parotidectomy, a total excision of the fistula was performed. During the operation the tract was recorded to lay between the branches of the facial nerve, extending with a blind ending canal parallel to the external acoustic meatus. Conclusively, first branchial cleft anomalies are rare malformations with cervical, parotid, or auricular clinical manifestations. Diagnosis of first branchial cleft lesions is achieved mainly through careful physical examination. Complete surgical excision with wide exposure of the lesion is essential in order to achieve permanent cure and avoid recurrence.

  6. Development of a method for estimating oesophageal temperature by multi-locational temperature measurement inside the external auditory canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Hirofumi; Horie, Seichi; Kawanami, Shoko; Inoue, Jinro; Iijima, Yoshinori; Sato, Kiyoharu; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to develop a practical method to estimate oesophageal temperature by measuring multi-locational auditory canal temperatures. This method can be applied to prevent heatstroke by simultaneously and continuously monitoring the core temperatures of people working under hot environments. We asked 11 healthy male volunteers to exercise, generating 80 W for 45 min in a climatic chamber set at 24, 32 and 40 °C, at 50% relative humidity. We also exposed the participants to radiation at 32 °C. We continuously measured temperatures at the oesophagus, rectum and three different locations along the external auditory canal. We developed equations for estimating oesophageal temperatures from auditory canal temperatures and compared their fitness and errors. The rectal temperature increased or decreased faster than oesophageal temperature at the start or end of exercise in all conditions. Estimated temperature showed good similarity with oesophageal temperature, and the square of the correlation coefficient of the best fitting model reached 0.904. We observed intermediate values between rectal and oesophageal temperatures during the rest phase. Even under the condition with radiation, estimated oesophageal temperature demonstrated concordant movement with oesophageal temperature at around 0.1 °C overestimation. Our method measured temperatures at three different locations along the external auditory canal. We confirmed that the approach can credibly estimate the oesophageal temperature from 24 to 40 °C for people performing exercise in the same place in a windless environment.

  7. Nontumorous enlargement of the internal auditory canal. A risk factor for sensorineural hearing loss? A high resolution CT-study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimmer, H.; Rummeny, E.J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Niedermeyer, H.P. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). ENT-Clinic; Kehl, V. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Inst. for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2015-06-15

    First aim of the study was to define normal shape and diameter of the internal auditory canal (IAC). In the second part the clinical relevance of IAC-enlargement was analyzed, considering also lesions of the subtle structures at the fundus of the internal auditory canal. 440 high resolution CT-scans of the temporal bone were used for retrospective analysis of the internal auditory canal and its fundus region. The mean value of the IAC diameter in axial and coronal plane was determined. In 20 of 440 patients IAC enlargement was found. In the group with pronounced enlargement (3fold SD) nearly all patients suffered from hearing impairment. In some of them we found structural abnormalities near the IAC fundus in the CSF/perilymph border zone. A new CT-based definition of normal shape and diameter of the internal auditory canal is presented. There is some evidence that a pathologic transmission of CSF-pressure in case of IAC-enlargement and/or abnormal fistulous communications could play an important role in the pathophysiology of hearing loss.

  8. The relationship between external auditory canal temperature and onset of estrus and ovulation in beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randi, Federico; McDonald, Michael; Duffy, Pat; Kelly, Alan K; Lonergan, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of body temperature fluctuations, as measured by external auditory canal temperature, to the onset of estrus and ovulation. Beef heifers (n = 44, mean age 23.5 ± 0.4 months, mean weight 603.3 ± 5.7 kg) were fitted with a Boviminder ® ear tag 2 weeks before the start of the estrous synchronization protocol to allow acclimatization. The device recorded the temperature, accurate to 0.01° Fahrenheit, every 10 min and transmitted the data via a base station over the internet where it could be accessed remotely. The estrous cycles of all heifers were synchronized using an 8-day progesterone-based synchronization program; on day 0 a PRID was inserted in conjunction with an injection of GnRH, and PGF2α was administered the day before PRID removal. Heifers were checked for signs of estrus at 4-h intervals (i.e., 6 times per day) commencing 24 h after PRID withdrawal. Beginning 12 h after the onset of estrus, the ovaries were ultrasound scanned at 4-h intervals to determine the time of ovulation. Body temperature was recorded every 10 min and averaged to hourly means for the following 4 periods relative to the detected oestrus onset (=Time 0): Period I: -48 h to -7 h, Period II: -6 h to +6 h, Period III +7 h to ovulation, and Period IV: ovulation to 48 h post ovulation. Data were analysed using a Mixed Model ANOVA in SAS in a completely randomized design to observe effects of induced estrus on external auditory canal temperature. The mean (±SD) interval from removal of the PRID to onset of estrus activity was 46.6 ± 14.7 h. The mean duration of estrus was 16.0 ± 5.67 h and the mean interval from estrus onset to ovulation was 27.9 ± 7.68 h. Highest temperatures (100.95 ± 0.03 °F) were observed in Period II around estrus onset, whereas lowest temperatures were observed in the 48 h preceding estrus onset (100.28 ± 0.03 °F; Period I) and around ovulation (100.30

  9. Cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal: neurovascular anatomy on gas CT cisternograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, C.R.; Hasso, A.N.; Drayer, B.P.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.; Thompson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors reviewed 103 normal gas CT cisternograms to delineate the appearance of normal neurovascular structures in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC). Cranial nerves VII and VIII were identified in the CPA in 97% of cases, either separately (53%) or as a bundle (44%). Intracanalicular branches of the VIIIth cranial nerve were identified in 20% of cases, and cranial nerve V was visualized in the CPA in 14%. The characteristic vascular loop, usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, was visible in 35% of cases, and, in 22% of visualized cases, was in an intracanalicular location. In 10% of cases, greater than 66% of the IAC was occupied by the neurovascular bundle. Familiarity with the normal anatomy and variations seen on gas CT cisternograms is necessary to prevent false-positive interpretations

  10. Morphometric Analysis of the Internal Auditory Canal by Computed Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Ajzen, Sergio; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Alonso, Luis; Isotani, Sadao; Lederman, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Many clinical and experimental studies have been done to analyze the anatomical and functional aspects of the internal auditory canal (IAC) in human beings since there are great inter-individual variability and structural variations that may occur regarding the other adjacent structures. The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology of the internal auditory canal (IAC) during development using high resolution computed tomography (CT) and to analyze its dimensions, which will be determined by measuring the nearby areas and structures using a system of digital image processing. CT images of the IAC of 110 normal subjects aged 1 to 92 years (mean age, 46.5 years) of both genders were reviewed to determine the shape, area, opening width (OW), longitudinal length (LL), vertical diameter (VD) and distance from the vestibular aqueduct. The shapes observed in children and adults were funnel-shaped (74% and 58.3%, respectively), cylindrical (22% and 30.9%, respectively) and bud-shaped (4% and 10.8%, respectively). The measurements by CT in children were: area= 50.30 mm 2 , OW = 7.53 mm, length = 11.17 mm, VD = 4.82 mm and the distance between the IAC and the vestibular aqueduct (VA) = 12.63 mm. In adults, the measurements were: area = 44.64 mm 2 , OW = 7.10 mm, length = 9.84 mm, VD = 4.47 mm and the distance between IAC and VA = 11.17 mm. CT images showed that the IAC has different shapes and when the measurements obtained for children were compared with those of adults, the parameters that presented statistically significant differences in either gender were length and diameter

  11. The role of high-resolution CT in cholesteatoma involving the supratubal recess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funai, Hiroaki; Yabe, Toshie; Kase, Yasuhiro; Kitahara, Nobuo; Horiuchi, Koji; Yano, Jun; Ushijima, Tatsujiro; Iinuma, Toshitaka

    1987-01-01

    Operative findings of the supratubal recess were examined in the 30 patients with acquired cholesteatoma. They were compared with findings of high-resolution CTs (HRCTs) obtained preoperatively. Thus the role of HRCT in cholesteatoma involving the supratubal recess were evaluated. HRCTs of 172 ears without otitis media and 65 ears with tubotympanic type otitis media were analyzed as control. The HRCT has proved to provide excellent informations regarding the presence of cholesteatoma in the supratubal recess. Diagnostic points were as follows. (1) Destruction of the ''cog''. (2) Erosion or destruction of surrounding bony structures, for example, facial canal, tympanic tegmen. (3) Soft tissue density in the supratubal recess. (author)

  12. A study with high resolution computed tomography of bone destruction in cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shigeru; Yamaso, Tatsuya; Higo, Ryusaburo; Senba, Tetsuo; Iinuma, Yoshitaka.

    1992-01-01

    The modes and incidences of bone destruction in the middle ear cholesteatoma were evaluated by high resolution computed tomography, comparing with chronic otitis media with central perforation (COM) as control. The head of the malleus, the body and long process of the incus were more markedly destroyed in cholesteatoma than in COM with statistical significance. With the further extension of cholesteatoma into the antrum, the tegmen of the aditus ad antrum, the lateral semicircular canal, the handle of the malleus and the Korner's septum were involved in bone destruction. (author)

  13. Selective attention reduces physiological noise in the external ear canals of humans. I: Auditory attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kyle P.; Pasanen, Edward G.; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency OAE (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was used to measure cochlear responses from human subjects while they simultaneously performed behavioral tasks requiring, or not requiring, selective auditory attention. Appended to each stimulus presentation, and included in the calculation of each nSFOAE response, was a 30-ms silent period that was used to estimate the level of the inherent physiological noise in the ear canals of our subjects during each behavioral condition. Physiological-noise magnitudes were higher (noisier) for all subjects in the inattention task, and lower (quieter) in the selective auditory-attention tasks. These noise measures initially were made at the frequency of our nSFOAE probe tone (4.0 kHz), but the same attention effects also were observed across a wide range of frequencies. We attribute the observed differences in physiological-noise magnitudes between the inattention and attention conditions to different levels of efferent activation associated with the differing attentional demands of the behavioral tasks. One hypothesis is that when the attentional demand is relatively great, efferent activation is relatively high, and a decrease in the gain of the cochlear amplifier leads to lower-amplitude cochlear activity, and thus a smaller measure of noise from the ear. PMID:24732069

  14. New radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, A.; Shiga, I.; Kanzaki, H. (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-07-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors.

  15. A new radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Akira; Shiga, Itsuo; Kanzaki, Hitoshi

    1982-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors. (author)

  16. New radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, A; Shiga, I; Kanzaki, H [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1982-07-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors.

  17. Use of piezosurgery for internal auditory canal drilling in acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kaminsky, Jan

    2011-10-01

    Piezosurgery is based on microvibrations generated by the piezoelectrical effect and has a selective bone-cutting ability with preservation of soft tissue. This study examined the applicability of Piezosurgery compared to rotating drills (RD) for internal auditory canal (IAC) opening in acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery. Piezosurgery was used in eight patients for IAC drilling in AN surgery. After exposition of the IAC and tumor, the posterior wall of the IAC was drilled using Piezosurgery instead of RD. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to practicability, safety, preciseness of bone cutting, preservation of cranial nerves, influences on neurophysiological monitoring, and facial nerve and hearing outcome. Piezosurgery was successfully used for selective bone cutting, while cranial nerves were structurally and functionally preserved, which could be measured by means of neuromonitoring. Piezosurgery guaranteed a safe and precise cut by removing bone layer by layer in a shaping way. Compared to RD, limited influence on neurophysiological monitoring attributable to Piezosurgery was noted, allowing for continuous neuromonitoring. No disadvantage due to microvibrations was noticed concerning hearing function. The angled tip showed better handling in right-sided than in left-sided tumors in the hands of a right-handed surgeon. The short, thick handpiece may be improved for more convenient handling. Piezosurgery is a safe tool for selective bone cutting for opening of the IAC with preservation of facial nerve and hearing function in AN surgery. Piezosurgery has the potential to replace RD for this indication because of its safe and precise bone-cutting properties.

  18. Challenges and outcomes of cholesteatoma management in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadersohi, Saied; Bhushan, Bharat; Billings, Kathleen R

    2018-03-01

    The high incidence of chronic otitis media with effusion and Eustachian tube dysfunction in children with Down syndrome (DS) may predispose them to cholesteatoma formation. Establishing the diagnosis, choosing the appropriate operative intervention, and post-operative care can be challenging. To describe management strategies for cholesteatoma diagnosis, surgical treatment, and post-operative management in children with Down syndrome. Retrospective case series of 14 patients (17 total ears) with Down syndrome diagnosed with cholesteatoma over a 9-year period. A total of 14 patients with cholesteatoma (3 with bilateral disease) were analyzed. Thirteen ears (76.5%) had ≥2 tympanostomy tubes insertions prior to cholesteatoma diagnosis, and otorrhea and hearing loss were the most common presenting symptoms. Common pre-operative CT scan findings included mastoid sclerosis and ossicular erosion. The average age at first surgery was 9.8 years, and the average follow-up was 4.3 years. For acquired cholesteatoma, most ears were managed with canal wall up (CWU) approaches, but ultimately 6/15 (40.0%) required canal wall down (CWD) approaches. Postoperatively, 3 (20.0%) ears developed new tympanic membrane retraction pockets, but no recurrent cholesteatoma. Four (26.7%) ears developed recurrent disease, and 3 (20.0%) had residual disease at secondary procedures. Ossiculoplasty was performed in 4 ears. Twelve (70.6%) ears were rehabilitated with hearing aids or FM systems. The diagnosis of cholesteatoma in Down syndrome was associated with otorrhea, hearing loss, and CT scan findings of ossicular erosion and mastoid sclerosis. Most cases were managed with CWU surgical approaches. Hearing aid use was common post-operatively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-resolution computed tomography of cholesteatoma of the middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kiyoshi; Fukusumi, Akio; Okudera, Toshio; Kato, Toshihiko; Soda, Toyoji

    1988-01-01

    The high-resolution computed tomography (CT) appearances of 72 consecutive cases (92 ears) of chronic otomastoiditis were reviewed. The cholesteatomas were verified surgically and/or otologically in 35 of these 92 ears. Discussion was made with special emphasis on the differential diagnosis of cholesteatoma of the middle ear from the non-cholesteatoma otitis media. The CT findings suggestive of cholesteatoma were as follows: the definitive findings was of a soft-tissue opacity filling Purssak's space, with a medial displacement of the malleus and the incus; the possible findings were 1) a bony erosion of the wall of the middle ear cavity, 2) a partial or complete disappearance of the malleus and/or the incus, and 3) an opacification of Purssak's space and the superomedial aspect of the external auditory meatus. (author)

  20. MR investigation of recurrent cholesteatomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyon, D.; Chan, K.Y.; Attia, M.; Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Bobin, S.; Sterkers, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    Nine cases of recurrent petrous cholesteatomas have been studied by a 1.5 T MR unit. Gadolinium was injected in 1 case. In all cases, comparison between MR, CT and clinical findings were made. MR allows for accurate topographic study and assessment of cholesteatomas extension, in particular in the posterior fossa and skull base. Relationships with the internal carotid artery and the jugular vein are clearly depicted.

  1. MR investigation of recurrent cholesteatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyon, D.; Chan, K.Y.; Attia, M.; Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Bobin, S.; Sterkers, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nine cases of recurrent petrous cholesteatomas have been studied by a 1.5 T MR unit. Gadolinium was injected in 1 case. In all cases, comparison between MR, CT and clinical findings were made. MR allows for accurate topographic study and assessment of cholesteatomas extension, in particular in the posterior fossa and skull base. Relationships with the internal carotid artery and the jugular vein are clearly depicted [fr

  2. Cholesteatoma of the external ear canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owen, Hanne H; Rosborg, Jørn; Gaihede, Michael

    2006-01-01

    (n = 2), and otorrhea (n = 1). Similar symptoms were found in secondary EECC, but less pronounced. In total the temporomandibular joint was exposed in 11 cases, while the mastoid and middle ear was invaded in six and three cases, respectively. In one primary case the facial nerve was exposed...

  3. Vertically transmitted HPV-dependent squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal. Case report of a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snietura, Miroslaw; Pakulo, Slawomir; Kopec, Agnieszka; Piglowski, Wojciech; Stanek-Widera, Agata; Chelmecka-Wiktorczyk, Liliana; Drabik, Grazyna; Kosowski, Bogdan; Wyrobek, Lukasz; Balwierz, Walentyna

    2017-01-01

    There is much evidence that high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a causative role in a subset of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in adults. HPV-positive tumors behave differently even in their response to treatment and are therefore a distinct subset. Both HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors of the head and neck region are usually in the domain of adults and cases in children are rare; thus when a 2-year-old child was diagnosed with this cancer in the external auditory canal, an in-depth assessment of the tumor was considered necessary. A 2-year-old girl was born to a HPV-positive mother who was diagnosed with cervical cancer during pregnancy. The child was delivered by caesarean section and the mother died of her cancer 7 months after delivery. After the diagnosis of locally invasive HPV-positive squamous cell cancer of the external auditory canal, the child was treated surgically, and with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Full remission was obtained lasting up to 325 weeks since treatment was started, resulting in over 6 years of disease-free survival. This is the first case of advanced, HPV-related HNSCC in a 2-year-old child, in whom the tumor was located in the external auditory canal and who made a dramatic recovery after treatment with nonradical surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The child has currently been disease free for 6 years. This case supports the observation that HPV-related HNSCC tumors appear to respond favorably to treatment despite the patient's young age and the clinically advanced stage of the tumor. (orig.) [de

  4. Computed tomography of the facial canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    The radiological details of the facial canal was investigated by computed tomography. In the first part of this study, dry skulls were used to delineate the full course of the facial canal by computed tomography. In the second part of this study, the patients with chronic otitis media and secondary cholesteatoma were evaluated. The labyrinthine and tympanic parts of the canal were well demonstrated with the axial scanning, and the mastoid part with the coronal scanning. Moreover, computed tomography showed excellent delineation of the middle ear contents. In patients with secondary cholesteatoma, the destructions of the intratympanic course of the bony facial canal were also assessed preoperatively. (author)

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal: computed tomography findings in six cases; Carcinoma espinocelular do conduto auditivo externo: estudo por tomografia computadorizada de seis casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Fabio Mota; Paes Junior, Ademar Jose de Oliveira; Tornin, Olger de Souza [Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: fmg961@yahoo.com.br; Souza, Ricardo Pires de [Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Programa de Residencia Medica em Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2005-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate the role of computed tomography in the assessment of deep extension of squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal. Materials and methods: in the period between May 1995 and December 2003 six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal were submitted to computed tomography scan at 'Hospital Heliopolis', Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, including axial and coronal slices with soft tissue and bone algorithms. Results: thickening of the soft tissue of the external auditory canal was seen in all patients, bone erosion and invasion of the middle ear in five (83.3%), invasion of the mastoid and parotid gland in four (66.7%), invasion of the temporomandibular joint in three (50%), and invasion of the middle cranial fossa, carotid canal and cervical lymph node enlargement in two (33.3%) patients. Conclusion: assessment of deep extension of squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal using computed tomography is useful for clinical staging of the disease allowing better therapeutic planning for these patients. (author)

  6. Expressions of TRPVs in the cholesteatoma epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ba Hung; Koizumi, Hiroki; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Kawaguchi, Rintaro; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2017-10-01

    We have recently proposed a hypothesis that acid leakage through the cholesteatoma epithelium mediates bone resorption in middle ear cholesteatoma. In the present study, we investigated the expressions of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels, which have been shown to play roles in the regulation of epidermal barrier function, in the cholesteatoma epithelium in comparison with the normal skin. Cholesteatoma epithelium and postauricular skin were collected from 17 patients with primary acquired middle ear cholesteatoma who underwent tympanomastoidectomy. Expressions of TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRPV6 were explored by fluorescence immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRPV6 mRNAs were all detected by qRT-PCR both in the skin and cholesteatoma tissue. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TRPV1 and TRPV3 were positive in the viable cell layers of the epidermis of the skin, and only TRPV3 was positive in those of the cholesteatoma epithelium. The immunoreactivity for TRPV3 was significantly weaker in cholesteatoma than in the skin. The lower expression of TRPV3 in cholesteatoma may be one of the mechanisms underlying the increased permeability of this tissue. On the other hand, TRPV1, TRPV4, and TRPV6 are unlikely to be involved in the regulation of epithelial permeability in cholesteatoma.

  7. Vertically transmitted HPV-dependent squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal. Case report of a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snietura, Miroslaw; Pakulo, Slawomir; Kopec, Agnieszka; Piglowski, Wojciech; Stanek-Widera, Agata [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Tumor Pathology Department, Gliwice (Poland); Chelmecka-Wiktorczyk, Liliana [University Children' s Hospital of Cracow, Department of Oncology and Hematology, Cracow (Poland); Drabik, Grazyna [University Children' s Hospital of Cracow, Pathology Department, Cracow (Poland); Kosowski, Bogdan [NZOZ Prosmed, Cracow (Poland); Wyrobek, Lukasz [University Children' s Hospital of Cracow, Department of Radiology, Cracow (Poland); Balwierz, Walentyna [University Children' s Hospital of Cracow, Department of Oncology and Hematology, Cracow (Poland); Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Clinic of Oncology and Hematology, Polish-American Pediatric Institute, Cracow (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    There is much evidence that high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a causative role in a subset of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in adults. HPV-positive tumors behave differently even in their response to treatment and are therefore a distinct subset. Both HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors of the head and neck region are usually in the domain of adults and cases in children are rare; thus when a 2-year-old child was diagnosed with this cancer in the external auditory canal, an in-depth assessment of the tumor was considered necessary. A 2-year-old girl was born to a HPV-positive mother who was diagnosed with cervical cancer during pregnancy. The child was delivered by caesarean section and the mother died of her cancer 7 months after delivery. After the diagnosis of locally invasive HPV-positive squamous cell cancer of the external auditory canal, the child was treated surgically, and with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Full remission was obtained lasting up to 325 weeks since treatment was started, resulting in over 6 years of disease-free survival. This is the first case of advanced, HPV-related HNSCC in a 2-year-old child, in whom the tumor was located in the external auditory canal and who made a dramatic recovery after treatment with nonradical surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The child has currently been disease free for 6 years. This case supports the observation that HPV-related HNSCC tumors appear to respond favorably to treatment despite the patient's young age and the clinically advanced stage of the tumor. (orig.) [German] Es gibt reichlich Belege dafuer, dass das menschliche Papillomavirus vom Hochrisikotyp (HR-HPV) in einigen Faellen von Plattenepithelkarzinomen des Kopf- und Halsbereichs (HNSCC) eine Schluesselrolle spielt. HPV-positive Tumoren verhalten sich anders, auch bezueglich des Ansprechens auf die Behandlung. Deswegen stellen sie eine separate biologische Gruppe dar. Sowohl HPV-positive als auch HPV

  8. Prosthetic rehabilitation of intentionally malpositioned implants in a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherpour, Reza; Mirfazaelian, Ali; Mangoli, Amir A; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2009-08-01

    This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a compromised temporal bone anatomy caused by resection of bone due to squamous cell carcinoma of external auditory canal. Tumor resection was followed by placement of three implants. The implants were intentionally malpositioned in the anterior-posterior plane due to the lack of temporal bone. Prosthodontic treatment included customized implant bar-supported auricular prosthesis.

  9. Differential diagnosis between chronic otitis media with and without cholesteatoma by temporal bone CT: focus on bone change and mass effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Cheol Kyu; Park, Dong Woo; Seong, Jin Yong; Lee, Kak Soo; Park Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine specific differences, we compared the temporal bone CT findings of chronic otitis media (COM) with and without cholesteatoma, focusing on bone change. Between 1997 and 1998, 82 patients (84 cases) underwent temporal bone CT and were shown to have COM, with or without cholesteatoma after mastoidectomy and tympanoplasty. There were 36 cases of COM with cholesteatoma (26 patients, M:F =3D 11:15; age range, 16-61 (mean, 36,2) years), and 58 cases without chlesteatoma (56 patients, M:F =3D 25:31, age range, 15-61 (mean, 36.2) years). The findings of temporal bone CT were analysed at the point of bony changes including erosion and medial displacement of ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes), erosion or destruction of the scutum, tegmen, facial canal, and lateral semicircular canal, and ballooning of the tympanic cavity and mastoid antrum. In addition, the soft tissue changes seen on temporal bone CT were analyzed at the site of lateral bulging of soft tissue in Prussak's space, perforation of the pars flaccida, tympanic membrane retraction, and tympanosclerosis. We retrospectively compared the findings of temporal bone CT with the surgical findings, and to assess statistical significance, the Chi-square test was used. Bone erosion or destruction was seen in 36.2% of COM cases without cholesteatoma, and in 96.2% of cases with cholesteatoma. Comparing COM with and without cholesteatoma, the erosion of ossicles including the malleus (81%, 24%), incus (88%, 14%), stapes (58%, 10%), scutum (88%, 10%), facial canal (8%, 0%), and lateral semicircular canal (8%, 0%), was more common in COM with cholesteatoma (p-value less than 0.05), with the exception of erosion of the tegmen (8%, 3%). Other bony changes including medial displacement of ossicles (27%, 3%), ballooning of tympanic cavity and mastoid antrum (96%, 16%), and the soft tissue changes including lateral bulging of soft tissue in Prussak's space (58%, 14%) and perforation of the pars flaccida (35

  10. Differential diagnosis between chronic otitis media with and without cholesteatoma by temporal bone CT: focus on bone change and mass effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Cheol Kyu; Park, Dong Woo; Seong, Jin Yong; Lee, Kak Soo; Park Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine specific differences, we compared the temporal bone CT findings of chronic otitis media (COM) with and without cholesteatoma, focusing on bone change. Between 1997 and 1998, 82 patients (84 cases) underwent temporal bone CT and were shown to have COM, with or without cholesteatoma after mastoidectomy and tympanoplasty. There were 36 cases of COM with cholesteatoma (26 patients, M:F =3D 11:15; age range, 16-61 (mean, 36,2) years), and 58 cases without chlesteatoma (56 patients, M:F =3D 25:31, age range, 15-61 (mean, 36.2) years). The findings of temporal bone CT were analysed at the point of bony changes including erosion and medial displacement of ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes), erosion or destruction of the scutum, tegmen, facial canal, and lateral semicircular canal, and ballooning of the tympanic cavity and mastoid antrum. In addition, the soft tissue changes seen on temporal bone CT were analyzed at the site of lateral bulging of soft tissue in Prussak's space, perforation of the pars flaccida, tympanic membrane retraction, and tympanosclerosis. We retrospectively compared the findings of temporal bone CT with the surgical findings, and to assess statistical significance, the Chi-square test was used. Bone erosion or destruction was seen in 36.2% of COM cases without cholesteatoma, and in 96.2% of cases with cholesteatoma. Comparing COM with and without cholesteatoma, the erosion of ossicles including the malleus (81%, 24%), incus (88%, 14%), stapes (58%, 10%), scutum (88%, 10%), facial canal (8%, 0%), and lateral semicircular canal (8%, 0%), was more common in COM with cholesteatoma (p-value less than 0.05), with the exception of erosion of the tegmen (8%, 3%). Other bony changes including medial displacement of ossicles (27%, 3%), ballooning of tympanic cavity and mastoid antrum (96%, 16%), and the soft tissue changes including lateral bulging of soft tissue in Prussak's space (58%, 14%) and perforation of the pars

  11. Foreign bodies in the external auditory canal: Influence of age on incidence and outcomes in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshio; Tanigawa, Tohru; Murotani, Kenta; Yamashita, Jun-Ichi

    2017-11-01

    Otolaryngologists occasionally observe foreign bodies (FB) in the external auditory canal (EAC), although relatively few studies have focused on the role of age in this condition. We retrospectively compared the incidences, outcomes and complications of FB in the EAC in different age groups. The patients at our center included 24 children (19%), 46 adults (37%) and 56 older adults (44%). Compared with adults, older adults were significantly more likely to have FB (peak age 75-79 years), be women (18/46 vs 34/56, P = 0.0461) and be unaware of their FB (18/46 vs 34/56, P = 0.0461). We observed that all EAC FB were more common during the summer, and biotic FB were not observed during the winter. Complications were more common in cases of biotic FB, compared with abiotic FB (5/27 vs 6/99, P = 0.0421). Our findings show that older adults are particularly susceptible to FB, are frequently unaware of their FB and can develop complications. These characteristics should be considered before treating FB in the EAC. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2131-2135. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Hearing preservation in retrosigmoid approach of small vestibular schwannomas: prognostic value of the degree of internal auditory canal filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Stéphane; Ferber-Viart, Chantal; Fuchsmann, Carine; Buiret, Guillaume; Zaouche, Sandra; Dubreuil, Christian

    2010-12-01

    To assess the contribution of preoperative radiologic appearance of vestibular schwannoma (VS) on the magnetic resonance imaging in constructive interference in steady-state sequences and demonstrate if the degree of the internal auditory canal (IAC) filling is correlated with hearing and facial preservation. A group of 278 patients who underwent VS surgery in a tertiary referral center. Retrosigmoid approach surgery. Patients were classified in 4 groups according to the percentage of IAC filling on the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging as Group IAC 1(IAC empty or filled filled from 25% to 50% with free fundus), Group IAC 3 (IAC filled from 50% to 75% with free fundus), and Group IAC 4 (complete filling of the IAC without fundus obliteration). A good correlation was observed between the IAC classification and the rate of hearing and facial preservation. The global rate of postoperative facial palsy was 10.4%. The global rate of hearing preservation in 213 patients with preoperative hearing class A and B was 40.8%. Regression analysis showed that the degree of lateral extension of the VS in the IAC was a strong predictor of hearing preservation ( p facial outcomes in selected patients with possible hearing preservation. In case of patient with small tumor and IAC empty or filled less than 75% and with free fundus, surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with serviceable hearing and the desire to retain it.

  13. Carcinoma espinocelular do conduto auditivo externo: estudo por tomografia computadorizada de seis casos Squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal: computed tomography findings in six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Mota Gonzalez

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a importância da avaliação tomográfica da extensão profunda dos carcinomas espinocelulares do conduto auditivo externo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizados exames tomográficos com cortes axiais e coronais com janelas para partes moles e óssea em seis pacientes com carcinoma espinocelular do conduto auditivo externo, com idade variando entre 55 e 71 anos, internados no Hospital Heliópolis, no período entre maio de 1995 e dezembro de 2003. RESULTADOS: Dos seis pacientes, todos apresentavam aumento de partes moles no conduto auditivo externo, cinco (83,3% tinham erosão óssea e invasão da orelha média, quatro (66,7% possuíam comprometimento da mastóide e da glândula parótida, três (50% apresentavam invasão da articulação temporomandibular, dois (33,3% tinham invasão da fossa média, do canal carotídeo e linfonodomegalia júgulo-carotídea alta ipisilateral. CONCLUSÃO: A avaliação da extensão tumoral profunda fornecida pela tomografia computadorizada é importante no estadiamento clínico, possibilitando um planejamento terapêutico mais eficaz.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of computed tomography in the assessment of deep extension of squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period between May 1995 and December 2003 six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal were submitted to computed tomography scan at "Hospital Heliópolis", São Paulo, SP, Brazil, including axial and coronal slices with soft tissue and bone algorithms. RESULTS: Thickening of the soft tissue of the external auditory canal was seen in all patients, bone erosion and invasion of the middle ear in five (83.3%, invasion of the mastoid and parotid gland in four (66.7%, invasion of the temporomandibular joint in three (50%, and invasion of the middle cranial fossa, carotid canal and cervical lymph node enlargement in two (33.3% patients. CONCLUSION: Assessment of

  14. A new grading system for analyzing pediatric cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Akira; Ashimori, Naoki; Tsurita, Minako; Ban, Akihiro

    2007-01-01

    We developed a new grading system to understand the complicated pathological changes of cholesteatoma in comparison to those of chronic otitis media. This grading system, based on the extent of the cholesteatoma and the surrounding pathlogical changes, is able to simply express the entire pathological condition of the ear with cholesteatoma. Using this grading system, we analyzed the ears of 48 children with cholesteatoma, who underwent tympanoplasty over the past ten years. Their ages ranged from 2 to 15 years with an average age of 8.5 years. The attic and mesotympanic cholesteatomas were associated with greater pathological changes than those observed in postero-superior quadrant cholesteatomas. The degree of the pathological change in the area surrounding the cholesteatoma appears to correlate with the degree of extention of the cholesteatoma. This system is thus considered to be useful for evaluating the improvement in the pathological conditions before and after surgery in patients with cholesteatoma. (author)

  15. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Reconstruction of Posterior Meatal Wall after Canal Wall Down Mastoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbary, Mohammad El-Sayed Abd; Nasr, Wail Fayez; Sorour, Samir Sorour

    2018-04-01

    Introduction  Canal wall down (CWD) mastoidectomy has many drawbacks, including chronic otorrhea not responding to medications, granulations, dizziness on exposure to cold or hot water, and tendency of debris accumulation in the mastoid cavity, demanding periodic cleaning. Many of these problems can be solved by reconstruction of the posterior meatal wall (PMW). Objectives  To assess the results of PMW reconstruction after CWD mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma using titanium mesh and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) mixed with bone pate. Methods  This study was conducted with 20 patients that have atticoantral chronic suppurative otitis media. All cases were subjected to CWD mastoid surgery with complete elimination of the disease and reconstruction of the PMW by titanium mesh and the mixture of PRP with bone pate. All patients were exposed to a full preoperative evaluation and full postoperative assessment of the complications, the appearance of the external auditory canal contour, and the hearing gain expressed by the change of the air bone gap postoperatively. Results  The PMW reconstructed by titanium mesh and the mixture of PRP with bone pate showed a smooth contour. During the follow-up of 12 to 36 months, the postoperative appearance of the external auditory canal contour was found to be smooth without hidden pouches, irregularities or stenosis in all cases. No granulation, foreign body reaction, or extrusion and/or displacement of the titanium mesh were registered. No facial palsy or recurrent cholesteatoma was reported. Conclusion  The surgical reconstruction of the PMW using PRP, bone pate and titanium mesh after CWD mastoidectomy appears to be reliable without considerable complications, giving a smooth appearance to the PMW.

  16. CT of petrou bone. Utility to cholesteatoma location. Study of 28 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, M.D.; Espinos, M.A.; Molina, A.; Martinez-Rodrigo, J.; Galant, J.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with cholesteatoma were studied preoperatively by means of CT petrous bone to determine the localization and extension of their lesion. All the patients underwent survey and the intraoperative findings were compared with those resulting from CT. The reading was carried out with no knowledge of the intraoperative data. The following results were obtained: localization of cholesteatoma in attic, antrum and posterior tympanic cavity had a sensitivity of 0.91 and a specificity of 0.57, with a Fisher's p value less than 0.0005. When the erosion produced by the cholesteatoma was studied in the different structures, the accuracy was greatest with the stape, the septum and prussak's space; the highest number of false negatives corresponded to the tympanic membrane. The false positives were produced in the assessment of the facial canal, tegmen tympani and the labyrinthine fistula. The reliability of CT was very high for the diagnosis of ossicular destruction and displacement of the small bones, as well as for the state of the mastoid cells and congenital variations. In conclusion, we point out the importance of performing a CT study prior to surgery for cholesteatoma due to its elevated sensitivity in locating the lesion, and we stress the value of the knowledge of the erosion of the different structures since it constitutes a guide for intraoperative exploration and assessment. (Author)

  17. Measurement of normal auditory ossicles by high-resolusion CT with application of normal criteria to disease cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Jyoko

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to define criteria for the normal position of ossicles and to apply them in patients with rhinolaryngologically or pathologically confirmed diseases. Ossicles were measured on high-resolution CT images of 300 middle ears, including 241 normal ears and 59 diseased ears, in a total of 203 subjects. Angles A, B, and C to the baseline between the most lateral margins of bilateral internal auditory canals, and distance ratio b/a were defined as measurement items. Normal angles A, B, and C and distance ratio b/a ranged from 19 deg to 59 deg, 101 deg to 145 deg, 51 deg to 89 deg, and 0.49 to 0.51, respectively. Based on these criteria, all of these items were within the normal range in 30/34 (88.2 %) ears for otitis media and mastoiditis. One or more items showed far abnormal values (standard deviation; more than 3) in 5/7 (71.4 %) ears for cholesteatoma and 4/4 (100 %) ears for external ear anomaly. These normal measurements may aid in evaluating the position of auditory ossicles especially in the case of cholesteatoma and auditory ossicle abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Measurement of normal auditory ossicles by high-resolusion CT with application of normal criteria to disease cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Jyoko

    1988-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to define criteria for the normal position of ossicles and to apply them in patients with rhinolaryngologically or pathologically confirmed diseases. Ossicles were measured on high-resolution CT images of 300 middle ears, including 241 normal ears and 59 diseased ears, in a total of 203 subjects. Angles A, B, and C to the baseline between the most lateral margins of bilateral internal auditory canals, and distance ratio b/a were defined as measurement items. Normal angles A, B, and C and distance ratio b/a ranged from 19 deg to 59 deg, 101 deg to 145 deg, 51 deg to 89 deg, and 0.49 to 0.51, respectively. Based on these criteria, all of these items were within the normal range in 30/34 (88.2 %) ears for otitis media and mastoiditis. One or more items showed far abnormal values (standard deviation; more than 3) in 5/7 (71.4 %) ears for cholesteatoma and 4/4 (100 %) ears for external ear anomaly. These normal measurements may aid in evaluating the position of auditory ossicles especially in the case of cholesteatoma and auditory ossicle abnormality. (Namekawa, K.).

  19. Congenital cholesteatoma of mastoid origin: A multicenter case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čvorović Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The mastoid is the rarest site for the onset of congenital cholesteatoma (CC. The symptoms are atypical and minimal. The aim of this multicenter retrospective descriptive study was to define this extremely rare condition and its clinical presentation, diagnosis and management. Methods. We analyzed data files for a 15- year period in 4 tertiary otology centers and discovered 6 patients with the diagnosis of CC of the mastoid. Results. The clinical presentation of CC varied from incidental findings in patient to patient with otogenic meningitis. The most common findings during surgical procedures were mastoid cortex erosion, sigmoid plate dehiscence, dural exposure and external canal wall destruction. Conclusion. CC of mastoid origin tends to occur in adult patients probably because of minimal symptoms and the delayed diagnosis. It can exist for years in a nonaggressive state and develop to giant sizes. In children it is almost incidentally diagnosed. Early imaging is necessary in order to prevent serious complication.

  20. Comparison of FSE T2 W PROPELLER and 3D-FIESTA of 3 T MR for the internal auditory canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-Bo; Yuan, Hui-Shu; Ma, Furong; Zhao, Qiang

    The study compared the use of periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) technique fast spin echo (FSE) T2 W and the sequence of three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) technique in the MRI of the internal auditory canal for overall image quality improvement. One hundred thirty-two patients undergoing FSE T2 W PROPELLER and 3D-FIESTA examinations of the internal auditory canal were included. All examinations were performed at 3.0 T with comparison of a sagittal oblique FSE T2 W sequence with the PROPELLER technique to 3D-FIESTA in the same reconstructed orientation with PROPELLER. Image quality was evaluated by two radiologists using a 4-point scale. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the data of the two techniques. The image quality of FSE T2 W PROPELLER was significantly improved compared to the reconstructed images of 3D-FIESTA. Observer 1: median FSE T2 W with PROPELLER, 4 [mean, 3.455] versus median reconstructed 3D-FIESTA, 3 [mean, 3.15], (PW with PROPELLER, 4 [mean, 3.47] versus median reconstructed 3D-FIESTA, 3 [mean, 3.25], (PW PROPELLER technique for MRI of internal auditory canal reduced uncertainty caused by motion artifact and improved the quality of the image compared to the reconstructed 3D-FIESTA. It was affected by different parameters including the blade width, echo train length (ETL). This is explained by data oversampling at the center region of k-space, which requires additional imaging time over conventional MRI techniques. Increasing blade was expected to improve motion correction effects but also the signal-to-noise ratio. ETL increases the image sharpness and the overall image quality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cholesteatoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the inner ear and brain. If untreated, deafness, brain abscess, meningitis, and, rarely, death can occur. Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. ...

  2. Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Halkierø-Sørensen, L.; Rasmussen, G.

    2001-01-01

    in the basal layer of the stratum granulosum, while the superior layer contained substantially fewer organelles than are found in normal skin. At the stratum granulosum/stratum corneum interface lipids secreted from Odland bodies were found in sac-like invaginations along the cell membrane but premature...... exocytosis was also frequently observed. In the intercellular spaces of the stratum corneum, multiple long sheets of lamellar structures interrupted by slits or pores enclosed the keratinized corneocytes. The intercellular spaces seemed narrow and an extracellular barrier was not found until well above...

  3. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Shin

    Full Text Available Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5-3, plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5-3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5-3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins

  4. The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestan, C.; Czerny, C.; Gstoettner, W.; Franz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas will be described in this paper. The pre- and postoperative imaging of the temporal bone was performed with HRCT and MRI. HRCT and MRI were performed in the axial and coronal plane. MRI was done with T2 weighted and T1 weighted sequences both before and after the intravenous application of contrast material. All imaging findings were confirmed clinically or surgically. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by HRCT included bony erosions of the ossicles, scutum, facial canal in the middle ear, tympanic walls including the tegmen tympani, and of the labyrinth. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by MRI included signs indicative for labyrinthitis, and brain abscess. Postoperative HRCT depicted bony erosions caused by recurrent cholesteatoma, bony defects of the facial nerve and of the labyrinth, and a defect of the tegmen tympani with a soft tissue mass in the middle ear. Postoperative MRI delineated neuritis of the facial nerve, labyrinthitis, and a meningo-encephalocele protruding into the middle ear. HRCT and MRI are excellent imaging tools to depict either bony or soft tissue complications or both if caused by acquired cholesteatomas. According to our findings and to the literature HRCT and MRI are complementary imaging methods to depict pre- or postoperative complications of acquired cholesteatomas if these are suspected by clinical examination. (orig.) [de

  5. Endoscopy-Assisted Ear Surgery for Treatment of Chronic Otitis Media With Cholesteatoma, Adhesion, or Retraction Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulku, Cagatay Han

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the results of endoscopy-assisted ear surgery for the treatment of chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma, adhesion, or retraction pockets.Fifty-one patients who underwent oto-endoscopy-assisted canal wall up tympanomastoid surgery and/or limited anterior atticotomy with tympanoplasty for chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma, adhesion, or retraction pocket from 2006 to 2013 have been included in this study. Eradication of the disease from the middle ear and mastoid air cells was achieved by combination of the oto-microscobic and oto-endoscopic approaches. Second look surgery was performed 18 months later from the initial surgery in selected patients. Age, gender, pre-/postoperative otoscopy findings/audiograms, type of the used prostheses, and follow-up time were obtained from the patient's file. Anatomic integrity rates of the tympanic membrane, the mean gains of air bone gap, on pure-tone audiogram at 4 frequencies and existence of the residual disease were reviewed parameters. Functional evaluation was made in patients with intact tympanic membrane.Of the 51 patients, the ratios of the chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma and isolated adhesive otitis or retraction pocket cases were 74.5% (38/51) and 25.5% (13/51), respectively. Ossicular chain reconstruction was made with PORP in 27 patients and TORP in 20 patients, whereas the ossicular chain was intact in 4 patients. Anatomic integrity rates of the tympanic membrane were 90.2% (46/51). The overall (n = 46) pre-/postoperative mean ABG obtained at 4 frequencies were 28.3 ± 12.26 and 9.18 ± 5.68 dB (P otitis media with cholesteatoma patients. However, there was no recurrence or new cholesteatoma formation in isolated retraction pockets or adhesive otitis patients.Oto-endoscopic eradication of the cholesteatoma or epithelial tissue from hidden area after the all visible cholesteatoma removal by oto-microscope improves the quality of surgery

  6. Biochemical and Bioimaging Evidence of Cholesterol in Acquired Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Bjarne; Bloksgaard, Maria; Groza, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    : The results show that the total lipid content of the cholesteatoma matrix is similar to that of stratum corneum from skin and that the cholesteatoma matrix unquestionably contains cholesterol. The cholesterol content in the cholesteatoma matrix is increased by over 30% (w/w dry weight) compared to the control....... The cholesterol sulfate content is below 1% of the total lipids in both the cholesteatoma and the control. Cholesterol ester was reduced by over 30% when compared to the control. CONCLUSIONS: The content of cholesterol in the cholesteatoma matrix is significantly different from that in stratum corneum from skin...

  7. In vitro cholesteatoma growth and secretion of cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgaland, Tore; Engelen, Bart; Olsnes, Carla; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen; Vassbotn, Flemming S

    2010-07-01

    Our results show a significant difference between skin and cholesteatoma biology in vitro. Cholesteatoma disease is a process of destruction characterized by uncontrolled growth of squamous epithelial cells in the middle ear or temporal bone. The pathophysiology behind the cholesteatoma development is controversial, and the mechanisms driving the cholesteatoma growth, migration and destructive properties is still unclear. We aimed to provide a method to study the effect of various compounds on cholesteatoma and skin tissue growth, as well as to further investigate the biological differences between normal skin and cholesteatoma tissue. We have established a method to study cholesteatoma biopsy tissue in vitro. Cholesteatoma tissues from patients undergoing surgery for chronic otitis were grown in culture medium and compared to growth patterns and behaviour of normal retroauricular skin. Conditioned medium was analysed for various secreted cytokines. We found a radial outgrowth of keratinocyte epithelium from the circular biopsies. After 5 days of culture we found a significant growth of both cholesteatoma and skin-derived cells. Cholesteatoma samples showed higher growth rate as compared with skin control cultures from the same patient. Moreover, the cholesteatoma cells showed higher production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin (IL)-6 as compared with normal skin.

  8. MR Imaging of the Internal Auditory Canal and Inner Ear at 3T: Comparison between 3D Driven Equilibrium and 3D Balanced Fast Field Echo Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyung Jin; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lee, Ji Won [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To compare the use of 3D driven equilibrium (DRIVE) imaging with 3D balanced fast field echo (bFFE) imaging in the assessment of the anatomic structures of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and inner ear at 3 Tesla (T). Thirty ears of 15 subjects (7 men and 8 women; age range, 22 71 years; average age, 50 years) without evidence of ear problems were examined on a whole-body 3T MR scanner with both 3D DRIVE and 3D bFFE sequences by using an 8-channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil. Two neuroradiologists reviewed both MR images with particular attention to the visibility of the anatomic structures, including four branches of the cranial nerves within the IAC, anatomic structures of the cochlea, vestibule, and three semicircular canals. Although both techniques provided images of relatively good quality, the 3D DRIVE sequence was somewhat superior to the 3D bFFE sequence. The discrepancies were more prominent for the basal turn of the cochlea, vestibule, and all semicircular canals, and were thought to be attributed to the presence of greater magnetic susceptibility artifacts inherent to gradient-echo techniques such as bFFE. Because of higher image quality and less susceptibility artifacts, we highly recommend the employment of 3D DRIVE imaging as the MR imaging choice for the IAC and inner ear

  9. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in evaluation of cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, M.; Sugimura, K.; Ishida, T.; Fujino, A.; Miyakuni, Y.

    1990-01-01

    It was sometimes difficult to differentiate cholesteatoma from accompanied granuloma, cholesterol granuloma, or mastoiditis on high-resolution CT. This study was designed to assess the reliability with which cholesteatoma can be differentiated from those accompanied lesions by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Eight patients suspected to have cholesteatoma were evaluated with GD-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging with a 1.5-T MR imaging GE Signa unit. axial pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted (TR/TE, 600/20) and T2-weighted (TR/TE, 2,000/70) images were studied. MR imaging findings were compared with histologic findings (13 lesions), which included cholesteatoma (n = 6), granuloma (n = 4), cholesterol granuloma (n = 2), and mastoiditis (n = 1). Cholesteatoma had an intermediate to high signal intensity (SI) similar to that of granuloma on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Cholesterol granulomas showed high SI on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Mastoiditis demonstrated marked high SI on T2-weighted images. Cholesterol granuloma and mastoiditis can be distinguished from cholesteatoma or granuloma on both T1- and T2-weighted images. On Gd-DTPA-enhanced images, there was marked enhancement of all granulomas. However, no cholesteatoma enhancement was seen in all six lesions. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images were able to distinguish cholesteatoma from granuloma and to estimate the exact extent of cholesteatoma. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging is valuable in the evaluation and management of cholesteatoma

  10. Surgery With or Without Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Early-stage External Auditory Canal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Ryohei; Takenaka, Yukinori; Takemura, Kazuya; Ashida, Naoki; Shimizu, Kotaro; Kitamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Uno, Atsuhiko

    2017-10-01

    External auditory canal squamous cell carcinoma (EACSCC) is a rare disease with no standard treatment supported by high-level evidence. The aim of this study was to investigate EACSCC prognoses according to treatment modality and thus determine the optimal intervention for early-stage disease. PubMed, Scopus, and Ichushi-Web searches of the English and Japanese-language literature published between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2016 were performed using the key words "external auditory canal cancer" and "temporal bone cancer." Articles related to EACSCC that include the 5-year overall survival rate or individual patient data for histological types, follow-up periods, and final outcomes were enrolled. Sex, age, Moody's modified Pittsburgh stage, type of treatment modality, type of operation, follow-up period, and 5-year survival rates were extracted. Twenty articles were used for the aggregate meta-analysis using a random-effects model, and 18 articles that reported 99 patients with early-stage EACSCC were used for the individual patient data meta-analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate of early-stage EACSCC was 77%. Postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) was performed in 45% of stage I patients and 68% of stage II patients. Survival analysis of all patients showed no differences between the surgery-only and PORT groups; however, PORT exhibited a better prognosis than surgery alone among patients with stage I disease (p = 0.003, log-rank test). This result indicated that PORT can be the standard therapy for stages I and II EACSCC.

  11. Influence of the auditory canal number of segments and radius variation on the outer ear frequency response

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thejane, T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available number of segments and the radius-length mapping function were used. The use of a third order polynomial to further improve the relationship between the radius and the length of the ear canal is suggested for future research work....

  12. Stratum Corneum Barrier Lipids in Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G

    2000-01-01

    emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures......Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies...

  13. Etiología del colesteatoma ótico Etiology of otic cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianis Loraine Quintero Noa

    2011-12-01

    very clear and controversial. Different theories are reported to explain the congenital cholesteatoma, the transition of a retraction pocket until the appearance of primary acquired cholesteatoma and other on the genesis of the secondary acquired cholesteatoma. Presence of some cytokines in cholesteatoma is described inducing to hyperproliferation and not coordinated of keratinocytes of the external auditory meatus and the pars flaccida more aggressive in the pediatric acquired cholesteatoma playing a fundamental role in the proliferation and in apoptosis of keratinocyte. In a sample of choleastomatous tissue in vitro culture has been recently identified that the a-TNF stimulates the production of IL-8. It is interesting to offer present review on the etiology of cholesteatoma that still is under research and a challenge for otologists due to its high relapses incidence and potential complications.

  14. Infantile inflammatory pseudotumor of the facial nerve as a complication of epidermal nevus syndrome with cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hato, Naohito; Tsujimura, Mika; Takagi, Taro; Okada, Masahiro; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Tauchi, Hisamichi

    2013-12-01

    The first reported case of facial paralysis due to an inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the facial nerve as a complication of epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) is herein presented. A 10-month-old female patient was diagnosed with ENS at 3 months of age. She was referred to us because of moderate left facial paralysis. Epidermal nevi of her left auricle extended deep into the external ear canal. Otoscopy revealed polypous nevi and cholesteatoma debris filling the left ear. Computed tomography showed a soft mass filling the ear canal, including the middle ear, and an enormously enlarged facial nerve. Surgical exploration revealed numerous polypous nevi, external ear cholesteatoma, and tumorous swelling of the facial nerve. The middle ear ossicles were completely lost. The facial paralysis was improved after decompression surgery, but recurred 5 months later. A second operation was conducted 10 months after the first. During this operation, facial nerve decompression was completed from the geniculate ganglion to near the stylomastoid foramen. Histological diagnosis of the facial nerve tumor was IPT probably caused by chronic external ear inflammation induced by epidermal nevi. The facial paralysis gradually improved to House-Blackmann grade III 5 years after the second operation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Post-traumatic cholesteatoma... a rare occurrence | Naidoo | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporal bone fractures and their acute complications have been well described in radiology and ENT journals; this is in contrast to the delayed and rare complication of implantation cholesteatomas. We present the computed tomographic (CT) findings of two cases of infiltrating cholesteatomas that developed many years ...

  16. Imaging evaluation of middle ear cholesteatoma: iconographic essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ana Flavia Assis de; Aburjeli, Bruna de Oliveira Melim; Moreira, Wanderval; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: fauassis@hotmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a relevant and relatively common disease that may have severe consequences. In the present pictorial essay, the authors have selected illustrative examples of multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging depicting the main presentations of cholesteatomas, and describing their characteristics, locations, and major complications. (author)

  17. Structural characterization and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Sørensen, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The goal of this work is to characterize the morphology and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma. We hypothesize that constitutive lipid membranes are present in the cholesteatoma and resemble those found in human skin stratum corneum. METHODS: We performed a comparative...... noninvasive structural and lipid compositional study of acquired cholesteatoma and control human skin using multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques and high-performance thin-layer chromatography. RESULTS: The structural arrangement of the cholesteatoma is morphologically invariant...... along a depth of more than 200 μm and resembles the stratum corneum of hyperorthokeratotic skin. Lipid compositional analyses of the cholesteatoma show the presence of all major lipid classes found in normal skin stratum corneum (ceramides, long chain fatty acids, and cholesterol). Consistent with this...

  18. Computed tomography of middle ear cholesteatomas without tympanic membrane perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettorre, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of a middle ear cholesteatoma behind a normal tympanic membrane is a rate though possible event. In such cases, CT may provide useful information for diagnosis. The results are presented of a CT study carried out on 14 patients affected with unilateral conductive hearing loss and with normal tympanic membrane. CT allowed the diagnosis of meddle ear cholesteatoma to be made in all cases. All patients were treated with surgery: 8 of them underwent tympanoplasty and 6 explorative tympanotomy. While the diagnosis of cholesteatoma was confirmed in 13 patients, in 1 case tympanosclerosis was diagnosed. CT diagnosis of middle ear cholesteatoma is based on the demonstration of a low-density soft-tissue mass, in association with bone erosion or ossicular dislocation. The author emphasizes the difficulty of a CT diagnosis of cholesteatoma in the patients with middle ear soft-tissue masses in the absence of bone alterations

  19. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wan-Yu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Sung-Hsin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ruey-Long [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ya-Fang [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping [Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chong, Fok-Ching [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Wei, E-mail: cwwang@ntuh.gov.tw [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  20. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Hong, Ruey-Long; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Chong, Fok-Ching; Wang, Chun-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6–33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  1. Comparison of Microbiological Flora in the External Auditory Canal of Normal Ear and an Ear with Acute Otitis Externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanpur, Asheesh Dora; Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Chawla, Kiran; Shashidhar, V; Singh, Rohit

    2017-09-01

    Acute Otitis Externa (AOE) is also known as swimmer's ear. Investigations initiated during World War II firmly established the role of bacteria in the aetiology of Acute Otitis Externa. To culture the microbiological flora of the normal ear and compare it with the flora causing AOE and to know the role of normal ear canal flora and anaerobes in the aetiology. A prospective observational study was conducted on 64 patients clinically diagnosed with unilateral AOE. Ear swabs were taken from both the ears. Microbiological flora was studied considering diseased ear as test ear and the normal ear as the control. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were done. Severity of the disease was assessed by subjective and objective scores. Effect of topical treatment with ichthammol glycerine pack was assessed after 48 hours and scores were calculated again. Patients with scores < 4 after pack removal were started on systemic antibiotics and were assessed after seven days of antibiotics course. Data was analysed using Paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Chi-square test. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (33%) was the most common bacteria cultured from the ear followed by Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (18%). Patients with anaerobic organism in the test ear had severe symptoms and needed systemic antibiotic therapy. Most of the cases may respond to empirical antibiotic therapy. In cases with severe symptoms and the ones refractory to empirical treatment, a culture from the ear canal will not be a tax on the patient. This helps in giving a better understanding about the disease, causative organisms and helps in avoiding the use of inappropriate antibiotics that usually result in developing resistant strains of bacteria.

  2. Otalgia and eschar in the external auditory canal in scrub typhus complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sung-Yuan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus, a mite-transmitted zoonosis caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, is an endemic disease in Taiwan and may be potentially fatal if diagnosis is delayed. Case presentations We encountered a 23-year-old previously healthy Taiwanese male soldier presenting with the right ear pain after training in the jungle and an eleven-day history of intermittent high fever up to 39°C. Amoxicillin/clavulanate was prescribed for otitis media at a local clinic. Skin rash over whole body and abdominal cramping pain with watery diarrhea appeared on the sixth day of fever. He was referred due to progressive dyspnea and cough for 4 days prior to admission in our institution. On physical examination, there were cardiopulmonary distress, icteric sclera, an eschar in the right external auditory canal and bilateral basal rales. Laboratory evaluation revealed thrombocytopenia, elevation of liver function and acute renal failure. Chest x-ray revealed bilateral diffuse infiltration. Doxycycline was prescribed for scrub typhus with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure. Fever subsided dramatically the next day and he was discharged on day 7 with oral tetracycline for 7 days. Conclusion Scrub typhus should be considered in acutely febrile patients with multiple organ involvement, particularly if there is an eschar or a history of environmental exposure in endemic areas. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, timely administration of antibiotics and intensive supportive care are necessary to decrease mortality of serious complications of scrub typhus.

  3. Baseline and follow-up MRI of the internal auditory canal after suboccipital resection of acoustic schwannoma: appearances and clinical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.; Castillo, M.; Campbell, J.; Pillsbury, H.; Walters, T.

    1995-01-01

    Prospective baseline MRI was obtained on 31 patients who had ''total'' removal of acoustic schwannoma 6 months to 9 years previously. Follow-up MRI was performed after 1-2 years on patients with questionable abnormalities. We found four patterns (1) internal auditory canals (IAC) with nonenhancing soft-tissue strands, possibly scars or distorted residual nerves (8); (2) IAC with marginal enhancement-reactive dura mater (16); (3) IAC with contrast-enhancing globular tissues suggesting residual or recurrent tumour (5); (4) high-signal intensity in the IAC before contrast medium administration, probably related to graft with fat/fascia/muscle (2). Prospective 1- to 2-year follow-up studies were available in 8, 5, and 1 patients in groups 2, 3, and 4 respectively. In group 2, dural enhancement remained unchanged in 5 patients and decreased in 3. In group 3 follow-up showed 1 tumor recurrence (surgically confirmed) and 4 stable abnormalities. In group 4, follow-up in 1 of the 2 patients was stable. In groups 1 and 2, the MRI features correlate well with complete tumor removal. Whether follow-up in these groups is indicated needs to be determined. In group 3 residual or recurrent tumor cannot be excluded. In group 4, grafts may prevent adequate visualization of the IAC. (orig.)

  4. School performance in cholesteatoma-operated children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurhuus, Bjarki; Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Pedersen, Jacob Krabbe

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteatoma in childhood had no long-term effect on school performance for the majority who completed lower secondary school. Aim To investigate whether individuals operated on for cholesteatoma in childhood have impaired school performance in adolescence. Methods All children born in Denmark...... between 1986-1991 with cholesteatoma surgery performed before the age of 15 years were included (cholestetaoma group). A control group consisting of a 5% random sample of all children born in Denmark during the same period was used for comparison. Final marks (average, mathematics, Danish, and English...

  5. Clinical application of 3D spiral CT of the auditory ossicular chain and labyrinth: Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yong; Wang Yisheng

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical application and limitation of 3D spiral CT of the auditory ossicular chain and labyrinth. Methods: 3D reconstruction of the auditory ossicular chain and labyrinth, including multiplanar reformation (MPR), minimum or maximum intensity projection (MinIP or MaxIP) and shaded surface display (SSD), were performed with 1 mm slice thickness, 5 cm field of view and 0.1 mm reconstruction interval spiral CT in 14 normal subjects, 15 patients with middle ear diseases. Results: With use of 3D reconstruction images in 14 normal subjects, 13 cases of ossicular chain showed that the long process of the incus was parallel to the manubrium and projected inferomedian toward the cochlear promontory, the incus-stapedial joint was like a 'L-shape' structure, and in 8 cases of labyrinth reconstruction, the cochlea and the three semicircular canals were demonstrated. 9 cholesteatomas of 13 chronic otitis media demonstrated destruction of ossicular chain of varying degrees. In 2 cases with congenital abnormality, ossicle dysplasia was seen. Conclusion: 3D CT is a useful technique for evaluating anatomic malformations and diseases of middle and inner ear, but there are still few pitfalls

  6. Surgical outcomes of early congenital cholesteatoma: minimally invasive transcanal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang H; Jang, Jeong H; Lee, Dongjun; Lee, Hye-Ryung; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2014-03-01

    To introduce a simple and alternative surgical technique, minimally invasive transcanal myringotomy (MITM), for early stage congenital cholesteatoma in children and to evaluate the feasibility and results of MITM for management of early stage congenital cholesteatoma with respect to its effectiveness and safety. Retrospective review. Between August 2008 and September 2012, a total of 36 patients with congenital cholesteatoma met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Patient medical records, including demographic characteristics, intraoperative findings, and follow-up records, were reviewed. Subjects consisted of 23 males (64%) and 13 females (36%), and the age at operation ranged from 12 months to 6 years (mean age = 3 years and 6 months). The number of congenital cholesteatoma was as follows: 26 patients at stage I and 10 patients at stage II. The follow-up duration was between 12 and 56 months, with an average of 30 months. There were no postoperative complications such as tympanic membrane perforation, dizziness, or secondary middle ear infection. Among 36 patients who had undergone the MITM approach for the treatment of congenital cholesteatoma, five (13.8%) showed recurrence and underwent a second-look operation. On the basis of our data, the MITM approach is a useful surgical technique for early stage congenital cholesteatoma in children. It has many advantages, in that there is no external wound and it is a simple surgical technique that involves easy postoperative care, a short operation time and hospitalization period, avoidance of serious complications, and easy repeatability for recurrence. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of cholesteatoma frequency in patients with chronic otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amad Meimaneh Jahromi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Chronic otitis media (COM is regarded as one of the disabling diseases which have a great influence on the quality of life. Because of the surgical approach of cholesteatoma, timely diagnosis is very important in management of patients with COM. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of cholesteatoma in patients with COM, demographic factors and disease related factors. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, medical records of 100 patients with COM who had surgery since 2005 to 2009 in Imam Reza Hospital were selected. Patients’ age, gender, duration of COM, clinical manifestations, location of perforation of tympanic membrane and presence or absence of cholesteatoma were analyzed by SPSS statistical software and some tables and graphs were planned. Results: patients   included 70 males and 30 females with an average age of 23.08 ± 11.35. Mean of COM duration was 8.04 ± 7.14 years. The most common manifestations of the disease were otorrhea (92% and hearing loss (80%. The most frequent type of tympanic perforation was total perforation. Frequency of cholesteatoma was 42% and it was more common in males than females (42.9% and 40%. Presence of choleasteatoma was related to gender, age, location of tympanic perforation, presence of otorrhea and hearing loss. Conclusion: Prevalence of cholesteatoma in patients  with COM  in  Mashhad  is more than  other  cites of Iran and  also other  countries, but it is less than prevalence of non cholesteatomatos COM. It is very important to pay more attention to patients with COM who are evaluated about presence of cholesteatoma, specially those with otorrhea, hearing loss, total perforation of tympanic membrane or male gender.

  8. The distribution of free calcium ions in the cholesteatoma epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Rasmussen, Gurli; Ottosen, Peter D

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of free calcium ions in normal skin and cholesteatoma epithelium was investigated using the oxalate precipitation method. In agreement with previous observations, we could demonstrate a calcium ion gradient in normal epidermis where the cells in stratum basale and spinosum reside...... appeared where oblong accumulations of free calcium ions were found basally in the stratum. These findings provide evidence that fluctuations in epidermal calcium in cholesteatoma epithelium may underlie the abnormal desquamation, may contribute to the formation of an abnormal permeability barrier and may...

  9. Diagnosis of cholesteatoma by high resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakitsubata, Yousuke; Kakitsubata, Sachiko; Ogata, Noboru; Asada, Keiko; Watanabe, Katsushi; Tohno, Tetsuya; Makino, Kohji

    1988-01-01

    Three normal volunteers and 57 patients with cholesteatoma were examined by high resolution computed tomography. Serial sections were made through the temporal bone at the nasaly inclined position of 30 degree to the orbitomeatal line (semiaxial plane ; SAP). The findings of temporal bone structures in normal subjects were evaluated in SAP and axial plane (OM). Although the both planes showed good visualization, SAP showed both the eustachian tube and tympanic cavity in one slice. In cholesteatoma soft tissue masses in the tympanic cavity, mastoid air cells and Eustachian tube were demonstrated clearly by SAP. (author)

  10. CASE REPORT CASE CASE Post-traumatic cholesteatoma … a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. CASE. 46. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • July 2008. CASE. Abstract. Temporal bone fractures and their acute complications have been well described in radiology and ENT journals; this is in contrast to ... post-traumatic cholesteatomas and made postulations on their origin. Since then, there have been ...

  11. On diagnostic accuracy of simple mastoid views in cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Shik; Chang, Kee Hyun; Park, Jae Hyung

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances in otologic surgical techniques, involving the use of an operation microscope, have led to increased demands in accurate radiological diagnosis of the temporal bone. However, the difficulties of roentgen diagnosis of cholesteatoma of the middle ear are frequently experienced. Authors reviewed a total of 248 cases of mastoid roentgenograms (165 cases of cholesteatoma and 83 cases of chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma) surgically proven at Seoul National University Hospital from March 1977 to June 1980 in order that diagnostic value of routine mastoid roentgenogram (Towne and Law views) could be determined. The results are as follows; 1. Detection rate of cholesteatoma is 68.5% with Towne view only and 62.4% with Law view only, while both Towne and Law views, it is increased up to 73.9%. 2. False positive is 10.8% even with both Towne and Law views. 3. A new simple technique, transorbital magnification view, is introduced to visualize the detailed anatomic structures of the ear

  12. HB-EGF expression as a potential biomarker of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shumin; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Hongmiao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jihao; Liu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    The heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) plays an essential role in the development and invasiveness of cholesteatoma. This study may help to realize the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma and make HB-EGF a promising target for drug intervention of cholesteatoma. To detect HB-EGF expression in human surgical specimens of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma and analyze its functional role as a regulator of epithelial keratinocytes hyperproliferation. A total of 34 patients who underwent surgical treatment for middle ear cholesteatoma were recruited in the study. The mRNA and protein expression of HB-EGF in middle ear cholesteatoma tissues and normal postauricular skin tissues was investigated by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. The correlation between bone resorption degree and HB-EGF expression was also analyzed. On average, compared with normal postauricular skin, expression of HB-EGF mRNA in the cholesteatoma epithelium was significantly elevated 2.41-fold by RT-qPCR, and HB-EGF protein significantly upregulated 2.32-fold by western blot. Positive HB-EGF immunostaining observed in the basal and suprabasal layers of cholesteatoma epithelium was significantly stronger than in normal postauricular skin. Meanwhile, an obviously positive correlation between HB-EGF protein expression and bone resorption degree was discovered.

  13. Cholesteatoma in the Sellar Region Presenting as Hypopituitarism and Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wu, Huanwen; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Kong, Yanguo; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically significant sellar cysts unrelated to pituitary adenomas are uncommon. Intracranial cholesteatomas are also rare and are most common in the middle ear and mastoid region. We report an even rarer case of cholesteatoma in the sellar region—a challenging diagnosis guided by clinical presentations, radiological signs, and biopsy, aiming at emphasize the importance of considering cholesteatoma when making differential diagnoses of sellar lesions. We present a case of cholesteatoma in the sellar region in a 56-year-old man with hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus, and cystic imaging findings. It was difficult to make an accurate diagnosis before surgery. We present detailed analysis of the patient's disease course and review pertinent literature. The patient underwent a surgical exploration and tumor resection through a transsphenoidal approach. Pathologic results revealed a cholesteatoma. The patient's symptoms improved a lot after surgery, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Taken together, the lesion's imaging appearance, pathological characteristics, and clinical features were all unique features that lead to a diagnosis of cholesteatoma. As we did not see such reports by Pubmed and EMBASE, we believe this is the first reported case of sellar cholesteatoma presenting in this manner. This article emphasized that cholesteatomas, although rare, should be considered part of the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions. PMID:26962793

  14. Radiological differences between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children with cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, J K; Fagan, J J; Wojno, M; Manning, K; Harris, T

    2018-07-01

    HIV-positive children are possibly more prone to developing cholesteatoma. Chronic inflammation of the middle ear cleft may be more common in patients with HIV and this may predispose HIV-positive children to developing cholesteatoma. There are no studies that describe the radiological morphology of the middle ear cleft in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative children with cholesteatoma. Compare the radiological differences of the middle ear cleft in HIV-positive and HIV-negative children with cholesteatoma. A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational analytical review of patients with cholesteatoma at our institute over a 6 year period. Forty patients were included in the study, 11 of whom had bilateral cholesteatoma and therefore 51 ears were eligible for our evaluation. HIV-positive patients had smaller (p=0.02) mastoid air cell systems (MACS). Forty percent of HIV-positive patients had sclerotic mastoids, whereas the rate was 3% in HIV-negative ears (p<0.02). Eighty-two percent of the HIV-positive patients had bilateral cholesteatoma compared to 7% of the control group (p<0.02). There was no difference between the 2 groups with regards to opacification of the middle ear cleft, bony erosion of middle ear structures, Eustachian tube obstruction or soft tissue occlusion of the post-nasal space. HIV-positive paediatric patients with cholesteatoma are more likely to have smaller, sclerotic mastoids compared to HIV-negative patients. They are significantly more likely to have bilateral cholesteatoma. This may have implications in terms of surveillance of HIV-positive children, as well as, an approach to management, recurrence and follow-up. HIV infection should be flagged as a risk factor for developing cholesteatoma. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Colesteatoma causando paralisia facial Cholesteatoma causing facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gurgel Testa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial causada pelo colesteatoma é pouco freqüente. As porções do nervo mais acometidas são a timpânica e a região do 2º joelho. Nos casos de disseminação da lesão colesteatomatosa para o epitímpano anterior, o gânglio geniculado é o segmento do nervo facial mais sujeito à injúria. A etiopatogenia pode estar ligada à compressão do nervo pelo colesteatoma seguida de diminuição do seu suprimento vascular como também pela possível ação de substâncias neurotóxicas produzidas pela matriz do tumor ou pelas bactérias nele contidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, as características clínicas e o tratamento da paralisia facial decorrente da lesão colesteatomatosa. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo envolvendo dez casos de paralisia facial por colesteatoma selecionados através de levantamento de 206 descompressões do nervo facial com diferentes etiologias, realizadas na UNIFESP-EPM nos últimos dez anos. RESULTADOS: A incidência de paralisia facial por colesteatoma neste estudo foi de 4,85%,com predominância do sexo feminino (60%. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 39 anos. A duração e o grau da paralisia (inicial juntamente com a extensão da lesão foram importantes em relação à recuperação funcional do nervo facial. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico precoce é fundamental para que ocorra um resultado funcional mais adequado. Nos casos de ruptura ou intensa fibrose do tecido nervoso, o enxerto de nervo (auricular magno/sural e/ou a anastomose hipoglosso-facial podem ser sugeridas.Facial paralysis caused by cholesteatoma is uncommon. The portions most frequently involved are horizontal (tympanic and second genu segments. When cholesteatomas extend over the anterior epitympanic space, the facial nerve is placed in jeopardy in the region of the geniculate ganglion. The aetiology can be related to compression of the nerve followed by impairment of its

  16. Congenital abnormality of the inner ear and internal auditory canal in a patient with deep sensorineural hearing loss: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Diego; Saab, Said; Cordoba, Claudia; Montes, Guillermo; Barreto, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    CT and MRI are complementary studies that have proven to be the best radiological tools in screening of children with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Only about a 20% of the patients with congenital sensor neural hearing loss have manifestations in images. Due to the fact that most of these manifestations initiate in the bone, the CT is the first line of image study. MRI is indicated in the evaluation of suspected agenesis, neuropathy, aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve, often associated with this type of hearing loss. We present a case of a 6 year old patient with deep bilateral sensor neural hearing loss, with radiological studies to determine a potential candidate for a cochlear or auditory brainstem implant as hearing rehabilitation.

  17. Expression of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) in human cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, No Hee; Chang, Ji-Won; Choi, June; Jung, Hak Hyun; Im, Gi Jung

    2013-02-01

    Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a 21-kDa signaling G protein that functions as a pleiotropic regulator of many cellular processes including epithelial differentiation. RAC1 activates the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase complex which promotes formation of reactive oxygen species and degradation enzymes. RAC1 has been associated with rapid epithelial differentiation and invasive properties in human cholesteatoma. This study aimed to identify the presence of RAC1 in human cholesteatoma and analyze its functional role as a regulator of proteolysis and overgrowth. Tissue samples from human cholesteatoma and normal postaural skin were obtained from patients during otologic surgery for cholesteatoma. The expression of RAC1 mRNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and localization of RAC1 expression was confirmed using immunohistochemical staining. Expression of RAC1 mRNA in the epithelium of cholesteatoma was significantly elevated 2.94 fold on average, compared with normal control skin. RAC1 expression in the suprabasal and basal layer of cholesteatoma epithelium was stronger than normal control skin. Our results suggest that RAC1 can be associated with rapid epithelial differentiation and invasive properties of human cholesteatoma.

  18. Expression of C-type lectin receptor mRNA in chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Han, Seung-Ho; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Kim, Young Il; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2017-06-01

    The levels of expression of various C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) messenger ribo nucleic acids (mRNAs) were significantly higher in cholesteatomas than in normal skin, suggesting that these CLRs may be involved in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. Altered expression of pattern recognition receptors may be associated with immune responses in patients with cholesteatoma. This study assessed the levels of expression of CLR mRNAs in normal skin and in cholesteatoma. Cholesteatoma specimens were obtained from 38 patients with acquired cholesteatoma. The levels of expression of various CLR mRNAs were assessed quantitatively using real-time RT-PCR (Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with age, sex, the presence of bacteria, hearing level, frequency of surgery, and degree of ossicle destruction. The levels of CD206 (cluster of differentiation 206), DEC-205 (Dendritic and epithelial cell-205), MGL (monoacylglycerol lipase), CLEC5A (C-type lectin domain family 5 member A), Dectin-2 (dendrite cell-associated C-type lectin-2), BDCA2 (Blood dendritic cell antigen 2), Mincle, DCIR (dendritic cell immunoreceptor), Dectin-1, MICL (Myeloid inhibitory C type-like lectin), and CLEC12B (C-type lectin domain family 12, member B) mRNAs were significantly higher in cholesteatoma than in control skin samples (p C-type lectin domain family 5 member) and Dectin-1 mRNAs were significantly higher in cholesteatomas with ≥2 than ≤1 destroyed ossicles (p < 0.05), and the levels of MGL, Mincle, Dectin-1, and CLEC12B mRNAs were significantly higher in recurrent than initial cholesteatoma specimens (p < 0.05). The level of CLEC5A mRNAs was significantly higher in patients with severe than mild-to-moderate hearing loss (p < 0.05).

  19. Repair of Temporal Bone Encephalocele following Canal Wall Down Mastoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarantis Blioskas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a temporal bone encephalocele after a canal wall down mastoidectomy performed to treat chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma. The patient was treated successfully via an intracranial approach. An enhanced layer-by-layer repair of the encephalocele and skull base deficit was achieved from intradurally to extradurally, using temporalis fascia, nasal septum cartilage, and artificial dural graft. After a 22-month follow-up period the patient remains symptom free and no recurrence is noted.

  20. Unusual association of congenital middle ear cholesteatoma and first branchial cleft anomaly: management and embryological concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, R; Tardivet, L; Bourlière-Najean, B; Sudre-Levillain, I; Triglia, J M

    2005-02-01

    To report two cases of an undescribed association of first branchial cleft fistula and middle ear congenital cholesteatoma and to discuss management and embryological hypothesis. Retrospective study and review of the literature Both patients were young girls free of past medical or surgical history. Surgical removal of the first cleft anomaly found in the two cases a fistula routing underneath the facial nerve. Both cholesteatomas were located in the hypotympanum, mesotympanum. In one case, an anatomical link between the two malformations was clearly identified with CT scan. The main embryological theories and classification are reviewed. A connection between Aimi's and Michaels' theories (congenital cholesteatoma) and Work classification might explain the reported clinical association.

  1. Mucous retention cyst of temporal bone: a mimic of cholesteatoma on DW-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandikar, Amit; Goh, Julian; Loke, Siu Cheng; Yeo, Seng Beng; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2013-01-01

    Non-EPI DW imaging is increasingly being used as a sensitive sequence in detecting cholesteatomas especially if CT findings are not confirmatory. Cholesteatoma appears as a hyperintense focus on DWI. We present two cases of mucous retention cysts in the mastoid temporal bone/middle ear cavity, which present as hyperintense on non-EPI DWI and potentially may mimic cholesteatomas. Differentiating between the two conditions is important, as surgery can be avoided in mucous retention cysts. We have also discussed ways to differentiate between these two conditions on MRI. To our knowledge, this entity is not reported previously. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholesteatoma behind an intact tympanic membrane: histopathologic evidence for a tympanic membrane origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhoff, H; Linthicum, F H

    2001-07-01

    Several theories have been proposed with respect to the origin and pathogenesis of cholesteatoma behind an intact tympanic membrane. The authors describe a case of cholesteatoma behind an intact tympanic membrane in a 71-year-old man with a history of tympanic membrane retraction fixed to the incus without evidence of a perforation. The membrane eventually became detached, and remnants of keratinizing squamous epithelium were found on the incus. Mechanisms such as metaplasia, ectopic epidermis rests, or ingrowth of meatal epidermis have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma behind an intact tympanic membrane. These findings, based on temporal bone histopathology, support the role of an acquired epidermal rest. This case report provides evidence that cholesteatoma behind an intact tympanic membrane can be established from a resolved retraction of the pars tensa of the tympanic membrane.

  3. Radioanatomy of the singular nerve canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Wadin, K. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Dimopoulos, P. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1991-08-01

    The singular canal conveys vestibular nerve fibers from the ampulla of the posterior semicircular canal to the posteroinferior border of the internal auditory meatus. Radiographic identification of this anatomic structure helps to distinguish it from a fracture. It is also a landmark in certain surgical procedures. Computed tomography (CT) examinations of deep-frozen temporal bone specimens were compared with subsequently prepared plastic casts of these bones, showing good correlation between the anatomy and the images. The singular canal and its variable anatomy were studied in CT examinations of 107 patients. The singular canal could be identified, in both the axial and in the coronal planes. Its point of entry into the internal auditory meatus varied considerably. (orig.)

  4. Reliability of mastoid X-rays in the diagnosis of cholesteatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, G.R.C.; Araneta, J.A.V.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the reliability of mastoid X-rays in the preoperative assessment of cholesteatoma. A total of 30 patients (15 males and 15 females) who underwent mastoid surgery at the Makati Medical Center from March 1989 to March 1992 were included in the study. Results suggest that the absence of cholesteatoma of mastoid X-rays correlates poorly with actual intraoperative findings. (author). 2 refs.; 2 tabs

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in postoperative follow-up: Reliability for detection of recurrent cholesteatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimsit, Nuri Cagatay [Marmara University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Engin Sitesi Peker Sokak No:1 D:13, 34330 Levent, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: cagataycimsit@gmail.com; Cimsit, Canan [Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Istanbul Goztepe Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, Radyoloji Klinigi, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: ccimsit@ttmail.com; Baysal, Begumhan [Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Istanbul Goztepe Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, Radyoloji Klinigi, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: begumbaysal@yahoo.com; Ruhi, Ilteris Cagatay [Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Department of ENT, Istanbul (Turkey); Istanbul Goztepe Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, KBB Klinigi, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: cruhi@yahoo.com; Ozbilgen, Suha [Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Department of ENT, Istanbul (Turkey); Istanbul Goztepe Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, KBB Klinigi, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: sozbilgen@yahoo.com; Aksoy, Elif Ayanoglu [Acibadem Bakirkoy Hospital, Department of ENT, Istanbul (Turkey); Acibadem Hastanesi, KBB Boeluemue, Bakirkoey, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: elifayanoglu@yahoo.com

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: Cholesteatoma is a progressively growing process that destroy the neighboring bony structures and treatment is surgical removal. Follow-up is important in the postoperative period, since further surgery is necessary if recurrence is present, but not if granulation tissue is detected. This study evaluates if diffusion-weighted MR imaging alone can be a reliable alternative to CT, without use of contrast agent for follow-up of postoperative patients in detecting recurrent cholesteatoma. Materials and methods: 26 consecutive patients with mastoidectomy reporting for routine follow-up CT after mastoidectomy were included in the study, if there was loss of middle ear aeration on CT examination. MR images were evaluated for loss of aeration and signal intensity changes on diffusion-weighted sequences. Surgical results were compared with imaging findings. Results: Interpretation of MR images were parallel with the loss of aeration detected on CT for all 26 patients. Of the 26 patients examined, 14 were not evaluated as recurrent cholesteatoma and verified with surgery (NPV: 100%). Twelve patients were diagnosed as recurrent cholesteatoma and 11 were surgically diagnosed as recurrent cholesteatoma (PPV: 91.7%). Four of these 11 patients had loss of aeration size greater than the high signal intensity area on DWI, which were surgically confirmed as granulation tissue or fibrosis accompanying recurrent cholesteatoma. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted MR for suspected recurrent cholesteatoma is a valuable tool to cut costs and prevent unnecessary second-look surgeries. It has the potential to become the MR sequence of choice to differentiate recurrent cholesteatoma from other causes of loss of aeration in patients with mastoidectomy.

  6. Usefulness of computed tomography hounsfield unit measurement for diagnosis of congenital cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Yong Woo; Baik, Seung Kug; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Il Woo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements for diagnosing of congenital cholesteatoma. A total of 43 patients who underwent surgery due to middle ear cavity lesions were enrolled. Twenty-one patients were confirmed to have congenital cholesteatoma by histopathological results and the other 22 patients were confirmed to have otitis media (OM) by operation. Their computed tomography images were retrospectively reviewed. We measured HU of the soft tissue mass in the middle ear cavity. In addition, we evaluated the largest diameter and location of the mass, the presence of bony erosion in the ear ossicle, and the status of the tympanic membrane in the cholesteatoma group. The mean HU was 37.36 ± 6.11 (range, 27.5-52.5) in the congenital cholesteatoma group and 76.09 ± 8.74 (range, 58.5-96) in the OM group (p < 0.001). The cut-off value was 55.5. The most common location for congenital cholesteatoma was the mesotympanum, and ear ossicle erosion was present in 24%. All patients had an intact tympanic membrane. HU measurement may be useful as an additional indicator to diagnose congenital cholesteatoma.

  7. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human middle ear cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Zhao, Pengfei; Kataoka, Yuko; Yoshinobu, Junko; Maeda, Yukihide; Ishihara, Hisashi; Higaki, Takaya; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome plays an important role in the pathogenesis of middle ear diseases. Modulation of inflammasome-mediated inflammation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media. NLRP3 inflammasome is a critical molecule mediating interleukin (IL)-1β responses. However, the expression of NLRP3 in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media has not been fully examined. This study sought to assess the expression of NLRP3, ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain and a pyrin domain), and caspase-1 in middle ear tissues in patients with cholesteatoma or chronic otitis media. Middle ear tissue samples were obtained from patients with cholesteatoma or chronic otitis media. Control middle ear samples were collected during cochlear implant surgery of patients without middle ear inflammation. The expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and immunohistochemical study. The levels of mRNA of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 were significantly elevated in cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media as compared with that of normal controls. The proteins of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 were observed in infiltrating inflammatory cells in cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media.

  8. Immunohistochemical profile of various neurotransmitters, neurotrophins and MIB-1 in cholesteatomas of the petrous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Bronzetti, Elena; Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Ionta, Brunella; Alicino, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Anna; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Compared to the normal epidermal epithelium, cholesteatomas have altered growth properties characterized by the excessive growth of keratinocytes leading to mucosal destruction. Either congenital or acquired, these lesions, which grow in the middle ear space, the petrous apex or the mastoid of temporal bones, are mostly considered benign skin tumoral lesions. However, many questions remain concerning their pathophysiology. Numerous studies have been proposed to identify those cholesteatoma lesions at risk of recurrence, a possible event that may cause hearing loss. We examined patients with petrous apex or mastoid cholesteatoma in order to analyze the expression of various neurotransmitters, neurotrophins and their receptors and the Ki-67 antigen for identification of a possible relationship between clinical outcome and histopathological behaviour in terms of the proliferative activity of cholesteatomas. Expression of the analyzed molecules was studied using immunohistochemical methods in seven adult patients with petrous apex cholesteatoma who underwent surgical removal of the lesion. Our results, in accordance with published data, confirm that Molecular Immunology Borstel-1 (MIB-1) and certain neurotransmitters could be useful in the prognostic evaluation of the risk of recurrence of aggressive forms of cholesteatoma.

  9. Usefulness of computed tomography hounsfield unit measurement for diagnosis of congenital cholesteatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Yong Woo; Baik, Seung Kug; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Il Woo [Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements for diagnosing of congenital cholesteatoma. A total of 43 patients who underwent surgery due to middle ear cavity lesions were enrolled. Twenty-one patients were confirmed to have congenital cholesteatoma by histopathological results and the other 22 patients were confirmed to have otitis media (OM) by operation. Their computed tomography images were retrospectively reviewed. We measured HU of the soft tissue mass in the middle ear cavity. In addition, we evaluated the largest diameter and location of the mass, the presence of bony erosion in the ear ossicle, and the status of the tympanic membrane in the cholesteatoma group. The mean HU was 37.36 ± 6.11 (range, 27.5-52.5) in the congenital cholesteatoma group and 76.09 ± 8.74 (range, 58.5-96) in the OM group (p < 0.001). The cut-off value was 55.5. The most common location for congenital cholesteatoma was the mesotympanum, and ear ossicle erosion was present in 24%. All patients had an intact tympanic membrane. HU measurement may be useful as an additional indicator to diagnose congenital cholesteatoma.

  10. canal24

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Canal system center lines in the Central Valley of California and adjacent areas captured from 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic maps. Updates and modifications made...

  11. A giant cholesteatoma of the mastoid extending into the foramen magnum: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidu A Richard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteatomas are very rare benign, progressive lesions that have embryologic derivation and usually result in progressive exfoliation and confinement of squamous epithelium behind an intact or preciously infected tympanic membrane. To the best of our understanding no reports demonstrates the extension of cholesteatoma from the temporal bone into the foramen magnum. We therefore present a case of cholesteatoma extending down into the foramen magnum. We report a case of 67- year-old man with a giant cholesteatoma extending into the foramen magnum without substantial destruction of the mastoid and petrous temporal bones. The patient’s major symptoms were recurrent tinnitus in the left ear and dizziness with unilateral conductive hearing loss. A working diagnosis of cholesteatomas was made combining the symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings. He was then successfully operated on with very minimal postoperative complications. Cholesteatomas originating from the mastoid bone often linger with the patients for many years in a subclinical state and progress into a massive size before causing symptoms. Patients with unilateral conductive hearing loss who are otherwise asymptomatic and have a normal tympanic membrane should be suspected with a progressive cholesteatoma. Cholesteatoma should be one of the working diagnosis when an elderly patient present with unilateral conductive hearing loss that is associated with tinnitus and dizziness.

  12. Gustatory Dysfunction and Decreased Number of Fungiform Taste Buds in Patients With Chronic Otitis Media With Cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Ito, Yumi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Okamoto, Masayuki; Manabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    To compare the number of fungiform taste buds among patients with chronic otitis media (COM), those with pars flaccida retraction type cholesteatoma, and those with pars tensa retraction type cholesteatoma in combination with gustatory function. Thirty-seven patients with COM, 22 patients with pars flaccida retraction type cholesteatoma, and 17 patients with pars tensa retraction type cholesteatoma were included. An average of 10 fungiform papillae (FP) per patient in the midlateral region of the tongue were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo, and the average number of taste buds were counted. Just before the observation of FP, electrogustometry (EGM) was performed to evaluate gustatory function. A significant decrease of the average number of fungiform taste buds and significant elevation of EGM thresholds were clarified in the pars tensa retraction type cholesteatoma group but not in the COM or pars flaccida type cholesteatoma group. It was suggested that some neurotoxic cytokines produced by cholesteatoma tissue might affect the CTN morphology, resulting in a decreased number of fungiform taste buds and elevation of EGM threshold in patients with pars tensa retraction type cholesteatoma. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Minimally invasive transcanal myringotomy for pediatric early stage congenital cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chul Ho; Jung, Eun Kyung; Sung, Chung Man; Kim, Seung Beom; Kim, Young Yoon; Seong, Jong Yuap; Kang, Sung Hoon; Cho, Yong Beom

    2016-11-01

    Recently, minimally invasive transcanal myringotomy (MITM), which is a useful surgical technique for early stage congenital cholesteatoma (CC) in children, was introduced. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term surgical results of MITM in pediatric early stage CC. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 24 patients who underwent MITM between January 2013 and October 2015. The patients' ages ranged from 1 to 16 years (mean, 2.6 years). There were 17 male and 7 female patients. The right side (n = 13) was affected twice as often as the left side (n = 11). The most common site was the anterosuperior quadrant (15 cases). The diameter of the CC on axial computed tomography images ranged from 2.8 to 5.7 mm (mean, 3.9 mm). CCs were graded according to Potsic's system: 18 cases were classified as stage I, 3 case as stage II, and 3 cases as stage III. AllCCs except 1 were closed type. In21 patients, the tympanic membrane closed naturally without recurrence. Three patients showed small persistent dry perforation. Natural closure occurred in these patients, who were treated with paper patches. MITM is a simple, effective technique for removing an early stage CC from the middle ear, and it can minimize operative time, length of hospitalization, and postoperative morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CANAL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gara, P.; Martin, E.

    1983-01-01

    The CANAL code presented here optimizes a realistic iron free extraction channel which has to provide a given transversal magnetic field law in the median plane: the current bars may be curved, have finite lengths and cooling ducts and move in a restricted transversal area; terminal connectors may be added, images of the bars in pole pieces may be included. A special option optimizes a real set of circular coils [fr

  15. CHRONIC OTITIS MEDIA WITH MIDDLE EAR CHOLESTEATOMA – CASEREPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Četina

    2008-02-01

    The case is interesting because in one patient three different complications are present(labyrinth fistula, destruction of facial nerve bony canal and skull base with dura exposure.There are also some data about surgery approaches, hearing results and discussionabout complications

  16. Canal rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    For more than fifty years the German physicist Eugen Goldstein was engaged in an obscure fringe field of physics, on which he has impressed like no other: Electrical gas discharges. Goldstein describes in this book his discovery of canal rays, which has given important impulses for modern atomic physics. For his research Goldstein received the Prix Hebert of the Parisienne Academie des sciences, the Hughes medal, and was repeatedly proposed for the Nobel prize. In Germany for the Jewish scientist the acknowledgement remained far-reachingly refused until after the war.

  17. Auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slevc, L Robert; Shell, Alison R

    2015-01-01

    Auditory agnosia refers to impairments in sound perception and identification despite intact hearing, cognitive functioning, and language abilities (reading, writing, and speaking). Auditory agnosia can be general, affecting all types of sound perception, or can be (relatively) specific to a particular domain. Verbal auditory agnosia (also known as (pure) word deafness) refers to deficits specific to speech processing, environmental sound agnosia refers to difficulties confined to non-speech environmental sounds, and amusia refers to deficits confined to music. These deficits can be apperceptive, affecting basic perceptual processes, or associative, affecting the relation of a perceived auditory object to its meaning. This chapter discusses what is known about the behavioral symptoms and lesion correlates of these different types of auditory agnosia (focusing especially on verbal auditory agnosia), evidence for the role of a rapid temporal processing deficit in some aspects of auditory agnosia, and the few attempts to treat the perceptual deficits associated with auditory agnosia. A clear picture of auditory agnosia has been slow to emerge, hampered by the considerable heterogeneity in behavioral deficits, associated brain damage, and variable assessments across cases. Despite this lack of clarity, these striking deficits in complex sound processing continue to inform our understanding of auditory perception and cognition. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI for the diagnosis of recurrent middle ear cholesteatoma in children - can we optimize the technique? Preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffray, Anne; Guesmi, Myriam; Nebbia, Jean Francois; Leloutre, Beatrice; Bailleux, Sonanda; Maschi, Claude [Fondation Lenval, Nice (France)

    2013-04-15

    Recurrent cholesteatoma after surgical excision occurs frequently in children. Until recently, a surgical second look was mandatory and considered as standard reference. MRI including a delayed T1 sequence after gadolinium injection and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has proved its efficiency but has been evaluated mainly in adults. Our purpose was to evaluate the accuracy of DWI to diagnose recurrence of cholesteatoma in children. We evaluated prospectively with MRI 20 ears in 18 children who had had surgery for cholesteatoma. We compared DWI and delayed T1-weighted images following gadolinium administration with intraoperative or follow-up findings. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each sequence for the diagnosis of recurrent cholesteatoma. Sensitivity to diagnose recurrent cholesteatoma was 87% for both DWI and delayed post-gadolinium sequences, specificity was 71% and 83%, respectively. Adding both sequences, the sensitivity was 87%, the specificity 100%. There was one false negative probably due to small size recurrence. In our series, DWI was reliable to diagnose recurrent cholesteatoma in children and allows avoiding surgery when negative. However, because small recurrences less than 5 mm may be missed, follow-up must be prolonged (5 years). (orig.)

  19. A Comparison of Surgical Treatments for Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziylan, F.; Kinaci, A.; Beynon, A.J.; Kunst, H.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigate the postoperative subjective and objective outcomes of different surgical treatments for superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD): vestibular signs, auditory signs, vestibular evoked myogenic potential test, pure tone audiogram, speech audiogram, or

  20. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2012-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2009-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  2. The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas; CT und MRT des erworbenen Cholesteatoms: Prae- und postoperative Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, C.; Czerny, C. [Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Gstoettner, W. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Frankfurt (Germany); Franz, P. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Wien (Austria)

    2003-03-01

    The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas will be described in this paper. The pre- and postoperative imaging of the temporal bone was performed with HRCT and MRI. HRCT and MRI were performed in the axial and coronal plane. MRI was done with T2 weighted and T1 weighted sequences both before and after the intravenous application of contrast material. All imaging findings were confirmed clinically or surgically. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by HRCT included bony erosions of the ossicles, scutum, facial canal in the middle ear, tympanic walls including the tegmen tympani, and of the labyrinth. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by MRI included signs indicative for labyrinthitis, and brain abscess. Postoperative HRCT depicted bony erosions caused by recurrent cholesteatoma, bony defects of the facial nerve and of the labyrinth, and a defect of the tegmen tympani with a soft tissue mass in the middle ear. Postoperative MRI delineated neuritis of the facial nerve, labyrinthitis, and a meningo-encephalocele protruding into the middle ear. HRCT and MRI are excellent imaging tools to depict either bony or soft tissue complications or both if caused by acquired cholesteatomas. According to our findings and to the literature HRCT and MRI are complementary imaging methods to depict pre- or postoperative complications of acquired cholesteatomas if these are suspected by clinical examination. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wird die Rolle der hochaufloesenden Computertomographie (HRCT) und der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zur Abklaerung prae- und postoperativ bedingter Komplikationen erworbener Cholesteatome beschrieben. Die Bildgebung wurde sowohl mit der HRCT als auch mit der MRT durchgefuehrt. Die HRCT und die MRT wurden in axialer und koronaler Ebene (auch

  3. Root canal irrigants

    OpenAIRE

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are...

  4. Bilateral External Auditory Exostoses Causing Conductive Hearing Loss: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Surfer's Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Dennis A; Hegde, Rahul; Li, Shuo; Abdelbaki, Ahmed; Bajaj, Divyansh

    2017-10-30

    In patients with repeated exposure to cold water, such as cold water surfers and kayakers, the reactive exostoses can occur in the external auditory canal. The external auditory canal exostoses are multiple, benign bony growths. They can cause external auditory canal stenosis, leading to repeated otitis externa and potentially conductive hearing loss. It is vital to consider this entity in susceptible patients who report hearing loss, as timely intervention such as proper ear protection equipment can lower the risk of developing severe external auditory canal exostoses. We present a case of a 42-year-old male, cold water surfer with conductive hearing loss and bilateral external auditory canal (EAC) stenosis demonstrated on the computed tomography.

  5. Direct and CT measurements of canals and foramina of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlis, A.; Schumacher, M.; Putz, R.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation is based on measurements of 60 macerated adult European skulls from the Alexander-Ecker Collection at the Anatomy Department of the University of Freiburg. Computer tomographical (CT) and anatomical measurements were compared to assess the accuracy of the CT representation of osseous structures. Nine structures were examined: the optic canal, superior orbital fissure, foramen rotundum, foramen ovale, foramen spinosum,foramen Vesalii (venosum), carotid canal, internal auditory canal and hypoglossal canal. Results show a good and even excellent correlation if the cranial opening is approximately at a right angle to the scanline. For this reason, the results of the coronal examination of the internal auditory canal are less satisfactory, and the coronal and axial measurements of the hypoglossal canal show only a moderately good correlation. (author)

  6. Identification of specific gene expression profiles in fibroblasts derived from middle ear cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Mamoru; Kojima, Hiromi; Wada, Kota; Tsukidate, Toshiharu; Okada, Naoko; Saito, Hirohisa; Moriyama, Hiroshi

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the role of fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. Tissue specimens were obtained from our patients. Middle ear cholesteatoma-derived fibroblasts (MECFs) and postauricular skin-derived fibroblasts (SFs) as controls were then cultured for a few weeks. These fibroblasts were stimulated with interleukin (IL) 1alpha and/or IL-1beta before gene expression assays. We used the human genome U133A probe array (GeneChip) and real-time polymerase chain reaction to examine and compare the gene expression profiles of the MECFs and SFs. Six patients who had undergone tympanoplasty. The IL-1alpha-regulated genes were classified into 4 distinct clusters on the basis of profiles differentially regulated by SF and MECF using a hierarchical clustering analysis. The messenger RNA expressions of LARC (liver and activation-regulated chemokine), GMCSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), epiregulin, ICAM1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1), and TGFA (transforming growth factor alpha) were more strongly up-regulated by IL-1alpha and/or IL-1beta in MECF than in SF, suggesting that these fibroblasts derived from different tissues retained their typical gene expression profiles. Fibroblasts may play a role in hyperkeratosis of middle ear cholesteatoma by releasing molecules involved in inflammation and epidermal growth. These fibroblasts may retain tissue-specific characteristics presumably controlled by epigenetic mechanisms.

  7. Auditory Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and adults with auditory neuropathy. Cochlear implants (electronic devices that compensate for damaged or nonworking parts ... and Drug Administration: Information on Cochlear Implants Telecommunications Relay Services Your Baby's Hearing Screening News Deaf health ...

  8. Anomaly of the facial canal in a Mondini malformation with recurrent meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtin, H.D.; Vignaud, J.; Bar, D.

    1982-01-01

    A patient with recurrent meningitis and congenital hearing loss was evaluated with tomography and metrizamide cisternography. Tomography showed an aberrant first portion of the facial nerve canal, while on cisternography, communication between the internal auditory canal and the dilated labyrinthine remnant was evident. The authors describe the radiographic findings and their significance and propose a mechanism for the formation of the anomalous facial nerve canal

  9. Anomaly of the facial canal in a Mondini malformation with recurrent meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, H D; Vignaud, J; Bar, D

    1982-07-01

    A patient with recurrent meningitis and congenital hearing loss was evaluated with tomography and metrizamide cisternography. Tomography showed an aberrant first portion of the facial nerve canal, while on cisternography, communication between the internal auditory canal and the dilated labyrinthine remnant was evident. The authors describe the radiographic findings and their significance and propose a mechanism for the formation of the anomalous facial nerve canal.

  10. Anomaly of the facial canal in a Mondini malformation with recurrent meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, H.D. (Eye and Ear Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA); Vignaud, J.; Bar, D.

    1982-07-01

    A patient with recurrent meningitis and congenital hearing loss was evaluated with tomography and metrizamide cisternography. Tomography showed an aberrant first portion of the facial nerve canal, while on cisternography, communication between the internal auditory canal and the dilated labyrinthine remnant was evident. The authors describe the radiographic findings and their significance and propose a mechanism for the formation of the anomalous facial nerve canal.

  11. Auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Jan Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations constitute a phenomenologically rich group of endogenously mediated percepts which are associated with psychiatric, neurologic, otologic, and other medical conditions, but which are also experienced by 10-15% of all healthy individuals in the general population. The group of phenomena is probably best known for its verbal auditory subtype, but it also includes musical hallucinations, echo of reading, exploding-head syndrome, and many other types. The subgroup of verbal auditory hallucinations has been studied extensively with the aid of neuroimaging techniques, and from those studies emerges an outline of a functional as well as a structural network of widely distributed brain areas involved in their mediation. The present chapter provides an overview of the various types of auditory hallucination described in the literature, summarizes our current knowledge of the auditory networks involved in their mediation, and draws on ideas from the philosophy of science and network science to reconceptualize the auditory hallucinatory experience, and point out directions for future research into its neurobiologic substrates. In addition, it provides an overview of known associations with various clinical conditions and of the existing evidence for pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Is there a relationship between myeloperoxidase activity and conductive hearing loss in chronic otitis media complicated by cholesteatoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi Erdivanli, Ozlem; Sanli, Arif

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, controlled study of patients with chronic otitis media and cholesteatoma (1) to examine the expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) using immunohistochemical staining techniques and (2) to investigate the relationship between MPO activity and the degree of conductive hearing loss in these patients. Our study population included 51 adults-26 men and 25 women, aged 18 to 58 years (mean: 37.5)-who had been diagnosed with chronic otitis media and cholesteatoma by physical examination and computed tomography (study group). Another 30 patients-13 men and 17 women, aged 18 to 52 years (mean: 32.7)-who had chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma served as the control group. Following audiometric evaluations, all patients underwent appropriate surgery. Postoperatively, cholesteatoma samples were analyzed by immunostaining for MPO positivity as a marker for acute inflammation. We found that MPO activity was present in all 51 study patients (100%) but in only 10 controls (33.3%); the difference was statistically significant (pconductive hearing loss (χ(2) = 13.518; p < 0.001). We encourage further study of all steps in the process of cholesteatoma formation.

  13. Blue Ear Cyst: A Rare Eccrine Hidrocystoma of the Ear Canal and Successful Endoscopic Excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha A. Mur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Hidrocystomas are benign cystic growths of the apocrine and eccrine sweat glands. These cystic lesions have been well documented on the face, head, and neck, but rarely in the external auditory canal. Presentation of Case. A 67-year-old woman presented with a bluish cystic mass partially occluding the external auditory canal and interfering with hearing aid use. Lesion was excised completely via a transcanal endoscopic approach with excellent cosmetic results, no canal stenosis, and no recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Discussion. We present a rare eccrine hidrocystoma of the external auditory canal and successful excision of this benign lesion. We describe the surgical management using a transcanal endoscopic approach and follow-up results. An eccrine gland cyst that presents as a mass occluding the external auditory canal is quite rare. There are only a few such cases reported in the literature. These masses can be mistaken for basal cell carcinomas or cholesterol granulomas but can be easily differentiated using histopathology. Conclusion. Eccrine hidrocystoma is a cystic lesion of sweat glands, rarely found in the external auditory canal. A characteristic bluish hue aids in diagnosis and surgical excision using ear endoscopy provides excellent control.

  14. Auditory changes in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabur, S; Korkmaz, H; Baysal, E; Hatipoglu, E; Aytac, I; Akarsu, E

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the changes involving auditory system in cases with acromegaly. Otological examinations of 41 cases with acromegaly (uncontrolled n = 22, controlled n = 19) were compared with those of age and gender-matched 24 healthy subjects. Whereas the cases with acromegaly underwent examination with pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech audiometry for speech discrimination (SD), tympanometry, stapedius reflex evaluation and otoacoustic emission tests, the control group did only have otological examination and PTA. Additionally, previously performed paranasal sinus-computed tomography of all cases with acromegaly and control subjects were obtained to measure the length of internal acoustic canal (IAC). PTA values were higher (p acromegaly group was narrower compared to that in control group (p = 0.03 for right ears and p = 0.02 for left ears). When only cases with acromegaly were taken into consideration, PTA values in left ears had positive correlation with growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels (r = 0.4, p = 0.02 and r = 0.3, p = 0.03). Of all cases with acromegaly 13 (32%) had hearing loss in at least one ear, 7 (54%) had sensorineural type and 6 (46%) had conductive type hearing loss. Acromegaly may cause certain changes in the auditory system in cases with acromegaly. The changes in the auditory system may be multifactorial causing both conductive and sensorioneural defects.

  15. CT virtual endoscopy of the auditory ossicular chain and its preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dong; Zhang Wanshi; Xiong Minghui; Xu Jiaxing; Yu Min; Xu Changyu

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of CT virtual endoscopy (CTVE) in visualization of auditory ossicular chain and its clinical application. Methods: CTVE of auditory ossicular chain was performed on GE HiSpeed CT/i with 1.0 mm slice thickness at pitch 1.0, bone algorithm, 9.6 cm FOV, and 0.1 mm reconstruction interval in 10 normal subjects and 21 patients with middle ear diseases, 14 of them were proved by operation. The threshold values for normal and abnormal auditory ossicular chain were -600--200 HU and 50-300 HU respectively. Results: CTVE could clearly demonstrate the shape, size, and relation of the normal auditory ossicular chain. A visualization rate of malleus, incus, and incudomalleal articulation was 100%, and was 32% for the stapedial foot plate. However, in only 21% could the anterior and posterior crura of stapes be distinguished. Cholesteatoma was found in 12 cases with chronic otitis media, in which CTVE demonstrated varying degrees of destruction of the auditory ossicle. In 1 case with congenital anomaly, ossicle dysplasia was seen. Conclusion: CTVE being a new, non-invasive method for demonstrating the three-dimensional image of auditory ossicular chain is useful in evaluating diseases of the ear, especially the auditory ossicles

  16. Curved adjustable fibre-optic diode laser in microscopic cholesteatoma surgery: description of use and review of the relevant literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffer, C J; Pabla, L; Watson, C

    2018-04-01

    The use of lasers in cholesteatoma surgery is common and well accepted. The most commonly used laser fibres are straight and non-adjustable; these have several limitations. This paper describes the use of an alternative laser fibre. This 'How I Do It' paper describes and illustrates the use of an alternative curved adjustable fibre-optic diode laser in microscopic cholesteatoma surgery. The curved, adjustable laser fibre allows accurate and atraumatic disease removal when the use of a straight laser fibre may be less effective or accurate. It reduces potential damage to delicate structures without the need for extra drilling or bone removal. It is suggested that the curved adjustable laser fibre is superior to the traditional straight fibre for cholesteatoma surgery.

  17. No evidence of cholesteatoma in untreated otitis media with effusion in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedia, Reshma; Ahmed, Jahangir; Navaratnam, Annakan; Harcourt, Jonny

    2018-02-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) describes a group of inherited disorders that result in abnormal ciliary motion leading to mucous stasis. Clinical features include almost universally otitis media with effusion (OME), particularly in infants. PCD patients provide us with a cohort of patients with OME that is not treated with ventilatory tube (VT) insertion as these have been shown to result in frequent complications including chronic otorrhoea, early extrusion and persistent perforation without significant improvement to hearing in the long term. This cohort was used to investigate whether children with PCD and OME not treated with VT were predisposed to cholesteatoma formation in the setting of a paediatric quaternary referral centre. A retrospective chart review was performed of all the children attending a multi-disciplinary PCD clinic at a national quaternary referral centre with a diagnosis of OME. We reviewed otoscopic findings, and audiometry and tympanometry results. We assessed the children in four groups: Watchful waiting, hearing aids, VT, and VT and hearing aids. One-hundred-and-one of 107 patients included in the study had a diagnosis of otitis media with effusion. No child with OME and PCD was diagnosed with a cholesteatoma during the follow up period. The only children who had insertion of a ventilatory tube were those who had the procedure prior to the formal diagnosis of PCD. We found a significant complication rate in the children with VT insertion. Hearing improved over time. The prevalence of retraction pockets in untreated OME was 1.72% (3 out of 174 ears). In children with PCD, OME is an almost universal finding in younger children, but not in adolescents. The study supports the current preference to avoid VT insertion in children with PCD as it confers a significantly higher rate of complications. No cases of cholesteatoma were found in this cohort of PCD children with OME managed without VTs. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B

  18. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on bacterial growth on human ossicles explanted from cholesteatoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Dommerich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High hydrostatic pressure (HHP treatment can eliminate cholesteatoma cells from explanted human ossicles prior to re-insertion. We analyzed the effects of HHP treatment on the microbial flora on ossicles and on the planktonic and biofilm states of selected isolates. METHODOLOGY: Twenty-six ossicles were explanted from cholesteatoma patients. Five ossicles were directly analyzed for microbial growth without further treatment. Fifteen ossicles were cut into two pieces. One piece was exposed to HHP of 350 MPa for 10 minutes. Both the treated and untreated (control pieces were then assessed semi-quantitatively. Three ossicles were cut into two pieces and exposed to identical pressure conditions with or without the addition of one of two different combinations of antibiotics to the medium. Differential effects of 10-minute in vitro exposure of planktonic and biofilm bacteria to pressures of 100 MPa, 250 MPa, 400 MPa and 540 MPa in isotonic and hypotonic media were analyzed using two patient isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Neisseria subflava. Bacterial cell inactivation and biofilm destruction were assessed by colony counting and electron microscopy. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A variety of microorganisms were isolated from the ossicles. Irrespective of the medium, HHP treatment at 350 MPa for 10 minutes led to satisfying but incomplete inactivation especially of gram-negative bacteria. The addition of antibiotics increased the efficacy of elimination. A comparison of HHP treatment of planktonic and biofilm cells showed that the effects of HPP were reduced by about one decadic logarithmic unit when HPP was applied to biofilms. High hydrostatic pressure conditions that are suitable to inactivate cholesteatoma cells fail to completely sterilize ossicles even if antibiotics are added. As a result of the reduced microbial load and the viability loss of surviving bacteria, however, there is a lower risk of re-infection after re-insertion.

  19. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Bacterial Growth on Human Ossicles Explanted from Cholesteatoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Jürgen; Lindner, Tobias; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Arndt, Kathleen; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Podbielski, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment can eliminate cholesteatoma cells from explanted human ossicles prior to re-insertion. We analyzed the effects of HHP treatment on the microbial flora on ossicles and on the planktonic and biofilm states of selected isolates. Methodology Twenty-six ossicles were explanted from cholesteatoma patients. Five ossicles were directly analyzed for microbial growth without further treatment. Fifteen ossicles were cut into two pieces. One piece was exposed to HHP of 350 MPa for 10 minutes. Both the treated and untreated (control) pieces were then assessed semi-quantitatively. Three ossicles were cut into two pieces and exposed to identical pressure conditions with or without the addition of one of two different combinations of antibiotics to the medium. Differential effects of 10-minute in vitro exposure of planktonic and biofilm bacteria to pressures of 100 MPa, 250 MPa, 400 MPa and 540 MPa in isotonic and hypotonic media were analyzed using two patient isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Neisseria subflava. Bacterial cell inactivation and biofilm destruction were assessed by colony counting and electron microscopy. Principal Findings A variety of microorganisms were isolated from the ossicles. Irrespective of the medium, HHP treatment at 350 MPa for 10 minutes led to satisfying but incomplete inactivation especially of Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of antibiotics increased the efficacy of elimination. A comparison of HHP treatment of planktonic and biofilm cells showed that the effects of HPP were reduced by about one decadic logarithmic unit when HPP was applied to biofilms. High hydrostatic pressure conditions that are suitable to inactivate cholesteatoma cells fail to completely sterilize ossicles even if antibiotics are added. As a result of the reduced microbial load and the viability loss of surviving bacteria, however, there is a lower risk of re-infection after re-insertion. PMID:22291908

  20. Anatomy, Physiology and Function of the Auditory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmeier, Birger

    The human ear consists of the outer ear (pinna or concha, outer ear canal, tympanic membrane), the middle ear (middle ear cavity with the three ossicles malleus, incus and stapes) and the inner ear (cochlea which is connected to the three semicircular canals by the vestibule, which provides the sense of balance). The cochlea is connected to the brain stem via the eighth brain nerve, i.e. the vestibular cochlear nerve or nervus statoacusticus. Subsequently, the acoustical information is processed by the brain at various levels of the auditory system. An overview about the anatomy of the auditory system is provided by Figure 1.

  1. Endoscopic root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, Joshua; Michaeli, Eli; Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-10-01

    To describe an innovative endoscopic technique for root canal treatment. Root canal treatment was performed on 12 patients (15 teeth), using a newly developed endoscope (Sialotechnology), which combines an endoscope, irrigation, and a surgical microinstrument channel. Endoscopic root canal treatment of all 15 teeth was successful with complete resolution of all symptoms (6-month follow-up). The novel endoscope used in this study accurately identified all microstructures and simplified root canal treatment. The endoscope may be considered for use not only for preoperative observation and diagnosis but also for active endodontic treatment.

  2. Topical application of Mitomycin C in the treatment of granulation tissue after Canal Wall Down mastoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Karimi-Yazdi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Otorrhea and granulation tissue in Canal Wall Down mastoidectomy (CWD is the common problem in cholesteatoma removal and leads to many discomfort for both the patient and the physician. The main objective in CWD is creating the dry cavity, so the topical antibiotic and acetic acid in variable saturations are used for this purpose. In this study we evaluate the effectiveness of topical MMC and chemical cautery by acetic acid.   Materials and Methods: Study population consists of 50 patients with cholesteatoma whom underwent CWD. All patient allocated randomly in two study groups, MMC and acetic acid. After 3 weeks, the first visit is planned, extension of granulation tissue and dryness of cavity are evaluated and topical drugs are used in blind fashion. MMC in 4% and acetic acid in 12.5% saturation are applied. Other visits are completed at next month and 3 months later.   Results: Both methods are effective in treatment of granulation tissue. In each group both treatment were effective too but MMC was more effective than acid acetic in the treatment of granulation tissue after 4 weeks.   Conclusion: Based on our findings, it is clear that topical MMC is very effective in the treatment of granulation tissue and in CWD. It results in dry cavity much better than acetic acid without any complication. 

  3. The impact of ventilation tubes in otitis media on the risk of cholesteatoma on a national level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurhuus, Bjarki Ditlev; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact of treatment with middle ear ventilation tube insertion (VTI) in children with otitis media (OM) on the risk of cholesteatoma on a national level. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Danish National Patient Register, the National Health Service Register...

  4. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  5. Does non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging have a role in assisting the clinical diagnosis of cholesteatoma in selected cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, R; Lingam, R K; Chandrasekharan, D; Singh, A

    2018-03-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of patients with suspected, but not clinically evident, cholesteatoma. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database of non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies (using a half-Fourier single-shot turbo-spin echo sequence) was conducted. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed to determine indications for imaging and operative findings. Seventy-eight investigations in 74 patients with suspected cholesteatoma aged 5.7-79.2 years (mean, 41.7 years) were identified. Operative confirmation was available in 44 ears. Diagnostic accuracy of the imaging technique was calculated using operative findings as a 'gold standard'. Sensitivity of the investigation was examined via comparison with clinically evident cholesteatoma. The accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of suspected cholesteatoma was 63.6 per cent. The imaging technique was significantly less accurate in assessment of suspected cholesteatoma than clinically evident disease (p < 0.001). Computed tomography and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may be complementary in assessment of suspected cholesteatoma, but should be used with caution, and clinical judgement is paramount.

  6. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully

  7. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully.

  8. Design of canals

    CERN Document Server

    Swamee, P K

    2015-01-01

    The book presents firsthand material from the authors on design of hydraulic canals. The book discusses elements of design based on principles of hydraulic flow through canals. It covers optimization of design based on usage requirements and economic constraints. The book includes explicit design equations and design procedures along with design examples for varied cases. With its comprehensive coverage of the principles of hydraulic canal design, this book will prove useful to students, researchers, and practicing engineers. End-of-chapter pedagogical elements make it ideal for use in graduate courses on hydraulic structures offered by most civil engineering departments across the world.

  9. ANALYTICAL STUDY OF SENSORY NEURAL HEARING LOSS IN CSOM WITH AND WITHOUT CHOLESTEATOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabikanta Samantaray

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic suppurative otitis media still remains a major cause of conductive hearing loss in our country. But, a few patients also display an added sensorineural hearing loss. MATERIALS & METHODS Hundred patients with CSOM undergoing surgery at our department were included in the study. The affected ears formed the ‘CSOM Group’ and the normal ears formed the ‘Control group’. Detailed otological history, clinical, surgical and audiometric findings were recorded and analysed. RESULTS It was inferred that CSOM associated with sensorineural hearing loss was found in small number of patients only. No correlation was established between duration of discharge and sensorineural loss. CONCLUSION Though greater SN loss was seen in patients of CSOM with cholesteatoma it was not statistically significant. Whether an early surgery in CSOM can prevent SN loss or not needs further studies.

  10. Matriz Metaloproteinase 2: um importante marcador genético para colesteatomas Matrix Metalloproteinase 2: an important genetic marker for cholesteatomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Salmazo Rocha Morales

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo foi desenvolvido para determinar a presença de MMP2 em colesteatomas humanos e observar se colesteatomas que complicam (invasivos apresentam uma maior expressão imunohistoquímica de Matriz Metaloproteinase 2 (MMP2. Colesteatomas produzem enzimas que causam erosão óssea, como a MMP2. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Analisamos a expressão imunohistoquímica de MMP2 em colesteatomas invasivos, comparando-os aos latentes. Um estudo de corte transversal com dezenove lâminas e blocos parafinados de colesteatoma, derivados de mastoidectomias, foram desparafinados e submetidos à técnica imunohistoquímica com anticorpos anti-MMP2. RESULTADOS: Os resultados foram expressos em 0 (tênue, + (leve, ++ (moderado e +++ (intenso, de acordo com a intensidade da expressão de MMP2. As expressões 0 e + foram denominadas Fraca e as expressões ++ e +++, Forte. Dos 8 colesteatomas invasivos, 7 apresentaram Forte expressão de MMP2 (87,5%. Com relação aos colesteatomas latentes (11, apenas 3 apresentaram Forte expressão de MMP2 (27,3%, com um teste exato de Fisher significante (p= 0,015. CONCLUSÃO: Colesteatomas expressam MMP2 e colesteatomas invasivos expressam MMP2 com maior intensidade, em relação aos latentes.AIM: This study is to determine the MMP2’s presence in cholesteatomas and whether complicating cholesteatomas show a higher immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2. Cholesteatoma produces enzymesthat cause bone erosion like Matrixmetalloproteinase 2 (MMP2. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of MMP2 in invasive (causing complications compared to latent cholesteatomas (not causing complications. A crosssectional study with nineteen slides and paraffin blocks of cholesteatomas derived from mastoidectomies were located and processed, including 8 invasive and 11 latent cholesteatomas. Immunohistochemical thecnique was empregated to MMP2. RESULTS: The results are expressed as 0, + (to low, ++ and +++(high

  11. Infectious Causes of Cholesteatoma and Treatment of Infected Ossicles prior to Reimplantation by Hydrostatic High-Pressure Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation, which is caused by recurrent infections, is one of the factors contributing to the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. If reimplantation of autologous ossicles after a surgical intervention is intended, inactivation of planktonic bacteria and biofilms is desirable. High hydrostatic pressure treatment is a procedure, which has been used to inactivate cholesteatoma cells on ossicles. Here we discuss the potential inactivating effect of high hydrostatic pressure on microbial pathogens including biofilms. Recent experimental data suggest an incomplete inactivation at a pressure level, which is tolerable for the bone substance of ossicles and results at least in a considerable reduction of pathogen load. Further studies are necessary to access how far this quantitative reduction of pathogens is sufficient to prevent ongoing chronic infections, for example, due to forming of biofilms. PMID:25705686

  12. Colesteatoma asociado a secuencia de labio y paladar hendidos Cholesteatoma associated with a sequence of cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianis Loraine Quintero Noa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available El colesteatoma adquirido asociado a secuencia de labio y paladar hendidos constituye una secuela común en los niños como consecuencia de una función anormal de la trompa de Eustaquio. Se presenta el cuadro clínico-otológico, la otomicroscopia y la eficacia del tratamiento quirúrgico en una paciente de 9 años, afecta de labio y paladar hendido y colesteatoma en el oído derecho complicado con meningitis. Se destaca el riesgo de complicaciones de la otitis media con derrame crónico y la importancia de su diagnóstico precoz, en estadios previos a la formación del colesteatoma.The cholesteatoma acquired associated with the sequence of cleft lip and palate is a common sequel in children as a result of a malfunction of the Eustachian tube. The clinical-otological picture, the otomicroscopy and the efficiency of the surgical treatment in a 9-year-old patient with cleft lip and palate and cholesteatoma on the right ear complicated with meningitis are presented. The risk for complications of otitis media with chronic effusion and the importance of its early diagnosis in stages previous to the formation of cholesteatoma are stressed.

  13. Intercellular Communication between Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts Induces Local Osteoclast Differentiation: a Mechanism Underlying Cholesteatoma-Induced Bone Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Yoriko; Nishikawa, Keizo; Imai, Ryusuke; Furuya, Masayuki; Uenaka, Maki; Ohta, Yumi; Morihana, Tetsuo; Itoi-Ochi, Saori; Penninger, Josef M; Katayama, Ichiro; Inohara, Hidenori; Ishii, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by a balance in activity between bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Shifting the balance toward bone resorption causes osteolytic bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis. Osteoclast differentiation is regulated by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), which, under some pathological conditions, is produced by T and B lymphocytes and synoviocytes. However, the mechanism underlying bone destruction in other diseases is little understood. Bone destruction caused by cholesteatoma, an epidermal cyst in the middle ear resulting from hyperproliferation of keratinizing squamous epithelium, can lead to lethal complications. In this study, we succeeded in generating a model for cholesteatoma, epidermal cyst-like tissue, which has the potential for inducing osteoclastogenesis in mice. Furthermore, an in vitro coculture system composed of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and osteoclast precursors was used to demonstrate that keratinocytes stimulate osteoclast differentiation through the induction of RANKL in fibroblasts. Thus, this study demonstrates that intercellular communication between keratinocytes and fibroblasts is involved in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts, which may provide the molecular basis of a new therapeutic strategy for cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Cholesteatoma has a high prevalence in Turner syndrome, highlighting the need for earlier diagnosis and the potential benefits of otoscopy training for paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D B N; Gault, E J; Kubba, H; Morrissey, M S C; Wynne, D M; Donaldson, M D C

    2014-07-01

    Girls with Turner syndrome are prone to cholesteatoma, a serious suppurative middle ear disease. We aimed to confirm its high prevalence in Turner syndrome, identify risk factors and suggest possible strategies for earlier detection. We reviewed 179 girls with Turner syndrome between 1989 and 2012 to identify cases of cholesteatoma. Seven girls (3.9%) had cholesteatoma (index girls) and each was compared with three age-matched girls without cholesteatoma (comparison girls). All the index girls had either the 45,X or 45,X/46X,i(Xq) karyotypes. Nine ears were initially affected, with three recurrences in two girls. Median age at first cholesteatoma presentation was 11.9 years (range: 7.5-15.2), with otorrhoea for three (range: one to seven) months in all 12 affected ears. Index girls had a significantly higher proportion of previous recurrent acute (p = 0.007) and chronic otitis media (p = 0.008), chronic perforation (p = 0.038) aural polyps (p Turner syndrome. Risk factors include 45,X and 46,XiXq karyotypes; a history of chronic otitis media, tympanic membrane retraction and persistent otorrhoea; and older age. Earlier recognition of ear disease is needed and otoscopy training for paediatricians caring for Turner syndrome patients may be beneficial. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Auditory Perspective Taking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinson, Eric; Brock, Derek

    2006-01-01

    .... From this knowledge of another's auditory perspective, a conversational partner can then adapt his or her auditory output to overcome a variety of environmental challenges and insure that what is said is intelligible...

  16. First Branchial Cleft Malformation with Duplication of External Auditory Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Pradipta Kumar; Raja, Kalairasi; Surianarayanan, Gopalakrishnan; Ganeshan, Sivaraman

    2013-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon, accounting for less than 10% of all branchial abnormalities. Their rare occurrence and varied presentation have frequently led to misdiagnosis and inadequate and inappropriate treatment of these conditions leading to repeated recurrences and secondary infection. In this paper, a case of 11-year girl with type 2 first branchial cleft defect is described. She first presented with a nonhealing ulcer of upper neck from childhood. Diagnosis had previously been missed and treated as tubercular ulcer. We confirmed the correct diagnosis by history and computerized tomography fistulogram. The lesion was completely excised with no further recurrence. PMID:24312740

  17. First Branchial Cleft Malformation with Duplication of External Auditory Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Kumar Parida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon, accounting for less than 10% of all branchial abnormalities. Their rare occurrence and varied presentation have frequently led to misdiagnosis and inadequate and inappropriate treatment of these conditions leading to repeated recurrences and secondary infection. In this paper, a case of 11-year girl with type 2 first branchial cleft defect is described. She first presented with a nonhealing ulcer of upper neck from childhood. Diagnosis had previously been missed and treated as tubercular ulcer. We confirmed the correct diagnosis by history and computerized tomography fistulogram. The lesion was completely excised with no further recurrence.

  18. CT and MR Imagings of Semicircular Canal Aplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chung Hee; Hong, Hyun Sook; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Kim, Shi Chan [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    To evaluate the clinical, CT and MR imaging findings of semicircular canal (SCC) aplasia and to evaluate if a correlation exists between these findings and the associated anomalies or syndromes. This study retrospectively reviewed the CT and MRI findings of five patients with SCC aplasia. The CT and MR findings were analyzed for SCC, direction of facial nerve canal, cochlea, vestibule, oval or round window, middle ear ossicles, and internal auditory canal (IAC). The subjects included three boys and two girls ranging in age from one to 120 months (mean age; 51 months). Four of the subjects had the CHARGE syndrome, and one had the Goldenhar syndrome. Moreover, four subjects had sensorineural hearing loss and one had combined hearing loss. The course of the facial nerve canal was abnormal in all five cases. Moreover, trapped cochlea and dysplastic modiolus were each observed in one case. Four subjects had atresia of the oval window; whereas ankylosis of the ossicles was present in three subjects. IAC stenosis was present in one patient with the CHARGE syndrome. The aberrant course of the facial nerve canal, atresia of the oval window, and abnormal ossicles were frequently associated in patients with SCC aplasia. In addition, the Goldenhar and CHARGE syndromes were also commonly associated syndromes.

  19. Continuous Adductor Canal Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monahan, Amanda M; Sztain, Jacklynn F; Khatibi, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    on cutaneous knee sensation in volunteers. METHODS: Bilateral adductor canal catheters were inserted in 24 volunteers followed by ropivacaine 0.2% administration for 8 hours. One limb of each subject was assigned randomly to a continuous infusion (8 mL/h) or automated hourly boluses (8 m...

  20. CANAL user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, A.; Wolf, L.; Todreas, N.

    1979-11-01

    CANAL is a subchannel computer program for the steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analysis of BWR fuel rod bundles. The purpose of this manual is to introduce the user into the mechanism of running the code by providing information about the input data and options

  1. Open-type congenital cholesteatoma: differential diagnosis for conductive hearing loss with a normal tympanic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Hyung; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chu, Ho-Suk; Jang, Jeon-Yeob; Chung, Won-Ho; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2012-06-01

    In patients with progressive conductive hearing loss and a normal tympanic membrane (TM), and with soft tissue density in the middle ear cavity (MEC) on temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT) scan, open-type congenital cholesteatoma (OCC) should be highly suspected and a proper surgical plan that includes mastoid exploration and second-stage operation is required. The clinical presentation of OCC is very similar to congenital ossicular anomaly (COA) presenting with a conductive hearing loss with intact TM. Therefore, it is challenging to make a correct preoperative diagnosis in patients with OCC. We evaluated the clinical characteristics of OCC compared with those of COA to find diagnostic clues useful in diagnosis of OCC. The medical records of 12 patients with surgically proven OCC and 14 patients with surgically proven COA were reviewed for demographic data, otologic history, preoperative TBCT findings, intraoperative findings, and pre- and postoperative audiologic data. There was no difference between OCC and COA based on demographic data, preoperative hearing, and ossicular status on TBCT. However, the presence of progressive hearing loss, soft tissue density in the MEC on TBCT scan, and the need for mastoid surgery and second-stage operation were significantly more frequent in OCC patients.

  2. Curved canals: Ancestral files revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Nidhi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to provide an insight into different techniques of cleaning and shaping of curved root canals with hand instruments. Although a plethora of root canal instruments like ProFile, ProTaper, LightSpeed ® etc dominate the current scenario, the inexpensive conventional root canal hand files such as K-files and flexible files can be used to get optimum results when handled meticulously. Special emphasis has been put on the modifications in biomechanical canal preparation in a variety of curved canal cases. This article compiles a series of clinical cases of root canals with curvatures in the middle and apical third and with S-shaped curvatures that were successfully completed by employing only conventional root canal hand instruments.

  3. Cholesteatoma: computed tomography and radiography in a dog; Colesteatoma: tomografia computadorizada e radiografia em cao com otite cronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: a_fbelotta@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia . Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Arruda, Vanesa Kutz de; Amorim, Rogerio Martins [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Clinica Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Cholesteatoma, a rare and/or misdiagnosed disease, results of a serious complication in dogs with chronic otitis. This article describes a case of a dachshund sent to the veterinary hospital presenting signs of cognitive dysfunction associated to peripheral neuropathy of the facial nerve on the right side. At radiography, an enlargement and thickness of the contours associated with loss of anatomical definition of the right tympanic bulla compared to the left was seen. At tomography, this enlargement and thickness were seen with better definition, besides the fulfilling by hyperdense calcified content, bullae osteolysis and temporal bone sclerosis at the same side. (author)

  4. Preoperative diagnosis and surgical strategy in congenital auditory ossicular malformation of 26 ears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Yuji; Naito, Yasushi; Shinohara, Shogo; Fujiwara, Keizo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Risa; Kishimoto, Ippei

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 26 ears of 21 subjects having auditory ossicular malformation and who had undergone auditory reconstruction between April 2004 and December 2010 at our clinic. We checked preoperative condition, pathological classification, surgical procedure, and hearing improvement. We could predict pathological conditions precisely from preoperative computed tomography (CT), including incudostapedial disconnection (9/12, 75%) and malleus and/or incus fixation (7/12, 58%), which tended to be present in external ear malformation, and stapes footplate fixation (0/12, 0%). We could not, however, predict complex malformation (0/8, 0%). Overall success was 90% (18/20) in the 20 ears observed for at least 1 year. In the 2 ears without improved hearing, the first had congenital cholesteatoma and no stapes superstructure, was treated with type IV tympanoplasty. The second had malleus, incus, and stapes fixation and discontinuity between the incus and stapes, and was treated with type III tympanoplasty and stapes mobilization. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult in mixed congenital auditory ossicular malformation, especially stapes footplate fixation, possibly requiring unexpected procedures, with a poor hearing outcome. Preoperative status must thus be evaluated precisely using hearing, tympanometry, acoustic reflex test, and CT. Temporal bone CT and external ear findings are useful in diagnosing middle-ear malformation. Subjects' informed consent should also be obtained due to the possible need for changing procedure based on findings during surgery. (author)

  5. Attending to auditory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jacqueline F; Moscovitch, Morris; Alain, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Attention to memory describes the process of attending to memory traces when the object is no longer present. It has been studied primarily for representations of visual stimuli with only few studies examining attention to sound object representations in short-term memory. Here, we review the interplay of attention and auditory memory with an emphasis on 1) attending to auditory memory in the absence of related external stimuli (i.e., reflective attention) and 2) effects of existing memory on guiding attention. Attention to auditory memory is discussed in the context of change deafness, and we argue that failures to detect changes in our auditory environments are most likely the result of a faulty comparison system of incoming and stored information. Also, objects are the primary building blocks of auditory attention, but attention can also be directed to individual features (e.g., pitch). We review short-term and long-term memory guided modulation of attention based on characteristic features, location, and/or semantic properties of auditory objects, and propose that auditory attention to memory pathways emerge after sensory memory. A neural model for auditory attention to memory is developed, which comprises two separate pathways in the parietal cortex, one involved in attention to higher-order features and the other involved in attention to sensory information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-echoplanar diffusion-weighted MRI in children and adolescents with cholesteatoma: reliability and pitfalls in comparison to middle ear surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Amrhein, Peter; Koitschev, Assen

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is only limited and contradictory evidence of the role of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in the management of children with cholesteatoma. To provide surgically controlled data that may allow to replace second-look surgery by non-echoplanar DW-MRI in children. Fifty-five children and adolescents with a median age of 8.6 years (2.2-17.7 years) underwent 61 preoperative half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) DW-MRI of their petrous bone. Surgical interventions followed within 24 h (79%), within 5 months (20%) or at 18 months (1 case). Surgery detected a cholesteatoma or retraction pocket in 41 of 61 cases (67%). In 49 cases (80%), the MR result was confirmed by surgical findings. Two MR findings were false-positive and 10 false-negative (including cholesteatomas <4 mm). HASTE DW-MRI alone had a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 90%. The positive predictive value was 94%, the negative predictive value 64%. In combination with preoperative otoscopy, sensitivity was 90% and negative predictive value 82%. DW-MRI correctly detected the majority of lesions but could not reliably exclude small cholesteatomas and empty retraction pockets. We would therefore not generally recommend MR as a substitute for second-look surgery. (orig.)

  7. Non-echoplanar diffusion-weighted MRI in children and adolescents with cholesteatoma: reliability and pitfalls in comparison to middle ear surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Amrhein, Peter; Koitschev, Assen [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Division of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology and Otology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Currently, there is only limited and contradictory evidence of the role of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in the management of children with cholesteatoma. To provide surgically controlled data that may allow to replace second-look surgery by non-echoplanar DW-MRI in children. Fifty-five children and adolescents with a median age of 8.6 years (2.2-17.7 years) underwent 61 preoperative half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) DW-MRI of their petrous bone. Surgical interventions followed within 24 h (79%), within 5 months (20%) or at 18 months (1 case). Surgery detected a cholesteatoma or retraction pocket in 41 of 61 cases (67%). In 49 cases (80%), the MR result was confirmed by surgical findings. Two MR findings were false-positive and 10 false-negative (including cholesteatomas <4 mm). HASTE DW-MRI alone had a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 90%. The positive predictive value was 94%, the negative predictive value 64%. In combination with preoperative otoscopy, sensitivity was 90% and negative predictive value 82%. DW-MRI correctly detected the majority of lesions but could not reliably exclude small cholesteatomas and empty retraction pockets. We would therefore not generally recommend MR as a substitute for second-look surgery. (orig.)

  8. A comparison of high resolution CT scan of temporal bone and operative findings in middle ear cholesteatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Tae Beom; Seong, Hun; Cheon, Mal Soon; Kim, Hack Jin; Jang, Keung Jae; Chun, Byung Hee [Dae Dong General Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    To evaluate the value of HRCT imaging in middle ear cholesteatoma, we prospectively analysed the CT images in 28 surgically proven cases with cholesteatomas regarding main site of lesion, ossicular change, facial nerve exposure and fistula formation. The most common main site of lesion was the epitympanum (92.8%). The results of sensitivity, positive predictability, and accuracy by CT imagings were as follows: for ossicular involvement, 94.1%, 88.8%, and 86.2% in malleus, 96.0%, 88.8%, and 85.7% in incus, 81.2%, 81.2%, and 78.5% in stapes; for facial nerve exposure, 66.6%, 57.1%, and 81.2%: for fistula formation, 100%, 75.0%, and 96.4%, respectively. In conclusion, the temoral bone HRCT imaging is an accurate preoperative method in detecting main lesion site, ossicular involvement, fistula formation. Because of the low sensitivity and positive predictability in detecting facial nerve exposure, it is necessary to correlate the HRCT images with the clinical status.

  9. Auditory Processing Disorder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role. Auditory cohesion problems: This is when higher-level listening tasks are difficult. Auditory cohesion skills — drawing inferences from conversations, understanding riddles, or comprehending verbal math problems — require heightened auditory processing and language levels. ...

  10. Osmolarity and root canal antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, G; Guastalli, A R

    2014-04-01

    Antiseptics used in endodontics for disinfection purposes include root canal dressings and irrigants. Osmotic shock is known to cause the alteration of microbial cell viability and might have a role in the mechanism of action of root canal antiseptics. The aim of this review was to determine the role of osmolarity on the performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment. A literature search using the Medline electronic database was conducted up to 30 May 2013 using the following search terms and combinations: 'osmolarity AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmolality AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmotic AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmosis AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; sodium chloride AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm'. Publications were included if the effects of osmolarity on the clinical performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment were stated, if preparations with different osmolarities values were compared and if they were published in English. A hand search of articles published online, 'in press' and 'early view', and in the reference list of the included papers was carried out following the same criteria. A total of 3274 publications were identified using the database, and three were included in the review. The evidence available in endodontics suggests a possible role for hyperosmotic root canal medicaments as disinfectants, and that there is no influence of osmolarity on the tissue dissolution capacity of sodium hypochlorite. There are insufficient data to obtain a sound conclusion regarding the role of hypo-osmosis in root canal disinfection, or osmosis in any further desirable

  11. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  12. Complete atrioventricular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Raffaele; Limongelli, Giuseppe

    2006-04-05

    Complete atrioventricular canal (CAVC), also referred to as complete atrioventricular septal defect, is characterised by an ostium primum atrial septal defect, a common atrioventricular valve and a variable deficiency of the ventricular septum inflow. CAVC is an uncommon congenital heart disease, accounting for about 3% of cardiac malformations. Atrioventricular canal occurs in two out of every 10,000 live births. Both sexes are equally affected and a striking association with Down syndrome was found. Depending on the morphology of the superior leaflet of the common atrioventricular valve, 3 types of CAVC have been delineated (type A, B and C, according to Rastelli's classification). CAVC results in a significant interatrial and interventricular systemic-to-pulmonary shunt, thus inducing right ventricular pressure and volume overload and pulmonary hypertension. It becomes symptomatic in infancy due to congestive heart failure and failure to thrive. Diagnosis of CAVC might be suspected from electrocardiographic and chest X-ray findings. Echocardiography confirms it and gives anatomical details. Over time, pulmonary hypertension becomes irreversible, thus precluding the surgical therapy. This is the reason why cardiac catheterisation is not mandatory in infants (less than 6 months) but is indicated in older patients if irreversible pulmonary hypertension is suspected. Medical treatment (digitalis, diuretics, vasodilators) plays a role only as a bridge toward surgery, usually performed between the 3rd and 6th month of life.

  13. Complete atrioventricular canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limongelli Giuseppe

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complete atrioventricular canal (CAVC, also referred to as complete atrioventricular septal defect, is characterised by an ostium primum atrial septal defect, a common atrioventricular valve and a variable deficiency of the ventricular septum inflow. CAVC is an uncommon congenital heart disease, accounting for about 3% of cardiac malformations. Atrioventricular canal occurs in two out of every 10,000 live births. Both sexes are equally affected and a striking association with Down syndrome was found. Depending on the morphology of the superior leaflet of the common atrioventricular valve, 3 types of CAVC have been delineated (type A, B and C, according to Rastelli's classification. CAVC results in a significant interatrial and interventricular systemic-to-pulmonary shunt, thus inducing right ventricular pressure and volume overload and pulmonary hypertension. It becomes symptomatic in infancy due to congestive heart failure and failure to thrive. Diagnosis of CAVC might be suspected from electrocardiographic and chest X-ray findings. Echocardiography confirms it and gives anatomical details. Over time, pulmonary hypertension becomes irreversible, thus precluding the surgical therapy. This is the reason why cardiac catheterisation is not mandatory in infants (less than 6 months but is indicated in older patients if irreversible pulmonary hypertension is suspected. Medical treatment (digitalis, diuretics, vasodilators plays a role only as a bridge toward surgery, usually performed between the 3rd and 6th month of life.

  14. Auditory-motor learning influences auditory memory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Palmer, Caroline

    2012-05-01

    In two experiments, we investigated how auditory-motor learning influences performers' memory for music. Skilled pianists learned novel melodies in four conditions: auditory only (listening), motor only (performing without sound), strongly coupled auditory-motor (normal performance), and weakly coupled auditory-motor (performing along with auditory recordings). Pianists' recognition of the learned melodies was better following auditory-only or auditory-motor (weakly coupled and strongly coupled) learning than following motor-only learning, and better following strongly coupled auditory-motor learning than following auditory-only learning. Auditory and motor imagery abilities modulated the learning effects: Pianists with high auditory imagery scores had better recognition following motor-only learning, suggesting that auditory imagery compensated for missing auditory feedback at the learning stage. Experiment 2 replicated the findings of Experiment 1 with melodies that contained greater variation in acoustic features. Melodies that were slower and less variable in tempo and intensity were remembered better following weakly coupled auditory-motor learning. These findings suggest that motor learning can aid performers' auditory recognition of music beyond auditory learning alone, and that motor learning is influenced by individual abilities in mental imagery and by variation in acoustic features.

  15. Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depressin, and hyperacute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of The Sound of a Moracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  16. Review: Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ja'fari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depression, and hyper acute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of the sound of a miracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  17. Hood Canal Steelhead - Hood Canal Steelhead Supplementation Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hood Canal Steelhead Project is a 17-year before-after-control-impact experiment that tests the effects of supplementation on natural steelhead populations in...

  18. Spatial Hearing with Incongruent Visual or Auditory Room Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Carvajal, Juan C.; Cubick, Jens; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    In day-to-day life, humans usually perceive the location of sound sources as outside their heads. This externalized auditory spatial perception can be reproduced through headphones by recreating the sound pressure generated by the source at the listener’s eardrums. This requires the acoustical features of the recording environment and listener’s anatomy to be recorded at the listener’s ear canals. Although the resulting auditory images can be indistinguishable from real-world sources, their externalization may be less robust when the playback and recording environments differ. Here we tested whether a mismatch between playback and recording room reduces perceived distance, azimuthal direction, and compactness of the auditory image, and whether this is mostly due to incongruent auditory cues or to expectations generated from the visual impression of the room. Perceived distance ratings decreased significantly when collected in a more reverberant environment than the recording room, whereas azimuthal direction and compactness remained room independent. Moreover, modifying visual room-related cues had no effect on these three attributes, while incongruent auditory room-related cues between the recording and playback room did affect distance perception. Consequently, the external perception of virtual sounds depends on the degree of congruency between the acoustical features of the environment and the stimuli.

  19. Beneficial auditory and cognitive effects of auditory brainstem implantation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, Liliana

    2007-09-01

    This preliminary study demonstrates the development of hearing ability and shows that there is a significant improvement in some cognitive parameters related to selective visual/spatial attention and to fluid or multisensory reasoning, in children fitted with auditory brainstem implantation (ABI). The improvement in cognitive paramenters is due to several factors, among which there is certainly, as demonstrated in the literature on a cochlear implants (CIs), the activation of the auditory sensory canal, which was previously absent. The findings of the present study indicate that children with cochlear or cochlear nerve abnormalities with associated cognitive deficits should not be excluded from ABI implantation. The indications for ABI have been extended over the last 10 years to adults with non-tumoral (NT) cochlear or cochlear nerve abnormalities that cannot benefit from CI. We demonstrated that the ABI with surface electrodes may provide sufficient stimulation of the central auditory system in adults for open set speech recognition. These favourable results motivated us to extend ABI indications to children with profound hearing loss who were not candidates for a CI. This study investigated the performances of young deaf children undergoing ABI, in terms of their auditory perceptual development and their non-verbal cognitive abilities. In our department from 2000 to 2006, 24 children aged 14 months to 16 years received an ABI for different tumour and non-tumour diseases. Two children had NF2 tumours. Eighteen children had bilateral cochlear nerve aplasia. In this group, nine children had associated cochlear malformations, two had unilateral facial nerve agenesia and two had combined microtia, aural atresia and middle ear malformations. Four of these children had previously been fitted elsewhere with a CI with no auditory results. One child had bilateral incomplete cochlear partition (type II); one child, who had previously been fitted unsuccessfully elsewhere

  20. Biomedical Simulation Models of Human Auditory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Mehmet M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed acoustic engineering models that explore noise propagation mechanisms associated with noise attenuation and transmission paths created when using hearing protectors such as earplugs and headsets in high noise environments. Biomedical finite element (FE) models are developed based on volume Computed Tomography scan data which provides explicit external ear, ear canal, middle ear ossicular bones and cochlea geometry. Results from these studies have enabled a greater understanding of hearing protector to flesh dynamics as well as prioritizing noise propagation mechanisms. Prioritization of noise mechanisms can form an essential framework for exploration of new design principles and methods in both earplug and earcup applications. These models are currently being used in development of a novel hearing protection evaluation system that can provide experimentally correlated psychoacoustic noise attenuation. Moreover, these FE models can be used to simulate the effects of blast related impulse noise on human auditory mechanisms and brain tissue.

  1. Auditory Spatial Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Jenison, Rick

    1995-01-01

    All auditory sensory information is packaged in a pair of acoustical pressure waveforms, one at each ear. While there is obvious structure in these waveforms, that structure (temporal and spectral patterns) bears no simple relationship to the structure of the environmental objects that produced them. The properties of auditory objects and their layout in space must be derived completely from higher level processing of the peripheral input. This chapter begins with a discussion of the peculiarities of acoustical stimuli and how they are received by the human auditory system. A distinction is made between the ambient sound field and the effective stimulus to differentiate the perceptual distinctions among various simple classes of sound sources (ambient field) from the known perceptual consequences of the linear transformations of the sound wave from source to receiver (effective stimulus). Next, the definition of an auditory object is dealt with, specifically the question of how the various components of a sound stream become segregated into distinct auditory objects. The remainder of the chapter focuses on issues related to the spatial layout of auditory objects, both stationary and moving.

  2. Ten-year results of cartilage palisades versus fascia in eardrum reconstruction after surgery for sinus or tensa retraction cholesteatoma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Andersen, Janne; Uzun, Cem

    2009-01-01

    threshold, and pure tone air-bone gap). RESULTS: All but two patients in both groups attended the 10-year follow-up examination (94% attendance). The mean overall follow-up period was 119 months (115 months in the palisade and 125 months in the fascia group). Total number of retractions during follow....... METHODS: A total of 64 children underwent surgery for either sinus or tensa retraction cholesteatoma during the period 1995 to 2000 (mean age 9 years, range 5-15). The eardrum was reconstructed using cartilage palisades in 32 children (32 ears) and fascia or perichondrium in 32 children (33 ears......). The patients were followed for at least one year postoperatively and re-evaluated 4 years after surgery, and again recently at a mean of 10 years. The main outcome measures were postoperative drum retraction and perforation, cholesteatoma recurrence, and hearing acuity (pure tone average, speech reception...

  3. Transcriptional maturation of the mouse auditory forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Troy A; Guo, Yan; Clause, Amanda; Hackett, Nicholas J; Garbett, Krassimira; Zhang, Pan; Polley, Daniel B; Mirnics, Karoly

    2015-08-14

    The maturation of the brain involves the coordinated expression of thousands of genes, proteins and regulatory elements over time. In sensory pathways, gene expression profiles are modified by age and sensory experience in a manner that differs between brain regions and cell types. In the auditory system of altricial animals, neuronal activity increases markedly after the opening of the ear canals, initiating events that culminate in the maturation of auditory circuitry in the brain. This window provides a unique opportunity to study how gene expression patterns are modified by the onset of sensory experience through maturity. As a tool for capturing these features, next-generation sequencing of total RNA (RNAseq) has tremendous utility, because the entire transcriptome can be screened to index expression of any gene. To date, whole transcriptome profiles have not been generated for any central auditory structure in any species at any age. In the present study, RNAseq was used to profile two regions of the mouse auditory forebrain (A1, primary auditory cortex; MG, medial geniculate) at key stages of postnatal development (P7, P14, P21, adult) before and after the onset of hearing (~P12). Hierarchical clustering, differential expression, and functional geneset enrichment analyses (GSEA) were used to profile the expression patterns of all genes. Selected genesets related to neurotransmission, developmental plasticity, critical periods and brain structure were highlighted. An accessible repository of the entire dataset was also constructed that permits extraction and screening of all data from the global through single-gene levels. To our knowledge, this is the first whole transcriptome sequencing study of the forebrain of any mammalian sensory system. Although the data are most relevant for the auditory system, they are generally applicable to forebrain structures in the visual and somatosensory systems, as well. The main findings were: (1) Global gene expression

  4. Integration of auditory and visual speech information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, M.; Smeele, P.M.T.; Kuhl, P.K.

    1998-01-01

    The integration of auditory and visual speech is observed when modes specify different places of articulation. Influences of auditory variation on integration were examined using consonant identifi-cation, plus quality and similarity ratings. Auditory identification predicted auditory-visual

  5. El Canal del Atazar I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Berges y de los Santos, Emilio

    1967-03-01

    Full Text Available The Atazar Canal helps to supply Madrid with water, from the rivers Lozoya, Jarama and Sorbe. The section which operates at present starts at the Torrelaguna dam and finishes at the El Goloso reservoir. Later a further section will be added, from the Atazar dam, on the Lozoya river, to link up with the control dam at Torrelaguna. The canal capacity is 16 m3/sec, and it is 43.47 km long. It has a slope of 4/10.000. The cross section is similar to that of the Jarama canal, already built. There are interconnections between this canal and the Canal Alto, which previously supplied the high and medium part of Madrid. To overcome the ground unevenness 5 syphons have been built, the most important of which is the Colmenar Goloso syphon, which is 10.88 km in length. Construction commenced on December 10, 1962, and water reached Madrid on June 15th, 1966. The initial budget for this project was 1,500 million pesetas.El canal del Atazar refuerza considerablemente el abastecimiento de aguas a Madrid, procedentes de los ríos Lozoya, Jarama y, en un próximo futuro, del Sorbe. El tramo, actualmente en funcionamiento, empieza en el salto de Torrelaguna y finaliza en los depósitos de El Goloso. Más adelante se completará su trazado mediante un nuevo tramo que partirá del embalse de Atazar, en el Lozoya, para unirse al actual en el depósito regulador de Torrelaguna. Su capacidad es de 16 m3/s; su longitud, 43,471 km, y su pendiente, 4 diezmilésimas. La sección tipo es análoga a la del canal del Jarama, de construcción anterior. Mediante la oportuna obra de transvase se realizan intercambios entre este Canal y el Canal Alto que abastecía anteriormente la parte media y alta de la capital. Para salvar los desniveles del terreno se han construido 5 sifones, siendo el más importante el de Colmenar-Goloso, con una longitud de 10,8S4 km. El comienzo de las obras tuvo lugar el 10 de diciembre de 1962, y el agua llegó a Madrid el 15 de junio de 1966. Su

  6. Congenital aplasia of the semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, Bulent; Mukherji, Suresh K; Telian, Steven A

    2003-05-01

    To describe the underrecognized inner ear malformation characterized by complete aplasia of the labyrinthine semicircular canals associated with a relatively well-formed cochlea, to investigate its relationship with known syndromic forms of hearing loss, and to hypothesize regarding the potential embryopathogenesis of this anomaly. A retrospective case review consisting of cases of sensorineural hearing loss with radiographic evidence demonstrating agenesis of the semicircular canals associated with a cochlea that was either morphologically normal or sufficiently well developed to accommodate the full insertion of a cochlear implant electrode. Cases were identified by computerized tomography findings that identified the anomaly under study. Departments of otolaryngology and radiology in a tertiary referral center, with a large cochlear implant program serving over 800 patients, more than half of whom are children. Fifteen patients with the anomaly under study were identified. Each patient underwent a complete otologic examination, audiometric studies, and high resolution computerized tomography of the temporal bone in axial and coronal planes. The bony morphology of the cochlea, round and oval windows, vestibule, semicircular canals, and vestibular aqueduct, and the course of the facial nerve were examined. Auditory findings and otologic treatment are presented. Of the 15 identified patients, 4 were nonsyndromic, 9 had CHARGE association (Coloboma of the eye, congenital Heart defects, choanal Atresia, mental and/or growth Retardation, Genital hypoplasia, and Ear anomalies and/or deafness), 1 met criteria for Noonan's syndrome, and one had features of both these syndromes. Although the cochlea was present in all cases, the cochlear morphology was usually abnormal in the CHARGE association patients. Of the 20 ears in the CHARGE subjects, only 3 ears (15%) were seen to have completely normal development of the cochlea in both the basal and upper turns. The others

  7. A miniaturized laser-Doppler-system in the ear canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T.; Gerhardt, U.; Kupper, C.; Manske, E.; Witte, H.

    2013-03-01

    Gathering vibrational data from the human middle ear is quite difficult. To this date the well-known acoustic probe is used to estimate audiometric parameters, e.g. otoacoustic emissions, wideband reflectance and the measurement of the stapedius reflex. An acoustic probe contains at least one microphone and one loudspeaker. The acoustic parameter determination of the ear canal is essential for the comparability of test-retest measurement situations. Compared to acoustic tubes, the ear canal wall cannot be described as a sound hard boundary. Sound energy is partly absorbed by the ear canal wall. In addition the ear canal features a complex geometric shape (Stinson and Lawton1). Those conditions are one reason for the inter individual variability in input impedance measurement data of the tympanic membrane. The method of Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry is well described in literature. Using this method, the surface velocity of vibrating bodies can be determined contact-free. Conventional Laser-Doppler-Systems (LDS) for auditory research are mounted on a surgical microscope. Assuming a free line of view to the ear drum, the handling of those laser-systems is complicated. We introduce the concept of a miniaturized vibrometer which is supposed to be applied directly in the ear canal for contact-free measurement of the tympanic membrane surface vibration. The proposed interferometer is based on a Fabry-Perot etalon with a DFB laser diode as light source. The fiber-based Fabry-Perot-interferometer is characterized by a reduced size, compared to e.g. Michelson-, or Mach-Zehnder-Systems. For the determination of the phase difference in the interferometer, a phase generated carrier was used. To fit the sensor head in the ear canal, the required shape of the probe was generated by means of the geometrical data of 70 ear molds. The suggested prototype is built up by a singlemode optical fiber with a GRIN-lens, acting as a fiber collimator. The probe has a diameter of 1.8 mm and a

  8. Auditory and Visual Sensations

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    Professor Yoichi Ando, acoustic architectural designer of the Kirishima International Concert Hall in Japan, presents a comprehensive rational-scientific approach to designing performance spaces. His theory is based on systematic psychoacoustical observations of spatial hearing and listener preferences, whose neuronal correlates are observed in the neurophysiology of the human brain. A correlation-based model of neuronal signal processing in the central auditory system is proposed in which temporal sensations (pitch, timbre, loudness, duration) are represented by an internal autocorrelation representation, and spatial sensations (sound location, size, diffuseness related to envelopment) are represented by an internal interaural crosscorrelation function. Together these two internal central auditory representations account for the basic auditory qualities that are relevant for listening to music and speech in indoor performance spaces. Observed psychological and neurophysiological commonalities between auditor...

  9. Modularity in Sensory Auditory Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Sylvain; Moroni, Christine; Samson, Séverine

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to review various experimental and neuropsychological studies that support the modular conception of auditory sensory memory or auditory short-term memory. Based on initial findings demonstrating that verbal sensory memory system can be dissociated from a general auditory memory store at the functional and anatomical levels. we reported a series of studies that provided evidence in favor of multiple auditory sensory stores specialized in retaining eit...

  10. Imaging of congenital anomalies of the temporal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, C; Bellet, P S

    2000-02-01

    This article briefly presents the embryology of the ear and discusses the external auditory canal and middle ear, including first branchial cleft anomalies, external auditory canal atresia and stenoses, congenital cholesteatoma, and congenital teratoma. Topics related to the labyrinths include aplasia, the common-chamber anomaly, the pseudo-Mondini and Mondini malformations, semicircular canal dysplasia, and the large vestibular aqueduct. Vascular malformations and variations also are presented, including the absent and aberrant internal carotid artery, the persistent stapedial artery, and high jugular bulb; cerebrospinal fluid and perilymph fistulas are the subjects of the final section.

  11. Computed tomographic features of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve in pediatric patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Tatsuo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diameters of the various bony canals of the inner ear in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and establish criteria for detecting hypoplasia of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve. Measurements obtained in 118 patients without inner ear malformations among 160 patients with unilateral SNHL were analyzed. The diameters of the internal auditory canal and the bony canals of the cochlear, vestibular, and facial nerves were measured on transverse or coronal computed tomographic images. Mean values (±standard deviation (SD)) were compared between the affected and unaffected ears, and statistical analysis was done. The diameter of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve was significantly smaller in affected ears than in unaffected ears (P<0.01). The affected ears could be divided into groups with (72 ears) and without (46 ears) bony canal stenosis. Most (60%) of the patients with unilateral SNHL showed a significant difference in the diameters of the bony canals of the cochlear nerve between the affected and unaffected sides; moreover, the mean value was significantly smaller in affected ears. The diameter of <1.7 mm on transverse images or <1.8 mm on coronal images suggests hypoplasia. (author)

  12. Unpredictable Root Canal Morphology: Expect the Unexpected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohez J Makani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A maxillary first molar with more than four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations, especially when two of these canals are detected, with separate apical foramen in the distal root. The inability to locate the unexpected canals of various anatomical configuration and subsequently treat them , may lead to therapeutic failures. Endodontic retreatment is usually the modality of choice in such cases. This report describes a case of a maxillary first molar with five canals (two mesial canals in mesial root, two distal canals in two distal roots and a palatal canal in palatal root. Additionally it shows a rare anatomic configuration and emphasizes the importance of identifying additional canals.

  13. Auditory Memory for Timbre

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Denis; Wellsted, David

    2009-01-01

    Psychophysical studies are reported examining how the context of recent auditory stimulation may modulate the processing of new sounds. The question posed is how recent tone stimulation may affect ongoing performance in a discrimination task. In the task, two complex sounds occurred in successive intervals. A single target component of one complex…

  14. Auditory evacuation beacons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van; Bronkhorst, A.W.; Boer, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    Auditory evacuation beacons can be used to guide people to safe exits, even when vision is totally obscured by smoke. Conventional beacons make use of modulated noise signals. Controlled evacuation experiments show that such signals require explicit instructions and are often misunderstood. A new

  15. Auricular Split-Thickness Skin Graft for Ear Canal Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Yarah M; Walia, Sartaaj; Sahyouni, Ronald; Ghavami, Yaser; Lin, Harrison W; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2016-12-01

    Split-thickness skin graft (STSG) continues to be the preferred means of external auditory canal (EAC) reconstruction. We thus sought to describe our experience using skin from the posterior aspect of the auricle (SPAA) as a donor site in EAC reconstruction. Grafts were, on average, 5 × 10 mm in size and obtained with a No. 10 blade after tumescence injection. The cases of 39 patients who underwent 41 procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 38 patients with both 3- and 6-month follow-ups, no postoperative stenosis or bony exposure occurred. STSG from the SPAA can be a good option in EAC reconstruction. Total EAC/tympanic membrane coverage can be obtained with STSG from the SPAA. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  16. Development of the auditory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Auditory development involves changes in the peripheral and central nervous system along the auditory pathways, and these occur naturally, and in response to stimulation. Human development occurs along a trajectory that can last decades, and is studied using behavioral psychophysics, as well as physiologic measurements with neural imaging. The auditory system constructs a perceptual space that takes information from objects and groups, segregates sounds, and provides meaning and access to communication tools such as language. Auditory signals are processed in a series of analysis stages, from peripheral to central. Coding of information has been studied for features of sound, including frequency, intensity, loudness, and location, in quiet and in the presence of maskers. In the latter case, the ability of the auditory system to perform an analysis of the scene becomes highly relevant. While some basic abilities are well developed at birth, there is a clear prolonged maturation of auditory development well into the teenage years. Maturation involves auditory pathways. However, non-auditory changes (attention, memory, cognition) play an important role in auditory development. The ability of the auditory system to adapt in response to novel stimuli is a key feature of development throughout the nervous system, known as neural plasticity. PMID:25726262

  17. Animal models for auditory streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatani, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Sounds in the natural environment need to be assigned to acoustic sources to evaluate complex auditory scenes. Separating sources will affect the analysis of auditory features of sounds. As the benefits of assigning sounds to specific sources accrue to all species communicating acoustically, the ability for auditory scene analysis is widespread among different animals. Animal studies allow for a deeper insight into the neuronal mechanisms underlying auditory scene analysis. Here, we will review the paradigms applied in the study of auditory scene analysis and streaming of sequential sounds in animal models. We will compare the psychophysical results from the animal studies to the evidence obtained in human psychophysics of auditory streaming, i.e. in a task commonly used for measuring the capability for auditory scene analysis. Furthermore, the neuronal correlates of auditory streaming will be reviewed in different animal models and the observations of the neurons’ response measures will be related to perception. The across-species comparison will reveal whether similar demands in the analysis of acoustic scenes have resulted in similar perceptual and neuronal processing mechanisms in the wide range of species being capable of auditory scene analysis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Auditory and visual scene analysis’. PMID:28044022

  18. Influence of Ossicular Chain Damage on Hearing After Chronic Otitis Media and Cholesteatoma Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Erik F; Gunning, Marlise N; Kleinrensink, Nienke J; Lokin, Alexander S H J; Bruijnzeel, Hanneke; Smit, Adriana L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-11-01

    Physicians should ideally be able to provide patients with chronic otitis media and/or cholesteatoma specific information about postoperative hearing outcome, based on their level of preoperative ossicular chain damage (OCD). To identify the influence of preoperative OCD on hearing outcomes in patients after chronic otitis media and/or cholesteatoma surgery. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for available evidence, without any constraints, on December 13, 2014, for articles published between January 1, 1975, and December 13, 2014. We reviewed the literature for articles assessing the prognostic value of OCD on postoperative hearing outcome (air-bone gap [ABG] in decibels), using Austin-Kartush criteria or independent OCD classification systems. We assessed relevance and validity using a self-designed critical appraisal tool based on the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. Characteristics of study populations and postoperative ABGs in decibels were extracted from all included studies by 4 authors (E.F.B., M.N.G., N.J.K., A.S.H.J.L.). The tested hypothesis was formulated before data collection. Primary study outcome was defined as postoperative adult hearing outcomes after COM and/or cholesteatoma surgery defined as mean postoperative ABG. Our search yielded 5661 articles. Nine articles with high relevance were included. Pooled results of studies using the Austin-Kartush criteria showed a significant (P influence of stapes structure (intact stapes suprastructure, 13.5 [95% CI, 10.3-16.7], 15.1 [95% CI, 11.8-18.3], and 21.9 [95% CI, 15.0-28.8] dB vs absent stapes structure, 12.8 [95% CI, 9.5-16.1], 19.5 [95% CI, 14.9-24.1], and 30.2 [95% CI, 24.7-35.8] dB) on postoperative ABG. One study reported a significant (P = .04) difference in mean ABG between patients with present (18.9 [95% CI, 15.7-22.1] dB) and absent (24.4 [95% CI, 20.2-28.6] dB) malleus. Pooled results of Austin-Kartush studies showed that in

  19. Dissection of the Auditory Bulla in Postnatal Mice: Isolation of the Middle Ear Bones and Histological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ayako; Kuroda, Yukiko; Kanzaki, Sho; Matsuo, Koichi

    2017-01-04

    In most mammals, auditory ossicles in the middle ear, including the malleus, incus and stapes, are the smallest bones. In mice, a bony structure called the auditory bulla houses the ossicles, whereas the auditory capsule encloses the inner ear, namely the cochlea and semicircular canals. Murine ossicles are essential for hearing and thus of great interest to researchers in the field of otolaryngology, but their metabolism, development, and evolution are highly relevant to other fields. Altered bone metabolism can affect hearing function in adult mice, and various gene-deficient mice show changes in morphogenesis of auditory ossicles in utero. Although murine auditory ossicles are tiny, their manipulation is feasible if one understands their anatomical orientation and 3D structure. Here, we describe how to dissect the auditory bulla and capsule of postnatal mice and then isolate individual ossicles by removing part of the bulla. We also discuss how to embed the bulla and capsule in different orientations to generate paraffin or frozen sections suitable for preparation of longitudinal, horizontal, or frontal sections of the malleus. Finally, we enumerate anatomical differences between mouse and human auditory ossicles. These methods would be useful in analyzing pathological, developmental and evolutionary aspects of auditory ossicles and the middle ear in mice.

  20. Retention of Root Canal Posts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Flury, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc...... received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement......, pretreatment with tribochemical silicate coating significantly increased retention of the posts. Increased cement film thickness resulted in decreased retention of untreated posts and of pretreated posts luted with zinc phosphate cement. Increased cement film thickness had no influence on retention...

  1. Auditory interfaces: The human perceiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, H. Steven

    1991-01-01

    A brief introduction to the basic auditory abilities of the human perceiver with particular attention toward issues that may be important for the design of auditory interfaces is presented. The importance of appropriate auditory inputs to observers with normal hearing is probably related to the role of hearing as an omnidirectional, early warning system and to its role as the primary vehicle for communication of strong personal feelings.

  2. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-07-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas.

  3. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas. (orig.) [de

  4. Auditory Perceptual Abilities Are Associated with Specific Auditory Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Zaltz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which auditory experience can shape general auditory perceptual abilities is still under constant debate. Some studies show that specific auditory expertise may have a general effect on auditory perceptual abilities, while others show a more limited influence, exhibited only in a relatively narrow range associated with the area of expertise. The current study addresses this issue by examining experience-dependent enhancement in perceptual abilities in the auditory domain. Three experiments were performed. In the first experiment, 12 pop and rock musicians and 15 non-musicians were tested in frequency discrimination (DLF, intensity discrimination, spectrum discrimination (DLS, and time discrimination (DLT. Results showed significant superiority of the musician group only for the DLF and DLT tasks, illuminating enhanced perceptual skills in the key features of pop music, in which miniscule changes in amplitude and spectrum are not critical to performance. The next two experiments attempted to differentiate between generalization and specificity in the influence of auditory experience, by comparing subgroups of specialists. First, seven guitar players and eight percussionists were tested in the DLF and DLT tasks that were found superior for musicians. Results showed superior abilities on the DLF task for guitar players, though no difference between the groups in DLT, demonstrating some dependency of auditory learning on the specific area of expertise. Subsequently, a third experiment was conducted, testing a possible influence of vowel density in native language on auditory perceptual abilities. Ten native speakers of German (a language characterized by a dense vowel system of 14 vowels, and 10 native speakers of Hebrew (characterized by a sparse vowel system of five vowels, were tested in a formant discrimination task. This is the linguistic equivalent of a DLS task. Results showed that German speakers had superior formant

  5. The Central Auditory Processing Kit[TM]. Book 1: Auditory Memory [and] Book 2: Auditory Discrimination, Auditory Closure, and Auditory Synthesis [and] Book 3: Auditory Figure-Ground, Auditory Cohesion, Auditory Binaural Integration, and Compensatory Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhemar, Mary Ann

    This kit for assessing central auditory processing disorders (CAPD), in children in grades 1 through 8 includes 3 books, 14 full-color cards with picture scenes, and a card depicting a phone key pad, all contained in a sturdy carrying case. The units in each of the three books correspond with auditory skill areas most commonly addressed in…

  6. Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourah ALSaleh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck is a rare condition in female children caused by a failure of complete obliteration of the canal of Nuck. The canal of Nuck is an abnormal patent pouch of the peritoneum extending anterior to the round ligament of the uterus into the labia majora. Incomplete obliteration of this canal (patent processus vaginalis can result in either an inguinal hernia or a hydrocele. Here, we report two cases of hydrocele of the canal of Nuck presented within a two-month period. In the first case, incarcerated right-sided inguinal hernia was suspected while the second case was clinically diagnosed as encysted hydrocele of canal of Nuck. Both patients underwent surgical exploration. Hydrocelectomy with high ligation was also performed. One month after the surgery, the first patient showed signs of hydrocele on contralateral side, while the other patient showed no sign of contralateral hydrocele or hernia.

  7. Auditory Reserve and the Legacy of Auditory Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Skoe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Musical training during childhood has been linked to more robust encoding of sound later in life. We take this as evidence for an auditory reserve: a mechanism by which individuals capitalize on earlier life experiences to promote auditory processing. We assert that early auditory experiences guide how the reserve develops and is maintained over the lifetime. Experiences that occur after childhood, or which are limited in nature, are theorized to affect the reserve, although their influence on sensory processing may be less long-lasting and may potentially fade over time if not repeated. This auditory reserve may help to explain individual differences in how individuals cope with auditory impoverishment or loss of sensorineural function.

  8. Stability of guest molecules in urea canal complexes by canal polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    It was found that various organic materials are attracted into urea canal by hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA) and long chain compounds. This means that materials which does not form complex by itself are induced in canal by HDDA and long chain compounds. To include with stability perfumes, insecticides, attractants and repellents in urea canal, leaf alcohol was used as a model compound for guest molecules in the canal. The leaf alcohol from the canal released gradually over many days and the release was inhibited for 15 days by long chain compounds and for 30 days by polymerized HDDA after irradiation. After releasing, the leaf alcohol in the canal remained 25 % stable for long chain compounds and 40 % for polymerized HDDA. The dose required for stabilization of leaf alcohol in the urea canal by canal polymerization of HDDA was 30 kGy. (author)

  9. [Root canal treatment of mandibular first premolar with 4 root canals: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-yang; Zhan, Fu-Liang

    2015-10-01

    The mandibular first premolar can be considered one of the most challenging teeth to treat, due to the complexity of its root canal morphology and increased incidence of multiple canals. A case of endodontic treatment of a mandibular first premolar exhibiting a total of 4 distinct root canals and 4 apical foramina was described. Anatomic variation of root canal morphology should be considered in endodontic treatment to ensure a favorable healing outcome, and its identification could be enhanced by careful examination using a dental operating microscope. Obturation of root canals using a warm vertical compaction technique with a highly-radiopaque root canal sealer, such as AH Plus, after careful ultrasonic activated irrigation might allow the flow of sealer into the narrowed but unprepared part of the canal, thereby facilitating optimum chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system.

  10. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  11. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  12. Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, J; Hubbard, A; Neely, S; Tubis, A

    1986-01-01

    How weIl can we model experimental observations of the peripheral auditory system'? What theoretical predictions can we make that might be tested'? It was with these questions in mind that we organized the 1985 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop, to bring together auditory researchers to compare models with experimental observations. Tbe workshop forum was inspired by the very successful 1983 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Delft [1]. Boston University was chosen as the site of our meeting because of the Boston area's role as a center for hearing research in this country. We made a special effort at this meeting to attract students from around the world, because without students this field will not progress. Financial support for the workshop was provided in part by grant BNS- 8412878 from the National Science Foundation. Modeling is a traditional strategy in science and plays an important role in the scientific method. Models are the bridge between theory and experiment. Tbey test the assumptions made in experim...

  13. Some History and Hydrology of the Panama Canal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pabst, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    At the request of the Panama Canal Commission (now Panama Canal Authority), the Hydrologic Engineering Center participated in the development of a model to simulate the existing operation of the Panama Canal System...

  14. About ecological aspects of "Eurasia" canal construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abdurakhmanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological aspects of "Eurasia" canal construction are considered here. The fact that can negatively affect natural area preservation (preserves, reserves, located in Kumo-Manych depression, along where the canal construction will take place, is shown in this article.

  15. [Upper lateral incisor with 2 canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabra Campos, H

    1991-01-01

    Clinical case summary of the patient with an upper lateral incisor with two root canals. The suspicion that there might be an anatomic anomaly in the root that includes a complex root canal system was made when an advanced radicular groove was detected in the lingual surface or an excessively enlarged cingulum.

  16. Neuronal hyperplasia in the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, C; Schrøder, H D

    1990-01-01

    In a consecutive series of minor surgical specimens from the anal canal, neuronal hyperplasia was found in nine of 56 haemorrhoidectomy specimens and in four of 23 fibrous polyps. In an additional series of 14 resections of the anal canal, neuronal hyperplasia was present in six cases, of which f...

  17. External dose conversion factor from canal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Pradeep; Chitra, S.; Mhatre, Arti S.; Singh, Kapil Deo

    2016-01-01

    External dose needs to be estimated for the radioactivity discharged into the canal, as it constitutes one of the pathways of exposure to the public. Two activities are considered here: i) a walk along the bank of the canal ii) and the walk on the bridge. A concentration of 1 Bq/l is assumed here for the gross beta activity for the estimation of the dose conversion factor. A canal of width 14.39 m and the depth of 2.5 m is considered for this study. Length of the canal is taken to be infinite. Canal side wall is assumed to be the 25 cm thick concrete. Two points are selected, one on the bank, and the second on a bridge 1 m above the top surface of canal water. Dose Conversion factors for the person moving on the Bridge (at one meter above the water surface) and standing on bank of canal is estimated by using the QAD CG code for 137 Cs. Dose conversion factors for the location mentioned above are found to be 1.11E-10 Sv/hr/(Bq/l) and 1.55 E-11 Sv/hr/(Bq/l) for bridge and bank of canal respectively. (author)

  18. Developmental programming of auditory learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Puddu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic structures involved in the development of auditory function and consequently in language acquisition are directed by genetic code, but the expression of individual genes may be altered by exposure to environmental factors, which if favorable, orient it in the proper direction, leading its development towards normality, if unfavorable, they deviate it from its physiological course. Early sensorial experience during the foetal period (i.e. intrauterine noise floor, sounds coming from the outside and attenuated by the uterine filter, particularly mother’s voice and modifications induced by it at the cochlear level represent the first example of programming in one of the earliest critical periods in development of the auditory system. This review will examine the factors that influence the developmental programming of auditory learning from the womb to the infancy. In particular it focuses on the following points: the prenatal auditory experience and the plastic phenomena presumably induced by it in the auditory system from the basilar membrane to the cortex;the involvement of these phenomena on language acquisition and on the perception of language communicative intention after birth;the consequences of auditory deprivation in critical periods of auditory development (i.e. premature interruption of foetal life.

  19. Type III apical transportation of root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv P Mantri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural accidents leading to complications such as canal transportation have been ascribed to inapt cleaning and shaping concepts. Canal transportation is an undesirable deviation from the natural canal path. Herewith a case of apical transportation of root canal resulting in endodontic retreatment failure and its management is presented. A healthy 21-year-old young male presented discomfort and swelling associated with painful endodontically retreated maxillary incisor. Radiograph revealed periradicular radiolucency involving underfilled 11 and overfilled 12. Insufficiently obturated 11 exhibited apical transportation of canal. This type III transportation was treated by periradicular surgery and repair using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Comfortable asymptomatic patient presented uneventful healing at third and fourth month recall visits. A decrease in the size of radiolucency in radiograph supported the clinical finding. In the present case, MTA is useful in repairing the transportation defect. The result of these procedures is predictable and successful.

  20. Microbiological examination of infected dental root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, B P F A; Pinheiro, E T; Gadê-Neto, C R; Sousa, E L R; Ferraz, C C R; Zaia, A A; Teixeira, F B; Souza-Filho, F J

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the root canal microbiota of primary and secondary root-infected canals and the association of constituent species with specific endodontic signs and symptoms. Microbial samples were taken from 60 root canals, 41 with necrotic pulp tissues (primary infection) and 19 with failed endodontic treatment (secondary infection). Strict anaerobic techniques were used for serial dilution, plating, incubation and identification. A total of 224 cultivable isolates were recovered belonging to 56 different bacterial species. Individual root canals yielded a maximum of 10 bacterial species. Of the bacterial isolates, 70% were either strict anaerobes or microphilic. The anaerobes most frequently isolated were: Peptostreptococcus micros (35%), Fusobacterium necrophorum (23.3%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (11.7%), Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (16.7%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (6.7%) and Porphyromonas endodontalis (5%). The root canal microflora of untreated teeth with apical periodontitis was found to be mixed, comprising gram-negative and gram-positive and mostly anaerobic microorganisms and usually containing more than 3 species per canal. On the other hand, facultative anaerobic and gram-positive bacteria predominated in canals with failed endodontic treatment, which harbored 1-2 species per canal. Suggested relationships were found between anaerobes, especially gram-negatives, and the presence or history of pain, tenderness to percussion and swelling (PEubacterium spp. (both Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp., P. micros, F. necrophorum (P<0.05). Our findings indicate potential complex interactions of species resulting in characteristic clinical pictures which cannot be achieved by individual species alone. They also indicate that the microbiota of primary infected canals with apical periodontitis differs in number and in species from the secondary infected canals by using the culture technique.

  1. Auditory short-term memory in the primate auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian H; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2016-06-01

    Sounds are fleeting, and assembling the sequence of inputs at the ear into a coherent percept requires auditory memory across various time scales. Auditory short-term memory comprises at least two components: an active ׳working memory' bolstered by rehearsal, and a sensory trace that may be passively retained. Working memory relies on representations recalled from long-term memory, and their rehearsal may require phonological mechanisms unique to humans. The sensory component, passive short-term memory (pSTM), is tractable to study in nonhuman primates, whose brain architecture and behavioral repertoire are comparable to our own. This review discusses recent advances in the behavioral and neurophysiological study of auditory memory with a focus on single-unit recordings from macaque monkeys performing delayed-match-to-sample (DMS) tasks. Monkeys appear to employ pSTM to solve these tasks, as evidenced by the impact of interfering stimuli on memory performance. In several regards, pSTM in monkeys resembles pitch memory in humans, and may engage similar neural mechanisms. Neural correlates of DMS performance have been observed throughout the auditory and prefrontal cortex, defining a network of areas supporting auditory STM with parallels to that supporting visual STM. These correlates include persistent neural firing, or a suppression of firing, during the delay period of the memory task, as well as suppression or (less commonly) enhancement of sensory responses when a sound is repeated as a ׳match' stimulus. Auditory STM is supported by a distributed temporo-frontal network in which sensitivity to stimulus history is an intrinsic feature of auditory processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Auditory short-term memory in the primate auditory cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Brian H.; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2015-01-01

    Sounds are fleeting, and assembling the sequence of inputs at the ear into a coherent percept requires auditory memory across various time scales. Auditory short-term memory comprises at least two components: an active ���working memory��� bolstered by rehearsal, and a sensory trace that may be passively retained. Working memory relies on representations recalled from long-term memory, and their rehearsal may require phonological mechanisms unique to humans. The sensory component, passive sho...

  3. Maps of the Auditory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Alyssa A; Barton, Brian

    2016-07-08

    One of the fundamental properties of the mammalian brain is that sensory regions of cortex are formed of multiple, functionally specialized cortical field maps (CFMs). Each CFM comprises two orthogonal topographical representations, reflecting two essential aspects of sensory space. In auditory cortex, auditory field maps (AFMs) are defined by the combination of tonotopic gradients, representing the spectral aspects of sound (i.e., tones), with orthogonal periodotopic gradients, representing the temporal aspects of sound (i.e., period or temporal envelope). Converging evidence from cytoarchitectural and neuroimaging measurements underlies the definition of 11 AFMs across core and belt regions of human auditory cortex, with likely homology to those of macaque. On a macrostructural level, AFMs are grouped into cloverleaf clusters, an organizational structure also seen in visual cortex. Future research can now use these AFMs to investigate specific stages of auditory processing, key for understanding behaviors such as speech perception and multimodal sensory integration.

  4. Demodulation Processes in Auditory Perception

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feth, Lawrence

    1997-01-01

    The long range goal of this project was the understanding of human auditory processing of information conveyed by complex, time varying signals such as speech, music or important environmental sounds...

  5. Acceleration induced water removal from ear canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hosung; Averett, Katelee; Jung, Sunghwan

    2017-11-01

    Children and adults commonly experience having water trapped in the ear canals after swimming. To remove the water, individuals will shake their head sideways. Since a child's ear canal has a smaller diameter, it requires more acceleration of the head to remove the trapped water. In this study, we theoretically and experimentally investigated the acceleration required to break the surface meniscus of the water in artificial ear canals and hydrophobic-coated glass tubes. In experiments, ear canal models were 3D-printed from a CT-scanned human head. Also, glass tubes were coated with silane to match the hydrophobicity in ear canals. Then, using a linear stage, we measured the acceleration values required to forcefully eject the water from the artificial ear canals and glass tubes. A theoretical model was developed to predict the critical acceleration at a given tube diameter and water volume by using a modified Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore, this research can shed light on the potential of long-term brain injury and damage by shaking the head to push the water out of the ear canal. This research was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1604424.

  6. Clinical significance of dental root canal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, B P; Lilley, J D; Drucker, D B

    1996-01-01

    Previous work by this group has shown that a significant association exists between pain and the presence of either Prevotella or Peptostreptococcus spp. in dental root canals. The aim of this study was to examine a more extensive series of canals microbiologically, to determine whether any other particular endodontic symptoms or clinical signs showed specific associations with individual bacterial species. Seventy root canals were examined microbiologically and clinical data collected to investigate in detail such associations. Of the canals studied, 37 were associated with pain, 49 with tenderness to percussion, 23 with swelling, six with purulent exudate and 57 presented with wet root canals. Anaerobes were isolated from 70.3% of painful canals and from 29.7% of pain-free canals. Significant associations were found between (a) pain and either Prevotella spp. or peptostreptococci, both with P spp. (P Eubacterium spp. (P spp. or Pstr. micros, both with P spp. (each P Eubacterium, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella or Propionibacterium (each P < 0.05). It was concluded that several different endodontic clinical signs and symptoms are significantly associated with specific bacterial species.

  7. Handheld tympanometer measurements in conscious dogs for the evaluation of the middle ear and auditory tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, George M; Fernandes, Asia J

    2015-06-01

    Otitis externa is frequently accompanied by otitis media, yet it can be difficult to evaluate the tympanum, middle ear and auditory tube without the use of advanced radiographic imaging. The objective was to develop techniques for tympanometry testing in conscious dogs and to present normative data for clinical use of this equipment to enable assessment of the tympanum, middle ear and auditory tube. Sixteen hounds (14 female) from a school teaching colony. Dogs were gently restrained in a standing position. After cleaning of the ear canal, a tympanometer probe tip extension was placed in the vertical canal and automated testing performed using a handheld device. Both ears were tested in all dogs. Acceptable recordings were obtained from both ears of 13 dogs, from one ear in each of two dogs and from neither ear of one dog, resulting in data from 28 of 32 (88%) ears. Otoscopic examination confirmed the absence of inflammation or any other obvious explanation for the noncompliant dogs. No significant differences were seen between ears for any measure. Normative data are reported for peak compliance, peak compliance pressure, gradient and ear canal volume. Tympanograms can be recorded in conscious dogs to assist in the evaluation of the middle ear structures. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Diminished auditory sensory gating during active auditory verbal hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Robert J; Meier, Andrew; Houck, Jon; Clark, Vincent P; Lewine, Jeffrey D; Turner, Jessica; Calhoun, Vince; Stephen, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Auditory sensory gating, assessed in a paired-click paradigm, indicates the extent to which incoming stimuli are filtered, or "gated", in auditory cortex. Gating is typically computed as the ratio of the peak amplitude of the event related potential (ERP) to a second click (S2) divided by the peak amplitude of the ERP to a first click (S1). Higher gating ratios are purportedly indicative of incomplete suppression of S2 and considered to represent sensory processing dysfunction. In schizophrenia, hallucination severity is positively correlated with gating ratios, and it was hypothesized that a failure of sensory control processes early in auditory sensation (gating) may represent a larger system failure within the auditory data stream; resulting in auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH). EEG data were collected while patients (N=12) with treatment-resistant AVH pressed a button to indicate the beginning (AVH-on) and end (AVH-off) of each AVH during a paired click protocol. For each participant, separate gating ratios were computed for the P50, N100, and P200 components for each of the AVH-off and AVH-on states. AVH trait severity was assessed using the Psychotic Symptoms Rating Scales AVH Total score (PSYRATS). The results of a mixed model ANOVA revealed an overall effect for AVH state, such that gating ratios were significantly higher during the AVH-on state than during AVH-off for all three components. PSYRATS score was significantly and negatively correlated with N100 gating ratio only in the AVH-off state. These findings link onset of AVH with a failure of an empirically-defined auditory inhibition system, auditory sensory gating, and pave the way for a sensory gating model of AVH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mandibular molar with five root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Fernando Branco; Dotto, Sidney Ricardo; Reis, Magda de Sousa; Ferreira, Ronise; Travassos, Rosana Maria Coelho

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the importance of knowledge of the internal anatomy of root canals for the success of endodontic treatment. Lack of knowledge of anatomic variations and their characteristics in different teeth has been pointed out as one of the main causes of endodontic therapy failure. In this report, the authors describe the endodontic treatment of a mandibular first molar with five root canals, evaluate the rate of occurrence of this number of canals, and discuss the importance of their identification and treatment.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and support...

  11. Assessment of periapical health, quality of root canal filling, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty three teeth were found to have short root canal fillings, whereas 74 teeth had adequate root canal fillings, and the remaining 10 teeth had over extended root canal filling. A significant correlation was observed between the length of root filling and apical periodontitis (P = 0,023). Inadequately dense root canal filling was ...

  12. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of canal cleaning after canal preparation with nickel titanium files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Root canal preparation is the most important phase of endodontic procedure and it consists of adequate canal space cleaning and shaping. In recent years, rotary instruments and techniques have gained importance because of the great efficacy, speed and safety of the preparation procedure. Objective. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of different NiTi files on the canal wall cleaning quality, residual dentine debris and smear layer. Methods. The research was conducted on extracted human teeth in vitro conditions. Teeth were divided in 7 main groups depending on the kind of instruments used for root canal preparation: ProTaper, GT, ProFile, K-3, FlexMaster, hand ProTaper and hand GT. Root canal preparation was accomplished by crown-down technique. Prepared samples were assessed on scanning electron microscopy JEOL, JSM-6460 LV. The evaluation of dentine debris was done with 500x magnification, and the evaluation of smear layer with 1,000 times magnification. Quantitive assessment of dentine debris and smear layer was done according to the criteria of Hulsmann. Results. The least amount of debris and smear layer has been found in canals shaped with ProFile instruments, and the largest amount in canals shaped with FlexMaster instruments. Canal cleaning efficacy of hand GT and ProTaper files has been similar to cleaning efficacy of rotary NiTi files. Statistic analysis has shown a significant difference in amount of dentine debris and smear layer on the canal walls between sample groups shaped with different instruments. Conclusion. Completely clean canals have not been found in any tested group of instruments. The largest amount of debris and smear layer has been found in the apical third of all canals. The design and the type of endodontic instruments influence the efficacy of the canal cleaning.

  13. Contribution of bioanthropology to the reconstruction of prehistoric productive processes. The external auditory exostoses in the prehispanic population of Gran Canaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Vázquez, Javier

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is an approach to the role of bioanthropological studies in the reconstruction of the productive processes of past societies. This objective is obtained starting from the survey and valuation of the prevalence of bone exostoses in the auditory canal among the prehistoric inhabitants of Gran Canaria. The auditory exostose is a bone wound well documented through clinical and experimental studies, closely related to the exposure of the auditory canal to cold water. The estimation of this bone anomaly among the analysed population, leads to the definition of outstanding territorial variations in the economic strategies of these human groups.

    En el presente trabajo se pretende abordar el papel de los estudios bioantropológicos en la reconstrucción de los procesos productivos de las sociedades del pasado. Esta finalidad es perseguida a partir del examen y valoración de la prevalencia de exostosis óseas en el canal auditivo en la población prehistórica de Gran Canaria. Las exostosis auditivas constituyen una lesión ósea, bien documentada en trabajos experimentales y clínicos, estrechamente relacionada con la exposición del canal auditivo al agua fría. La estimación de esta anormalidad ósea en el conjunto poblacional analizado permite la definición de importantes variaciones territoriales en las estrategias económicas emprendidas por estos grupos humanos.

  14. Are Patients with Spontaneous CSF Otorrhea and Superior Canal Dehiscence Congenitally Predisposed to Their Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Shawn M; Hock, Kiefer; Samy, Ravi N; Pensak, Myles L

    2018-04-01

    Objectives (1) Compare lateral skull base (LSB) height/thickness in patients with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea (CSF), superior canal dehiscence (SCD), acoustic neuromas (AN), and otosclerosis (OTO). (2) Perform correlations between age, body mass index (BMI), sex, and LSB height/thickness. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods Patients with CSF, SCD, AN, and OTO diagnosed from 2006 to 2016 were included if they had high-definition temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and absence of trauma, radiation, chronic ear disease, and/or congenital anomaly. CT-based measurements included LSB height/thickness and pneumatization rates overlaying the external auditory canal (EAC), tegmen tympani (TgT), perigeniculate region (PG), and internal auditory canal (IAC). LSB height/thickness, age, sex, and BMI were statistically correlated. In total, 256 patients and 493 ears (109 CSF, 115 SCD, 269 AN/OTO) were measured. Results Patients with CSF had significantly higher BMIs than the other groups ( P CSF and SCD had similar radiographic LSB phenotypes at most measured locations. Both groups exhibited a significantly lower LSB height compared to the AN and OTO groups (mean, 3.9-4.2 mm vs 4.9-5.6 mm; P CSF and SCD also demonstrated significantly lower pneumatization rates, as low as 17% to 23% overlaying the PG and IAC ( P CSF and SCD exhibit similar radiographic LSB phenotypes. Age, sex, and BMI do not significantly correlate with LSB height/thickness. These data support the theory that CSF and SCD arise via similar congenital pathoetiologic mechanisms.

  15. Infected Hydrocele of the Canal of Nuck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkash Mandhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck in children is rare. It may present as incarcerated inguinal hernia and necessitates emergency exploration. Risk of infection in hydrocele of the canal of nuck is very rare. We present a case report of a 5-year-old girl who presented with a left tender inguinolabial region swelling with fever, tachycardia, and mild dehydration. The clinical features were suggestive of strangulated left inguinal hernia and further imaging and surgical exploration revealed it to be an infected hydrocele of the canal of Nuck. High ligation and hydrocelectomy were performed. Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck in a female child presenting with an inguinal swelling should be considered in differential diagnosis.

  16. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate

  17. Mechanics of the Panama Canal slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, George F.

    1917-01-01

    Dr. Becker visited the Canal Zone in 1913 as a geologist of the United States Geological Survey and since that time has given the problem the benefit of his study. His appointment as a member of the committee of the National Academy of Sciences has made it appropriate for his conclusions, based upon his personal observations and already reported in part to the Canal Commission, to be stated for the benefit of his associates and other American scientists and engineers.

  18. Experimental analysis of considering the sound pressure distribution pattern at the ear canal entrance as an unrevealed head-related localization clue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Xin; QI Na; MENG Zihou

    2018-01-01

    By analyzing the differences between binaural recording and real listening,it was deduced that there were some unrevealed auditory localization clues,and the sound pressure distribution pattern at the entrance of ear canal was probably a clue.It was proved through the listening test that the unrevealed auditory localization clues really exist with the reduction to absurdity.And the effective frequency bands of the unrevealed localization clues were induced and summed.The result of finite element based simulations showed that the pressure distribution at the entrance of ear canal was non-uniform,and the pattern was related to the direction of sound source.And it was proved that the sound pressure distribution pattern at the entrance of the ear canal carried the sound source direction information and could be used as an unrevealed localization cluc.The frequency bands in which the sound pressure distribution patterns had significant differences between front and back sound source directions were roughly matched with the effective frequency bands of unrevealed localization clues obtained from the listening tests.To some extent,it supports the hypothesis that the sound pressure distribution pattern could be a kind of unrevealed auditory localization clues.

  19. Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Lampl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.

  20. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  1. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-01-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  2. Effects of incongruent auditory and visual room-related cues on sound externalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvajal, Juan Camilo Gil; Santurette, Sébastien; Cubick, Jens

    Sounds presented via headphones are typically perceived inside the head. However, the illusion of a sound source located out in space away from the listener’s head can be generated with binaural headphone-based auralization systems by convolving anechoic sound signals with a binaural room impulse...... response (BRIR) measured with miniature microphones placed in the listener’s ear canals. Sound externalization of such virtual sounds can be very convincing and robust but there have been reports that the illusion might break down when the listening environment differs from the room in which the BRIRs were...... recorded [1,2,3]. This may be due to incongruent auditory cues between the recording and playback room during sound reproduction [2]. Alternatively, an expectation effect caused by the visual impression of the room may affect the position of the perceived auditory image [3]. Here, we systematically...

  3. Posterior semicircular canal dehiscence: a morphologic cause of vertigo similar to superior semicircular canal dehiscence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krombach, G.A.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W.; DiMartino, E.; Prescher, A.; Kinzel, S.

    2003-01-01

    Heading Abstract.The aim of this study was to assess imaging findings of posterior semicircular dehiscence on computed tomography and to evaluate incidence of posterior and superior semicircular canal dehiscence in patients presenting with vertigo, sensorineuronal hearing loss or in a control group without symptoms related to the inner ear. Computed tomography was performed in 507 patients presenting either with vertigo (n=128; 23 of these patients suffered also from sensorineuronal hearing loss), other symptoms related to the inner ear, such as hearing loss or tinnitus (n=183) or symptoms unrelated to the labyrinth (n=196). All images were reviewed for presence of dehiscence of the bone, overlying the semicircular canals. Twenty-nine patients had superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Of these patients, 83% presented with vertigo, 10% with hearing loss or tinnitus and the remaining 7% with symptoms unrelated to the inner ear. In 23 patients dehiscence of the posterior semicircular canal was encountered. Of these patients, 86% presented with vertigo, 9% with hearing loss or tinnitus and 5% with symptoms unrelated to the inner ear. Defects of the bony overly are found at the posterior semicircular canal, in addition to the recently introduced superior canal dehiscence syndrome. Significant prevalence of vertigo in these patients suggests that posterior semicircular canal dehiscence can cause vertigo, similar to superior semicircular canal dehiscence. (orig.)

  4. Industrial canal waterfronts in The Netherlands : transforming the canal zones of B5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curulli, G.I.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Canal Waterfronts in The Netherlands provides a comprehensive presentation of the characteristics and challenges of five interconnected and dismissed industrial canal zones located in the Dutch Brabant cities of Eindhoven, Breda, Tilburg, s’-Hertogenbosch and Helmond (B5). Through the

  5. Posterior semicircular canal dehiscence: a morphologic cause of vertigo similar to superior semicircular canal dehiscence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krombach, G A; Schmitz-Rode, T; Haage, P; Guenther, R W [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); DiMartino, E [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Prescher, A [Department of Anatomy, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Kinzel, S [Department of Experimental Veterinarian Medicine, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Heading Abstract.The aim of this study was to assess imaging findings of posterior semicircular dehiscence on computed tomography and to evaluate incidence of posterior and superior semicircular canal dehiscence in patients presenting with vertigo, sensorineuronal hearing loss or in a control group without symptoms related to the inner ear. Computed tomography was performed in 507 patients presenting either with vertigo (n=128; 23 of these patients suffered also from sensorineuronal hearing loss), other symptoms related to the inner ear, such as hearing loss or tinnitus (n=183) or symptoms unrelated to the labyrinth (n=196). All images were reviewed for presence of dehiscence of the bone, overlying the semicircular canals. Twenty-nine patients had superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Of these patients, 83% presented with vertigo, 10% with hearing loss or tinnitus and the remaining 7% with symptoms unrelated to the inner ear. In 23 patients dehiscence of the posterior semicircular canal was encountered. Of these patients, 86% presented with vertigo, 9% with hearing loss or tinnitus and 5% with symptoms unrelated to the inner ear. Defects of the bony overly are found at the posterior semicircular canal, in addition to the recently introduced superior canal dehiscence syndrome. Significant prevalence of vertigo in these patients suggests that posterior semicircular canal dehiscence can cause vertigo, similar to superior semicircular canal dehiscence. (orig.)

  6. 77 FR 42644 - Safety Zone; Canal Fest of the Tonawandas, Erie Canal, Tonawanda, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    .... ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the... Canal during the Canal Fest of the Tonawandas Fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with a fireworks display. DATES: This...

  7. Pre-Attentive Auditory Processing of Lexicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Horvath, Janos; Schroger, Erich; Lattner, Sonja; Widmann, Andreas; Winkler, Istvan

    2004-01-01

    The effects of lexicality on auditory change detection based on auditory sensory memory representations were investigated by presenting oddball sequences of repeatedly presented stimuli, while participants ignored the auditory stimuli. In a cross-linguistic study of Hungarian and German participants, stimulus sequences were composed of words that…

  8. Feature Assignment in Perception of Auditory Figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Melissa K.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2012-01-01

    Because the environment often includes multiple sounds that overlap in time, listeners must segregate a sound of interest (the auditory figure) from other co-occurring sounds (the unattended auditory ground). We conducted a series of experiments to clarify the principles governing the extraction of auditory figures. We distinguish between auditory…

  9. Auditory-visual integration in fields of the auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Michinori; Sugimoto, Shunji; Hosokawa, Yutaka; Ojima, Hisayuki; Horikawa, Junsei

    2017-03-01

    While multimodal interactions have been known to exist in the early sensory cortices, the response properties and spatiotemporal organization of these interactions are poorly understood. To elucidate the characteristics of multimodal sensory interactions in the cerebral cortex, neuronal responses to visual stimuli with or without auditory stimuli were investigated in core and belt fields of guinea pig auditory cortex using real-time optical imaging with a voltage-sensitive dye. On average, visual responses consisted of short excitation followed by long inhibition. Although visual responses were observed in core and belt fields, there were regional and temporal differences in responses. The most salient visual responses were observed in the caudal belt fields, especially posterior (P) and dorsocaudal belt (DCB) fields. Visual responses emerged first in fields P and DCB and then spread rostroventrally to core and ventrocaudal belt (VCB) fields. Absolute values of positive and negative peak amplitudes of visual responses were both larger in fields P and DCB than in core and VCB fields. When combined visual and auditory stimuli were applied, fields P and DCB were more inhibited than core and VCB fields beginning approximately 110 ms after stimuli. Correspondingly, differences between responses to auditory stimuli alone and combined audiovisual stimuli became larger in fields P and DCB than in core and VCB fields after approximately 110 ms after stimuli. These data indicate that visual influences are most salient in fields P and DCB, which manifest mainly as inhibition, and that they enhance differences in auditory responses among fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in Properties of Auditory Nerve Synapses following Conductive Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaowen; Sun, Wei; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A

    2017-01-11

    Auditory activity plays an important role in the development of the auditory system. Decreased activity can result from conductive hearing loss (CHL) associated with otitis media, which may lead to long-term perceptual deficits. The effects of CHL have been mainly studied at later stages of the auditory pathway, but early stages remain less examined. However, changes in early stages could be important because they would affect how information about sounds is conveyed to higher-order areas for further processing and localization. We examined the effects of CHL at auditory nerve synapses onto bushy cells in the mouse anteroventral cochlear nucleus following occlusion of the ear canal. These synapses, called endbulbs of Held, normally show strong depression in voltage-clamp recordings in brain slices. After 1 week of CHL, endbulbs showed even greater depression, reflecting higher release probability. We observed no differences in quantal size between control and occluded mice. We confirmed these observations using mean-variance analysis and the integration method, which also revealed that the number of release sites decreased after occlusion. Consistent with this, synaptic puncta immunopositive for VGLUT1 decreased in area after occlusion. The level of depression and number of release sites both showed recovery after returning to normal conditions. Finally, bushy cells fired fewer action potentials in response to evoked synaptic activity after occlusion, likely because of increased depression and decreased input resistance. These effects appear to reflect a homeostatic, adaptive response of auditory nerve synapses to reduced activity. These effects may have important implications for perceptual changes following CHL. Normal hearing is important to everyday life, but abnormal auditory experience during development can lead to processing disorders. For example, otitis media reduces sound to the ear, which can cause long-lasting deficits in language skills and verbal

  11. Root canal treatment and special needs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, E; Parashos, P; Borromeo, G L

    2015-04-01

    To identify current trends of root canal treatment for patients with special needs. A postal questionnaire was sent to General Dentists in Victoria, Australia and Endodontists and Special Needs Dentists across Australia to determine the extent of root canal treatment performed on special needs patients. Over a four-month period, 1120 questionnaires were distributed with an overall response rate of 63.9% (n = 716). Response rates were 63.2% (n = 655), 68.5% (n = 50) and 100.0% (n = 11) amongst General Dentists, Endodontists and Special Needs Dentists, respectively. Endodontists (95.7%) and Special Needs Dentists (100.0%) performed significantly more root canal treatment on adult patients with special needs compared with 51.2% of General Dentists, (P special needs patients compared with only 29.7% of General Dentists (P special needs patients was more likely to be carried out by specialist dental practitioners who were more likely to utilize a pharmacological approach for behaviour guidance and to perform single-visit root canal treatment compared with General Dentists. A multidisciplinary approach for special needs patients who require root canal treatment provides an opportunity for these patients to retain their dentition. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cancer of the external auditory canal and middle ear in Denmark from 1992 to 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Gundgaard, Maria G; Hoff, Camilla M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the context of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group, nationwide material from 1992-2001 was analyzed to study the extent and nature of the disease, evaluate treatment, compare staging systems, and examine prognosis and survival. METHODS: Review of 68 consecutive cases: 47 squamous...

  13. Auditory and audio-visual processing in patients with cochlear, auditory brainstem, and auditory midbrain implants: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierholz, Irina; Finke, Mareike; Kral, Andrej; Büchner, Andreas; Rach, Stefan; Lenarz, Thomas; Dengler, Reinhard; Sandmann, Pascale

    2017-04-01

    There is substantial variability in speech recognition ability across patients with cochlear implants (CIs), auditory brainstem implants (ABIs), and auditory midbrain implants (AMIs). To better understand how this variability is related to central processing differences, the current electroencephalography (EEG) study compared hearing abilities and auditory-cortex activation in patients with electrical stimulation at different sites of the auditory pathway. Three different groups of patients with auditory implants (Hannover Medical School; ABI: n = 6, CI: n = 6; AMI: n = 2) performed a speeded response task and a speech recognition test with auditory, visual, and audio-visual stimuli. Behavioral performance and cortical processing of auditory and audio-visual stimuli were compared between groups. ABI and AMI patients showed prolonged response times on auditory and audio-visual stimuli compared with NH listeners and CI patients. This was confirmed by prolonged N1 latencies and reduced N1 amplitudes in ABI and AMI patients. However, patients with central auditory implants showed a remarkable gain in performance when visual and auditory input was combined, in both speech and non-speech conditions, which was reflected by a strong visual modulation of auditory-cortex activation in these individuals. In sum, the results suggest that the behavioral improvement for audio-visual conditions in central auditory implant patients is based on enhanced audio-visual interactions in the auditory cortex. Their findings may provide important implications for the optimization of electrical stimulation and rehabilitation strategies in patients with central auditory prostheses. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2206-2225, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  15. Molecular approach of auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Magali Aparecida Orate Menezes da; Piatto, Vânia Belintani; Maniglia, Jose Victor

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the otoferlin gene are responsible for auditory neuropathy. To investigate the prevalence of mutations in the mutations in the otoferlin gene in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. This original cross-sectional case study evaluated 16 index cases with auditory neuropathy, 13 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, and 20 normal-hearing subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the mutations in the otoferlin gene sites were amplified by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. The 16 index cases included nine (56%) females and seven (44%) males. The 13 deaf patients comprised seven (54%) males and six (46%) females. Among the 20 normal-hearing subjects, 13 (65%) were males and seven were (35%) females. Thirteen (81%) index cases had wild-type genotype (AA) and three (19%) had the heterozygous AG genotype for IVS8-2A-G (intron 8) mutation. The 5473C-G (exon 44) mutation was found in a heterozygous state (CG) in seven (44%) index cases and nine (56%) had the wild-type allele (CC). Of these mutants, two (25%) were compound heterozygotes for the mutations found in intron 8 and exon 44. All patients with sensorineural hearing loss and normal-hearing individuals did not have mutations (100%). There are differences at the molecular level in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamics of auditory working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eKaiser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Working memory denotes the ability to retain stimuli in mind that are no longer physically present and to perform mental operations on them. Electro- and magnetoencephalography allow investigating the short-term maintenance of acoustic stimuli at a high temporal resolution. Studies investigating working memory for non-spatial and spatial auditory information have suggested differential roles of regions along the putative auditory ventral and dorsal streams, respectively, in the processing of the different sound properties. Analyses of event-related potentials have shown sustained, memory load-dependent deflections over the retention periods. The topography of these waves suggested an involvement of modality-specific sensory storage regions. Spectral analysis has yielded information about the temporal dynamics of auditory working memory processing of individual stimuli, showing activation peaks during the delay phase whose timing was related to task performance. Coherence at different frequencies was enhanced between frontal and sensory cortex. In summary, auditory working memory seems to rely on the dynamic interplay between frontal executive systems and sensory representation regions.

  17. Short-term plasticity in auditory cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Raij, Tommi; Sams, Mikko

    2007-12-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that auditory system short-term plasticity can enable several perceptual and cognitive functions that have been previously considered as relatively distinct phenomena. Here we review recent findings suggesting that auditory stimulation, auditory selective attention and cross-modal effects of visual stimulation each cause transient excitatory and (surround) inhibitory modulations in the auditory cortex. These modulations might adaptively tune hierarchically organized sound feature maps of the auditory cortex (e.g. tonotopy), thus filtering relevant sounds during rapidly changing environmental and task demands. This could support auditory sensory memory, pre-attentive detection of sound novelty, enhanced perception during selective attention, influence of visual processing on auditory perception and longer-term plastic changes associated with perceptual learning.

  18. Computed tomography in lumbar canal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shu; Baba, Itsushi; Ishida, Akihisa; Sumida, Tadayuki; Sasaki, Seishu

    1984-01-01

    Preoperative CT was done in 39 patients with lumbar canal stenosis. Marked symmetrical narrowing of the whole vertebral canal was seen in the group with nervous symptoms in the cauda equina. Deformed bilateral intervertebral joints were seen in the group with both nervous symptoms in the cauda equina and radicular sciatica. The lateral recess on the affected side was markedly narrowed by the projection of the upper and lower joints and herniation. In the group with radicular sciatica, the vertebral canal itself was not so narrowed, but the unilateral intervertebral joint was extremely deformed, causing a narrowing of the lateral recess. There were large differences in the angle of the left and right intervertebral joints. (Namekawa, K)

  19. Canal shaping of different single-file systems in curved root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio D'Amario

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: This study compared maintenance of canal anatomy, occurrence of apical transportation, and working time observed after instrumentation with One Shape New Generation rotary system (Micro-Mega, with those observed after instrumentation with Reciproc (VDW and WaveOne (Dentsply-Maillefer reciprocating systems. Materials and methods: The mesial canals of 45 mandibular molars (curvature angles between 35° and 45° were selected. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups, and canal preparations were performed using One Shape, Reciproc, or WaveOne systems (size #25. A digital double radiographic technique was used to determine apical transportation and change in angle of curvature. Also, working time and instrument failures were recorded. Data were statistically analyzed. Results: During preparation, no file fractured. No statistically significant differences were found among groups. No system showed a significantly faster preparation time than others (P>0.05. All instruments maintained the original canal curvature well and were safe to use. Conclusion: Both continuous rotary instrument and reciprocating systems did not have any influence on the presence of apical transportation or caused an alteration in angle of canal curvature. Keywords: canal curvature, canal straightening, endodontics, reciprocating motion, single file instrumentation

  20. Decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in root-canal exudates during root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamapun, Kassara; Handagoon, Sira; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Gutmann, James L; Pavasant, Prasit; Krisanaprakornkit, Suttichai

    2017-10-01

    To determine the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) levels in root-canal exudates from teeth undergoing root-canal treatment. The root-canal exudates from six teeth with normal pulp and periradicular tissues that required intentional root canal treatment for prosthodontic reasons and from twelve teeth with pulp necrosis and asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP) were sampled with paper points for bacterial culture and aspirated for the detection of proMMP-2 and active MMP-2 by gelatin zymography and the quantification of MMP-2 levels by ELISA. By gelatin zymography, both proMMP-2 and active MMP-2 were detected in the first collection of root-canal exudates from teeth with pulp necrosis and AAP, but not from teeth with normal pulp, and their levels gradually decreased and disappeared at the last collection. Consistently, ELISA demonstrated a significant decrease in MMP-2 levels in the root-canal exudates of teeth with pulp necrosis and AAP following root canal procedures (papical lesions, similar to the clinical application of MMP-8 as a biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Otolith and canal reflexes in human standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathers, Ian; Day, Brian L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2005-01-01

    We used galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to identify human balance reflexes of the semicircular canals and otolith organs. The experiment used a model of vestibular signals arising from GVS modulation of the net signal from vestibular afferents. With the head upright, the model predicts that the GVS-evoked canal signal indicates lateral head rotation while the otolith signal indicates lateral tilt or acceleration. Both signify body sway transverse to the head. With the head bent forward, the model predicts that the canal signal indicates body spin about a vertical axis but the otolith signal still signifies lateral body motion. Thus, we compared electromyograms (EMG) in the leg muscles and body sway evoked by GVS when subjects stood with the head upright or bent forward. With the head upright, GVS evoked a large sway in the direction of the anodal electrode. This response was abolished with the head bent forward leaving only small, oppositely directed, transient responses at the start and end of the stimulus. With the head upright, GVS evoked short-latency (60–70 ms), followed by medium-latency (120 ms) EMG responses, of opposite polarity. Bending the head forward abolished the medium-latency but preserved the short-latency response. This is compatible with GVS evoking separate otolithic and canal reflexes, indicating that balance is controlled by independent canal and otolith reflexes, probably through different pathways. We propose that the short-latency reflex and small transient sway are driven by the otolith organs and the medium-latency response and the large sway are driven by the semicircular canals. PMID:15618274

  2. Cerebrospinal otorrhoea--a temporal bone report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walby, A P

    1988-05-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal otorrhoea is a rare complication of a cholesteatoma. The histological findings in a temporal bone from such a case are reported. The cholesteatoma had eroded deeply through the vestibule into the internal auditory meatus.

  3. Incidence and characteristics of mandibular accessory canals: A radiographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Taschieri, Silvio; Vavassori, Virna; Re, Dino; Francetti, Luca; Corbella, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore, through tridimensional reconstructions of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, the presence and the characteristics of mandibular accessory canals. For each included participant, the presence of accessory canals was recorded. The diameter of the canal, as well as the distance between the canal walls and the walls of the mandibular bone (lingual, buccal, cranial and caudal), were measured and recorded. Mandibular accessory canals could be found in 8.8% of participants. Retromolar canals were the most frequently found accessory mandibular canals. Accessory mandibular canals were found in a relatively high number of participants through the examination of CBCT scans and tridimensional reconstruction. The presence of such structures should be considered cautiously when planning and performing surgical interventions in mandibular area. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Radiographic versus electronic root canal working length determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumnije Kqiku

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The present ex vivo study showed that electronic root canal working length determination is not superior to radiographic methods. Both methods provided a good performance in determining the root canal working length.

  5. Report from the Panama Canal Stakeholder Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This project assists the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) in assessing the potential impacts of the Panama Canal expansion on Texas ports and the landside transportation system. TxDOT formed a Panama Canal Stakeholder Working Group (PCSWG) ...

  6. Rapid Auditory System Adaptation Using a Virtual Auditory Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Parseihian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have highlighted plasticity of the auditory system from visual stimuli, limiting the trained field of perception. The aim of the present study is to investigate auditory system adaptation using an audio-kinesthetic platform. Participants were placed in a Virtual Auditory Environment allowing the association of the physical position of a virtual sound source with an alternate set of acoustic spectral cues or Head-Related Transfer Function (HRTF through the use of a tracked ball manipulated by the subject. This set-up has the advantage to be not being limited to the visual field while also offering a natural perception-action coupling through the constant awareness of one's hand position. Adaptation process to non-individualized HRTF was realized through a spatial search game application. A total of 25 subjects participated, consisting of subjects presented with modified cues using non-individualized HRTF and a control group using individual measured HRTFs to account for any learning effect due to the game itself. The training game lasted 12 minutes and was repeated over 3 consecutive days. Adaptation effects were measured with repeated localization tests. Results showed a significant performance improvement for vertical localization and a significant reduction in the front/back confusion rate after 3 sessions.

  7. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaharu Tabuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked.

  8. Adaptation in the auditory system: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePérez-González

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The early stages of the auditory system need to preserve the timing information of sounds in order to extract the basic features of acoustic stimuli. At the same time, different processes of neuronal adaptation occur at several levels to further process the auditory information. For instance, auditory nerve fiber responses already experience adaptation of their firing rates, a type of response that can be found in many other auditory nuclei and may be useful for emphasizing the onset of the stimuli. However, it is at higher levels in the auditory hierarchy where more sophisticated types of neuronal processing take place. For example, stimulus-specific adaptation, where neurons show adaptation to frequent, repetitive stimuli, but maintain their responsiveness to stimuli with different physical characteristics, thus representing a distinct kind of processing that may play a role in change and deviance detection. In the auditory cortex, adaptation takes more elaborate forms, and contributes to the processing of complex sequences, auditory scene analysis and attention. Here we review the multiple types of adaptation that occur in the auditory system, which are part of the pool of resources that the neurons employ to process the auditory scene, and are critical to a proper understanding of the neuronal mechanisms that govern auditory perception.

  9. Lumbar Vertebral Canal Diameters in Adult Ugandan Skeletons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Normal values of lumbar vertebral canal diameters are useful in facilitating diagnosis of lumbar vertebral canal stenosis. Various studies have established variation on values between different populations, gender, age, and ethnic groups. Objectives: To determine the lumbar vertebral canal diameters in adult ...

  10. Newer Root Canal Irrigants in Horizon: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Jaju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium hypochloride is the most commonly used endodontic irrigant, despite limitations. None of the presently available root canal irrigants satisfy the requirements of ideal root canal irrigant. Newer root canal irrigants are studied for potential replacement of sodium hypochloride. This article reviews the potential irrigants with their advantages and limitations with their future in endodontic irrigation.

  11. Comparison of Curved Root Canals Prepared with Various Chelating Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    aqueous base (11). According to Bramante and Betti, instrumentation with NiTi hand files using EDTA caused greater deviation of the root canal from...15. Peters OA, Peters CI, Schonenberger K, Barbakow F. ProTaper rotary root canal preparation: effects of canal anatomy on final shape analysed by

  12. Middle mesial canals in mandibular molars: incidence and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Ali; Deschenes, Raney J; Tordik, Patricia A; Hicks, M Lamar; Fouad, Ashraf F

    2015-01-01

    Although the internal anatomy of mandibular molars has been extensively studied, information about middle mesial (MM) canals is limited. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence of MM canals in mandibular first and second molars. The secondary aim was to correlate the incidence of MM canals with variables of molar type, sex, age, ethnicity, and presence of a second distal canal. All mature permanent first and second mandibular molars treated from August 2012 to May 2014 were included in the analysis. After completion of root canal instrumentation in all main canals, the clinician inspected the isthmus area of the mesial root using the dental operating microscope. If there was a catch point in this area with a file or explorer, the operator spent more time attempting to negotiate an MM canal. Seventy-five mandibular first and second molars were treated during the specified period. Fifteen (20%) teeth had negotiable MM canals. The incidence of MM canals was 32.1% in patients ≤ 20 years old, 23.8% in patients 21-40 years old, and 3.8% in patients > 40 years. Analysis of data revealed a significant difference in the distribution of MM canals among different age groups (P molar type, and presence of a second distal canal were not significant. The incidence of negotiable MM canals overall and their frequency of identification in younger patients were higher than in previous reports. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended...

  14. Effect of delayed auditory feedback on stuttering with and without central auditory processing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoloto, Luana Altran; Cardoso, Ana Cláudia Vieira; Cerqueira, Amanda Venuti; Oliveira, Cristiane Moço Canhetti de

    2017-12-07

    To verify the effect of delayed auditory feedback on speech fluency of individuals who stutter with and without central auditory processing disorders. The participants were twenty individuals with stuttering from 7 to 17 years old and were divided into two groups: Stuttering Group with Auditory Processing Disorders (SGAPD): 10 individuals with central auditory processing disorders, and Stuttering Group (SG): 10 individuals without central auditory processing disorders. Procedures were: fluency assessment with non-altered auditory feedback (NAF) and delayed auditory feedback (DAF), assessment of the stuttering severity and central auditory processing (CAP). Phono Tools software was used to cause a delay of 100 milliseconds in the auditory feedback. The "Wilcoxon Signal Post" test was used in the intragroup analysis and "Mann-Whitney" test in the intergroup analysis. The DAF caused a statistically significant reduction in SG: in the frequency score of stuttering-like disfluencies in the analysis of the Stuttering Severity Instrument, in the amount of blocks and repetitions of monosyllabic words, and in the frequency of stuttering-like disfluencies of duration. Delayed auditory feedback did not cause statistically significant effects on SGAPD fluency, individuals with stuttering with auditory processing disorders. The effect of delayed auditory feedback in speech fluency of individuals who stutter was different in individuals of both groups, because there was an improvement in fluency only in individuals without auditory processing disorder.

  15. Periapical repair after root canal filling with different root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Tanomaru, Juliane Maria Guerreiro; Leonardo, Mario Roberto; da Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate periapical repair after root canal filling with different endodontic sealers. Sixty-four root canals from dog s teeth were filled, divided into 4 groups (n=16). Root canals were instrumented with K-type files and irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Root canals were filled in the same session by active lateral condensation of the cones and sealers: Intrafill, AH Plus, Roeko Seal and Resilon/Epiphany System. After 90 days, the animals were euthanized and the tissues to be evaluated were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. For histopathological analysis, the following parameters were evaluated: inflammatory process, mineralized tissue resorption, and apical mineralized tissue deposition. Histopathological analysis demonstrated that Intrafill had less favorable results in terms of apical and periapical repair, compared to the other sealers (p0.05). In conclusion, AH Plus and the materials Roeko Seal and Epiphany are good options for clinical use in Endodontics.

  16. Reality of auditory verbal hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raij, Tuukka T; Valkonen-Korhonen, Minna; Holi, Matti; Therman, Sebastian; Lehtonen, Johannes; Hari, Riitta

    2009-11-01

    Distortion of the sense of reality, actualized in delusions and hallucinations, is the key feature of psychosis but the underlying neuronal correlates remain largely unknown. We studied 11 highly functioning subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder while they rated the reality of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The subjective reality of AVH correlated strongly and specifically with the hallucination-related activation strength of the inferior frontal gyri (IFG), including the Broca's language region. Furthermore, how real the hallucination that subjects experienced was depended on the hallucination-related coupling between the IFG, the ventral striatum, the auditory cortex, the right posterior temporal lobe, and the cingulate cortex. Our findings suggest that the subjective reality of AVH is related to motor mechanisms of speech comprehension, with contributions from sensory and salience-detection-related brain regions as well as circuitries related to self-monitoring and the experience of agency.

  17. The Suez Canal and the petroleum harbors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Suez Canal is the second longest channel in the world and allows to save 60% of the travel time between the petroleum harbors of the Arabic peninsula and Europe. This short paper gives a summary of the main petroleum harbors activity along the channel from the Red sea to the Mediterranean sea. (J.S.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  19. Note on Tendipedidae of the Suez Canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruseman, G.

    1949-01-01

    Mr. A. C. V. VAN BEMMEL and Dr. A. DIAKONOFF of the Buitenzorg Museum (Java) collected Tendipedidae, which were attracted by artificial lights, when they passed the Suez Canal on 8-XI-1937 and 16-V-1939 respectively. This very interesting collection, containing some new species, was sent to me for

  20. The crazy project – Canal Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Kundak

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It was late April 2011 when “the Crazy Project - Canal Istanbul” was proposed by the Prime Minister of Turkey, during his election campaign.  Although the idea of an artificial canal is not new, since it is initiated without any consensus between the people and institutions in Istanbul, the project immediately set a large number of debates. These vary from the legitimacy of decentralization of governance, to potential impacts of the canal on international politics, economy, environment and urban life.  Regarding past infrastructure projects in Istanbul, such large scale investments have caused extensive acceleration in construction sector in one hand and social and economic shifts on the other.  In this paper, the Canal Istanbul Project is evaluated according to basic motivations and claims of the PM, multi-perspective view through challenges and limitation that the project is likely to face with and speculations on implementation approach. The final discussion on the project is based on benefits/losses of Istanbul once the project will be implemented.

  1. Anatomic study on mental canal and incisive nerve canal in interforaminal region in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Suo, Ning; Tian, Xiufen; Li, Fei; Zhong, Guangxin; Liu, Xiaoran; Bao, Yongxing; Song, Tao; Tian, Hua

    2015-08-01

    This study was aimed to detect the positions of mental canal and incisive nerve canal as well as the prolongation of mandibular canal in interforaminal region in Chinese population to supply the reference data of the surgical safe zone in chin for clinicians. A total of 80 formalin-fixed semi-mandibles of Chinese adult cadavers were dissected, the positions and courses of mental canal and incisive nerve canal as well as the prolongation of mandibular canal in interforaminal region were measured. The mental foramina were present in all cases (100 %), and most of them were located below 2nd premolar (58.75 %). Accessory mental foramina were observed in 5 %. The anterior end of mandibular canal, extending along the course of 7.37 ± 1.10 mm above the lower border of mandible to interforaminal region about 3.54 ± 0.70 mm medial to the mental foramen, most often ended below between the two premolars (73.75 %), where it continued as the incisive nerve canal (100 %) and the mental canal (96.25 %). Mental canal, with the wall formed by compact bone, being 2.60 ± 0.60 mm in diameter and 4.01 ± 1.20 mm in length, opened into mental foramen. Incisive nerve canal, with the wall formed by thin compact bone and/or partly or completely by spongy bone, being 1.76 ± 0.27 mm in diameter and 24.87 ± 2.23 mm in length, extended to the incisor region along the course of 9.53 ± 1.43 mm above the lower border of mandible, and most often ended below the lateral incisor (70.00 %). This research recommended for chin operations in Chinese population: the surgical safe zone could be set in the region about over 4 mm anterior to the mental foramen, and over 12 mm above inferior border of mandible for anterior alveolar surgery, or within 9 mm above inferior border of mandible for genioplasty.

  2. Laterality of basic auditory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sininger, Yvonne S; Bhatara, Anjali

    2012-01-01

    Laterality (left-right ear differences) of auditory processing was assessed using basic auditory skills: (1) gap detection, (2) frequency discrimination, and (3) intensity discrimination. Stimuli included tones (500, 1000, and 4000 Hz) and wide-band noise presented monaurally to each ear of typical adult listeners. The hypothesis tested was that processing of tonal stimuli would be enhanced by left ear (LE) stimulation and noise by right ear (RE) presentations. To investigate the limits of laterality by (1) spectral width, a narrow-band noise (NBN) of 450-Hz bandwidth was evaluated using intensity discrimination, and (2) stimulus duration, 200, 500, and 1000 ms duration tones were evaluated using frequency discrimination. A left ear advantage (LEA) was demonstrated with tonal stimuli in all experiments, but an expected REA for noise stimuli was not found. The NBN stimulus demonstrated no LEA and was characterised as a noise. No change in laterality was found with changes in stimulus durations. The LEA for tonal stimuli is felt to be due to more direct connections between the left ear and the right auditory cortex, which has been shown to be primary for spectral analysis and tonal processing. The lack of a REA for noise stimuli is unexplained. Sex differences in laterality for noise stimuli were noted but were not statistically significant. This study did establish a subtle but clear pattern of LEA for processing of tonal stimuli.

  3. MR determination of neonatal spinal canal depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Owen; Thayyil, Sudhin; Wade, Angie; Chong, W K Kling; Sebire, Neil J; Taylor, Andrew M

    2012-08-01

    Lumbar punctures (LPs) are frequently performed in neonates and often result in traumatic haemorrhagic taps. Knowledge of the distance from the skin to the middle of the spinal canal (mid-spinal canal depth - MSCD) may reduce the incidence of traumatic taps, but there is little data in extremely premature or low birth weight neonates. Here, we determined the spinal canal depth at post-mortem in perinatal deaths using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Spinal canal depth was measured in 78 post-mortem foetuses and perinatal cases (mean gestation 26 weeks; mean weight 1.04kg) at the L3/L4 inter-vertebral space at post-mortem MRI. Both anterior (ASCD) and posterior (PSCD) spinal canal depth were measured; MSCD was calculated and modelled against weight and gestational age. ASCD and PSCD (mm) correlated significantly with weight and gestational age (all r>0.8). A simple linear model MSCD (mm)=3×Weight (kg)+5 was the best fit, identifying an SCD value within the correct range for 87.2% (68/78) (95% CI (78.0, 92.9%)) cases. Gestational age did not add significantly to the predictive value of the model. There is a significant correlation between MSCD and body weight at post-mortem MRI in foetuses and perinatal deaths. If this association holds in preterm neonates, use of the formula MSCD (mm)=3×Weight (kg)+5 could result in fewer traumatic LPs in this population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MR determination of neonatal spinal canal depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen, E-mail: owenarthurs@uk2.net [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London WC1N 3JH (United Kingdom); Thayyil, Sudhin, E-mail: s.thayyil@ucl.ac.uk [Academic Neonatology, Institute for Women' s Health, London WC1E 6AU (United Kingdom); Wade, Angie, E-mail: a.wade@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Chong, W.K., E-mail: Kling.Chong@gosh.nhs.uk [Paediatric Neuroradiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J., E-mail: Neil.Sebire@gosh.nhs.uk [Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London WC1E 6AU (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M., E-mail: a.taylor76@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Cardiorespiratory Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London WC1E 6AU (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: Lumbar punctures (LPs) are frequently performed in neonates and often result in traumatic haemorrhagic taps. Knowledge of the distance from the skin to the middle of the spinal canal (mid-spinal canal depth - MSCD) may reduce the incidence of traumatic taps, but there is little data in extremely premature or low birth weight neonates. Here, we determined the spinal canal depth at post-mortem in perinatal deaths using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and methods: Spinal canal depth was measured in 78 post-mortem foetuses and perinatal cases (mean gestation 26 weeks; mean weight 1.04 kg) at the L3/L4 inter-vertebral space at post-mortem MRI. Both anterior (ASCD) and posterior (PSCD) spinal canal depth were measured; MSCD was calculated and modelled against weight and gestational age. Results: ASCD and PSCD (mm) correlated significantly with weight and gestational age (all r > 0.8). A simple linear model MSCD (mm) = 3 Multiplication-Sign Weight (kg) + 5 was the best fit, identifying an SCD value within the correct range for 87.2% (68/78) (95% CI (78.0, 92.9%)) cases. Gestational age did not add significantly to the predictive value of the model. Conclusion: There is a significant correlation between MSCD and body weight at post-mortem MRI in foetuses and perinatal deaths. If this association holds in preterm neonates, use of the formula MSCD (mm) = 3 Multiplication-Sign Weight (kg) + 5 could result in fewer traumatic LPs in this population.

  5. Anomalous facial nerve canal with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, L V; Curtin, H D

    2001-05-01

    Anteromedial "migration" of the first segment of the facial nerve canal has been previously identified in a patient with a non-Mondini-type cochlear malformation. In this study, several patients with the same facial nerve canal anomaly were reviewed to assess for the association and type of cochlear malformation. CT scans of the temporal bone of 15 patients with anteromedial migration of the first segment of the facial nerve canal were collected from routine departmental examinations. In seven patients, the anomalous course was bilateral, for a total of 22 cases. The migration was graded relative to normal as either mild/moderate or pronounced. The cochlea in each of these cases was examined for the presence and size of the basilar, second, and apical turns. The turns were either absent, small, normal, or enlarged. The CT scans of five patients with eight Mondini malformations were examined for comparison. The degree of the facial nerve migration was pronounced in nine cases and mild/moderate in 13. All 22 of these cases had associated cochlear abnormalities of the non-Mondini variety. These included common cavity anomalies with lack of definition between the cochlea and vestibule (five cases), cochleae with enlarged basilar turns and absent second or third turns (five cases), and cochleae with small or normal basilar turns with small or absent second or third turns (12 cases). None of the patients with Mondini-type cochlear malformations had anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal. Anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal occurs in association with some cochlear malformations. It did not occur in association with the Mondini malformations. A cochlea with a Mondini malformation, being similar in size to a normal cochlea, may physically prohibit such a deviation in course.

  6. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struck, Aaron F.; Carr, Carrie M.; Shah, Vinil; Hesselink, John R.; Haughton, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  7. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struck, Aaron F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States); Carr, Carrie M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shah, Vinil [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haughton, Victor M. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  8. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Berger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  9. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christopher C; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect-an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  10. Perda auditiva sensório-neural na otite média crônica supurativa em pacientes com e sem colesteatoma Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media with and without cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fernandes de Azevedo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Perda auditiva sensório-neural (PASN relacionada a otite média crônica supurativa (OMCS foi estudada para esclarecer a participação do colesteatoma nesse contexto. OBJETIVO: Avaliar ocorrência de PASN na OMCS, correlacionando com colesteatoma, duração da doença e idade. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de 115 pacientes com OMCS com e sem colesteatoma submetidos à cirurgia. Incluíram-se pacientes com doença unilateral, orelha contralateral normal e idade inferior a 60 anos. RESULTADOS: Idade média foi de 26 anos, sendo 58 homens e 57 mulheres. Tempo médio de duração da doença otológica de 12,4 anos. Limiar auditivo médio foi de 40 dB na orelha com OMCS e 22dB na orelha normal (P=0,002. Observou-se colesteatoma em 78 dos 115 casos. Na orelha com OMCS, ocorreram 15 (13% casos de PASN, sendo 7 associadas à colesteatoma e 8 não associadas. Seis casos de PASN foram severa/profunda, correlacionando-se com idade ajustada (P=0,003, ausência de colesteatoma (P=0,01, mas não com duração da doença (P=0,458. CONCLUSÃO: PASN ocorreu em 13% dos pacientes com OMCS, correlacionando-se com o aumento da idade, mas não com a presença de colesteatoma ou com maior duração da doença otológica.Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL related to chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM was studied to clarify the involvement of cholesteatomas in this context. AIM: to evaluate SNHL related to CSOM and its association with cholesteatomas, disease duration and patients’ ages. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 115 patients with CSOM with and without cholesteatoma submitted to surgical treatment. Inclusion criteria were active unilateral disease, normal contralateral ear and age below 60 years. RESULTS: The average age was 26.3 years, 58 males and 57 females. The duration of ear disease was, in average, 12.4 years. The average threshold of hearing was 40 dB in CSOM ear and 22 dB in the normal contralateral ear (P=0.002. CSOM with

  11. Efeito do ácido trans-retinóico na inibição de colesteatoma em cobaias Effect of trans-retinoic acid in the inhibition of cholesteatoma in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Luiz Antunes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O colesteatoma de orelha média atingia mais de 5 milhões de pessoas até a década de 80. Vários modelos animais já foram utilizados para alternativas de tratamento do colesteatoma sem sucesso. OBJETIVO: Estudar os efeitos do ácido trans-retinóico, uso tópico na orelha externa em cobaias, na inibição da formação do colesteatoma de orelha média induzido pelo propilenoglicol. Estudo experimental prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: 25 cobaias foram submetidas à aplicação de propilenoglicol a 100% na bula timpânica bilateralmente e uma solução de ácido trans-retinóico foi aplicada topicamente (total de 5 aplicações na orelha externa, região justa-timpânica, na orelha direita, enquanto na orelha esquerda aplicou-se solução fisiológica (orelha controle. As cobaias foram sacrificadas após 6 semanas do procedimento inicial e os ossos temporais foram separados, fixados e descalcificados, para análise macroscópica e histológica. RESULTADOS: Os achados macroscópicos evidenciaram a presença e suspeita de colesteatoma em 25% das orelhas direitas e 85% das orelhas esquerdas (P=0,0003*. Os achados histológicos dos 40 ossos temporais evidenciaram a presença de colesteatoma em 30% das orelhas direitas e 75% das orelhas esquerdas (P=0,0104*. CONCLUSÃO: O uso tópico do ácido trans-retinóico é efetivo na inibição da formação de colesteatoma induzido pelo propilenoglicol em cobaias.Middle ear cholesteatoma affected more than 5 million people until the 80`s. Many animal models were used, unsuccessfully, to study an alternative therapy to cholesteatoma. AIM: observe the effect of the trans-retinoic acid in the inhibition of middle ear cholesteatomas induced by propylene glycol. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical and Experimental. METHODS: 25 guinea pigs were submitted to the application of a 100% propylene glycol solution in their bulla bilaterally and a solution of trans-retinoic acid was applied locally in the external right ear, while

  12. Maxillary First Molars with 2 Distobuccal Canals: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Howard M; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2017-11-01

    An appreciation of the anatomic complexity of the root canal system is essential at every step of endodontic treatment. Endodontic treatment of teeth with unusual root canal anatomy presents a unique challenge. Eight patients underwent nonsurgical root canal treatment of 3-rooted maxillary first molars in a specialty endodontic private practice. Four cases of Weine type II and 4 cases of Weine type III canal configurations in the distobuccal root of maxillary first molars were presented.This article highlighted an uncommon anatomic variation of 2 canals in the distobuccal root of the maxillary first molar. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Working Memory Training on Auditory Stream Segregation in Auditory Processing Disorders Children

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollah Moossavi; Saeideh Mehrkian; Yones Lotfi; Soghrat Faghih zadeh; Hamed Adjedi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the efficacy of working memory training for improving working memory capacity and related auditory stream segregation in auditory processing disorders children. Methods: Fifteen subjects (9-11 years), clinically diagnosed with auditory processing disorder participated in this non-randomized case-controlled trial. Working memory abilities and auditory stream segregation were evaluated prior to beginning and six weeks after completing the training program...

  14. Comparison of the rheological properties of four root canal sealers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seok Woo Chang; Kwang Shik Bae; Young-Kyu Lee; Qiang Zhu; Won Jun Shon; Woo Cheol Lee; Kee Yeon Kum; Seung Ho Baek; In Bog Lee; Bum-Soon Lim

    2015-01-01

    The flowability of a root canal sealer is clinically important because it improves the penetration of the sealer into the complex root canal system. The purpose of this study was to compare the flowabilities of four root canal sealers, measured using the simple press method (ISO 6876), and their viscosities, measured using a strain-controlled rheometer. A newly developed, calcium phosphate-based root canal sealer (Capseal) and three commercial root canal sealers (AH Plus, Sealapex and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT) were used in this study. The flowabilities of the four root canal sealers were measured using the simple press method (n55) and their viscosities were measured using a strain-controlled rheometer (n55). The correlation between these two values was statistically analysed using Spearman’s correlation test. The flow diameters and the viscosities of the root canal sealers were strongly negatively correlated (r520.8618). The viscosity of Pulp Canal Sealer EWT was the lowest and increased in the following order:AH Plus,Sealapex,Capseal (P,0.05). All of the tested root canal sealers showed characteristic time-and temperature-dependent changes in their rheological properties. The viscosities measured using the strain-controlled rheometer were more precise than the flowabilities measured using the simple press method, suggesting that the rheometer can accurately measure the rheological properties of root canal sealers.

  15. Dorello's Canal for Laymen: A Lego-Like Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Thakur, Jai Deep; Nanda, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Objective Dorello's canal was first described by Gruber in 1859, and later by Dorello. Vail also described the anatomy of Dorello's canal. In the preceding century, Dorello's canal was clinically important, in understanding sixth nerve palsy and nowadays it is mostly important for skull base surgery. The understanding of the three dimensional anatomy, of this canal is very difficult to understand, and there is no simple explanation for its anatomy and its relationship with adjacent structures. We present a simple, Lego-like, presentation of Dorello's canal, in a stepwise manner. Materials and Methods Dorello's canal was dissected in five formalin-fixed cadaver specimens (10 sides). The craniotomy was performed, while preserving the neural and vascular structures associated with the canal. A 3D model was created, to explain the canal's anatomy. Results Using the petrous pyramid, the sixth nerve, the cavernous sinus, the trigeminal ganglion, the petorclival ligament and the posterior clinoid, the three-dimensional structure of Dorello's canal was defined. This simple representation aids in understanding the three dimensional relationship of Dorello's canal to its neighboring structures. Conclusion Dorello's canal with its three dimensional structure and relationship to its neighboring anatomical structures could be reconstructed using a few anatomical building blocks. This method simplifies the understanding of this complex anatomical structure, and could be used for teaching purposes for aspiring neurosurgeons, and anatomy students.

  16. Functional mapping of the primate auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poremba, Amy; Saunders, Richard C; Crane, Alison M; Cook, Michelle; Sokoloff, Louis; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2003-01-24

    Cerebral auditory areas were delineated in the awake, passively listening, rhesus monkey by comparing the rates of glucose utilization in an intact hemisphere and in an acoustically isolated contralateral hemisphere of the same animal. The auditory system defined in this way occupied large portions of cerebral tissue, an extent probably second only to that of the visual system. Cortically, the activated areas included the entire superior temporal gyrus and large portions of the parietal, prefrontal, and limbic lobes. Several auditory areas overlapped with previously identified visual areas, suggesting that the auditory system, like the visual system, contains separate pathways for processing stimulus quality, location, and motion.

  17. Auditory Modeling for Noisy Speech Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... digital filtering for noise cancellation which interfaces to speech recognition software. It uses auditory features in speech recognition training, and provides applications to multilingual spoken language translation...

  18. Auditory prediction during speaking and listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Marc; Shiller, Douglas M

    2018-02-02

    In the present EEG study, the role of auditory prediction in speech was explored through the comparison of auditory cortical responses during active speaking and passive listening to the same acoustic speech signals. Two manipulations of sensory prediction accuracy were used during the speaking task: (1) a real-time change in vowel F1 feedback (reducing prediction accuracy relative to unaltered feedback) and (2) presenting a stable auditory target rather than a visual cue to speak (enhancing auditory prediction accuracy during baseline productions, and potentially enhancing the perturbing effect of altered feedback). While subjects compensated for the F1 manipulation, no difference between the auditory-cue and visual-cue conditions were found. Under visually-cued conditions, reduced N1/P2 amplitude was observed during speaking vs. listening, reflecting a motor-to-sensory prediction. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between the magnitude of behavioral compensatory F1 response and the magnitude of this speaking induced suppression (SIS) for P2 during the altered auditory feedback phase, where a stronger compensatory decrease in F1 was associated with a stronger the SIS effect. Finally, under the auditory-cued condition, an auditory repetition-suppression effect was observed in N1/P2 amplitude during the listening task but not active speaking, suggesting that auditory predictive processes during speaking and passive listening are functionally distinct. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Factors Military Lexicon: Auditory Displays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Letowski, Tomasz

    2001-01-01

    .... In addition to definitions specific to auditory displays, speech communication, and audio technology, the lexicon includes several terms unique to military operational environments and human factors...

  20. Auditory, visual and auditory-visual memory and sequencing performance in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Roshni; Yathiraj, Asha

    2017-09-01

    The study evaluated whether there exists a difference/relation in the way four different memory skills (memory score, sequencing score, memory span, & sequencing span) are processed through the auditory modality, visual modality and combined modalities. Four memory skills were evaluated on 30 typically developing children aged 7 years and 8 years across three modality conditions (auditory, visual, & auditory-visual). Analogous auditory and visual stimuli were presented to evaluate the three modality conditions across the two age groups. The children obtained significantly higher memory scores through the auditory modality compared to the visual modality. Likewise, their memory scores were significantly higher through the auditory-visual modality condition than through the visual modality. However, no effect of modality was observed on the sequencing scores as well as for the memory and the sequencing span. A good agreement was seen between the different modality conditions that were studied (auditory, visual, & auditory-visual) for the different memory skills measures (memory scores, sequencing scores, memory span, & sequencing span). A relatively lower agreement was noted only between the auditory and visual modalities as well as between the visual and auditory-visual modality conditions for the memory scores, measured using Bland-Altman plots. The study highlights the efficacy of using analogous stimuli to assess the auditory, visual as well as combined modalities. The study supports the view that the performance of children on different memory skills was better through the auditory modality compared to the visual modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stuttering adults' lack of pre-speech auditory modulation normalizes when speaking with delayed auditory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Ayoub; Max, Ludo

    2018-02-01

    Auditory modulation during speech movement planning is limited in adults who stutter (AWS), but the functional relevance of the phenomenon itself remains unknown. We investigated for AWS and adults who do not stutter (AWNS) (a) a potential relationship between pre-speech auditory modulation and auditory feedback contributions to speech motor learning and (b) the effect on pre-speech auditory modulation of real-time versus delayed auditory feedback. Experiment I used a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm to estimate auditory-motor speech learning. Using acoustic speech recordings, we quantified subjects' formant frequency adjustments across trials when continually exposed to formant-shifted auditory feedback. In Experiment II, we used electroencephalography to determine the same subjects' extent of pre-speech auditory modulation (reductions in auditory evoked potential N1 amplitude) when probe tones were delivered prior to speaking versus not speaking. To manipulate subjects' ability to monitor real-time feedback, we included speaking conditions with non-altered auditory feedback (NAF) and delayed auditory feedback (DAF). Experiment I showed that auditory-motor learning was limited for AWS versus AWNS, and the extent of learning was negatively correlated with stuttering frequency. Experiment II yielded several key findings: (a) our prior finding of limited pre-speech auditory modulation in AWS was replicated; (b) DAF caused a decrease in auditory modulation for most AWNS but an increase for most AWS; and (c) for AWS, the amount of auditory modulation when speaking with DAF was positively correlated with stuttering frequency. Lastly, AWNS showed no correlation between pre-speech auditory modulation (Experiment II) and extent of auditory-motor learning (Experiment I) whereas AWS showed a negative correlation between these measures. Thus, findings suggest that AWS show deficits in both pre-speech auditory modulation and auditory-motor learning; however, limited pre

  2. Preserved otolith organ function in caspase-3-deficient mice with impaired horizontal semicircular canal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick A; Wood, Scott J; Shimizu, Naoki; Kuster, Kael; Perachio, Adrian; Makishima, Tomoko

    2015-06-01

    Genetically engineered mice are valuable models for elucidation of auditory and vestibular pathology. Our goal was to establish a comprehensive vestibular function testing system in mice using: (1) horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (hVOR) to evaluate semicircular canal function and (2) otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) to evaluate otolith organ function and to validate the system by characterizing mice with vestibular dysfunction. We used pseudo off-vertical axis rotation to induce an otolith-only stimulus using a custom-made centrifuge. For the OOR, horizontal slow-phase eye velocity and vertical eye position were evaluated as a function of acceleration. Using this system, we characterized hVOR and OOR in the caspase-3 (Casp3) mutant mice. Casp3 (-/-) mice had severely impaired hVOR gain, while Casp3 (+/-) mice had an intermediate response compared to WT mice. Evaluation of OOR revealed that at low-to-mid frequencies and stimulus intensity, Casp3 mutants and WT mice had similar responses. At higher frequencies and stimulus intensity, the Casp3 mutants displayed mildly reduced otolith organ-related responses. These findings suggest that the Casp3 gene is important for the proper function of the semicircular canals but less important for the otolith organ function.

  3. Preserved otolith organ function in caspase-3 deficient mice with impaired horizontal semicircular canal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick A; Wood, Scott J; Shimizu, Naoki; Kuster, Kael; Perachio, Adrian; Makishima, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice are valuable models for elucidation of auditory and vestibular pathology. Our goal was to establish a comprehensive vestibular function testing system in mice using: 1) horizontal angular vestibular-ocular reflex (hVOR) to evaluate semicircular canal function, and 2) otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) to evaluate otolith organ function, and to validate the system by characterizing mice with vestibular dysfunction. We used pseudo-off vertical axis rotation (pOVAR) to induce an otolith-only stimulus using a custom-made centrifuge. For the OOR, horizontal slow phase eye velocity (HEV) and vertical eye position (VEP) was evaluated as a function of acceleration. Using this system, we characterized hVOR and OOR in the caspase-3 (Casp3) mutant mice. Casp3 −/− mice had severely impaired hVOR gain, while Casp3 +/− mice had an intermediate response compared to WT mice. Evaluation of OOR revealed that at low to mid frequencies and stimulus intensity, Casp3 mutants and WT mice had similar responses. At higher frequencies and stimulus intensity, the Casp3 mutants displayed mildly reduced otolith organ related responses. These findings suggest that the Casp3 gene is important for the proper function of the semicircular canals but less important for the otolith organ function. PMID:25827332

  4. Auditory Association Cortex Lesions Impair Auditory Short-Term Memory in Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michael; D'Amato, Michael R.; Rodman, Hillary R.; Gross, Charles G.

    1990-01-01

    Monkeys that were trained to perform auditory and visual short-term memory tasks (delayed matching-to-sample) received lesions of the auditory association cortex in the superior temporal gyrus. Although visual memory was completely unaffected by the lesions, auditory memory was severely impaired. Despite this impairment, all monkeys could discriminate sounds closer in frequency than those used in the auditory memory task. This result suggests that the superior temporal cortex plays a role in auditory processing and retention similar to the role the inferior temporal cortex plays in visual processing and retention.

  5. An evaluation of canal curvature at the apical one third in type II mesial canals of mandibular molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Rim Yun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the buccolingual curvature at the apical one third in type II mesial canals of mandibular molars using the radius and angle of curvature. Materials and Methods Total 100 mandibular molars were selected. Following an endodontic access in the teeth, their distal roots were removed. #15 H- or K-files (Dentsply Maillefer were inserted into the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals of the teeth. Radiographs of the teeth were taken for the proximal view. Among them, type II canals were selected and divided into two subgroups, IIa and IIb. In type IIa, two separate canals merged into one canal before reaching the apex and in type IIb, two separate canals merged into one canal within the apical foramen. The radius and angle of curvature of specimens were examined. Results In type II, mean radius of curvature in mesiolingual and mesiobuccal canals were 2.82 mm and 3.58 mm, respectively. The radius of the curvature of mesiolingual canals were significantly smaller than that of mesiobuccal canals in type II, and especially in type IIa. However, there were no statistically significant differences in radius of curvature between mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals in type IIb and there were no significant differences in angle of curvature between type IIa and IIb. Conclusion In this study, type II mesial canals of mandibular molars showed severe curvature in the proximal view. Especially, mesiolingual canals of type IIa had more abrupt curvature than mesiobuccal canals at the apical one third.

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, F T

    2012-01-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma ofthe anal canal represents 1.5% of all malignancies affectingthe gastrointestinal tract. Over the past 20 years dramatic changes have been seen in both the epidemiological distribution of the disease and in the therapeutic modalities utilised to manage it. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT: Historically abdominoperineal resection had been the treatment of choice with local resection reserved for early stage disease. Work by Nigro et al. has revolutionised how we currently manage carcinoma of the anal canal, demonstrating combined modality chemoradiotherapy as an appropriate alternative to surgical resection with the benefit of preserving sphincter function. Surgery is then reserved for recurrent disease with salvage abdominoperineal resection. This article reviews current literature and highlights the changing therapeutic modalities with selected clinical cases

  7. The shape of the human lumbar vertebral canal A forma do canal vertebral lombar humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Zarzur

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on the anatomy of the human vertebral column characterizes the shape of the lumbar vertebral canal as triangular. The purpose of the present study was to determine the precise shape of the lumbar vertebral canal. Ten lumbar vertebral columns of adult male cadavers were dissected. Two transverse sections were performed in the third lumbar vertebra. One section was performed at the level of the lower border of the ligamenta flava, and the other section was performed at the level of the pedicles. The shape of the lumbar vertebral canal at the level of the pedicles tends to be oval or circular, whereas the shape of the lumbar vertebral canal at the level of the lower border of the ligamenta flava is triangular. Thus, the shape of the human lumbar vertebral canal is not exclusively triangular, as reported in the literature. It is related to the level of the transversal section performed on the lumbar vertebra. This finding should be taken into consideration among factors involved in the spread of solutions introduced into the epidural space.A literatura sobre a anatomia da coluna vertebral descreve como sendo triangular o formato do canal vertebral na região lombar. O objetivo deste estudo é determinar a real forma do canal da coluna vertebral lombar.Dez colunas vertebrais de cadáveres de homens adultos foram dissecadas. Dois cortes transversais foram executados na terceira vértebra lombar. Um corte foi feito no nível das bordas inferiores de dois ligamentos amarelos vizinhos e o outro corte foi transversal, no nível dos pedículos. A forma do canal vertebral variou: no nível dos pedículos ela tende a ser oval ou circular e junto às bordas inferiores dos ligamentos amarelos passa a ser triangular. Portanto, a forma do canal vertebral lombar não é somente triangular; ela depende do nível em que se faz o corte transversal da vértebra. Estes achados devem ser levados em consideração entre os fatores envolvidos na difusão das

  8. Meningeal cysts in the sacral canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salatkova, A.; Matejka, J.

    1996-01-01

    Meningeal cysts develop from the meningeal cover, contain liquor, are localised in the spinal canal. Clinical demonstration are different, often with no clinical manifestation, or with manifestation from compression surrounding structures. Meningeal cysts is possible diagnostic imaging with perimyelography, CT and MRI. In the paper it was discussed different feature in the diagnosis meningeal cysts with perimyelography and CT of the spine, position and time of the examination.(authors). 7 figs., 11 refs

  9. Root canal filling using Resilon: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D J

    2011-07-01

    Root canal treatment is achieved by chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system followed by filling. The filling material \\'entombs\\' residual bacteria and acts as a barrier which prevents the entrance of oral microorganisms and reinfection of the root canal system through microleakage. However, filling with contemporary root filling materials such as gutta-percha offers limited long-term resistance to microorganisms; as a result other materials such as Resilon have been investigated as alternatives. The aim of this review was to analyse the literature to consider whether Resilon is a suitable root canal filling material. A MEDLINE and Cochrane library search including various keyword searches identified several papers which investigated or discussed Resilon or RealSeal\\/Epiphany. Analysis of the literature demonstrated that the bulk of the literature is in vitro in nature, based largely on leakage-type studies, and demonstrates a wide variety of methodologies with conflicting findings; as a result meaningful conclusions are difficult. Within the limit of these in vitro studies Resilon appears to perform adequately in comparison to gutta-percha, however, as a result of the questionable merit of such studies, it cannot presently be considered an evidence-based alternative to the current gold standard gutta-percha. It is imperative that before Resilon is considered as a replacement material, a better understanding of the physical properties of the resin sealer and the reality of the adhesive \\'monoblock\\' are elucidated. The literature also demonstrates a paucity of quality long-term clinical outcome studies which will need to be addressed before firm conclusions can be reached.

  10. Anal canal plasmacytoma - An uncommon presentation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, M. I.; Bujor, L.; Grillo, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP) are rare plasma cell tumors that arise outside the bone marrow. They are most often located in the head and neck region, but may also occur in the other locations. The lower gastrointestinal EMP represents less than 5% of all cases, and location in the anal canal is exceedingly rare. Aim: We present an exceedingly rare case of anal canal plasmacytoma, aiming to achieve a better understanding of this rare entity. Methods: We report a case of a 61-year-old man with a bulky mass in the anal canal. The lesion measured about 6 cm and invaded in all layers of the anal canal wall. The biopsy was performed and revealed a round and plasmocitoid cell population with a solid growth pattern and necrosis. The tumoral cells have express CD79a and CD138 with lambda chains. There was no evidence of disease in other locations and these features were consistent with the diagnosis of an extra-osseous plasmacytoma. The patient was submitted to conformal radiotherapy 50.4 Gy total dose, 1.8 Gy per fraction. After 24 months, the patient is asymptomatic and the lesion has completely disappeared. Conclusions: EMP accounts for approximately 3% of plasma cell malignancies. The median age is about 60 years, and the majority of patients are male. The treatment of choice for extramedullary plasmacytoma is radiation therapy in a dosage of about 50 Gy. Patients should be followed-up for life with repeated bone marrow aspiration and protein studies to detect the development of multiple myeloma. (authors)

  11. Roentgenographic study of the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1980-01-01

    The mandibular canal must be considered carefully during the surgical treatment, especially surgical extraction of the impacted tooth and intraosseous implant, because it contains the important inferior alveolar nerve and vessels. The author investigated the curvature of the mandibular canal and its relation to the mandibular molars and positional relation between the mental foramen and the mandibular premolars in orthopantomogram. The materials consisted of 441 orthopantomograms divided four groups; Group I consisted of 56 males and 44 females from 1 to 6 years of age, Group II consisted of 58 males and 45 females from 7 to 12 years of age, Group III consisted of 65 males and 33 females from 13 to 18 years of age, Group IV consisted of 86 males and 54 females over 19 years of age. The results were as followings; 1. The curvature of mandibular canal was 144.50 .deg. in Group II, 148.11 .deg. in Group III, 147.33 .deg. in Group IV. 2. The curvature of mandibular canal was located most frequently on the area between mandibular 1st molar and mandibular 2nd molar in Group I (42%) and on the mandibular 2nd molar area in Group II (54%), Group III (59%), Group IV (53%). 3. The position of mental foramen was most frequently below the mandibular 1st premolar in Group I (58%), between the mandibular 1st premolar and the 2nd premolar in Group II (62%), Group III (47%), and below the mandibular 2nd premolar in Group IV (58%).

  12. Effectiveness of auditory and tactile crossmodal cues in a dual-task visual and auditory scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Kevin; Kass, Steven J; Blalock, Lisa Durrance; Brill, J Christopher

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we examined how spatially informative auditory and tactile cues affected participants' performance on a visual search task while they simultaneously performed a secondary auditory task. Visual search task performance was assessed via reaction time and accuracy. Tactile and auditory cues provided the approximate location of the visual target within the search display. The inclusion of tactile and auditory cues improved performance in comparison to the no-cue baseline conditions. In comparison to the no-cue conditions, both tactile and auditory cues resulted in faster response times in the visual search only (single task) and visual-auditory (dual-task) conditions. However, the effectiveness of auditory and tactile cueing for visual task accuracy was shown to be dependent on task-type condition. Crossmodal cueing remains a viable strategy for improving task performance without increasing attentional load within a singular sensory modality. Practitioner Summary: Crossmodal cueing with dual-task performance has not been widely explored, yet has practical applications. We examined the effects of auditory and tactile crossmodal cues on visual search performance, with and without a secondary auditory task. Tactile cues aided visual search accuracy when also engaged in a secondary auditory task, whereas auditory cues did not.

  13. Diagnosis and root canal treatment in a mandibular premolar with three canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Lanuce Rosa; Arruda, Marcos; de Arruda, Marcos Pôrto; Rangel, Andréa Leão; Takano, Edson; de Carvalho Júnior, Jacy Ribeiro; Saquy, Paulo Cesar

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of a left mandibular second premolar with three canals and three different apical foramina. A 39-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with pain in the mandibular left second premolar. Initially, pain was caused by cold stimulus and later was spontaneously. The intraoral clinical examination revealed a fractured amalgam restoration with occlusal caries. Percussion and cold (Endo-Frost) tests were positive. The radiographic examination showed the presence of two roots. The probable diagnosis was an acute pulpitis. After access cavity, it was observed remaining roof of the pulp chamber and mild bleeding in the tooth lingual area, indicating the possible presence of a third canal. The endodontic treatment was completed in a single session using Root ZX apex locator and K3 NiTi rotary system with surgical diameter corresponding to a .02/45 file in the three canals and irrigation with 1% sodium hypochlorite. The canals were obtured with gutta-percha cones and Sealer 26 using the lateral condensation technique. After 1 year of follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and periapical repair was observed radiographically. Internal alterations should be considered during the endodontic treatment of mandibular second premolars. The correct diagnosis of these alterations by the analysis of preoperative radiographs can help the location of two or more canals, thereby avoiding root therapy failure.

  14. Semiconductor laser irradiation improves root canal sealing during routine root canal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingxue; Wang, Dashan; Cui, Ting; Yao, Ruyong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of semiconductor laser irradiation on root canal sealing after routine root canal therapy (RCT). Methods Sixty freshly extracted single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). The anatomic crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction and the remaining roots were prepared endodontically with conventional RCT methods. Groups A and B were irradiated with semiconductor laser at 1W for 20 seconds; Groups C and D were ultrasonically rinsed for 60 seconds as positive control groups; Groups E and F without treatment of root canal prior to RCT as negative control groups. Root canal sealing of Groups A, C and E were evaluated by measurements of apical microleakage. The teeth from Groups B, D and F were sectioned, and the micro-structures were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One way ANOVA and LSD-t test were used for statistical analysis (α = .05). Results The apical sealing of both the laser irradiated group and the ultrasonic irrigated group were significantly different from the control group (pirrigated group (p>0.5). SEM observation showed that most of the dentinal tubules in the laser irradiation group melted, narrowed or closed, while most of the dentinal tubules in the ultrasonic irrigation group were filled with tooth paste. Conclusion The application of semiconductor laser prior to root canal obturation increases the apical sealing of the roots treated. PMID:28957407

  15. The human ear canal: investigation of its suitability for monitoring photoplethysmographs and arterial oxygen saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budidha, K; Kyriacou, P A

    2014-01-01

    For the last two decades, pulse oximetry has been used as a standard procedure for monitoring arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ). However, SpO 2 measurements made from extremities such as the finger, ear lobe and toes become susceptible to inaccuracies when peripheral perfusion is compromised. To overcome these limitations, the external auditory canal has been proposed as an alternative monitoring site for estimating SpO 2 , on the hypothesis that this central site will be better perfused. Therefore, a dual wavelength optoelectronic probe along with a processing system was developed to investigate the suitability of measuring photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals and SpO 2 in the human auditory canal. A pilot study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers to validate the feasibility of measuring PPGs and SpO 2  from the ear canal (EC), and comparative studies were performed by acquiring the same signals from the left index finger (LIF) and the right index finger (RIF) in conditions of induced peripheral vasoconstriction (right hand immersion in ice water). Good quality baseline PPG signals with high signal-to-noise ratio were obtained from the EC, the LIF and the RIF sensors. During the ice water immersion, significant differences in the amplitude of the red and infrared PPG signals were observed from the RIF and the LIF sensors. The average drop in amplitude of red and infrared PPG signals from the RIF was 52.7% and 58.3%. Similarly, the LIF PPG signal amplitudes have reduced by 47.52% and 46.8% respectively. In contrast, no significant changes were seen in the red and infrared EC PPG amplitude measurements, which changed by +2.5% and −1.2% respectively. The RIF and LIF pulse oximeters have failed to estimate accurate SpO 2  in seven and four volunteers respectively, while the EC pulse oximeter has only failed in one volunteer. These results suggest that the EC may be a suitable site for reliable monitoring of PPGs and SpO 2 s even in the presence of

  16. Further Evidence of Auditory Extinction in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Rebecca Shisler; Basilakos, Alexandra; Love-Myers, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preliminary research ( Shisler, 2005) suggests that auditory extinction in individuals with aphasia (IWA) may be connected to binding and attention. In this study, the authors expanded on previous findings on auditory extinction to determine the source of extinction deficits in IWA. Method: Seventeen IWA (M[subscript age] = 53.19 years)…

  17. Auditory and visual evoked potentials during hyperoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. B. D.; Strawbridge, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental study of the auditory and visual averaged evoked potentials (AEPs) recorded during hyperoxia, and investigation of the effect of hyperoxia on the so-called contingent negative variation (CNV). No effect of hyperoxia was found on the auditory AEP, the visual AEP, or the CNV. Comparisons with previous studies are discussed.

  18. Auditory Processing Disorder and Foreign Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovska, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    This article aims at exploring various strategies for coping with the auditory processing disorder in the light of foreign language acquisition. The techniques relevant to dealing with the auditory processing disorder can be attributed to environmental and compensatory approaches. The environmental one involves actions directed at creating a…

  19. Neural circuits in auditory and audiovisual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakke, B; Romanski, L M

    2016-06-01

    Working memory is the ability to employ recently seen or heard stimuli and apply them to changing cognitive context. Although much is known about language processing and visual working memory, the neurobiological basis of auditory working memory is less clear. Historically, part of the problem has been the difficulty in obtaining a robust animal model to study auditory short-term memory. In recent years there has been neurophysiological and lesion studies indicating a cortical network involving both temporal and frontal cortices. Studies specifically targeting the role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in auditory working memory have suggested that dorsal and ventral prefrontal regions perform different roles during the processing of auditory mnemonic information, with the dorsolateral PFC performing similar functions for both auditory and visual working memory. In contrast, the ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC), which contains cells that respond robustly to auditory stimuli and that process both face and vocal stimuli may be an essential locus for both auditory and audiovisual working memory. These findings suggest a critical role for the VLPFC in the processing, integrating, and retaining of communication information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary Auditory Cortex Regulates Threat Memory Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigestrand, Mattis B.; Schiff, Hillary C.; Fyhn, Marianne; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Sears, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing threatening from nonthreatening stimuli is essential for survival and stimulus generalization is a hallmark of anxiety disorders. While auditory threat learning produces long-lasting plasticity in primary auditory cortex (Au1), it is not clear whether such Au1 plasticity regulates memory specificity or generalization. We used…

  1. Canal Centring Ability of ProTaper and Mtwo Rotary Systems in Curved Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkaydin Dilek Erbay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to compare centring ratio of ProTaper and Mtwo rotary systems. 60 mandibular molar teeth which had 25, 30 and 35 degree curvature in mesio-buccal root canal were used. Group 1 had 25°, Group 2 had 30°, and Group 3 had 35° curvatures. The roots were sectioned horizontally at 2 mm away from the apex. The apical region was then observed under a stereo-microscope. In each group, teeth were instrumented using ProTaper and Mtwo systems. After canal preparation, digital images of apical part of canals were taken. These images were then superimposed by using Adobe Photoshop CS2 programme. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student’s t-test.

  2. Temporal auditory processing in elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzolini, Vanuza Conceição

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the trial of aging all the structures of the organism are modified, generating intercurrences in the quality of the hearing and of the comprehension. The hearing loss that occurs in consequence of this trial occasion a reduction of the communicative function, causing, also, a distance of the social relationship. Objective: Comparing the performance of the temporal auditory processing between elderly individuals with and without hearing loss. Method: The present study is characterized for to be a prospective, transversal and of diagnosis character field work. They were analyzed 21 elders (16 women and 5 men, with ages between 60 to 81 years divided in two groups, a group "without hearing loss"; (n = 13 with normal auditive thresholds or restricted hearing loss to the isolated frequencies and a group "with hearing loss" (n = 8 with neurosensory hearing loss of variable degree between light to moderately severe. Both the groups performed the tests of frequency (PPS and duration (DPS, for evaluate the ability of temporal sequencing, and the test Randon Gap Detection Test (RGDT, for evaluate the temporal resolution ability. Results: It had not difference statistically significant between the groups, evaluated by the tests DPS and RGDT. The ability of temporal sequencing was significantly major in the group without hearing loss, when evaluated by the test PPS in the condition "muttering". This result presented a growing one significant in parallel with the increase of the age group. Conclusion: It had not difference in the temporal auditory processing in the comparison between the groups.

  3. A Brain System for Auditory Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sukhbinder; Joseph, Sabine; Gander, Phillip E; Barascud, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2016-04-20

    The brain basis for auditory working memory, the process of actively maintaining sounds in memory over short periods of time, is controversial. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in human participants, we demonstrate that the maintenance of single tones in memory is associated with activation in auditory cortex. In addition, sustained activation was observed in hippocampus and inferior frontal gyrus. Multivoxel pattern analysis showed that patterns of activity in auditory cortex and left inferior frontal gyrus distinguished the tone that was maintained in memory. Functional connectivity during maintenance was demonstrated between auditory cortex and both the hippocampus and inferior frontal cortex. The data support a system for auditory working memory based on the maintenance of sound-specific representations in auditory cortex by projections from higher-order areas, including the hippocampus and frontal cortex. In this work, we demonstrate a system for maintaining sound in working memory based on activity in auditory cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex, and functional connectivity among them. Specifically, our work makes three advances from the previous work. First, we robustly demonstrate hippocampal involvement in all phases of auditory working memory (encoding, maintenance, and retrieval): the role of hippocampus in working memory is controversial. Second, using a pattern classification technique, we show that activity in the auditory cortex and inferior frontal gyrus is specific to the maintained tones in working memory. Third, we show long-range connectivity of auditory cortex to hippocampus and frontal cortex, which may be responsible for keeping such representations active during working memory maintenance. Copyright © 2016 Kumar et al.

  4. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eGori

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial-bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014. To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile-feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject’s forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal-feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no-feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially coherent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality.

  5. Auditory agnosia due to long-term severe hydrocephalus caused by spina bifida - specific auditory pathway versus nonspecific auditory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Kaga, Kimitaka; Hayashi, Akimasa

    2011-07-01

    A 27-year-old female showed auditory agnosia after long-term severe hydrocephalus due to congenital spina bifida. After years of hydrocephalus, she gradually suffered from hearing loss in her right ear at 19 years of age, followed by her left ear. During the time when she retained some ability to hear, she experienced severe difficulty in distinguishing verbal, environmental, and musical instrumental sounds. However, her auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were largely intact in the left ear. Her bilateral auditory cortices were preserved, as shown by neuroimaging, whereas her auditory radiations were severely damaged owing to progressive hydrocephalus. Although she had a complete bilateral hearing loss, she felt great pleasure when exposed to music. After years of self-training to read lips, she regained fluent ability to communicate. Clinical manifestations of this patient indicate that auditory agnosia can occur after long-term hydrocephalus due to spina bifida; the secondary auditory pathway may play a role in both auditory perception and hearing rehabilitation.

  6. Environmental pollution and shipping feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jihong; Zeng, Xin; Deng, Yibing

    2016-12-15

    In recent years, the Nicaraguan government's renewed interest in constructing this interoceanic canal has once again aroused widespread concern, particularly in the global shipping industry. The project's immense ecological risks, coupled with the recent expansions of both the Panama Canal and the Suez Canal, have raised questions among scientists and experts about its viability. Whether the Nicaragua Canal is really feasible for international shipping, given its high marine pollution risks, requires the further study. This paper discusses and analyses the feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal in the context of its environmental impact and value as a shipping service. This paper aims to provide an important information reference to inform strategic decision-making among policymakers and stakeholders. Our research results indicate that the environmental complexity, economic costs and safety risks of building a new transoceanic canal are simply too high to justify the project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Canal of Nuck hernia: a multimodality imaging review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, Mitchell A. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Squires, James E. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Gastroenterology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tadros, Sameh; Squires, Judy H. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Canal of Nuck abnormalities are a rare but important cause of morbidity in girls, most often those younger than 5 years of age. The canal of Nuck, which is the female equivalent of the male processus vaginalis, is a protrusion of parietal peritoneum that extends through the inguinal canal and terminates in the labia majora. The canal typically obliterates early in life, but in some cases the canal can partially or completely fail to close, potentially resulting in a hydrocele or hernia of pelvic contents. Recognition of this entity is especially important in cases of ovarian hernia due to the risk of incarceration and torsion. We aim to increase awareness of this condition by reviewing the embryology, anatomy and diagnosis of canal of Nuck disorders with imaging findings on US, CT and MRI using several cases from a single institution. (orig.)

  8. Canal of Nuck hernia: a multimodality imaging review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, Mitchell A.; Squires, James E.; Tadros, Sameh; Squires, Judy H.

    2017-01-01

    Canal of Nuck abnormalities are a rare but important cause of morbidity in girls, most often those younger than 5 years of age. The canal of Nuck, which is the female equivalent of the male processus vaginalis, is a protrusion of parietal peritoneum that extends through the inguinal canal and terminates in the labia majora. The canal typically obliterates early in life, but in some cases the canal can partially or completely fail to close, potentially resulting in a hydrocele or hernia of pelvic contents. Recognition of this entity is especially important in cases of ovarian hernia due to the risk of incarceration and torsion. We aim to increase awareness of this condition by reviewing the embryology, anatomy and diagnosis of canal of Nuck disorders with imaging findings on US, CT and MRI using several cases from a single institution. (orig.)

  9. NMR imaging of the vertebral column and the spinal canal. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, Michael; Uhlenbrock, Detlev; Wanke, Isabel; Universitaetsklinikum Essen

    2009-01-01

    The book on the MRT (magnetic resonance tomography) of the vertebral cord and spinal canal covers the following topics: physics fundamentals and application; malformation of the spinal canal; degenerative vertebral column diseases; vertebral column and spinal canal carcinomas; inflammatory diseases of the vertebral column and the spinal canal; applicability of MRT in case of acute spinal cord traumata; vascular diseases of the spinal canal

  10. Computed tomography imaging for superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobeli, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Superior semicircular canal dehiscence is a newly described syndrome of sound and/or pressure induced vertigo. Computed tomography (CT) imaging plays an important role in confirmation of a defect in the bone overlying the canal. A high resolution CT technique utilising 0.5 mm or thinner slices and multi-planar reconstructions parallel to the superior semicircular canal is required. Placement of a histogram over a suspected defect can assist CT diagnosis

  11. Optimizing the chemical aspect of root canal irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    de Macedo, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Root canal treatment is aimed at the removal of inflamed and infected tissue present in the root canal system. It will prevent the entrance of new microorganisms or nutrients in order to maintain or create a healthy environment around the root. There is sufficient evidence that shows that traditional endodontic therapy cannot make the root canal system completely free of bacteria. Moreover, it may not always result in complete healing of apical periodontitis, highlighting the need of optimizi...

  12. ROOT CANAL IRRIGANTS AND IRRIGATION TECHNIQUES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Aniketh; Mohamed; Geeta; Nandakishore; Gourav Kumar; Patrick Timothy; Jayson Mathew; Sahle Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Root canal irrigation is not much emphasised in endodontic therapy. Most articles discussed are on root canal shaping and obturation not much emphasis is given for irrigation. There are many irrigation solutions which are introduced into market. The primary objective of root canal therapy is the ret ention of the pulpless or pulpally involved tooth with its associated periapical tissues in a healthy state. Achievement of this objective requires that the pulpal spaces and con...

  13. SCADA system with predictive controller applied to irrigation canals

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, João; Botto, Miguel; Rijo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies a model predictive controller (MPC) to an automatic water canal with sensors and actuators controlled by a network (programmable logic controller), and supervised by a SCADA system (supervisory control and a data acquisition). This canal is composed by a set of distributed sub-systems that control the water level in each canal pool, constrained by discharge gates (control variables) and water off-takes (disturbances). All local controllers are available through an industria...

  14. Three root canals in the maxillary second premolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Almeida-Gomes Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report an endodontic treatment of the maxillary second premolar with three root canals and distinct foramens. The possibility of three root canals in this tooth is quite small; however, it must be taken into account in clinical and radiographic evaluation during endodontic treatment. Many times, their presence is noticed only after canal treatment due to continuing post-operative discomfort.

  15. Auditory midbrain processing is differentially modulated by auditory and visual cortices: An auditory fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Patrick P; Zhang, Jevin W; Fan, Shu-Juan; Sanes, Dan H; Wu, Ed X

    2015-12-01

    The cortex contains extensive descending projections, yet the impact of cortical input on brainstem processing remains poorly understood. In the central auditory system, the auditory cortex contains direct and indirect pathways (via brainstem cholinergic cells) to nuclei of the auditory midbrain, called the inferior colliculus (IC). While these projections modulate auditory processing throughout the IC, single neuron recordings have samples from only a small fraction of cells during stimulation of the corticofugal pathway. Furthermore, assessments of cortical feedback have not been extended to sensory modalities other than audition. To address these issues, we devised blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms to measure the sound-evoked responses throughout the rat IC and investigated the effects of bilateral ablation of either auditory or visual cortices. Auditory cortex ablation increased the gain of IC responses to noise stimuli (primarily in the central nucleus of the IC) and decreased response selectivity to forward species-specific vocalizations (versus temporally reversed ones, most prominently in the external cortex of the IC). In contrast, visual cortex ablation decreased the gain and induced a much smaller effect on response selectivity. The results suggest that auditory cortical projections normally exert a large-scale and net suppressive influence on specific IC subnuclei, while visual cortical projections provide a facilitatory influence. Meanwhile, auditory cortical projections enhance the midbrain response selectivity to species-specific vocalizations. We also probed the role of the indirect cholinergic projections in the auditory system in the descending modulation process by pharmacologically blocking muscarinic cholinergic receptors. This manipulation did not affect the gain of IC responses but significantly reduced the response selectivity to vocalizations. The results imply that auditory cortical

  16. Environmental pollution and shipping feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jihong; Zeng, Xin; Deng, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Nicaraguan government's renewed interest in constructing this interoceanic canal has once again aroused widespread concern, particularly in the global shipping industry. The project's immense ecological risks, coupled with the recent expansions of both the Panama Canal and the Suez Canal, have raised questions among scientists and experts about its viability. Whether the Nicaragua Canal is really feasible for international shipping, given its high marine pollution risks, requires the further study. This paper discusses and analyses the feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal in the context of its environmental impact and value as a shipping service. This paper aims to provide an important information reference to inform strategic decision-making among policymakers and stakeholders. Our research results indicate that the environmental complexity, economic costs and safety risks of building a new transoceanic canal are simply too high to justify the project. - Highlights: • The Nicaragua Canal is a long-standing controversial maritime project. • We develop specific analysis of the high environmental pollution risks of the canal. • The shipping service feasibility of the canal is faced with great uncertainty. • The government and stakeholders are suggested to be discreet to the mega project.

  17. Mandibular second premolar with three canals: Re-treatment of a case with unusual root canal anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough knowledge of root canal anatomy along with the anatomical variations that may be present is essential for success of endodontic therapy. Unusual presentations in the number of the roots or the canals should be expected in every tooth. Mandibular second premolars are thought of as having a single root and canal. Studies have stated that the prevalence of three canals with three orifices in this tooth is 0.4%. The mandibular second premolar is particularly difficult to treat owing to the fact that a wide variation in the number, location and curvature of the roots and canals exist. Added to this is the fact that the access opening is restricted and location of the lingually placed orifices is difficult. This case report details the re-treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three canals and three separate orifices using the surgical microscope.

  18. Auditory memory function in expert chess players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Fariba; Geshani, Ahmad; Jafari, Zahra; Jalaie, Shohreh; Salman Mahini, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Chess is a game that involves many aspects of high level cognition such as memory, attention, focus and problem solving. Long term practice of chess can improve cognition performances and behavioral skills. Auditory memory, as a kind of memory, can be influenced by strengthening processes following long term chess playing like other behavioral skills because of common processing pathways in the brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the auditory memory function of expert chess players using the Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test. The Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test was performed for 30 expert chess players aged 20-35 years and 30 non chess players who were matched by different conditions; the participants in both groups were randomly selected. The performance of the two groups was compared by independent samples t-test using SPSS version 21. The mean score of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test between the two groups, expert chess players and non-chess players, revealed a significant difference (p≤ 0.001). The difference between the ears scores for expert chess players (p= 0.023) and non-chess players (p= 0.013) was significant. Gender had no effect on the test results. Auditory memory function in expert chess players was significantly better compared to non-chess players. It seems that increased auditory memory function is related to strengthening cognitive performances due to playing chess for a long time.

  19. Auditory attention activates peripheral visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D Cate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed that putatively unimodal regions of visual cortex can be activated during auditory tasks in sighted as well as in blind subjects. However, the task determinants and functional significance of auditory occipital activations (AOAs remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined AOAs in an intermodal selective attention task to distinguish whether they were stimulus-bound or recruited by higher-level cognitive operations associated with auditory attention. Cortical surface mapping showed that auditory occipital activations were localized to retinotopic visual cortex subserving the far peripheral visual field. AOAs depended strictly on the sustained engagement of auditory attention and were enhanced in more difficult listening conditions. In contrast, unattended sounds produced no AOAs regardless of their intensity, spatial location, or frequency. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Auditory attention, but not passive exposure to sounds, routinely activated peripheral regions of visual cortex when subjects attended to sound sources outside the visual field. Functional connections between auditory cortex and visual cortex subserving the peripheral visual field appear to underlie the generation of AOAs, which may reflect the priming of visual regions to process soon-to-appear objects associated with unseen sound sources.

  20. Auditory conflict and congruence in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Agustus, Jennifer L; Hardy, Christopher J D; Russell, Lucy L; Brotherhood, Emilie V; Dick, Katrina M; Marshall, Charles R; Mummery, Catherine J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2017-09-01

    Impaired analysis of signal conflict and congruence may contribute to diverse socio-emotional symptoms in frontotemporal dementias, however the underlying mechanisms have not been defined. Here we addressed this issue in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 19) and semantic dementia (SD; n = 10) relative to healthy older individuals (n = 20). We created auditory scenes in which semantic and emotional congruity of constituent sounds were independently probed; associated tasks controlled for auditory perceptual similarity, scene parsing and semantic competence. Neuroanatomical correlates of auditory congruity processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Relative to healthy controls, both the bvFTD and SD groups had impaired semantic and emotional congruity processing (after taking auditory control task performance into account) and reduced affective integration of sounds into scenes. Grey matter correlates of auditory semantic congruity processing were identified in distributed regions encompassing prefrontal, parieto-temporal and insular areas and correlates of auditory emotional congruity in partly overlapping temporal, insular and striatal regions. Our findings suggest that decoding of auditory signal relatedness may probe a generic cognitive mechanism and neural architecture underpinning frontotemporal dementia syndromes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. A previously unidentified Chorioptes species infesting outer ear canals of moose (Alces alces: characterization of the mite and the pathology of infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattsson Roland

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decade, Chorioptes mites occupying the outer ear canals have been a common finding at routine necropsies of moose (Alces alces in Sweden, but neither the taxonomy of the mites nor lesions from the infestation have been investigated. In this study, the mites are characterized by morphological and molecular techniques, and the histopathology of the skin of the outer ear canal is described. Methods External auditory meatuses from 53 necropsied moose were examined for the presence of Chorioptes, and samples from outer ear canals were taken for histopathological and microbiological examination. A proportion of the mites from each moose was identified to species. The DNA was extracted from mites from three moose, and their ITS-2 sequences were determined; these sequences were compared phylogenetically to sequences from other Chorioptes taxa. Results Chorioptes mites were found in 43 (81% of the 53 moose. The mites had morphological and genetic characteristics distinct from those of C. texanus and C. bovis, the two species generally accepted within the genus. Morphology also did not argue for a diagnosis as C. crewei, C. mydaus or C. panda. On histopathology, lesions were characterized by a hyperplastic perivascular to interstitial dermatitis with epidermal hyperkeratosis and crust formation. Dermal inflammatory infiltrates were composed of mixed T- and B-lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages, whereas eosinophils were notably uncommon. Staphylococcus aureus was grown from the infested epidermis of five of 14 examined moose. Conclusion Chorioptes mite infestation was frequently detected in the outer ear canals of moose in Sweden. The mites were evidently pathogenic, being associated with inflammatory lesions of the external auditory meatus. Our studies indicate infestations with a previously undescribed Chorioptes species.

  2. Auditory Connections and Functions of Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany ePlakke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The functional auditory system extends from the ears to the frontal lobes with successively more complex functions occurring as one ascends the hierarchy of the nervous system. Several areas of the frontal lobe receive afferents from both early and late auditory processing regions within the temporal lobe. Afferents from the early part of the cortical auditory system, the auditory belt cortex, which are presumed to carry information regarding auditory features of sounds, project to only a few prefrontal regions and are most dense in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC. In contrast, projections from the parabelt and the rostral superior temporal gyrus (STG most likely convey more complex information and target a larger, widespread region of the prefrontal cortex. Neuronal responses reflect these anatomical projections as some prefrontal neurons exhibit responses to features in acoustic stimuli, while other neurons display task-related responses. For example, recording studies in non-human primates indicate that VLPFC is responsive to complex sounds including vocalizations and that VLPFC neurons in area 12/47 respond to sounds with similar acoustic morphology. In contrast, neuronal responses during auditory working memory involve a wider region of the prefrontal cortex. In humans, the frontal lobe is involved in auditory detection, discrimination, and working memory. Past research suggests that dorsal and ventral subregions of the prefrontal cortex process different types of information with dorsal cortex processing spatial/visual information and ventral cortex processing non-spatial/auditory information. While this is apparent in the non-human primate and in some neuroimaging studies, most research in humans indicates that specific task conditions, stimuli or previous experience may bias the recruitment of specific prefrontal regions, suggesting a more flexible role for the frontal lobe during auditory cognition.

  3. Auditory connections and functions of prefrontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakke, Bethany; Romanski, Lizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The functional auditory system extends from the ears to the frontal lobes with successively more complex functions occurring as one ascends the hierarchy of the nervous system. Several areas of the frontal lobe receive afferents from both early and late auditory processing regions within the temporal lobe. Afferents from the early part of the cortical auditory system, the auditory belt cortex, which are presumed to carry information regarding auditory features of sounds, project to only a few prefrontal regions and are most dense in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). In contrast, projections from the parabelt and the rostral superior temporal gyrus (STG) most likely convey more complex information and target a larger, widespread region of the prefrontal cortex. Neuronal responses reflect these anatomical projections as some prefrontal neurons exhibit responses to features in acoustic stimuli, while other neurons display task-related responses. For example, recording studies in non-human primates indicate that VLPFC is responsive to complex sounds including vocalizations and that VLPFC neurons in area 12/47 respond to sounds with similar acoustic morphology. In contrast, neuronal responses during auditory working memory involve a wider region of the prefrontal cortex. In humans, the frontal lobe is involved in auditory detection, discrimination, and working memory. Past research suggests that dorsal and ventral subregions of the prefrontal cortex process different types of information with dorsal cortex processing spatial/visual information and ventral cortex processing non-spatial/auditory information. While this is apparent in the non-human primate and in some neuroimaging studies, most research in humans indicates that specific task conditions, stimuli or previous experience may bias the recruitment of specific prefrontal regions, suggesting a more flexible role for the frontal lobe during auditory cognition. PMID:25100931

  4. Teacher's Guide to Canal. The Middlesex Canal: A Role Playing Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Cary W.; Tedesco, Paul H.

    The document consists of a role-playing game and related teacher's guide designed to illustrate decision-making processes leading to the building of the Middlesex Canal in Massachusetts in 1793. The primary educational objective is to involve students in the decision-making process through role play. The game is designed to facilitate…

  5. Impact of canal water shortages on groundwater in the Lower Bari Doab Canal system in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, A.S.; Rehman, H.U.; Khan, N.M.; Qazi, A.U.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents rigorous analysis of shortage of canal water supplies, crop water requirements, and groundwater use and its quality in the command of Lower Bari Doab Canal, Pakistan. The annual canal water supplies are 36% less than the crop water requirements. This shortage further increases to 56% if actual canal supplies (averaged over last ten years) are compared with the crop water requirement. The groundwater levels are depleting at the rate of 30 to 40 cm per year in most parts of the LBDC command and this tendency of lowering may increase in future due to further increase in crop water requirements. The analysis of data for the last seven years indicate that quality of groundwater in most parts of LBDC command is generally good (64% of the area) or marginally acceptable (28%) for irrigation use. However, declining trends in groundwater quality are visible and can create long term sustain ability problems if proper remedial actions are not taken well in time. (author)

  6. Large blastholes in coal mining, canal effects. Barrenos largos en la mineria del carbon, efecto canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz Hevia, E.; Legorburu Zuazva, V.; Blanco Gonzalez, R. (Union Explosivos Rio Tinto SA, Madrid (Spain))

    1988-01-01

    The 'canal effect' has been known for a long time. It appears only in underground workings. It may be said that the coal industry has suffered from it less than other sectors, perhaps because of its rigorous safety legislation. The Spanish coal mining industry has now been without this phenomenon for many years. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Neuromechanistic Model of Auditory Bistability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rankin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequences of higher frequency A and lower frequency B tones repeating in an ABA- triplet pattern are widely used to study auditory streaming. One may experience either an integrated percept, a single ABA-ABA- stream, or a segregated percept, separate but simultaneous streams A-A-A-A- and -B---B--. During minutes-long presentations, subjects may report irregular alternations between these interpretations. We combine neuromechanistic modeling and psychoacoustic experiments to study these persistent alternations and to characterize the effects of manipulating stimulus parameters. Unlike many phenomenological models with abstract, percept-specific competition and fixed inputs, our network model comprises neuronal units with sensory feature dependent inputs that mimic the pulsatile-like A1 responses to tones in the ABA- triplets. It embodies a neuronal computation for percept competition thought to occur beyond primary auditory cortex (A1. Mutual inhibition, adaptation and noise are implemented. We include slow NDMA recurrent excitation for local temporal memory that enables linkage across sound gaps from one triplet to the next. Percepts in our model are identified in the firing patterns of the neuronal units. We predict with the model that manipulations of the frequency difference between tones A and B should affect the dominance durations of the stronger percept, the one dominant a larger fraction of time, more than those of the weaker percept-a property that has been previously established and generalized across several visual bistable paradigms. We confirm the qualitative prediction with our psychoacoustic experiments and use the behavioral data to further constrain and improve the model, achieving quantitative agreement between experimental and modeling results. Our work and model provide a platform that can be extended to consider other stimulus conditions, including the effects of context and volition.

  8. The enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal: a new CT finding of facial nerve canal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Ruozhen; Li Yuhua; Gong Wuxian; Wu Lebin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the value of enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal in the diagnosis of facial nerve canal fracture. Methods: Thirty patients with facial nerve canal fracture underwent axial and coronal CT scan. The correlation between the fracture and the enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was analyzed. The ability of showing the fracture and enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal in axial and coronal imaging were compared. Results: Fracture of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was found in the operation in 30 patients, while the fracture was detected in CT in 18 patients. Enlargement of geniculate ganglion of facial nerve was detected in 30 patients in the operation, while the enlargement of fossa was found in CT in 28 cases. Enlargement and fracture of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal were both detected in CT images in 18 patients. Only the enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was shown in 12 patients in CT. Conclusion: Enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was a useful finding in the diagnosis of fracture of geniculate fossa in patients with facial paralysis, even no fracture line was shown on CT images. (authors)

  9. Three distal root canals in mandibular first molar with different canal configurations: Report of two cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of reports of aberrant root canal morphology, the clinician needs to be aware of the variable anatomy. Various case reports have been published with the finding of middle mesial canal in mandibular first molar, however finding of three distal canals in distal roots of mandibular first molar is rare. This article reports endodontic management of two mandibular first molars presented with three distal canals present in a single distal root (Sert and Bayirli type XVIII and distal and distolingual root.

  10. Assessing the aging effect on auditory-verbal memory by Persian version of dichotic auditory verbal memory test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, significant reduction in auditory memory was seen in aged group and the Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test, like many other auditory verbal memory tests, showed the aging effects on auditory verbal memory performance.

  11. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  12. Competition and convergence between auditory and cross-modal visual inputs to primary auditory cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu-Ting; Hua, Tian-Miao

    2011-01-01

    Sensory neocortex is capable of considerable plasticity after sensory deprivation or damage to input pathways, especially early in development. Although plasticity can often be restorative, sometimes novel, ectopic inputs invade the affected cortical area. Invading inputs from other sensory modalities may compromise the original function or even take over, imposing a new function and preventing recovery. Using ferrets whose retinal axons were rerouted into auditory thalamus at birth, we were able to examine the effect of varying the degree of ectopic, cross-modal input on reorganization of developing auditory cortex. In particular, we assayed whether the invading visual inputs and the existing auditory inputs competed for or shared postsynaptic targets and whether the convergence of input modalities would induce multisensory processing. We demonstrate that although the cross-modal inputs create new visual neurons in auditory cortex, some auditory processing remains. The degree of damage to auditory input to the medial geniculate nucleus was directly related to the proportion of visual neurons in auditory cortex, suggesting that the visual and residual auditory inputs compete for cortical territory. Visual neurons were not segregated from auditory neurons but shared target space even on individual target cells, substantially increasing the proportion of multisensory neurons. Thus spatial convergence of visual and auditory input modalities may be sufficient to expand multisensory representations. Together these findings argue that early, patterned visual activity does not drive segregation of visual and auditory afferents and suggest that auditory function might be compromised by converging visual inputs. These results indicate possible ways in which multisensory cortical areas may form during development and evolution. They also suggest that rehabilitative strategies designed to promote recovery of function after sensory deprivation or damage need to take into

  13. Water Environment Evolution along the China Grand Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, F; Wu, Y X; Yang, B F; Li, X J

    2014-01-01

    The China Grand Canal is one of the earliest canals in the world, having lasted for nearly 3000 years. Even its section canals have a rich history, such as the North-South Grand Canal that was established during the Sui Dynasty, whereas the Beijing-Hangzhou Canal was excavated during the Yuan Dynasty and the east line of the South-to-North Water Diversion. As one of the longest in the world, the China Grand Canal's total length is over 3500 kilometers. This length includes the navigable, unnavigable, and underground sections. Making the best use of situations and according to local conditions, the Chinese people harmoniously constructed the Beijing-Hangzhou Canal with nature. Tens of millions of workers took nearly 3000 years to complete the great shipping system. Navigable sections still exist for up to 900 kilometers and the volume of freight traffic is approximately 300 million tons. The canal remains the main logistical channel of the North-to-South Coal Transportation, South-to-North Water Diversion, and resources circulation. To date, China is promoting the success of heritage application. Part of these efforts is the declaration of the China Grand Canal as a World Cultural Heritage by 2014. In addition, the east route of the South-to-North Water Transfer project is planned to be navigable by 2016. The ancient Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal will usher in the new ecological civilization and cultural revival along the canal. This paper presents technical methods of water environment evolution research on the river system, river, and water quality along the Beijing-Hangzhou Canal through the integration of historical literature and modern remote sensing image data. The study carried out water environment investigation and analysis along the Beijing-Hangzhou canal by using ETM, SPOT image data, and GPS measurement data. Spatial and temporal evolution characteristics and regulations of the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal regional water environment in the span of

  14. Root canal treatment of mandibular second premolar tooth with taurodontism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujašković Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Taurodontism is a morphoanatomical change in the shape of a tooth. An enlarged body of a tooth with smaller than usual roots is a characteristic feature. Internal tooth anatomy correlates with this appearance, which means that a taurodontal tooth has a large pulp chamber and apically positioned furcations. This dental anomaly may be associated with different syndromes and congenital discoders. CASE OUTLINE The case report presents the patient of a rare case of taurodontism in the mandibular second premolar with chronic periodontitis. Endodontic treatment was performed after dental history and clinical examination. Special care is required in all segments of endodontic treatment of a taurodontal tooth from the identification orifice, canal exploration, determining working length, cleaning and shaping and obturation of the root canal. Precurved K-file was used for canal exploration and location of the furcation. One mesial and one distal canal with the buccal position were identified in the apical third of the root canal. The working lengths of two canals were determined by radiographic interpretation with two K-files in each canal and verified with the apex locator. During canal instrumentation, the third canal was located in the disto-lingual position. The working length of the third canal was established using the apex locator. CONCLUSION Thorough knowledge of tooth anatomy and its variations can lead to lower percentage of endodontic failure. Each clinical case involving these teeth should be investigated carefully, clinically and radiographically to detect additional root canals. High quality radiographs from different angles and proper instrumentarium improve the quality of endodontic procedure.

  15. 78 FR 69847 - North Side Canal Company; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... Canal Hydro Project would be located along North Side Canal Company's irrigation system on the U Canal... agricultural, municipal, or industrial consumption and not primarily for the generation of electricity. FPA 30...

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  12. [Assessment of the efficiency of the auditory training in children with dyslalia and auditory processing disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Szkiełkowska, Agata; Skarżyński, Henryk; Piłka, Adam

    2011-01-01

    To assess effectiveness of the auditory training in children with dyslalia and central auditory processing disorders. Material consisted of 50 children aged 7-9-years-old. Children with articulation disorders stayed under long-term speech therapy care in the Auditory and Phoniatrics Clinic. All children were examined by a laryngologist and a phoniatrician. Assessment included tonal and impedance audiometry and speech therapists' and psychologist's consultations. Additionally, a set of electrophysiological examinations was performed - registration of N2, P2, N2, P2, P300 waves and psychoacoustic test of central auditory functions: FPT - frequency pattern test. Next children took part in the regular auditory training and attended speech therapy. Speech assessment followed treatment and therapy, again psychoacoustic tests were performed and P300 cortical potentials were recorded. After that statistical analyses were performed. Analyses revealed that application of auditory training in patients with dyslalia and other central auditory disorders is very efficient. Auditory training may be a very efficient therapy supporting speech therapy in children suffering from dyslalia coexisting with articulation and central auditory disorders and in children with educational problems of audiogenic origin. Copyright © 2011 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner (Poland). All rights reserved.

  13. Single-rooted maxillary first molar with a single canal: endodontic retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Francisco; Cisneros-Cabello, Rafael; Aranguren, José Luis; Estévez, Roberto; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Segura-Egea, Juan José

    2008-12-01

    This case report presents an unusual root canal system in a maxillary first molar tooth: a single canal in a single root. The endodontic access cavity displayed only 1 canal orifice. This case demonstrated that: 1) clinicians must have adequate knowledge about root canal morphology and its variations; 2) the location and morphology of root canals should be identified radiologically before the root canal treatment; and 3) careful examination of radiographs and the internal anatomy of teeth is essential.

  14. Effects of irrigation solutions and Calcium hydroxide dressing on root canal treatments of periapical lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmala, Vita

    2006-01-01

    The preparation of root canal in endodontic treatment plays an important role in treating non vital teeth with periapical lesion. Some factors influence the success of root canal treatment in short and long terms are the irrigation of root canal using antiseptic solution and the use of root canal medicament. The aim of this literature study is to determined the effect of irrigation solution and Calcium hydroxide dressing in root canal treatment of periapical lesions. The use of root canal med...

  15. Auditory Pattern Memory and Group Signal Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorkin, Robert

    1997-01-01

    .... The experiments with temporally-coded auditory patterns showed how listeners' attention is influenced by the position and the amount of information carried by different segments of the pattern...

  16. Auditory Peripheral Processing of Degraded Speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghitza, Oded

    2003-01-01

    ...". The underlying thesis is that the auditory periphery contributes to the robust performance of humans in speech reception in noise through a concerted contribution of the efferent feedback system...

  17. Robotic Discovery of the Auditory Scene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinson, E; Schultz, A

    2007-01-01

    .... Motivated by the large negative effect of ambient noise sources on robot audition, the long-term goal is to provide awareness of the auditory scene to a robot, so that it may more effectively act...

  18. Effect of omega-3 on auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Omega-3 fatty acid have structural and biological roles in the body 's various systems . Numerous studies have tried to research about it. Auditory system is affected a s well. The aim of this article was to review the researches about the effect of omega-3 on auditory system.Methods: We searched Medline , Google Scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SID search engines with the "auditory" and "omega-3" keywords and read textbooks about this subject between 19 70 and 20 13.Conclusion: Both excess and deficient amounts of dietary omega-3 fatty acid can cause harmful effects on fetal and infant growth and development of brain and central nervous system esspesially auditory system. It is important to determine the adequate dosage of omega-3.

  19. Presbycusis and auditory brainstem responses: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Khullar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing loss or presbycusis is a complex phenomenon consisting of elevation of hearing levels as well as changes in the auditory processing. It is commonly classified into four categories depending on the cause. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs are a type of early evoked potentials recorded within the first 10 ms of stimulation. They represent the synchronized activity of the auditory nerve and the brainstem. Some of the changes that occur in the aging auditory system may significantly influence the interpretation of the ABRs in comparison with the ABRs of the young adults. The waves of ABRs are described in terms of amplitude, latencies and interpeak latency of the different waves. There is a tendency of the amplitude to decrease and the absolute latencies to increase with advancing age but these trends are not always clear due to increase in threshold with advancing age that act a major confounding factor in the interpretation of ABRs.

  20. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen eAlink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left- or rightwards auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left- or rightwards more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements.

  1. Auditory-vocal mirroring in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mirror neurons are theorized to serve as a neural substrate for spoken language in humans, but the existence and functions of auditory-vocal mirror neurons in the human brain remain largely matters of speculation. Songbirds resemble humans in their capacity for vocal learning and depend on their learned songs to facilitate courtship and individual recognition. Recent neurophysiological studies have detected putative auditory-vocal mirror neurons in a sensorimotor region of the songbird's brain that plays an important role in expressive and receptive aspects of vocal communication. This review discusses the auditory and motor-related properties of these cells, considers their potential role on song learning and communication in relation to classical studies of birdsong, and points to the circuit and developmental mechanisms that may give rise to auditory-vocal mirroring in the songbird's brain.

  2. Environment for Auditory Research Facility (EAR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — EAR is an auditory perception and communication research center enabling state-of-the-art simulation of various indoor and outdoor acoustic environments. The heart...

  3. Visibility of the central canal on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit-Lacour, M.C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Iffenecker, C.; Benoudiba, F.; Hadj Rabia, M.; Doyon, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Faculte de Paris Sud (France); Hurth, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculte Paris Sud, Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2000-10-01

    The central canal of the spinal cord is present at birth and becomes progressively obliterated. Cadaver studies have shown that it may persiste partially or completely. To our knowledge, this entity has not been described on MRI. We reviewed 794 MRI studies of the spinal cord, and found 12 patients (aged 14 to 65 years) who had an intramedullary cavity. The cavity was at the junction of the ventral {sup 1}/{sub 3} and dorsal {sup 2}/{sub 3} of the spinal cord, except at the level of the lumbar enlargement, where it was central. It was filiform in most cases, although sometimes fusiform (3 to 4 mm in diameter), and had regular contours. The cavity were thoracic in 69 % of cases. The clinical features were totally unrelated to the image, and there were no anatomical factors (Chiari malformation, dysraphism) predisposing to syringomyelia. The images were perfectly compatible with a persistent central canal, which we interpret as a variant of normal anatomy. Therefore it is important to regard these findings as normal, to avoid unnecessary treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  4. Visibility of the central canal on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Lacour, M.C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Iffenecker, C.; Benoudiba, F.; Hadj Rabia, M.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.

    2000-01-01

    The central canal of the spinal cord is present at birth and becomes progressively obliterated. Cadaver studies have shown that it may persiste partially or completely. To our knowledge, this entity has not been described on MRI. We reviewed 794 MRI studies of the spinal cord, and found 12 patients (aged 14 to 65 years) who had an intramedullary cavity. The cavity was at the junction of the ventral 1 / 3 and dorsal 2 / 3 of the spinal cord, except at the level of the lumbar enlargement, where it was central. It was filiform in most cases, although sometimes fusiform (3 to 4 mm in diameter), and had regular contours. The cavity were thoracic in 69 % of cases. The clinical features were totally unrelated to the image, and there were no anatomical factors (Chiari malformation, dysraphism) predisposing to syringomyelia. The images were perfectly compatible with a persistent central canal, which we interpret as a variant of normal anatomy. Therefore it is important to regard these findings as normal, to avoid unnecessary treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of three root canal preparation techniques on root canal geometry using micro-computed tomography: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikha M Al-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the effects of three root canal preparation techniques on canal volume and surface area using three-dimensionally reconstructed root canals in extracted human maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted Human Maxillary Molars having three separate roots and similar root shape were randomly selected from a pool of extracted teeth for this study and stored in normal saline solution until used. A computed tomography scanner (Philips Brilliance CT 64-slice was used to analyze root canals in extracted maxillary molars. Specimens were scanned before and after canals were prepared using stainless steel K-Files, Ni-Ti rotary ProTaper and rotary SafeSiders instruments. Differences in dentin volume removed, the surface area, the proportion of unchanged area and canal transportation were calculated using specially developed software. Results: Instrumentation of canals increased volume and surface area. Statistical analysis found a statistically significant difference among the 3 groups in total change in volume (P = 0.001 and total change in surface area (P = 0.13. Significant differences were found when testing both groups with group III (SafeSiders. Significant differences in change of volume were noted when grouping was made with respect to canal type (in MB and DB (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The current study used computed tomography, an innovative and non destructive technique, to illustrate changes in canal geometry. Overall, there were few statistically significant differences between the three instrumentation techniques used. SafeSiders stainless steel 40/0.02 instruments exhibit a greater cutting efficiency on dentin than K-Files and ProTaper. CT is a new and valuable tool to study root canal geometry and changes after preparation in great details. Further studies with 3D-techniques are required to fully understand the biomechanical aspects of root canal preparation.

  6. The Effect of Canal Contamination with Saliva on Apical Sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sabaghi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal obturation aims at sealing the root canal system to prevent re-contamination of canal and periapical space. Presence of moisture in canal before obturation may posit a negative effect on the quality of canal sealing. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of canal contamination with saliva on apical microleakage. Methods: In this laboratory study, 58 human uni-root teeth were cleaned and shaped for obturation with gutta percha and sealer AH26. In the case group, specimens were contaminated with human saliva immediately before obturation, whereas the teeth in the control group were kept dry. All canals were filled by lateral condensation technique. Moreover, the teeth were placed in methylene blue dye for 3 days. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicrosope. As a matter of fact, the study data were analyzed via utilizing t-test. Results: A significant difference was found between the two groups in regard with the apical leakage(P<0.001. The microleakage mean of dye in the dry group was 3/48mm, whereas it was 6/36mm in the saliva contaminated group. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that complete drying of canal can improve apical sealing.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging anatomy of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashyap, P.; Bates, N.

    2004-01-01

    The anatomy of the anal canal is complex but well demonstrated by MRI. Understanding the anatomy is a prerequisite for determining the true site and the extent of pathology, especially for surgical workup. In this article, the MRI anatomy of the anal canal has been displayed using highlighted MRI images and line diagrams. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. 33 CFR 117.181 - Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal. 117.181 Section 117.181 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Tidal Canal. The draws of the Alameda County highway drawbridges at Park Street, mile 5.2; Fruitvale...

  9. GEOPOLITICS AND TRANSPORTATION. UNITED STATES AND PANAMA CANAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benea Ciprian Beniamin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the great connection which exists between the realization of Panama Canal and the rising power on United States; and how this state, after the construction of this canal, could promote efficiently at global level its interests.

  10. Leiomyoma of the anal canal: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, M; Bernheim, J; Griffel, B; Dinbar, A

    1986-10-01

    Leiomyoma of the rectum and anal canal is an unusual clinical entity. Generally, it does not produce any clinical signs and in most cases it is discovered incidentally in the course of routine rectal examination. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical treatment are described in two presented cases of anal canal leiomyoma.

  11. Optimizing the chemical aspect of root canal irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Macedo, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Root canal treatment is aimed at the removal of inflamed and infected tissue present in the root canal system. It will prevent the entrance of new microorganisms or nutrients in order to maintain or create a healthy environment around the root. There is sufficient evidence that shows that

  12. MRI diagnosis of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into central spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Cheng Jingliang; Wang Juan; Li Huali; Ren Cuiping; Zhang Yan; Gao Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the appearances of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal, as well as the MRI diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: Eleven cases of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal were reviewed. Six cases underwent whole spine MRI scan, 2 cases with thoracic and lumbar spine MRI, as well as 3 cases only with lumbar spine MRI. Results: Free fat droplets within spinal cord central canal demonstrated high signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight declined signal intensity on T 2 WI, and extremely low signal on fat suppression sequence. Of the 11 cases, 2 cases broke into neighboring central spinal canal of the dermoid, 3 cases scattered within thoracic spinal cord central canal, 4 cases discontinuously distributed in the whole spinal cord central canal, 2 cases showed continuous distribution. Conclusion: Intraspinal dermoid ruptured in the central spinal canal had specific appearance on MRI, when a dermoid tumor is suspected, MRI of the entire spine were recommended to detect possible leakage of' fat within central spinal canal. (authors)

  13. 33 CFR 117.769 - Black Rock Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black Rock Canal. 117.769 Section 117.769 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.769 Black Rock Canal. The draws of the...

  14. Improvement on the Performance of Canal Network and Method of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the required improvement on the performance of canal network and method of on-farm water application systems at Tunga-Kawo irrigation scheme, Wushishi, Niger state. The problems of poor delivery of water to the farmland were identified to include erosion of canal embarkment, lack of water ...

  15. Status of the interoceanic canal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, R.H.

    1970-01-01

    The studies of Atlantic-Pacific Interoceanic Sea-Level Canal Study Commission are are not as yet completed, although there is no reason at this time to doubt that the 1 December 1970 deadline for the Commission's final report will be met. Since it has not been published, I am unable to pass on to you any of its conclusions; they simply do not exist today. And it would be improper for me to reveal the substance of the Commission's deliberations to date or to speculate upon what their outcome may be. But many elements of the work being conducted under my supervision - The Engineering Feasibility Study - are already in the public domain. It is to them that my remarks here are addressed. Of the six basic routes we have considered in our studies for possible sea-level canal alinements, four could involve nuclear excavating techniques. The so-called nuclear alternatives are Route 8 along the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border, Route 17 across the Darien Isthmus of Panama, Route 23 crossing the Panama-Colombia border and Route 25 across the western tip of Colombia. The conventionally excavated routes are Route 10 west of the Panama Canal Zone and Route 14 along the alinement of the present canal. The engineering studies examine from a technical standpoint the feasibility of constructing these routes and estimate their costs. To accomplish this we have made conceptual designs for canals capable of transiting at least 40,000 vessels annually (and possibly several times that many) and of accommodating ships of up to 250,000 dwt in size. Thus, in terms of basic requirements, all alternatives - conventional and nuclear - have been made comparable. Beginning with the northernmost route, let us now consider the four nuclear alternatives. Route 8 is 137 miles in length. Its maximum elevations are slightly less than 800 feet in the Continental Divide and about 400 feet through the so-called Eastern Divide. The rock to be excavated is primarily volcanic tuff. It is readily apparent that

  16. Status of the interoceanic canal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, R H [Engineering Agent for the Atlantic-Pacific, Interoceanic Canal Study Commission (United States)

    1970-05-01

    The studies of Atlantic-Pacific Interoceanic Sea-Level Canal Study Commission are are not as yet completed, although there is no reason at this time to doubt that the 1 December 1970 deadline for the Commission's final report will be met. Since it has not been published, I am unable to pass on to you any of its conclusions; they simply do not exist today. And it would be improper for me to reveal the substance of the Commission's deliberations to date or to speculate upon what their outcome may be. But many elements of the work being conducted under my supervision - The Engineering Feasibility Study - are already in the public domain. It is to them that my remarks here are addressed. Of the six basic routes we have considered in our studies for possible sea-level canal alinements, four could involve nuclear excavating techniques. The so-called nuclear alternatives are Route 8 along the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border, Route 17 across the Darien Isthmus of Panama, Route 23 crossing the Panama-Colombia border and Route 25 across the western tip of Colombia. The conventionally excavated routes are Route 10 west of the Panama Canal Zone and Route 14 along the alinement of the present canal. The engineering studies examine from a technical standpoint the feasibility of constructing these routes and estimate their costs. To accomplish this we have made conceptual designs for canals capable of transiting at least 40,000 vessels annually (and possibly several times that many) and of accommodating ships of up to 250,000 dwt in size. Thus, in terms of basic requirements, all alternatives - conventional and nuclear - have been made comparable. Beginning with the northernmost route, let us now consider the four nuclear alternatives. Route 8 is 137 miles in length. Its maximum elevations are slightly less than 800 feet in the Continental Divide and about 400 feet through the so-called Eastern Divide. The rock to be excavated is primarily volcanic tuff. It is readily apparent that

  17. In search of an auditory engram

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Jonathan; Mishkin, Mortimer; Saunders, Richard C.

    2005-01-01

    Monkeys trained preoperatively on a task designed to assess auditory recognition memory were impaired after removal of either the rostral superior temporal gyrus or the medial temporal lobe but were unaffected by lesions of the rhinal cortex. Behavioral analysis indicated that this result occurred because the monkeys did not or could not use long-term auditory recognition, and so depended instead on short-term working memory, which is unaffected by rhinal lesions. The findings suggest that mo...

  18. Neural oscillations in auditory working memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wilsch, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis investigated memory load and memory decay in auditory working memory. Alpha power as a marker for memory load served as the primary indicator for load and decay fluctuations hypothetically reflecting functional inhibition of irrelevant information. Memory load was induced by presenting auditory signals (syllables and pure-tone sequences) in noise because speech-in-noise has been shown before to increase memory load. The aim of the thesis was to assess with magnetoencephalog...

  19. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  20. Procedures for central auditory processing screening in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Nádia Giulian de; Ubiali, Thalita; Amaral, Maria Isabel Ramos do; Santos, Maria Francisca Colella

    2018-03-22

    Central auditory processing screening in schoolchildren has led to debates in literature, both regarding the protocol to be used and the importance of actions aimed at prevention and promotion of auditory health. Defining effective screening procedures for central auditory processing is a challenge in Audiology. This study aimed to analyze the scientific research on central auditory processing screening and discuss the effectiveness of the procedures utilized. A search was performed in the SciELO and PUBMed databases by two researchers. The descriptors used in Portuguese and English were: auditory processing, screening, hearing, auditory perception, children, auditory tests and their respective terms in Portuguese. original articles involving schoolchildren, auditory screening of central auditory skills and articles in Portuguese or English. studies with adult and/or neonatal populations, peripheral auditory screening only, and duplicate articles. After applying the described criteria, 11 articles were included. At the international level, central auditory processing screening methods used were: screening test for auditory processing disorder and its revised version, screening test for auditory processing, scale of auditory behaviors, children's auditory performance scale and Feather Squadron. In the Brazilian scenario, the procedures used were the simplified auditory processing assessment and Zaidan's battery of tests. At the international level, the screening test for auditory processing and Feather Squadron batteries stand out as the most comprehensive evaluation of hearing skills. At the national level, there is a paucity of studies that use methods evaluating more than four skills, and are normalized by age group. The use of simplified auditory processing assessment and questionnaires can be complementary in the search for an easy access and low-cost alternative in the auditory screening of Brazilian schoolchildren. Interactive tools should be proposed, that

  1. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  2. Hydrology and environmental aspects of Erie Canal (1817-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, Walter Basil

    1976-01-01

    As the first major water project in the United States, the old Erie Canal provides an example of the hydrological and environmental consequences of water development. The available record shows that the project aroused environmental fears that the canal might be impaired by the adverse hydrologic effects of land development induced by the canal. Water requirements proved greater than anticipated, and problems of floods and hydraulic inefficiencies beset navigation throughout its history. The Erie Canal proved the practicality of major hydraulic works to the extent that operations and maintenance could cope with the burdens of deficiencies in design. The weight of prior experience that upland streams, such as the Potomac and Mohawk Rivers, had proved unsatisfactory for dependable navigation, led to a decision to build an independent canal which freed the location from the constraints of river channels and made possible a cross-country water route directly to Lake Erie. The decision on dimensioning the canal prism--chiefly width and depth-involved balance between a fear of building too small and thus not achieving the economic potentials, and a fear of building too expensively. The constraints proved effective, and for the first part of its history the revenues collected were sufficient to repay all costs. So great was the economic advantage of the canal that the rising trend in traffic soon induced an enlargement of the canal cross section, based upon a new but riskier objective-build as large as the projected trend in toll revenues would finance. The increased revenues did not materialize. Water supplies were a primary concern for both the planners and the operators of the canal. Water required for lockage, although the most obvious to the planners, proved to be a relatively minor item compared with the amounts of water that were required to compensate for leakage through the bed and banks of the canal. Leakage amounted to about 8 inches of depth per day. The total

  3. Maxillary second molar with four roots and five canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjia Sha

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we present a maxillary second molar variant, which had two palatal roots with two canals and two buccal roots with three canals, including a second mesiobuccal canal. A 44-year-old female patient complained about a tooth crown fracture and severe pain in her right maxillary second molar. A clinical intraoral inspection and radiography were carried out on the tooth, and a diagnosis of chronic apical periodontitis was made. Four roots (two buccal and two palatal and five canals (three buccal and two palatal were found. The anatomical variation of the tooth was further confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography, a cone-fit procedure, and a radiograph with a shifted projection angle. Root-canal treatment was performed under an endodontic microscope.

  4. Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome Affecting 3 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kileny, Paul R; Ahmed, Sameer; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Melendez, Tori L; Basura, Gregory J; Lesperance, Marci M

    2017-07-01

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is an increasingly recognized cause of hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, but the etiology of this condition remains unknown. To describe 7 cases of SCDS across 3 families. This retrospective case series included 7 patients from 3 different families treated at a neurotology clinic at a tertiary academic medical center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were referred by other otolaryngologists or were self-referred. Each patient demonstrated unilateral or bilateral SCDS or near dehiscence. Clinical evaluation involved body mass index calculation, audiometry, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, electrocochleography, and multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) scan of the temporal bones. Zygosity testing was performed on twin siblings. The diagnosis of SCDS was made if bone was absent over the superior semicircular canal on 2 consecutive CT images, in addition to 1 physiologic sign consistent with labyrinthine dehiscence. Near dehiscence was defined as absent bone on only 1 CT image but with symptoms and at least 1 physiologic sign of labyrinthine dehiscence. A total of 7 patients (5 female and 2 male; age range, 8-49 years) from 3 families underwent evaluation. Family A consisted of 3 adult first-degree relatives, of whom 2 were diagnosed with SCDS and 1 with near dehiscence. Family B included a mother and her child, both of whom were diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. Family C consisted of adult monozygotic twins, each of whom was diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. For all cases, dehiscence was located at the arcuate eminence. Obesity alone did not explain the occurrence of SCDS because 5 of the 7 cases had a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) less than 30.0. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome is a rare, often unrecognized condition. This report of 3 multiplex families with SCDS provides evidence in support of a potential genetic contribution to the etiology

  5. Predictive coding of visual-auditory and motor-auditory events: An electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekelenburg, Jeroen J; Vroomen, Jean

    2015-11-11

    The amplitude of auditory components of the event-related potential (ERP) is attenuated when sounds are self-generated compared to externally generated sounds. This effect has been ascribed to internal forward modals predicting the sensory consequences of one's own motor actions. Auditory potentials are also attenuated when a sound is accompanied by a video of anticipatory visual motion that reliably predicts the sound. Here, we investigated whether the neural underpinnings of prediction of upcoming auditory stimuli are similar for motor-auditory (MA) and visual-auditory (VA) events using a stimulus omission paradigm. In the MA condition, a finger tap triggered the sound of a handclap whereas in the VA condition the same sound was accompanied by a video showing the handclap. In both conditions, the auditory stimulus was omitted in either 50% or 12% of the trials. These auditory omissions induced early and mid-latency ERP components (oN1 and oN2, presumably reflecting prediction and prediction error), and subsequent higher-order error evaluation processes. The oN1 and oN2 of MA and VA were alike in amplitude, topography, and neural sources despite that the origin of the prediction stems from different brain areas (motor versus visual cortex). This suggests that MA and VA predictions activate a sensory template of the sound in auditory cortex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Amygdala and auditory cortex exhibit distinct sensitivity to relevant acoustic features of auditory emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannese, Alessia; Grandjean, Didier; Frühholz, Sascha

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating between auditory signals of different affective value is critical to successful social interaction. It is commonly held that acoustic decoding of such signals occurs in the auditory system, whereas affective decoding occurs in the amygdala. However, given that the amygdala receives direct subcortical projections that bypass the auditory cortex, it is possible that some acoustic decoding occurs in the amygdala as well, when the acoustic features are relevant for affective discrimination. We tested this hypothesis by combining functional neuroimaging with the neurophysiological phenomena of repetition suppression (RS) and repetition enhancement (RE) in human listeners. Our results show that both amygdala and auditory cortex responded differentially to physical voice features, suggesting that the amygdala and auditory cortex decode the affective quality of the voice not only by processing the emotional content from previously processed acoustic features, but also by processing the acoustic features themselves, when these are relevant to the identification of the voice's affective value. Specifically, we found that the auditory cortex is sensitive to spectral high-frequency voice cues when discriminating vocal anger from vocal fear and joy, whereas the amygdala is sensitive to vocal pitch when discriminating between negative vocal emotions (i.e., anger and fear). Vocal pitch is an instantaneously recognized voice feature, which is potentially transferred to the amygdala by direct subcortical projections. These results together provide evidence that, besides the auditory cortex, the amygdala too processes acoustic information, when this is relevant to the discrimination of auditory emotions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction of language, auditory and memory brain networks in auditory verbal hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curcic-Blake, Branislava; Ford, Judith M.; Hubl, Daniela; Orlov, Natasza D.; Sommer, Iris E.; Waters, Flavie; Allen, Paul; Jardri, Renaud; Woodruff, Peter W.; David, Olivier; Mulert, Christoph; Woodward, Todd S.; Aleman, Andre

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) occur in psychotic disorders, but also as a symptom of other conditions and even in healthy people. Several current theories on the origin of AVH converge, with neuroimaging studies suggesting that the language, auditory and memory/limbic networks are of

  8. Manipulation of Auditory Inputs as Rehabilitation Therapy for Maladaptive Auditory Cortical Reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Okamoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurophysiological and neuroimaging data suggest that the brains of not only children but also adults are reorganized based on sensory inputs and behaviors. Plastic changes in the brain are generally beneficial; however, maladaptive cortical reorganization in the auditory cortex may lead to hearing disorders such as tinnitus and hyperacusis. Recent studies attempted to noninvasively visualize pathological neural activity in the living human brain and reverse maladaptive cortical reorganization by the suitable manipulation of auditory inputs in order to alleviate detrimental auditory symptoms. The effects of the manipulation of auditory inputs on maladaptively reorganized brain were reviewed herein. The findings obtained indicate that rehabilitation therapy based on the manipulation of auditory inputs is an effective and safe approach for hearing disorders. The appropriate manipulation of sensory inputs guided by the visualization of pathological brain activities using recent neuroimaging techniques may contribute to the establishment of new clinical applications for affected individuals.

  9. Improvement of auditory hallucinations and reduction of primary auditory area's activation following TMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesel, Frederik L.; Mehndiratta, Amit; Hempel, Albrecht; Hempel, Eckhard; Kress, Kai R.; Essig, Marco; Schröder, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the present case study, improvement of auditory hallucinations following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) therapy was investigated with respect to activation changes of the auditory cortices. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), activation of the auditory cortices was assessed prior to and after a 4-week TMS series of the left superior temporal gyrus in a schizophrenic patient with medication-resistant auditory hallucinations. Results: Hallucinations decreased slightly after the third and profoundly after the fourth week of TMS. Activation in the primary auditory area decreased, whereas activation in the operculum and insula remained stable. Conclusions: Combination of TMS and repetitive fMRI is promising to elucidate the physiological changes induced by TMS.

  10. Seismically observed seiching in the Panama Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D.E.; Ringler, A.T.; Hutt, C.R.; Gee, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    A large portion of the seismic noise spectrum is dominated by water wave energy coupled into the solid Earth. Distinct mechanisms of water wave induced ground motions are distinguished by their spectral content. For example, cultural noise is generally Panama Canal there is an additional source of long-period noise generated by standing water waves, seiches, induced by disturbances such as passing ships and wind pressure. We compare seismic waveforms to water level records and relate these observations to changes in local tilt and gravity due to an oscillating seiche. The methods and observations discussed in this paper provide a first step toward quantifying the impact of water inundation as recorded by seismometers. This type of quantified understanding of water inundation will help in future estimates of similar phenomena such as the seismic observations of tsunami impact. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Chelation in root canal therapy reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Matthias; Schmidlin, Patrick; Sener, Beatrice; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess interactions of EDTA and citric acid (CA) with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), the indispensable endodontic irrigant. Other chelators were simultaneously evaluated as possible alternatives: sodium triphosphate (STP), amino tris methylenephosphonic acid (ATMA), and 1- hydroxyethylidene-1, 1-bisphosphonate (HEBP). Available chlorine was titrated in chelator-NaOCl solutions. All chelators other than HEBP and STP caused an almost complete, immediate loss of available chlorine in solution. Atomic absorbtion spectrometry and SEM evaluation of root canal walls of instrumented teeth indicated that NaOCl had no negative effect on calcium-complexing ability of chelators. STP was too weak a complexing agent to warrant further studies. Finally, CA-, EDTA-, and HEBP-NaOCl mixtures were evaluated for their antimicrobial capacity. Again, EDTA and CA negatively interfered with NaOCl, while HEBP did not.

  12. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

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    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  13. Detection of Mesiobuccal Canal in Maxillary Molars and Distolingual Canal in Mandibular Molars by Dental CT: A Retrospective Study of 100 Cases

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    Sushma Rathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To detect presence of MB2 canal in maxillary molars and distolingual canal in mandibular molars by Dental CT. Material and Methods. A retrospective study of 100 Dental CTs was done. Axial and paraxial images obtained were used to assess the presence of MB2 canal in maxillary molars and distolingual canal in mandibular molars. Results. The youngest patient was of 11 years while the eldest patient was of 77 years. Males were 58 in number and females were 42 in number. MB2 canals were present in 57 patients and distolingual canal was present in 18 patients. Maximum MB2 canals were present in age group between 51 and 60 years, while distolingual canals were present in age group of 21–30 years. Conclusion. Dental CT allows adequate visualization of variation in root canal morphology and can be important diagnostic tool for successful endodontic therapy.

  14. Success rate of overfilled root canal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, W.; Sheikh, A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, poor obturation has been considered the primary cause of root canal treatment failures The purpose of this study was to assess the success rate of overfilled root canal treatment cases in order to decide whether a definitive restoration can be placed immediately following treatment in an overfilled case or whether the patient needs to be kept on a follow up prior to the placement of a definitive restoration. Methods: A total of 1242 patients periapical radiographs (1748 teeth) were assessed, out of which 397 teeth (in 285 patients) were found to be overfilled. Out of these 285 patients, 111 (128 cases) agreed to participate in this cross sectional study and were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination. Success was evaluated clinically by absence of symptoms (pain, swelling, tenderness to percussion and sinus tract) and radiograhically by the decrease in size of periapical lesion or no change in size. Increase in size of periapical lesion was deemed to be a failure. Results: Our findings revealed that despite overfill, the treatment was successful in 115 cases and failure was noted in 13 cases showing an overall success rate of 89.8% and failure rate of 10.2%. Out of 13 cases of failure, all 13 showed an increase in periapical lesion size, out of which 10 were accompanied with pain. Conclusion: Based on the results obtained in our study, we have determined that there is no need to delay placement of a permanent restoration on overfilled teeth (ruling out the presence of other procedural errors) nor is there any need to pursue any further surgical or non-surgical endodontic treatment. However we would suggest that patients should be kept on follow-up after placement of permanent restoration. (author)

  15. Using Auditory Steady-State Responses for Measuring Hearing Protector Attenuation

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    Olivier Valentin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Present methods of measuring the attenuation of hearing protection devices (HPDs have limitations. Objective measurements such as field microphone in real-ear do not assess bone-conducted sound. Psychophysical measurements such as real-ear attenuation at threshold (REAT are biased due to the low frequency masking effects from test subjects’ physiological noise and the variability of measurements based on subjective responses. An auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs procedure is explored as a technique which might overcome these limitations. Subjects and Methods: Pure tone stimuli (500 and 1000 Hz, amplitude modulated at 40 Hz, are presented to 10 normal-hearing adults through headphones at three levels in 10 dB steps. Two conditions were assessed: unoccluded ear canal and occluded ear canal. ASSR amplitude data as a function of the stimulation level are linearized using least-square regressions. The “physiological attenuation” is then calculated as the average difference between the two measurements. The technical feasibility of measuring earplug attenuation is demonstrated for the group average attenuation across subjects. Results: No significant statistical difference is found between the average REAT attenuation and the average ASSR-based attenuation. Conclusion: Feasibility is not yet demonstrated for individual subjects since differences between the estimates occurred for some subjects.

  16. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  17. Perfluoroalkyl substances in waters along the Grand Canal, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, H T; Jiao, X C; Gai, N; Chen, S; Lu, G H; Yin, X C; Yamazaki, E; Yamashita, N; Tan, K Y; Yang, Y L; Pan, J

    2017-07-01

    The Grand Canal, also known as the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the longest canal in the world. It is an important trunk line of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China. The contamination status and spatial distributions of perfluoroalky substances (PFASs) in waters of the Grand Canal were investigated. The total concentrations of PFASs (∑PFASs) range from 7.8 ng/L to 218.0 ng/L, with high ∑PFASs occurring in the southern part of the Grand Canal which is located in a highly urbanized and economically developed region. The dominance of PFOA showed a decreasing trend toward north while shorter chain homologue proportions increased in the northern part of the Canal which mainly traverses underdeveloped and rural areas in Eastern China. Positive correlations were observed between ∑PFASs and the population density as well as GDP per capita. Intersection with large rivers may affect the contamination levels and composition of PFASs in the water of the Grand Canal near the intersection sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender and laterality in semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimnejad, K; Czerny, M S; Lookabaugh, S; Lee, D J; Mikulec, A A

    2016-08-01

    To determine if there is gender or laterality predilection in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome. A multi-institutional chart review was performed to identify patients diagnosed with semicircular canal dehiscence between 2000 and 2015. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed to further identify patients with semicircular canal dehiscence. Age, gender and laterality data were collected. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for gender or laterality preponderance. A total of 682 patients with semicircular canal dehiscence were identified by literature and chart review. Mean age of diagnosis was 49.75 years (standard deviation = 15.33). Semicircular canal dehiscence was associated with a statistically significant female predominance (chi-square = 7.185, p = 0.007); the female-to-male ratio was 1.2 to 1. Left-sided semicircular canal dehiscence was most common, followed by right-sided then bilateral (chi-square = 23.457, p < 0.001). Semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome is most commonly left-sided and exhibits a female predominance. This may be secondary to morphological cerebral hemisphere asymmetries in both sexes and a predilection of women to seek more medical care than men.

  19. Discharge Estimation in a Lined Canal Using Information Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chang Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a new method and technology to measure the discharge in a lined canal in Taiwan. An Acoustic Digital Current Meter mounted on a measurement platform is used to measure the velocities over the full cross-section for establishing the measurement method. The proposed method primarily employs Chiu’s Equation which is based on entropy to establish a constant ratio the relation between the maximum and mean velocities in an irrigation canal, and compute the maximum velocity by the observed velocity profile. In consequence, the mean velocity of the lined canal can be rapidly determined by the maximum velocity and the constant ratio. The cross-sectional area of the artificial irrigation canal can be calculated for the water stage. Finally, the discharge in the lined canal can be efficiently determined by the estimated mean velocity and the cross-sectional area. Using the data of discharges and stages collected in the Wan-Dan Canal, the correlation of stage and discharge is also developed for remote real-time monitoring and estimating discharge from the pumping station. Overall, Chiu’s Equation is demonstrated to reliably and accurately measure discharge in a lined canal, and can serve as reference for future calibration for a stage-discharge rating curve.

  20. Auditory brainstem evoked responses and temperature monitoring during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R A; Edmonds, H L; Auden, S M; Austin, E H

    1999-09-01

    To examine the effects of temperature on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in infants during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass for total circulatory arrest (TCA). The relationship between ABRs (as a surrogate measure of core-brain temperature) and body temperature as measured at several temperature monitoring sites was determined. In a prospective, observational study, ABRs were recorded non-invasively at normothermia and at every 1 or 2 degrees C change in ear-canal temperature during cooling and rewarming in 15 infants (ages: 2 days to 14 months) that required TCA. The ABR latencies and amplitudes and the lowest temperatures at which an ABR was identified (the threshold) were measured during both cooling and rewarming. Temperatures from four standard temperature monitoring sites were simultaneously recorded. The latencies of ABRs increased and amplitudes decreased with cooling (P < 0.01), but rewarming reversed these effects. The ABR threshold temperature as related to each monitoring site (ear-canal, nasopharynx, esophagus and bladder) was respectively determined as 23 +/- 2.2 degrees C, 20.8 +/- 1.7 degrees C, 14.6 +/- 3.4 degrees C, and 21.5 +/- 3.8 degrees C during cooling and 21.8 +/- 1.6 degrees C, 22.4 +/- 2.0 degrees C, 27.6 +/- 3.6 degrees C, and 23.0 +/- 2.4 degrees C during rewarming. The rewarming latencies were shorter and Q10 latencies smaller than the corresponding cooling values (P < 0.01). Esophageal and bladder sites were more susceptible to temperature variations as compared with the ear-canal and nasopharynx. No temperature site reliably predicted an electrophysiological threshold. A faster latency recovery during rewarming suggests that body temperature monitoring underestimates the effects of rewarming in the core-brain. ABRs may be helpful to monitor the effects of cooling and rewarming on the core-brain during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

  1. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Palmer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians' encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies), and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies). Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning) or performing without sound (motor learning); following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall). During either Learning (Experiment 1) or Recall (Experiment 2), pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced) and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals) were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists' pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2). Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1): Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2): Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the presence of

  2. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M.; Palmer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians' encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies), and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies). Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning) or performing without sound (motor learning); following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall). During either Learning (Experiment 1) or Recall (Experiment 2), pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced) and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals) were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists' pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2). Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1): Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2): Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the presence of

  3. Experience and information loss in auditory and visual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloede, Michele E; Paulauskas, Emily E; Gregg, Melissa K

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies show that recognition memory for sounds is inferior to memory for pictures. Four experiments were conducted to examine the nature of auditory and visual memory. Experiments 1-3 were conducted to evaluate the role of experience in auditory and visual memory. Participants received a study phase with pictures/sounds, followed by a recognition memory test. Participants then completed auditory training with each of the sounds, followed by a second memory test. Despite auditory training in Experiments 1 and 2, visual memory was superior to auditory memory. In Experiment 3, we found that it is possible to improve auditory memory, but only after 3 days of specific auditory training and 3 days of visual memory decay. We examined the time course of information loss in auditory and visual memory in Experiment 4 and found a trade-off between visual and auditory recognition memory: Visual memory appears to have a larger capacity, while auditory memory is more enduring. Our results indicate that visual and auditory memory are inherently different memory systems and that differences in visual and auditory recognition memory performance may be due to the different amounts of experience with visual and auditory information, as well as structurally different neural circuitry specialized for information retention.

  4. Perceptual Plasticity for Auditory Object Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Shannon L. M.; Van Hedger, Stephen C.; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2017-01-01

    In our auditory environment, we rarely experience the exact acoustic waveform twice. This is especially true for communicative signals that have meaning for listeners. In speech and music, the acoustic signal changes as a function of the talker (or instrument), speaking (or playing) rate, and room acoustics, to name a few factors. Yet, despite this acoustic variability, we are able to recognize a sentence or melody as the same across various kinds of acoustic inputs and determine meaning based on listening goals, expectations, context, and experience. The recognition process relates acoustic signals to prior experience despite variability in signal-relevant and signal-irrelevant acoustic properties, some of which could be considered as “noise” in service of a recognition goal. However, some acoustic variability, if systematic, is lawful and can be exploited by listeners to aid in recognition. Perceivable changes in systematic variability can herald a need for listeners to reorganize perception and reorient their attention to more immediately signal-relevant cues. This view is not incorporated currently in many extant theories of auditory perception, which traditionally reduce psychological or neural representations of perceptual objects and the processes that act on them to static entities. While this reduction is likely done for the sake of empirical tractability, such a reduction may seriously distort the perceptual process to be modeled. We argue that perceptual representations, as well as the processes underlying perception, are dynamically determined by an interaction between the uncertainty of the auditory signal and constraints of context. This suggests that the process of auditory recognition is highly context-dependent in that the identity of a given auditory object may be intrinsically tied to its preceding context. To argue for the flexible neural and psychological updating of sound-to-meaning mappings across speech and music, we draw upon examples

  5. Endodontic Management of a Maxillary Molar with Three Mesiobuccal Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Gundam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative that the clinician should have comprehensive knowledge about the normal anatomy and its variations of the teeth as the deviations from the usual are very common. An increased awareness of unusual anatomy and a better understanding of the root canal system guide the clinician in accurate diagnosis and treatment of such variations in order to achieve a successful endodontic outcome. The maxillary first molar has been shown to have a wide variation in respect to the number of canals specifically noted in the mesiobuccal root. The current case report shows the successful management of a maxillary molar in which the mesiobuccal root had three canals.

  6. Absence of auditory 'global interference' in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Jessica M; Stewart, Mary E; Barnard, Louise; Rodgers, Jacqui; Young, Allan H; O'Brien, Gregory; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2003-12-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the cognitive style of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). One theory, that of weak central coherence, concerns an inability to combine stimulus details into a coherent whole. Here we test this theory in the case of sound patterns, using a new definition of the details (local structure) and the coherent whole (global structure). Thirteen individuals with a diagnosis of autism or Asperger's syndrome and 15 control participants were administered auditory tests, where they were required to match local pitch direction changes between two auditory sequences. When the other local features of the sequence pairs were altered (the actual pitches and relative time points of pitch direction change), the control participants obtained lower scores compared with when these details were left unchanged. This can be attributed to interference from the global structure, defined as the combination of the local auditory details. In contrast, the participants with ASD did not obtain lower scores in the presence of such mismatches. This was attributed to the absence of interference from an auditory coherent whole. The results are consistent with the presence of abnormal interactions between local and global auditory perception in ASD.

  7. Facilitated auditory detection for speech sounds

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    Carine eSignoret

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available If it is well known that knowledge facilitates higher cognitive functions, such as visual and auditory word recognition, little is known about the influence of knowledge on detection, particularly in the auditory modality. Our study tested the influence of phonological and lexical knowledge on auditory detection. Words, pseudo words and complex non phonological sounds, energetically matched as closely as possible, were presented at a range of presentation levels from sub threshold to clearly audible. The participants performed a detection task (Experiments 1 and 2 that was followed by a two alternative forced choice recognition task in Experiment 2. The results of this second task in Experiment 2 suggest a correct recognition of words in the absence of detection with a subjective threshold approach. In the detection task of both experiments, phonological stimuli (words and pseudo words were better detected than non phonological stimuli (complex sounds, presented close to the auditory threshold. This finding suggests an advantage of speech for signal detection. An additional advantage of words over pseudo words was observed in Experiment 2, suggesting that lexical knowledge could also improve auditory detection when listeners had to recognize the stimulus in a subsequent task. Two simulations of detection performance performed on the sound signals confirmed that the advantage of speech over non speech processing could not be attributed to energetic differences in the stimuli.

  8. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

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    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  9. Auditory memory for temporal characteristics of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokoll, Melanie A; Klump, Georg M; Langemann, Ulrike

    2008-05-01

    This study evaluates auditory memory for variations in the rate of sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) of noise bursts in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). To estimate the extent of the starling's auditory short-term memory store, a delayed non-matching-to-sample paradigm was applied. The birds were trained to discriminate between a series of identical "sample stimuli" and a single "test stimulus". The birds classified SAM rates of sample and test stimuli as being either the same or different. Memory performance of the birds was measured as the percentage of correct classifications. Auditory memory persistence time was estimated as a function of the delay between sample and test stimuli. Memory performance was significantly affected by the delay between sample and test and by the number of sample stimuli presented before the test stimulus, but was not affected by the difference in SAM rate between sample and test stimuli. The individuals' auditory memory persistence times varied between 2 and 13 s. The starlings' auditory memory persistence in the present study for signals varying in the temporal domain was significantly shorter compared to that of a previous study (Zokoll et al. in J Acoust Soc Am 121:2842, 2007) applying tonal stimuli varying in the spectral domain.

  10. ROUTING DEMAND CHANGES TO USERS ON THE WM LATERAL CANAL WITH SACMAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most canals have either long travel times or insufficient in-canal storage to operate on-demand. Thus, most flow changes must be routed through the canal. Volume compensation has been proposed as a method for easily applying feedforward control to irrigation canals. SacMan (Software for Automated Ca...

  11. Shaping ability of several nickel–titanium systems in double-curved simulated canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna Alrahabi

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The iRaCe, ProTaper Next, Wave One, and TF systems preserved the original shape of the double-curved (S-shaped canal with minimum root canal transportation. These systems produced satisfactory root canal instrumentation in S-shaped canals.

  12. 46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a... Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of...

  13. Visual and Auditory Memory in Spelling: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J. B.; Wedell, K.

    1972-01-01

    Using visual and auditory memory sequencing tests with 140 children aged 8-10, this study aimed to investigate the assumption that visual and auditory memory are important component functions in children's spelling. (Author)

  14. Naftidrofuryl affects neurite regeneration by injured adult auditory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, P P; Staecker, H; Moonen, G; van de Water, T R

    1993-07-01

    Afferent auditory neurons are essential for the transmission of auditory information from Corti's organ to the central auditory pathway. Auditory neurons are very sensitive to acute insult and have a limited ability to regenerate injured neuronal processes. Therefore, these neurons appear to be a limiting factor in restoration of hearing function following an injury to the peripheral auditory receptor. In a previous study nerve growth factor (NGF) was shown to stimulate neurite repair but not survival of injured auditory neurons. In this study, we have demonstrated a neuritogenesis promoting effect of naftidrofuryl in an vitro model for injury to adult auditory neurons, i.e. dissociated cell cultures of adult rat spiral ganglia. Conversely, naftidrofuryl did not have any demonstrable survival promoting effect on these in vitro preparations of injured auditory neurons. The potential uses of this drug as a therapeutic agent in acute diseases of the inner ear are discussed in the light of these observations.

  15. The role of temporal coherence in auditory stream segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Simon Krogholt

    The ability to perceptually segregate concurrent sound sources and focus one’s attention on a single source at a time is essential for the ability to use acoustic information. While perceptual experiments have determined a range of acoustic cues that help facilitate auditory stream segregation......, it is not clear how the auditory system realizes the task. This thesis presents a study of the mechanisms involved in auditory stream segregation. Through a combination of psychoacoustic experiments, designed to characterize the influence of acoustic cues on auditory stream formation, and computational models...... of auditory processing, the role of auditory preprocessing and temporal coherence in auditory stream formation was evaluated. The computational model presented in this study assumes that auditory stream segregation occurs when sounds stimulate non-overlapping neural populations in a temporally incoherent...

  16. Central auditory processing outcome after stroke in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla M. I. Freiria Elias

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate central auditory processing in children with unilateral stroke and to verify whether the hemisphere affected by the lesion influenced auditory competence. Method 23 children (13 male between 7 and 16 years old were evaluated through speech-in-noise tests (auditory closure; dichotic digit test and staggered spondaic word test (selective attention; pitch pattern and duration pattern sequence tests (temporal processing and their results were compared with control children. Auditory competence was established according to the performance in auditory analysis ability. Results Was verified similar performance between groups in auditory closure ability and pronounced deficits in selective attention and temporal processing abilities. Most children with stroke showed an impaired auditory ability in a moderate degree. Conclusion Children with stroke showed deficits in auditory processing and the degree of impairment was not related to the hemisphere affected by the lesion.

  17. The effect of background music in auditory health persuasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbert, Sarah; Dijkstra, Arie

    2013-01-01

    In auditory health persuasion, threatening information regarding health is communicated by voice only. One relevant context of auditory persuasion is the addition of background music. There are different mechanisms through which background music might influence persuasion, for example through mood

  18. Auditory motion-specific mechanisms in the primate brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colline Poirier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work examined the mechanisms underlying auditory motion processing in the auditory cortex of awake monkeys using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We tested to what extent auditory motion analysis can be explained by the linear combination of static spatial mechanisms, spectrotemporal processes, and their interaction. We found that the posterior auditory cortex, including A1 and the surrounding caudal belt and parabelt, is involved in auditory motion analysis. Static spatial and spectrotemporal processes were able to fully explain motion-induced activation in most parts of the auditory cortex, including A1, but not in circumscribed regions of the posterior belt and parabelt cortex. We show that in these regions motion-specific processes contribute to the activation, providing the first demonstration that auditory motion is not simply deduced from changes in static spatial location. These results demonstrate that parallel mechanisms for motion and static spatial analysis coexist within the auditory dorsal stream.

  19. Source reliability in auditory health persuasion : Its antecedents and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbert, Sarah P.; Dijkstra, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Persuasive health messages can be presented through an auditory channel, thereby enhancing the salience of the source, making it fundamentally different from written or pictorial information. We focused on the determinants of perceived source reliability in auditory health persuasion by

  20. Neuronal Correlates of Auditory Streaming in Monkey Auditory Cortex for Tone Sequences without Spectral Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Knyazeva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study finds a neuronal correlate of auditory perceptual streaming in the primary auditory cortex for sequences of tone complexes that have the same amplitude spectrum but a different phase spectrum. Our finding is based on microelectrode recordings of multiunit activity from 270 cortical sites in three awake macaque monkeys. The monkeys were presented with repeated sequences of a tone triplet that consisted of an A tone, a B tone, another A tone and then a pause. The A and B tones were composed of unresolved harmonics formed by adding the harmonics in cosine phase, in alternating phase, or in random phase. A previous psychophysical study on humans revealed that when the A and B tones are similar, humans integrate them into a single auditory stream; when the A and B tones are dissimilar, humans segregate them into separate auditory streams. We found that the similarity of neuronal rate responses to the triplets was highest when all A and B tones had cosine phase. Similarity was intermediate when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had alternating phase. Similarity was lowest when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had random phase. The present study corroborates and extends previous reports, showing similar correspondences between neuronal activity in the primary auditory cortex and auditory streaming of sound sequences. It also is consistent with Fishman’s population separation model of auditory streaming.

  1. Neuronal Correlates of Auditory Streaming in Monkey Auditory Cortex for Tone Sequences without Spectral Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazeva, Stanislava; Selezneva, Elena; Gorkin, Alexander; Aggelopoulos, Nikolaos C; Brosch, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This study finds a neuronal correlate of auditory perceptual streaming in the primary auditory cortex for sequences of tone complexes that have the same amplitude spectrum but a different phase spectrum. Our finding is based on microelectrode recordings of multiunit activity from 270 cortical sites in three awake macaque monkeys. The monkeys were presented with repeated sequences of a tone triplet that consisted of an A tone, a B tone, another A tone and then a pause. The A and B tones were composed of unresolved harmonics formed by adding the harmonics in cosine phase, in alternating phase, or in random phase. A previous psychophysical study on humans revealed that when the A and B tones are similar, humans integrate them into a single auditory stream; when the A and B tones are dissimilar, humans segregate them into separate auditory streams. We found that the similarity of neuronal rate responses to the triplets was highest when all A and B tones had cosine phase. Similarity was intermediate when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had alternating phase. Similarity was lowest when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had random phase. The present study corroborates and extends previous reports, showing similar correspondences between neuronal activity in the primary auditory cortex and auditory streaming of sound sequences. It also is consistent with Fishman's population separation model of auditory streaming.

  2. Musical experience shapes top-down auditory mechanisms: evidence from masking and auditory attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Ashley, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that cognitive functions, such as attention and memory, drive perception by tuning sensory mechanisms to relevant acoustic features. Long-term musical experience also modulates lower-level auditory function, although the mechanisms by which this occurs remain uncertain. In order to tease apart the mechanisms that drive perceptual enhancements in musicians, we posed the question: do well-developed cognitive abilities fine-tune auditory perception in a top-down fashion? We administered a standardized battery of perceptual and cognitive tests to adult musicians and non-musicians, including tasks either more or less susceptible to cognitive control (e.g., backward versus simultaneous masking) and more or less dependent on auditory or visual processing (e.g., auditory versus visual attention). Outcomes indicate lower perceptual thresholds in musicians specifically for auditory tasks that relate with cognitive abilities, such as backward masking and auditory attention. These enhancements were observed in the absence of group differences for the simultaneous masking and visual attention tasks. Our results suggest that long-term musical practice strengthens cognitive functions and that these functions benefit auditory skills. Musical training bolsters higher-level mechanisms that, when impaired, relate to language and literacy deficits. Thus, musical training may serve to lessen the impact of these deficits by strengthening the corticofugal system for hearing. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multichannel auditory search: toward understanding control processes in polychotic auditory listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M D

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments are presented that serve as a framework for exploring auditory information processing. The framework is referred to as polychotic listening or auditory search, and it requires a listener to scan multiple simultaneous auditory streams for the appearance of a target word (the name of a letter such as A or M). Participants' ability to scan between two and six simultaneous auditory streams of letter and digit names for the name of a target letter was examined using six loudspeakers. The main independent variable was auditory load, or the number of active audio streams on a given trial. The primary dependent variables were target localization accuracy and reaction time. Results showed that as load increased, performance decreased. The performance decrease was evident in reaction time, accuracy, and sensitivity measures. The second study required participants to practice the same task for 10 sessions, for a total of 1800 trials. Results indicated that even with extensive practice, performance was still affected by auditory load. The present results are compared with findings in the visual search literature. The implications for the use of multiple auditory displays are discussed. Potential applications include cockpit and automobile warning displays, virtual reality systems, and training systems.

  4. Endodontic management of a permanent mandibular first molar with six canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ahmad Alenezi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An excellent knowledge of root canal anatomy of teeth is a golden standard for the successful clinical outcome of root canal therapy. Several anatomic variations may occur in a permanent mandibular first molar. Usually, three to four root canals are found, but six to eight canals have been reported. A 22-year-old Bangladeshi woman was referred for endodontic treatment of mandibular right first molar. Rigorous clinical examination revealed the presence of three canals in mesial root and three canals in distal root as well. The dentists should expect any variation in root canal system and use the diagnostic tools to manage the cases.

  5. High resolution computed tomography of auditory ossicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, M.; Murata, K.; Ohta, F.; Yoshida, A.; Ishida, O.; Kinki Univ., Osaka

    1990-01-01

    Auditory ossicular sections were scanned at section thicknesses (mm)/section interspaces (mm) of 1.5/1.5 (61 patients), 1.0/1.0 (13 patients) or 1.5/1.0 (33 patients). At any type of section thickness/interspace, the malleal and incudal structures were observed with almost equal frequency. The region of the incudostapedial joint and each component part of the stapes were shown more frequently at a section interspace of 1.0 mm than at 1.5 mm. The visualization frequency of each auditory ossicular component on two or more serial sections was investigated. At a section thickness/section interspace of 1.5/1.5, the visualization rates were low except for large components such as the head of the malleus and the body of the incus, but at a slice interspace of 1.0 mm, they were high for most components of the auditory ossicles. (orig.)

  6. The Relationship between Types of Attention and Auditory Processing Skills: Reconsidering Auditory Processing Disorder Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinos, Georgios; Iliadou, Vassiliki-Maria; Edwards, Lindsey; Sirimanna, Tony; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2018-01-01

    Measures of attention have been found to correlate with specific auditory processing tests in samples of children suspected of Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), but these relationships have not been adequately investigated. Despite evidence linking auditory attention and deficits/symptoms of APD, measures of attention are not routinely used in APD diagnostic protocols. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between auditory and visual attention tests and auditory processing tests in children with APD and to assess whether a proposed diagnostic protocol for APD, including measures of attention, could provide useful information for APD management. A pilot study including 27 children, aged 7–11 years, referred for APD assessment was conducted. The validated test of everyday attention for children, with visual and auditory attention tasks, the listening in spatialized noise sentences test, the children's communication checklist questionnaire and tests from a standard APD diagnostic test battery were administered. Pearson's partial correlation analysis examining the relationship between these tests and Cochrane's Q test analysis comparing proportions of diagnosis under each proposed battery were conducted. Divided auditory and divided auditory-visual attention strongly correlated with the dichotic digits test, r = 0.68, p attention battery identified as having Attention Deficits (ADs). The proposed APD battery excluding AD cases did not have a significantly different diagnosis proportion than the standard APD battery. Finally, the newly proposed diagnostic battery, identifying an inattentive subtype of APD, identified five children who would have otherwise been considered not having ADs. The findings show that a subgroup of children with APD demonstrates underlying sustained and divided attention deficits. Attention deficits in children with APD appear to be centred around the auditory modality but further examination of types of attention in both

  7. What determines auditory distraction? On the roles of local auditory changes and expectation violations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P Röer

    Full Text Available Both the acoustic variability of a distractor sequence and the degree to which it violates expectations are important determinants of auditory distraction. In four experiments we examined the relative contribution of local auditory changes on the one hand and expectation violations on the other hand in the disruption of serial recall by irrelevant sound. We present evidence for a greater disruption by auditory sequences ending in unexpected steady state distractor repetitions compared to auditory sequences with expected changing state endings even though the former contained fewer local changes. This effect was demonstrated with piano melodies (Experiment 1 and speech distractors (Experiment 2. Furthermore, it was replicated when the expectation violation occurred after the encoding of the target items (Experiment 3, indicating that the items' maintenance in short-term memory was disrupted by attentional capture and not their encoding. This seems to be primarily due to the violation of a model of the specific auditory distractor sequences because the effect vanishes and even reverses when the experiment provides no opportunity to build up a specific neural model about the distractor sequence (Experiment 4. Nevertheless, the violation of abstract long-term knowledge about auditory regularities seems to cause a small and transient capture effect: Disruption decreased markedly over the course of the experiments indicating that participants habituated to the unexpected distractor repetitions across trials. The overall pattern of results adds to the growing literature that the degree to which auditory distractors violate situation-specific expectations is a more important determinant of auditory distraction than the degree to which a distractor sequence contains local auditory changes.

  8. C-shaped root canal in a maxillary first molar: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Z; Tuncel, B; Serper, A; Calt, S

    2006-02-01

    This case report presents an unusual C-shaped root canal system in a maxillary first molar tooth. Although C-shaped root canals are most frequently seen in the mandibular second molar, they may also appear in maxillary molars. A literature search revealed only a few case reports of C-shaped root canal systems in maxillary molars. The present case describes a C-shaped canal in the buccal root of a maxillary first molar. The endodontic access cavity displayed two canal orifices, one leading to the canal system in the buccal root, the other into the palatal root canal system. In the buccal root, what appeared to be the mesial and distal canals joined to form a single C-shaped canal. --Careful examination of radiographs and the internal anatomy of teeth is essential.-- The location and morphology of root canals should be identified at high magnification under the microscope.

  9. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians’ encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies, and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies. Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning or performing without sound (motor learning; following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall. During either Learning (Experiment 1 or Recall (Experiment 2, pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists’ pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2. Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1: Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2: Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the

  10. Differential Recruitment of Auditory Cortices in the Consolidation of Recent Auditory Fearful Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Grosso, Anna; Renna, Annamaria; Sacchetti, Benedetto

    2016-08-17

    Memories of frightening events require a protracted consolidation process. Sensory cortex, such as the auditory cortex, is involved in the formation of fearful memories with a more complex sensory stimulus pattern. It remains controversial, however, whether the auditory cortex is also required for fearful memories related to simple sensory stimuli. In the present study, we found that, 1 d after training, the temporary inactivation of either the most anterior region of the auditory cortex, including the primary (Te1) cortex, or the most posterior region, which included the secondary (Te2) component, did not affect the retention of recent memories, which is consistent with the current literature. However, at this time point, the inactivation of the entire auditory cortices completely prevented the formation of new memories. Amnesia was site specific and was not due to auditory stimuli perception or processing and strictly related to the interference with memory consolidation processes. Strikingly, at a late time interval 4 d after training, blocking the posterior part (encompassing the Te2) alone impaired memory retention, whereas the inactivation of the anterior part (encompassing the Te1) left memory unaffected. Together, these data show that the auditory cortex is necessary for the consolidation of auditory fearful memories related to simple tones in rats. Moreover, these results suggest that, at early time intervals, memory information is processed in a distributed network composed of both the anterior and the posterior auditory cortical regions, whereas, at late time intervals, memory processing is concentrated in the most posterior part containing the Te2 region. Memories of threatening experiences undergo a prolonged process of "consolidation" to be maintained for a long time. The dynamic of fearful memory consolidation is poorly understood. Here, we show that 1 d after learning, memory is processed in a distributed network composed of both primary Te1 and

  11. Research progress of antagonistic interactions among root canal irrigations disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen QU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Root canal therapy is the most effective way to treat various pulposis and periapical disease. Simple mechanical apparatus can not clean root canal thoroughly, but may affect tight filling instead. It can achieve a satisfactory cleansing effect only when it is combined with a chemical solution. Irrigation fluid for root canal should possess the properties of tissue dissolution, antimicrobial, lubrication, and removal of smear layer. So far, no solution is able to fulfill all these functions. Therefore, a combined use of multiple irrigation solutions is suggested. It can not only achieve good effect in cleaning and disinfection, also it can lower the concentration of different solutions, thus reducing the side effects. Nevertheless, some experiments proved that antagonism existed among the chemicals used for irrigations. The purpose of present article is to review the antagonistic effect among the chemicals used for irrigation when they are used together for root canal treatment.

  12. Spinal canal extension of hyperalimentation catheter without neurologic sequela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasier, M.; Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock; Hassell, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt at placement of a left femoral vein hyperalimentation catheter resulted in entrance of the catheter into the spinal canal. Catheter location was documented by injections of nonionic contrast material into the catheter without neurologic sequellae. (orig.)

  13. Canalization of Gene Action in the Gossypium Leaf Shape System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The important, .... Canalization of gene action is important from two aspects. In the first .... indices for the heterozygotes also agree with Silow's actual figures, and it may be inferred .... demic outbreaks which often annihilate the whole stock.

  14. Evaluation of Root Canal Morphology of Human Primary Mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Keywords: Primary teeth, root canal, Vertucci classification. Evaluation of Root .... Radiology using CBCT; Veraviewepocs 3D R100/F40. (J Morita Mfg. Corp., .... maxillofacial structures by CBCT on a high resolution, and this ...

  15. Evaluation of complications of root canal treatment performed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mothanna K. AlRahabi

    2017-07-05

    Jul 5, 2017 ... treatment performed by undergraduate dental students, Libyan Journal of Medicine, 12:1, 1345582, .... mass could be detected on X-ray radiographs. Overfilling was ... of tooth structure on root canal obturation and anatomical.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces prepared with three rotary endodontic systems: Lightspeed, ProTaper and EndoWave. ... fracture with LightSpeed (LS), ProTaper (PT) and EndoWave (Ew) rotary instruments.

  17. Incisive canal deflation for correct implant placement: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spin-Neto, Rubens; Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; de Paula, Wagner Nunes; de Freitas, Rubens Moreno; de Oliveira Ramalho, Lizeti Toledo; Marcantonio, Elcio

    2009-12-01

    This article is a case report of a patient in whom the prosthetic planning indicated the necessity of an incisive canal deflation for the correct installation of an implant that is to be osseointegrated. In the reopening phase after the bone graft installation, the incisive canal deflation (biopsy of its content) was done and titanium implants were installed with one of them invading the anatomical space occupied previously by the incisive canal. The biopsy analysis showed fragments of the incisive artery and nerve, which are responsible for the anterior upper-tooth pulp, the periodontium vascularization and the innervation. From the anastomosis present along with other structures allied with the absence of teeth in the region, there was no detriment to the patient caused by the deflation. Incisive canal deflation is a viable technique in implantology. It can permit ideal prosthetic planning with no detriment to the patient.

  18. The epidural expansion in the waist canal - less obvious findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekula, J.; Bucil, J.; Burval, S.

    1998-01-01

    The authors demonstrated 55 less obvious epidural expansion in the waist canal. These expansions are discussed. The detection of the epidural mass at myeloma multiples has a principal significance for the indication of the radiotherapy or surgical intervention

  19. Pollution of Lahore canal water in the city premises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Baig, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water contamination is one of the major environmental pollution problems facing Pakistan because it has a direct impact on the health of human beings and crops. Lahore Canal water is being used both for irrigation and a source of ground water recharge. For the best use of this water, extent of pollution and its effect on soil hydraulic properties needs to be studied. For this purpose, water samples from twenty three sites and soil samples from three sites were collected along the Canal within the city limits of Lahore. The survey of the area from Jallo Park to Mall Road, show that all the abadies/colonies and industries situated on both sides of the canal dump their waste water and garbage in to canal. This result in increase of salinity as well as BOD and COD values which were found maximum at the locations of Herbuns Pura, Mughal Pura Dharam Pura, and Thoker Niaz Baig. (authors)

  20. Molecular mechanisms of canalization: Hsp90 and beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-03-26

    Mar 26, 2006 ... ... and regulatory circuits, accounting for the important role Hsp90 plays in ... by environmental stress, genetic or pharmaceutical targeting of Hsp90. The ... Here, we discuss the role of Hsp90 in canalization and organismal ...