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  1. 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... H1N1 flu vaccine. 1 The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is safe and well tested. Clinical trials conducted ...

  2. Narcolepsy and H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of narcolepsy between January 2000 and December 2010 in children in western Sweden and its relation to the Pandemrix H1N1 influenza vaccination were assessed by collection of data from hospital and clinic medical records and by parent telephone interviews.

  3. 1918 pandemic H1N1 DNA vaccine protects ferrets against 2007 H1N1 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    Influenza vaccines with the ability to induce immune responses cross-reacting with drifted virus variants would be of great advantage for vaccine development against seasonal and emerging new strains. We demonstrate that gene gun administrated DNA vaccine encoding HA and NA and/or NP and M proteins...... of the H1N1 pandemic virus from 1918 induce protection in ferrets against infection with a H1N1 (A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)) virus which was included in the conventional vaccine for the 2006-2007 season. The viruses are separated by a time interval of 89 years and differ by 21.2% in the HA1 protein....... These results suggest not only a unique ability of the DNA vaccines, but perhaps also natural infection, to induce cross-protective responses against even extremely drifted virus variants....

  4. Narcolepsy and H1N1 vaccination: a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebault, Simon; Vincent, Angela; Gringras, Paul

    2013-11-01

    A number of European countries have reported a dramatic increase in the rates of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy in children immunized with a split-virion adjuvanted swine flu vaccine. Here, we review the strengths and weaknesses of these epidemiological studies and possible neuroimmunological mechanisms. Initial concerns of a 13-fold increased relative risk of narcolepsy were raised by the Scandinavian health protection agencies in 2010. Subsequent retrospective studies support these findings in Canada, France, Ireland, England and Denmark. The cases are predominantly young children who present with severe and rapid onset of cataplexy as well as narcolepsy often within a few weeks of vaccination. The proposed mechanism for postvaccination narcolepsy is one in which an environmental trigger causes or enhances an antibody-mediated autoimmune response in patients with a preexisting genetic susceptibility. However, there have not yet been any reports of specific autoimmunity, either antibody or T-cell-mediated. There is a strong association between narcolepsy and H1N1 vaccination. However, whether this reflects a true increase in affected individuals or a hastening of disease onset in individuals who would otherwise have developed narcolepsy later will become clear in the coming years. The pathological explanation of this association and narcolepsy is likely to be autoimmune, although supportive evidence is lacking.Video abstract available: See the Video Supplementary Digital Content 1 (http://links.lww.com/COPM/A9).

  5. Reasons for Low Pandemic H1N1 2009 Vaccine Acceptance within a College Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell D. Ravert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined health beliefs associated with novel influenza A (H1N1 immunization among US college undergraduates during the 2009-2010 pandemic. Undergraduates (ages 18–24 years from a large Midwestern University were invited to complete an online survey during March, 2010, five months after H1N1 vaccines became available. Survey items measured H1N1 vaccine history and H1N1-related attitudes based on the health belief literature. Logistic regression was used to identify attitudes associated with having received an H1N1 vaccine, and thematic analysis of student comments was conducted to further understand influences on vaccine decisions. Among the 296 students who participated in the survey, 15.2% reported having received an H1N1 vaccine. In regression analysis, H1N1 immunization was associated with seasonal flu vaccine history, perceived vaccine effectiveness, perceived obstacles to vaccination, and vaccine safety concerns. Qualitative results illustrate the relationship of beliefs to vaccine decisions, particularly in demonstrating that students often held concerns that vaccine could cause H1N1 or side effects. Vaccine safety, efficacy, and obstacles to immunization were major considerations in deciding whether to accept the H1N1 pandemic vaccine. Therefore, focusing on those aspects might be especially useful in future vaccine efforts within the college population.

  6. Protection of mice against lethal challenge with 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus by 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Manicassamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus infection in humans has resulted in nearly 5,000 deaths worldwide. Early epidemiological findings indicated a low level of infection in the older population (>65 years with the pandemic virus, and a greater susceptibility in people younger than 35 years of age, a phenomenon correlated with the presence of cross-reactive immunity in the older population. It is unclear what virus(es might be responsible for this apparent cross-protection against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. We describe a mouse lethal challenge model for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain, used together with a panel of inactivated H1N1 virus vaccines and hemagglutinin (HA monoclonal antibodies to dissect the possible humoral antigenic determinants of pre-existing immunity against this virus in the human population. By hemagglutinination inhibition (HI assays and vaccination/challenge studies, we demonstrate that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is antigenically similar to human H1N1 viruses that circulated from 1918-1943 and to classical swine H1N1 viruses. Antibodies elicited against 1918-like or classical swine H1N1 vaccines completely protect C57B/6 mice from lethal challenge with the influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 virus isolate. In contrast, contemporary H1N1 vaccines afforded only partial protection. Passive immunization with cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs raised against either 1918 or A/California/04/2009 HA proteins offered full protection from death. Analysis of mAb antibody escape mutants, generated by selection of 2009 H1N1 virus with these mAbs, indicate that antigenic site Sa is one of the conserved cross-protective epitopes. Our findings in mice agree with serological data showing high prevalence of 2009 H1N1 cross-reactive antibodies only in the older population, indicating that prior infection with 1918-like viruses or vaccination against the 1976 swine H1N1 virus in the USA are likely to provide protection against the 2009

  7. Safety of pandemic H1N1 vaccines in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor); S. de Bie (Sandra); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDuring the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic several pandemic H1N1 vaccines were licensed using fast track procedures, with relatively limited data on the safety in children and adolescents. Different extensive safety monitoring efforts were put in place to ensure timely detection of

  8. H1N1 and influenza viruses: why pregnant women might be hesitant to be vaccinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirdamadi, Kamelia; Einarson, Adrienne

    2011-09-01

    I have been encouraging pregnant women to receive both the H1N1 and influenza vaccines since I became aware of Health Canada's guidelines. However, some of the women in my practice have heard conflicting information, often from media sources, and they are hesitant to be vaccinated. What is the evidence behind these guidelines, and should I really be convincing these women to be vaccinated? Pregnant women and growing fetuses are considered a population vulnerable to H1N1 and influenza viruses. Health Canada published a report in late 2010 estimating that this population was at increased risk of hospitalization and severe outcomes of H1N1 infection. Recommendations included pregnant women as a priority group to receive the H1N1 vaccine as well as the influenza vaccine. This information should be explained unambiguously to pregnant women, and they should be made aware of the sensationalism of media reports, which are often based on opinion and not evidence.

  9. Immunization-Safety Monitoring Systems for the 2009 H1N1 Monovalent Influenza Vaccination Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Daniel A.; Akhtar, Aysha; Mergler, Michelle J.; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Izurieta, Hector; Ball, Robert; Lee, Grace M.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Garman, Patrick; Cunningham, Francesca; Gellin, Bruce; Koh, Howard; Lurie, Nicole

    The effort to vaccinate the US population against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus hinged, in part, on public confidence in vaccine safety. Early in the vaccine program, >20% of parents reported that they would not vaccinate their children. Concerns about the safety of the vaccines were reported by

  10. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims Who Received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, Amr; Abdel Kereem, Eman; El-Refay, Samir; Afifi, Salma; Abukela, Mohammed; Earhart, Kenneth; El-Sayed, Nasr; El-Gabaly, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    In Egypt, vaccination against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was required of pilgrims departing for the 2009 Hajj. A survey of 551 pilgrims as they returned to Egypt found 542 (98.1% [weighted]) reported receiving the vaccine; 6 (1.0% [weighted]) were infected with influenza virus A (H3N2) but none with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. PMID:21762583

  11. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  12. Vaccine-related internet search activity predicts H1N1 and HPV vaccine coverage: implications for vaccine acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Internet is a primary source for health-related information, and Internet search activity is associated with infectious disease outbreaks. The authors hypothesized that Internet search activity for vaccine-related information would predict vaccination coverage. They examined Internet search activity for H1N1 and human papilloma virus (HPV) disease and vaccine information in relation to H1N1 and HPV vaccine uptake. Google Insight for Search was used to assess the volume of Internet search queries for H1N1- and vaccine-related terms in the United States in 2009, the year of the H1N1 pandemic. Vaccine coverage data were also obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at the state level for H1N1 vaccinations in 2009. These same measures were collected at the state level for HPV- and vaccine-related search terms in 2010 as well as HPV vaccine uptake in that year. Analyses showed that the search terms H1N1 and vaccine were correlated with H1N1 vaccine uptake; ordinal regression found the H1N1 search term was independently associated with H1N1 vaccine coverage. Similarly, the correlation between vaccine search volume and HPV coverage was significant; ordinal regression showed the search term vaccine independently predicted HPV vaccination coverage. This is among the first studies to show that Internet search activity is associated with vaccination coverage. The Internet should be exploited as an opportunity to dispel vaccine misinformation by providing accurate information to support vaccine decision making.

  13. Reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccines protect pigs against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and H1N2 swine influenza virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Shi, Jianzhong; Guo, Jing; Xin, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Qiao, Chuanling; Chen, Hualan

    2011-09-28

    Influenza A (H1N1) virus has caused human influenza outbreaks in a worldwide pandemic since April 2009. Pigs have been found to be susceptible to this influenza virus under experimental and natural conditions, raising concern about their potential role in the pandemic spread of the virus. In this study, we generated a high-growth reassortant virus (SC/PR8) that contains the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel H1N1 isolate, A/Sichuan/1/2009 (SC/09), and six internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus, by genetic reassortment. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this reassortant virus were evaluated at different doses in a challenge model using a homologous SC/09 or heterologous A/Swine/Guangdong/1/06(H1N2) virus (GD/06). Two doses of SC/PR8 virus vaccine elicited high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies specific for the 2009 H1N1 virus and conferred complete protection against challenge with either SC/09 or GD/06 virus, with reduced lung lesions and viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with non-vaccinated control animals. These results indicated for the first time that a high-growth SC/PR8 reassortant H1N1 virus exhibits properties that are desirable to be a promising vaccine candidate for use in swine in the event of a pandemic H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilyard, Karen M.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance…

  15. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  16. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients' CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research.

  17. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccine: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Goel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The world witnessed a the first influenza pandemic in this century and fourth overall since first flu pandemic was reported during the World War I. The past experiences with influenza viruses and this pandemic of H1N1 place a consider-able strain on health services and resulted in serious illnesses and a large number of deaths. Develop-ing countries were declared more likely to be at risk from the pandemic effects, as they faced the dual problem of highly vulnerable populations and limited resources to respond H1N1. The public health experts agreed that vaccination is the most effective ways to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic. The vaccines for H1N1 virus have been used in over 40 coun-tries and administered to over 200 million people helped in a great way and on August 10, 2010, World Health Organization (WHO announced H1N1 to be in postpandemic period. But based on knowledge about past pandemics, the H1N1 (2009 virus is expected to continue to circulate as a seasonal virus and may undergo some agenic-variation. As WHO strongly recommends vaccination, vigilance for regular updating of the composition of influenza vaccines, based on an assessment of the future impact of circulating viruses along with safety surveillance of the vaccines is necessary. This review has been done to take a stock of the currently available H1N1 vaccines and their possible use as public health intervention in the postpandemic period.

  18. Assessment of H1N1 influenza: A swine flu vaccination in Kumasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess H1N1 vaccination in the Kumasi metropolis of the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Questionnaires on the subject were administered to 504 individuals compris-ing of 254 health personnel and 250 from the general public (in a cross-sectional survey) after an initial interview of 1,686 individuals.

  19. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilyard, Karen M; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S

    2014-06-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance of the H1N1 vaccine, we examined data from a representative national sample of parents (n = 684), using the health belief model as a framework. The most important predictors of vaccine acceptance were "cues to action" at multiple levels, from intrapersonal to mass communication, including the influence of friends, family, the media, and modeling by the Obama family; costs and benefits and self-efficacy were also significant predictors of vaccine acceptance. Higher perceived levels of H1N1 risk were not associated with vaccine uptake. Results suggest that traditional measures of perceived risk may not account for the cost-benefit analysis inherent in vaccine decision making, and that messages designed to emphasize disease risk may be ineffective. The authors recommend emphasizing cues to action that support norming and modeling of vaccine acceptance. © 2013 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.; Bos, J.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Stolk, R.P.; Wolters, B.; Bijl, M.; Postma, M.J.; Wilschut, J.; Nichol, K.L.; Hak, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. Methods: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was

  1. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Tacken, Margot; Bos, Jens; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Korevaar, Joke C.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Wolters, Bert; Bijl, Marc; Postma, Maarten J.; Wilschut, Jan; Nichol, Kristin L.; Hak, Eelko

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. METHODS: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was

  2. Associations between health communication behaviors, neighborhood social capital, vaccine knowledge, and parents' H1N1 vaccination of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Lin, Leesa; Viswanath, K

    2013-10-01

    During the H1N1 pandemic in 2009-10, the vaccination behavior of parents played a critical role in preventing and containing the spread of the disease and the subsequent health outcomes among children. Several studies have examined the relationship between parents' health communication behaviors and vaccinations for children in general. Little is known, however, about the link between parents' health communication behaviors and the vaccination of their children against the H1N1 virus, and their level of vaccine-related knowledge. We drew on a national survey among parents with at least one child less than 18 years of age (n=639) to investigate Parents' H1N1-related health communication behaviors including sources of information, media exposure, information-seeking behaviors, H1N1-related knowledge, and neighborhood social capital, as well as the H1N1 vaccination rates of their children. Findings showed that there is a significant association between the degree at which parents obtained H1N1 vaccination for their children and health communication variables: watching the national television news and actively seeking H1N1 information. And this association was moderated by the extent of the parents' H1N1-related knowledge. In addition, the parents' degree of neighborhood social capital mediated the association between H1N1 knowledge of the parents and H1N1 vaccination acceptance for their children. We found, compared to those with a low-level of neighborhood social capital, parents who have a high-level of neighborhood social capital are more likely to vaccinate their children. These findings suggest that it is necessary to design a strategic health communication campaign segmented by parent health communication behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. FDG uptake in axillary lymph nodes after vaccination against pandemic (H1N1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; Exarhos, Demetrios; Housianakou, Irene; Bournazos, Apostolos; Datseris, Ioannis [General Hospital, PET/CT Unit, Athens (Greece)

    2010-05-15

    To alert the imaging community to potential false positive findings related to current immunization programmes against H1N1 influenza virus. We reviewed 10 patients referred for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) who had undergone recent vaccination. All studies showed{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the draining axillary lymph nodes close to the vaccination site, while low-dose CT revealed lymph nodes ranged between 0.5 cm and 1.2 cm at the same site. This potential pitfall in PET/CT should be borne in mind during current vaccination programmes. (orig.)

  4. Risk factors affecting seroconversion after influenza A/H1N1 vaccination in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Sung Jin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background Hemodialysis (HD patients have multiple causes of immune dysfunction and poor immune response to influenza vaccination. We investigated the antibody response rate to a pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza vaccination and clinical parameters influencing the induction of antibody responses in HD patients. Methods A total of 114 HD patients were vaccinated with a monovalent adjuvanted H1N1 inactivated influenza vaccine. Titers of neutralizing antibodies were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay at pre- and 4 weeks after vaccination. Seroconversion was defined as either a pre-vaccination HI titer  1:40 or a pre-vaccination HI titer ≥ 1:10 and a minimum four-fold rise in post-vaccination HI antibody titer. Seventeen out of 114 HD patients (14.9% tested positive for antibodies against influenza A/H1N1/2009 before vaccination. The remaining 97 baseline sero-negative patients were included in the analysis. Results Only 30 (30.9% HD patients had seroconversion 4 weeks after vaccination. The elderly patients, those over 65 years of age, showed significantly lower seroconversion rate compared to younger HD patients (20.5% vs. 39.6%, p = 0.042. Furthermore, patients with hemoglobin values less than 10 g/dL had a significantly lower seroconversion rate compared to those with higher hemoglobin values (20.0 vs. 38.6%, p = 0.049. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, only age ≥65 years (OR = 0.336, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.116-0.971, p = 0.044 and hemoglobin levels Conclusions Our data show that HD patients, especially who are elderly with low hemoglobin levels, are at increased risk for lower seroconversion rate after influenza A/H1N1 vaccination. Further studies are needed to improve the efficacy of vaccination in these high risk patients.

  5. Altered response to A(H1N1)pnd09 vaccination in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Anne Louise; Følsgaard, Nilofar Vahman; Carson, Charlotte Giwercman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women were suspected to be at particular risk when H1N1pnd09 influenza became pandemic in 2009. Our primary objective was to compare the immune responses conferred by MF59®-adjuvanted vaccine (Focetria®) in H1N1pnd09-naïve pregnant and non-pregnant women. The secondary aims...... women after gestational week 20: (1) 7.5 µg H1N1pnd09 antigen with MF59-adjuvant (Pa7.5 µg); (2) 3.75 µg antigen half MF59-adjuvanted (Pa3.75 µg); (3) 15 µg antigen unadjuvanted (P15 µg); and in non-pregnant women receiving (4) 7.5 µg antigen full adjuvanted (NPa7.5 µg). Blood samples were collected...... at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 and 10 months after vaccination, adverse events were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: 58 pregnant women were allocated to Pa7.5 µg and 149 non-pregnant women were recruited to NPa7.5 µg. The sero-conversion rate was significantly increased in non-pregnant (NPa7.5 µg) compared...

  6. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Chilean commercial turkeys with genetic and serologic comparisons to U.S. H1N1 avian influenza vaccine isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning in April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus has caused acute respiratory disease in humans, first in Mexico and then spreading around the world. The resulting pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) virus was isolated in swine in Canada in June, 2009, and later in turkey breeders in Chile, ...

  7. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Dae Gwon

    Full Text Available An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA. However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP-forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1. BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m. and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8, elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines.

  8. Quantifying and explaining accessibility with application to the 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier Stamm, Jessica L; Serban, Nicoleta; Swann, Julie; Wortley, Pascale

    2017-03-01

    Accessibility and equity across populations are important measures in public health. This paper is specifically concerned with potential spatial accessibility, or the opportunity to receive care as moderated by geographic factors, and with horizontal equity, or fairness across populations regardless of need. Both accessibility and equity were goals of the 2009 vaccination campaign for the novel H1N1a influenza virus, including during the period when demand for vaccine exceeded supply. Distribution system design can influence equity and accessibility at the local level. We develop a general methodology that integrates optimization, game theory, and spatial statistics to measure potential spatial accessibility across a network, where we quantify spatial accessibility by travel distance and scarcity. We estimate and make inference on local (census-tract level) associations between accessibility and geographic, socioeconomic, and health care infrastructure factors to identify potential inequities in vaccine accessibility during the 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign in the U.S. We find that there were inequities in access to vaccine at the local level and that these were associated with factors including population density and health care infrastructure. Our methodology for measuring and explaining accessibility leads to policy recommendations for federal, state, and local public health officials. The spatial-specific results inform the development of equitable distribution plans for future public health efforts.

  9. Twitter influence on vaccination and antiviral uptake during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eMcNeill

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveInformation exchange via Twitter and other forms of social media make public health communication more complex as citizens play an increasingly influential role in shaping acceptable or desired health behaviours. Taking the case of the 2009-10 H1N1 pandemic, we explore in detail the dissemination of H1N1-related advice in the UK through Twitter to see how it was used to discourage or encourage vaccine and antiviral uptake.MethodsIn three stages we conducted (1 an analysis of general content, retweeting patterns and URL sharing, (2 a discourse analysis of the public evaluation of press releases and (3 a template analysis of conversations around vaccine and antiviral uptake, using Protection Motivation Theory (PMT as a way of understanding how the public weighed the costs and benefits.ResultsNetwork analysis of retweets showed that information from official sources predominated. Analysing the spread of significant messages through Twitter showed that most content was descriptive but there was some criticism of health authorities. A detailed analysis of responses to press releases revealed some scepticism over the economic beneficiaries of vaccination, that served to undermine public trust. Finally, the conversational analysis showed the influence of peers when weighing up the risks and benefits of medication.ConclusionsMost tweets linked to reliable sources, however Twitter was used to discuss both individual and health authority motivations to vaccinate. The PMT framework describes the ways individuals assessed the threat of the H1N1 pandemic, weighing this against the perceived cost of taking medication. These findings offer some valuable insights for social media communication practices in future pandemics.

  10. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination policies and coverage in Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mereckiene, J

    2012-06-01

    In August 2010 the Vaccine European New Integrated Collaboration Effort (VENICE) project conducted a survey to collect information on influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination policies and vaccination coverage in the European Union (EU), Norway and Iceland. Of 29 responding countries, 26 organised national pandemic influenza vaccination and one country had recommendations for vaccination but did not have a specific programme. Of the 27 countries with vaccine recommendations, all recommended it for healthcare workers and pregnant women. Twelve countries recommended vaccine for all ages. Six and three countries had recommendations for specific age groups in children and in adults, countries for specific adult age groups. Most countries recommended vaccine for those in new risk groups identified early in the pandemic such as morbid obese and people with neurologic diseases. Two thirds of countries started their vaccination campaigns within a four week period after week 40\\/2009. The reported vaccination coverage varied between countries from 0.4% to 59% for the entire population (22 countries); 3% to 68% for healthcare workers (13 countries); 0% to 58% for pregnant women (12 countries); 0.2% to 74% for children (12 countries). Most countries identified similar target groups for pandemic vaccine, but substantial variability in vaccination coverage was seen. The recommendations were in accordance with policy advice from the EU Health Security Committee and the World Health Organization.

  11. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 vaccines in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, K; Nicoll, A; Ciancio, B C; Kramarz, P

    2009-10-15

    Pandemic vaccines from four manufacturers are now available for use within the European Union (EU). Use of these vaccines will protect individuals and reduce the impact on health services to more manageable levels. The majority of the severely ill will be from known risk groups and the best strategy will be to start vaccinating in line with the recommendation from the European Union Health Security Committee prioritizing adults and children with chronic conditions, pregnant women and healthcare workers. The composition of authorized vaccines is reviewed in this article. The vaccine strain in all authorized pandemic vaccines worldwide is based on the same initial isolate of influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)v but the vaccines differ in conditions for virus propagation, antigen preparation, antigen content and whether they are adjuvanted or not. The vaccines are likely to be effective since no significant genetic or antigenic drift has occurred and there are already mechanisms for estimating clinical effectiveness. Influenza vaccines have good safety records and no safety concerns have so far been encountered with any of the vaccines developed. However, special mechanisms have been devised for the early detection and rigorous investigation of possible significant side effects in Europe through post-marketing surveillance and analysis. Delivery of the vaccines to the risk groups will pose difficulties where those with chronic illnesses are not readily identifiable to the healthcare services. There is considerable scope for European added value through Member States with excess vaccines making them available to other states.

  12. Milk-Alkali syndrome induced by H1N1 influenza vaccine

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    Abdullah K Al-Hwiesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk-Alkali syndrome (MAS consists of a triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and acute renal failure. We hereby report a 75-year-old Indian gentleman who presented to our emergency department with a history of generalized weakness and easy fatigability. Investigations were consistent with MAS secondary to calcium carbonate and calcitriol treatment to prevent osteoporosis, aggravated by H1N1 influenza vaccine. The patient was treated with hemodialysis and zoledronate. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of such association in the literature.

  13. Assessment of epicutaneous testing of a monovalent Influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccine in egg allergic patients

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    Pitt Tracy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H1N1 is responsible for the first influenza pandemic in 41 years. In the fall of 2009, an H1N1 vaccine became available in Canada with the hopes of reducing the overall effect of the pandemic. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of administering 2 different doses of a monovalent split virus 2009 H1N1 vaccine in egg allergic patients. Methods Patients were skin tested to the H1N1 vaccine in the outpatient paediatric and adult allergy and immunology clinics of the Health Sciences Centre and Children's Hospital of Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada. Individuals Results A total of 61 patients with egg allergy (history of an allergic reaction to egg with either positive skin test &/or specific IgE to egg >0.35 Ku/L were referred to our allergy clinics for skin testing to the H1N1 vaccine. 2 patients were excluded, one did not have a skin prick test to the H1N1 vaccine (only vaccine administration and the other passed an egg challenge during the study period. Ages ranged from 1 to 27 years (mean 5.6 years. There were 41(69.5% males and 18(30.5% females. All but one patient with a history of egg allergy, positive skin test to egg and/or elevated specific IgE level to egg had negative skin tests to the H1N1 vaccine. The 58 patients with negative skin testing to the H1N1 vaccine were administered the vaccine and observed for 30 minutes post vaccination with no adverse results. The patient with the positive skin test to the H1N1 vaccine was also administered the vaccine intramuscularly with no adverse results. Conclusions Despite concern regarding possible anaphylaxis to the H1N1 vaccine in egg allergic patients, in our case series 1/59(1.7% patients with sensitization to egg were also sensitized to the H1N1 vaccine. Administration of the H1N1 vaccine in egg allergic patients with negative H1N1 skin tests and observation is safe. Administering the vaccine in a 1 or 2 dose protocol without skin testing is a reasonable alternative

  14. H1N1 influenza A outbreak among young medical staff members who received single dose of non-adjuvanted split-virion 2009 H1N1 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Mamiko; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Naoto, Hosokawa; Kami, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    We experienced an H1N1 influenza A outbreak among medical staff members who had received a vaccination. To investigate the preventive effects of the H1N1 influenza vaccine on the H1N1 influenza A infection, we examined the data on the medical staff members and patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza A or influenza-like illness retrospectively. Approximately half of the young individuals under 30 years of age developed H1N1 influenza A, while the diagnosis was established in 3% of medical staff over the age of 30 and 0.9% of patients with a median age of 67. The mechanism for association between age and the risk of H1N1 infection is unclear; however, it might have been associated with an age-related increase in the prevalence of neutralizing antibody titers against the 2009 H1N1 influenza A as indicated by previous reports. This study showed that current Japanese H1N1 influenza A vaccine program using one dose of non-adjuvant split-virion 2009 H1N1 vaccine with 7.5 μg hemagglutinin had a limited preventive effect on H1N1 influenza A infection in adults under 30 years of age.

  15. Willingness to accept H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine: A cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses

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    Wong Carmen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2009 pandemic of influenza A (H1N1 infection has alerted many governments to make preparedness plan to control the spread of influenza A (H1N1 infection. Vaccination for influenza is one of the most important primary preventative measures to reduce the disease burden. Our study aims to assess the willingness of nurses who work for the community nursing service (CNS in Hong Kong on their acceptance of influenza A (H1N1 influenza vaccination. Methods 401 questionnaires were posted from June 24, 2009 to June 30, 2009 to community nurses with 67% response rate. Results of the 267 respondents on their willingness to accept influenza A (H1N1 vaccine were analyzed. Results Twenty-seven percent of respondents were willing to accept influenza vaccination if vaccines were available. Having been vaccinated for seasonable influenza in the previous 12 months were significantly independently associated with their willingness to accept influenza A (H1N1 vaccination (OR = 4.03; 95% CI: 2.03-7.98. Conclusions Similar to previous findings conducted in hospital healthcare workers and nurses, we confirmed that the willingness of community nurses to accept influenza A (H1N1 vaccination is low. Future studies that evaluate interventions to address nurses' specific concerns or interventions that aim to raise the awareness among nurses on the importance of influenza A (H1N1 vaccination to protect vulnerable patient populations is needed.

  16. Twin Peaks: A/H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus Infection and Vaccination in Norway, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Effelterre, Thierry; Dos Santos, Gaël; Shinde, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination campaigns against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus (A/H1N1p) began in autumn 2009 in Europe, after the declaration of the pandemic at a global level. This study aimed to estimate the proportion of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p in Norway who were already infected (asymptomatically or symptomatically) by A/H1N1p before vaccination, using a mathematical model. A dynamic, mechanistic, mathematical model of A/H1N1p transmission was developed for the Norwegian population. The model parameters were estimated by calibrating the model-projected number of symptomatic A/H1N1p cases to the number of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system, accounting for potential under-reporting. It was assumed in the base case that the likelihood of vaccination was independent of infection/disease state. A sensitivity analysis explored the effects of four scenarios in which current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection would influence the likelihood of being vaccinated. The number of model-projected symptomatic A/H1N1p cases by week during the epidemic, accounting for under-reporting and timing, closely matched that of the laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system. The model-projected incidence of symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was 27% overall, 55% in people independence of vaccination and infection; however, even when current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was assumed to reduce the likelihood of vaccination, the estimated percentage of individuals who were infected before vaccination remained at least 32% in all age groups. This analysis suggests that over half the people vaccinated against A/H1N1p in Norway during the 2009 pandemic may already have been infected by A/H1N1p before being vaccinated.

  17. Modelling the risk-benefit impact of H1N1 influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lawrence D; Fasolo, Barbara; Zafiropoulous, Nikolaos; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Ehmann, Falk; Jekerle, Veronika; Kramarz, Piotr; Nicoll, Angus; Lönngren, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Shortly after the H1N1 influenza virus reached pandemic status in June 2009, the benefit-risk project team at the European Medicines Agency recognized this presented a research opportunity for testing the usefulness of a decision analysis model in deliberations about approving vaccines soon based on limited data or waiting for more data. Undertaken purely as a research exercise, the model was not connected to the ongoing assessment by the European Medicines Agency, which approved the H1N1 vaccines on 25 September 2009. A decision tree model constructed initially on 1 September 2009, and slightly revised subsequently as new data were obtained, represented an end-of-September or end-of-October approval of vaccines. The model showed combinations of uncertain events, the severity of the disease and the vaccines' efficacy and safety, leading to estimates of numbers of deaths and serious disabilities. The group based their probability assessments on available information and background knowledge about vaccines and similar pandemics in the past. Weighting the numbers by their joint probabilities for all paths through the decision tree gave a weighted average for a September decision of 216 500 deaths and serious disabilities, and for a decision delayed to October of 291 547, showing that an early decision was preferable. The process of constructing the model facilitated communications among the group's members and led to new insights for several participants, while its robustness built confidence in the decision. These findings suggest that models might be helpful to regulators, as they form their preferences during the process of deliberation and debate, and more generally, for public health issues when decision makers face considerable uncertainty.

  18. Correlates of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptance among Middle and High School Teachers in Rural Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Lisa M.; Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Weiss, Paul; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Teachers play an essential role in the school community, and H1N1 vaccination of teachers is critical to protect not only themselves but also adolescents they come in contact within the classroom through herd immunity. School-aged children have a greater risk of developing H1N1 disease than seasonal influenza. The goal of this study…

  19. Properly folded bacterially expressed H1N1 hemagglutinin globular head and ectodomain vaccines protect ferrets against H1N1 pandemic influenza virus.

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    Surender Khurana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the face of impending influenza pandemic, a rapid vaccine production and mass vaccination is the most effective approach to prevent the large scale mortality and morbidity that was associated with the 1918 "Spanish Flu". The traditional process of influenza vaccine production in eggs is time consuming and may not meet the demands of rapid global vaccination required to curtail influenza pandemic.Recombinant technology can be used to express the hemagglutinin (HA of the emerging new influenza strain in a variety of systems including mammalian, insect, and bacterial cells. In this study, two forms of HA proteins derived from the currently circulating novel H1N1 A/California/07/2009 virus, HA1 (1-330 and HA (1-480, were expressed and purified from E. coli under controlled redox refolding conditions that favoured proper protein folding. However, only the recombinant HA1 (1-330 protein formed oligomers, including functional trimers that bound receptor and caused agglutination of human red blood cells. These proteins were used to vaccinate ferrets prior to challenge with the A/California/07/2009 virus. Both proteins induced neutralizing antibodies, and reduced viral loads in nasal washes. However, the HA1 (1-330 protein that had higher content of multimeric forms provided better protection from fever and weight loss at a lower vaccine dose compared with HA (1-480. Protein yield for the HA1 (1-330 ranged around 40 mg/Liter, while the HA (1-480 yield was 0.4-0.8 mg/Liter.This is the first study that describes production in bacterial system of properly folded functional globular HA1 domain trimers, lacking the HA2 transmembrane protein, that elicit potent neutralizing antibody responses following vaccination and protect ferrets from in vivo challenge. The combination of bacterial expression system with established quality control methods could provide a mechanism for rapid large scale production of influenza vaccines in the face of influenza pandemic

  20. Determinants of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza vaccination among pregnant women in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Marie; Wu, Kendra M; Yuen, Carol Yuet Shueng; Cheung, Ka Lun; Chan, Vincci Hiu Sze

    2013-01-01

    During the 2009–2010 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic, pregnant women infected with the virus experienced excess morbidity and mortality when compared with other groups. Once a vaccine was available, pregnant women were a priority group for vaccination. Only a few studies have reported on the uptake of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza vaccine among pregnant women during the pandemic and none were from Asia. The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with 2009 A/H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake among pregnant women in Hong Kong. Using a multi-center, cross-sectional design, we recruited 549 postpartum women from four post-natal wards in Hong Kong over a 4-month period during the second wave of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in the winter and spring of 2010. Only 6.2% (n = 34) of participants had received the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza vaccine and 4.9% (n = 27) had received the seasonal influenza vaccine. The most common reasons for not receiving the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine were fear of causing harm to themselves or their fetus. A high knowledge level (OR = 19.06; 95% CI 5.55, 65.48), more positive attitudes (OR = 3.52; 95% CI 1.37, 9.07), and having a family member who had the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza vaccine (OR = 7.69; 95% CI 2.92, 20.19) were independently and positively associated with vaccination. Study results show an unacceptably low uptake of the pandemic A/H1N1 influenza vaccine among pregnant women in Hong Kong. Interventions to increase influenza vaccine knowledge and uptake among this group should be a priority for future pandemic planning and seasonal vaccination campaigns.

  1. [Adherence to the H1N1 vaccination recommendation in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    In September 2009, the German "Standing Committee for Vaccination" (STIKO) recommended the H1N1 influenza vaccination to all patients with chronic diseases. We investigated the adherence to this recommendation in patients with the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Special attention was paid to arguments for vaccination refusal. In an explorative multicenter study we asked adult patients to answer a questionnaire about their participation in the H1N1 vaccination campaign, their arguments for and against this vaccination and disease specific parameters. Out of 1389 participating patients, 226 (16 %) received the H1N1 vaccination. Among patients who were vaccinated against the seasonal flu as well as patients who were treated with anti-TNF-treatment and members of the German Crohn's and Colitis Association, the participation rates were significantly higher (32 %, 26 %, 25 %, respectively). The main argument against the H1N1 vaccination was fear of side effects (59 %). However, 77 % of all vaccinated patients judged the vaccine as very well tolerated. The non-adherence to general vaccination recommendations against tetanus and seasonal flu was also high (25 % and 66 %, respectively). Only a minority of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis had adhered to the official recommendation concerning vaccination against H1N1. In order to reach higher acceptance, further vaccination campaigns must focus on the safety of the recommended vaccine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza a (H1N1) vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Soonawala (Darius); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); L.B.S. Gelinck (Luc); L.G. Visser (Leo); F.P. Kroon (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition

  3. Impact of Body Mass Index on Immunogenicity of Pandemic H1N1 Vaccine in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, S. Todd; Wolff, Mark; Hill, Heather R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Keitel, Wendy; Atmar, Robert; Patel, Shital; Sahly, Hana El; Munoz, Flor; Paul Glezen, W.; Brady, Rebecca; Frenck, Robert; Bernstein, David; Harrison, Christopher; Jackson, Mary Anne; Swanson, Douglas; Newland, Jason; Myers, Angela; Livingston, Robyn A; Walter, Emmanuel; Dolor, Rowena; Schmader, Kenneth; Mulligan, Mark J.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Rouphael, Nadine; Whitaker, Jennifer; Spearman, Paul; Keyserling, Harry; Shane, Andi; Eckard, Allison Ross; Jackson, Lisa A.; Frey, Sharon E.; Belshe, Robert B.; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin; Englund, Janet A.; Healy, Sara; Winokur, Patricia; Stapleton, Jack; Meier, Jeffrey; Kotloff, Karen; Chen, Wilbur; Hutter, Julia; Stephens, Ina; Wooten, Susan; Wald, Anna; Johnston, Christine; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Buddy Creech, C.; Todd Callahan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity emerged as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality related to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection. However, few studies examine the immune responses to H1N1 vaccine among children and adults of various body mass indices (BMI). Pooling data from 3 trials of unadjuvanted split-virus H1N1 A/California/07/2009 influenza vaccines, we analyzed serologic responses of participants stratified by BMI grouping. A single vaccine dose produced higher hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers at day 21 in obese compared to nonobese adults, but there were no significant differences in responses to H1N1 vaccine among children or adults of various BMI following 2 doses. PMID:24795475

  4. Narcolepsy with cataplexy after A/H1N1 vaccination – A case reported from Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaimi Rosales Mesa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare sleep disorder with a neurological basis which has been recently linked to H1N1 vaccination either in children or adults. Cases from Europe, United States and Brasil were registered. Authors describe a case report of a 15 years old boy who developed narcolepsy with cataplexy after H1N1 vaccination in Havana. As far as it is concerned this is the first case reported from Cuba.

  5. Absolute lymphocyte count predicts the response to new H1N1 vaccination in pediatric cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A.M.C.; Flier, M. van der; Stelma, F.F.; Leer-Buter, C.C. van; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the vaccination response to the new H1N1 in relation to lymphocyte count prior to vaccination in pediatric cancer patients. Absolute lymphocyte count above the lower normal limits (LNL) for age prior to vaccination predicts the response to influenza vaccination in pediatric cancer

  6. Influenza A (H1N1)pnd09 Vaccination of Pregnant Women and Immunological Consequences for Their Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    of the groups. In paper II we compared the local immune signature of the airway mucosa and the incidence of infections in the first year of life in neonates of mothers receiving H1N1pnd09 vaccination during pregnancy versus neonates of mothers not vaccinated during pregnancy. Vaccination against influenza A(H1N...... the woman is vaccinated. We found no changes in the incidence of infections in the first year of life in the children. In conclusion, we find the immune response to the H1N1pnd09 vaccine in pregnant women may be diminished compared with non-pregnant women. Furthermore, H1N1pnd09 vaccination during pregnancy......Pregnant women experience increased influenza related morbidity and mortality during seasonal influenza epidemics, and even graver outcomes during influenza pandemics. Thus, even though the huge amount of data on clinical efficacy and effectiveness of influenza vaccine in pregnant women...

  7. Monitoring adverse events of the vaccination campaign against influenza A (H1N1) in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Broos, Nancy; van Grootheest, Kees

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In November 2009, a vaccination campaign against Influenza A (H1N1) was started in the Netherlands. The accelerated registration procedure of the vaccines used in this campaign and the use of these vaccines on a large scale indicated a need for real-time safety monitoring. OBJECTIVE: To

  8. The decision to vaccinate or not during the H1N1 pandemic: selecting the lesser of two evils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Ashbaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the release of the H1N1 vaccine, there was much controversy surrounding its use despite strong encouragements to be vaccinated in the media. Though studies have examined factors influencing people's decision to be vaccinated, few have focused on how general beliefs about the world or where an individual gathers information might influence that decision. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional web-based survey (N = 817 was conducted during the H1N1 outbreak after the vaccine was available. Variables examined included sociodemographic information, health related behaviours, specific beliefs concerning the H1N1 virus and its vaccine, as well as general beliefs, such as fear of contamination, intolerance of uncertainty, emotional states, coping behaviour, and the source of information concerning the virus. Three converging statistical methods were used to examine the associations - analysis of variance, logistic regression, and recursive partition modelling. The most consistent and strongest association was that negative beliefs about the H1N1 vaccine (e.g. fear of its side effects was related to the decision not to be vaccinated, whereas beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus was related to the decision to be vaccinated. Most notably, having very strong negative beliefs about the vaccine was a more powerful predictor than even strong beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus. Furthermore, obtaining information from the Internet, as compared to more traditional sources of information (e.g., TV, newspapers was related to the decision not to be vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with the Health Belief Model. Importantly they suggest that during future pandemics public health officials should not only discuss the dangers of the pandemic but also (i take additional steps to reassure the public about the safety of vaccines and (ii monitor the information disseminated over the Internet

  9. The decision to vaccinate or not during the H1N1 pandemic: selecting the lesser of two evils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Andrea R; Herbert, Christophe F; Saimon, Elena; Azoulay, Nelson; Olivera-Figueroa, Lening; Brunet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    With the release of the H1N1 vaccine, there was much controversy surrounding its use despite strong encouragements to be vaccinated in the media. Though studies have examined factors influencing people's decision to be vaccinated, few have focused on how general beliefs about the world or where an individual gathers information might influence that decision. A cross-sectional web-based survey (N = 817) was conducted during the H1N1 outbreak after the vaccine was available. Variables examined included sociodemographic information, health related behaviours, specific beliefs concerning the H1N1 virus and its vaccine, as well as general beliefs, such as fear of contamination, intolerance of uncertainty, emotional states, coping behaviour, and the source of information concerning the virus. Three converging statistical methods were used to examine the associations - analysis of variance, logistic regression, and recursive partition modelling. The most consistent and strongest association was that negative beliefs about the H1N1 vaccine (e.g. fear of its side effects) was related to the decision not to be vaccinated, whereas beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus was related to the decision to be vaccinated. Most notably, having very strong negative beliefs about the vaccine was a more powerful predictor than even strong beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus. Furthermore, obtaining information from the Internet, as compared to more traditional sources of information (e.g., TV, newspapers) was related to the decision not to be vaccinated. These results are consistent with the Health Belief Model. Importantly they suggest that during future pandemics public health officials should not only discuss the dangers of the pandemic but also (i) take additional steps to reassure the public about the safety of vaccines and (ii) monitor the information disseminated over the Internet rather than strictly relying on the more traditional mass media.

  10. Polysomnographic and actigraphic characteristics of patients with H1N1-vaccine-related and sporadic narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakuijala, Anniina; Sarkanen, Tomi; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    After the pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine, Pandemrix©, was used in late 2009 and early 2010, the incidence of narcolepsy increased in many European countries. This incidence mainly increased in children and adolescents and, to a lesser degree, in adults. 125 unmedicated patients, aged 4 to 61 years, were included in this case-series study. Of these, 69 were diagnosed to have an H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy and 57 had sporadic narcolepsy. Most of these patients had: an actigraphy recording of 1-2 weeks, polysomnography, a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 concentration analysis. Patients with H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy had shorter diagnostic delays, lower periodic leg movement index during sleep, earlier sleep-wake rhythm, and were younger in age at diagnosis, compared with sporadic cases. They also had shorter sleep latency and more sleep onset REM periods in MSLT, but these results were strongly age-dependent. Actigraphy showed quantitatively less sleep and more sleep fragmentation than polysomnography. Regarding polysomnographic and actigraphic characteristics, there were no dramatic deviations between H1N1-vaccine-related and sporadic narcolepsy. Circadian rhythms indicated some interesting new findings with respect to the H1N1-vaccine-related disease. An actigraphy recording of 1-2 weeks is useful when studying the nocturnal aspects of narcolepsy and sleep-wake rhythms of narcoleptic patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Weesendorp, E.; Zoelen-Bos, van D.J.; Heutink, R.; Quak, J.; Goovaerts, D.; Heldens, J.; Maas, H.A.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Koch, G.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named “pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009¿ (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to

  12. Seasonal flu vaccination in Dutch at-risk populations was not affected by A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Mulder, J.; Verheij, R.A.; Heijnen, M.L.A.; Campbell, S.M.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    We read with interest the recent paper by Maurer and colleagues describing the attitudes toward seasonal and H1N1 vaccination and vaccination uptake among US adults (Maurer et al., 2010). They found the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) vaccine uptake as considerably lower than seasonal vaccine uptake, which

  13. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccination among libyan health care personnel: A cross-sectional retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagiat Tayeb Hwisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Vaccination rate among health-care personnel′s (HCPs are not promising notwithstanding the World Health Organization campaigns over three decades resulting in compromising patient safety. The H1N1 virus, which caused a world-wide pandemic earlier has now transformed into a seasonal flu virus. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of 2009-10 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccination among Libyan HCPs in four hospitals of Al-Zawia, Libya. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire, which listed eight sections of parameters distributed among 310 HCPs to assess the vaccination rate and resulting adverse effects. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson′s χ2-test and Student′s t-test where appropriate. Results: The overall pandemic A (H1N1 vaccination among all HCPs was only 107 (39.9% out of 268 respondents. The distribution of respondents based on physicians, other staff and sex were found significant (P < 0.05. The common barriers of H1N1 vaccination being lack of awareness fear of adverse effects, allergies and religious beliefs. The major adverse effect observed was erythema in 95.56% of physicians and 87.1% in other staff. About 2% of HCPs have reported arthralgia. No significant differences existed between the responses of general variables and adverse effects. The glycoprotein 120 and squalene were found responsible for the reported adverse effects. 37 (82.22% vaccinated medical HCPs have advised their patients to get vaccinated. Conclusions: Due to recurrence of H1N1 influenza in recent times, vaccination campaigns should be promoted immediately to address the knowledge gap of HCPs for intervention by regulatory and health organizations in Libya. The health belief model could be applied to improve vaccination among HCPs.

  14. Clinical course of H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Alakuijala, Anniina; Partinen, Markku

    2016-03-01

    To follow and analyze the clinical course and quality of life of Pandemrix H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy (pNT1). Twenty-six drug-naïve confirmed pNT1 subjects completed Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale (UNS), Swiss Narcolepsy Scale (SNS), Rimon's Brief Depression scale (RDS), and WHO-5 Well-being index questionnaires near the disease onset and in a follow-up a minimum of two years later. The number of cataplexies and body mass index (BMI) were recorded. The effects of hypocretin-1 levels and sleep recording results were analyzed. The findings at the follow-up visit were compared with 25 non-vaccine-related type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) subjects. In pNT1, RDS score decreased significantly (mean 10.2, SD 4.7 vs mean 6.7, SD 4.5, p = 0.003). Median of BMI increased from 20.8 kg m(-2) to 23.4 kg m(-2), p <0.001. There were no significant differences in other sleep scores. However, deviation and range in questionnaire scores at the follow-up were wide. Subjects with very low or undetectable hypocretin-1 levels had worse scores in UNS (mean 26.4, SD 6.95 vs mean 19.1, SD 3.83, p = 0.006) and ESS (mean 17.9, SD = 4.29 vs mean 14.1, SD = 3.70, p = 0.047) than those with hypocretin-1 levels of 20-110 pg/mL. Most disabling symptoms were excessive daytime sleepiness and disturbed sleep. There were no significant differences between the scores in pNT1 and NT1. Clinical course of pNT1 is heterogeneous but the evolution of pNT1 seems similar to NT1. Lower hypocretin levels in pNT1 are associated with a more severe phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Determinants of Non-Vaccination against Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza in Pregnant Women: A Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Romain; Le Ray, Camille; Charlier, Caroline; Avenell, Carolyn; Truster, Van; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Skalli, Dounia; Ville, Yves; Goffinet, François; Launay, Odile

    2011-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 8...

  16. A/H1N1 Vaccine Intentions in College Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in college students who have not previously received the A/H1N1 vaccine. Participants: Undergraduate communication students at a metropolitan southern university. Methods: In January-March 2010, students from voluntarily participating communication classes completed a…

  17. Monitoring the safety of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine using web-based intensive monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmark, Linda; van Hunsel, Florence; Hak, Eelko; van Grootheest, Kees

    2011-01-01

    Background: When adjuvant vaccines against the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus became available after an accelerated registration process, safety issues dominated the public debate. As part of the immunisation campaign, the Dutch government installed an active monitoring of possible adverse events

  18. Long term effectiveness of adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örtqvist, Åke; Bennet, Rutger; Hamrin, Johan; Rinder, Malin Ryd; Lindblad, Hans; Öhd, Joanna Nederby; Eriksson, Margareta

    2015-05-21

    Immunological studies have indicated that the effectiveness of AS03 adjuvanted monovalent influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine (Pandemrix) may be of longer duration than what is seen for non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines. Sixty-nine percent of children 6 months-18 years of age in Stockholm County received at least one dose of Pandemrix during the 2009 pandemic. We studied the effectiveness of the vaccine during the influenza seasons 2010-2011 and 2012-2013 in children hospitalized with virologically confirmed influenza. The season 2011-2012 was not included, since influenza A(H3N2) was the predominant circulating strain. In a retrospective case-control study using a modified test-negative design we compared the percentage vaccinated with Pandemrix among children diagnosed with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (cases), with that of those diagnosed with influenza A(H3N2) or influenza B (controls) during the two seasons. We excluded children born after July 1, 2009, since only children who were 6 months of age or older received the pandemic vaccine in October-December 2009. During the 2010-2011 season, 3/16 (19%) of children diagnosed with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, vs. 32/41 (78%) of those with influenza A(H3N2) or influenza B had been vaccinated with Pandemrix in 2009. The odds ratio, after adjustment for sex, age and underlying diseases, for becoming a case when vaccinated with Pandemrix was 0.083 (95%CI 0.014, 0.36), corresponding to a VE of 91.7%. During the season 2012-2013, there was no difference between the two groups; 59% of children diagnosed with influenza A(H3N2)/B and 60% of those with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 had been vaccinated with Pandemrix in 2009. The AS03 adjuvanted monovalent influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 vaccine (Pandemrix) was effective in preventing hospital admission for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in children during at least two seasons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); R. Bodewes (Rogier); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); G. van Amerongen (Geert); T. Kuiken (Thijs); J.H. Simon (James); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G. del Giudice (Giuseppe); R. Rappuoli (Rino); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSerum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine

  20. International collaboration to assess the risk of Guillain Barré Syndrome following Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Dodd (Caitlin); S.A. Romio (Silvana); S. Black (Steve); C. Vellozzi (Claudia); N.J. Andrews (Nick); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); P. Zuber (Patrick); W. Hua (Wei); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); J. Buttery (Jim); N. Crawford (Nigel); G. Deceuninck (Genevieve); C.S. de Vries (Corinne); P. de Wals (Philippe); D. Gimeno (David); H. Heijbel (Harald); H. Hughes (Hayley); K. Hur (Kwan); A. Hviid (Anders); J. Kelman (Jeffrey); T. Kilpi (Tehri); S.K. Chuang (S.); T. Macartney (Thomas); M. Rett (Melisa); V.R. Lopez-Callada (Vesta Richardson); D. Salmon (Daniel); F.G. Sanchez (Francisco Gimenez); N. Sanz (Nuria); B. Silverman (Bernard); J. Storsaeter (Jann); U. Thirugnanam (Umapathi); N.A.T. van der Maas (Nicoline); K. Yih (Katherine); T. Zhang (Teng Fei); H.S. Izurieta (Hector); B.J. Addis; A. Akhtar (Aysha); J. Cope (Judith); R.L. Davis (Robert); P. Gargiullo (Paul); X. Kurz (Xavier); B. Law (Barbara); I. Sahinovic (Isabelle); J. Tokars (Jerry); P. Serrano (Pedro); A. Cheng (Aixin); N.J. Andrews (Nick); P. Charles (Pat); H. Clothier (Hazel); B. Day (Bruce); T. Day (Timothy); P. Gates (Peter); R. MacDonnell (Richard); L. Roberts (Les); V. Rodriguez-Casero (Vic-toria); T. Wijeratne (Tissa); H.A.L. Kiers (Henk); C. Blyth (Christopher); R. Booy (Robert); E. Elliott (Elizabeth); M.R. Gold (Michael); H. Marshall; P. McIntyre (Peter); P. Richmond (Peter); J. Royle (Jenny); N.W. Wood (Nicholas); Y. Zurynski (Yvonne); G. Calvo (Gonzalo); M. Campins (Magda); N. Corominas (Nuria); F. Torres (Ferran); V. Valls; A. Vilella (Ángels); A. Dutra (Amalia); A. Eick-Cost (Angelia); H.M. Jackson (Henry); K. Garman (Katherine); Z. Hu (Zheng); J. Rigo; J. Badoo (Judith); D Cho (David); L.L. Polakowski (Laura); S.K. Sandhu (Sukhminder); G. Sun (Guoying); H.-S.S. Chan (Hoi-Shan Sophelia); K.-Y. Chan (Kwok-Yin); R. Cheung (Raymond); Y-F. Cheung (Yuk-Fai); S. Cherk (Sharon); S.K Chuang (S.); D. Fok (Dennis); B.-H. Fung (Bun-Hey); K.-F. Ko (Kwai-Fu); K.W. Lau (Ka Wing); K.-K. Lau (Kwok-Kwong); P. Li (Pulin); H.-T. Liu (Hui-Tung); S.-H. Liu (Shao-Haei); K. Mok (Kin); J. So (Joanna); W. Wong (Winnie); S.-P. Wu (Shun-Ping); V. Avagyan (Vardan); R. Ball (Robert); D. Burwen (Dale); R.L. Franks (Riley); J.M. Gibbs (Jonathan); R.E. Kliman (Rebecca); S. Kropp (Silke); T.E. MaCurdy (Thomas); D.B. Martin (David); S.-D.K. Sandhu (Sukhmin-Der); B.B. Worrall (Bradford B.); D.E.F. Fuentes (Dra. Elvira Fuentes); P.C.O. González (Paola Carolina Ojeda); V.F. Reyna (Valerie ); M. Kulldorff (Martin); G. Lee (Grace); T.A. Lieu (Tracy); S. Platt; G.D. Serres (Gaston De); K. Jabin (Kamilah); B.L.S. Soh (Bee Leng Sally); L. Arnheim-Dahlström (Lisen); A. Castot (Anne); H.E. de Melker (Hester); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); J. Hallgren (Jonal); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); K. Johansen (Kari); P Kramarz (Piotr); M. Lapeyre (Maryse); T. Leino (Tuija); D. Mølgaard-Nielsen (Ditte); M. Mosseveld (Mees); H.K. Olberg (Henning K); C.-M. Sammon (Cor-Mac); C. Saussier (Christel); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); A. Sommet (Agnès); P. Sparen (Pär); H. Svanström (Henrik); A.M. Vanrolleghem (Ann M.); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); J.D. Domingo (Javier Diez); J.L. Esparza (José LuísMicó); R.M.O. Lucas (Rafael M. Ortí); J.B.M. Maseres (Juan B. Mollar); J.L.A. Sánchez (José Luís Alfonso); M.G. Sánchez (Mercedes Garcés); V.Z. Viguer (Vicente Zanón); F. Cunningham (Francesca); B. Thakkar (Bharat); R. Zhang (Rongping)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The global spread of the 2009 novel pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus led to the accelerated production and distribution of monovalent 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccines (pH1N1). This pandemic provided the opportunity to evaluate the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which

  1. Seasonal influenza vaccine and protection against pandemic (H1N1 2009-associated illness among US military personnel.

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    Matthew C Johns

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A novel A/H1N1 virus is the cause of the present influenza pandemic; vaccination is a key countermeasure, however, few data assessing prior seasonal vaccine effectiveness (VE against the pandemic strain of H1N1 (pH1N1 virus are available. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surveillance of influenza-related medical encounter data of active duty military service members stationed in the United States during the period of April-October 2009 with comparison of pH1N1-confirmed cases and location and date-matched controls. Crude odds ratios (OR and VE estimates for immunized versus non-immunized were calculated as well as adjusted OR (AOR controlling for sex, age group, and history of prior influenza vaccination. Separate stratified VE analyses by vaccine type (trivalent inactivated [TIV] or live attenuated [LAIV], age groups and hospitalization status were also performed. For the period of April 20 to October 15, 2009, a total of 1,205 cases of pH1N1-confirmed cases were reported, 966 (80% among males and over one-half (58% under 25 years of age. Overall VE for service members was found to be 45% (95% CI, 33 to 55%. Immunization with prior season's TIV (VE = 44%, 95% CI, 32 to 54% as well as LAIV (VE = 24%, 95% CI, 6 to 38% were both found to be associated with protection. Of significance, VE against a severe disease outcome was higher (VE = 62%, 95% CI, 14 to 84% than against milder outcomes (VE = 42%, 95% CI, 29 to 53%. CONCLUSION: A moderate association with protection against clinically apparent, laboratory-confirmed Pandemic (H1N1 2009-associated illness was found for immunization with either TIV or LAIV 2008-09 seasonal influenza vaccines. This association with protection was found to be especially apparent for severe disease as compared to milder outcome, as well as in the youngest and older populations. Prior vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccines in 2004-08 was also independently associated with protection.

  2. Efficacy of a high-growth reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccine against the classical swine H1N1 subtype influenza virus in mice and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease caused by swine influenza A viruses (SwIVs), and it poses a potential global threat to human health. Classical H1N1 (cH1N1) SwIVs are still circulating and remain the predominant subtype in the swine population in China. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) harboring the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel cH1N1 isolate in China, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (GD/11) and six internal genes from the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/34(PR8) virus was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate seed virus for the preparation of an inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice and pigs challenged with GD/11 virus. Prime and boost inoculation of GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and IgG antibodies for GD/11 in both mice and pigs. Complete protection of mice and pigs against cH1N1 SIV challenge was observed, with significantly fewer lung lesions and reduced viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with unvaccinated control animals. Our data demonstrated that the GD/PR8 may serve as the seed virus for a promising SwIVs vaccine to protect the swine population.

  3. Bell's palsy and influenza(H1N1pdm09 containing vaccines: A self-controlled case series.

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    Leonoor Wijnans

    Full Text Available An association between AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine and the occurrence of Bell's palsy was found in a population based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden. To evaluate this association in a different population, we conducted a self-controlled case series in a primary health care database, THIN, in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased risk of Bell's palsy following vaccination with any influenza vaccine containing A/California/7/2009 (H1N1-like viral strains. Secondly, we investigated whether risks were different following pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccines and seasonal influenza vaccines containing the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 strain.The study population comprised all incident Bell's palsy cases between 1 June 2009 and 30 June 2013 identified in THIN. We determined the relative incidence (RI of Bell's palsy during the 6 weeks following vaccination with either pandemic or seasonal influenza vaccine. All analyses were adjusted for seasonality and confounding variables.We found an incidence rate of Bell's palsy of 38.7 per 100,000 person years. Both acute respiratory infection (ARI consultations and pregnancy were found to be confounders. When adjusted for seasonality, ARI consultations and pregnancies, the RI during the 42 days after vaccination with an influenza vaccine was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.72-1.01. The RI was similar during the 42 days following seasonal vaccine (0.96, 95%CI: 0.82-1.13 or pandemic vaccine (0.73, 95%CI: 0.47-1.12.We found no evidence for an increased incidence of Bell's palsy following seasonal influenza vaccination overall, nor for monovalent pandemic influenza vaccine in 2009.

  4. An adverse event following 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination: a case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

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    Sang Teak Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that typically follows an infection or vaccination and has a favorable long-term prognosis. We describe the first reported case of ADEM after vaccination against novel influenza A (H1N1. A previously healthy 34-monthold boy who developed ADEM presented with a seizure and leftsided weakness 5 days after vaccination against novel influenza A (H1N1. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed elevated cell counts. T2-weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images revealed multiple patchy hyperintense lesions in the frontal and parietal subcortical white matter and the left thalamus. After the administration of intravenous corticosteroid, the patient’s clinical symptoms improved and he recovered completely without neurologic sequelae.

  5. Immunogenicity of Licensed Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines in HIV-Infected Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Robert F; Nachman, Sharon; Flynn, Patricia M; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Cunningham, Coleen K; Borkowsky, William; McAuley, James B; Spector, Stephen A; Petzold, Elizabeth; Levy, Wende; Siberry, George K; Handelsman, Ed; Utech, L Jill; Weinberg, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    With the emergence of pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) in 2009, children and youth infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were vulnerable because of immunologic impairment and the greater virulence of this infection in young persons. A multicenter study of the immunogenicity of 3 licensed influenza A (H1N1) monovalent vaccines (1 live attenuated and 2 inactivated) was conducted in children and youth with perinatal HIV infection, most of whom were receiving ≥3 antiretroviral drugs, had CD4% ≥15, and plasma HIV RNA levels Puerto Rico. Over 40% had baseline HAI titers ≥40. For subjects aged 6 months to vaccine. Three weeks after a single immunization with an inactivated vaccine, similar immunogenicity results were achieved in youth aged 10-24 years. With multivariable analysis, only Hispanic ethnicity and CD4% ≥15 were associated with achieving both HAI titer ≥40- and ≥4-fold rise in titer. Although licensed pH1N1 vaccines produced HAI titers that were considered to be protective in the majority of HIV-infected children and youth, the proportion with titers ≥40- and ≥4-fold rise in titer was lower than expected for children without HIV infection. Vaccine immunogenicity was lower in HIV-infected children and youth with evidence of immune suppression. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Association Between Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Vaccination in Pregnancy and Early Childhood Morbidity in Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Anders; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Lambach, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    Several studies investigating potential adverse effects of the pandemic A(H1N1) vaccine have supported that influenza A(H1N1) vaccination does not increase the risk for major pregnancy and birth adverse outcomes, but little is known about possible adverse effects in offspring of A(H1N1)-vaccinated mothers beyond the perinatal period and into early childhood. To evaluate whether pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in pregnancy increases the risk for early childhood morbidity in offspring. Register-based cohort study comprising all live-born singleton children in Denmark from pregnancies overlapping the A(H1N1) influenza vaccination campaign in Denmark, from November 2, 2009, to March 31, 2010. From a cohort of 61 359 pregnancies, offspring exposed and unexposed to the influenza A(H1N1) vaccine during pregnancy were matched 1:4 on propensity scores. Vaccination in pregnancy with a monovalent inactivated AS03-adjuvanted split virion influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine (Pandemrix; GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals). Rate ratios of hospitalization in early childhood until 5 years of age. Hospitalization was defined as (1) first inpatient hospital admission, (2) all inpatient hospital admissions, and (3) first hospital contact for selected diseases, which included individual infectious diseases and individual neurologic, autoimmune, and behavioral conditions. The mean (SD) age at end of follow-up was 4.6 (0.40) years for the 61 359 children included in the study. In the cohort, the mothers of 55 048 children were unvaccinated, 349 mothers were vaccinated in the first trimester, and 5962 mothers were vaccinated in the second or third trimesters. Children exposed in the first trimester were not more likely to be hospitalized in early childhood than unexposed children (hospitalization rates per 1000 person-years, 300.6 for exposed vs 257.5 for unexposed; rate ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.94-1.45). Similarly, children exposed in the second or third trimester were not more likely to

  7. Meta-analysis of the immunogenicity and tolerability of pandemic influenza A 2009 (H1N1 vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberto Manzoli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the 2009 (H1N1 influenza pandemic officially ended in August 2010, the virus will probably circulate in future years. Several types of H1N1 vaccines have been tested including various dosages and adjuvants, and meta-analysis is needed to identify the best formulation. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and nine clinical trial registries to April 2011, in any language for randomized clinical trials (RCTs on healthy children, adolescents, adults and the elderly. Primary outcome was the seroconversion rate according to hemagglutinination-inhibition (HI; secondary outcomes were adverse events. For the primary outcome, we used head-to-head meta-analysis and multiple-treatments meta-analysis. RESULTS: Eighteen RCTs could be included in all primary analyses, for a total of 76 arms (16,725 subjects. After 2 doses, all 2009 H1N1 split/subunit inactivated vaccines were highly immunogenic and overcome CPMP seroconversion criteria. After 1 dose only, all split/subunit vaccines induced a satisfactory immunogenicity (> = 70% in adults and adolescents, while only some formulations showed acceptable results for children and elderly (non-adjuvanted at high-doses and oil-in-water adjuvanted vaccines. Vaccines with oil-in-water adjuvants were more immunogenic than both nonadjuvanted and aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines at equal doses and their immunogenicity at doses < = 6 µg (even with as little as 1.875 µg of hemagglutinin antigen was not significantly lower than that achieved after higher doses. Finally, the rate of serious vaccine-related adverse events was low for all 2009 H1N1 vaccines (3 cases, resolved in 10 days, out of 22826 vaccinated subjects. However, mild to moderate adverse reactions were more (and very frequent for oil-in-water adjuvanted vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: Several one-dose formulations might be valid for future vaccines, but 2 doses may be needed for children, especially if a low-dose non-adjuvanted vaccine is

  8. What the public was saying about the H1N1 vaccine: perceptions and issues discussed in on-line comments during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

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    Natalie Henrich

    Full Text Available During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, a vaccine was made available to all Canadians. Despite efforts to promote vaccination, the public's intent to vaccinate remained low. In order to better understand the public's resistance to getting vaccinated, this study addressed factors that influenced the public's decision making about uptake. To do this, we used a relatively novel source of qualitative data--comments posted on-line in response to news articles on a particular topic. This study analysed 1,796 comments posted in response to 12 articles dealing with H1N1 vaccine on websites of three major Canadian news sources. Articles were selected based on topic and number of comments. A second objective was to assess the extent to which on-line comments can be used as a reliable data source to capture public attitudes during a health crisis. The following seven themes were mentioned in at least 5% of the comments (% indicates the percentage of comments that included the theme: fear of H1N1 (18.8%; responsibility of media (17.8%; government competency (17.7%; government trustworthiness (10.7%; fear of H1N1 vaccine (8.1%; pharmaceutical companies (7.6%; and personal protective measures (5.8%. It is assumed that the more frequently a theme was mentioned, the more that theme influenced decision making about vaccination. These key themes for the public were often not aligned with the issues and information officials perceived, and conveyed, as relevant in the decision making process. The main themes from the comments were consistent with results from surveys and focus groups addressing similar issues, which suggest that on-line comments do provide a reliable source of qualitative data on attitudes and perceptions of issues that emerge in a health crisis. The insights derived from the comments can contribute to improved communication and policy decisions about vaccination in health crises that incorporate the public's views.

  9. Influenza A/H1N1 MF59 adjuvanted vaccine in pregnant women and adverse perinatal outcomes: multicentre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micone, P; Bonotti, A; Wainer, V; Schwarcz, A; Augustovski, F; Pichon Riviere, A; Karolinski, A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of adverse perinatal events of vaccination of pregnant women with an MF59 adjuvanted vaccine. Design Cross sectional multicentre study. Setting 49 public hospitals in major cities in Argentina, from September 2010 to May 2011. Participants 30 448 mothers (7293 vaccinated) and their 30 769 newborns. Main outcome measure Primary composite outcome of low birth weight, preterm delivery, or fetal or early neonatal death up to seven days postpartum. Results Vaccinated women had a lower risk of the primary composite outcome (7.0% (n=513) v 9.3% (n=2160); adjusted odds ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 0.89). The propensity score analysis showed similar results. Adjusted odds ratios for vaccinated women were 0.74 (0.65 to 0.83) for low birth weight, 0.79 (0.69 to 0.90) for preterm delivery, and 0.68 (0.42 to 1.06) for perinatal mortality. These findings were consistent in further subgroup analysis. No significant differences in maternal outcomes were found. Conclusion This large study using primary data collection found that MF59 adjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine did not result in an increased risk of adverse perinatal events and suggested a lower risk among vaccinated women. These findings should contribute to inform stakeholders and decision makers on the prescription of vaccination against influenza A/H1N1 in pregnant women. PMID:23381200

  10. Immunogenicity of a 2009 pandemic influenza virus A H1N1 vaccine, administered simultaneously with the seasonal influenza vaccine, in children receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottóffy, Gábor; Horváth, Petra; Muth, Lajos; Sólyom, Alexander; Garami, Miklós; Kovács, Gábor; Nyári, Tibor; Molnár, Dénes; Pauler, Gábor; Jankovics, István

    2014-06-01

    No examination of simultaneous vaccination against pandemic H1N1 and the seasonal influenza virus strains, in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy, are yet published. We investigated the immunogenicity of a whole-virion, inactivated, adjuvanted pandemic H1N1, and seasonal influenza vaccines administered simultaneously to children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. We prospectively enrolled 27 pediatric patients receiving therapy for various types of cancer. All received influenza vaccination once in a seasonal risk period. We checked hemaglutination-inhibition (HAI) antibody titers in the sera of patients before, and 21-28 days after vaccination. Seroprotective titer was defined as an antibody titer ≥ 40, and seroresponse as ≥ 4-fold increase in antibody titers after vaccination. The pre- and post-vaccination seroprotective rates were H1N1: 33-48%, H3N2: 56-78%, B: 0-15% for seasonal influenza, and for pandemic H1N1: 15-37%. The seroresponse rates for seasonal influenza H1N1, H3N2, and B were 22%, 37%, and 22%, respectively, and 30% for the pandemic H1N1 vaccine. Whole-virion, inactivated, adjuvanted vaccine for the pandemic H1N1 Influenza A virus and the seasonal influenza vaccines were found safe and partially immunogenic in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy. The only determinants of responsiveness were lymphocyte count and serum immunoglobulin-G. Only influenza B vaccine elicited significant differences in differences in pre- and post-vaccination seroprotective rates. The response to vaccination for pandemic H1N1 is as effective as other vaccines, however administration of a single vaccine during chemotherapy is more comfortable for pediatric cancer patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Adjuvant effect of docetaxel on the immune responses to influenza A H1N1 vaccine in mice

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    Chen Jian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination remains one of the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Immune responses to vaccination can be enhanced by inclusion of adjuvant in a vaccine. Paclitaxel extracted from the bark of the Pacific yew tree Taxus brevifola was previously demonstrated to have adjuvant property. Compared to paclitaxel, docetaxel is another member of taxane family, and is more soluble in water and easier to manipulate in medication. To investigate the adjuvant effect of this compound, we measured the immune responses induced by co-administration of a split inactivated influenza H1N1 vaccine antigen with docetaxel. Results When co-administered with docetaxel, lower dose antigen (equivalent to 10 ng HA induced similar levels of IgG and IgG isotypes as well as HI titers to those induced by higher dose antigen (equivalent to 100 ng HA. Docetaxel promoted splenocyte responses to H1N1 antigen, ConA and LPS, mRNA expressions of cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-12, IL-4 and IL-10 and T-bet/GATA-3 by splenocytes. The enhanced immunity was associated with up-expressed microRNAs (miR-155, miR-150 and miR-146a in docetaxel-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Docetaxel promoted similar IgE level to but alum promoted significantly higher IgE level than the control. Conclusion Docetaxel has adjuvant effect on the influenza H1N1 vaccine by up-regulation of Th1/Th2 immune responses. Considering its unique vaccine adjuvant property as well as the safe record as an anti-neoplastic agent clinically used in humans during a long period, docetaxel should be further studied for its use in influenza vaccine production.

  12. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of health professionals in relation to A/H1N1 influenza and its vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picado, Amanda; Apiñaniz, Antxon; Ramos, Amaia Latorre; Miranda-Serrano, Erika; Cobos, Raquel; Parraza-Díez, Naiara; Amezua, Patricia; Martinez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; Aizpuru, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the intention of health professionals, doctors and nurses, concerning whether or not to be vaccinated against A/H1N1 influenza virus, and their perception of the severity of this pandemic compared with seasonal flu. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out based on an questionnaire e-mailed to health professionals in public healthcare centres in Vitoria between 6 and 16 November 2009; the percentage of respondents who wanted to be vaccinated and who perceived the pandemic flu to carry a high risk of death were calculated. Results A total of 115 people completed the questionnaire of whom 61.7% (n=71) were doctors and 38.3% (n=44) were nurses. Of these, 33.3% (n=23) of doctors and 13.6% (n=6) of nurses intended to be vaccinated (p=0.019). Even among those who considered themselves to be at a high risk, 70.6% (n=48) of doctors and 31.7% (n=13) of nurses participating in the study (p=0.001) planned to have the vaccination. Conclusions Most health professionals, and in particular nurses, had no intention to be vaccinated against A/H1N1 influenza virus at the beginning of the vaccination campaign. PMID:22461846

  13. Determinants of refusal of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination in a high risk population: a qualitative approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenie d'Alessandro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our study analyses the main determinants of refusal or acceptance of the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine in patients with cystic fibrosis, a high-risk population for severe flu infection, usually very compliant for seasonal flu vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews in 3 cystic fibrosis referral centres in Paris, France. The study included 42 patients with cystic fibrosis: 24 who refused the vaccine and 18 who were vaccinated. The two groups differed quite substantially in their perceptions of vaccine- and disease-related risks. Those who refused the vaccine were motivated mainly by the fears it aroused and did not explicitly consider the 2009 A/H1N1 flu a potentially severe disease. People who were vaccinated explained their choice, first and foremost, as intended to prevent the flu's potential consequences on respiratory cystic fibrosis disease. Moreover, they considered vaccination to be an indirect collective prevention tool. Patients who refused the vaccine mentioned multiple, contradictory information sources and did not appear to consider the recommendation of their local health care provider as predominant. On the contrary, those who were vaccinated stated that they had based their decision solely on the clear and unequivocal advice of their health care provider. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results of our survey led us to formulate three main recommendations for improving adhesion to new pandemic vaccines. (1 it appears necessary to reinforce patient education about the disease and its specific risks, but also general population information about community immunity. (2 it is essential to disseminate a clear and effective message about the safety of novel vaccines. (3 this message should be conveyed by local health care providers, who should be involved in implementing immunization.

  14. Lymphadenitis as a Rare Side Effect of H1N1 Vaccine in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Gundogdu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 5-year-old boy who had the complaint of swelling and pain on the right vaccine shot and right axillary areas. The right axillary area was diagnosed as reactive lymphadenitis, which we believe is a rare local side effect of the swine flu vaccine. The key message to take away from this case is that the patient had lymphadenitis as a local side effect of the swine flu vaccine. Lymphadenitis should be reported as a possible local side effect of the swine flu vaccine.

  15. Effectiveness of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccines: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansbury, Louise E; Smith, Sherie; Beyer, Walter; Karamehic, Emina; Pasic-Juhas, Eva; Sikira, Hana; Mateus, Ana; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Zhao, Hongxin; Beck, Charles R; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S

    2017-04-11

    The clinical effectiveness of monovalent influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines has not been comprehensively summarised. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess vaccine effectiveness (VE) for adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccines. We searched healthcare databases and grey literature from 11 June 2009 to 12 November 2014. Two researchers independently assessed titles and abstracts to identify studies for full review. Random effects meta-analyses estimated the pooled effect size of vaccination compared to placebo or no vaccination for crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) to prevent laboratory confirmed influenza illness (LCI) and related hospitalization. VE was calculated as (1-pooled OR)∗100. Narrative synthesis was undertaken where meta-analysis was not possible. We identified 9229 studies of which 38 at moderate risk of bias met protocol eligibility criteria; 23 were suitable for meta-analysis. Pooled adjusted VE against LCI with adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccines both reached statistical significance (adjuvanted: VE=80%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 59-90%; unadjuvanted: VE=66%; 95% CI 47-78%); in planned secondary analyses, VE in adults often failed to reach statistical significance and pooled point estimates were lower than observed in children. Overall pooled adjusted VE against hospitalization was 61% (95% CI 14-82%); in planned secondary analyses, adjusted VE attained statistical significance in adults aged 18-64years and children for adjuvanted vaccines. Adjuvanted vaccines were significantly more effective in children compared to adults for both outcomes. Adjuvanted and unadjuvanted monovalent influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines were both effective in preventing LCI. Overall, the vaccines were also effective against influenza-related hospitalization. For both outcomes adjuvanted vaccines were more effective in children than in adults. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Stockhofe, N; Weesendorp, E; van Zoelen-Bos, D; Heutink, R; Quak, S; Goovaerts, D; Heldens, J G M; Maas, R; Moormann, R J; Koch, G

    2011-09-28

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named "pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009" (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to reduce exposure of human contacts with infected pigs, thereby preventing cross-species transfer, but also to protect pigs themselves, should this virus cause damage in the pig population. Three swine influenza vaccines, two of them commercially available and one experimental, were therefore tested and compared for their efficacy against an H1N1v challenge. One of the commercial vaccines is based on an American classical H1N1 influenza strain, the other is based on a European avian H1N1 influenza strain. The experimental vaccine is based on reassortant virus NYMC X179A (containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1v) and the internal genes of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)). Excretion of infectious virus was reduced by 0.5-3 log(10) by the commercial vaccines, depending on vaccine and sample type. Both vaccines were able to reduce virus replication especially in the lower respiratory tract, with less pathological lesions in vaccinated and subsequently challenged pigs than in unvaccinated controls. In pigs vaccinated with the experimental vaccine, excretion levels of infectious virus in nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, were at or below 1 log(10)TCID(50) per swab and lasted for only 1 or 2 days. An inactivated vaccine containing the HA and NA of an H1N1v is able to protect pigs from an infection with H1N1v, whereas swine influenza vaccines that are currently available are of limited efficaciousness. Whether vaccination of pigs against H1N1v will become opportune remains to be seen and will depend on future evolution of this strain in the pig population. Close monitoring of the pig population, focussing on presence and evolution of

  17. Immunization-Safety Monitoring Systems for the 2009 H1N1 Monovalent Influenza Vaccination Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and may ultimately help improve public confidence in vaccines. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as...vaccine safety, and may ultimately help improve public con- fidence in vaccines. Pediatrics 2011;127:S78–S86 AUTHORS: Daniel A. Salmon, PhD, MPH,a Aysha...Asthma/wheezing 493.0, 493.1, 493.9, 786.07, and 519.11 1–14 Live, attenuated Asthma/wheezing / bronchiolitis 466.1, 466.11, 466.19, 493.0–493.9, 786.07

  18. Fever following immunization with influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in children : a survey-based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, Nancy; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; van Grootheest, Kees

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In November 2009, all children in the Netherlands from 6 months up to 4 years of age were indicated to receive the Influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. Fever is a common adverse event following immunization in children. Pandemrix®, an inactivated, split-virus influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, was used

  19. Immunogenicity, boostability, and sustainability of the immune response after vaccination against Influenza A virus (H1N1) 2009 in a healthy population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth; Rossen, John; Mulder, Paul; van Beek, Ruud; van Vugt, Hennie; Verbakel, Johannes; Rimmelzwaan, Guus; Koopmans, Marion; Peeters, Marcel

    The emergence of a new influenza A virus (H1N1) variant in 2009 led to a worldwide vaccination program, which was prepared in a relatively short period of time. This study investigated the humoral immunity against this virus before and after vaccination with a 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1)

  20. Determinants of vaccine immunogenicity in HIV-infected pregnant women: analysis of B and T cell responses to pandemic H1N1 monovalent vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Weinberg

    Full Text Available Influenza infections have high frequency and morbidity in HIV-infected pregnant women, underscoring the importance of vaccine-conferred protection. To identify the factors that determine vaccine immunogenicity in this group, we characterized the relationship of B- and T-cell responses to pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 vaccine with HIV-associated immunologic and virologic characteristics. pH1N1 and seasonal-H1N1 (sH1N1 antibodies were measured in 119 HIV-infected pregnant women after two double-strength pH1N1 vaccine doses. pH1N1-IgG and IgA B-cell FluoroSpot, pH1N1- and sH1N1-interferon γ (IFNγ and granzyme B (GrB T-cell FluoroSpot, and flow cytometric characterization of B- and T-cell subsets were performed in 57 subjects. pH1N1-antibodies increased after vaccination, but less than previously described in healthy adults. pH1N1-IgG memory B cells (Bmem increased, IFNγ-effector T-cells (Teff decreased, and IgA Bmem and GrB Teff did not change. pH1N1-antibodies and Teff were significantly correlated with each other and with sH1N1-HAI and Teff, respectively, before and after vaccination. pH1N1-antibody responses to the vaccine significantly increased with high proportions of CD4+, low CD8+ and low CD8+HLADR+CD38+ activated (Tact cells. pH1N1-IgG Bmem responses increased with high proportions of CD19+CD27+CD21- activated B cells (Bact, high CD8+CD39+ regulatory T cells (Treg, and low CD19+CD27-CD21- exhausted B cells (Bexhaust. IFNγ-Teff responses increased with low HIV plasma RNA, CD8+HLADR+CD38+ Tact, CD4+FoxP3+ Treg and CD19+IL10+ Breg. In conclusion, pre-existing antibody and Teff responses to sH1N1 were associated with increased responses to pH1N1 vaccination in HIV-infected pregnant women suggesting an important role for heterosubtypic immunologic memory. High CD4+% T cells were associated with increased, whereas high HIV replication, Tact and Bexhaust were associated with decreased vaccine immunogenicity. High Treg increased antibody responses but

  1. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Soonawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1 (pH1N1 vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition we tested whether recent vaccination with seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV induced cross-reactive antibodies to pH1N1. (clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:NCT01066169.In this single-center prospective cohort study MF59-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine (Focetria®, Novartis was administered twice to 58 adult HIV-infected patients and 44 healthy controls in November 2009 (day 0 and day 21. Antibody responses were measured at baseline, day 21 and day 56 with hemagglutination-inhibition (HI assay. The seroprotection rate (defined as HI titers ≥ 1 : 40 for HIV-infected patients was 88% after the first and 91% after the second vaccination. These rates were comparable to those in healthy controls. Post-vaccination GMT, a sensitive marker of the immune competence of a group, was lower in HIV-infected patients. We found a high seroprotection rate at baseline (31%. Seroprotective titers at baseline were much more common in those who had received 2009-2010 seasonal TIV three weeks prior to the first dose of pH1N1 vaccine. Using stored serum samples of 51 HIV-infected participants we measured the pH1N1 specific response to 2009-2010 seasonal TIV. The seroprotection rate to pH1N1 increased from 22% to 49% after vaccination with 2009-2010 seasonal TIV. Seasonal TIV induced higher levels of antibodies to pH1N1 in older than in younger subjects.In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy, with a median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count above 500 cells/mm(3, one dose of MF59-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine induced a high seroprotection rate comparable to that in healthy controls. A second dose had a modest additional effect. Furthermore, seasonal TIV induced cross-reactive antibodies to pH1N1

  2. Upregulation of TGF-beta 1 in neonates of mothers receiving Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Anne Louise; Folsgaard, N.; Bisgaard, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Influenza vaccination of pregnant women is generally considered safe,but the effects on the immune system of the unborn child are unknown.Objectives: Our primary objective was to explore differences in cytokine and chemokine levels in nasal mucosal lining fluid in neonates of mothers....... aureus; older siblings; furred animals in home; smoking during 3rd trimester; and mothers’ atopic disease. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination during pregnancy affects the mucosal immune competence of the unborn child. The up-regulation of TGF-b1 and down...... vaccinated during or after pregnancy. Method: IFN-c, IL-1b, IL-2, -4, -5, -10, - 12p70, -13, -17, TNF-a, IL-8, eotaxin-1,eotaxin-3, IP-10, MCP-1, MCP-4, MDC, MIP-1b, TGF-b1 and TARC were quantified in nasal mucosal lining fluid in neonates of mothers receiving Influenza A (H1N1v) vaccine during (n = 52...

  3. Impact of cytokine in type 1 narcolepsy: Role of pandemic H1N1 vaccination ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecendreux, Michel; Libri, Valentina; Jaussent, Isabelle; Mottez, Estelle; Lopez, Régis; Lavault, Sophie; Regnault, Armelle; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures (pandemic influenza 2009 vaccination) provide strong support that narcolepsy type 1 is an immune-mediated disease. Considering the limited knowledge regarding the immune mechanisms involved in narcolepsy whether related to flu vaccination or not and the recent progresses in cytokine measurement technology, we assessed 30 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors using the Luminex technology in either peripheral (serum) or central (CSF) compartments in a large population of 90 children and adult patients with narcolepsy type 1 in comparison to 58 non-hypocretin deficient hypersomniacs and 41 healthy controls. Furthermore, we compared their levels in patients with narcolepsy whether exposed to pandemic flu vaccine or not, and analyzed the effect of age, duration of disease and symptom severity. Comparison for sera biomarkers between narcolepsy (n = 84, 54 males, median age: 15.5 years old) and healthy controls (n = 41, 13 males, median age: 20 years old) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of several pro- and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and growth factors with interferon-γ, CCL11, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-2 receptor being independently associated with narcolepsy. Increased levels of interferon-γ, CCL11, and interleukin-12 were found when close to narcolepsy onset. After several adjustments, only one CSF biomarker differed between narcolepsy (n = 44, 26 males, median age: 15 years old) and non-hypocretin deficient hypersomnias (n = 57, 24 males, median age: 36 years old) with higher CCL 3 levels found in narcolepsy. Comparison for sera biomarkers between patients with narcolepsy who developed the disease post-pandemic flu vaccination (n = 36) to those without vaccination (n = 48) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of three cytokines, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed

  4. H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Italy Revisited: Has the Willingness to Get Vaccinated Suffered in the Long Run?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Ramona; Nobile, Marta; Hartung, Uwe; Castaldi, Silvana; Schulz, Peter J

    2015-07-16

    The aim of the study is to assess the long-term secondary effects of personal experience with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009/2010 and the perception of the institutional reaction to it on Italians' willingness to get vaccinated in case of a novel influenza pandemic. We conducted 140 face-to-face interviews in the Registry Office of the Municipality of Milan, Italy, from October to December 2012. Willingness to get vaccinated during a novel influenza pandemic was best predicted by having been vaccinated against the seasonal flu in the past (OR=5.18; 95%CI: 1.40 to 19.13) and fear of losing one's life in case of an infection with H1N1 (OR=4.09; 95%CI: 1.68 to 9.97). It was unaffected by the assessment of institutional performance. The findings of this study do not point to long-term secondary effects of the institutional handling of the H1N1 pandemic. The results highlight the fact that behavioural intention is not the same as behaviour, and that the former cannot simply be taken as an indicator of the latter. Significance for public healthWhereas influenza pandemics occurred rather rarely in the last centuries, their frequency can be expected to increase in the future due to the enhanced globalisation and still raising importance of air travelling. Recent examples (Ebola, H1N1, SARS, avian influenza) demonstrate that initially local disease outbreaks often become worldwide health threats of international concern. National and international health authorities are consequently urged to present preparedness plans on how to manage such health crises. However, their success highly depends on their acceptance by the public. To ensure the public compliance with recommended actions, effective communication is needed. Since communication is most successful when it meets the needs of the target audience, a full understanding of the audience is crucial. This study can help public health experts to better understand the variables determining people's willingness to get vaccinated

  5. Clinical and Immune Responses to Inactivated Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotloff, Karen L.; Halasa, Natasha B.; Harrison, Christopher J.; Englund, Janet A.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; King, James C.; Creech, C. Buddy; Healy, Sara A.; Dolor, Rowena J.; Stephens, Ina; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Noah, Diana L.; Hill, Heather; Wolff, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background As the influenza AH1N1 pandemic emerged in 2009, children were found to experience high morbidity and mortality and were prioritized for vaccination. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, age-stratified trial assessed the safety and immunogenicity of inactivated influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in healthy children aged 6 months to 17 years. Methods Children received two doses of approximately 15 μg or 30 μg hemagglutin antigen 21 days apart. Reactogenicity was assessed for 8 days after each dose, adverse events through day 42, and serious adverse events or new-onset chronic illnesses through day 201. Serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers were measured on days 0 (pre-vaccination), 8, 21, 29, and 42. Results A total of 583 children received the first dose and 571 received the second dose of vaccine. Vaccinations were generally well-tolerated and no related serious adverse events were observed. The 15 μg dosage elicited a seroprotective HAI (≥1:40) in 20%, 47%, and 93% of children in the 6-35 month, 3-9 year, and 10-17 year age strata 21 days after dose 1 and in 78%, 82%, and 98% of children 21 days after dose 2, respectively. The 30 μg vaccine dosage induced similar responses. Conclusions The inactivated influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine exhibited a favorable safety profile at both dosage levels. While a single 15 or 30 μg dose induced seroprotective antibody responses in most 10-17 year olds, younger children required 2 doses, even when receiving dosages 4-6 fold higher than recommended. Well-tolerated vaccines are needed that induce immunity after a single dose for use in young children during influenza pandemics. PMID:25222307

  6. Coordination Costs for School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics, Maine, 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Cho, Bo-Hyun; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    School nurses played a key role in Maine's school-located influenza vaccination (SLV) clinics during the 2009-2010 pandemic season. The objective of this study was to determine, from the school district perspective, the labor hours and costs associated with outside-clinic coordination activities (OCA). The authors defined OCA as labor hours spent…

  7. Responses to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccines in participants previously vaccinated with seasonal influenza vaccine: a randomized, observer-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Van der Most, Robbert; Li, Ping; Vaughn, David W

    2014-11-01

    Prior receipt of a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV) can affect hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses to pandemic influenza vaccines. We investigated the effect of TIV priming on humoral responses to AS03-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, the role of AS03 on cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and vaccine safety. Healthy adults (aged 19-40 years) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive TIV or saline followed 4 months later by 2 doses, 3 weeks apart, of adjuvanted or nonadjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine and followed up to study end (day 507). Pre- and postvaccination responses of HI and neutralizing antibody, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts were assessed. Ninety-nine of the 133 participants enrolled completed the study. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were recorded. In TIV-primed participants, A(H1N1)pdm09-specific antibody and CD4(+) T-cell and memory B-cell responses to the pandemic vaccine tended to be diminished. Vaccine adjuvantation led to increased responses of vaccine-homologous and -heterologous HI and neutralizing antibodies and CD4(+) T cells, homologous memory B cells, and plasmablasts. In healthy adults, prior TIV administration decreased humoral and CMI responses to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. Adjuvantation of A(H1N1)pdm09 antigen helped to overcome immune interference between the influenza vaccines. No safety concerns were observed. Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT00707967. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  8. Safety and efficacy of a novel live attenuated influenza vaccine against pandemic H1N1 in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is the predominant influenza strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers a...

  9. Determinants of non-vaccination against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in pregnant women: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Freund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 882 pregnant women were randomly included between October 12, 2009 and February 3, 2010, with the aim to study characteristics of pandemic influenza during pregnancy. At inclusion, socio-demographic, medical, obstetrical factors and those associated with a higher risk of flu exposition and disease-spreading were systematically collected. Pandemic flu vaccine uptake was checked until delivery. 555 (62.9% women did not get vaccinated. Determinants associated with non-vaccination in a multivariate logistic regression were: geographic origin (Sub-Saharan African origin, adjusted Odd Ratio aOR = 5.4[2.3-12.7], North African origin, aOR = 2.5[1.3-4.7] and Asian origin, aOR = 2.1[1.7-2.6] compared to French and European origin and socio-professional categories (farmers, craftsmen and tradesmen, aOR = 2.3[2.0-2.6], intermediate professionals, aOR = 1.3[1.0-1.6], employees and manual workers, aOR = 2.5[1.4-4.4] compared to managers and intellectual professionals. The probability of not receiving pandemic flu vaccine was lower among women vaccinated against seasonal flu in the previous 5 years (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8] and among those who stopped smoking before or early during pregnancy (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]. Number of children less than 18 years old living at home, work in contact with children or in healthcare area, or professional contact with the public, were not associated with a higher vaccine uptake. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this cohort of pregnant women, vaccine coverage against pandemic

  10. Determinants of non-vaccination against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in pregnant women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Romain; Le Ray, Camille; Charlier, Caroline; Avenell, Carolyn; Truster, Van; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Skalli, Dounia; Ville, Yves; Goffinet, François; Launay, Odile

    2011-01-01

    In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 882 pregnant women were randomly included between October 12, 2009 and February 3, 2010, with the aim to study characteristics of pandemic influenza during pregnancy. At inclusion, socio-demographic, medical, obstetrical factors and those associated with a higher risk of flu exposition and disease-spreading were systematically collected. Pandemic flu vaccine uptake was checked until delivery. 555 (62.9%) women did not get vaccinated. Determinants associated with non-vaccination in a multivariate logistic regression were: geographic origin (Sub-Saharan African origin, adjusted Odd Ratio aOR = 5.4[2.3-12.7], North African origin, aOR = 2.5[1.3-4.7] and Asian origin, aOR = 2.1[1.7-2.6] compared to French and European origin) and socio-professional categories (farmers, craftsmen and tradesmen, aOR = 2.3[2.0-2.6], intermediate professionals, aOR = 1.3[1.0-1.6], employees and manual workers, aOR = 2.5[1.4-4.4] compared to managers and intellectual professionals). The probability of not receiving pandemic flu vaccine was lower among women vaccinated against seasonal flu in the previous 5 years (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]) and among those who stopped smoking before or early during pregnancy (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]). Number of children less than 18 years old living at home, work in contact with children or in healthcare area, or professional contact with the public, were not associated with a higher vaccine uptake. In this cohort of pregnant women, vaccine coverage against pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 flu was low, particularly in immigrant women and those having a low socio

  11. Patient reported outcome data following influenza A (H1N1p vaccination in the 2009–2010 season: web-based and telephone evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade AG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alan G Wade1, Gordon M Crawford1, Neil Pumford1, Alex McConnachie21Patients Direct, 3 Todd Campus, Glasgow, UK; 2Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKBackground: There has been worldwide interest in the safety of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1p vaccines, although limited data are available from the vaccine recipients’ perspective. This evaluation was designed to collect data from people who had received an influenza vaccination during the 2009–2010 season using a web-based data collection tool supplemented by telephone reporting (PROBE.Methods: People scheduled to receive the influenza A (H1N1p or seasonal influenza vaccines were recruited through media advertising and campaigns throughout the West of Scotland. Vaccine recipients participated in the evaluation by answering demographic and side effect questions using PROBE methodology on the day of the immunization, after 3 days, 8 days, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks.Results: A total of 1103 vaccine recipients including 134 young children (0–4 years participated in the evaluation; 694 (63% received H1N1p vaccine only, 135 (12% seasonal vaccine only, 224 (20% both H1N1p and seasonal vaccines, and 50 (5% received H1N1p or seasonal vaccine with a non-influenza vaccine (eg, travel or pneumococcal. Overall, 42% of recipients reported experiencing a side effect after their baseline vaccination; the most commonly reported were general and arm side effects (>20%. Injection site discomfort/pain and flu-like symptoms were reported by 57% and 24% of recipients, respectively. A significantly higher proportion of the 960 H1N1p vaccine recipients experienced a side effect (44% vs 27%, P < 0.001 or injection site discomfort/pain (61% vs 26%, P < 0.001 than those receiving seasonal influenza vaccines. Female sex and H1N1p vaccination were associated with a significantly higher risk of injection site discomfort/pain, whereas the 70+ age group was associated with a

  12. Mielitis transversa relacionada con vacunación anti-influenza A(H1N1 Transverse myelitis associated with anti-influenza A (H1N1 vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Arcondo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available La mielitis transversa es una enfermedad inflamatoria que se caracteriza por disfunción de la médula espinal. Las causas reconocidas de mielitis transversa son autoinmunes, enfermedades desmielinizantes, post infecciosas y post vacunales, aunque hasta el 50% de los casos son idiopáticas. Las vacunas contra la rubéola, paperas, rabia y gripe estacional han sido asociadas a diversos trastornos neurológicos, como el Síndrome de Guillain Barré, la encefalomielitis diseminada aguda (ADEM y la mielitis transversa. Como mecanismo preventivo luego de la pandemia de 2009, en febrero del año 2010 se inició en nuestro país la campaña de vacunación contra la Influenza A (H1N1. Se presenta el caso de una paciente con hipoestesias que aparecieron cuatro días después de haber recibido la vacuna monovalente anti-influenza A (H1N1 y progresaron con evidente nivel sensitivo. La paciente cumplía criterios diagnósticos de mielitis transversa, según el Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group. Tuvo remisión de las imágenes de la resonancia magnética y estabilidad clínica sin tratamiento con corticoides. Se discuten aspectos diagnósticos, pronósticos y terapéuticos de esta entidad clínica.Transverse myelitis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by spinal cord dysfunction. Infectious, autoimmune, postinfectious and postvaccination diseases are the most common recognized causes of transverse myelitis, but near 50% of the cases are finally assumed as idiopathic. Rubeolla, mumps, rabies and influenza vaccines were associated with many neurologic complications, such as Guillain Barré Syndrome, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM and transverse myelitis. As a prevention measure after the 2009 pandemia, in February 2010 a National Campaigne of Vaccination against the Influenza A (H1N1 was started in our country. We report a case of a woman who received a monovalent Influenza A (H1N1 vaccine and four days after, began with sensory

  13. Development and preclinical testing of HNVAC, a cell culture-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagendra R; Kumar, Deepak; Rao, P Panduranga; Kumari, P Krishna; Kaushik, Yashpal; Ravikrishnan, R; Prasad, Sai D; Ella, Krishna M

    2014-06-17

    Several limitations of the use of embryonated eggs and the threat of pandemics have highlighted the need for other platforms for the production of influenza vaccines. We report the indigenous development and pre-clinical testing of an MDCK-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine HNVAC from India. The cell bank and virus seed were characterized extensively. The cells were characterized by PCR, electron microscopy, and karyotyping, and found to be of female canine epithelial origin. The virus was confirmed by neutralization, haemagglutination inhibition, neuraminidase inhibition, and PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Adventitious agent testing was performed by both in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro studies included culturing, haemadsorption, haemagglutination, PCR and RT-PCR, whereas in vivo studies included passage in embryonated eggs and in laboratory animals. Both cell bank and virus seed were free of adventitious agents. MDCK cell lysates as well as cellular DNA did not produce tumours in newborn or adult laboratory animals. The bioprocess parameters were standardized to recover antigen with minimal levels of process-related impurities. The vaccine bulk was tested for the presence of specific antigen, and quantified by single radial immunodiffusion. Finally, non-adjuvanted and aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine formulations were found to be safe in preclinical toxicity studies in mice, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits, and immunogenic in mice and rabbits. This is the first and only cell culture-based influenza vaccine platform developed in any developing country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. International collaboration to assess the risk of Guillain Barré Syndrome following Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Caitlin; Romio, Silvana; Black, Steve; Vellozzi, Claudia; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Zuber, Patrick; Hua, Wei; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Buttery, Jim; Crawford, Nigel; Deceuninck, Genevieve; de Vries, Corinne; Wals, Philippe; Gimeno, David; Heijbel, Harald

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The global spread of the 2009 novel pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus led to the accelerated production and distribution of monovalent 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccines (pH1N1). This pandemic provided the opportunity to evaluate the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which has been an influenza vaccine safety concern since the swine flu pandemic of 1976, using a common protocol among high and middle-income countries. The primary objective of this project was to demo...

  15. [Immunogenicity of inactivated subunit adsorbed monovalent vaccine against influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, V V; Kostinov, M P; Mikhailova, N A; Zhirova, S N; Mironov, A N; Terkacheva, O A; Romanova, A A; Cherdantsev, A P

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity of Pandeflu subunit vaccine against influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) was evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. The vaccine was intramuscularly injected twice at an interval of 28 days. Each dose (0.5 ml) contains A(HIN1) influenza virus hemagglutinin (15 +/- 2.2 microg), aluminum hydroxide (Denmark) (0.475 +/- 0.075 microg), and the preservative thiomerosal (merthiolate) (50 +/- 7.5 microg). The level of antibodies was determined in the microneutralization assay. After administration of two doses of the vaccine at a 28-day interval, the geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT) reached 1:21.1 with a further increase to 1:30 (the baseline GMAT) was 1:6.1). The frequencies of seroconversion and seroprotection were 71.4 and 59.2%, respectively; the antibody increase factor was 4.92, which meets the CPMP criteria. The administration of the vaccine did not result in adverse reactions in the postvaccination period.

  16. Guillain-Barré Syndrome During the 2009–2010 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Population-based Surveillance Among 45 Million Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Matthew E.; Viray, Melissa; Sejvar, James J.; Lewis, Paige; Baughman, Andrew L.; Connor, Walter; Danila, Richard; Giambrone, Greg P.; Hale, Christa; Hogan, Brenna C.; Meek, James I.; Murphree, Rendi; Oh, John Y.; Reingold, Arthur; Tellman, Norisse; Conner, Susan M.; Singleton, James A.; Lu, Peng-Jun; DeStefano, Frank; Fridkin, Scott K.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Morgan, Oliver W.

    2012-01-01

    Because of widespread distribution of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine (pH1N1 vaccine) and the prior association between Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and the 1976 H1N1 influenza vaccine, enhanced surveillance was implemented to estimate the magnitude of any increased GBS risk following administration of pH1N1 vaccine. The authors conducted active, population-based surveillance for incident cases of GBS among 45 million persons residing at 10 Emerging Infections Program sites during October 2009–May 2010; GBS was defined according to published criteria. The authors determined medical and vaccine history for GBS cases through medical record review and patient interviews. The authors used vaccine coverage data to estimate person-time exposed and unexposed to pH1N1 vaccine and calculated age- and sex-adjusted rate ratios comparing GBS incidence in these groups, as well as age- and sex-adjusted numbers of excess GBS cases. The authors received 411 reports of confirmed or probable GBS. The rate of GBS immediately following pH1N1 vaccination was 57% higher than in person-time unexposed to vaccine (adjusted rate ratio = 1.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.21), corresponding to 0.74 excess GBS cases per million pH1N1 vaccine doses (95% confidence interval: 0.04, 1.56). This excess risk was much smaller than that observed during the 1976 vaccine campaign and was comparable to some previous seasonal influenza vaccine risk assessments. PMID:22582209

  17. Low adherence to influenza vaccination campaigns: is the H1N1 virus pandemic to be blamed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Valeria; Gandini, Vera; Nespoli, Luigi

    2011-11-10

    Over the last few months, debates about the handling of the influenza virus A (H1N1) pandemic took place, in particular regarding the change of the WHO pandemic definition, economic interests, the dramatic communication style of mass media. The activation of plans to reduce the virus diffusion resulted in an important investment of resources. Were those investments proportionate to the risk? Was the pandemic overrated? The workload of the Pediatric Emergency Room (P.E.R.) at a teaching hospital in Varese (Northern Italy) was investigated in order to evaluate the local diffusion and severity of the new H1N1 influenza epidemic. A 100% increase of the number of P.E.R. visits, particularly for influenza-like illness, was recorded during weeks 42-46 of 2009 (October, 17 to November, 2); the low rate of hospitalization and the mild presentation of the infection gave rise to the conclusion that the pandemic risk was overrated. Mass media communications concerning the new virus created a disproportionate fear in the population that significantly enhanced the burden of cares at the hospital. In the absence of generally implemented measures for etiological diagnosis, the actual incidence of the H1N1 infection could not be estimated. Virus identification, in fact, was limited to children showing severe symptoms after consultancy with an infectious disease specialist. The alarming nature of the communication campaign and the choice to limit etiologic diagnosis to severe cases created a climate of uncertainty which significantly contributed to the massive admissions to the P.E.R.. The communication strategy adopted by the mass media was an important element during the pandemic: the absence of clarity contributed to the spread of a pandemic phobia that appeared to result more from the sensationalism of the campaign than from infection with the novel influenza A variant of human, avian, swine origin virus. One relevant effect of the media coverage was the extremely low adherence

  18. Low adherence to influenza vaccination campaigns: is the H1N1 virus pandemic to be blamed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivellin Valeria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last few months, debates about the handling of the influenza virus A (H1N1 pandemic took place, in particular regarding the change of the WHO pandemic definition, economic interests, the dramatic communication style of mass media. The activation of plans to reduce the virus diffusion resulted in an important investment of resources. Were those investments proportionate to the risk? Was the pandemic overrated? The workload of the Pediatric Emergency Room (P.E.R. at a teaching hospital in Varese (Northern Italy was investigated in order to evaluate the local diffusion and severity of the new H1N1 influenza epidemic. Discussion A 100% increase of the number of P.E.R. visits, particularly for influenza-like illness, was recorded during weeks 42-46 of 2009 (October, 17 to November, 2; the low rate of hospitalization and the mild presentation of the infection gave rise to the conclusion that the pandemic risk was overrated. Mass media communications concerning the new virus created a disproportionate fear in the population that significantly enhanced the burden of cares at the hospital. In the absence of generally implemented measures for etiological diagnosis, the actual incidence of the H1N1 infection could not be estimated. Virus identification, in fact, was limited to children showing severe symptoms after consultancy with an infectious disease specialist. The alarming nature of the communication campaign and the choice to limit etiologic diagnosis to severe cases created a climate of uncertainty which significantly contributed to the massive admissions to the P.E.R.. Summary The communication strategy adopted by the mass media was an important element during the pandemic: the absence of clarity contributed to the spread of a pandemic phobia that appeared to result more from the sensationalism of the campaign than from infection with the novel influenza A variant of human, avian, swine origin virus. One relevant effect

  19. Vaccination against 2009 pandemic H1N1 in a population dynamical model of Vancouver, Canada: timing is everything

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conway Jessica M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much remains unknown about the effect of timing and prioritization of vaccination against pandemic (pH1N1 2009 virus on health outcomes. We adapted a city-level contact network model to study different campaigns on influenza morbidity and mortality. Methods We modeled different distribution strategies initiated between July and November 2009 using a compartmental epidemic model that includes age structure and transmission network dynamics. The model represents the Greater Vancouver Regional District, a major North American city and surrounding suburbs with a population of 2 million, and is parameterized using data from the British Columbia Ministry of Health, published studies, and expert opinion. Outcomes are expressed as the number of infections and deaths averted due to vaccination. Results The model output was consistent with provincial surveillance data. Assuming a basic reproduction number = 1.4, an 8-week vaccination campaign initiated 2 weeks before the epidemic onset reduced morbidity and mortality by 79-91% and 80-87%, respectively, compared to no vaccination. Prioritizing children and parents for vaccination may have reduced transmission compared to actual practice, but the mortality benefit of this strategy appears highly sensitive to campaign timing. Modeling the actual late October start date resulted in modest reductions in morbidity and mortality (13-25% and 16-20%, respectively with little variation by prioritization scheme. Conclusion Delays in vaccine production due to technological or logistical barriers may reduce potential benefits of vaccination for pandemic influenza, and these temporal effects can outweigh any additional theoretical benefits from population targeting. Careful modeling may provide decision makers with estimates of these effects before the epidemic peak to guide production goals and inform policy. Integration of real-time surveillance data with mathematical models holds the promise of

  20. Responses to pandemic ASO3-adjuvanted A/California/07/09 H1N1 influenza vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza infection may be more serious in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals, therefore, vaccination against seasonal and pandemic strains is highly advised. Seasonal influenza vaccines have had no significant negative effects in well controlled HIV infection, but the impact of adjuvanted pandemic A/California/07/2009 H1N1 influenza hemaglutinin (HA vaccine, which was used for the first time in the Canadian population as an authorized vaccine in autumn 2009, has not been extensively studied. Objective Assess vaccine-related effects on CD4+ T cell counts and humoral responses to the vaccine in individuals attending the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial HIV clinic. Methods A single dose of ArepanrixTM split vaccine including 3.75 μg A/California/07/2009 H1N1 HA antigen and ASO3 adjuvant was administered to 81 HIV-infected individuals by intramuscular injection. Plasma samples from shortly before, and 1–5 months after vaccination were collected from 80/81 individuals to assess humoral anti-H1N1 HA responses using a sensitive microbead-based array assay. Data on CD4+ T cell counts, plasma viral load, antiretroviral therapy and patient age were collected from clinical records of 81 individuals. Results Overall, 36/80 responded to vaccination either by seroconversion to H1N1 HA or with a clear increase in anti-H1N1 HA antibody levels. Approximately 1/3 (28/80 had pre-existing anti-H1N1 HA antibodies and were more likely to respond to vaccination (22/28. Responders had higher baseline CD4+ T cell counts and responders without pre-existing antibodies against H1N1 HA were younger than either non-responders or responders with pre-existing antibodies. Compared to changes in their CD4+ T cell counts observed over a similar time period one year later, vaccine recipients displayed a minor, transient fall in CD4+ T cell numbers, which was greater amongst responders. Conclusions We observed low response rates

  1. Key points in evaluating immunogenicity of pandemic influenza vaccines: A lesson from immunogenicity studies of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohfuji, Satoko; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Ide, Yuichiro; Egawa, Yumi; Saito, Tomoko; Kondo, Kyoko; Ito, Kazuya; Kase, Tetsuo; Maeda, Akiko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-09-18

    Immunogenicity studies on pandemic influenza vaccine are necessary to inform rapid development and implementation of a vaccine during a pandemic. Thus, strategies for immunogenicity assessment are required. To identify essential factors to consider when evaluating the immunogenicity of pandemic influenza vaccines using the experience in Japan with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. We conducted a search of observational studies using PubMed and IchushiWeb. Search terms included "influenza vaccine AND (immunogenicity OR immune response) AND Japan AND (2009 OR pdm09) NOT review," and was limited to studies conducted in humans. A total of 33 articles were identified, of which 16 articles met the inclusion criteria. Immunogenicity of the commercially available influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine satisfied the international criteria for influenza vaccine immunogenicity in all study populations. The most remarkable immune response was observed in junior high school students, while the lowest immune response was observed in hematological malignancy patients. Similar to immunogenicity studies on seasonal influenza vaccines, factors such as patient background (e.g., age, underlying condition, pre-vaccination titer, body mass index, etc.) and study procedure (e.g., concurrent measurement of pre- and post-vaccination antibody titer, effects of infection during the study period) may have affected the assessment of immunogenicity to the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. In addition, prior vaccination with the seasonal influenza vaccine may inhibit antibody induction by the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. This review discusses factors and strategies that must be considered and addressed during immunogenicity assessments of pandemic influenza vaccines, which may provide useful information for future influenza pandemics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The Social Ecological Model as a Framework for Determinants of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Uptake in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Supriya; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Donald; Hilyard, Karen M.; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on influenza vaccine uptake has focused largely on intrapersonal determinants (perceived risk, past vaccine acceptance, perceived vaccine safety) and on physician recommendation. The authors used a social ecological framework to examine influenza vaccine uptake during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Surveying an adult population (n = 2,079) in…

  3. Febrile seizures after 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccination and infection: a nationwide registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Inger Johanne; Aaberg, Kari Modalsli; Ghaderi, Sara; Gunnes, Nina; Trogstad, Lill; Magnus, Per; Håberg, Siri Eldevik

    2015-11-09

    During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, a monovalent pandemic strain vaccine containing the oil-in-water adjuvant AS03 (Pandemrix®) was offered to the Norwegian population. The coverage among children reached 54%. Our aim was to estimate the risk of febrile seizure in children after exposure to pandemic influenza vaccination or infection. The study population comprised 226,889 children born 2006-2009 resident in Norway per October 1st, 2009. Febrile seizure episodes were defined by emergency hospital admissions / emergency outpatient hospital care with International Classification of Diseases, Version 10, codes R56.0 or R56.8. The self-controlled case series method was applied to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) in pre-defined risk periods compared to the background period. The total observation window was ± 180 days from exposure day. Among 113,068 vaccinated children, 656 (0.6%) had at least one febrile seizure episode. The IRR of febrile seizures 1-3 days after vaccination was 2.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15-3.51). In the period 4-7 days after vaccination, no increased risk was observed. Among the 8172 children diagnosed with pandemic influenza, 84 (1.0%) had at least one febrile seizure episode. The IRR of febrile seizures on the same day as a diagnosis of influenza was 116.70 (95% CI: 62.81-216.90). In the period 1-3 days after a diagnosis of influenza, a tenfold increased risk was observed (IRR 10.12, 95% CI: 3.82 - 26.82). In this large population-based study with precise timing of exposures and outcomes, we found a twofold increased risk of febrile seizures 1-3 days after pandemic influenza vaccination. However, we found that pandemic influenza infection was associated with a much stronger increase in risk of febrile seizures.

  4. Why do I need it? I am not at risk! Public perceptions towards the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Kirsten F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the 30th September 2009, the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine was made available to adults and children aged 10 years and over, in Australia. Acceptance of a novel vaccine is influenced by perceptions of risk including risk of infection, risk of death or severe illness and risk of serious vaccine side-effects. We surveyed a sample of residents from Sydney, Australia to ascertain their risk perception, attitudes towards the pandemic and willingness to accept the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine. Methods We sampled residents using a cross-sectional intercept design during the WHO Phase 6. Members of the public were approached in shopping and pedestrian malls to undertake the survey during September and October 2009. The survey measured perceived risk, seriousness of disease, recent behavioural changes, likely acceptance of the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine and issues relating to uptake and perceived safety. Results Of the 627 respondents, the majority felt that they had a "very low to low" (332/627, 52.9% risk of acquiring H1N1. 24.5% (154/627 of respondents believed that the disease would "very seriously or extremely" affect their health. Nearly half (305/627, 48.6% reported that in response to the "swine flu" outbreak they had undertaken one or more of the investigated behavioural changes. Overall, the self-reported likelihood of accepting vaccination against novel H1N1 was 54.7% (343/627. Conclusions While, most participants did not believe they were at high risk of acquiring pandemic H1N1 2009, over half of the sample indicated that they would accept the vaccine. Participants who were vaccinated against the seasonal influenza were more likely to receive the H1N1 vaccine. Concerns about safety, the possibility of side effects and the vaccine development process need to be addressed.

  5. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-10-01

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Sheena Aislinn; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-01-01

    Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.

  7. [Factors associated with willingness to be vaccinated against pandemic flu A/H1N1 in the adult population of the Health Department of Elche (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuells, J; Caballero, P; Nolasco, A; Montagud, E

    2012-01-01

    To assess, in the general population, the information sources, attitudes and willingness to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 in 2009. We carried out a cross sectional study between 25th November and 30th December 2009, through face to face interviews with a random sample (826) of adults resident in the Health Department of Elche (Spain). Respondents reported that television (57%) and the family doctor (47.9%) were their main sources of information about vaccinations. Eighty-two point two percent had a good opinion of vaccinations, 30.5% perceived A/H1N1 to be more severe than seasonal flu, with a higher rate among older and less educated people. Twenty-five point four percent of respondents were concerned about contracting it, especially among the less educated. Forty-two point one percent expressed their willingness to be vaccinated against seasonal flu. Eighteen point four percent intended to be vaccinated against A/H1N1. The bias towards vaccination increases with age and in the case of A/H1N1 decreases among more educated people. The family doctor was the main source of information when people wanted to be immunized against seasonal flu (OR = 1.43) and A/H1N1 (OR = 2.47). Low acceptance of the pandemic vaccination and low perceived severity of influenza A/H1N1. Previous vaccination experience with seasonal flu creates a predisposition to immunization against A/H1N1. Although the media were the leading source of information during this period, the family doctor's influence on their decision to be vaccinated was significant.

  8. Inactivated trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine induces limited cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses against 2009 pandemic and 1934 PR8 H1N1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J; Tay, Joshua K; Chen, Mark I C; Phoon, M C; Xie, M L; Wu, Y; Lee, Cynthia X X; Yap, Jonathan; Sakharkar, K R; Sakharkar, M K; Lin, Raymond T; Cui, Lin; Kelly, Paul M; Leo, Yee Sin; Tan, Yee Joo; Chow, Vincent T K

    2010-10-04

    In June 2009, we conducted a prospective study in Singapore on 51 individuals to determine their serologic responses before and following receipt of the 2009 Southern Hemisphere seasonal influenza vaccine. Paired serum samples were obtained before and 3-4 weeks after vaccination. Virus microneutralization assays were performed to quantify antibodies against A/Brisbane/59/2007 vaccine, pandemic H1N1-2009 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 H1N1 strains. Post-vaccination, 43%, 12% and 24% of subjects displayed a 4-fold or greater rise in neutralizing antibody titers against the three strains, respectively. There was a positive correlation among individuals who showed increased titers to both pandemic H1N1-2009 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 (pvaccination confers a certain degree of cross-protection to other H1N1 strains. The correlation in cross-reactive antibody titers to A/Puerto Rico/08/34 and pandemic H1N1-2009 implies that previous exposure to pre-1957 H1N1 strains may confer some protection against the 2009 pandemic strain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. H1N1 influenza (Swine flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine flu; H1N1 type A influenza ... The H1N1 virus is now considered a regular flu virus. It is one of the three viruses included in the regular (seasonal) flu vaccine . You cannot get H1N1 flu virus from ...

  10. Trivalent influenza vaccine in patients on haemodialysis: impaired seroresponse with differences for A-H3N2 and A-H1N1 vaccine components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); D.J. Versluis; P. Kramer; P.P.N.M. Diderich (Philip); W. Weimar (Willem); N. Masurel (Nic)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractOne hundred and one patients on haemodialysis, 21 patients on peritoneal dialysis and 30 healthy controls received a trivalent split vaccine containing 15 micrograms haemagglutinin of a recent influenza A-H3N2, influenza A-H1N1 and influenza B strain, respectively. Antibody production

  11. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael; Brühl, Peter; Kreil, Thomas R; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Barrett, P Noel

    2010-02-23

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  12. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otfried Kistner

    Full Text Available The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  13. B cell response and hemagglutinin stalk-reactive antibody production in different age cohorts following 2009 H1N1 influenza virus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Mark Y; Baer, Jane; Santiago, Felix W; Fitzgerald, Theresa; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Sundararajan, Aarthi; Henn, Alicia D; Krammer, Florian; Yang, Hongmei; Luke, Catherine J; Zand, Martin S; Wright, Peter F; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J; Subbarao, Kanta

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus carried a swine-origin hemagglutinin (HA) that was closely related to the HAs of pre-1947 H1N1 viruses but highly divergent from the HAs of recently circulating H1N1 strains. Consequently, prior exposure to pH1N1-like viruses was mostly limited to individuals over the age of about 60 years. We related age and associated differences in immune history to the B cell response to an inactivated monovalent pH1N1 vaccine given intramuscularly to subjects in three age cohorts: 18 to 32 years, 60 to 69 years, and ≥70 years. The day 0 pH1N1-specific hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and microneutralization (MN) titers were generally higher in the older cohorts, consistent with greater prevaccination exposure to pH1N1-like viruses. Most subjects in each cohort responded well to vaccination, with early formation of circulating virus-specific antibody (Ab)-secreting cells and ≥4-fold increases in HAI and MN titers. However, the response was strongest in the 18- to 32-year cohort. Circulating levels of HA stalk-reactive Abs were increased after vaccination, especially in the 18- to 32-year cohort, raising the possibility of elevated levels of cross-reactive neutralizing Abs. In the young cohort, an increase in MN activity against the seasonal influenza virus A/Brisbane/59/07 after vaccination was generally associated with an increase in the anti-Brisbane/59/07 HAI titer, suggesting an effect mediated primarily by HA head-reactive rather than stalk-reactive Abs. Our findings support recent proposals that immunization with a relatively novel HA favors the induction of Abs against conserved epitopes. They also emphasize the need to clarify how the level of circulating stalk-reactive Abs relates to resistance to influenza.

  14. Adjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccination during pregnancy : Description of a prospective cohort and spontaneously reported pregnancy-related adverse reactions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Loes; van Hunsel, Florence; Cuppers-Maarschalkerweerd, Benedikte; van Puijenbroek, Eugène; van Grootheest, Kees

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During influenza pandemics, pregnant women have an increased risk of severe complications. Vaccination can diminish these complications. In the Netherlands, the adjuvanted vaccines Focetria® and Pandemrix® were used during the A/H1N1 (2009) influenza pandemic. The national vaccination

  15. Pandemic vaccination strategies and influenza severe outcomes during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and the post-pandemic influenza season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil Cuesta, Julita; Aavitsland, Preben; Englund, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    During the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, the five Nordic countries adopted different approaches to pandemic vaccination. We compared pandemic vaccination strategies and severe influenza outcomes, in seasons 2009/10 and 2010/11 in these countries with similar influenza surveillance...... and experienced less A(H1N1)pdm09-related severe outcomes in 2010/11. Pandemic vaccination may have had an impact on severe influenza outcomes in the post-pandemic season. Surveillance of severe outcomes may be used to compare the impact of influenza between seasons and support different vaccination strategies....

  16. CLINICAL STUDIES OF REACTOGENICITY, SAFETY AND IMMUNOGENICITY OF LIVE MONOVALENT INFLUENZA VACCINE (STRAIN А/17/CALIFORNIA/2009/38 — H1N1 IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Bushmenkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of performed pre-clinical and clinical studies with volunteers 18-60 years old allowed registration of vaccine «INFLUVIR» (live monovalent vaccine for the prophylaxis of influenza A/H1N1, strain A/17/California/2009/38 (H1N1, developed by NPO «Microgen» in Russian Federation so timely vaccination campaign was performed. As a result, the level of morbidity with influenza A/H1N1 in Russia was decreased, and development of complication was prevented. Clinical studies in different groups of children were performed for the purpose of widening indications for vaccine «INFLUVIR» administration. According to the results of studies vaccine «INFLUVIR» has good tolerability and safety, low reactogenicity, and significant immunogenicity. This fact will allow changing of present normative documentation and administration of «INFLUVIR» in children of different age for prophylaxis of influenza A/H1N1.Key words: children, influenza, virus A/H1N1, live influenza vaccine, tolerability, safety, immunogenicity.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:101-105

  17. Transient Impact of Rituximab in H1N1 Vaccination-associated Narcolepsy With Severe Psychiatric Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Alén, Reija; Partinen, Markku

    2016-09-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is an organic sleep disorder caused by the destruction of hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. In addition to daytime sleepiness, the spectrum and severity of symptoms are very variable. Psychiatric comorbidity and phenomena resembling psychotic symptoms are also common. Current treatment options for narcolepsy are symptomatic but there are few case reports of positive effect of immunotherapy. We report a very severely affected young boy treated with rituximab (RXB). A 12-year-old boy developed narcolepsy after Pandemrix H1N1 vaccination in 2010. He started to express severe psychiatric symptoms shortly after the onset. Cataplexy and sleepiness were devastatingly disabling. Conventional treatments did not have any effect on symptoms so we decided to try RXB, chimeric human monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed in B lymphocytes. After the first treatment his condition ameliorated dramatically. Unfortunately, the effect lasted only for 2 months. Following attempts did not show any effect. Effect of RXB on narcolepsy has not been reported before. Remarkable but short-lasting effect of RXB in narcolepsy is intriguing as it could imply that there is still ongoing B cell-mediated autoimmune response possible contributing to symptoms in narcolepsy.

  18. Pandemic H1N1 influenza infection and vaccination in humans induces cross-protective antibodies that target the hemagglutinin stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Ann Thomson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs generated from humans infected or vaccinated with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1 influenza virus targeted the hemagglutinin (HA stem. These anti-HA stem mAbs mostly used IGHV1-69 and bound readily to epitopes on the conventional seasonal influenza and pdmH1N1 vaccines. The anti-HA stem mAbs neutralized pdmH1N1, seasonal influenza H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza viruses by inhibiting HA-mediated fusion of membranes and protected against and treated heterologous lethal infections in mice with H5N1 influenza virus. This demonstrated that therapeutic mAbs could be generated a few months after the new virus emerged. Human immunization with the pdmH1N1 vaccine induced circulating antibodies that protected mice from lethal, heterologous H5N1 influenza infections. We observed that the dominant heterosubtypic antibody response against the HA stem correlated with the relative absence of memory B cells against the HA head of pdmH1N1, thus enabling the rare heterosubtypic memory B cells induced by seasonal influenza and specific for conserved sites on the HA stem to compete for T-cell help. These results support the notion that broadly protective antibodies against influenza would be induced by successive vaccination with conventional influenza vaccines based on subtypes of HA in viruses not circulating in humans.

  19. Immune response after one or two doses of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) monovalent, AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in HIV infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bybeck Nielsen, Allan; Nielsen, Henriette Schjønning; Nielsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Continued research is needed to evaluate and improve the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in HIV infected patients. We aimed to determine the antibody responses after one or two doses of the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in HIV infected patients. METHOD......: Following the influenza season 2009/2010, 219 HIV infected patients were included and divided into three groups depending on whether they received none (n=60), one (n=31) or two (n=128) doses of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. At inclusion, antibody titers for all patients were analyzed and compared.......7% and seroconversion rate of 86.7%. CONCLUSION: A single dose of AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine created an adequate immune response in HIV infected patients lasting as long as 4-9 months. Two doses improved the immunogenicity further....

  20. Decreased serologic response in vaccinated military recruits during 2011 correspond to genetic drift in concurrent circulating pandemic A/H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Faix

    Full Text Available Population-based febrile respiratory illness surveillance conducted by the Department of Defense contributes to an estimate of vaccine effectiveness. Between January and March 2011, 64 cases of 2009 A/H1N1 (pH1N1, including one fatality, were confirmed in immunized recruits at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, suggesting insufficient efficacy for the pH1N1 component of the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV.To test serologic protection, serum samples were collected at least 30 days post-vaccination from recruits at Fort Jackson (LAIV, Parris Island (LAIV and trivalent inactivated vaccine [TIV] at Cape May, New Jersey (TIV and responses measured against pre-vaccination sera. A subset of 78 LAIV and 64 TIV sera pairs from recruits who reported neither influenza vaccination in the prior year nor fever during training were tested by microneutralization (MN and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays. MN results demonstrated that seroconversion in paired sera was greater in those who received TIV versus LAIV (74% and 37%. Additionally, the fold change associated with TIV vaccination was significantly different between circulating (2011 versus the vaccine strain (2009 of pH1N1 viruses (ANOVA p value = 0.0006. HI analyses revealed similar trends. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis revealed that the quantity, IgG/IgM ratios, and affinity of anti-HA antibodies were significantly greater in TIV vaccinees. Finally, sequence analysis of the HA1 gene in concurrent circulating 2011 pH1N1 isolates from Fort Jackson exhibited modest amino acid divergence from the vaccine strain.Among military recruits in 2011, serum antibody response differed by vaccine type (LAIV vs. TIV and pH1N1 virus year (2009 vs. 2011. We hypothesize that antigen drift in circulating pH1N1 viruses contributed to reduce vaccine effectiveness at Fort Jackson. Our findings have wider implications regarding vaccine protection from circulating pH1N1 viruses in 2011-2012.

  1. A post-marketing surveillance study of a human live-virus pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine (Nasovac (®) ) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad S; Raut, Sidram K; Dhere, Rajeev M

    2013-01-01

    A live attenuated pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine was developed in India. A post marketing surveillance was conducted retrospectively in healthy individuals (³ 3 years) who were vaccinated intranasally around one year before. After consent, the subjects recorded adverse events developing within 42 days. Among 7565 individuals (3 - 85 years), a total of 81 solicited adverse reactions (1%) were reported in 49 subjects (0.65%). The reactions included mild to moderate respiratory symptoms. No H1N1 case was encountered during one year postvaccination. The data show the safety of the live attenuated influenza vaccine platform developed in India.

  2. Chart-confirmed guillain-barre syndrome after 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination among the Medicare population, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakowski, Laura L; Sandhu, Sukhminder K; Martin, David B; Ball, Robert; Macurdy, Thomas E; Franks, Riley L; Gibbs, Jonathan M; Kropp, Garner F; Avagyan, Armen; Kelman, Jeffrey A; Worrall, Christopher M; Sun, Guoying; Kliman, Rebecca E; Burwen, Dale R

    2013-09-15

    Given the increased risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) found with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, both active surveillance and end-of-season analyses on chart-confirmed cases were performed across multiple US vaccine safety monitoring systems, including the Medicare system, to evaluate the association of GBS after 2009 monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccination. Medically reviewed cases consisted of H1N1-vaccinated Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized for GBS. These cases were then classified by using Brighton Collaboration diagnostic criteria. Thirty-one persons had Brighton level 1, 2, or 3 GBS or Fisher Syndrome, with symptom onset 1-119 days after vaccination. Self-controlled risk interval analyses estimated GBS risk within the 6-week period immediately following H1N1 vaccination compared with a later control period, with additional adjustment for seasonality. Our results showed an elevated risk of GBS with 2009 monovalent H1N1 vaccination (incidence rate ratio = 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.14, 5.11; attributable risk = 2.84 per million doses administered, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 5.48). This observed risk was slightly higher than that seen with previous seasonal influenza vaccines; however, additional results that used a stricter case definition (Brighton level 1 or 2) were not statistically significant, and our ability to account for preceding respiratory/gastrointestinal illness was limited. Furthermore, the observed risk was substantially lower than that seen with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine.

  3. Análise do custo parcial com vacina para prevenção da Influenza A (H1N1 / Analysis of partial cost with vaccine for prevention of Influenza A (H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmilson de Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estudo que teve como objetivo identificar o custo parcial da vacina contra o vírus Influenza A (H1N1, na cidade de Londrina-PR, no ano de 2012. Utilizou-se como fonte de dados os documentos contidos na Avaliação do Programa de Imunização e também do DATASUS. O custo parcial da vacina foi calculado a partir do produto, do preço unitário da vacina e da quantidade de doses administradas, com base na moeda nacional (Reais. Constatou-se que o custo total da vacina foi de R$ 870.097,90, equivalente a 122.549 doses unitárias. Dessas, o maior consumo foi entre os idosos e crianças menores de dois anos, que totalizou R$ 533.366,20. Para vacinar toda a população de Londrina-PR seriam necessários R$ 3.597.577,10. Concluiu-se que a vacina disponibilizada para o município, em 2012, foi suficiente para imunizar toda a população de Londrina, definida pelo Ministério da Saúde e também para aquelas denominadas de alto risco. O número de vacinas destinadas às crianças menores de dois anos e aos profissionais de saúde excedeu o número de indivíduos destas populações identificadas na cidade, e o impacto financeiro da vacinação global seria mínimo no orçamento. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This paper aimed to identify the partial cost of the vaccine against Influenza A (H1N1 in Londrina, during the year 2012. The documents contained in the Evaluation of Immunization Program and also from DATASUS were used as a data source. The partial cost of the vaccine was calculated taking from the product of the unit price and quantity of vaccine doses administered, based on national currency (Real. We realized that the to-tal cost of the vaccine was R$ 870,097.90, equivalent to 122,549 unit doses. The highest consumption was between the elderly and children under two years, which totaled R$ 533.366,20. To vaccinate the entire population of Londrina-PR would be necessary an amount of R$ 3

  4. The priming effect of previous natural pandemic H1N1 infection on the immunogenicity to subsequent 2010-2011 influenza vaccination in children: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Kyeong; Eun, Byung Wook; Kim, Nam Hee; Lim, Jung Sub; Lee, Jun Ah; Kim, Dong Ho

    2016-08-22

    The effect of previous natural pandemic H1N1 (H1N1 pdm09) influenza infection on the immunogenicity to subsequent inactivated influenza vaccination in children has not been well studied. We aimed to evaluate the effect of H1N1 pdm09 natural infection and vaccination on the immunogenicity to subsequent 2010-2011 seasonal inactivated influenza vaccination in children. From October 2010 to May 2011, we conducted an open-label, multi-center study in children aged 6 months -18 years in Korea. We measured antibody titers with a hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay at baseline, 1 month, and 6 months after vaccination with trivalent split or subunit vaccines containing H1N1 pdm, A/H3N2, and B. The subjects were classified into 4 groups depending on the presence of laboratory-confirmed H1N1 pdm09 infection and/or vaccination in the 2009-2010 season; Group I: vaccination (-)/infection(-), Group II: vaccination (-)/infection(+), Group III: vaccination (+)/infection(-), Group IV: vaccination (+)/infection(+). Among the subjects in group I, 47 subjects who had a baseline titer >1:10 were considered to have an asymptomatic infection. They were included into the final group II (n = 80). We defined the new group II as the infection-primed (IP) group and group III as the vaccine-primed (VP) group. Seroconversion rate (57.5 % vs 35.9 %, p = 0.001), seroprotection rate at 6 months after vaccination (70.8 % vs 61.8 %, p = 0.032), and GMT at 1 month after vaccination (129.9 vs 66.5, p = 0.002) were significantly higher in the IP group than in the VP group. In the 9-18 year-old group, seroconversion rate and immunogenicity at 1 and 6 months were significantly higher in the IP group than in the VP group. However in the 1-7 year-old age group, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Previous H1N1 pdm09 infection appears to have positive effects on immunogenicity of subsequent inactivated influenza vaccines against H1N1 pdm09 in older

  5. US school morbidity and mortality, mandatory vaccination, institution closure, and interventions implemented during the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Elliott, Michael B; Swick, Zachary; Reddick, David

    2013-03-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic disproportionately affected school-aged children, but only school-based outbreak case studies have been conducted. The purposes of this study were to evaluate US academic institutions' experiences during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in terms of infection prevention interventions implemented and to examine factors associated with school closure during the pandemic. An online survey was sent to school nurses in May through July 2011. Hierarchical logistic regressions were used to determine predictive models for having a mandatory H1N1 vaccination policy for school nurses and school closure. In all, 1,997 nurses from 26 states participated. Very few nurses (3.3%, n=65) reported having a mandatory H1N1 influenza vaccination policy; nurses were more likely than all other school employees (pvaccine. Determinants of having a mandatory H1N1 vaccination policy were being employed by a hospital or public health agency, and the school being located in a western or northeastern state. Factors related to school closure included being in a western or northeastern state, having higher H1N1-related morbidity/mortality, being a school nurse employed by a public health agency or hospital, and being a private school. The most commonly implemented interventions included encouraging staff and students to exercise hand hygiene and increasing classroom cleaning; least commonly implemented interventions included discouraging face-to-face meetings, training staff on H1N1 influenza and/or respiratory hygiene, and discouraging handshaking. Schools should develop and continue to improve their pandemic plans, including collaborating with community response agencies.

  6. Long-term immunogenicity of an inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus vaccine with or without aluminum adjuvant in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenting; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Ze

    2015-03-01

    In 2009, a global epidemic of influenza A(H1N1) virus caused the death of tens of thousands of people. Vaccination is the most effective means of controlling an epidemic of influenza and reducing the mortality rate. In this study, the long-term immunogenicity of influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) split vaccine was observed as long as 15 months (450 days) after immunization in a mouse model. Female BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with different doses of aluminum-adjuvanted vaccine. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (10× 50% lethal dose [LD(50)]) of homologous virus 450 days after immunization. The results showed that the supplemented aluminum adjuvant not only effectively enhanced the protective effect of the vaccine but also reduced the immunizing dose of the vaccine. In addition, the aluminum adjuvant enhanced the IgG antibody level of mice immunized with the H1N1 split vaccine. The IgG level was correlated to the survival rate of the mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 vaccine has good immunogenicity and provided long-term protection against lethal influenza virus challenge in mice. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The safety of H1N1 vaccine in children in Saudi Arabia: a cohort study using modern technology in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadhey, Hisham; Alyabsi, Mesnad; Alrwisan, Adel; Alqahtani, Nasser; Almutairi, Reem; Al Tawil, Esraa; Adam, Mansour; Shakir, Saad; Aljeraisy, Majed; Al-Blowi, Ali; Alkhashan, Hesham; Albogami, Yasser; Murray, Michael D

    2012-07-01

    With its rapid introduction in 2009, concerns about the safety of the H1N1 vaccines have been raised. Data were especially limited on the pediatric safety of H1N1 vaccine in Saudi Arabia. The objectives of this study were to investigate the safety of the H1N1 vaccine (Pandemrix(®)) in children and examine the feasibility of obtaining information on possibly associated adverse reactions using mobile telephone contact with child caregivers. A cohort study was conducted in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients were included if they were aged between 6 and 18 years and had received one dose of the H1N1 vaccine. A control group involved children from the same school system who had not received the vaccine. Six months following vaccination, a clinical pharmacist called the caregiver of the child to ask about hospitalization, emergency room visits and events related to H1N1 vaccine administration using a standardized questionnaire. Caregivers of 372 school-age children were contacted. The response rate was 97% (n = 359). A total of 169 children who received at least one dose of the H1N1 vaccine were compared with 190 children in the control group who had not received the vaccine. Controlling for age, sex, education and use of medications, the odds ratio (OR) of hospitalization or emergency room visits for children within the 6 months after vaccination relative to the unvaccinated children was 1.25 (95% CI 0.47, 3.35). The risk of influenza-like symptoms was significantly reduced in vaccinated children compared with unvaccinated children (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.41, 0.99). School-age children in Saudi Arabia who received the H1N1 vaccine did not have an increased risk of hospitalization or emergency room visits. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results. Proactive pharmacovigilance is important in assessing the safety of vaccines and other medications. It is feasible to collect information on adverse drug reactions using mobile telephones, a method that can be of benefit in

  8. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Romio; Daniel Weibel; Dieleman, Jeanne P; Olberg, Henning K; de Vries, Corinne S.; Cormac Sammon; Nick Andrews; Henrik Svanström; Ditte Mølgaard-Nielsen; Anders Hviid; Maryse Lapeyre-Mestre; Agnès Sommet; Christel Saussier; Anne Castot; Harald Heijbel

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods: A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Informati...

  9. A tool for the economic analysis of mass prophylaxis operations with an application to H1N1 influenza vaccination clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Hicks, Katherine A; Honeycutt, Amanda A; Hupert, Nathaniel; Khavjou, Olga; Messonnier, Mark; Washington, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    This article uses the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination program experience to introduce a cost analysis approach that may be relevant for planning mass prophylaxis operations, such as vaccination clinics at public health centers, work sites, schools, or pharmacy-based clinics. These costs are important for planning mass influenza vaccination activities and are relevant for all public health emergency preparedness scenarios requiring countermeasure dispensing. We demonstrate how costs vary depending on accounting perspective, staffing composition, and other factors. We also describe a mass vaccination clinic budgeting tool that clinic managers may use to estimate clinic costs and to examine how costs vary depending on the availability of volunteers or donated supplies and on the number of patients vaccinated per hour. Results from pilot tests with school-based H1N1 influenza vaccination clinic managers are described. The tool can also contribute to planning efforts for universal seasonal influenza vaccination.

  10. Evaluation of T and B memory cell responses elicited by the pandemic H1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peifang; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Defang, Gabriel; Williams, Maya; Ganesan, Anuradha; Agan, Brian K; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Whitman, Timothy; Brandt, Carolyn; Burgess, Timothy H

    2017-10-27

    This study was to compare B and T memory cells elicited by a single dose monovalent 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccine (strain A/California/7/2009 H1N1) in HIV+ and HIV- groups, and to analyze the impact of the prior seasonal vaccines to the immunogenicity of this vaccine. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (day 0) and at days 28 and 180. Participants were categorized into HIV-/LAIV, HIV-/TIV and HIV+/TIV subgroups according to the trivalent live-attenuated or inactivated (LAIV or TIV) seasonal influenza vaccines they received previously. The IgG+ memory B cells (BMem) and IFNγ+ T cells were measured against antigens including the H1N1 vaccine, the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins or peptide pools of the pandemic and the seasonal H1N1 strains, respectively. Overall BMem responses increased significantly at day 28 but returned to baseline by day 180 in all three subgroups. The average frequency of the H1N1-specific BMem at day 28 for the HIV-/LAIV, HIV-/TIV and HIV+/TIV groups was 2.14%, 1.26% and 1.67%, respectively, and the average fold change was 14.39, 3.81 and 3.93, respectively. The differences of BMem between HIV-/LAIV and the two TIV subgroups were significant. For the IFNγ response, the overall spot counts ranged widely between 0 and 958/106 PBMCs. The group average spot counts to H1N1 vaccine was 89, 102, and 30 at day 28 for HIV-/LAIV, HIV-/TIV and HIV+/TIV subgroups, respectively. The average increase of IFNγ response at day 28 vs day 0 in all three subgroups did not reach 2-fold. Participants with a prior LAIV seasonal vaccine, as compared to a TIV seasonal vaccine, responded significantly better to the monovalent H1N1 vaccine. Excluding LAIV participants, no difference was seen between the HIV+ and HIV- subject groups in terms of BMem. The BMem response declined at 6months. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Health care versus non-health care businesses' experiences during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: financial impact, vaccination policies, and control measures implemented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Wang, Jing; Swick, Zachary; Reddick, David; Minden-Birkenmaier, Corina

    2013-06-01

    Only limited data are available on businesses' experiences related to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in terms of interventions implemented, staffing shortages, employees working while ill, and H1N1 vaccination policy. A questionnaire was administered to human resource professionals during May-July 2011 to assess US businesses' experiences related to the 2009 pandemic. Logistic regressions were used to describe factors associated with providing H1N1 and respiratory hygiene training and offering H1N1 vaccine to staff. Linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher infection prevention intervention scores (ie, number of interventions implemented). In all, 471 human resource professionals participated. Most (85.1%, n = 401) did not work while ill. Twelve percent (n = 57) reported staffing shortages, 2.1% (n = 10) needed to hire temporary staff, and fewer than 1% (0.8%, n = 4) reduced workload or closed during the pandemic. From logistic and linear regressions, determinants of providing employees H1N1 influenza training, respiratory hygiene education, offering H1N1 vaccine to employees, and higher infection prevention intervention scores were size of the business (with larger businesses implementing more interventions, such as providing education and vaccine, than smaller businesses) and being a health care agency. Businesses should continue to improve business continuity and pandemic plans to prepare for the next biologic event (ie, pandemic, bioterrorism attack, or emerging infectious disease outbreak). Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High Vaccination Coverage among Children during Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 as a Potential Factor of Herd Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Matsuoka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify factors related to the expansion of infection and prevention of influenza A(H1N1pdm09. A retrospective non-randomized cohort study (from June 2009 to May 2010 on influenza A(H1N1pdm09 was conducted in a sample of residents from Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. The cumulative incidence of the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 and the pandemic vaccine effectiveness (VE were estimated. The response rate was 53.5% (178,669/333,892. Overall, the odds ratio of non-vaccinated group to vaccinated group for cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 was 2.18 (95% confidence interval (CI: 2.13–2.23 and the VE was 43.9% (CI: 42.8–44.9. The expansion of infection, indicating the power of transmission from infected person to susceptible person, was high in the 7–15 years age groups in each area. In conclusion, results from this survey suggested that schoolchildren-based vaccination rate participates in determining the level of herd immunity to influenza and children might be the drivers of influenza transmission. For future pandemic preparedness, vaccination of schoolchildren may help to prevent disease transmission during influenza outbreak.

  13. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Romio (Silvana); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); H.K. Olberg (Henning); C.S. de Vries (Corinne); C. Sammon (Cormac); N.J. Andrews (Nick); H. Svanström (Henrik); D. Mølgaard-Nielsen (Ditte); A. Hviid (Anders); M. Lapeyre-Mestre (Maryse); A. Sommet (Agnès); C. Saussier (Christel); A. Castot (Anne); H. Heijbel (Harald); L. Arnheim-Dahlström (Lisen); P. Sparen (Pär); M. Mosseveld (Mees); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); N.A.T. van der Maas (Nicoline); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); T. Leino (Tuija); T. Kilpi (Terhi); J. Storsaeter (Jann); K. Johansen (Kari); P Kramarz (Piotr); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following

  14. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Romio, Silvana; Weibel, Daniel; Dieleman, Jeanne; Olberg, Henning; Vries, Corinne; Sammon, Cormac; Anews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Pär; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09...

  15. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: Multinational case-control study in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); S. Romio (Silvana); K. Johansen (Kari); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess the association between pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Five European countries. Participants: 104 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant Miller-Fisher syndrome matched to one

  16. The incidence of narcolepsy in Europe: before, during, and after the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and vaccination campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnans, L.; Lecomte, C.; Vries, C. de; Weibel, D.; Sammon, C.; Hviid, A.; Svanstrom, H.; Molgaard-Nielsen, D.; Heijbel, H.; Dahlstrom, L.A.; Hallgren, J.; Sparen, P.; Jennum, P.; Mosseveld, M.; Schuemie, M.; Maas, N. van der; Partinen, M.; Romio, S.; Trotta, F.; Santuccio, C.; Menna, A.; Plazzi, G.; Moghadam, K.K.; Ferro, S.; Lammers, G.J.; Overeem, S.; Johansen, K.; Kramarz, P.; Bonhoeffer, J.; Sturkenboom, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In August 2010 reports of a possible association between exposure to AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine and occurrence of narcolepsy in children and adolescents emerged in Sweden and Finland. In response to this signal, the background rates of narcolepsy in Europe were

  17. The incidence of narcolepsy in Europe: Before, during, and after the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and vaccination campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor); C. Lecomte (Coralie); C.S. de Vries (Corinne); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); C. Sammon (Cormac); A. Hviid (Anders); H. Svanström (Henrik); D. Mølgaard-Nielsen (Ditte); H. Heijbel (Harald); L.A. Dahlström (Lisen Arnheim); J. Hallgren (Jonas); P. Sparen (Pär); P. Jennum (Poul); M. Mosseveld (Mees); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); N.A.T. van der Maas (Nicoline); M. Partinen (Markku); S.A. Romio (Silvana); F. Trotta (Francesco); C. Santuccio (Carmela); A. Menna (Angelo); G. Plazzi (Giuseppe); K.K. Moghadam (Keivan Kaveh); M.T. Ferro (María); G.J. Lammers (Gert Jan); S. Overeem (Sebastiaan); K. Johansen (Kari); P Kramarz (Piotr); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In August 2010 reports of a possible association between exposure to AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine and occurrence of narcolepsy in children and adolescents emerged in Sweden and Finland. In response to this signal, the background rates of narcolepsy in Europe

  18. Conservation and diversity of influenza A H1N1 HLA-restricted T cell epitope candidates for epitope-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Thiamjoo Tan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated.HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54 peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007-2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes.Seventeen (17 T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus.

  19. Intent to receive pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, compliance with social distancing and sources of information in NC, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Jennifer A; Moore, Zack; Davis, Meredith; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2010-06-18

    Public adherence to influenza vaccination recommendations has been low, particularly among younger adults and children under 2, despite the availability of safe and effective seasonal vaccine. Intention to receive 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine has been estimated to be 50% in select populations. This report measures knowledge of and intention to receive pandemic vaccine in a population-based setting, including target groups for seasonal and H1N1 influenza. On August 28-29, 2009, we conducted a population-based survey in 2 counties in North Carolina. The survey used the 30x7 two-stage cluster sampling methodology to identify 210 target households. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Knowledge of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine was high, with 165 (80%) aware that a vaccine was being prepared. A total of 133 (64%) respondents intended to receive pandemic vaccine, 134 (64%) intended to receive seasonal vaccine, and 109 (53%) intended to receive both. Reporting great concern about H1N1 infection (PR 1.55; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.85), receiving seasonal influenza vaccine in 2008-09 (PR 1.47; 95%CI: 1.18, 1.82), and intending to receive seasonal influenza vaccine in 2009-10 (PR 1.27; 95%CI: 1.14, 1.42) were associated with intention to receive pandemic vaccine. Not associated were knowledge of vaccine, employment, having children under age 18, gender, race/ethnicity and age. Reasons cited for not intending to get vaccinated include not being at risk for infection, concerns about vaccine side effects and belief that illness caused by pandemic H1N1 would be mild. Forty-five percent of households with children under 18 and 65% of working adults reported ability to comply with self-isolation at home for 7-10 days if recommended by authorities. This is the first report of a population based rapid assessment used to assess knowledge and intent to receive pandemic vaccine in a community sample. Intention to receive pandemic and seasonal

  20. Intent to receive pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccine, compliance with social distancing and sources of information in NC, 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Horney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Public adherence to influenza vaccination recommendations has been low, particularly among younger adults and children under 2, despite the availability of safe and effective seasonal vaccine. Intention to receive 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccine has been estimated to be 50% in select populations. This report measures knowledge of and intention to receive pandemic vaccine in a population-based setting, including target groups for seasonal and H1N1 influenza. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On August 28-29, 2009, we conducted a population-based survey in 2 counties in North Carolina. The survey used the 30x7 two-stage cluster sampling methodology to identify 210 target households. Prevalence ratios (PR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated. Knowledge of pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccine was high, with 165 (80% aware that a vaccine was being prepared. A total of 133 (64% respondents intended to receive pandemic vaccine, 134 (64% intended to receive seasonal vaccine, and 109 (53% intended to receive both. Reporting great concern about H1N1 infection (PR 1.55; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.85, receiving seasonal influenza vaccine in 2008-09 (PR 1.47; 95%CI: 1.18, 1.82, and intending to receive seasonal influenza vaccine in 2009-10 (PR 1.27; 95%CI: 1.14, 1.42 were associated with intention to receive pandemic vaccine. Not associated were knowledge of vaccine, employment, having children under age 18, gender, race/ethnicity and age. Reasons cited for not intending to get vaccinated include not being at risk for infection, concerns about vaccine side effects and belief that illness caused by pandemic H1N1 would be mild. Forty-five percent of households with children under 18 and 65% of working adults reported ability to comply with self-isolation at home for 7-10 days if recommended by authorities. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a population based rapid assessment used to assess knowledge and intent to

  1. Seroincidence of 2009 H1N1 infection in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women prior to vaccine availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Keri N.; Eichelberger, Maryna; Gange, Stephen J.; Sharp, Gerald B.; Gao, Jin; Glesby, Marshall J.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; French, Audrey L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Minkoff, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was a unique opportunity to investigate differences in influenza infection using serology by HIV status. Using serial serum specimens collected from 1 April to 30 September 2009 and the prior 2 years from Women’s Interagency HIV study participants, there was no difference in serologic evidence of 2009 H1N1 infection among HIV-infected women with a CD4 cell count at least 350 cells/µl compared with HIV-uninfected women. Owing to evidence showing a greater risk of influenza-related complications, HIV-infected individuals should continue to be a priority group for vaccination. PMID:21505313

  2. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif

    2013-01-01

    The composition of current influenza protein vaccines has to be reconsidered every season to match the circulating influenza viruses, continuously changing antigenicity. Thus, influenza vaccines inducing a broad cross-reactive immune response would be a great advantage for protection against both...... seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs...... intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA...

  3. Airway Mucosal Immune-suppression in Neonates of Mothers Receiving A(H1N1)pnd09 Vaccination During Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Bischoff, Anne L.; Folsgaard, Nilofar V.

    2015-01-01

    , IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin-1, eotaxin-3, TARC, MDC, IL-17, IL-1 beta, IL-8, transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-beta 1, IL-10 and IL-2. Infections were monitored the first year of life by daily diary cards and clinical controls. Results: Neonates of mothers vaccinated during pregnancy had significant up......Background: It is recommended to vaccinate pregnant women against influenza. A possible impact on the immune expression of the fetus has never been studied. We aim to study the immune signature in the upper airways and the incidence of infections in neonates born to mothers receiving Influenza A(H1......N1) pnd09 vaccination during pregnancy. Methods: One hundred and fifty-six women from the unselected Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC 2010) received Influenza A(H1N1) pnd09-vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Fifty-one mothers received the vaccine during pregnancy...

  4. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Adjuvanted Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Vaccines: A Multinational Self-Controlled Case Series in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Jeanne P.; Olberg, Henning K.; de Vries, Corinne S.; Sammon, Cormac; Andrews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Par; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; van der Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart C.; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1–4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI). Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. Results Three hundred and three (303) GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99) were exposed to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.2–5.5), based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2–3.1) after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–3.2) when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom) we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month) to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8), which is the main finding. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8). Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule

  5. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccines: a multinational self-controlled case series in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Romio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1pdm09 immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination. METHODS: A self-controlled case series (SCCS analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1-4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI. Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. RESULTS: Three hundred and three (303 GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99 were exposed to A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria. The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 2.2-5.5, based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2-3.1 after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.2 when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8, which is the main finding. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8. Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule out with

  6. Factors associated with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccination acceptance among university students from India during the post-pandemic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There was a low adherence to influenza A (H1N1 vaccination program among university students and health care workers during the pandemic influenza in many parts of the world. Vaccination of high risk individuals is one of the recommendations of World Health Organization during the post-pandemic period. It is not documented about the student's knowledge, attitude and willingness to accept H1N1 vaccination during the post-pandemic period. We aimed to analyze the student's knowledge, attitude and willingness to accept H1N1 vaccination during the post-pandemic period in India. Methods Vaccine against H1N1 was made available to the students of Vellore Institute of Technology, India from September 2010. The data are based on a cross-sectional study conducted during October 2010 to January 2011 using a self-administered questionnaire with a representative sample of the student population (N = 802. Results Of the 802 respondents, only 102/802 (12.7% had been vaccinated and 105/802 (13% planned to do so in the future, while 595/802 (74% would probably or definitely not get vaccinated in the future. The highest coverage was among the female (65/102, 63.7% and non-compliance was higher among men in the group (384/595; 64.5% (p Conclusions Our study shows that the vaccination coverage among university students remains very low in the post-pandemic period and doubts about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine are key elements in their rejection. Our results indicate a need to provide accessible information about the vaccine safety by scientific authorities and fill gaps and confusions in this regard.

  7. An H5N1 M2e-based multiple antigenic peptide vaccine confers heterosubtypic protection from lethal infection with pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A 2009 global influenza pandemic caused by a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus has posted an increasing threat of a potential pandemic by the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus, driving us to develop an influenza vaccine which confers cross-protection against both H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. Previously, we have shown that a tetra-branched multiple antigenic peptide (MAP vaccine based on the extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e from H5N1 virus (H5N1-M2e-MAP induced strong immune responses and cross-protection against different clades of HPAI H5N1 viruses. In this report, we investigated whether such M2e-MAP presenting the H5N1-M2e consensus sequence can afford heterosubtypic protection from lethal challenge with the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. Results Our results demonstrated that H5N1-M2e-MAP plus Freund's or aluminum adjuvant induced strong cross-reactive IgG antibody responses against M2e of the pandemic H1N1 virus which contains one amino acid variation with M2e of H5N1 at position 13. These cross-reactive antibodies may maintain for 6 months and bounced back quickly to the previous high level after the 2nd boost administered 2 weeks before virus challenge. H5N1-M2e-MAP could afford heterosubtypic protection against lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus, showing significant decrease of viral replications and obvious alleviation of histopathological damages in the challenged mouse lungs. 100% and 80% of the H5N1-M2e-MAP-vaccinated mice with Freund's and aluminum adjuvant, respectively, survived the lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus. Conclusions Our results suggest that H5N1-M2e-MAP has a great potential to prevent the threat from re-emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza and possible novel influenza pandemic due to the reassortment of HPAI H5N1 virus with the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus.

  8. Panblok-H1+advax H1N1/2009pdm vaccine: Insights into rapid development of a delta inulin adjuvanted recombinant pandemic influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Sajkov, Dimitar; Gordon, David; Cox, Manon M J; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2017-06-03

    Timely vaccine supply is critical during influenza pandemics but is impeded by current virus-based manufacturing methods. The 2009 H1N1/2009pdm 'swine flu' pandemic reinforced the need for innovation in pandemic vaccine design. We report on insights gained during rapid development of a pandemic vaccine based on recombinant haemagglutinin (rHA) formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (Panblok-H1/Advax). Panblok-H1/Advax was designed and manufactured within 1 month of the pandemic declaration by WHO and successfully entered human clinical testing in under 3 months from first isolation and sequencing of the novel pandemic virus, requiring several major challenges to be overcome. Panblok-H1/Advax successfully induced neutralising antibodies against the pandemic strain, but also induced cross-neutralising antibodies in a subset of subjects against an H1N1 strain (A/Puerto Rico/8/34) derived from the 1918 Spanish flu, highlighting the possibility to use Advax to induce more broadly cross-protective antibody responses. Interestingly, the rHA from H1N1/2009pdm exhibited variants in the receptor binding domain that had a major impact on receptor binding and hemagglutination ability. We used an in silico structural modeling approach to better understand the unusual behavior of the novel hemagglutinin, thereby demonstrating the power of computational modeling approaches for rapid characterization of new pandemic viruses. While challenges remain in ensuring ultrafast vaccine access for the entire population in response to future pandemics, the adjuvanted recombinant Panblok-H1/Advax vaccine proved its utility during a real-life pandemic situation.

  9. Evaluation of the implementation of the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in local health departments (LHDs) in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, Lauren M; Davis, Sarah E H; Rosselli, Richard; Horney, Jennifer

    2011-05-23

    Effective conduct of vaccination campaigns by public health authorities can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with influenza. The emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza in April 2009 resulted in an unprecedented vaccination campaign in the US during the 2009-2010 influenza season. The variety of methods local health departments (LHDs) utilized to cope with a mismatch between public demand and supply and ever-changing guidelines have gone unexamined thus far. The purpose of this research is to identify and share lessons learned related to H1N1 influenza vaccination activities at LHDs. In April 2010, a comprehensive survey was developed to evaluate 2009-10 LHD H1N1 vaccination practices and document lessons learned. A stratified random sample was selected from NC's 85 LHDs. Interviews were conducted with key personnel involved in LHD vaccination campaigns. Results were analyzed to identify quantitative trends and qualitative themes. Twenty-five of 26 LHDs (96% response rate) participated in our survey. Each LHD utilized a different approach to address the challenges they faced during their H1N1 vaccination campaign. Variation between LHDs was found in terms of the types of vaccine-dispensing methods implemented and in the selection of outside organizations LHDs partnered with to assist with vaccinations. Having a Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) and pandemic influenza plan, hiring temporary staff, building on existing community partnerships, implementing a variety of vaccination strategies and using a variety of sites are strategies that will help LHDs deal more effectively with challenges posed by future pandemics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Where are we in our understanding of the association between narcolepsy and one of the 2009 adjuvanted influenza A (H1N1) vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, K; Brasseur, D; MacDonald, N; Nohynek, H; Vandeputte, J; Wood, D; Neels, P

    2016-07-01

    Evaluating new rare serious vaccine safety signals is difficult and complex work. To further assess the observed increase in narcolepsy cases seen in Europe with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine, the International Alliance for Biological Standardization (IABS) invited a wide range of experts to a one day meeting in Geneva in October 2015 to present data and to discuss the implications. The presentations covered the following topics: clinical picture of childhood narcolepsy following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaigns; epidemiological studies conducted to assess the risk of narcolepsy, other neurological and immune-related diseases following 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine; potential biases influencing the different epidemiological study designs; potential genetic contribution to the development of narcolepsy; potential biological mechanisms for development of narcolepsy in this setting including the role of the virus itself, antigenic differences between the vaccines and differences in AS03-adjuvanted vaccines. The presentations were followed by fulsome roundtable discussions. Members from affected families also attended and made informal comments to round out the day's deliberations. This meeting emphasized the value added in bringing together in a neutral setting a wide range of experts and vaccine producers to discuss such a complex new serious adverse event following immunization. Copyright © 2016.

  11. Trust in medical organizations predicts pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccination behavior and perceived efficacy of protection measures in the Swiss public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Ingrid; Bangerter, Adrian; Clémence, Alain; Green, Eva G T; Krings, Franciska; Staerklé, Christian; Wagner-Egger, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    Following the recent avian influenza and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreaks, public trust in medical and political authorities is emerging as a new predictor of compliance with officially recommended protection measures. In a two-wave longitudinal survey of adults in French-speaking Switzerland, trust in medical organizations longitudinally predicted actual vaccination status 6 months later, during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccination campaign. No other variables explained significant amounts of variance. Trust in medical organizations also predicted perceived efficacy of officially recommended protection measures (getting vaccinated, washing hands, wearing a mask, sneezing into the elbow), as did beliefs about health issues (perceived vulnerability to disease, threat perceptions). These findings show that in the case of emerging infectious diseases, actual behavior and perceived efficacy of protection measures may have different antecedents. Moreover, they suggest that public trust is a crucial determinant of vaccination behavior and underscore the practical importance of managing trust in disease prevention campaigns.

  12. Antigenic Differences between AS03 Adjuvanted Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic Vaccines: Implications for Pandemrix-Associated Narcolepsy Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi; Vuorela, Arja; Partinen, Markku; Baumann, Marc; Freitag, Tobias L.; Meri, Seppo; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Olsen, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Rouvinen, Juha; Roivainen, Merja; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kilpi, Terhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy results from immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin secreting neurons in hypothalamus, however the triggers and disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Vaccine-attributable risk of narcolepsy reported so far with the AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination Pandemrix has been manifold compared to the AS03 adjuvanted Arepanrix, which contained differently produced H1N1 viral antigen preparation. Hence, antigenic differences and antibody response to these vaccines were investigated. Methods and Findings Increased circulating IgG-antibody levels to Pandemrix H1N1 antigen were found in 47 children with Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy when compared to 57 healthy children vaccinated with Pandemrix. H1N1 antigen of Arepanrix inhibited poorly these antibodies indicating antigenic difference between Arepanrix and Pandemrix. High-resolution gel electrophoresis quantitation and mass spectrometry identification analyses revealed higher amounts of structurally altered viral nucleoprotein (NP) in Pandemrix. Increased antibody levels to hemagglutinin (HA) and NP, particularly to detergent treated NP, was seen in narcolepsy. Higher levels of antibodies to NP were found in children with DQB1*06∶02 risk allele and in DQB1*06∶02 transgenic mice immunized with Pandemrix when compared to controls. Conclusions This work identified 1) higher amounts of structurally altered viral NP in Pandemrix than in Arepanrix, 2) detergent-induced antigenic changes of viral NP, that are recognized by antibodies from children with narcolepsy, and 3) increased antibody response to NP in association of DQB1*06∶02 risk allele of narcolepsy. These findings provide a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy. Although detailed mechanisms of Pandemrix in narcolepsy remain elusive, our results move the focus from adjuvant(s) onto the H1N1 viral proteins. PMID:25501681

  13. Antigenic differences between AS03 adjuvanted influenza A (H1N1) pandemic vaccines: implications for pandemrix-associated narcolepsy risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi; Vuorela, Arja; Partinen, Markku; Baumann, Marc; Freitag, Tobias L; Meri, Seppo; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Olsen, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Rouvinen, Juha; Roivainen, Merja; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kilpi, Terhi

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy results from immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin secreting neurons in hypothalamus, however the triggers and disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Vaccine-attributable risk of narcolepsy reported so far with the AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination Pandemrix has been manifold compared to the AS03 adjuvanted Arepanrix, which contained differently produced H1N1 viral antigen preparation. Hence, antigenic differences and antibody response to these vaccines were investigated. Increased circulating IgG-antibody levels to Pandemrix H1N1 antigen were found in 47 children with Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy when compared to 57 healthy children vaccinated with Pandemrix. H1N1 antigen of Arepanrix inhibited poorly these antibodies indicating antigenic difference between Arepanrix and Pandemrix. High-resolution gel electrophoresis quantitation and mass spectrometry identification analyses revealed higher amounts of structurally altered viral nucleoprotein (NP) in Pandemrix. Increased antibody levels to hemagglutinin (HA) and NP, particularly to detergent treated NP, was seen in narcolepsy. Higher levels of antibodies to NP were found in children with DQB1*06:02 risk allele and in DQB1*06:02 transgenic mice immunized with Pandemrix when compared to controls. This work identified 1) higher amounts of structurally altered viral NP in Pandemrix than in Arepanrix, 2) detergent-induced antigenic changes of viral NP, that are recognized by antibodies from children with narcolepsy, and 3) increased antibody response to NP in association of DQB1*06:02 risk allele of narcolepsy. These findings provide a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy. Although detailed mechanisms of Pandemrix in narcolepsy remain elusive, our results move the focus from adjuvant(s) onto the H1N1 viral proteins.

  14. Acceptability of pandemic A(H1N1) influenza vaccination by Essential Community Workers in 2010 Alicante (Spain), perceived seriousness and sources of information

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero Pérez, Pablo; Tuells Hernández, José; Duro Torrijos, José Luis; Nolasco Bonmatí, Andreu

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Describe acceptability of pandemic A(H1N1) influenza vaccination by Essential Community Workers (ECWs) from Alicante province (Spain) in January 2010. Evaluate the correlation with attitudes, beliefs, professional advice and information broadcasted by media. Method. In this cross-sectional study, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 742 ECWs to assess their attitudes towards vaccination against the pandemic influenza strain. A multivariable regression model was made to adjus...

  15. A Whole Virus Pandemic Influenza H1N1 Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Protective in Active Immunization and Passive Protection Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A.; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G.; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus c...

  16. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans. PMID:26919288

  17. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

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    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    Full Text Available The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs, have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  18. Economic evaluation of the vaccination program against seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza among customs officers in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamma, Maria; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-01-01

    Health policies from many countries recommend influenza vaccination of "high-priority" professional groups, including customs officers. Our aim was to estimate the economic impact of the vaccination program against influenza among customs officers in Greece during the 2009/2010 period. We developed a decision analytical computational simulation model including dynamic transmission elements that estimated the economic impact of various scenarios with different attack rates, symptomatic percentages and vaccination participation among customs officers. We also assessed in real-time the economic impact of the national 2009/2010 campaign against seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza. Implementing a seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza vaccination program among customs officers in Greece with a participation rate of 30%, influenza vaccination was not cost-saving in any of the studied influenza scenarios. When the participation rate reached 100%, the program was cost-saving, when the influenza attack rate was 30% and the symptomatic rate 65%. The real-time estimated mean net cost-benefit value in 2009/2010 period was -7.3 euros/custom officer. With different clinical scenarios, providing a vaccination program against seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza can incur a substantial net benefit for customs offices. However, the size of the benefit strongly depends upon the attack rate of influenza, the symptomatic rate as well as the participation rate of the customs officers in the program. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low acceptability of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination in French adult population: did public health policy fuel public dissonance?

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    Michaël Schwarzinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In July 2009, French public health authorities embarked in a mass vaccination campaign against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic-influenza. We explored the attitudes and behaviors of the general population toward pandemic vaccination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among 2,253 French representative adults aged 18 to 64 from November 17 to 25, 2009 (completion rate: 93.8%. The main outcome was the acceptability of A/H1N1 vaccination as defined by previous receipt or intention to get vaccinated ("Yes, certainly", "Yes, probably". Overall 17.0% (CI 95%, 15.5% to 18.7% of respondents accepted A/H1N1 vaccination. Independent factors associated with acceptability included: male sex (p = .0001; older age (p = .002; highest or lowest level of education (p = .016; non-clerical occupation (p = .011; having only one child (p = .008; and having received seasonal flu vaccination in prior 3 years (p<.0001. Acceptability was also significantly higher among pregnant women (37.9% and other at risk groups with chronic diseases (34.8% (p = .002. Only 35.5% of respondents perceived A/H1N1 influenza illness as a severe disease and 12.7% had experienced A/H1N1 cases in their close relationships with higher acceptability (p<.0001 and p = .006, respectively. In comparison to 26.0% respondents who did not consult their primary care physician, acceptability was significantly higher among 8.0% respondents who were formally advised to get vaccinated, and lower among 63.7% respondents who were not advised to get vaccinated (respectively: 15.8%, 59.5% and 11.7%- p<.0001. Among respondents who refused vaccination, 71.2% expressed concerns about vaccine safety. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our survey occurred one week before the peak of the pandemic in France. We found that alarming public health messages aiming at increasing the perception of risk severity were counteracted by daily personal experience which did not confirm the threat

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy and cross-protectivity of recent human and swine vaccines against the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk; Lee, Jun Han; Park, Kuk Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Baek, Yun Hee; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Rho, Jong-Bok; Kim, Chul-Joong; Poo, Haryoung; Ryoo, Thomas S; Sung, Moon-Hee; Choi, Young Ki

    2009-12-23

    The current pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus remains transmissible among humans worldwide with cases of reverse zoonosis, providing opportunities to produce more pathogenic variants which could pose greater human health concerns. To investigate whether recent seasonal human or swine H1N1 vaccines could induce cross-reactive immune responses against infection with the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, mice, ferrets or mini-pigs were administered with various regimens (once or twice) and antigen content (1.77, 3.5 or 7.5 microg HA) of a-Brsibane/59/07, a-CAN01/04 or RgCA/04/09xPR8 vaccine. Receipt of a-CAN01/04 (2-doses) but not a-Brisbane/59/07 induced detectable but modest (20-40 units) cross-reactive serum antibody against CA/04/09 by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assays in mice. Only double administration (7.5 microg HA) of both vaccine in ferrets could elicit cross-reactivity (30-60 HI titers). Similar antigen content of a-CAN01/04 in mini-pigs also caused a modest approximately 30 HI titers (twice vaccinated). However, vaccine-induced antibody titers could not suppress active virus replication in the lungs (mice) or virus shedding (ferrets and pigs) of immunized hosts intranasally challenged with CA/04/09. Furthermore, neither ferrets nor swine could abrogate aerosol transmission of the virus into naïve contact animals. Altogether, these results suggest that neither recent human nor animal H1N1 vaccine could provide complete protectivity in all animal models. Thus, this study warrants the need for strain-specific vaccines that could yield the optimal protection desired for humans and/or animals.

  1. Safety and immunogenicity of an MF59-adjuvanted A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in children from three to seventeen years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Markus; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Rümke, Hans C; Abarca, Katia; Rivera, Luis; Lattanzi, Maria; Pedotti, Paola; Arora, Ashwani; Kieninger-Baum, Dorothee; Della Cioppa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the optimal dose of an MF59-adjuvanted, monovalent, A/H1N1 influenza vaccine in healthy paediatric subjects. Subjects aged 3-8 years (n=194) and 9-17 years (n=160) were randomized to receive two primary doses of A/H1N1 vaccine containing either 3.75 μg antigen with half a standard dose of MF59 adjuvant, 7.5 μg antigen with a full dose of MF59, or (children 3-8 years only), a non-adjuvanted 15 μg formulation. A booster dose of MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine including homologous A/H1N1 strain was given one year after priming. Immunogenicity was assessed by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays. Vaccine safety was assessed throughout the study (up to 18 months). A single priming dose of either MF59-adjuvanted formulation was sufficient to meet the European licensure criteria for pandemic influenza vaccines (HI titres ≥1:40>70%; seroconversion>40%; and GMR>2.5). Two non-adjuvanted vaccine doses were required to meet the same licensure criteria. After first and second doses, percentage of subjects with HI titres ≥1:40 were between 97% and 100% in the adjuvanted vaccine groups compared with 68% and 91% in the non-adjuvanted group, respectively. Postvaccination seroconversion rates ranged from 91% to 98% in adjuvanted groups and were 68% (first dose) and 98% (second dose) in the non-adjuvanted group. HI titres ≥1:330 after primary doses were achieved in 69% to 90% in adjuvanted groups compared with 41% in the non-adjuvanted group. Long-term antibody persistence after priming and a robust antibody response to booster immunization were observed in all vaccination groups. All A/H1N1 vaccine formulations were generally well tolerated. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred, and no subjects were withdrawn from the study due to an adverse event. An MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine containing 3.75 μg of A/H1N1 antigen was well tolerated and sufficiently immunogenic to meet all the

  2. Safety and immunogenicity following administration of a live, attenuated monovalent 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine to children and adults in two randomized controlled trials.

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    Raburn M Mallory

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a monovalent intranasal 2009 A/H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV were evaluated in children and adults. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were completed in children (2-17 y and adults (18-49 y. Subjects were assigned 4:1 to receive 2 doses of H1N1 LAIV or placebo 28 days apart. The primary safety endpoint was fever ≥38.3°C during days 1-8 after the first dose; the primary immunogenicity endpoint was the proportion of subjects experiencing a postdose seroresponse. Solicited symptoms and adverse events were recorded for 14 days after each dose and safety data were collected for 180 days post-final dose. In total, 326 children (H1N1 LAIV, n = 261; placebo, n = 65 and 300 adults (H1N1 LAIV, n = 240; placebo, n = 60 were enrolled. After dose 1, fever ≥38.3°C occurred in 4 (1.5% pediatric vaccine recipients and 1 (1.5% placebo recipient (rate difference, 0%; 95% CI: -6.4%, 3.1%. No adults experienced fever following dose 1. Seroresponse rates in children (H1N1 LAIV vs. placebo were 11.1% vs. 6.3% after dose 1 (rate difference, 4.8%; 95% CI: -9.6%, 13.8% and 32.0% vs. 14.5% after dose 2 (rate difference, 17.5%; 95% CI: 5.5%, 27.1%. Seroresponse rates in adults were 6.1% vs. 0% (rate difference, 6.1%; 95% CI: -5.6%, 12.6% and 14.9% vs. 5.6% (rate difference, 9.3%; 95% CI: -0.8%, 16.3% after dose 1 and dose 2, respectively. Solicited symptoms after dose 1 (H1N1 LAIV vs. placebo occurred in 37.5% vs. 32.3% of children and 41.7% vs. 31.7% of adults. Solicited symptoms occurred less frequently after dose 2 in adults and children. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In subjects aged 2 to 49 years, two doses of H1N1 LAIV have a safety and immunogenicity profile similar to other previously studied and efficacious formulations of seasonal trivalent LAIV. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of cell-derived MF59®-adjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Markus; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Rümke, Hans; Rivera, Luis; Pedotti, Paola; Arora, Ashwani Kumar; Lattanzi, Maria; Kieninger, Dorothee; Cioppa, Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Mass immunization of children has the potential to decrease infection rates and prevent the transmission of influenza. We evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of different formulations of cell-derived MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine in children and adolescents. This was a randomized, single-blind, multicenter study with a total of 666 healthy subjects aged 6 months–17 y in one of 3 vaccination groups, each receiving formulations containing different amounts of influenza A/H1N1 antigen with or without MF59. A booster trivalent seasonal MF59 vaccine was administered one year after primary vaccinations. Antibody titers were assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays obtained on days 1, 22, 43, 366, and 387 (3 weeks post booster). Safety was monitored throughout the study. One vaccination with 3.75 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 50% MF59 (3.75_halfMF59) or 7.5 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 100% MF59 (7.5_fullMF59) induced an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% of children in the 1–vaccinations with nonadjuvanted 15 μg A/H1N1 antigen were needed to achieve this response in the 1–children aged 6–11 months, 1 dose of 7.5_fullMF59 resulted in an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% while 2 doses of 3.75_halfMF59 were required to achieve this result. All vaccines were well tolerated. Our findings support the immunogenicity and safety of the 3.75_halfMF59 (2 doses for children vaccine formulations for use in children and adolescents aged 6 months to 17 y The use of the 3.75_halfMF59 could have the benefit of antigen and adjuvant sparing, increasing the available vaccine doses allowing vaccination of more people. PMID:25621884

  4. DURABILITY OF ANTIBODY RESPONSES AFTER RECEIPT OF THE MONOVALENT 2009 INFLUENZA A (H1N1) VACCINE AMONG HIV-INFECTED AND HIV-UNINFECTED ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Iverson, Erik; Defang, Gabriel; Blair, Patrick J.; Eberly, Lynn; Maguire, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Faix, Dennis; Duplessis, Christopher; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Whitman, Timothy; Brandt, Carolyn; Macalino, Grace; Millar, Eugene V.; Burgess, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons are at risk for severe influenza infections. Although vaccination against the H1N1 pandemic influenza strain is recommended, currently, there are no data on the durability of post-vaccination antibody responses in this population. Methods HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults (18–50 years old) received a single dose of monovalent 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccine (strain A/California/7/2009H1N1). Antibody levels to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain were determined at day 0, day 28, and 6 months by hemagglutination-inhibition assay. A seroprotective response was a post-vaccination titer of ≥1:40 among those with a pre-vaccination level of ≤1:10. Geometric mean titers (GMT) and factors associated with higher levels were also evaluated. Results We studied 127 participants with a median age of 35 (interquartile range (IQR) 28, 42) years. Among the HIV-infected arm (n=63), the median CD4 count was 595 (IQR 476, 819) cells/mm3 and 83% were receiving HAART. Thirty-five percent of all participants had a pre-vaccination level of >1:10. HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected adults were less likely to generate a seroprotective response at day 28 (54% vs. 75%, adjusted OR 0.23, p=0.021) or have a durable response at 6 months post-vaccination (28% vs. 56%, adjusted OR 0.19, p=0.005). Additionally, although pre-vaccination GMT were similar in both arms (median 7 vs. 8, p=0.11), the GMT at 6 months was significantly lower among HIV-infected versus HIV-uninfected adults (median 20 vs. 113, p=0.003). Among HIV-infected persons, younger age (p=0.035) and receipt of HAART (p=0.028) were associated with higher GMTs at 6 months. Conclusions Despite vaccination, most HIV-infected adults do not have durable seroprotective antibody responses to the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus, and hence may remain vulnerable to infection. In addition to HAART use, more immunogenic vaccines are likely needed for improving protection

  5. Potency of whole virus particle and split virion vaccines using dissolving microneedle against challenges of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Akihiro; Kuruma, Koji; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Hiono, Takahiro; Suzuki, Mizuho; Matsuno, Keita; Kida, Hiroshi; Oyamada, Takayoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-15

    Transdermal vaccination using a microneedle (MN) confers enhanced immunity compared with subcutaneous (SC) vaccination. Here we developed a novel dissolving MN patch for the influenza vaccine. The potencies of split virion and whole virus particle (WVP) vaccines prepared from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) and A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (H5N1), respectively, were evaluated. MN vaccination induced higher neutralizing antibody responses than SC vaccination in mice. Moreover, MN vaccination with a lower dose of antigens conferred protective immunity against lethal challenges of influenza viruses than SC vaccination in mice. These results suggest that the WVP vaccines administered using MN are an effective combination for influenza vaccine to be further validated in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidence of narcolepsy before and after MF59-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in South Korean soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jung; Lee, Sang Don; Lee, Eun; Namkoong, Kee; Choe, Kang-Won; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Hye Won; Heo, Jung Yeon

    2015-09-11

    Previous reports mostly from Europe suggested an association between an occurrence of narcolepsy and an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine adjuvanted with AS03 (Pandemrix(®)). During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaign, the Korean military performed a vaccination campaign with one type of influenza vaccine containing MF59-adjuvants. This study was conducted to investigate the background incidence rate of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers and the association of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine with the occurrence of narcolepsy in a young adult group. To assess the incidence of narcolepsy, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of suspicious cases of narcolepsy in 2007-2013 in the whole 20 military hospitals of the Korean military. The screened cases were classified according to the Brighton Collaboration case definition of narcolepsy. After obtaining the number of confirmed cases of narcolepsy per 3 months in 2007-2013, we compared the crude incidence rate of narcolepsy before and after the vaccination campaign. We included 218 narcolepsy suspicious cases in the initial review, which were screened by the diagnostic code on the computerized disease registry in 2007-2013. Forty-one cases were finally diagnosed with narcolepsy in 2007-2013 (male sex, 95%; median age, 21 years). The average background incidence rate of narcolepsy in Korean soldiers was 0.91 cases per 100,000 persons per year. During the 9 months before vaccination implementation (April to December 2009), 6 narcolepsy cases occurred, whereas during the next 9 months (January to September 2010) including the 3-month vaccination campaign, 5 cases occurred. The incidence of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers was not increased after the pandemic vaccination campaign using the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. Our results suggest that the MF59-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine did not contribute to the occurrence of narcolepsy in this young adult group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceptions populaires du risque et savoirs experts en contexte de pandémie : le cas du A(H1N1 au Québec. Public perceptions of risk and expert knowledge in times of pandemic disease: the cases of A (H1N1 in Quebec.

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    Michel Désy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available La pandémie A(H1N1 de 2009 a mis en évidence les limites des stratégies de communication du risque tout en ravivant l’intérêt pour une analyse des perceptions populaires du risque. Au Québec, la campagne de vaccination de l’automne 2009 fut le théâtre de la circulation d’informations perçues souvent comme contradictoires sur le risque épidémique. Dans le cadre de dix focus groups organisés à Montréal et à Québec dans les mois qui ont suivi la fin de la campagne de vaccination, 100 Québécois francophones ont été invités à débattre de leur perception tant du risque associé au virus et au vaccin que de la gestion qui en fut faite par les autorités de santé publique. L’article analyse ces perceptions, en illustre la diversité et montre que diverses logiques cohabitent dans un savoir populaire marqué d’une certaine réflexivité. L’article conclut sur certaines leçons à tirer pour les stratégies de communication du risque épidémique.The A(H1N1 pandemic of 2009 illustrated the limitations of communication strategies on risk and revived interest in the analysis of public perception of risk. In Quebec, during the vaccination campaign carried out in the fall of 2009, the spread of information on epidemiological risk was often perceived as contradictory. In the months following the vaccination campaign, 10 focus groups were organized in Montréal and Québec City and 100 French-speaking Quebecers were invited to discuss their perception of the risk associated with the virus and vaccination, the management of the situation by public health authorities and the pertinence of holding a public consultation in the context of a pandemic disease. The article presents the different opinions of the general public tempered, however, by a measure of reflexivity. The article concludes with lessons to be learned regarding communication strategies on epidemiological risk.

  8. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  9. Pandemic vaccination strategies and influenza severe outcomes during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and the post-pandemic influenza season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil Cuesta, Julita; Aavitsland, Preben; Englund, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    During the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, the five Nordic countries adopted different approaches to pandemic vaccination. We compared pandemic vaccination strategies and severe influenza outcomes, in seasons 2009/10 and 2010/11 in these countries with similar influenza surveillance...... systems. We calculated the cumulative pandemic vaccination coverage in 2009/10 and cumulative incidence rates of laboratory confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infections, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and deaths in 2009/10 and 2010/11. We estimated incidence risk ratios (IRR) in a Poisson regression model...... to compare those indicators between Denmark and the other countries. The vaccination coverage was lower in Denmark (6.1%) compared with Finland (48.2%), Iceland (44.1%), Norway (41.3%) and Sweden (60.0%). In 2009/10 Denmark had a similar cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions and deaths compared...

  10. A/H1N1 antibodies and TRIB2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients diagnosed in conjunction with the Pandemrix vaccination campaign in Sweden 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Alexander; Ramelius, Anita; Olsson, Tomas; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Lamb, Favelle; Khademi, Mohsen; Ambati, Aditya; Maeurer, Markus; Nilsson, Anna-Lena; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Fink, Katharina; Lernmark, Åke

    2014-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder related to hypocretin deficiency resulting from a specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area. The disease is thought to be autoimmune due to a strong association with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the H1N1 2009 flu pandemic (A/H1N1PDM09). In response to this, the Swedish vaccination campaign began in October of the same year, using the influenza vaccine Pandemrix(®). A few months later an excess of narcolepsy cases was observed. It is still unclear to what extent the vaccination campaign affected humoral autoimmunity associated with narcolepsy. We studied 47 patients with narcolepsy (6-69 years of age) and 80 healthy controls (3-61 years of age) selected after the Pandemrix vaccination campaign. The first aim was to determine antibodies against A/H1N1 and autoantibodies to Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2), a narcolepsy autoantigen candidate as well as to GAD65 and IA-2 as disease specificity controls. The second aim was to test if levels and frequencies of these antibodies and autoantibodies were associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In vitro transcribed and translated [(35)S]-methionine and -cysteine-labeled influenza A virus (A/California/04/2009/(H1N1)) segment 4 hemagglutinin was used to detect antibodies in a radiobinding assay. Autoantibodies to TRIB2, GAD65 and IA-2 were similarly detected in standard radiobinding assays. The narcolepsy patients had higher median levels of A/H1N1 antibodies than the controls (p = 0.006). A/H1N1 antibody levels were higher among the narcolepsy patients (r = 0.819, p narcolepsy patients positive for HLA-DQB1*06:02. The possibility that TRIB2 is an autoantigen in narcolepsy remains to be clarified. We could verify autoantibody responses against TRIB2 which needs to be determined in larger patient cohorts and control populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: multinational case-control study in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Dieleman, Jeanne; Romio, Silvana; Johansen, Kari; Weibel, Daniel; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess the association between pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Five European countries. Participants: 104 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant Miller-Fisher syndrome matched to one or more controls. Case status was classified according to the Brighton Collaboration definition. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, index date, and country. Main outcome measures: Relative ...

  12. Attitudes of the medical students from two Czech universities to pandemic flu A (H1N1) 2009 and to influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomáskov, Hana; Bohácová, Sylva; Slachtová, Hana

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to find out the approach of students to vaccination against seasonal influenza, how they perceived risk associated with influenza pandemic, and whether the pandemic influenced their approach to vaccination against seasonal flu. Data collection was conducted through an anonymous questionnaire survey. Distribution and collection of questionnaires took place from November to December 2010 at the medical faculties of two universities. Out of the total 360 distributed questionnaires, 343 were filled. The qualitative data were analysed using chi2 test and Fisher's exact test. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and two-sample t-test were used for the evaluation of quantitative data. Statistical tests were performed at a significance level of 5% in STATA 10. The proportion of students regularly vaccinated against seasonal flu was low (4%). Students rated the risk of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in 2009 as relatively low and an interest in vaccination did not increase even during the pandemic and consequently only 5% expressed their interest to get vaccinated during the pandemic. However, only 3% of respondents were vaccinated at the time of vaccine availability. In the following year, only 5% of respondents planned to get vaccinated against seasonal influenza. The results of the questionnaire study indicate that young people have not perceived vaccination against influenza as an important anti-epidemic measure and their opinion have not changed even during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in 2009.

  13. The public's acceptance of novel vaccines during a pandemic: a focus group study and its application to influenza H1N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, N; Holmes, B

    2009-01-01

    As influenza H1N1 spreads around the world, health officials are considering the development and use of a new vaccine to protect the public and help control the outbreak. Acceptance of novel vaccines during health crises, however, is influenced by perceptions of a range of risks, including the risk of infection, risk of becoming severely ill or dying if infected, as well as the risk of serious side and long-term effects of the vaccine. A study on 11 focus groups was conducted with the public in Vancouver, Canada in 2006 and 2007 to explore how people assess these risks and how these assessments relate to their willingness to use novel vaccines in a pandemic. Concerns about using new vaccines during a pandemic differ from concerns about using established products in a non-crisis situation. Participants were hesitant to use novel vaccines because of a low perception of the early risk of infection in a pandemic, coupled with the many uncertainties that surround new vaccines and the emerging infectious disease, and owing to the concern that unsafe pharmaceuticals may be rushed to market during a health crisis. Understanding the public´s assessment of the risks related to, and willingness to use, novel vaccines during a pandemic can help officials promote disease-control measures in ways that improve the likelihood of acceptance by the public and may increase uptake of an H1N1 vaccine.

  14. VACCINE-CHALLENGED IMMUNE RESISTANCE TOWARD VIRUS A/CALIFORNIA/7/2009(H1N1)v IN IMMUNIZED PREGNANT WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    A. Cherdantsev; M. Kostinov; А. Kuselman; Y. Dagil; A.A. Savis’ko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We studied immune resistance efficiency of vaccination against influenza A/California/7/2009(H1N1)v in women at second trimester of physiological pregnancy in a blind, placebocontrolled study. The first group included thirty pregnant women who were injected by univalent subunit “MonoGrippol plus” vaccine. The second group consisted of thirty-seven pregnant women immunized by trivalent “Grippol plus” vaccine. Thirty-one pregnant women (III group) received placebo treatment. Non-pregn...

  15. Neurological and autoimmune disorders after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) with a monovalent adjuvanted vaccine: population based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardage, Carola; Persson, Ingemar; Ortqvist, Ake; Bergman, Ulf; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Granath, Fredrik

    2011-10-12

    To examine the risk of neurological and autoimmune disorders of special interest in people vaccinated against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) with Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline, Middlesex, UK) compared with unvaccinated people over 8-10 months. Retrospective cohort study linking individualised data on pandemic vaccinations to an inpatient and specialist database on healthcare utilisation in Stockholm county for follow-up during and after the pandemic period. Stockholm county, Sweden. Population All people registered in Stockholm county on 1 October 2009 and who had lived in this region since 1 January 1998; 1,024,019 were vaccinated against H1N1 and 921,005 remained unvaccinated. Neurological and autoimmune diagnoses according to the European Medicines Agency strategy for monitoring of adverse events of special interest defined using ICD-10 codes for Guillain-Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, multiple sclerosis, polyneuropathy, anaesthesia or hypoaesthesia, paraesthesia, narcolepsy (added), and autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes; and short term mortality according to vaccination status. Excess risks among vaccinated compared with unvaccinated people were of low magnitude for Bell's palsy (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.48) and paraesthesia (1.11, 1.00 to 1.23) after adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and healthcare utilisation. Risks for Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis remained unchanged. The risks of paraesthesia and inflammatory bowel disease among those vaccinated in the early phase (within 45 days from 1 October 2009) of the vaccination campaign were significantly increased; the risk being increased within the first six weeks after vaccination. Those vaccinated in the early phase were at a slightly reduced risk of death than those who were unvaccinated (0.94, 0.91 to 0.98), whereas those vaccinated in the late phase

  16. A pandemic influenza H1N1 live vaccine based on modified vaccinia Ankara is highly immunogenic and protects mice in active and passive immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Hessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of novel influenza vaccines inducing a broad immune response is an important objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate live vaccines which induce both strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against the novel human pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, and to show protection in a lethal animal challenge model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For this purpose, the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of the influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1 strain (CA/07 were inserted into the replication-deficient modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus--a safe poxviral live vector--resulting in MVA-H1-Ca and MVA-N1-Ca vectors. These live vaccines, together with an inactivated whole virus vaccine, were assessed in a lung infection model using immune competent Balb/c mice, and in a lethal challenge model using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice after passive serum transfer from immunized mice. Balb/c mice vaccinated with the MVA-H1-Ca virus or the inactivated vaccine were fully protected from lung infection after challenge with the influenza H1N1 wild-type strain, while the neuraminidase virus MVA-N1-Ca induced only partial protection. The live vaccines were already protective after a single dose and induced substantial amounts of neutralizing antibodies and of interferon-gamma-secreting (IFN-gamma CD4- and CD8 T-cells in lungs and spleens. In the lungs, a rapid increase of HA-specific CD4- and CD8 T cells was observed in vaccinated mice shortly after challenge with influenza swine flu virus, which probably contributes to the strong inhibition of pulmonary viral replication observed. In addition, passive transfer of antisera raised in MVA-H1-Ca vaccinated immune-competent mice protected SCID mice from lethal challenge with the CA/07 wild-type virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The non-replicating MVA-based H1N1 live vaccines induce a broad protective immune response and are promising vaccine candidates for

  17. No Evidence for Disease History as a Risk Factor for Narcolepsy after A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Favelle; Ploner, Alexander; Fink, Katharina; Maeurer, Markus; Bergman, Peter; Piehl, Fredrik; Weibel, Daniel; Sparén, Pär; Dahlström, Lisen Arnheim

    2016-01-01

    To investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy. Case-control study in Sweden. Cases included persons referred for a Multiple Sleep Latency Test between 2009 and 2010, identified through diagnostic sleep centres and confirmed through independent review of medical charts. Controls, selected from the total population register, were matched to cases on age, gender, MSLT-referral date and county of residence. Disease history (prescriptions and diagnoses) and vaccination history was collected through telephone interviews and population-based healthcare registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk-factor for narcolepsy. In total, 72 narcolepsy cases and 251 controls were included (range 3-69 years mean19-years). Risk of narcolepsy was increased in individuals with a disease history of nervous system disorders (OR range = 3.6-8.8) and mental and behavioural disorders (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-8.8) before referral. In a second analysis of vaccinated individuals only, nearly all initial associations were no longer statistically significant and effect sizes were smaller (OR range = 1.3-2.6). A significant effect for antibiotics (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8) and a marginally significant effect for nervous system disorders was observed. In a third case-only analysis, comparing cases referred before vaccination to those referred after; prescriptions for nervous system disorders (OR = 26.0 95% CI 4.0-170.2) and ADHD (OR = 35.3 95% CI 3.4-369.9) were statistically significant during the vaccination period, suggesting initial associations were due to confounding by indication. The findings of this study do not support disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy.

  18. Factors associated with uptake of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 monovalent pandemic vaccine in K-12 Public Schools, Maine 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorick, Suchita A; Goldberg, Lisa; Zhang, Fan; Birkhimer, Nancy; Dube, Nancy; Dutram, Kay; Hubley, Teresa; Tipton, Meredith; Basurto-Davila, Ricardo; Graitcer, Sam; Mills, Dora Anne

    2015-01-01

    Maine implemented a statewide pre-K through 12-school vaccination program during the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The main objective of this study was to determine which school, nurse, consent form, and clinic factors were associated with school-level vaccination rates for the first dose of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccine. In April 2010, school nurses or contacts were e-mailed electronic surveys. Generalized linear mixed regression was used to predict adjusted vaccination rates using random effects to account for correlations within school districts. Elementary and secondary (middle and high) schools were analyzed separately. Of 645 schools invited to participate, 82% (n = 531) completed the survey. After excluding schools that were ineligible or could not provide outcome data, data for 256 elementary and 124 secondary public schools were analyzed and included in the multivariable analyses. The overall, unadjusted, vaccination rate was 51% for elementary schools and 45% for secondary schools. Elementary schools that had 50 or fewer students per grade, had availability of additional nursing staff, which did not require parental presence at the H1N1 clinic or disseminated consent forms by mail and backpack (compared with backpack only) had statistically significant (P schools, the vaccination rate for schools with the lowest proportion of students receiving subsidized lunch (ie, highest socioeconomic status) was 58% compared with 37% (P schools with the highest proportion receiving subsidized lunch. Several factors were independently associated with vaccination rates. For elementary schools, planners should consider strategies such as providing additional nursing staff and disseminating consent forms via multiple methods. The impact of additional factors, including communication approaches and parent and student attitudes, needs to be investigated, especially for secondary schools.

  19. Entrapment of H1N1 Influenza Virus Derived Conserved Peptides in PLGA Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Response and Vaccine Efficacy in Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Hiremath

    Full Text Available Pigs are believed to be one of the important sources of emerging human and swine influenza viruses (SwIV. Influenza virus conserved peptides have the potential to elicit cross-protective immune response, but without the help of potent adjuvant and delivery system they are poorly immunogenic. Biodegradable polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle (PLGA-NP based vaccine delivery system enhances cross-presentation of antigens by the professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, Norovirus P particle containing SwIV M2e (extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2 chimera and highly conserved two each of H1N1 peptides of pandemic 2009 and classical human influenza viruses were entrapped in PLGA-NPs. Influenza antibody-free pigs were vaccinated with PLGA-NPs peptides cocktail vaccine twice with or without an adjuvant, Mycobacterium vaccae whole cell lysate, intranasally as mist. Vaccinated pigs were challenged with a virulent heterologous zoonotic SwIV H1N1, and one week later euthanized and the lung samples were analyzed for the specific immune response and viral load. Clinically, pigs vaccinated with PLGA-NP peptides vaccine had no fever and flu symptoms, and the replicating challenged SwIV was undetectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Immunologically, PLGA-NP peptides vaccination (without adjuvant significantly increased the frequency of antigen-specific IFNγ secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells response in the lung lymphocytes, despite not boosting the antibody response both at pre- and post-challenge. In summary, our data indicated that nanoparticle-mediated delivery of conserved H1N1 influenza peptides induced the virus specific T cell response in the lungs and reduced the challenged heterologous virus load in the airways of pigs.

  20. H1N1 update review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenzi, Faris Q

    2010-03-01

    There is worldwide concern on the spreading pandemic wave of the new swine influenza virus (S-OIV). The WHO has placed the pandemic threat alert to level 6. World leaders and scientists importantly stress that regulations and pandemic preparedness may lower the morbidity and mortality. This review describes the background, origin, epidemiology, signs and symptoms, methods of detecting H1N1, the risk of H1N1 pandemic control plans, immunity to H1N1, vaccination against H1N1, hospital management, patient management, and treatment of symptoms. It also describes in considerable detail the responsibilities of health professionals in navigating the complex areas of laboratory diagnosis, patient isolation procedures, and how to minimize and manage any accompanying staff infections, all of which are vital processes to help mitigate and minimize the seriousness of local and national de-novo outbreaks of emerging H1N1 infection.

  1. The impact of immunosenescence on humoral immune response variation after influenza A/H1N1 vaccination in older subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iana H Haralambieva

    Full Text Available Although influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly, the factors underlying the reduced vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in this age group are not completely understood. Age and immunosenescence factors, and their impact on humoral immunity after influenza vaccination, are of growing interest for the development of better vaccines for the elderly.We assessed associations between age and immunosenescence markers (T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles - TREC content, peripheral white blood cell telomerase - TERT expression and CD28 expression on T cells and influenza A/H1N1 vaccine-induced measures of humoral immunity in 106 older subjects at baseline and three timepoints post-vaccination.TERT activity (TERT mRNA expression was significantly positively correlated with the observed increase in the influenza-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response at Day 28 compared to baseline (p-value=0.025. TREC levels were positively correlated with the baseline and early (Day 3 influenza A/H1N1-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response (p-value=0.042 and p-value=0.035, respectively. The expression and/or expression change of CD28 on CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells at baseline and Day 3 was positively correlated with the influenza A/H1N1-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response at baseline, Day 28 and Day 75 post-vaccination. In a multivariable analysis, the peak antibody response (HAI and/or VNA at Day 28 was negatively associated with age, the percentage of CD8+CD28 low T cells, IgD+CD27- naïve B cells, and percentage overall CD20- B cells and plasmablasts, measured at Day 3 post-vaccination. The early change in influenza-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response was positively correlated with the observed increase in influenza A/H1N1-specific HAI antibodies at Day 28 and Day 75 relative to baseline (p-value=0.007 and p-value=0.005, respectively.Our data suggest that influenza-specific humoral immunity is significantly influenced by

  2. Seroprevalence of Pandemic A(H1N1) pmd09 Virus Antibodies in Mexican Health Care Workers Before and After Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Castelán-Vega, Juan Arturo; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc Arturo; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Estrada-García, Iris; Baltierra-Jasso, Laura; Cervantes-Servín, Nicté; Méndez-Ortega, Vanessa; Haro-García, Luis C; Sánchez-Román, Francisco Raúl; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Fabila-Castillo, Luis H; Magaña-Hernández, Anastasia; Chávez-Negrete, Adolfo; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio Abdel; Jiménez-Alberto, Alicia

    2015-02-01

    In April 2009, a new strain of influenza A(H1N1) was identified in Mexico and in the U.S. In June 2009, WHO declared this a pandemic. Health care workers constituted a risk group for their close contact with infected individuals. The aim was to estimate seropositivity for A(H1N1)pdm09 in health staff at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. A two-stage cross-sectional study, before and after vaccination in the same workers, was performed on a random sample of health-care workers. A socio-occupational questionnaire was applied and serum antibodies against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were determined through neutralization of retroviral pseudotypes; two logistic regression models for both were constructed. The average (median/mean) age of 1378 participants from 13 work centers was 41.7 years and 68.7% (947) were women. Seroprevalence for the first stage was 26.5% (365) (7.4-43%) vs. 20.8% (11) in a control group from the blood bank; for the second stage, the vaccinated group was 33% (215) (18.2-47%) and 27% (196) (11.6-50%) for the unvaccinated group. In regression models, seropositivity was associated with occupational exposure to suspected influenza infected patients, being physicians, and being vaccinated. Seropositivity against pandemic virus is similar to what was reported, both for vaccinated (2.8-40.9%) and unvaccinated (18.8-64.7%). Low seroprevalence in the vaccinated group indicates that between 67% and 73% were susceptible to infection. Given the relatively low vaccine-induced seropositivity, it is imperative to increase, hygiene and safety for health staff and at-risk populations, and strengthen epidemiological surveillance. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Healthcare workers under a mandated H1N1 vaccination policy with employment termination penalty: a survey to assess employee perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Lori; Wagner, Stephanie; Chan, Shu

    2014-08-20

    The ethical debate over mandatory healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccination is a heated one. Our study hospital instituted a mandatory employee influenza vaccination policy for the 2009-2010 influenza season during the highly publicized pandemic of the H1N1 "Swine Flu." Under this mandate there was no informed declination option, and termination of employment was the consequence for noncompliance. Our objective was to examine HCW perceptions of the H1N1 influenza virus, the vaccine, and the strict mandated vaccination policy. A survey was designed, distributed, and anonymously collected. In total, 202 completed questionnaires were obtained via accidental sampling by the investigators achieving a 100% response rate. Data analysis showed that 31.7% of surveyed HCWs felt the mandate was an infringement on their rights and 3.5% of HCWs would electively seek employment elsewhere. Significantly more nurses and clerks/technicians were opposed to the mandate compared to other types of employees. 96% felt that the mandating hospital should be liable should a significant adverse effect occur from receiving the vaccine. While the mandate helped to increase HCW influenza vaccination rates dramatically, the strict consequence of employment termination created negative feelings of coercion. Adopting a policy that includes a declination option with mandatory masking during influenza season might be a more widely acceptable and still adequate approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Unequal access to vaccines in the WHO European Region during the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Pernille; Wasley, Annemarie; Mereckiene, Jolita; Cotter, Suzanne; Weber, J Todd; Brown, Caroline Sarah

    2013-08-28

    In a severe pandemic, rapid production and deployment of vaccines will potentially be critical in mitigating the impact on populations and essential services. We compared access to vaccines and timing of delivery relative to identification of A(H1N1)pdm09 and the geographic progression of the pandemic in the WHO European Region in order to identify gaps in provision. Information on vaccine procurement and donations was collected through a web-based survey conducted in all 53 member states of the Region. Among the 51 countries responding to the survey, the majority (84%) implemented vaccination campaigns against A(H1N1)pdm09. However, time of vaccine receipt and number of doses varied substantially across the region, with delayed access in many countries especially in those in the lowest income range. Improving access to influenza vaccines in low resource countries and solving issues of product liability should help reduce inequalities and operational challenges arising during a future public health crisis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Duration of (18)F-FDG avidity in lymph nodes after pandemic H1N1v and seasonal influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Anders; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne; Gerke, Oke

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of our study was to investigate the occurrence of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avidity in draining axillary lymph nodes after vaccination against influenza (H1N1v pandemic and seasonal) and to determine the period of increased FDG uptake. METHODS: During December 2009, patients...... axillary. If more vaccinations had been given, only the latest vaccination was evaluated in each deltoid region. RESULTS: Of all patients who underwent PET/CT scans during December 2009, 26% had been vaccinated with at least one influenza vaccination in the deltoid region. A total of 92 'draining' and 60...... lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: Influenza vaccination may lead to FDG-avid draining lymph nodes beyond 1 month....

  6. Social and political determinants of vaccine hesitancy: Lessons learned from the H1N1 pandemic of 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesch, Gustavo S; Schwirian, Kent P

    2015-11-01

    Public acceptance of vaccination programs is essential for vaccine preventable diseases. However, increasing sectors of the population have expressed hesitancy about participating in such programs, leading to the re-emergence of vaccine preventable diseases. In this study we rely on a recreancy hypothesis to test the association between confidence in the government and local hospitals and the willingness to take the vaccine. A secondary analysis of a survey that used a large sample of the U.S. population conducted in October 2009 was used (N = 968). The results indicate that 36.1% of the respondents expressed willingness to be vaccinated. Those with the greatest trust in the government were the most likely to be vaccinated (43.4%), and those least confident were the least willing (15.8%). From the ones reporting being confident in the local health system, 38.4% were willing to be vaccinated, and from those not confident, only 23.5% were willing to be vaccinated. The decision to get vaccinated in the midst of a contagious outbreak involves many considerations. Trust in the government's technical and organization skill to deal with the infectious outbreak along with trust in medical organizations predict the adoption of recommended protection measures. The results indicate that public compliance with vaccination plans in health crisis requires the development of social and institutional trust. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acceptance and tolerability of an adjuvanted nH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients in the Cologne-Bonn cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, B; Kümmerle, T; Koch, S; Birtel, A; Schwarze-Zander, C; Emmelkamp, J; Kern, W V; Hertenstein, C; Wyen, C; Lehmann, C; Cornely, O A; Rockstroh, J; Fätkenheuer, Gerd

    2011-07-25

    To evaluate the acceptance and tolerability of the nH1N1 2009 vaccine in HIV-positive individuals. 758 patients were included in this prospective study. Different study populations were formed: The Tolerability Study Group consists of HIV-infected patients who visited three outpatient clinics (Cologne, Bonn, Freiburg) during a predefined time period. Patients were offered nH1N1 vaccination. Those accepting were administered a standard dose AS03 adjuvant nH1N1 vaccine. Questionnaires to report side effects occurring within 7 days after immunization were handed out. In a substudy conducted during the same time period, acceptance towards immunization was recorded. This Acceptance Study Group consists of all HIV-infected patients visiting the Cologne clinic. They were offered vaccination. In case of refusal, motivation was recorded. In the Tolerability Study Group, a total of 475 patient diaries returned in the three study centres could be evaluated, 119 of those (25%) reported no side effects. Distribution of symptoms was as follows: Pain 285/475 patients (60%), swelling 96 (20%), redness 54 (11%), fever 48/475 (10%), muscle/joint ache 173 (36%), headache 127 (27%), and fatigue 210 (44%). Association of side effects with clinical data was calculated for patients in Cologne and Bonn. Incidence of side effects was significantly associated with CDC stages A, B compared to C, and with a detectable viral load (>50 copies/mL). No correlation was noted for CD4 cell count, age, gender or ethnicity. - In the Acceptance Study Group, 538 HIV-infected patients were offered vaccination, 402 (75%) accepted, while 136 (25%) rejected. Main reasons for rejection were: Negative media coverage (35%), indecisiveness with preference to wait until a later date (23%), influenza not seen as personal threat (19%) and scepticism towards immunization in general (10%). A total of 622 HIV-infected patients were vaccinated against nH1N1-influenza in the three study centres. No severe adverse

  8. Acceptance and tolerability of an adjuvanted nH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients in the cologne-bonn cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffens B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the acceptance and tolerability of the nH1N1 2009 vaccine in HIV-positive individuals. Method 758 patients were included in this prospective study. Different study populations were formed: The Tolerability Study Group consists of HIV-infected patients who visited three outpatient clinics (Cologne, Bonn, Freiburg during a predefined time period. Patients were offered nH1N1 vaccination. Those accepting were administered a standard dose AS03 adjuvant nH1N1 vaccine. Questionnaires to report side effects occurring within 7 days after immunization were handed out. In a substudy conducted during the same time period, acceptance towards immunization was recorded. This Acceptance Study Group consists of all HIV-infected patients visiting the Cologne clinic. They were offered vaccination. In case of refusal, motivation was recorded. Results In the Tolerability Study Group, a total of 475 patient diaries returned in the three study centres could be evaluated, 119 of those (25% reported no side effects. Distribution of symptoms was as follows: Pain 285/475 patients (60%, swelling 96 (20%, redness 54 (11%, fever 48/475 (10%, muscle/joint ache 173 (36%, headache 127 (27%, and fatigue 210 (44%. Association of side effects with clinical data was calculated for patients in Cologne and Bonn. Incidence of side effects was significantly associated with CDC stages A, B compared to C, and with a detectable viral load (> 50 copies/mL. No correlation was noted for CD4 cell count, age, gender or ethnicity. In the Acceptance Study Group, 538 HIV-infected patients were offered vaccination, 402 (75% accepted, while 136 (25% rejected. Main reasons for rejection were: Negative media coverage (35%, indecisiveness with preference to wait until a later date (23%, influenza not seen as personal threat (19% and scepticism towards immunization in general (10%. Conclusion A total of 622 HIV-infected patients were vaccinated against nH1N1-influenza in

  9. Duration of {sup 18}F-FDG avidity in lymph nodes after pandemic H1N1v and seasonal influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, Anders; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne; Gerke, Oke; Johansen, Allan; Petersen, Henrik [OUH, Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense C (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of our study was to investigate the occurrence of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avidity in draining axillary lymph nodes after vaccination against influenza (H1N1v pandemic and seasonal) and to determine the period of increased FDG uptake. During December 2009, patients referred for {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans (n = 293) filled in a questionnaire concerning vaccination type (seasonal and/or H1N1v), time and anatomical localization of vaccination. Only injections in deltoid regions were evaluated, thus ensuring that draining lymph nodes were axillary. If more vaccinations had been given, only the latest vaccination was evaluated in each deltoid region. Of all patients who underwent PET/CT scans during December 2009, 26% had been vaccinated with at least one influenza vaccination in the deltoid region. A total of 92 'draining' and 60 'reference' (i.e. contralateral, non-vaccinated) axillary lymph nodes were evaluated in 61 patients (19 of 61 patients were scanned twice). The maximal intensity in FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}) in draining lymph nodes was 5 g/ml body weight (BW), whereas the maximal intensity in reference lymph nodes was 1.9 g/ml BW. The SUV{sub max} was normalized approximately 40 days after vaccination. No significant enlargement of metabolically active draining lymph nodes could be demonstrated on CT scan. Chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs given within 2 weeks from vaccination did not affect SUV{sub max} in the axillary lymph nodes. Influenza vaccination may lead to FDG-avid draining lymph nodes beyond 1 month. (orig.)

  10. Pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 infection in Victoria, Australia: no evidence for harm or benefit following receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Heath A; Grant, Kristina A; Fielding, James E; Carville, Kylie S; Looker, Clare O; Tran, Thomas; Jacoby, Peter

    2011-08-26

    Conflicting findings regarding the level of protection offered by seasonal influenza vaccination against pandemic influenza H1N1 have been reported. We performed a test-negative case control study using sentinel patients from general practices in Victoria to estimate seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness against laboratory proven infection with pandemic influenza. Cases were defined as patients with an influenza-like illness who tested positive for influenza while controls had an influenza-like illness but tested negative. We found no evidence of significant protection from seasonal vaccine against pandemic influenza virus infection in any age group. Age-stratified point estimates, adjusted for pandemic phase, ranged from 44% in persons aged less than 5 years to -103% (odds ratio=2.03) in persons aged 50-64 years. Vaccine effectiveness, adjusted for age group and pandemic phase, was 3% (95% CI -48 to 37) for all patients. Our study confirms the results from our previous interim report, and other studies, that failed to demonstrate benefit or harm from receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine in patients with confirmed infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Persistence and avidity maturation of antibodies to A(H1N1)pdm09 in healthcare workers following repeated annual vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidem, Synnøve; Tete, Sarah M; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Hoschler, Katja; Montomoli, Emanuele; Brokstad, Karl A; Cox, Rebecca J

    2015-08-07

    Healthcare workers are at increased risk of influenza infection through direct patient care, particularly during the early stages of a pandemic. Although influenza vaccination is widely recommended in Healthcare workers, data on long-term immunogenicity of vaccination in healthcare workers are lacking. The present study was designed to assess the persistence of the humoral response after pandemic vaccination as well as the impact of repeated annual vaccination in healthcare workers (n=24). Pandemic influenza vaccination resulted in a significant increase in haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers with 93-100% of subjects achieving protective titers 21-days post each of the three annual vaccinations. Seroprotective antibodies measured by HI, microneutralization and single radial hemolysis assays were present in 77-94% of healthcare workers 6 months post-vaccination. Repeated vaccination resulted in an increased duration of seroprotective antibodies with seroprotective titers increasing from 35-62% 12 months after 2009 pandemic vaccination to 50-75% 12 months after 2010 vaccination. Furthermore, repeated annual vaccination augmented the avidity of influenza-specific IgG antibodies. In conclusion, we have shown that A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination induces high seroprotective titers that persist for at least 6 months. We demonstrate that repeated vaccination is beneficial to healthcare workers and results in further avidity maturation of vaccine-induced antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Influenza HA and M2e Based Vaccine Delivered by a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Mutant Protects Mice against Homologous H1N1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad A. Hajam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated Salmonella strains constitute a promising technology for the development of a more efficient multivalent protein based vaccines. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA and the conserved extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2 (M2e. We demonstrated that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient HA and M2e protein expressions and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we showed that the mice vaccinated with a Salmonella strain expressing HA and M2e protein antigens, respectively, induced significant production of HA and M2e-specific serum IgG1 and IgG2a responses, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells. Furthermore, immunization with Salmonella-HA-M2e-based vaccine via different routes provided protection in 66.66% orally, 100% intramuscularly, and 100% intraperitoneally immunized mice against the homologous H1N1 virus while none of the animals survived treated with either the PBS or the Salmonella carrying empty expression vector. Ex vivo stimulated dendritic cells (DCs with heat killed Salmonella expressing HA demonstrated that DCs play an important role in the elicitation of HA-specific humoral immune responses in mice. In summary, Salmonella-HA-M2e-based vaccine elicits efficient antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, and provides significant immune protection against a highly pathogenic H1N1 influenza virus.

  13. Composition of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase affects the antigen yield of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 candidate vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakura, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Tashiro, Masato; Nobusawa, Eri

    2013-01-01

    To improve the hemagglutinin (HA) antigen yield of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 candidate vaccine viruses, we generated 7:1, 6:2, and 5:3 genetic reassortant viruses between wild-type (H1N1)pdm09 (A/California/7/2009) (Cal7) and a high-yielding master virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8). These viruses contained the HA; HA and neuraminidase (NA); and HA, NA, and M genes, respectively, derived from Cal7, on a PR8 backbone. The influence of the amino acid residue at position 223 in Cal7 HA on virus growth and HA antigen yield differed between these reassortant viruses. NIIDRG-7, a 7:1 virus possessing arginine at position 223, exhibited a 10-fold higher 50% egg infectious dose (EID(50)) (10.0 log(10)EID(50)/ml) than the 5:3 and 6:2 viruses. It also had 1.5- to 3-fold higher protein (13.8 μg/ml of allantoic fluids) and HA antigen (4.1 μg/ml of allantoic fluids) yields than the 5:3 and 6:2 viruses, which possessed identical Cal7 HA proteins. However, the HA antigen yield of the other 7:1 virus, which possessed glutamine at position 223 was 60% of that of NIIDRG-7. In addition, a novel 6:2 virus possessing Cal7 HA and the NA of A/Wisconsin/10/98 (a triple reassortant swine-like H1N1 virus), produced 107% of the HA yield of NIIDRG-7. In this study, we showed that the balance between HA and NA in the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus affects its protein and antigen yield.

  14. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Peter T; Yager, Eric J; Lynch, Debbie T; Narendran, Amithi; Stagnar, Cristy; Franchini, Anthony M; Fuller, James T; White, Phil A; Nyuandi, Julia; Wiley, Clayton A; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Fuller, Deborah H

    2010-06-08

    The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99) HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun) was analyzed in rhesus macaques. Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine. These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  15. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques.Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine.These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  16. Willingness to receive pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine among doctors and nurses in public health facilities in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatiregun, Akinola Ayoola; Adeyemo, Adeola Aisha; Olowookere, Samuel Anu

    2012-03-16

    As part of global efforts to contain the spread of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1), the Federal Ministry of Health of Nigeria is embarking on the vaccination of health care workers employed in health facilities nationwide. This study was designed to assess the willingness of doctors and nurses working in public health facilities in Ibadan, Nigeria to receive the influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed. Stratified simple random sampling was used to select a total of 304 doctors and nurses who worked at the public primary (70), secondary (51) and tertiary (183) levels of health care facilities in Ibadan. A self-administered, structured questionnaire that contained items on socio-demographics, sources of information, knowledge about the infection and the vaccine, risk perception, willingness to receive the vaccine and suggestions to improve vaccination acceptance by health-care workers was used to collect the data. A total of 255 providers responded for an overall response rate of 84%. The mean age of the respondents was 35.0 ± 9.7 years. A high proportion (88.2%) of the participants, including 94.9% of the doctors and 87.0% of the nurses, reported a willingness to receive the vaccine. Perceptions regarding the risk of contracting influenza, the availability of effective vaccinations for prevention and beliefs that the disease is fatal were reasons given by respondents who reported willingness to receive the vaccination. Those participants who reported ever hearing about the pandemic (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.2) and those who had a high-risk perception of contracting the disease (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.7) were likely to receive the vaccine. Doctors and nurses at the three levels of health care facilities in Ibadan were willing to receive the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. Efforts should be made to deliver the vaccines via adequate planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating the most effective distribution strategies to assure administration of pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine to New York State children and adolescents: evaluation using the New York State Immunization Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Robert A; DuVall, Sarah; Meldrum, Megan D; Flynn, Michael K; Santilli, Loretta A; Easton, Delia E; Sharma, Priya; Blog, Debra S; Zansky, Shelley M; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Birkhead, Guthrie S

    2013-01-01

    To examine differences in H1N1 influenza vaccine distribution strategies that may impact the ability to rapidly administer vaccine during a pandemic or public health emergency. Retrospective evaluation of immunization data in the New York State Immunization Information System (NYSIIS). Analysis of existing NYSIIS data. Children and adolescents younger than 19 years for whom information on at least 1 H1N1 influenza vaccine was present in NYSIIS. Median time to administer vaccines to children and adolescents younger than 19 years by December 31, 2009, by county; venue of H1N1 vaccine administration (local health department [LHD] or private medical provider); comparison of immunization-seeking behavior for routine childhood vaccinations and H1N1 vaccine. A total of 459 189 first or only doses of H1N1 influenza vaccine were recorded in NYSIIS as being administered to New York State, outside of New York City, children aged less than 19 years, between October 2, 2009, and December 31, 2009. Overall, LHD administered 31% of H1N1 vaccine doses; in counties having population less than 100,000, LHD administered 63% of H1N1 doses compared with 23% in counties having population more than 100,000. Time to median administration was faster for LHD in smaller counties and similar for LHD and private medical providers in larger counties. Children who always received routine childhood immunizations either within or outside of their county of residence often had the same practice for H1N1 vaccine, with 85% of children following these patterns. Children who did not follow these patterns were more likely to receive H1N1 influenza vaccine through LHD. Local health departments were able to rapidly administer large quantities of H1N1 influenza vaccine, and patterns of health care seeking relying on increased use of LHD needs to be further studied for future public health emergency planning.

  18. Impact of information on intentions to vaccinate in a potential epidemic: swine-origin Influenza A (H1N1)

    OpenAIRE

    Chanel, Olivier; Luchini, Stephane; Massoni, Sébastien; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    URL des Documents de travail : http://centredeconomiesorbonne.univ-paris1.fr/bandeau-haut/documents-de-travail/; Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 2010.87 - ISSN : 1955-611X; Vaccination campaigns to prevent the spread of epidemics are successful only if the targeted populations subscribe to the recommendations of health authorities. However, because compulsory vaccination is hardly conceivable in modern democracies, governments need to convince their populations throug...

  19. The immunogenetics of narcolepsy associated with A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (Pandemrix) supports a potent gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, I L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Szakács, A; Silveira, A; Franzén, L; Azhary, V; Maeurer, M; Feltelius, N; Darin, N; Hallböök, T; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Kockum, I; Olsson, T

    2017-03-01

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination campaign from 2009 to 2010 was associated with a sudden increase in the incidence of narcolepsy in several countries. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*06:02 allele, and protective associations with the DQB1*06:03 allele have been reported. Several non-HLA gene loci are also associated, such as common variants of the T-cell receptor-α (TRA), the purinergic receptor P2RY11, cathepsin H (CTSH) and TNFSF4/OX40L/CD252. In this retrospective multicenter study, we investigated if these predisposing gene loci were also involved in vaccination-associated narcolepsy. We compared HLA- along with single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes for non-HLA regions between 42 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 1990 population-based controls. The class II gene loci associations supported previous findings. Nominal association (P-value<0.05) with TRA as well as suggestive (P-value<0.1) associations with P2RY11 and CTSH were found. These associations suggest a very strong gene-environment interaction, in which the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain or Pandemrix vaccine can act as potent environmental triggers.

  20. Fever following immunization with influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in children: a survey-based study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Nancy; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; van Grootheest, Kees

    2010-12-01

    In November 2009, all children in the Netherlands from 6 months up to 4 years of age were indicated to receive the Influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. Fever is a common adverse event following immunization in children. Pandemrix®, an inactivated, split-virus influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, was used for this age group. A clinical study mentioned in the Summary of Product Characteristics of Pandemrix® found an increased reactogenicity after the second dose in comparison with the first dose, particularly in the rate of fever. In the Netherlands, this adverse reaction was a point of concern for the parents or caregivers of these children. To investigate the course and height of fever following the first and second dose of Pandemrix® in children aged from 6 months up to 4 years. The secondary aim was to evaluate the use of an online survey during a vaccination campaign. Survey-based descriptive study. Adverse drug reaction reporting database of the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre (Lareb). Parents or caregivers (n = 839) of vaccinated children who reported fever to Lareb following the first immunization with Pandemrix®. Questionnaires were sent by email to parents or caregivers of eligible children following the first and second doses of Pandremix®. Time between vaccination and the occurrence of fever, the maximum measured temperature, the occurrence of other adverse events after first and second vaccination, the decision to get the second vaccination and the social implication of the fever in terms of absence from work, nursery or school, and hospitalization. Following the first vaccination against Influenza A (H1N1), the height of the fever was between 39.0 and 40.0°C in 359/639 (56.2%) of the children. In most of these children (235/639 [36.8%]), the onset of fever was between 6 and 12 hours following vaccination. 450/639 (70.4%) children recovered within 2 days. Of the 539 responders to the second questionnaire, 380 (70.5%) received the second vaccination against

  1. Likely correlation between sources of information and acceptability of A/H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus vaccine in Marseille, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougairède, Antoine; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Ninove, Laetitia; Sartor, Catherine; Badiaga, Sékéné; Botelho, Elizabeth; Brouqui, Philippe; Zandotti, Christine; De Lamballerie, Xavier; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel; Gould, Ernest A; Charrel, Rémi N; Raoult, Didier

    2010-06-25

    In France, there was a reluctance to accept vaccination against the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus despite government recommendation and investment in the vaccine programme. We examined the willingness of different populations to accept A/H1N1 vaccination (i) in a French hospital among 3315 employees immunized either by in-house medical personnel or mobile teams of MDs and (ii) in a shelter housing 250 homeless persons. Google was used to assess the volume of enquiries concerning incidence of influenza. We analyzed the information on vaccination provided by Google, the website of the major French newspapers, and PubMed. Two trust Surveys were used to assess public opinion on the trustworthiness of people in different professions. Paramedics were significantly more reluctant to accept immunisation than qualified medical staff. Acceptance was significantly increased when recommended directly by MDs. Anecdotal cases of directly observed severe infections were followed by enhanced acceptance of paramedical staff. Scientific literature was significantly more in favour of vaccination than Google and French newspaper websites. In the case of the newspaper websites, information correlated with their recognised political reputations, although they would presumably claim independence from political bias. The Trust Surveys showed that politicians were highly dis-trusted in contrast with doctors and pharmacists who were considered much more trustworthy. The low uptake of the vaccine could reflect failure to convey high quality medical information and advice relating to the benefits of being vaccinated. We believe that the media and internet contributed to this problem by raising concerns within the general population and that failure to involve GPs in the control programme may have been a mistake. GPs are highly regarded by the public and can provide face-to-face professional advice and information. The top-down strategy of vaccine programme management and information

  2. Bell's palsy and influenza(H1N1)pdm09 containing vaccines: A self-controlled case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnans, L. (Leonoor); C. Dodd (Caitlin); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAn association between AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine and the occurrence of Bell's palsy was found in a population based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden. To evaluate this association in a different population, we conducted a self-controlled case series in a primary health

  3. Costs of School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts…

  4. Protective antibody responses against A(H1N1)pdm09 primed by infection and recalled by intranasal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazuyuki; Ainai, Akira; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2015-11-09

    This study investigated the effects of preceding infection and administration of whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine on immune responses against influenza virus challenge. Preceding infection alone provided minimal reduction in virus titer following viral challenge. Single administration of intranasal or subcutaneous WIV vaccine alone failed to reduce virus titers and induce antibody responses. Subcutaneous administration of A/Narita/1/09 (A/NRT)-WIV after A/NRT infection provided complete protection against infection and yielded low nasal IgA and high serum IgG antibody responses. Subcutaneous administration of A/NRT-WIV after A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (A/PR8) infection provided no protection. Conversely, intranasal administration of A/NRT-WIV after A/NRT infection provided complete protection and high nasal IgA and serum IgG antibody responses. While, intranasal administration of A/NRT-WIV after A/PR8 infection provided moderate reduction in viral titer with moderate increases in nasal IgA antibodies. These results indicate that intranasal vaccination is superior to subcutaneous vaccination in inducing protective immune responses after preceding heterologous infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Snell, and Isabel Jacobsen from the Department of Defense Birth and Infant Health Registry for their participation in study background discussions as well...record, a comparable safety profile was expected.5 Despite this expectation, and in light of the excess risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome that suspended...et al. Reassessment of the associ- ation between Guillain-Barré syndrome and receipt of swine influenza vaccine in 1976–1977: results of a two-state

  6. Altered Response to A(H1N1)pnd09 Vaccination in Pregnant Women: A Single Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Anne Louise; Følsgaard, Nilofar Vahman; Carson, Charlotte Giwercman; Stokholm, Jakob; Pedersen, Louise; Holmberg, Maria; Bisgaard, Amalie; Birch, Sune; Tsai, Theodore F.; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background Pregnant women were suspected to be at particular risk when H1N1pnd09 influenza became pandemic in 2009. Our primary objective was to compare the immune responses conferred by MF59®-adjuvanted vaccine (Focetria®) in H1N1pnd09-naïve pregnant and non-pregnant women. The secondary aims were to compare influences of dose and adjuvant on the immune response. Methods The study was nested in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2010) pregnancy cohort in 2009-2010 and conducted as a single-blinded block-randomised [1∶1∶1] controlled clinical trial in pregnant women after gestational week 20: (1) 7.5 µg H1N1pnd09 antigen with MF59-adjuvant (Pa7.5 µg); (2) 3.75 µg antigen half MF59-adjuvanted (Pa3.75 µg); (3) 15 µg antigen unadjuvanted (P15 µg); and in non-pregnant women receiving (4) 7.5 µg antigen full adjuvanted (NPa7.5 µg). Blood samples were collected at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 and 10 months after vaccination, adverse events were recorded prospectively. Results 58 pregnant women were allocated to Pa7.5 µg and 149 non-pregnant women were recruited to NPa7.5 µg. The sero-conversion rate was significantly increased in non-pregnant (NPa7.5 µg) compared with pregnant (Pa7.5 µg) women (OR = 2.48 [1.03–5.95], p = 0.04) and geometric mean titers trended towards being higher, but this difference was not statistically significant (ratio 1.27 [0.85–1.93], p = 0.23). The significant titer increase rate showed no difference between pregnant (Pa7.5 µg) and non-pregnant (NPa7.5 µg) groups (OR = 0.49 [0.13–1.85], p = 0.29). Conclusion Our study suggests the immune response to the 7.5 µg MF59-adjuvanted Focetria® H1N1pnd09 vaccine in pregnant women may be diminished compared with non-pregnant women. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01012557. PMID:23637733

  7. Altered response to A(H1N1pnd09 vaccination in pregnant women: a single blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Louise Bischoff

    Full Text Available Pregnant women were suspected to be at particular risk when H1N1pnd09 influenza became pandemic in 2009. Our primary objective was to compare the immune responses conferred by MF59®-adjuvanted vaccine (Focetria® in H1N1pnd09-naïve pregnant and non-pregnant women. The secondary aims were to compare influences of dose and adjuvant on the immune response.The study was nested in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2010 pregnancy cohort in 2009-2010 and conducted as a single-blinded block-randomised [1∶1∶1] controlled clinical trial in pregnant women after gestational week 20: (1 7.5 µg H1N1pnd09 antigen with MF59-adjuvant (Pa7.5 µg; (2 3.75 µg antigen half MF59-adjuvanted (Pa3.75 µg; (3 15 µg antigen unadjuvanted (P15 µg; and in non-pregnant women receiving (4 7.5 µg antigen full adjuvanted (NPa7.5 µg. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 and 10 months after vaccination, adverse events were recorded prospectively.58 pregnant women were allocated to Pa7.5 µg and 149 non-pregnant women were recruited to NPa7.5 µg. The sero-conversion rate was significantly increased in non-pregnant (NPa7.5 µg compared with pregnant (Pa7.5 µg women (OR = 2.48 [1.03-5.95], p = 0.04 and geometric mean titers trended towards being higher, but this difference was not statistically significant (ratio 1.27 [0.85-1.93], p = 0.23. The significant titer increase rate showed no difference between pregnant (Pa7.5 µg and non-pregnant (NPa7.5 µg groups (OR = 0.49 [0.13-1.85], p = 0.29.Our study suggests the immune response to the 7.5 µg MF59-adjuvanted Focetria® H1N1pnd09 vaccine in pregnant women may be diminished compared with non-pregnant women.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01012557.

  8. Acceptability of pandemic A(H1N1) influenza vaccination by Essential Community Workers in 2010 Alicante (Spain), perceived seriousness and sources of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Pablo; Tuells, José; Duro-Torrijos, José Luis; Nolasco, Andreu

    2013-11-01

    Describe acceptability of pandemic A(H1N1) influenza vaccination by Essential Community Workers (ECWs) from Alicante province (Spain) in January 2010. Evaluate the correlation with attitudes, beliefs, professional advice and information broadcasted by media. In this cross-sectional study, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 742 ECWs to assess their attitudes towards vaccination against the pandemic influenza strain. A multivariable regression model was made to adjust the Odds Ratios (ORs). Some ECWs reported having been vaccinated with seasonal vaccine, 21.5% (95%IC 18.6-24.9); only 15.4% (95%IC 12.8-18.4) with the pandemic one. ECWs vaccinated regularly against seasonal flu (OR 5.1; 95%IC 2.9-9.1), those who considered pandemic influenza as a severe or more serious disease than seasonal flu (OR 3.8; 95%IC 2.1-6.7) and those who never had doubts about vaccine safety (OR 3.7; 95%IC2.1-6.7) had a better acceptance of pandemic vaccine. Finally, 78.7% (95%IC 75.1-81.4) had doubts about pandemic vaccine's effectiveness. The vast amount of information provided by the media did not seem to be decisive to prevent doubts or to improve the acceptability of the vaccine in ECWs. Professional advice should be the focus of interest in future influenza vaccination campaigns. These results should be taken into account by health authorities. © 2013.

  9. Increased Incidence and Clinical Picture of Childhood Narcolepsy following the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination Campaign in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partinen, Markku; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Ilveskoski, Ismo; Hublin, Christer; Linna, Miika; Olsén, Päivi; Nokelainen, Pekka; Alén, Reija; Wallden, Tiina; Espo, Merimaaria; Rusanen, Harri; Olme, Jan; Sätilä, Heli; Arikka, Harri; Kaipainen, Pekka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kirjavainen, Turkka

    2012-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy is a rare neurological sleep disorder especially in children who are younger than 10 years. In the beginning of 2010, an exceptionally large number of Finnish children suffered from an abrupt onset of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and cataplexy. Therefore, we carried out a systematic analysis of the incidence of narcolepsy in Finland between the years 2002–2010. Methods All Finnish hospitals and sleep clinics were contacted to find out the incidence of narcolepsy in 2010. The national hospital discharge register from 2002 to 2009 was used as a reference. Findings Altogether 335 cases (all ages) of narcolepsy were diagnosed in Finland during 2002–2009 giving an annual incidence of 0.79 per 100 000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 0.62–0.96). The average annual incidence among subjects under 17 years of age was 0.31 (0.12–0.51) per 100 000 inhabitants. In 2010, 54 children under age 17 were diagnosed with narcolepsy (5.3/100 000; 17-fold increase). Among adults ≥20 years of age the incidence rate in 2010 was 0.87/100 000, which equals that in 2002–2009. Thirty-four of the 54 children were HLA-typed, and they were all positive for narcolepsy risk allele DQB1*0602/DRB1*15. 50/54 children had received Pandemrix vaccination 0 to 242 days (median 42) before onset. All 50 had EDS with abnormal multiple sleep latency test (sleep latency narcolepsy. Interpretation A sudden increase in the incidence of abrupt childhood narcolepsy was observed in Finland in 2010. We consider it likely that Pandemrix vaccination contributed, perhaps together with other environmental factors, to this increase in genetically susceptible children. PMID:22470463

  10. Serum-Free Suspension Culture of MDCK Cells for Production of Influenza H1N1 Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding; Peng, Wen-Juan; Ye, Qian; Liu, Xu-Ping; Zhao, Liang; Fan, Li; Xia-Hou, Kang; Jia, Han-Jing; Luo, Jian; Zhou, Lin-Ting; Li, Bei-Bei; Wang, Shi-Lei; Xu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Ze; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Development of serum-free suspension cell culture processes is very important for influenza vaccine production. Previously, we developed a MDCK suspension cell line in a serum-free medium. In the present study, the growth kinetics of suspension MDCK cells and influenza virus production in the serum-free medium were investigated, in comparison with those of adherent MDCK cells in both serum-containing and serum-free medium. It was found that the serum-free medium supported the stable subculture and growth of both adherent and suspension cells. In batch culture, for both cell lines, the growth kinetics in the serum-free medium was comparable with those in the serum-containing medium and a commercialized serum-free medium. In the serum-free medium, peak viable cell density (VCD), haemagglutinin (HA) and median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) titers of the two cell lines reached 4.51×106 cells/mL, 2.94Log10(HAU/50 μL) and 8.49Log10(virions/mL), and 5.97×106 cells/mL, 3.88Log10(HAU/50 μL), and 10.34Log10(virions/mL), respectively. While virus yield of adherent cells in the serum-free medium was similar to that in the serum-containing medium, suspension culture in the serum-free medium showed a higher virus yield than adherent cells in the serum-containing medium and suspension cells in the commercialized serum-free medium. However, the percentage of infectious viruses was lower for suspension culture in the serum-free medium. These results demonstrate the great potential of this suspension MDCK cell line in serum-free medium for influenza vaccine production and further improvements are warranted.

  11. Increased incidence and clinical picture of childhood narcolepsy following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaign in Finland.

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    Markku Partinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Narcolepsy is a rare neurological sleep disorder especially in children who are younger than 10 years. In the beginning of 2010, an exceptionally large number of Finnish children suffered from an abrupt onset of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and cataplexy. Therefore, we carried out a systematic analysis of the incidence of narcolepsy in Finland between the years 2002-2010. METHODS: All Finnish hospitals and sleep clinics were contacted to find out the incidence of narcolepsy in 2010. The national hospital discharge register from 2002 to 2009 was used as a reference. FINDINGS: Altogether 335 cases (all ages of narcolepsy were diagnosed in Finland during 2002-2009 giving an annual incidence of 0.79 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 0.62-0.96. The average annual incidence among subjects under 17 years of age was 0.31 (0.12-0.51 per 100,000 inhabitants. In 2010, 54 children under age 17 were diagnosed with narcolepsy (5.3/100,000; 17-fold increase. Among adults ≥20 years of age the incidence rate in 2010 was 0.87/100,000, which equals that in 2002-2009. Thirty-four of the 54 children were HLA-typed, and they were all positive for narcolepsy risk allele DQB1*0602/DRB1*15. 50/54 children had received Pandemrix vaccination 0 to 242 days (median 42 before onset. All 50 had EDS with abnormal multiple sleep latency test (sleep latency <8 min and ≥2 sleep onset REM periods. The symptoms started abruptly. Forty-seven (94% had cataplexy, which started at the same time or soon after the onset of EDS. Psychiatric symptoms were common. Otherwise the clinical picture was similar to that described in childhood narcolepsy. INTERPRETATION: A sudden increase in the incidence of abrupt childhood narcolepsy was observed in Finland in 2010. We consider it likely that Pandemrix vaccination contributed, perhaps together with other environmental factors, to this increase in genetically susceptible children.

  12. The Lao Experience in Deploying Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine: Lessons Made Relevant in Preparing for Present Day Pandemic Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeuatvongsa, Anonh; Mirza, Sara; Winter, Christian; Feldon, Keith; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Phonekeo, Darouny; Denny, Justin; Khanthamaly, Viengphone; Kounnavong, Bounheuang; Lylianou, Doualy; Phousavath, Sisouphane; Norasingh, Sisouveth; Boutta, Nao; Olsen, Sonja; Bresee, Joseph; Moen, Ann; Corwin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Lao PDR, as did most countries of the Mekong Region, embarked on a pandemic vaccine initiative to counter the threat posed by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Overall, estimated vaccine coverage of the Lao population was 14%, with uptake in targeted health care workers and pregnant women 99% and 41%, respectively. Adverse Events Following Immunization accounted for only 6% of survey driven, reported vaccination experiences, with no severe consequences or deaths. Public acceptability of the vaccine campaign was high (98%). Challenges to vaccine deployment included: 1) no previous experience in fielding a seasonal influenza vaccine, 2) safety and efficacy concerns, and 3) late arrival of vaccine 10 months into the pandemic. The Lao success in surmounting these hurdles was in large measure attributed to the oversight assigned the National Immunization Program, and national sensitivities in responding to the avian influenza A(H5N1) crisis in the years leading up to the pandemic. The Lao "lessons learned" from pandemic vaccine deployment are made even more relevant four years on, given the many avian influenza strains circulating in the region, all with pandemic potential.

  13. The Lao Experience in Deploying Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 Vaccine: Lessons Made Relevant in Preparing for Present Day Pandemic Threats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anonh Xeuatvongsa

    Full Text Available The Lao PDR, as did most countries of the Mekong Region, embarked on a pandemic vaccine initiative to counter the threat posed by influenza A(H1N1pdm09. Overall, estimated vaccine coverage of the Lao population was 14%, with uptake in targeted health care workers and pregnant women 99% and 41%, respectively. Adverse Events Following Immunization accounted for only 6% of survey driven, reported vaccination experiences, with no severe consequences or deaths. Public acceptability of the vaccine campaign was high (98%. Challenges to vaccine deployment included: 1 no previous experience in fielding a seasonal influenza vaccine, 2 safety and efficacy concerns, and 3 late arrival of vaccine 10 months into the pandemic. The Lao success in surmounting these hurdles was in large measure attributed to the oversight assigned the National Immunization Program, and national sensitivities in responding to the avian influenza A(H5N1 crisis in the years leading up to the pandemic. The Lao "lessons learned" from pandemic vaccine deployment are made even more relevant four years on, given the many avian influenza strains circulating in the region, all with pandemic potential.

  14. Increasing uptake of influenza vaccine by pregnant women post H1N1 pandemic: a longitudinal study in Melbourne, Australia, 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Pollock, Wendy Elizabeth; Tapper, Lauren; Sommerville, Maree; McDonald, Susan

    2015-03-05

    A Melbourne (Australia) university affiliated, tertiary obstetric hospital provides lay and professional education about influenza vaccine in pregnancy annually each March, early in the local influenza season. Responding to a 2011 survey of new mothers' opinions, the hospital made influenza vaccine freely available in antenatal clinics from 2012. We wished to determine influenza vaccination uptake during pregnancy with these strategies 5 years after 2009 H1N1. Face to face interviews based on US Center for Disease Control and Prevention Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System with new mothers in postnatal wards each July, 2010 to 2014. We calculated recalled influenza vaccine uptake each year and assessed trends with chi square tests, and logistic regression. We recorded 1086 interviews. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy increased by 6% per year (95% confidence interval 4 to 8%): from 29.6% in 2010 to 51.3% in 2014 (p benefits are increasingly being heeded. However, there was progressively lower awareness of maternal benefits of influenza vaccination, especially for women with risk factors for severe disease. We observed improving influenza vaccination during pregnancy. There is potential to integrate technology such as text message or internet with antenatal consultations to increase vaccination coverage further.

  15. Pitfalls in anti-influenza T cell detection by Elispot using thimerosal containing pandemic H1N1 vaccine as antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvat, A; Benhamouda, N; Loison, E; Gougeon, M L; Gey, A; Levionnois, E; Ravel, P; Abitbol, V; Roncelin, S; Marcheteau, E; Quintin-Colonna, F; Fridman, W H; Launay, O; Tartour, E

    2012-04-30

    Monitoring T cells in combination with humoral response may be of value to predict clinical protection and cross-protective immunity after influenza vaccination. Elispot technique which measures cytokine produced after antigen-specific T cell stimulation is used routinely to detect and characterize anti-viral T cells. We found that the preservative thimerosal present in most H1N1 pandemic vaccines, induced in vitro abortive activation of T cells followed by cell death leading to false-positive results with the Elispot technique. The size of the spots, usually not measured in routine analysis, appears to be a discriminative criterion to detect this bias. Multi-dose vials of vaccine containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery and our results alert about false-positive results of Elispot to monitor the clinical efficacy of these vaccines. We showed that this finding extends for other T cell monitoring techniques based on cytokine production such as ELISA. Although measuring in vitro immune response using the whole vaccine used for human immunization directly reflects in vivo global host response to the vaccine, the present study strongly supports the use of individual vaccine components for immune monitoring due to the presence of contaminants, such as thimerosal, leading to a bias in interpretation of the results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. System factors to explain 2009 pandemic H1N1 state vaccination rates for children and high-risk adults in US emergency response to pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila-Payan, Carlo; Swann, Julie; Wortley, Pascale M

    2014-01-03

    During the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, children and high-risk adults had priority for vaccination. Vaccine in short supply was allocated to states pro-rata by population, but vaccination rates as of January 2010 varied among states from 21.3% to 84.7% for children and 10.4% to 47.2% for high-risk adults. States had different campaign processes and decisions. To determine program and system factors associated with higher state pandemic vaccination coverage for children and high-risk adults during an emergency response with short supply of vaccine. Regression analysis of factors predicting state-specific H1N1 vaccination coverage in children and high-risk adults, including state campaign information, demographics, preventive or health-seeking behavior, preparedness funding, providers, state characteristics, and surveillance data. Our modeling explained variation in state-specific vaccination coverage with an adjusted R-squared of 0.82 for children and 0.78 for high-risk adults. We found that coverage of children was positively associated with programs focusing on school clinics and with a larger proportion of doses administered in public sites; negatively with the proportion of children in the population, and the proportion not visiting a doctor because of cost. The coverage for high-risk adults was positively associated with shipments of vaccine to "general access" locations, including pharmacy and retail, with the percentage of women with a Pap smear within the past 3 years and with past seasonal influenza vaccination. It was negatively associated with the expansion of vaccination to the general public by December 4, 2009. For children and high-risk adults, coverage was positively associated with the maximum number of ship-to-sites and negatively associated with the proportion of medically underserved population. Findings suggest that distribution and system decisions such as vaccination venues and providers targeted can positively impact vaccination rates for

  17. Molecular Characterisation of the Haemagglutinin Glycan-Binding Specificity of Egg-Adapted Vaccine Strains of the Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Swine Influenza A Virus

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    Vincenzo Carbone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The haemagglutinin (HA glycan binding selectivity of H1N1 influenza viruses is an important determinant for the host range of the virus and egg-adaption during vaccine production. This study integrates glycan binding data with structure-recognition models to examine the impact of the K123N, D225G and Q226R mutations (as seen in the HA of vaccine strains of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 swine influenza A virus. The glycan-binding selectivity of three A/California/07/09 vaccine production strains, and purified recombinant A/California/07/09 HAs harboring these mutations was examined via a solid-phase ELISA assay. Wild-type A/California/07/09 recombinant HA bound specifically to α2,6-linked sialyl-glycans, with no affinity for the α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans in the array. In contrast, the vaccine virus strains and recombinant HA harboring the Q226R HA mutation displayed a comparable pattern of highly specific binding to α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans, with a negligible affinity for α2,6-linked sialyl-glycans. The D225G A/California/07/09 recombinant HA displayed an enhanced binding affinity for both α2,6- and α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans in the array. Notably its α2,6-glycan affinity was generally higher compared to its α2,3-glycan affinity, which may explain why the double mutant was not naturally selected during egg-adaption of the virus. The K123N mutation which introduces a glycosylation site proximal to the receptor binding site, did not impact the α2,3/α2,6 glycan selectivity, however, it lowered the overall glycan binding affinity of the HA; suggesting glycosylation may interfere with receptor binding. Docking models and ‘per residues’ scoring were employed to provide a structure-recognition rational for the experimental glycan binding data. Collectively, the glycan binding data inform future vaccine design strategies to introduce the D225G or Q226R amino acid substitutions into recombinant H1N1 viruses.

  18. A De-O-acylated Lipooligosaccharide-Based Adjuvant System Promotes Antibody and Th1-Type Immune Responses to H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine in Mice

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    Ji In Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are agents that are used to promote immune responses to vaccine antigens and thereby to enhance the protective efficacy of the vaccines. In this study, we investigated the adjuvant activity of CIA06, an adjuvant system that is composed of a toll-like receptor 4 agonist de-O-acylated lipooligosaccharide (dLOS and aluminum hydroxide, on the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Greenflu-S® in mice. CIA06 significantly enhanced influenza-specific serum IgG, hemagglutination-inhibition, and virus-neutralizing antibody titers, which eliminated vaccine dose-dependency in the antibody response. Mice immunized with the CIA06-adjuvanted Greenflu-S showed Th1-type-predominant cytokine profiles, and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were induced. Immunization of mice with the CIA06-adjuvanted vaccine reduced the mortality and morbidity of mice upon lethal challenges with influenza virus, and no excessive inflammatory responses were observed in the lung tissues of the immunized mice after viral infection. These data suggest that the dLOS-based adjuvant system CIA06 can be used to promote the immune responses to influenza vaccine or to spare antigen dose without causing harmful inflammatory responses.

  19. Personal decision-making criteria related to seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1 influenza-vaccination acceptance among French healthcare workers.

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    Lila Bouadma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza-vaccination rates among healthcare workers (HCW remain low worldwide, even during the 2009 A(H1N1 pandemic. In France, this vaccination is free but administered on a voluntary basis. We investigated the factors influencing HCW influenza vaccination. METHODS: In June-July 2010, HCW from wards of five French hospitals completed a cross-sectional survey. A multifaceted campaign aimed at improving vaccination coverage in this hospital group was conducted before and during the 2009 pandemic. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, we assessed the relationships between seasonal (SIV and pandemic (PIV influenza vaccinations, and sociodemographic and professional characteristics, previous and current vaccination statuses, and 33 statements investigating 10 sociocognitive domains. The sociocognitive domains describing HCWs' SIV and PIV profiles were analyzed using the classification-and-regression-tree method. RESULTS: Of the HCWs responding to our survey, 1480 were paramedical and 401 were medical with 2009 vaccination rates of 30% and 58% for SIV and 21% and 71% for PIV, respectively (p<0.0001 for both SIV and PIV vaccinations. Older age, prior SIV, working in emergency departments or intensive care units, being a medical HCW and the hospital they worked in were associated with both vaccinations; while work shift was associated only with PIV. Sociocognitive domains associated with both vaccinations were self-perception of benefits and health motivation for all HCW. For medical HCW, being a role model was an additional domain associated with SIV and PIV. CONCLUSIONS: Both vaccination rates remained low. Vaccination mainly depended on self-determined factors and for medical HCW, being a role model.

  20. Guillain-Barre syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: multinational case-control study in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Jeanne; Romio, Silvana; Johansen, Kari; Weibel, Daniel; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2011-07-12

    To assess the association between pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Case-control study. Five European countries. 104 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant Miller-Fisher syndrome matched to one or more controls. Case status was classified according to the Brighton Collaboration definition. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, index date, and country. Relative risk estimate for Guillain-Barré syndrome after pandemic influenza vaccine. Case recruitment and vaccine coverage varied considerably between countries; the most common vaccines used were adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled risk estimate for all countries was 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 6.0). After adjustment for influenza-like illness/upper respiratory tract infection and seasonal influenza vaccination, receipt of pandemic influenza vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (adjusted odds ratio 1.0, 0.3 to 2.7). The 95% confidence interval shows that the absolute effect of vaccination could range from one avoided case of Guillain-Barré syndrome up to three excess cases within six weeks after vaccination in one million people. The risk of occurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome is not increased after pandemic influenza vaccine, although the upper limit does not exclude a potential increase in risk up to 2.7-fold or three excess cases per one million vaccinated people. When assessing the association between pandemic influenza vaccines and Guillain-Barré syndrome it is important to account for the effects of influenza-like illness/upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal influenza vaccination, and calendar time.

  1. Pandemic influenza (A/H1N1 vaccine uptake among French private general practitioners: a cross sectional study in 2010.

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    Pierre Verger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In July, 2009, French health authorities, like those in many other countries, decided to embark on a mass vaccination campaign against the pandemic A(H1N1 influenza. Private general practitioners (GPs were not involved in this campaign. We studied GPs' pandemic vaccine (pvaccine uptake, quantified the relative contribution of its potential explanatory factors and studied whether their own vaccination choice was correlated with their recommendations to patients about pvaccination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this cross-sectional telephone survey, professional investigators interviewed an existing panel of randomly selected private GPs (N = 1431; response rate at inclusion in the panel: 36.8%; participation rate in the survey: 100%. The main outcome variable was GPs' own pvaccine uptake. We used an averaging multi-model approach to quantify the relative contribution of factors associated with their vaccination. The pvaccine uptake rate was 61% (95%CI = 58.3-63.3. Four independent factors contributed the most to this rate (partial Nagelkerke's R(2: history of previous vaccination against seasonal influenza (14.5%, perception of risks and efficacy of the pvaccine (10.8%, opinions regarding the organization of the vaccination campaign (7.1%, and perception of the pandemic's severity (5.2%. Overall, 71.3% (95%CI = 69.0-73.6 of the participants recommended pvaccination to young adults at risk and 40.1% (95%CI = 37.6-42.7 to other young adults. GPs' own pvaccination was strongly predictive of their recommendation to both young adults at risk (OR = 9.6; 95%CI = 7.2-12.6 and those not at risk (OR = 8.5; 95%CI = 6.4-11.4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that around 60% of French private GPs followed French authorities' recommendations about vaccination of health care professionals against the A(H1N1 influenza. They pinpoint priority levers for improving preparedness for future influenza pandemics. Besides encouraging GPs

  2. Pandemic influenza (A/H1N1) vaccine uptake among French private general practitioners: a cross sectional study in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Pierre; Flicoteaux, Rémi; Schwarzinger, Michael; Sagaon-Teyssier, Luis; Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Launay, Odile; Sebbah, Remy; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    In July, 2009, French health authorities, like those in many other countries, decided to embark on a mass vaccination campaign against the pandemic A(H1N1) influenza. Private general practitioners (GPs) were not involved in this campaign. We studied GPs' pandemic vaccine (pvaccine) uptake, quantified the relative contribution of its potential explanatory factors and studied whether their own vaccination choice was correlated with their recommendations to patients about pvaccination. In this cross-sectional telephone survey, professional investigators interviewed an existing panel of randomly selected private GPs (N = 1431; response rate at inclusion in the panel: 36.8%; participation rate in the survey: 100%). The main outcome variable was GPs' own pvaccine uptake. We used an averaging multi-model approach to quantify the relative contribution of factors associated with their vaccination. The pvaccine uptake rate was 61% (95%CI = 58.3-63.3). Four independent factors contributed the most to this rate (partial Nagelkerke's R(2)): history of previous vaccination against seasonal influenza (14.5%), perception of risks and efficacy of the pvaccine (10.8%), opinions regarding the organization of the vaccination campaign (7.1%), and perception of the pandemic's severity (5.2%). Overall, 71.3% (95%CI = 69.0-73.6) of the participants recommended pvaccination to young adults at risk and 40.1% (95%CI = 37.6-42.7) to other young adults. GPs' own pvaccination was strongly predictive of their recommendation to both young adults at risk (OR = 9.6; 95%CI = 7.2-12.6) and those not at risk (OR = 8.5; 95%CI = 6.4-11.4). These results suggest that around 60% of French private GPs followed French authorities' recommendations about vaccination of health care professionals against the A(H1N1) influenza. They pinpoint priority levers for improving preparedness for future influenza pandemics. Besides encouraging GPs' own uptake of regular vaccination against seasonal influenza, providing

  3. Profiling of humoral response to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and vaccination measured by a protein microarray in persons with and without history of seasonal vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Reimerink, Johan; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Beek, Janko; Meijer, Adam; de Bruin, Erwin; Friesema, Ingrid; de Jong, Menno D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Peeters, Marcel F.; Rossen, John W. A.; Koopmans, Marion

    2013-01-01

    The influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination on the antibody response produced by natural infection or vaccination is not well understood. We compared the profiles of antibody responses of 32 naturally infected subjects and 98 subjects vaccinated with a 2009 influenza A(H1N1) monovalent

  4. Opinion about seasonal influenza vaccination among the general population 3 years after the A(H1N1)pdm2009 influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiron, Karine; Sarazin, Marianne; Debin, Marion; Raude, Jocelyn; Rossignol, Louise; Guerrisi, Caroline; Odinkemelu, Didi; Hanslik, Thomas; Colizza, Vittoria; Blanchon, Thierry

    2015-11-27

    To assess the opinions of the French general population about seasonal influenza vaccination three years after the A(H1N1)pdm 09 pandemic and identify factors associated with a neutral or negative opinion about this vaccination. The study was conducted using data collected from 5374 participants during the 2012/2013 season of the GrippeNet.fr study. The opinion about seasonal influenza vaccination was studied on three levels ("positive", "negative" or "neutral"). The link between the participant's characteristics and their opinion regarding the seasonal influenza vaccination were studied using a multinomial logistic regression with categorical variables. The "positive" opinion was used as the reference for identifying individuals being at risk of having a "neutral" or a "negative" opinion. Among the participants, 39% reported having a positive opinion about seasonal influenza vaccine, 39% a neutral opinion, and 22% a negative opinion. Factors associated with a neutral or negative opinion were young age, low educational level, lack of contact with sick or elderly individuals, lack of treatment for a chronic disease and taking a homeopathic preventive treatment. These results show that an important part of the French population does not have a positive opinion about influenza vaccination in France. Furthermore, it allows outlining the profiles of particularly reluctant individuals who could be targeted by informative campaigns. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Psychiatric comorbidity and cognitive profile in children with narcolepsy with or without association to the H1N1 influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakács, Attila; Hallböök, Tove; Tideman, Pontus; Darin, Niklas; Wentz, Elisabet

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidity and the cognitive profile in children and adolescents with narcolepsy in western Sweden and the relationship of these problems to H1N1 vaccination. Thirty-eight patients were included in the study. We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study to investigate psychiatric comorbidity using a test battery of semistructured interviews generating Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnoses, including the Development and Well-Being Assessment and the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder rating scale. The Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were used to screen for autistic traits and psychotic symptoms, respectively. The cognitive assessments were made by a clinical psychologist using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition, or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition. In the post-H1N1 vaccination (PHV) narcolepsy group (n = 31), 43% of patients had psychiatric comorbidity, 29% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattentive type, 20% had major depression, 10% had general anxiety disorder, 7% had oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), 3% had pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (i.e., atypical autism), and 3% had eating disorder not otherwise specified (anorectic type). In the non-post-H1N1 vaccination (nPHV) narcolepsy group, one of seven patients had ADHD, inattentive type and ODD. The most frequent psychiatric symptom was temper tantrums, which occurred in 94% of the patients in the PHV group and 71% of the patients in the nPHV narcolepsy group. The cognitive assessment profile was similar in both groups and showed normal results for mean full-scale IQ and perceptual speed but decreased verbal comprehension and working memory. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity had a significantly lower full

  6. Evaluation of seasonal influenza vaccines for H1N1pdm09 and type B viruses based on a replication-incompetent PB2-KO virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Hiroki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Uraki, Ryuta; Kiso, Maki; Oishi, Kohei; Murakami, Shin; Mimori, Shigetaka; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-04

    Vaccination is the first line of protection against influenza virus infection in humans. Although inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines are available, each vaccine has drawbacks in terms of immunogenicity and safety. To overcome these issues, our group has developed a replication-incompetent PB2-knockout (PB2-KO) influenza virus that replicates only in PB2-expressing cells. Here we generated PB2-KO viruses possessing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) segments from H1N1pdm09 or type B viruses and tested their vaccine potential. The two PB2-KO viruses propagated efficiently in PB2-expressing cells, and expressed chimeric HA as expected. Virus-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in mice immunized with the viruses, and the immunized mice showed milder clinical signs and/or lower virus replication levels in the respiratory tract upon virus challenge. Our results indicate that these PB2-KO viruses have potential as vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. H1N1 and influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirdamadi, Kamelia; Einarson, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Question I have been encouraging pregnant women to receive both the H1N1 and influenza vaccines since I became aware of Health Canada’s guidelines. However, some of the women in my practice have heard conflicting information, often from media sources, and they are hesitant to be vaccinated. What is the evidence behind these guidelines, and should I really be convincing these women to be vaccinated? Answer Pregnant women and growing fetuses are considered a population vulnerable to H1N1 and influenza viruses. Health Canada published a report in late 2010 estimating that this population was at increased risk of hospitalization and severe outcomes of H1N1 infection. Recommendations included pregnant women as a priority group to receive the H1N1 vaccine as well as the influenza vaccine. This information should be explained unambiguously to pregnant women, and they should be made aware of the sensationalism of media reports, which are often based on opinion and not evidence. PMID:21918141

  8. Comparative study of lymphocytes from individuals that were vaccinated and unvaccinated against the pandemic 2009-2011 H1N1 influenza virus in Southern Brazil

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    Deise Nascimento de Freitas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION:While no single factor is sufficient to guarantee the success of influenza vaccine programs, knowledge of the levels of immunity in local populations is critical. Here, we analyzed influenza immunity in a population from Southern Brazil, a region with weather conditions that are distinct from those in the rest of country, where influenza infections are endemic, and where greater than 50% of the population is vaccinated annually.METHODS:Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 40 individuals. Of these, 20 had received the H1N1 vaccine, while the remaining 20 were unvaccinated against the disease. Cells were stimulated in vitro with the trivalent post-pandemic influenza vaccine or with conserved major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I peptides derived from hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Cell viability was then analyzed by [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide]-based colorimetric assay (MTT, and culture supernatants were assayed for helper T type 1 (Th1 and Th2-specific cytokine levels.RESULTS:Peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated, but not unvaccinated, individuals exhibited significant proliferation in vitro in the presence of a cognate influenza antigen. After culturing with vaccine antigens, cells from vaccinated individuals produced similar levels of interleukin (IL-10 and interferon (IFN-γ, while those from unvaccinated individuals produced higher levels of IFN-γ than of IL-10.CONCLUSIONS:Our data indicate that peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated individuals are stimulated upon encountering a cognate antigen, but did not support the hypothesis that cross-reactive responses related to previous infections can ameliorate the immune response. Moreover, monitoring IL-10 production in vaccinated individuals could comprise a valuable tool for predicting disease evolution.

  9. Oral Delivery of a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Expressing Influenza A Virus Proteins Protects Mice against H5N1 and H1N1 Viral Infection.

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    Zenglin Pei

    Full Text Available Attenuated strains of invasive enteric bacteria, such as Salmonella, represent promising gene delivery agents for nucleic acid-based vaccines as they can be administrated orally. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. We showed that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient gene transfer activity for HA and NA expression and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we evaluated the immune responses and protection induced by the constructed Salmonella-based vaccine. Our study showed that the Salmonella-based vaccine induced significant production of anti-HA serum IgG and mucosal IgA, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells in orally vaccinated mice. Furthermore, mice orally vaccinated with the Salmonella vaccine expressing viral HA and NA proteins were completely protected from lethal challenge of highly pathogenic H5N1 as well as H1N1 influenza viruses while none of the animals treated with the Salmonella vaccine carrying the empty expression vector with no viral antigen expression was protected. These results suggest that the Salmonella-based vaccine elicits strong antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and provides effective immune protection against multiple strains of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the feasibility of developing novel attenuated Salmonella strains as new oral vaccine vectors against influenza viruses.

  10. Immunogenicity and Cross Protection in Mice Afforded by Pandemic H1N1 Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Containing Wild-Type Nucleoprotein.

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    Rekstin, Andrey; Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Petukhova, Galina; Korenkov, Daniil; Losev, Igor; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    Since conserved viral proteins of influenza virus, such as nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 protein, are the main targets for virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), we hypothesized that introduction of the NP gene of wild-type virus into the genome of vaccine reassortants could lead to better immunogenicity and afford better protection. This paper describes in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies of two new reassortants of pandemic H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) candidates. One had the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from A/South Africa/3626/2013 H1N1 wild-type virus on the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 master donor virus backbone (6 : 2 formulation) while the second had the HA, NA, and NP genes of the wild-type virus on the same backbone (5 : 3 formulation). Although both LAIVs induced similar antibody immune responses, the 5 : 3 LAIV provoked greater production of virus-specific CTLs than the 6 : 2 variant. Furthermore, the 5 : 3 LAIV-induced CTLs had higher in vivo cytotoxic activity, compared to 6 : 2 LAIV. Finally, the 5 : 3 LAIV candidate afforded greater protection against infection and severe illness than the 6 : 2 LAIV. Inclusion in LAIV of the NP gene from wild-type influenza virus is a new approach to inducing cross-reactive cell-mediated immune responses and cross protection against pandemic influenza.

  11. Immunogenicity and Cross Protection in Mice Afforded by Pandemic H1N1 Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Containing Wild-Type Nucleoprotein

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    Andrey Rekstin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since conserved viral proteins of influenza virus, such as nucleoprotein (NP and matrix 1 protein, are the main targets for virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs, we hypothesized that introduction of the NP gene of wild-type virus into the genome of vaccine reassortants could lead to better immunogenicity and afford better protection. This paper describes in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies of two new reassortants of pandemic H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV candidates. One had the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from A/South Africa/3626/2013 H1N1 wild-type virus on the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 master donor virus backbone (6 : 2 formulation while the second had the HA, NA, and NP genes of the wild-type virus on the same backbone (5 : 3 formulation. Although both LAIVs induced similar antibody immune responses, the 5 : 3 LAIV provoked greater production of virus-specific CTLs than the 6 : 2 variant. Furthermore, the 5 : 3 LAIV-induced CTLs had higher in vivo cytotoxic activity, compared to 6 : 2 LAIV. Finally, the 5 : 3 LAIV candidate afforded greater protection against infection and severe illness than the 6 : 2 LAIV. Inclusion in LAIV of the NP gene from wild-type influenza virus is a new approach to inducing cross-reactive cell-mediated immune responses and cross protection against pandemic influenza.

  12. Effectiveness of the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine against pandemic influenza virus A/(H1N1 2009--a comparison of two methods; Germany, 2009/10.

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    Helmut Uphoff

    Full Text Available During the autumn wave of the pandemic influenza virus A/(H1N1 2009 (pIV the German population was offered an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine. The authors compared results of two methods calculating the effectiveness of the vaccine (VE. The test-negative case-control method used data from virologic surveillance including influenza-positive and negative patients. An innovative case-series methodology explored data from all nationally reported laboratory-confirmed influenza cases. The proportion of reported cases occurring in vaccinees during an assumed unprotected phase after vaccination was compared with that occurring in vaccinees during their assumed protected phase. The test-negative case-control method included 1,749 pIV cases and 2,087 influenza test-negative individuals of whom 6 (0.3% and 36 (1.7%, respectively, were vaccinated. The case series method included data from 73,280 cases. VE in the two methods was 79% (95% confidence interval (CI = 35-93%; P = 0.007 and 87% (95% CI = 78-92%; P<0.001 for individuals less than 14 years of age and 70% (95% CI = -45%-94%, P = 0.13 and 74% (95% CI = 64-82%; P<0.001 for individuals above the age of 14. Both methods yielded similar VE in both age groups; and VE for the younger age group seemed to be higher.

  13. VACCINE-CHALLENGED IMMUNE RESISTANCE TOWARD VIRUS A/CALIFORNIA/7/2009(H1N1v IN IMMUNIZED PREGNANT WOMEN

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    A. Cherdantsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We studied immune resistance efficiency of vaccination against influenza A/California/7/2009(H1N1v in women at second trimester of physiological pregnancy in a blind, placebocontrolled study. The first group included thirty pregnant women who were injected by univalent subunit “MonoGrippol plus” vaccine. The second group consisted of thirty-seven pregnant women immunized by trivalent “Grippol plus” vaccine. Thirty-one pregnant women (III group received placebo treatment. Non-pregnant women (IV group were injected with “MonoGrippol plus”. We did not find any differences in clinical features of vacccine-challenged time period in pregnant women from groups I-III. Notably, sufficient numbers of women were found to be seroprotected 1 month post-vaccination (I group, 80.0% ; II group, 75.7% ; IVgroup, 80.6% with high levels seroconversion (I group, 46.6%; II group, 51.4%; IV group, 53.3%. Within 9-10 months after vaccination, a decreased seroprotection was revealed in II group of pregnant women. More stable specific immunity levels were detected for the groups immunized with univalent vaccine.Hence, the local subunit adjuvant “MonoGrippol plus” and “Grippol plus” vaccines were shown to exibit a high immune resistance efficiency profile and clinical safety, when used in pregnant women, thus presuming an extended application field for these biological drugs in public health service. State of pregnancy seems not to be a limiting condition for induction of specific immune resistance.

  14. Effects of immunizing school children with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) monovalent vaccine on absenteeism among students and teachers in Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graitcer, Samuel B; Dube, Nancy L; Basurto-Davila, Ricardo; Smith, Peter F; Ferdinands, Jill; Thompson, Mark; Uzicanin, Amra; Gargiullo, Paul; Chaves, Sandra S; Robinson, Sara; Sears, Stephen; Tipton, Meredith; Monto, Arnold S; Mills, Dora; Shay, David K

    2012-07-06

    The overall and indirect effects of immunizing school children with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic virus vaccine prior to and during the peak of virus circulation were evaluated on student and teacher school absenteeism. We used records collected from late 2009 through early 2010 from schools in four Maine counties. Mixed logistic regression models were used to estimate the daily association between school-level immunization coverage and absenteeism by level of influenza activity, after adjusting for the proportion of students receiving reduced-cost lunches, student minority status, absences adjacent to weekends and Thanksgiving, rural school location, and the circulation of other respiratory viruses. Increasing student immunization coverage was associated with reduced absenteeism during periods of high influenza activity. For example, as immunization coverage during the peak week of pandemic virus circulation increased from 38% to 69% (the 10th and 90th percentiles of observed coverage, respectively), relative reductions in daily absenteeism among all students, unimmunized students, and teachers were 8.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.5, 9.9), 5.7% (95% CI: 4.2, 7.3), and 8.7% (95% CI: 1.3, 16), respectively. Increased vaccination coverage among school-aged Maine children had modest overall and indirect effects on student and teacher absenteeism, despite vaccination occurring just prior and during peak pandemic virus circulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Risk of Narcolepsy after AS03 Adjuvanted Pandemic A/H1N1 2009 Influenza Vaccine in Adults: A Case-Coverage Study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nicholas; Kosky, Christopher; Dennis, Gary; Eriksson, Sofia; Hall, Andrew; Leschziner, Guy; Reading, Paul; Shneerson, John M; Donegan, Katherine; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    An increased risk of narcolepsy has been observed in children following ASO3-adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (Pandemrix) vaccine. We investigated whether this risk extends to adults in England. Six adult sleep centers in England were visited between November 2012 and February 2014 and vaccination/clinical histories obtained from general practitioners. Suspected narcolepsy cases aged older than 17 y were selected. The risk of narcolepsy following Pandemrix was calculated using cases diagnosed by the time of the center visits and those with a diagnosis by November 30, 2011 after which there was increased awareness of the risk in children. The odds of vaccination in cases and in matched population data were compared using a case-coverage design. Of 1,446 possible cases identified, most had onset before 2009 or were clearly not narcolepsy. Of the 60 remaining cases, 20 were excluded after expert review, leaving 40 cases with narcolepsy; 5 had received Pandemrix between 3 and 18 mo before onset. All the vaccinated cases had cataplexy, two received a diagnosis by November 2011 and two were aged 40 y or older. The odds ratio for vaccination in cases compared to the population was 4.24 (95% confidence interval 1.45-12.38) using all cases and 9.06 (1.90-43.17) using cases with a diagnosis by November 2011, giving an attributable risk of 0.59 cases per 100,000 doses. We found a significantly increased risk of narcolepsy in adults following Pandemrix vaccination in England. The risk was lower than that seen in children using a similar study design. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Risk of narcolepsy associated with inactivated adjuvanted (AS03 A/H1N1 (2009 pandemic influenza vaccine in Quebec.

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    Jacques Montplaisir

    Full Text Available An association between an adjuvanted (AS03 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccine and narcolepsy has been reported in Europe.To assess narcolepsy risk following administration of a similar vaccine in Quebec.Retrospective population-based study.Neurologists and lung specialists in the province were invited to report narcolepsy cases to a single reference centre.Patients were interviewed by two sleep experts and standard diagnostic tests were performed. Immunization status was verified in the provincial pandemic influenza vaccination registry.Confirmed narcolepsy with or without cataplexy with onset of excessive daytime sleepiness between January 1st, 2009, and December 31st, 2010. Relative risks (RRs were calculated using a Poisson model in a cohort analysis, by a self-controlled case series (SCCS and a case-control method.A total of 24 cases were included and overall incidence rate was 1.5 per million person-years. A cluster of 7 cases was observed among vaccinated persons in the winter 2009-2010. In the primary cohort analysis, 16-week post-vaccination RR was 4.32 (95% CI: 1.50-11.12. RR was 2.07 (0.70-6.17 in the SCCS, and 1.48 (0.37-7.03 using the case-control method. Estimates were lower when observation was restricted to the period of pandemic influenza circulation, and tended to be higher in persons <20 years old and for cataplexy cases.Results are compatible with an excess risk of approximately one case per million vaccine doses, mainly in persons less than 20 years of age. However, a confounding effect of the influenza infection cannot be ruled out.

  17. Conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas sobre la influenza A(H1N1 2009 y la vacunación contra influenza pandémica: resultados de una encuesta poblacional Knowledge, attitudes and practices about influenza A(H1N1 2009, and influenza vaccine in Mexico: results of a population survey

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    María Eugenia Jiménez-Corona

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas respecto a la pandemia de influenza, con especial énfasis en la vacuna contra influenza estacional y pandémica. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal con muestreo polietápico probabilístico, realizado durante diciembre de 2009 en residentes mayores de 18 años de la Ciudad de México (y área metropolitana, Monterrey, Guadalajara y Mérida. RESULTADOS: Se incluyeron 1 600 sujetos (48.9% masculino; 34% había recibido vacuna contra influenza estacional en años pasados, 90.6% estaba dispuesto a recibir la vacuna contra A(H1N1. La principal causa de rechazo a la vacunación fue no confiar en la vacuna (46.5%. Principales medidas preventivas identificadas por los encuestados: lavado de manos (47.5%, vacuna contra A(H1N1 (28% y etiqueta respiratoria (19.4%. El nivel escolar (1.7, p=0.006 y edad (1.02, pOBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza pandemic, with special emphasis on issues related to influenza vaccine, seasonal and pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study, probabilistic multistage sampling in patients over 18 years, residents of Mexico City (and metropolitan area, Monterrey, Guadalajara and Merida in December 2009. RESULTS: A total of 1.600 subjects (48.9% male were interviewed, 34% had previously received seasonal flu vaccine, 90.6% were willing to be vaccinated against A(H1N1, 46.5% of those who would not receive the vaccine was because they did not trust A (H1N1, 68% considered influenza A (H1N1 as a risk for their family. Hand washing was the preventive measure most commonly reported (47.5%, secondly influenza vaccine (28%. Schooling (1.7, p=0.006 and age (1.02, p<0.001 influence rejection to get vaccine. 82.9% of respondents rate the federal government's management as good or very good. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high acceptance rate for the pandemic influenza vaccine in Mexico when compared to similar studies in other

  18. Narcolepsy, 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic influenza, and pandemic influenza vaccinations: what is known and unknown about the neurological disorder, the role for autoimmunity, and vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Schur, Peter H; MacDonald, Noni E; Steinman, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The vaccine safety surveillance system effectively detected a very rare adverse event, narcolepsy, in subjects receiving AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the European inactivation/purification protocol. The reports of increased cases of narcolepsy in non-vaccinated subjects infected with wild A(H1N1) pandemic influenza virus suggest a role for the viral antigen(s) in disease development. However, additional investigations are needed to better understand what factor(s) in wild influenza infection trigger(s) narcolepsy in susceptible hosts. An estimated 31 million doses of European AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine were used in more than 47 countries. The Canadian AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine was used with high coverage in Canada where an estimated 12 million doses were administered. As no similar narcolepsy association has been reported to date with the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the Canadian inactivation/purification protocol, this suggests that the AS03 adjuvant alone may not be responsible for the narcolepsy association. To date, no narcolepsy association has been reported with the MF59®-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine. This review article provides a brief background on narcolepsy, outlines the different types of vaccine preparations including the ones for influenza, reviews the accumulated evidence for the safety of adjuvants, and explores the association between autoimmune diseases and natural infections. It concludes by assimilating the historical observations and recent clinical studies to formulate a feasible hypothesis on why vaccine-associated narcolepsy may not be solely linked to the AS03 adjuvant but more likely be linked to how the specific influenza antigen component of the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccine was prepared. Careful and long-term epidemiological studies of subjects who developed narcolepsy in association with AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine prepared with

  19. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Design of a shear-thinning recoverable peptide hydrogel from native sequences and application for influenza H1N1 vaccine adjuvant

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    Huang, Hongzhou; Shi, Jishu; Laskin, Julia; Liu, Ziyan; McVey, David S.; Sun, Xiuzhi S.

    2011-10-07

    Peptide hydrogels are considered injectable materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Most published hydrogel-forming sequences contain either alternating-charged and noncharged residues or amphiphilic blocks. Here, we report a self-assembling peptide, h9e (FLIVIGSIIGPGGDGPGGD), designed by rationally combining two native sequences from an elastic segment of spider silk and a trans-membrane segment of human muscle L-type calcium channel. The turning segment GSII of h9e promoted hydrogel formation in both Ca2+ solution and acidic pH conditions at water content greater than 99.5%. Although h9e Ca2+ hydrogel and h9e acidic hydrogel have the same sequence, they have distinct physical properties. The shear-thinning, rapid-strengthrecovering h9e Ca2+ hydrogel was used as an H1N1 influenza vaccine adjuvant. The h9e adjuvant was biologically safe and improved immune response by 70% compared with an oil-based commercial adjuvant.

  1. Patterns in influenza antiviral medication use before and during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, Vaccine Safety Datalink Project, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sharon K; Shay, David K; Yin, Ruihua; McCarthy, Natalie L; Baxter, Roger; Jackson, Michael L; Jacobsen, Steven J; Nordin, James D; Irving, Stephanie A; Naleway, Allison L; Glanz, Jason M; Lieu, Tracy A

    2012-11-01

    U.S. recommendations for using influenza antiviral medications changed in response to viral resistance (to reduce adamantane use) and during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (to focus on protecting high-risk patients). Little information is available on clinician adherence to these recommendations. We characterized population-based outpatient antiviral medication usage, including diagnosis and testing practices, before and during the pandemic. Eight medical care organizations in the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project provided data on influenza antiviral medication dispensings from January 2000 through June 2010. Dispensing rates were explored in relation to changes in recommendations and influenza diagnosis and laboratory testing frequencies. Factors associated with oseltamivir dispensings in pandemic versus pre-pandemic periods were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Antiviral use changed coincident with recommendations to avoid adamantanes in 2006, to use alternatives to oseltamivir in 2008, and to use oseltamivir during the pandemic. Of 38,019 oseltamivir dispensings during the pandemic, 31% were to patients not assigned an influenza diagnosis, and 97% were to patients not tested for influenza. Oseltamivir was more likely to be dispensed in pandemic versus pre-pandemic periods to patients change antiviral prescribing based on resistance and to focus on high-risk patients during the pandemic. Medications were commonly dispensed to patients without influenza diagnoses and tests, suggesting that antiviral dispensings may offer useful supplemental data for monitoring influenza incidence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Influenza pandemic (H1N1 2009 activity during summer 2009: Effectiveness of the 2008-9 trivalent vaccine against pandemic influenza in Spain Actividad de la gripe pandémica (H1N1 2009 durante el verano de 2009: Efectividad de la vacuna trivalente 2008-9 frente a la gripe pandémica en España

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    Amparo Larrauri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Spanish influenza surveillance system (SISS maintained its activity during the summer of 2009 to monitor the influenza pandemic. Objectives: To describe pandemic influenza activity from May to September 2009 and to estimate the effectiveness of the 2008-9 seasonal influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza. Methods: Data from the SISS were used to identify the trend of pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza outside the influenza season. For the effectiveness study, we compared the vaccination status of notified cases [influenza-like illnesses (ILI laboratory confirmed as pandemic influenza] with that of the test-negative controls. Results: The first laboratory-confirmed case of the pandemic virus was notified in the system in week 20/2009. The ILI rate increased gradually in the study period, exceeding basic activity in week 38. The proportion of pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza viruses detected by the system represented 14% in week 20/2009 and rapidly increased to 90% in week 34. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness of the 2008-9 seasonal vaccine against laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza was 12% (-30; 41. Conclusions: The SISS became an essential tool for pandemic monitoring in Spain. The improved SISS will provide more accurate information on influenza activity in future seasonal or pandemic waves. Using surveillance data, we could not demonstrate the effectiveness of the seasonal 2008-9 vaccine against laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza.Introducción: El Sistema de Vigilancia de Gripe en España (SVGE continuó y reforzó su actividad durante el verano de 2009 con el objetivo de vigilar la evolución de la pandemia en España. Objetivos: Describir la actividad de la gripe pandémica en España de mayo a septiembre de 2009 y estimar la efectividad de la vacuna antigripal estacional 2008-2009 frente a casos confirmados de gripe pandémica (H1N1 2009. Métodos: Se utilizaron datos del SVGE para

  3. H1N1 influenza vaccination in HIV-infected women on effective antiretroviral treatment did not induce measurable antigen-driven proliferation of the HIV-1 proviral reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thor A; Huang, Hannah C; Salyer, Christen E; Richardson, Kelly M; Weinberg, Adriana; Nachman, Sharon; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2017-02-13

    Antigen-induced activation and proliferation of HIV-1-infected cells is hypothesized to be a mechanism of HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy. The objective of this study was to determine if proliferation of H1N1-specific HIV-infected cells could be detected following H1N1 vaccination. This study utilized cryopreserved PBMC from a previously conducted trial of H1N1 vaccination in HIV-infected pregnant women. HIV-1 DNA concentrations and 437 HIV-1 C2V5 env DNA sequences were analyzed from ten pregnant women on effective antiretroviral therapy, before and 21 days after H1N1 influenza vaccination. HIV-1 DNA concentration did not change after vaccination (median pre- vs. post-vaccination: 95.77 vs. 41.28 copies/million PBMC, p = .37). Analyses of sequences did not detect evidence of HIV replication or proliferation of infected cells. Antigenic stimulation during effective ART did not have a detectable effect on the genetic makeup of the HIV-1 DNA reservoir. Longitudinal comparison of the amount and integration sites of HIV-1 in antigen-specific cells to chronic infections (such as herpesviruses) may be needed to definitively evaluate whether antigenic stimulation induces proliferation of HIV-1 infected cells.

  4. Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross-reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril; Thomsen, Joakim S.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bragstad et al. (2010) Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross-reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 13-23. Background Alternative influenza vaccines...... in the vaccine formulations. Objective In this study, we compared the ability of pandemic influenza DNA vaccines to induce immunity against distantly related strains within a subtype with the immunity induced by conventional trivalent protein vaccines against homologous virus challenge. Methods Ferrets were...... immunised by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with DNA vaccines based on the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) and/or the matrix (M) and nucleoprotein genes of the 1918 H1N1 Spanish influenza pandemic virus or the 1968 H3N2 Hong Kong influenza pandemic virus. The animals were...

  5. Evaluation of the attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a live virus vaccine generated by codon-pair bias de-optimization of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Anafu, Amanda; Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-20

    Codon-pair bias de-optimization (CPBD) of viruses involves re-writing viral genes using statistically underrepresented codon pairs, without any changes to the amino acid sequence or codon usage. Previously, this technology has been used to attenuate the influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus. The de-optimized virus was immunogenic and protected inbred mice from challenge. In order to assess whether CPBD could be used to produce a live vaccine against a clinically relevant influenza virus, we generated an influenza A/California/07/2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus with de-optimized HA and NA gene segments (2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min)), and evaluated viral replication and protein expression in MDCK cells, and attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy in outbred ferrets. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus grew to a similar titer as the 2009 pH1N1 wild type (wt) virus in MDCK cells (∼10(6)TCID50/ml), despite reduced HA and NA protein expression on western blot. In ferrets, intranasal inoculation of 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus at doses ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50 led to seroconversion in all animals and protection from challenge with the 2009 pH1N1 wt virus 28 days later. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus did not cause clinical illness in ferrets, but replicated to a similar titer as the wt virus in the upper and lower respiratory tract, suggesting that de-optimization of additional gene segments may be warranted for improved attenuation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the potential of using CPBD technology for the development of a live influenza virus vaccine if the level of attenuation is optimized. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Influenza viruses and cross-reactivity in healthy adults: humoral and cellular immunity induced by seasonal 2007/2008 influenza vaccination against vaccine antigens and 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Anna M; Bistoni, Onelia; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lepri, Enrica; Camilloni, Barbara; Russano, Anna M; Neri, Mariella; Basileo, Michela; Spinozzi, Fabrizio

    2012-02-21

    We analyzed humoral and cellular immune responses against vaccine antigens and the new A(H1N1) virus in healthy adults before and after immunization with the 2007/2008 commercially available trivalent subunit MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine during the Fall 2007, prior to the emergence of the new virus. Antibody titers were significantly boosted only against the three vaccine antigens. Seasonal vaccination boosted pre-existing cellular responses upon stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells not only with the homologous three vaccine antigens, but also with the heterologous new 2009 A(H1N1) and with a highly conserved peptide present in the stalk region of hemagglutinin (HA). These results show that cross-reactive cell responses against the new virus were present before the circulation of the virus and were boosted by seasonal vaccination. The cross-reactivity of cellular responses might, at least in part, explain the low pathogenicity of the new pandemic virus. The finding of cellular immunity, that can be increased by seasonal vaccination, against the conserved HA peptide, underline the potential use, in human vaccines, of conserved peptides of the stalk region of HA characterized by broad immunogenicity in experimental systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cross reactivity of serum antibody responses elicited by DNA vaccines expressing HA antigens from H1N1 subtype influenza vaccines in the past 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Iman; Chen, Huaiqing; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    In the past three decades, ten H1 subtype influenza vaccines have been recommended for global seasonal flu vaccination. Some of them were used only for one year before being replaced by another H1 flu vaccine while others may be used for up to seven years. While the selection of a new seasonal flu vaccine was based on the escape of a new emerging virus that was not effectively protected by the existing flu formulation, there is limited information on the magnitude and breadth of cross reactivity among H1 subtype virus circulation over a long period. In the current study, HA-expressing DNA vaccines were constructed to express individual HA antigens from H1 subtype vaccines used in the past 30 y. Rabbits naïve to HA antibody responses were immunized with these HA DNA vaccines and the cross reactivity of these sera against HA antigen and related H1 viruses in the same period was studied. Our data indicate that the level of cross reactivity was different for different viral isolates and the key mutations responsible for the cross reactivity may involve only a limited number of residues. Our results provide useful information for the development of improved seasonal vaccines than can achieve broad protection against viruses within the same H1 subtype.

  8. The impact of pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza and vaccine-associated adverse events on parental attitudes and influenza vaccine uptake in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Christopher C; Richmond, Peter C; Jacoby, Peter; Thornton, Patrick; Regan, Annette; Robins, Christine; Kelly, Heath; Smith, David W; Effler, Paul V

    2014-07-07

    Parental attitudes towards vaccination significantly influence vaccine uptake. The A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza pandemic was followed in 2010 by an unprecedented increase in febrile reactions in children receiving trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine manufactured by bioCSL. Uptake of TIV in children vaccination is uncertain. A parental attitudes survey towards influenza illness and vaccination was conducted as part of the West Australian Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness study. Vaccination status was assessed by parental interview and confirmed by the national register and/or vaccine providers. Parental attitudes from vaccinated and unvaccinated children and attitudes in 2008-2009 and 2010-2012 were compared. Principal Component Analysis was conducted to determine core attitudes that influenced vaccine uptake. Vaccination history and parental attitude surveys were available from 2576 children. Parents of fully vaccinated children less frequently stated that influenza was a mild disease, more frequently stated that influenza vaccine was safe and were less frequently worried about vaccine side effects. Uptake of influenza vaccine decreased significantly from 2010 onwards. From 2010, parents were less concerned about severe influenza, but more concerned about vaccine side effects and safety. Despite this significant shift in attitudes towards influenza vaccine, parental acceptance of vaccines on the national immunisation program did not change. Principal Component Analysis revealed that attitudes around vaccine safety and efficacy were the most important attitudes impacting on vaccine uptake. Parental attitudes to influenza vaccine changed from 2010. Confidence in the WA preschool influenza vaccination program remains low yet appeared unchanged for other vaccines. Restoring public confidence in childhood influenza vaccination is needed before uptake can be improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Protection of guinea pigs by vaccination with a recombinant swinepox virus co-expressing HA1 genes of swine H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiarong; Yang, Deji; Huang, Dongyan; Xu, Jiaping; Liu, Shichao; Lin, Huixing; Zhu, Haodan; Liu, Bao; Lu, Chengping

    2013-03-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory infectious disease of swine caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). SIV is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a potent threat to human health. Here, we report the construction of a recombinant swinepox virus (rSPV/H3-2A-H1) co-expressing hemagglutinin (HA1) of SIV subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. Immune responses and protection efficacy of the rSPV/H3-2A-H1 were evaluated in guinea pigs. Inoculation of rSPV/H3-2A-H1 yielded neutralizing antibodies against SIV H1N1 and H3N2. The IFN-γ and IL-4 concentrations in the supernatant of lymphocytes stimulated with purified SIV HA1 antigen were significantly higher (P guinea pigs against SIV H1N1 or H3N2 challenge was observed. No SIV shedding was detected from guinea pigs vaccinated with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 after challenge. Most importantly, the guinea pigs immunized with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 did not show gross and micrographic lung lesions. However, the control guinea pigs experienced distinct gross and micrographic lung lesions at 7 days post-challenge. Our data suggest that the recombinant swinepox virus encoding HA1 of SIV H1N1 and H3N2 might serve as a promising candidate vaccine for protection against SIV H1N1 and H3N2 infections.

  10. Concurrent and cross-season protection of inactivated influenza vaccine against A(H1N1)pdm09 illness among young children: 2012-2013 case-control evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanxi; Xu, Jianxiong; Lin, Jinyan; Wang, Ming; Li, Kuibiao; Ge, Jing; Thompson, Mark G

    2015-06-09

    In 2012-2013, we examined 1729 laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza cases matched 1:1 with healthy controls and estimated influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) to be 67% (95% confidence interval=58-74%) for ages 8 months to 6 years old. Among children aged 8-35 months old, VE for fully vaccinated children (73%, 60-81%) was significantly higher than VE for partially vaccinated children (55%, 33-70%). Significant cross-season protection from prior IIV3 was noted, including VE of 31% (8-48%) from IIV3 received in 2010-2011 against influenza illness in 2012--2013 without subsequent boosting doses. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. [Population-based cross sectional study about vaccine acceptability and perception of the severity of A/H1N1 influenza: opinion of the general population and health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiñaniz, Antxon; López-Picado, Amanda; Miranda-Serrano, Erika; Latorre, Amaia; Cobos, Raquel; Parraza-Díez, Naiara; Amezua, Patricia; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; Aizpuru, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    To determine the intention of general population and health professionals to vaccinate against the H1N1 influenza A virus. To determine the perception of severity of the H1N1 influenza A in both groups compared to that of seasonal influenza. Cross-sectional telephone survey performed to a sample of population (obtained randomly from the Vitoria-Gasteiz telephone directory) and cross-sectional electronically-administered survey to a sample of health professionals from public health centres in Vitoria-Gasteiz, conducted between 6th and 16th November 2009. The relative and absolute frecuency of persons willing to be vaccinated and the proportion of those considering the H1N1 influenza A as a life-threatening risk were calculated in both groups. 219 (33%) persons out of 637 contacted telephone numbers answered the questionnaire, as well as 109 health professionals. 63.0% (n=138) of general population and 73.4% (n=80) of the professional group would not undergo vaccination, even if it was for free (p=0.595). If belonging to a high-risk group, the corresponding proportions of unwillingness were 14.6% (n=32) for general population and 40.4 (n=44) for professionals (p<0.001). The proportion of undecided persons is 25.6% (n=56) in general population, against 6.4% (n=7) among the professionals. At the beginning of the vaccination campaign, the majority of population is unwilling to undergo immunization against the H1N1 influenza A virus. The proportion in general population is similar to that among the health professionals. However, when belonging to a high-risk group, there is a high proportion of undecided persons in general population. Copyright © 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Immune response to influenza A/H1N1 vaccine in inflammatory bowel disease patients treated with anti TNF-α agents: effects of combined therapy with immunosuppressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, G; Frasca, D; Romero, M; Armuzzi, A; Felice, C; Marzo, M; Pugliese, D; Papa, A; Mocci, G; De Vitis, I; Rapaccini, G L; Blomberg, B B; Guidi, L

    2013-05-01

    Our first objective was to evaluate the immune response to the adjuvanted 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) vaccine in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients treated with anti-TNF-α alone or combined with immunosuppressants (IS). Second and third aims were the safety of pH1N1 vaccine and the effects on IBD clinical activity. 36 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 26 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and thirty-one healthy control (HC) subjects were enrolled. 47 patients were on anti TNF-α maintenance monotherapy and 15 on anti TNF-α combined with IS. Sera were collected at baseline (T0) and 4 weeks after the vaccination (T1) for antibody determination by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Disease activity was monitored at T0 and T1. Seroprotective titers (≥1:40) in patients were comparable to HC. Seroconvertion rate (≥4 fold increase in HAI titer) was lower than HC in IBD patients (p=0.009), either on anti TNF-α monotherapy (p=0.034) or combined with IS (p=0.011). Geometric mean titer (GMT) of antibodies at T1 was significantly lower in patients on combined therapy versus those on monotherapy (p=0.0017) and versus HC (p=0.011). The factor increase of GMT at T1 versus T0 was significantly lower in IBD patients versus HC (p=0.042), and in those on combined immunosuppression, both versus monotherapy (p=0.0048) and HC (p=0.0015). None of the patients experienced a disease flare. Our study has shown a suboptimal response to pH1N1 vaccine in IBD patients on therapy with anti TNF-α and IS compared to those on anti-TNF-α monotherapy and HC. Copyright © 2012 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinant factors for acceptance of seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers after the 2009 influenza-A (H1N1) pandemia in a hospital at the metropolitan area of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Leyda; García-Fragoso, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare associated influenza is a serious public health problem that contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. To determine the seasonal influenza vaccination rate and reasons for its acceptance among healthcare workers in a hospital located at the metropolitan area of Puerto Rico. Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 120 volunteer healthcare workers and ancillary staff. Immunization rates for the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1), seasonal vaccines 2009 and 2010 seasonal influenza vaccine were 50%, 53% and 65%, respectively. Determinant factors for acceptance of vaccination in 2010 included obtaining the 2009 vaccines, not knowing someone with adverse effect to the vaccine, and believing the vaccine should be mandatory for all healthcare workers. Influenza immunization rate is below the recommended rate to decrease healthcare associated influenza infection. Our results serve to confirm that education is needed to improve immunization rates among these healthcare workers and eliminate misconceptions about the vaccine.

  14. Effect of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant on the immunogenicity of the 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine: multi-level modeling of data with repeated measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Da Peng; Zhu, Bao Ping; Wang, Hua Qing; Cao, Lei; Wu, Wen Di; Jiang, Ke Yu; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Guo Min; Zheng, Jing Shan; Cao, Ling Sheng; Liang, Xiao Feng

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of the aluminum hydroxide (Al-OH) adjuvant on the 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 (pH1N1) vaccine. In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, participants received two doses of split-virion formulation containing 15 μg hemagglutinin antigen, with or without aluminum hydroxide (Al-OH). We classified the participants into six age categories (>61 years, 41-60 years, 19-40 years, 13-18 years, 8-12 years, and 3-7 years) and obtained four blood samples from each participant on days 0, 21, 35, and 42 following the first dose of immunization. We assessed vaccine immunogenicity by measuring the geometric mean titer (GMT) of hemagglutination inhibiting antibody. We used a two-level model to evaluate the fixed effect of aluminum Al-OH and other factors, accounting for repeated measures. The predictions of repeated measurement on GMTs of formulations with or without Al-OH, were 80.35 and 112.72, respectively. Al-OH significantly reduced immunogenicity after controlling for time post immunization, age-group and gender. The Al-OH adjuvant does not increase but actually reduces the immunogenicity of the split-virion pH1N1 vaccine. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A clinical trial to assess the immunogenicity and safety of Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (Whole Virion IP (Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009 Monovalent Vaccine; VaxiFlu-S ™ in healthy Indian adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A H Kubavat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The pandemic of H1N1 2009 influenza has spread world over and low degree of virus transmission has continued in several regions of India. Aims : To assess the immunogenicity and safety of Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009 Monovalent Vaccine in healthy adult Indian population. Settings and Design : Prospective, open label, multicentric, phase 2/3 clinical trial. Materials and Methods : Healthy adult Indian subjects belonging to either 18-59 years or ≥60 years age groups were enrolled and administered a single 0.5 ml (≥15 mcg of hemagglutinin antigen dose of vaccine in the deltoid muscle. Anti-hemagglutinin antibody titer was assessed at baseline and 21 (±2 days after vaccination by Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI test. Safety assessments were done for a period of 42 days. Statistical Analysis Used : Percentages of appropriate population with 95% confidence intervals calculated, log transformation of the data to calculate Geometric Mean Titers (GMTs and chi-square test and student′s t-test applied for significance testing. Results : 182/198 and 53/63 volunteers in age groups of 18-59 years and ≥60 years, respectively, achieved an HI titer ≥1 : 40 at Day 21 (91.9% [95% confidence interval: 88.1-95.7%] and 84.1% [75.1-93.2%]; P=0.072. Further, 171/198 and 50/63 volunteers in the respective age groups achieved seroconversion/four-fold increase in titer at Day 21 (86.4% [81.6-91.1%] and 79.4% [69.4-89.4%]; P=0.179. A significant rise of 22.6-fold [18.0-28.4] and 10.5-fold [7.4-15.0] was noted in GMT in the respective age groups (P<0.001 for both groups as compared to baseline. Nine vaccine-related adverse events were reported (3.4% incidence [1.2-5.6%], which were of low severity only. Conclusions : Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009 Monovalent Vaccine produces excellent immunogenic response with a good tolerability profile in adult Indian population.

  16. The European I-MOVE Multicentre 2013-2014 Case-Control Study. Homogeneous moderate influenza vaccine effectiveness against A(H1N1)pdm09 and heterogenous results by country against A(H3N2).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Valenciano, Marta

    2015-06-04

    In the first five I-MOVE (Influenza Monitoring Vaccine Effectiveness in Europe) influenza seasons vaccine effectiveness (VE) results were relatively homogenous among participating study sites. In 2013-2014, we undertook a multicentre case-control study based on sentinel practitioner surveillance networks in six European Union (EU) countries to measure 2013-2014 influenza VE against medically-attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory-confirmed as influenza. Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses co-circulated during the season.

  17. Prospective hospital-based case–control study to assess the effectiveness of pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination and risk factors for hospitalization in 2009–2010 using matched hospital and test-negative controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Wiebke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed a case–control study to estimate vaccine effectiveness (VE for prevention of hospitalization due to pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 (pH1N1 and to identify risk factors for pH1N1 and acute respiratory infection (ARI in 10 hospitals in Berlin from December 2009 to April 2010. Methods Cases were patients aged 18–65 years with onset of ARI ≤10 days before admission testing positive for pH1N1 by PCR performed on nasal and throat swabs or by serological testing. Cases were compared to (1 matched hospital controls with acute surgical, traumatological or other diagnoses matched on age, sex and vaccination probability, and (2 ARI patients testing negative for pH1N1. Additionally, ARI cases were compared to matched hospital controls. A standardized interview and chart review elicited demographic and clinical data as well as potential risk factors for pH1N1/ARI. VE was estimated by 1-(Odds ratio for pH1N1-vaccination ≥10 days before symptom onset using exact logistic regression analysis. Results Of 177 ARI cases recruited, 27 tested pH1N1 positive. A monovalent AS03-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine was the only pandemic vaccine type identified among cases and controls (vaccination coverage in control group 1 and 2: 15% and 5.9%. The only breakthrough infections were observed in 2 of 3 vaccinated HIV positive pH1N1 patients. After exclusion of HIV positive participants, VE was 96% (95%CI: 26-100% in the matched multivariate analysis and 46% (95%CI: -376-100% in the test-negative analysis. Exposure to children in the household was independently associated with hospitalization for pH1N1 and ARI. Conclusions Though limited by low vaccination coverage and number of pH1N1 cases, our results suggest a protective effect of the AS03-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine for the prevention of pH1N1 hospitalization. The use of hospital but not test-negative controls showed a statistically protective effect of pH1N1-vaccination and permitted

  18. Comparison of adverse events following immunization with pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09 vaccine with or without adjuvant among health professionals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cerbino-Neto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A vaccination campaign against pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09 was held in Brazil in March 2010, using two types of monovalent split virus vaccines: an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine and a non-adjuvanted vaccine. We compared the reactogenicity of the vaccines in health professionals from a Clinical Research Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and there were no serious adverse events following immunization (AEFI among the 494 subjects evaluated. The prevalence of any AEFI was higher in the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine at 2 h and 24 h post-vaccination [preva-lence ratio (PR: 2.05, confidence interval (CI 95%: 1.55-2.71, PR: 3.42, CI 95%: 2.62-4.48, respectively]; however, there was no difference between the vaccines in the assessments conducted at seven and 21 days post-vaccination. The group receiving the AS03 post-adjuvanted vaccine had a higher frequency of local reactions at 2 h (PR: 3.01, CI 95%: 2.12-4.29, 24 h (PR: 4.57, CI 95%: 3.29-6.37 and seven days (PR: 6.05, CI 95%: 2.98-12.28 post-vaccination. We concluded that the two types of vaccines caused no serious AEFI in the studied population and the adjuvanted vaccine was more reactogenic, particularly in the 24 h following vaccination. This behaviour must be confirmed and better characterised by longitudinal studies in the general population.

  19. Comparison of adverse events following immunization with pandemic influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 vaccine with or without adjuvant among health professionals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino-Neto, José; Santos, Ananza Tainá da Silva; Gouvea, Maria Isabel Fragoso da Silveira; Pedro, Renata Saraiva; Ramos, Grazielle Viana; Guaraldo, Lusiele; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro

    2012-11-01

    A vaccination campaign against pandemic influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 was held in Brazil in March 2010, using two types of monovalent split virus vaccines: an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine and a non-adjuvanted vaccine. We compared the reactogenicity of the vaccines in health professionals from a Clinical Research Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and there were no serious adverse events following immunization (AEFI) among the 494 subjects evaluated. The prevalence of any AEFI was higher in the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine at 2 h and 24 h post-vaccination [preva-lence ratio (PR): 2.05, confidence interval (CI) 95%: 1.55-2.71, PR: 3.42, CI 95%: 2.62-4.48, respectively]; however, there was no difference between the vaccines in the assessments conducted at seven and 21 days post-vaccination. The group receiving the AS03 post-adjuvanted vaccine had a higher frequency of local reactions at 2 h (PR: 3.01, CI 95%: 2.12-4.29), 24 h (PR: 4.57, CI 95%: 3.29-6.37) and seven days (PR: 6.05, CI 95%: 2.98-12.28) post-vaccination. We concluded that the two types of vaccines caused no serious AEFI in the studied population and the adjuvanted vaccine was more reactogenic, particularly in the 24 h following vaccination. This behaviour must be confirmed and better characterised by longitudinal studies in the general population.

  20. A clinical trial to assess the immunogenicity and safety of Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (Whole Virion) IP (Pandemic Influenza (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine; VaxiFlu-S™) in healthy Indian adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubavat, A H; Mittal, R; Patel, P M; Jarsaniya, D H; Pawar, P R

    2011-01-01

    The pandemic of H1N1 2009 influenza has spread world over and low degree of virus transmission has continued in several regions of India. To assess the immunogenicity and safety of Pandemic Influenza (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine in healthy adult Indian population. Prospective, open label, multicentric, phase 2/3 clinical trial. Healthy adult Indian subjects belonging to either 18-59 years or ≥ 60 years age groups were enrolled and administered a single 0.5 ml (≥ 15 mcg of hemagglutinin antigen) dose of vaccine in the deltoid muscle. Anti-hemagglutinin antibody titer was assessed at baseline and 21 (± 2) days after vaccination by Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI) test. Safety assessments were done for a period of 42 days. Percentages of appropriate population with 95% confidence intervals calculated, log transformation of the data to calculate Geometric Mean Titers (GMTs) and chi-square test and student's t-test applied for significance testing. 182/198 and 53/63 volunteers in age groups of 18-59 years and ≥ 60 years, respectively, achieved an HI titer ≥ 1 : 40 at Day 21 (91.9% [95% confidence interval: 88.1-95.7%] and 84.1% [75.1-93.2%]; P=0.072). Further, 171/198 and 50/63 volunteers in the respective age groups achieved seroconversion/four-fold increase in titer at Day 21 (86.4% [81.6-91.1%] and 79.4% [69.4-89.4%]; P=0.179). A significant rise of 22.6-fold [18.0-28.4] and 10.5-fold [7.4-15.0] was noted in GMT in the respective age groups (Ppopulation.

  1. Phase 2 Assessment of the Safety and Immunogenicity of Two Inactivated Pandemic Monovalent H1N1 Vaccines in Adults as a Component of the U.S. Pandemic Preparedness Plan in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wilbur H.; Winokur, Patricia L.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Lisa A.; Wald, Anna; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Noah, Diana L.; Wolff, Mark; Kotloff, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in 2009 created an urgent need to develop vaccines for mass immunization. To guide decisions regarding the optimal immunization dosage and schedule for adults, we evaluated two monovalent, inactivated, unadjuvanted H1N1 influenza vaccines in independent, but simultaneously conducted, multi-center Phase 2 trials of identical design. Methods Healthy adults, stratified by age (18 to 64 years and ≥65 years), were randomized (1:1 allocation), in a double-blind, parallel-group design, to receive two intramuscular doses (21 days apart) of vaccine containing approximately 15 μg or 30 μg of hemagglutinin (HA). Primary endpoints were safety (reactogenicity for 8 days after each vaccination and vaccine-associated serious adverse events during the 7 month study) and immunogenicity (proportion of subjects, stratified by age, achieving a serum hemagglutination inhibition [HI] antibody titer ≥1:40 or a ≥4-fold rise in titer after a single injection of either dosage). Results Both vaccines were well-tolerated. A single 15 μg dose induced HI titers ≥1:40 in 90% of younger adults (95% confidence interval [CI] 82%-95%) and 81% of elderly (95% CI 71%–88%) who received Sanofi-Pasteur vaccine (subsequently found to contain 24 μg HA in the standard potency assay), and in 80% of younger adults (95% CI 71%–88%) and 60% of elderly (95% CI 50%–70%) who received CSL vaccine. Both vaccines were significantly more immunogenic in younger compared with elderly adults by at least one endpoint measure. Increasing the dose to 30 μg raised the frequency of HI titers ≥1:40 in the elderly by approximately 10%. Higher dosage did not significantly enhance immunogenicity in younger adults and a second dose provided little additional benefit to either age group. Conclusion These trials provided evidence for policymakers that a single 15 μg dose of 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine would likely protect most U.S. adults and suggest a potential benefit of a 30

  2. Establishment of Vero cell RNA polymerase I-driven reverse genetics for Influenza A virus and its application for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Suk; Baek, Yun Hee; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-06-01

    The constant threat of newly emerging influenza viruses with pandemic potential requires the need for prompt vaccine production. Here, we utilized the Vero cell polymerase I (PolI) promoter, rather than the commonly used human PolI promoter, in an established reverse-genetics system to rescue viable influenza viruses in Vero cells, an approved cell line for human vaccine production. The Vero PolI promoter was more efficient in Vero cells and demonstrated enhanced transcription levels and virus rescue rates commensurate with that of the human RNA PolI promoter in 293T cells. These results appeared to be associated with more efficient generation of A(H1N1)pdm09- and H5N1-derived vaccine seed viruses in Vero cells, whilst the rescue rates in 293T cells were comparable. Our study provides an alternative means for improving vaccine preparation by using a novel reverse-genetics system for generating influenza A viruses.

  3. Adjuvanted influenza-H1N1 vaccination reveals lymphoid signatures of age-dependent early responses and of clinical adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Olga; Binda, Elisa; O'Farrell, Sean; Lorenc, Anna; Pradines, Joel; Huang, Yongqing; Duffner, Jay; Schulz, Reiner; Cason, John; Zambon, Maria; Malim, Michael H; Peakman, Mark; Cope, Andrew; Capila, Ishan; Kaundinya, Ganesh V; Hayday, Adrian C

    2016-02-01

    Adjuvanted vaccines afford invaluable protection against disease, and the molecular and cellular changes they induce offer direct insight into human immunobiology. Here we show that within 24 h of receiving adjuvanted swine flu vaccine, healthy individuals made expansive, complex molecular and cellular responses that included overt lymphoid as well as myeloid contributions. Unexpectedly, this early response was subtly but significantly different in people older than ∼35 years. Wide-ranging adverse clinical events can seriously confound vaccine adoption, but whether there are immunological correlates of these is unknown. Here we identify a molecular signature of adverse events that was commonly associated with an existing B cell phenotype. Thus immunophenotypic variation among healthy humans may be manifest in complex pathophysiological responses.

  4. Eventos adversos pós-vacinação contra influenza pandêmica A (H1N1 2009 em crianças Adverse events following vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Nepomuceno de Andrade

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi estimar a frequência e os fatores associados à ocorrência de eventos adversos pós-vacinação contra a influenza pandêmica A (H1N1 2009 em crianças com idade entre seis meses e dois anos. Participaram do estudo 156 crianças. Modelos multivariados de regressão de Cox foram construídos para avaliar a associação independente de cada covariável e a queixa de pelo menos um evento adverso. A força da associação foi medida pela hazard ratio e seus respectivos intervalos de 95% de confiança. Após a primeira dose, foi relatado algum tipo de evento adverso por 40,3% dos participantes e, após a segunda, por 35,5%. Os eventos sistêmicos foram mais frequentes que os locais, destaque para irritabilidade, diarreia e febre. As incidências de eventos adversos, no geral e sistêmicos, após a primeira dose, foram maiores nas crianças com doença concomitante/alergia em relação àquelas sem o agravo (HR = 3,43; IC95%: 1,34-8,77 e HR = 2,76; IC95%: 1,11-6,89. A maioria dos eventos foi de intensidade leve. Febre alta, vômito e diarreia motivaram a busca por serviços de saúde.The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of adverse events following vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 and associated factors in children from six months to two years of age (n = 156. Multivariate Cox regression was used to assess the independent associations between covariates and complaints of at least one adverse event. Strength of association was measured by hazard ratios and respective 95% confidence intervals. Following the first dose, 40.3% of parents reported one or more adverse events in their children, compared to 35.5% after the second dose. Systemic adverse events, specifically irritation, diarrhea, and fever, were more frequent than local reactions at the vaccination site. Incidence rates for adverse events in general and systemic reactions following the first dose were higher in children with

  5. Efficacy and effectiveness of seasonal and pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 influenza vaccines in low and middle income countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Breteler, J.K.; Tam, J.S.; Jit, M.; Ket, J.C.; de Boer, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Influenza vaccines have been recommended for populations at risk for severe infection in low and middle income countries (LMICs) although knowledge of the evidence-base for their effectiveness and efficacy is limited in these countries. The aim of this systematic review is to provide an

  6. Correlates of general practitioners' recommendations to patients regarding vaccination for the 2009-2010 pandemic influenza (A/H1N1) in France: implications for future vaccination campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicoteaux, Rémi; Pulcini, Céline; Carrieri, Patrizia; Schwarzinger, Michael; Leport, Catherine; Verger, Pierre

    2014-04-25

    General practitioners' (GPs) recommendations to their patients regarding influenza vaccination is a key determinant of patient uptake of influenza vaccination. To study factors associated with GPs' recommendations regarding pandemic vaccination (pvaccination) to adults ≤65 years of age (hereafter referred to as adults) at risk and not at risk of severe complications of the 2009-2010 A/H1N1 influenza. National cross-sectional survey of 1431 French GPs. Pvaccination recommendations by GPs to adults were studied according to three categories: recommended pvaccination to at-risk adults only; recommended pvaccination to all adults; recommended against pvaccination or did not provide any advice to any adult. GPs were more likely to recommend pvaccination to at-risk than not-at-risk adults (73.4% vs 40.1%, p<0.01). GPs who consulted official sources of information rather than news media during the pandemic were more likely to recommend pvaccination to at-risk adults only (OR=1.78; CI 95%=1.27-2.48) and to all adults (OR=2.03; CI 95%=1.42-2.92) than other GPs. GPs' unfavorable perceptions of the risk/efficacy balance of the pandemic vaccine (pvaccine) together with their perceptions of the low severity of the disease were negatively associated with recommending pvaccination. Hospitalization of GPs' patients because of the influenza was specifically associated with pvaccine recommendation to all adults (OR=2.81; CI 95%=1.98-3.99) but not with pvaccine recommendation to at-risk adults only. In the pandemic context, GPs' perceptions of disease severity and the risk/efficacy balance of the pvaccine were the major determinants of French GPs recommending pvaccination or not. To increase the general public's acceptability of vaccination policies, GPs should be adequately informed about the course of the epidemics and the safety of the vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunity to pre-1950 H1N1 influenza viruses confers cross-protection against the pandemic swine-origin 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Kim, Jin Hyang; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Masseoud, Feda; Weldon, William C; Martin, Maria Del Pilar; Mittler, Robert S; Compans, Richard; Jacob, Joshy

    2010-08-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus outbreak is the first pandemic of the twenty-first century. Epidemiological data reveal that of all the people afflicted with H1N1 virus, 60 y old have pre-existing neutralizing Abs against the 2009 H1N1 virus. This finding suggests that influenza strains that circulated 50-60 y ago might provide cross-protection against the swine-origin 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. To test this, we determined the ability of representative H1N1 influenza viruses that circulated in the human population from 1930 to 2000, to induce cross-reactivity to and cross-protection against the pandemic swine-origin H1N1 virus, A/California/04/09. We show that exposure of mice to the 1947 virus, A/FM/1/47, or the 1934 virus, A/PR/8/34, induced robust cross-protective immune responses and these mice were protected against a lethal challenge with mouse-adapted A/California/04/09 H1N1 virus. Conversely, we observed that mice exposed to the 2009 H1N1 virus were protected against a lethal challenge with mouse-adapted 1947 or 1934 H1N1 viruses. In addition, exposure to the 2009 H1N1 virus induced broad cross-reactivity against H1N1 as well as H3N2 influenza viruses. Finally, we show that vaccination with the older H1N1 viruses, particularly A/FM/1/47, confers protective immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. Taken together, our data provide an explanation for the decreased susceptibility of the elderly to the 2009 H1N1 outbreak and demonstrate that vaccination with the pre-1950 influenza strains can cross-protect against the pandemic swine-origin 2009 H1N1 influenza virus.

  8. Formal kinetics of H1N1 epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurevich Konstantin G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formal kinetics of the H1N1 epidemic seems to take the form of an exponential curve. There is a good correlation between this theoretical model and epidemiological data on the number of H1N1-infected people. But this formal model leads to paradoxes about the dates when everyone becomes infected: in Mexico this will happen after one year, then in the rest of the world. Further implications of the formal model The general limitations of this formal kinetics model are discussed. More detailed modeling is examined and the implications are examined in the light of currently available data. The evidence indicates that not more than 10% of the population is initially resistant to the H1N1 virus. Conclusion We are probably only at the initial stage of development of the H1N1 epidemic. Increasing the number of H1N1-resistant people in future (e.g. due to vaccination may influence the dynamics of epidemic development. At present, the development of the epidemic depends only on the number of people in the population who are initially resistant to the virus.

  9. H1N1 in dialysis units: Prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkar Ayman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis patients are at increased risk of contracting influenza A H1N1 and deve-loping serious illness. Increasing the awareness of dialysis patients and continuous education and training of medical staff on early recognition and management of influenza A H1N1 can help in saving the life of patients. Antiviral drugs and influenza vaccines are effective in providing ade-quate immunity in dialysis patients with strict implementation of infection control policies and procedures can help in preventing and controlling the dissemination of influenza A H1N1 in dia-lysis units. We report a case of a patient who presented with HINI influenza and developed acute kidney injury during his hospitalization and his course with disease.

  10. An observer-blind, randomized, multi-center trial assessing long-term safety and immunogenicity of AS03-adjuvanted or unadjuvanted H1N1/2009 influenza vaccines in children 10-17 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Airi; Simurka, Pavol; Li, Ping; Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Vaughn, David

    2014-02-19

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent influenza. This observer-blind, randomized study in children 10-17 years of age assessed whether the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses elicited by H1N1/2009 vaccines adjuvanted with AS03 (an adjuvant system containing α-tocopherol and squalene in an oil-in-water emulsion) or without adjuvant, met the European regulatory immunogenicity criteria at Days 21 and 182. Three hundred and ten healthy children were randomized (3:3:3:5) to receive one dose of 3.75 μg hemagglutinin (HA) AS03A-adjuvanted vaccine, one or two doses of 1.9 μg HA AS03B-adjuvanted vaccine, or one dose of 15 μg HA pandemic vaccine. All children received a booster dose of the allocated vaccine at Day 182. Serum samples were tested for HI antibody response at Days 21, 42, 182 and 189. All vaccination regimens elicited HI antibody responses that met the European regulatory criteria at Days 21 and 42. HI antibody responses fulfilling European regulatory criteria were still observed six months after the first vaccine dose in all study vaccines groups. Two doses of 1.9 μg HA AS03B-adjuvanted vaccine elicited the strongest HI antibody response throughout the study. The non-adjuvanted 15 μg HA vaccine elicited a lower HI antibody response than the AS03-adjuvanted vaccines. At Day 189, the European regulatory criteria were met for all vaccines with baseline HI antibody titers as reference. An anamnestic response for all vaccines was suggested at Day 189, based on the rapid increase in HI antibody geometric mean titers (1.5-2.5-fold increase). Injection site reactogenicity was higher following the AS03-adjuvanted vaccines compared with the non-adjuvanted vaccine. No safety concerns were identified for any study vaccine. All study vaccines elicited HI antibody responses that persisted at purported protective levels through six months after vaccination and fulfilled the European regulatory criteria. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published

  11. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  12. Immune response of human volunteers and animals to vaccination with egg-grown influenza A (H1N1) virus is influenced by three amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R W; Jennings, R; Major, D L; Robertson, J S; Jenkins, R; Potter, C W; Burnett, I; Jewes, L; Anders, M; Jackson, D

    1993-01-01

    Inactivated subunit vaccines were prepared from high-growth reassortants derived from two separate egg isolates from a single clinical specimen of influenza A (H1N1) virus. One of these reassortants, NIB-14, was antigenically indistinguishable from isolates made in tissue culture, while the other, NIB-17, was antigenically different and typical of egg isolates. The viruses differed by three amino acid residues in the haemagglutinin (HA) molecule and the anti-HA serological response induced was studied in animal models and human volunteers. In the volunteer groups both vaccines induced very high levels of circulating haemagglutination inhibition antibodies but with different serological specificities. Both NIB-14 and NIB-17 vaccines induced high levels of cross-reactive antibodies capable of reacting with both strains, but only NIB-14 vaccine induced significant levels of strain-specific antibodies capable of reacting exclusively with the homologous strain. Antisera containing only cross-reactive antibodies proved as capable of virus neutralization as antisera containing high levels of strain-specific antibodies. We extended the argument that epidemic strains are antigenically more closely related to tissue culture isolates and established that viruses which differ by only single amino acids at critical points in the HA structure can induce a significantly different immune response when used as inactivated vaccines.

  13. Single-dose mucosal immunization with a candidate universal influenza vaccine provides rapid protection from virulent H5N1, H3N2 and H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme E Price

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The sudden emergence of novel influenza viruses is a global public health concern. Conventional influenza vaccines targeting the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase must antigenically match the emerging strain to be effective. In contrast, "universal" vaccines targeting conserved viral components could be used regardless of viral strain or subtype. Previous approaches to universal vaccination have required protracted multi-dose immunizations. Here we evaluate a single dose universal vaccine strategy using recombinant adenoviruses (rAd expressing the conserved influenza virus antigens matrix 2 and nucleoprotein.In BALB/c mice, administration of rAd via the intranasal route was superior to intramuscular immunization for induction of mucosal responses and for protection against highly virulent H1N1, H3N2, or H5N1 influenza virus challenge. Mucosally vaccinated mice not only survived, but had little morbidity and reduced lung virus titers. Protection was observed as early as 2 weeks post-immunization, and lasted at least 10 months, as did antibodies and lung T cells with activated phenotypes. Virus-specific IgA correlated with but was not essential for protection, as demonstrated in studies with IgA-deficient animals.Mucosal administration of NP and M2-expressing rAd vectors provided rapid and lasting protection from influenza viruses in a subtype-independent manner. Such vaccines could be used in the interval between emergence of a new virus strain and availability of strain-matched vaccines against it. This strikingly effective single-dose vaccination thus represents a candidate off-the-shelf vaccine for emergency use during an influenza pandemic.

  14. Estudio transversal basado en la población sobre la aceptabilidad de la vacuna y la percepción de la gravedad de la gripe A/H1N1: opinión de la población general y de los profesionales sanitarios Population-based cross sectional study about vaccine acceptability and perception of the severity of A/H1N1 influenza: Opinion of the general population and health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antxon Apiñaniz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la intención de la población general y de los profesionales sanitarios de vacunarse contra la gripe A/H1N1, así como la percepción que tienen de la gravedad de la gripe A/H1N1 en comparación con la gripe estacional. Métodos: Estudio transversal mediante encuesta telefónica a una muestra de población general, a partir de la guía telefónica, y electrónica a profesionales sanitarios de los centros asistenciales públicos de Vitoria-Gasteiz, entre los días 6 y 16 de noviembre de 2009. En ambos colectivos se calcularon las frecuencias absolutas y relativas de los que se querían vacunar y de los que perciben la gripe como un riesgo alto para la vida. Resultados: Contestaron al cuestionario el 33% (n=219 de las 637 personas contactadas y se obtuvieron 109 respuestas de profesionales. El 63,0% (n=138 de la población general y el 73,4% (n=80 de la población sanitaria no se vacunaría si la vacuna fuese gratis (p=0,595. En caso de pertenecer a alguno de los grupos de riesgo no se vacunaría el 14,6% (n=32 de la población ni el 40,4% (n=44 de los sanitarios (pObjectives: To determine the intention of general population and health professionals to vaccinate against the H1N1 influenza A virus. To determine the perception of severity of the H1N1 influenza A in both groups compared to that of seasonal influenza. Methods: Cross-sectional telephone survey performed to a sample of population (obtained randomly from the Vitoria-Gasteiz telephone directory and cross-sectional electronically-administered survey to a sample of health professionals from public health centres in Vitoria-Gasteiz, conducted between 6th and 16th November 2009. The relative and absolute frecuency of persons willing to be vaccinated and the proportion of those considering the H1N1 influenza A as a life-threatening risk were calculated in both groups. Results: 219 (33% persons out of 637 contacted telephone numbers answered the questionnaire, as well as

  15. In Silico Identification of Highly Conserved Epitopes of Influenza A H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1 with Diagnostic and Vaccination Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Esteban Muñoz-Medina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unpredictable, evolutionary nature of the influenza A virus (IAV is the primary problem when generating a vaccine and when designing diagnostic strategies; thus, it is necessary to determine the constant regions in viral proteins. In this study, we completed an in silico analysis of the reported epitopes of the 4 IAV proteins that are antigenically most significant (HA, NA, NP, and M2 in the 3 strains with the greatest world circulation in the last century (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 and in one of the main aviary subtypes responsible for zoonosis (H5N1. For this purpose, the HMMER program was used to align 3,016 epitopes reported in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB and distributed in 34,294 stored sequences in the Pfam database. Eighteen epitopes were identified: 8 in HA, 5 in NA, 3 in NP, and 2 in M2. These epitopes have remained constant since they were first identified (~91 years and are present in strains that have circulated on 5 continents. These sites could be targets for vaccination design strategies based on epitopes and/or as markers in the implementation of diagnostic techniques.

  16. H1N1: pandemia e perspectiva atual H1N1: overview and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Bellei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O vírus influenza de origem suína, A/California/04/2009 (H1N1, foi inicialmente detectado no México e determinou a pandemia de influenza de 2009. Em agosto de 2010, a Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS declarou o início da fase pós-pandêmica. As características dessa última pandemia foram marcadamente diferentes das anteriores. O vírus emergiu de rearranjos genéticos originários em hospedeiro mamífero não humano, demonstrou transmissibilidade interespécies e afetou a população humana de forma diferente dos vírus pandêmicos anteriores (1918, 1957 e 1968 com maior morbidade e mortalidade em crianças e adultos jovens. Atualmente, o vírus apresenta padrão sazonal da mesma forma que o influenza A H3N2 e o influenza B, mantendo, até o momento, o mesmo perfil de patogenicidade, espectro clínico e sensibilidade a antivirais. A cepa foi incluída na vacina sazonal trivalente anual recomendada, principalmente para proteção dos grupos de risco mais vulneráveis a complicações pelas diferentes cepas de influenza.The swine origin influenza virus A/CALIFORNIA/04/2009 (H1N1 was first detected in Mexico and determined the 2009 influenza pandemic. In August 2010, World Health Organization (WHO declared the beginning of the post-pandemic period. This last pandemic was distinctly different from previous ones. The virus emerged from genetic rearrangement in non-human mammalian host. Moreover, its inter-species transmission is fully reported. However, it affected human population differently from previous pandemic viruses (1918, 1957, 1968, with increased morbidity and mortality among children and young adults. Currently, the virus has a seasonal pattern in the same way as influenza A H3N2 and influenza B, maintaining the same pathogenicity profile, clinical spectrum and sensitivity to antiviral agents. The strain was included in the annual trivalent seasonal vaccine formulation, mainly for risk groups, which are more vulnerable to

  17. H1N1: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-07

    90% immune (vaccinated or previous infection) • High risk cohorts: elderly, young children, pregnant women, and people with certain health conditions...To 28.6 16.6 49.0 5.7 Children/ Teens 29%Likely sites of transmission Adults 59% Seniors 12% DemographicsSchool Household 8/7/2009 29Glass

  18. Profiling of humoral response to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and vaccination measured by a protein microarray in persons with and without history of seasonal vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Reimerink, Johan; Mulder, Paul G H; van Beek, Janko; Meijer, Adam; de Bruin, Erwin; Friesema, Ingrid; de Jong, Menno D; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Peeters, Marcel F; Rossen, John W A; Koopmans, Marion

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination on the antibody response produced by natural infection or vaccination is not well understood. METHODS: We compared the profiles of antibody responses of 32 naturally infected subjects and 98 subjects vaccinated with a 2009 influenza

  19. Prior infection with classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses is associated with protective immunity to the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, John C; Qi, Li; Dugan, Vivien G; Jagger, Brett W; Hrabal, Rachel J; Memoli, Matthew J; Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2010-05-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic emerged even though seasonal H1N1 viruses have circulated for decades. Epidemiological evidence suggested that the current seasonal vaccine did not offer significant protection from the novel pandemic, and that people over the age of 50 were less susceptible to infection. In a mouse challenge study with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, we evaluated protective immune responses elicited by prior infection with human and swine influenza A viruses. Mice infected with A/Mexico/4108/2009 (Mex09) showed significant weight loss and 40% mortality. Prior infection with a 1976 classical swine H1N1 virus resulted in complete protection from Mex09 challenge. Prior infection with either a 2009 or a 1940 seasonal H1N1 influenza virus provided partial protection and a >100-fold reduction in viral lung titers at day 4 post-infection. These findings indicate that in experimental animals recently induced immunity to 1918-derived H1N1 seasonal influenza viruses, and to a 1976 swine influenza virus, afford a degree of protection against the 2009 pandemic virus. Implications of these findings are discussed in the context of accumulating data suggesting partial protection of older persons during the 2009 pandemic.

  20. Cross-neutralizing antibodies to pandemic 2009 H1N1 and recent seasonal H1N1 influenza A strains influenced by a mutation in hemagglutinin subunit 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Anderson, Christine M; De Feo, Christopher J; Zhuang, Min; Yang, Hong; Vassell, Russell; Xie, Hang; Ye, Zhiping; Scott, Dorothy; Weiss, Carol D

    2011-06-01

    Pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus (2009 H1N1) differs from H1N1 strains that circulated in the past 50 years, but resembles the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 strain used in the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. We investigated whether sera from persons immunized with the 1976 swine influenza or recent seasonal influenza vaccines, or both, neutralize 2009 H1N1. Using retroviral pseudovirions bearing hemagglutinins on their surface (HA-pseudotypes), we found that 77% of the sera collected in 1976 after immunization with the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 swine influenza vaccine neutralized 2009 H1N1. Forty five percent also neutralized A/New Caledonia/20/1999 H1N1, a strain used in seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2000/01-2006/07 seasons. Among adults aged 48-64 who received the swine influenza vaccine in 1976 and recent seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2004/05-2008/09 seasons, 83% had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. However, 68% of age-matched subjects who received the same seasonal influenza vaccines, but did not receive the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, also had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. Sera from both 1976 and contemporary cohorts frequently had cross-neutralizing antibodies to 2009 H1N1 and A/New Caledonia/20/1999 that mapped to hemagglutinin subunit 2 (HA2). A conservative mutation in HA2 corresponding to a residue in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 and A/Brisbane/59/2007 H1N1 strains that circulated in the 2006/07 and 2007/08 influenza seasons, respectively, abrogated this neutralization. These findings highlight a cross-neutralization determinant influenced by a point mutation in HA2 and suggest that HA2 may be evolving under direct or indirect immune pressure.

  1. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  2. Epidemiological characteristics of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A novel influenza A virus strain (H1N1-2009) spread first in Mexico and the United Stated in late April 2009, leading to the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiological and virological characteristics of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1-2009) in ...

  3. Adverse events following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the 2009-2010 season in the active component U.S. military and civilians aged 17-44years reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardenheier, Barbara H; Duderstadt, Susan K; Engler, Renata J M; McNeil, Michael M

    2016-08-17

    No comparative review of Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) submissions following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the pandemic season among U.S. military personnel has been published. We compared military vs. civilian adverse event reporting rates. Adverse events (AEs) following vaccination were identified from VAERS for adults aged 17-44years after pandemic (monovalent influenza [MIV], and seasonal (trivalent inactivated influenza [IIV3], live attenuated influenza [LAIV3]) vaccines. Military vaccination coverage was provided by the Department of Defense's Defense Medical Surveillance System. Civilian vaccination coverage was estimated using data from the National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Vaccination coverage was more than four times higher for MIV and more than twenty times higher for LAIV3 in the military than in the civilian population. The reporting rate of serious AE reports following MIV in service personnel (1.19 per 100,000) was about half that reported by the civilian population (2.45 per 100,000). Conversely, the rate of serious AE reports following LAIV3 among service personnel (1.32 per 100,000) was more than twice that of the civilian population. Although fewer military AEs following MIV were reported overall, the rate of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) (4.01 per million) was four times greater than that in the civilian population. (1.04 per million). Despite higher vaccination coverage in service personnel, the rate of serious AEs following MIV was about half that in civilians. The rate of GBS reported following MIV was higher in the military. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The seroprevalence of pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009 virus in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiling Xu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mainland China experienced pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009 virus (pH1N1 with peak activity during November-December 2009. To understand the geographic extent, risk factors, and attack rate of pH1N1 infection in China we conducted a nationwide serological survey to determine the prevalence of antibodies to pH1N1.Stored serum samples (n = 2,379 collected during 2006-2008 were used to estimate baseline serum reactogenicity to pH1N1. In January 2010, we used a multistage-stratified random sampling method to select 50,111 subjects who met eligibility criteria and collected serum samples and administered a standardized questionnaire. Antibody response to pH1N1 was measured using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay and the weighted seroprevalence was calculated using the Taylor series linearization method. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine risk factors for pH1N1 seropositivity. Baseline seroprevalence of pH1N1 antibody (HI titer ≥40 was 1.2%. The weighted seroprevalence of pH1N1 among the Chinese population was 21.5%(vaccinated: 62.0%; unvaccinated: 17.1%. Among unvaccinated participants, those aged 6-15 years (32.9% and 16-24 years (30.3% had higher seroprevalence compared with participants aged 25-59 years (10.7% and ≥60 years (9.9%, P<0.0001. Children in kindergarten and students had higher odds of seropositivity than children in family care (OR: 1.36 and 2.05, respectively. We estimated that 207.7 million individuals (15.9% experienced pH1N1 infection in China.The Chinese population had low pre-existing immunity to pH1N1 and experienced a relatively high attack rate in 2009 of this virus. We recommend routine control measures such as vaccination to reduce transmission and spread of seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses.

  5. Evaluation of In Vitro Cross-Reactivity to Avian H5N1 and Pandemic H1N1 2009 Influenza Following Prime Boost Regimens of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Healthy Human Subjects: A Randomised Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    of influenza. Live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is an intranasally administered vaccine, designed to induce an immune response resembling...or the Department of Immunology and Medicine, AFRIMS, Bangkok. Clinical Methods Vaccine administration. The vaccines used were FluMistH intranasal ... Pediatr Infect Dis 17: 206-212. 5. Verrier F, Burda S, Belshe R, Duliege AM, Excler JL, et al. (2000) A human immunodeficiency virus prime-boost

  6. Influenza A (H1N1) organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrego, Alfons; Pajares, Virginia; Mola, Anna; Lerma, Enrique; Franquet, Tomás

    2010-04-27

    In November 2009, countries around the world reported confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1, including over 6000 deaths. No peak in activity has been seen. The most common causes of death are pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with organising pneumonia associated with influenza A (H1N1) infection confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. Organising pneumonia should also be considered as a possible complication of influenza A (H1N1) infection, given that these patients can benefit from early diagnosis and appropriate specific management.

  7. Infection with 2009 H1N1 influenza virus primes for immunological memory in human nose-associated lymphoid tissue, offering cross-reactive immunity to H1N1 and avian H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahallawi, Waleed H; Kasbekar, Anand V; McCormick, Maxwell S; Hoschler, Katja; Temperton, Nigel; Leong, Samuel C; Beer, Helen; Ferrara, Francesca; McNamara, Paul S; Zhang, Qibo

    2013-05-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious mucosal infection in the respiratory tract. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus infection resulted in substantial morbidity and mortality in humans. Little is known on whether immunological memory develops following pH1N1 infection and whether it provides protection against other virus subtypes. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay was used to analyze hemagglutinin (HA)-specific memory B cell responses after virus antigen stimulation in nose-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) from children and adults. Individuals with serological evidence of previous exposure to pH1N1 showed significant cross-reactive HA-specific memory B cell responses to pH1N1, seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1), and avian H5N1 (aH5N1) viruses upon pH1N1 virus stimulation. pH1N1 virus antigen elicited stronger cross-reactive memory B cell responses than sH1N1 virus. Intriguingly, aH5N1 virus also activated cross-reactive memory responses to sH1N1 and pH1N1 HAs in those who had previous pH1N1 exposure, and that correlated well with the memory response stimulated by pH1N1 virus antigen. These memory B cell responses resulted in cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against sH1N1, 1918 H1N1, and aH5N1 viruses. The 2009 pH1N1 infection appeared to have primed human host with B cell memory in NALT that offers cross-protective mucosal immunity to not only H1N1 but also aH5N1 viruses. These findings may have important implications for future vaccination strategies against influenza. It will be important to induce and/or enhance such cross-protective mucosal memory B cells.

  8. A contributing role for anti-neuraminidase antibodies on immunity to pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glendie Marcelin

    Full Text Available Exposure to contemporary seasonal influenza A viruses affords partial immunity to pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1 infection. The impact of antibodies to the neuraminidase (NA of seasonal influenza A viruses to cross-immunity against pH1N1 infection is unknown.Antibodies to the NA of different seasonal H1N1 influenza strains were tested for cross-reactivity against A/California/04/09 (pH1N1. A panel of reverse genetic (rg recombinant viruses was generated containing 7 genes of the H1N1 influenza strain A/Puerto Rico/08/34 (PR8 and the NA gene of either the pandemic H1N1 2009 strain (pH1N1 or one of the following contemporary seasonal H1N1 strains: A/Solomon/03/06 (rg Solomon or A/Brisbane/59/07 (rg Brisbane. Convalescent sera collected from mice infected with recombinant viruses were measured for cross-reactive antibodies to pH1N1 via Hemagglutinin Inhibition (HI or Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. The ectodomain of a recombinant NA protein from the pH1N1 strain (pNA-ecto was expressed, purified and used in ELISA to measure cross-reactive antibodies. Analysis of sera from elderly humans immunized with trivalent split-inactivated influenza (TIV seasonal vaccines prior to 2009 revealed considerable cross-reactivity to pNA-ecto. High titers of cross-reactive antibodies were detected in mice inoculated with either rg Solomon or rg Brisbane. Convalescent sera from mice inoculated with recombinant viruses were used to immunize naïve recipient Balb/c mice by passive transfer prior to challenge with pH1N1. Mice receiving rg California sera were better protected than animals receiving rg Solomon or rg Brisbane sera.The NA of contemporary seasonal H1N1 influenza strains induces a cross-reactive antibody response to pH1N1 that correlates with reduced lethality from pH1N1 challenge, albeit less efficiently than anti-pH1N1 NA antibodies. These findings demonstrate that seasonal NA antibodies contribute to but are not sufficient for cross

  9. H1N1, globalization and the epidemiology of inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparke, Matthew; Anguelov, Dimitar

    2012-07-01

    This paper examines the lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in relation to wider work on globalization and the epidemiology of inequality. The media attention and economic resources diverted to the threats posed by H1N1 were significant inequalities themselves when contrasted with weaker responses to more lethal threats posed by other diseases associated with global inequality. However, the multiple inequalities revealed by H1N1 itself in 2009 still provide important insights into the future of global health in the context of market-led globalization. These lessons relate to at least four main forms of inequality: (1) inequalities in blame for the outbreak in the media; (2) inequalities in risk management; (3) inequalities in access to medicines; and (4) inequalities encoded in the actual emergence of new flu viruses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kompliceret influenza A (H1N1) hos gravid i andet trimester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersboell, Anne Schjoedt; Hesselvig, Anne Brun; Hedegaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman at 25 weeks of gestation was admitted to hospital due to bilateral pneumonia with increasing hypoxia. She was tested positive for influenza A (H1N1) and successfully treated with oral oseltamivir. Nine days after the admission pathological umbilical flows were recorded and an ...... and an emergency caesarean was performed at 26 weeks + 2 days of gestation. The neonatal period was uncomplicated. Influenza A (H1N1) is especially dangerous in pregnant women and vaccination is important.......A 27-year-old woman at 25 weeks of gestation was admitted to hospital due to bilateral pneumonia with increasing hypoxia. She was tested positive for influenza A (H1N1) and successfully treated with oral oseltamivir. Nine days after the admission pathological umbilical flows were recorded...

  11. Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies to Pandemic 2009 H1N1 and Recent Seasonal H1N1 Influenza A Strains Influenced by a Mutation in Hemagglutinin Subunit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Anderson, Christine M.; De Feo, Christopher J.; Zhuang, Min; Yang, Hong; Vassell, Russell; Xie, Hang; Ye, Zhiping; Scott, Dorothy; Weiss, Carol D.

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus (2009 H1N1) differs from H1N1 strains that circulated in the past 50 years, but resembles the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 strain used in the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. We investigated whether sera from persons immunized with the 1976 swine influenza or recent seasonal influenza vaccines, or both, neutralize 2009 H1N1. Using retroviral pseudovirions bearing hemagglutinins on their surface (HA-pseudotypes), we found that 77% of the sera collected in 1976 after immunization with the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 swine influenza vaccine neutralized 2009 H1N1. Forty five percent also neutralized A/New Caledonia/20/1999 H1N1, a strain used in seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2000/01–2006/07 seasons. Among adults aged 48–64 who received the swine influenza vaccine in 1976 and recent seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2004/05–2008/09 seasons, 83% had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. However, 68% of age-matched subjects who received the same seasonal influenza vaccines, but did not receive the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, also had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. Sera from both 1976 and contemporary cohorts frequently had cross-neutralizing antibodies to 2009 H1N1 and A/New Caledonia/20/1999 that mapped to hemagglutinin subunit 2 (HA2). A conservative mutation in HA2 corresponding to a residue in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 and A/Brisbane/59/2007 H1N1 strains that circulated in the 2006/07 and 2007/08 influenza seasons, respectively, abrogated this neutralization. These findings highlight a cross-neutralization determinant influenced by a point mutation in HA2 and suggest that HA2 may be evolving under direct or indirect immune pressure. PMID:21695241

  12. Population‐based surveillance for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in Guatemala, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Lissette; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Gray, Jennifer; Moir, Juan C.; Gordillo, Betty; Frenkel, Gal; Ardón, Francisco; Moscoso, Fabiola; Olsen, Sonja J.; Fry, Alicia M.; Lindstrom, Steve; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Reyes et al. (2010) Population‐based surveillance for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in Guatemala, 2009. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 4(3), 129–140. Background  In April 2009, 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (2009 H1N1) was first identified in Mexico but did not cause widespread transmission in neighboring Guatemala until several weeks later. Methodology and principle findings  Using a population‐based surveillance system for hospitalized pneumonia and influenza‐like illness ongoing before the 2009 H1N1 pandemic began, we tracked the onset of 2009 H1N1 infection in Guatemala. We identified 239 individuals infected with influenza A (2009 H1N1) between May and December 2009, of whom 76 were hospitalized with pneumonia and 11 died (case fatality proportion: 4·6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2·3–8·1%). The median age of patients infected with 2009 H1N1 was 8·8 years, the median age of those hospitalized with pneumonia was 4·2 years, and five (45·5%) deaths occurred in children Guatemala, making it difficult to identify this risk group for vaccination. Children 6 months to 5 years old should be among priority groups for vaccination to prevent serious consequences because of 2009 H1N1 infection. PMID:20409209

  13. The novel influenza A (H1N1 virus pandemic: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrosillo N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 4 months since it was first recognized, the pandemic strain of a novel influenza A (H1N1 virus has spread to all continents and, after documentation of human-to-human transmission of the virus in at least three countries in two separate World Health Organization (WHO regions, the pandemic alert was raised to level 6. The agent responsible for this pandemic, a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1 virus (S-OIV, is characterized by a unique combination of gene segments that has not previously been identified among human or swine influenza A viruses. As of 31th July 2009, 168 countries and overseas territories/communities have each reported at least one laboratory-confirmed case of pandemic H1N1 infection. There have been a total of 162,380 reported cases and 1154 associated deaths. Influenza epidemics usually take off in autumn, and it is important to prepare for an earlier start this season. Estimates from Europe indicate that 230 millions Europe inhabitants will have clinical signs and symptoms of S-OIV this autumn, and 7– 35% of the clinical cases will have a fatal outcome, which means that there will be 160,000– 750,000 H1N1-related deaths. A vaccine against H1N1 is expected to be the most effective tool for controlling influenza A (H1N1 infection in terms of reducing morbidity and mortality and limiting diffusion. However, there are several issues with regard to vaccine manufacture and approval, as well as production capacity, that remain unsettled. We searched the literature indexed in PubMed as well as the websites of major international health agencies to obtain the material presented in this update on the current S-OIV pandemic.

  14. Social capital and immunisation against the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnerstrand, Björn

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the connection between social capital indicators and immunisation. The national Society Opinion & Media (SOM) survey is an annual cross-sectional postal survey. In 2009, a random sample of persons aged 16-85 was drawn from the Swedish national register and yielded a 59% participation rate. The number of respondents analysed was 2130. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the connection between the explanatory variables institutional trust and generalised trust and the outcome variable immunisation intent. The analyses included sex, age, education, self-rated health, and personal and societal concern about the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic. For institutional trust in health care, the odds ratios for intention to vaccinate against the A(H1N1) pandemic were significantly higher in the Medium trust and High trust categories as compared to the Low trust reference category. For generalised trust, the odds ratio for vaccination intention was significantly higher in the High trust category as compared to the Low trust reference category. Two important social capital indicators - institutional trust in health care and generalised trust - seem to be independently associated with intention to accept vaccination against the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic. The effect holds also when controlling for plausible confounders, such as education, self-rated health, and personal and societal concern about the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic.

  15. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009: a pandemic alarm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    The most recent updates given by WHO confirm a total of 2,67,105 reported cases of .... Diagnosis of the new reassortant virus needs to be updated accordingly. In response to the rise in H1N1 swine flu ..... Biological and epidemiological aspects of influenza virus H5N1 in context of India; Indian J. Exp. Biol. 44 265–278.

  16. Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-06

    Dr. George Nelson, a CDC medical officer, discusses the relationship between pneumococcal pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1.  Created: 6/6/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/6/2012.

  17. H1N1 Influenza A hos mennesker og svin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2009-01-01

    Den nye pandemiske influenza A stamme H1N1 er hovedsagelig et nyt virus, som spredes mellem mennesker, men virusset er formodentlig opstået ved blanding af to svineinfluenza-virus og har derfor bibeholdt evnen til at kunne smitte fra mennesker til svin og fra svin til svin. Det er derfor vigtigt...

  18. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009: a pandemic alarm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At this critical juncture when the world has not yet recovered from the threat of avian influenza, the virus has returned in the disguise of swine influenza, a lesser known illness common in pigs. It has reached pandemic proportions in a short time span with health personnel still devising ways to identify the novel H1N1 virus ...

  19. Influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Viviane Brandao; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Zanetti, Glaucia [Escola de Medicina de Petropolis, RJ (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: to describe aspects found on HRCT scans of the chest in patients infected with the influenza A (H1N1) virus. Methods: we retrospectively analyzed the HRCT scans of 71 patients (38 females and 33 males) with H1N1 infection, confirmed through laboratory tests, between July and September of 2009. The HRCT scans were interpreted by two thoracic radiologists independently, and in case of disagreement, the decisions were made by consensus. Results: the most common HRCT findings were ground-glass opacities (85%), consolidation (64%), or a combination of ground-glass opacities and consolidation (58%). Other findings were airspace nodules (25%), bronchial wall thickening (25%), interlobular septal thickening (21%), crazy-paving pattern (15%), perilobular pattern (3%), and air trapping (3%). The findings were frequently bilateral (89%), with a random distribution (68%). Pleural effusion, when observed, was typically minimal. No lymphadenopathy was identified. Conclusions: the most common findings were ground-glass opacities and consolidations, or a combination of both. Involvement was commonly bilateral with no axial or cranio caudal predominance in the distribution. Although the major tomographic findings in H1N1 infection are nonspecific, it is important to recognize such findings in order to include infection with the H1N1 virus in the differential diagnosis of respiratory symptoms. (author)

  20. Deaths and hospitalizations related to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) - Greece, May 2009-February 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    The first laboratory-confirmed case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Greece was reported on May 18, 2009. During July--August, Greece experienced a moderate wave of transmission of 2009 H1N1; a stronger wave began in October, and a peak in incidence occurred during November 23-29. To conduct surveillance in Greece for 2009 H1N1, the Hellenic Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention (HCDCP), in collaboration with the National Health Operations Centre (NaHOC) of the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity, collected and analyzed data regarding 1) laboratory-confirmed 2009 H1N1 cases, 2) influenza-like illness (ILI) visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs), 3) ILI hospitalizations, 4) confirmed 2009 H1N1 admissions to intensive-care units (ICUs), and 5) confirmed 2009 H1N1 deaths in hospitals. This report summarizes the findings in Greece during May 18, 2009-February 28, 2010, when 18,075 laboratory-confirmed 2009 H1N1 cases, 294 ICU admissions, and 140 deaths were reported. The majority of severe 2009 H1N1 cases were associated with underlying medical conditions (68.4% of ICU admissions and 82.1% of deaths), including pregnancy. In Greece, where 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage was limited and a large proportion of the population likely remains susceptible, continued surveillance and effective vaccination programs will be needed this winter to combat 2009 H1N1 and any other circulating influenza virus.

  1. Evolutionary genomics of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses (pH1N 1v

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Gang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new strain of human H1N1 influenza A viruses was broken out in the April 2009 and caused worldwide pandemic emergency. The present study is trying to estimate a temporal reassortment history of 2009 H1N1 viruses by phylogenetic analysis based on a total 394 sequences of H1N1viruses isolated from swine, human and avian. Results Phylogenetic trees of eight gene segments showed that viruses sampled from human formed a well-supported clade, whereas swine and avian lineages were intermixed together. A new divergence swine sublineage containing gene segments of 2009 H1N1 viruses was characterized, which were closely related with swine viruses collected from USA and South Korea during 2004 to 2007 in six segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NP and NS, and to swine viruses isolated from Thailand during 2004 to 2005 in NA and M. Substitution rates were varied drastically among eight segments and the average substitution rate was generally higher in 2009 H1N1 than in swine and human viruses (F2,23 = 5.972, P dN/dS substitution ratios were identified in 2009 H1N1 than in swine and human viruses except M2 gene (F2, 25 = 3.779, P Conclusion Our results implied that at least four reassortments or transmissions probably occurred before 2009 H1N1 viruses. Initial reassortment arose in 1976 and avian-like Eurasian swine viruses emerged. The second transmission happened in Asia and North America between 1988 and 1992, and mostly influenced six segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NP and NS. The third reassortment occurred between North American swine and avian viruses during 1998 to 2000, which involved PB2 and PA segments. Recent reassortments occurred among avian-to-swine reassortant, Eurasian and classical swine viruses during 2004 to 2005. South Korea, Thailand and USA, were identified as locations where reassortments most likely happened. The co-circulation of multiple swine sublineages and special lifestyle in Asia might have facilitated mixing of

  2. Clinical outcomes of seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza A (H1N1 in pediatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budd Alicia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In April 2009, a novel influenza A H1N1 (nH1N1 virus emerged and spread rapidly worldwide. News of the pandemic led to a heightened awareness of the consequences of influenza and generally resulted in enhanced infection control practices and strengthened vaccination efforts for both healthcare workers and the general population. Seasonal influenza (SI illness in the pediatric population has been previously shown to result in significant morbidity, mortality, and substantial hospital resource utilization. Although influenza pandemics have the possibility of resulting in considerable illness, we must not ignore the impact that we can experience annually with SI. Methods We compared the outcomes of pediatric patients ≤18 years of age at a large urban hospital with laboratory confirmed influenza and an influenza-like illness (ILI during the 2009 pandemic and two prior influenza seasons. The primary outcome measure was hospital length of stay (LOS. All variables potentially associated with LOS based on univariable analysis, previous studies, or hypothesized relationships were included in the regression models to ensure adjustment for their effects. Results There were 133 pediatric cases of nH1N1 admitted during 2009 and 133 cases of SI admitted during the prior 2 influenza seasons (2007-8 and 2008-9. Thirty-six percent of children with SI and 18% of children with nH1N1 had no preexisting medical conditions (p = 0.14. Children admitted with SI had 1.73 times longer adjusted LOS than children admitted for nH1N1 (95% CI 1.35 - 2.13. There was a trend towards more children with SI requiring mechanical ventilation compared with nH1N1 (16 vs.7, p = 0.08. Conclusions This study strengthens the growing body of evidence demonstrating that SI results in significant morbidity in the pediatric population. Pandemic H1N1 received considerable attention with strong media messages urging people to undergo vaccination and encouraging improved

  3. Spread of H1N1 within Households

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-29

    This podcast describes an investigation into how H1N1 was spreading within households during the initial days of the pandemic in Texas. CDC's Dr. Oliver Morgan discusses what investigators learned about the role that children played in introducing the virus into households and spreading flu.  Created: 3/29/2010 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/29/2010.

  4. Myastenia gravis following H1N1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Horta e; Nascimento, A.; Zwolinski, N.; André, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis is an auto-immune disease, resulting from the production of anti-Ach receptor antibodies at the neuromuscular junction. In spite of its unknown etiology, there seems to exist some factors which withstand its arise and/or the worsening of the patient's clinical condition.The mainstay of medical treatment relies on anticholinesterase drugs and immunosuppression. Thymectomy is considered the treatment of choice in selected cases.Influenza A (H1N1) viral infection ...

  5. Seroprevalence to influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus--where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Eeva; Nicoll, Angus; Amato-Gauci, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    Age-specific seroprevalences for influenza virus make important contributions to estimating the burden of infection and determining the vulnerable populations. It is especially difficult to know the true clinical attack rates of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic; however, we can estimate infection rates through analyses of seroprevalences based on national studies from different continents and countries with different demographics. After the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic, seroprevalence studies found 5 to 60% of populations across different continents and age groups having antibodies against the A(H1N1) 2009 virus. The seropositivity was highest in children and teenagers (20 to 60%) as well as in the elderly older than 80 years (20 to 40%). Preexisting cross-reactive antibodies against the virus were present mostly in sera of older people (born before 1950) who could have encountered viruses descended from the 1918 pandemic viruses. Experience with the 2009 pandemic indicates how essential early and timely serology data against the emerging virus can be for informing decisions on use of antivirals and vaccination campaigns, especially in regard to risk groups. The objectives of this review were to summarize the current data available on seroprevalence before and after the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic and the lessons learned for future pandemic preparedness.

  6. Nosocomial pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enstone, Joanne E; Myles, Puja R; Openshaw, Peter J M; Gadd, Elaine M; Lim, Wei Shen; Semple, Malcolm G; Read, Robert C; Taylor, Bruce L; McMenamin, James; Armstrong, Colin; Bannister, Barbara; Nicholson, Karl G; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S

    2011-04-01

    To determine clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized in the United Kingdom with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, we studied 1,520 patients in 75 National Health Service hospitals. We characterized patients who acquired influenza nosocomially during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Of 30 patients, 12 (80%) of 15 adults and 14 (93%) of 15 children had serious underlying illnesses. Only 12 (57%) of 21 patients who received antiviral therapy did so within 48 hours after symptom onset, but 53% needed escalated care or mechanical ventilation; 8 (27%) of 30 died. Despite national guidelines and standardized infection control procedures, nosocomial transmission remains a problem when influenza is prevalent. Health care workers should be routinely offered influenza vaccine, and vaccination should be prioritized for all patients at high risk. Staff should remain alert to the possibility of influenza in patients with complex clinical problems and be ready to institute antiviral therapy while awaiting diagnosis during influenza outbreaks.

  7. Underreporting of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Cases

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-08

    Influenza cases are difficult to track because many people don't go to the doctor or get tested for flu when they're sick. The first months of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic were no different. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Carrie Reed discusses a study in the December issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases that looked at the actual number of cases reported and estimated the true number of cases when correcting for underreporting.  Created: 12/8/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 12/8/2009.

  8. Initial human transmission dynamics of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbohloul, Babak; Ahued, Armando; Davoudi, Bahman; Meza, Rafael; Meyers, Lauren A.; Skowronski, Danuta M.; Villaseñor, Ignacio; Galván, Fernando; Cravioto, Patricia; Earn, David J. D.; Dushoff, Jonathan; Fisman, David; Edmunds, W. John; Hupert, Nathaniel; Scarpino, Samuel V.; Trujillo, Jesús; Lutzow, Miguel; Morales, Jorge; Contreras, Ada; Chávez, Carolina; Patrick, David M.; Brunham, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Between 5 and 25 April 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 caused a substantial, severe outbreak in Mexico, and subsequently developed into the first global pandemic in 41 years. We determined the reproduction number of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 by analyzing the dynamics of the complete case series in Mexico City during this early period. Methods  We analyzed three mutually exclusive datasets from Mexico City Distrito Federal which constituted all suspect cases from 15 March to 25 April: confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infections, non‐pandemic influenza A infections and patients who tested negative for influenza. We estimated the initial reproduction number from 497 suspect cases identified prior to 20 April, using a novel contact network methodology incorporating dates of symptom onset and hospitalization, variation in contact rates, extrinsic sociological factors, and uncertainties in underreporting and disease progression. We tested the robustness of this estimate using both the subset of laboratory‐confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infections and an extended case series through 25 April, adjusted for suspected ascertainment bias. Results  The initial reproduction number (95% confidence interval range) for this novel virus is 1·51 (1·32–1·71) based on suspected cases and 1·43 (1·29–1·57) based on confirmed cases before 20 April. The longer time series (through 25 April) yielded a higher estimate of 2·04 (1·84–2·25), which reduced to 1·44 (1·38–1·51) after correction for ascertainment bias. Conclusions  The estimated transmission characteristics of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 suggest that pharmaceutical and non‐pharmaceutical mitigation measures may appreciably limit its spread prior the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:19702583

  9. Trust During the Early Stages of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREIMUTH, VICKI S.; MUSA, DON; HILYARD, KAREN; QUINN, SANDRA CROUSE; KIM, KEVIN

    2013-01-01

    Distrust of the government often stands in the way of cooperation with public health recommendations in a crisis. The purpose of this paper is to describe the public’s trust in government recommendations during the early stages of the H1N1 pandemic and identify factors that might account for these trust levels. We surveyed 1543 respondents about their experiences and attitudes related to H1N1 influenza between June 3, 2009 and July 6, 2009, during the first wave of the pandemic using the Knowledge Networks (KN) online panel. This panel is representative of the US population, and uses a combination of random-digit dial and address-based probability sampling frames covering 99% of the US household population to recruit participants. To ensure participation of low-income individuals and those without Internet access, KN provides hardware and access to the Internet if needed. Measures included standard demographics, a trust scale, trust ratings for individual spokespersons, involvement with H1N1, experience with H1N1, and past discrimination in health care. We found that trust of government was low (2.3 out of 4) and varied across demographic groups. Blacks and Hispanics reported higher trust in government than did Whites. Of the spokespersons included, personal health professionals received the highest trust ratings and religious leaders the lowest. Attitudinal and experience variables predicted trust better than demographic characteristics. Closely following the news about the flu virus, having some self-reported knowledge about H1N1, self-reporting of local cases and previously experiencing discrimination were the significant attitudinal and experience predictors of trust. Using a second longitudinal survey, trust in the early stages of the pandemic did predict vaccine acceptance later but only for white, non-Hispanic individuals. PMID:24117390

  10. Modelling and analysis of influenza A (H1N1) on networks.

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    Jin, Zhen; Zhang, Juping; Song, Li-Peng; Sun, Gui-Quan; Kan, Jianli; Zhu, Huaiping

    2011-02-25

    In April 2009, a new strain of H1N1 influenza virus, referred to as pandemic influenza A (H1N1) was first detected in humans in the United States, followed by an outbreak in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Soon afterwards, this new virus kept spreading worldwide resulting in a global outbreak. In China, the second Circular of the Ministry of Health pointed out that as of December 31, 2009, the country's 31 provinces had reported 120,000 confirmed cases of H1N1. We formulate an epidemic model of influenza A based on networks. We calculate the basic reproduction number and study the effects of various immunization schemes. The final size relation is derived for the network epidemic model. The model parameters are estimated via least-squares fitting of the model solution to the observed data in China. For the network model, we prove that the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when the basic reproduction is less than one. The final size will depend on the vaccination starting time, T, the number of infective cases at time T and immunization schemes to follow. Our theoretical results are confirmed by numerical simulations. Using the parameter estimates based on the observation data of the cumulative number of hospital notifications, we estimate the basic reproduction number R0 to be 1.6809 in China. Network modelling supplies a useful tool for studying the transmission of H1N1 in China, capturing the main features of the spread of H1N1. While a uniform, mass-immunization strategy helps control the prevalence, a targeted immunization strategy focusing on specific groups with given connectivity may better control the endemic.

  11. Communicating uncertainty - how Australian television reported H1N1 risk in 2009: a content analysis

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    Blood R Warwick

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health officials face particular challenges in communicating with the public about emerging infectious diseases of unknown severity such as the 2009 H1N1(swine 'flu pandemic (pH1N1. Statements intended to create awareness and convey the seriousness of infectious disease threats can draw accusations of scare-mongering, while officials can be accused of complacency if such statements are not made. In these communication contexts, news journalists, often reliant on official sources to understand issues are pivotal in selecting and emphasising aspects of official discourse deemed sufficiently newsworthy to present to the public. This paper presents a case-study of news communication regarding the emergence of pH1N1. Methods We conducted a content analysis of all television news items about pH1N1. We examined news and current affairs items broadcast on 5 free-to-air Sydney television channels between April 25 2009 (the first report and October 9 (prior to the vaccine release for statements about 1 the seriousness of the disease 2 how the public could minimise contagion 3 government responses to emerging information. Results pH1N1 was the leading health story for eight of 24 weeks and was in the top 5 for 20 weeks. 353 news items were identified, yielding 3086 statements for analysis, with 63.4% related to the seriousness of the situation, 12.9% providing advice for viewers and 23.6% involving assurances from government. Coverage focused on infection/mortality rates, the spread of the virus, the need for public calm, the vulnerability of particular groups, direct and indirect advice for viewers, and government reassurances about effective management. Conclusions Overall, the reporting of 2009 pH1N1 in Sydney, Australia was generally non-alarmist, while conveying that pH1N1 was potentially serious. Daily infection rate tallies and commentary on changes in the pandemic alert level were seldom contextualised to assist viewers in

  12. Virological characterization of influenza H1N1pdm09 in Vietnam, 2010-2013.

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    Nguyen, Hang K L; Nguyen, Phuong T K; Nguyen, Thach C; Hoang, Phuong V M; Le, Thanh T; Vuong, Cuong D; Nguyen, Anh P; Tran, Loan T T; Nguyen, Binh G; Lê, Mai Q

    2015-07-01

    Influenza A/H1N1pdm09 virus was first detected in Vietnam on May 31, 2009, and continues to circulate in Vietnam as a seasonal influenza virus. This study has monitored genotypic and phenotypic changes in this group of viruses during 2010-2013 period. We sequenced hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from representative influenza A/H1N1pdm09 and compared with vaccine strain A/California/07/09 and other contemporary isolates from neighboring countries. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neuraminidase inhibition (NAI) assays also were performed on these isolates. Representative influenza A/H1N1pdm09 isolates (n = 61) from ILI and SARI surveillances in northern Vietnam between 2010 and 2013. The HA and NA phylogenies revealed six and seven groups, respectively. Five isolates (8·2%) had substitutions G155E and N156K in the HA, which were associated with reduced HI titers by antiserum raised against the vaccine virus A/California/07/2009. One isolate from 2011 and one isolate from 2013 had a predicted H275Y substitution in the neuraminidase molecule, which was associated with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir in a NAI assay. We also identified a D222N change in the HA of a virus isolated from a fatal case in 2013. Significant genotypic and phenotypic changes in A/ H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses were detected by the National Influenza Surveillance System (NISS) in Vietnam between 2010 and 2013 highlighting the value of this system to Vietnam and to the region. Sustained NISS and continued virological monitoring of seasonal influenza viruses are required for vaccine policy development in Vietnam. 3. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Antigenicity of the 2015-2016 seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus HA and NA proteins.

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    Amelia M Clark

    Full Text Available Antigenic drift of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA influenza virus proteins contributes to reduced vaccine efficacy. To analyze antigenic drift in human seasonal H1N1 viruses derived from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1-like viruses accounts for the limited effectiveness (around 40% of vaccination against pH1N1-like viruses during the 2015-2016 season, nasal washes/swabs collected from adult subjects in the Rochester, NY area, were used to sequence and isolate the circulating viruses. The HA and NA proteins from viruses circulating during the 2015-2016 season encoded eighteen and fourteen amino acid differences, respectively, when compared to A/California/04/2009, a strain circulating at the origin of the 2009 pandemic. The circulating strains belonged to subclade 6B.1, defined by HA amino acid substitutions S101N, S179N, and I233T. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI and HA-specific neutralizing serum antibody (Ab titers from around 50% of pH1N1-like virus-infected subjects and immune ferrets were 2-4 fold lower for the 2015-2016 circulating strains compared to the vaccine strain. In addition, using a luminex-based mPlex HA assay, the binding of human sera from subjects infected with pH1N1-like viruses to the HA proteins from circulating and vaccine strains was not identical, strongly suggesting antigenic differences in the HA protein. Additionally, NA inhibition (NAI Ab titers in human sera from pH1N1-like virus-infected subjects increased after the infection and there were measurable antigenic differences between the NA protein of circulating strains and the vaccine strain using both ferret and human antisera. Despite having been vaccinated, infected subjects exhibited low HAI Ab titers against the vaccine and circulating strains. This suggests that poor responses to the H1N1 component of the vaccine as well as antigenic differences in the HA and NA proteins of currently circulating pH1N1-like viruses could be contributing to

  14. Planning for the next influenza H1N1 season: a modelling study

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    Pelat Camille

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The level of herd immunity before and after the first 2009 pandemic season is not precisely known, and predicting the shape of the next pandemic H1N1 season is a difficult challenge. Methods This was a modelling study based on data on medical visits for influenza-like illness collected by the French General Practitioner Sentinel network, as well as pandemic H1N1 vaccination coverage rates, and an individual-centred model devoted to influenza. We estimated infection attack rates during the first 2009 pandemic H1N1 season in France, and the rates of pre- and post-exposure immunity. We then simulated various scenarios in which a pandemic influenza H1N1 virus would be reintroduced into a population with varying levels of protective cross-immunity, and considered the impact of extending influenza vaccination. Results During the first pandemic season in France, the proportion of infected persons was 18.1% overall, 38.3% among children, 14.8% among younger adults and 1.6% among the elderly. The rates of pre-exposure immunity required to fit data collected during the first pandemic season were 36% in younger adults and 85% in the elderly. We estimated that the rate of post-exposure immunity was 57.3% (95% Confidence Interval (95%CI 49.6%-65.0% overall, 44.6% (95%CI 35.5%-53.6% in children, 53.8% (95%CI 44.5%-63.1% in younger adults, and 87.4% (95%CI 82.0%-92.8% in the elderly. The shape of a second season would depend on the degree of persistent protective cross-immunity to descendants of the 2009 H1N1 viruses. A cross-protection rate of 70% would imply that only a small proportion of the population would be affected. With a cross-protection rate of 50%, the second season would have a disease burden similar to the first, while vaccination of 50% of the entire population, in addition to the population vaccinated during the first pandemic season, would halve this burden. With a cross-protection rate of 30%, the second season could be

  15. Seroprevalence study in Vojvodina (Serbia following 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v

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    Petrović Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The seroprevalence study was performed in Vojvodina during May and June 2010 in order to asses the effects of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v epidemic on herd immunity. It was a part of the Serbian Ministry of Health funded nationwide study. Objective. Prevalence of antibodies against 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v was determined in a 1% sample of the population monitored for influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infections in Vojvodina through sentinel surveillance system. Methods. The study sample involved a total of 1004 inhabitants of Vojvodina. The control group consisted of randomly selected and age-adjusted 1054 sera collected in the pre-pandemic period. Sera were tested by the reaction of hemagglutination inhibition using influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1 antigen in dilution from 1:8 to 1:256. Antibody titers ≥1:32 and ≥1:8 were considered protective and diagnostic, respectively. Results. The differences between control and study sera in all age groups were significant for both diagnostic ≥1/8 and protective titres ≥1/32 of hemagglutination inhibition antibodies (chi square test, p<0.001. The highest percentage of seropositive subjects was registered in the age group 15-19 years followed by children aged 5-14 years. Both diagnostic and protective titres were about twice higher in the vaccinated as compared to the non-vaccinated group. There were no statistically significant differences in seroprevalence between seven districts of Vojvodina. Conclusion. The 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v epidemic significantly influenced the herd immunity in our population regardless of low immunization coverage with highest immunity levels in adolescents aged 15-19 years and with similar herd immunity levels in all the regions in the province six months after the outbreak.

  16. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian 'avian-like' H1N1 swine viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian "avian-like" (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. © 2013 The Authors Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian ‘avian-like’ H1N1 swine viruses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian “avian-like” (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Design Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Sample Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Setting Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Main outcome measures Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Results and Conclusions Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. PMID:24373385

  18. MicroRNA expression in mice infected with seasonal H1N1, swine H1N1 or highly pathogenic H5N1.

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    Vela, Eric M; Kasoji, Manjula D; Wendling, Morgan Q; Price, Jennifer A; Knostman, Katherine A B; Bresler, Herbert S; Long, James P

    2014-09-01

    Influenza virus infections in humans remain a healthcare concern, and the need for vaccines, therapeutics and prophylactics remains a high priority. Understanding the molecular events associated with influenza-virus-induced pathology may lead to the identification of clinical disease biomarkers and novel antiviral targets. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are well-conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs known to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression as well as play a major role in many biological processes and pathways. Animal studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in viral disease and controlling inflammation. In this study, we examined the differences in the miRNA expression profiles associated with the lung in mice infected with influenza viruses that varied in virulence and pathogenicity. A statistical model was employed that utilized changes in miRNA expression to identify the virus that was used to infect the mice. This study identified a unique fingerprint of viral pathogenicity associated with seasonal H1N1, swine H1N1 and highly pathogenic H5N1 in the mouse model, and may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic and prophylactic targets. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. Cross-reactive immunity against influenza viruses in children and adults following 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection.

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    Ahmed, Muhammad S; Jacques, Laura C; Mahallawi, Waleed; Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel; Upile, Nav; Vaughan, Casey; Sharma, Ravi; Beer, Helen; Hoschler, Katja; McNamara, Paul S; Zhang, Qibo

    2015-02-01

    2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) virus infected large numbers of people worldwide. Recent studies suggest infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus elicited cross-reactive anti-hemagglutinin (HA) memory B cell response to conserved regions of HA. However, the breadth and magnitude of cross-reactive immunity in children and adults following A(H1N1)pdm09 infection are unknown. We investigated serum anti-HA immunity to a number of group-1 and -2 viruses in children and adults using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay. Applying hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers ⩾40 against A(H1N1)pdm09 as threshold of sero-positivity, we observed significantly higher levels of anti-HA antibodies to a number of virus subtypes, including those neutralizing H5N1, in subjects with HAI titer ⩾40 than those with HAI immunity. Our results suggest individuals exposed to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus developed a broad and age-associated cross-reactive anti-HA immunity which may have important implications for future vaccination strategies to enable protection against a broader range of influenza viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of a pandemic in the Italian newspapers: the A(H1N1 experience

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    Alessandro Zanetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: in 2009 a novel infective agent, a(H1n1, was recognized by the World Health organization (WHo as a pandemic virus. Like most European countries, Italy experienced a single pandemic wave during fall-winter 2009. The objective of our study was to evaluate the news reports and the representation of the a(H1n1 pandemic in the Italian newspapers both quantitatively and qualitatively.

    Methods: from april 24th, 2009 to February 28th, 2010, seven national newspapers were monitored for the quantitative reporting of a(H1n1. In a three month sample period, reports were evaluated quali- tatively by considering their front page presence, tones used for headlines, and images and figures dedicated to the topic.

    Results: in a ten month window, a total of 1220 articles were published. The reporting period showed four peaks and one hollow, with a similar pattern for all the newspapers. during the three-month sample period, we found a total of 382 articles, 98.4% of which appeared on front pages, 33.8% of which contained headlines using alarming tones, and 47.8% which contained info-graphic elements.

    Conclusions: the a(H1n1 2009 pandemic in Italy was mild; nonetheless, newspapers devoted great attention to the new influenza and used alarmist tones. In similar situations, there are several areas where scientists should play a greater role. scientists should support journalists in understanding scientific issues and help them translate scientific information into news items. scientists should also help to contain the anxiety aroused in lay people by a pandemic, and support vaccination efforts dedicated to it....

  1. CD4+ T cell autoimmunity to hypocretin/orexin and cross-reactivity to a 2009 H1N1 influenza A epitope in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Mahlios, Josh

    2013-01-01

    of narcolepsy with the 2009 H1N1 influenza A strain (pH1N1), we administered a seasonal influenza vaccine (containing pH1N1) to patients with narcolepsy and found an increased frequency of circulating HCRT56-68- and HCRT87-99-reactive T cells. We also identified a hemagglutinin (HA) pHA1 epitope specific...... in narcolepsy patients and possible molecular mimicry between HCRT and a similar epitope in influenza pH1N1, pHA1275-287....

  2. Prevalence of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus antibodies, Tampa Bay Florida--November-December, 2009.

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    Chad M Cox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2009, a novel influenza virus (2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus (pH1N1 caused significant disease in the United States. Most states, including Florida, experienced a large fall wave of disease from September through November, after which disease activity decreased substantially. We determined the prevalence of antibodies due to the pH1N1 virus in Florida after influenza activity had peaked and estimated the proportion of the population infected with pH1N1 virus during the pandemic. METHODS: During November-December 2009, we collected leftover serum from a blood bank, a pediatric children's hospital and a pediatric outpatient clinic in Tampa Bay Florida. Serum was tested for pH1N1 virus antibodies using the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI assay. HI titers ≥40 were considered seropositive. We adjusted seroprevalence results to account for previously established HI assay specificity and sensitivity and employed a simple statistical model to estimate the proportion of seropositivity due to pH1N1 virus infection and vaccination. RESULTS: During the study time period, the overall seroprevalence in Tampa Bay, Florida was 25%, increasing to 30% after adjusting for HI assay sensitivity and specificity. We estimated that 5.9% of the population had vaccine-induced seropositivity while 25% had seropositivity secondary to pH1N1 virus infection. The highest cumulative incidence of pH1N1 virus infection was among children aged 5-17 years (53% and young adults aged 18-24 years (47%, while adults aged ≥50 years had the lowest cumulative incidence (11-13% of pH1N1 virus infection. CONCLUSIONS: After the peak of the fall wave of the pandemic, an estimated one quarter of the Tampa Bay population had been infected with the pH1N1 virus. Consistent with epidemiologic trends observed during the pandemic, the highest burdens of disease were among school-aged children and young adults.

  3. Modeling influenza epidemics and pandemics: insights into the future of swine flu (H1N1

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    Blower Sally

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we present a review of the literature of influenza modeling studies, and discuss how these models can provide insights into the future of the currently circulating novel strain of influenza A (H1N1, formerly known as swine flu. We discuss how the feasibility of controlling an epidemic critically depends on the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (R0. The R0 for novel influenza A (H1N1 has recently been estimated to be between 1.4 and 1.6. This value is below values of R0 estimated for the 1918–1919 pandemic strain (mean R0~2: range 1.4 to 2.8 and is comparable to R0 values estimated for seasonal strains of influenza (mean R0 1.3: range 0.9 to 2.1. By reviewing results from previous modeling studies we conclude it is theoretically possible that a pandemic of H1N1 could be contained. However it may not be feasible, even in resource-rich countries, to achieve the necessary levels of vaccination and treatment for control. As a recent modeling study has shown, a global cooperative strategy will be essential in order to control a pandemic. This strategy will require resource-rich countries to share their vaccines and antivirals with resource-constrained and resource-poor countries. We conclude our review by discussing the necessity of developing new biologically complex models. We suggest that these models should simultaneously track the transmission dynamics of multiple strains of influenza in bird, pig and human populations. Such models could be critical for identifying effective new interventions, and informing pandemic preparedness planning. Finally, we show that by modeling cross-species transmission it may be possible to predict the emergence of pandemic strains of influenza.

  4. [Pandemic influenza caused by A(H1N1) in pregnant women].

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    Torres-Ramírez, Armando

    2010-02-01

    Pandemic influenza caused byA H1N1 virus, that started in Mexico in 2009 and that persist though with mortality and morbidity much lower rates, did not have the repercussions of the other pandemias in the 20th Century, this is because the members of the World Health Organization anticipated everything that was necessary to fight it since 1997, when that international organism suggested to be prepared because the bird flu H5N1 was suffering mutations and was creating a new type of virus that have already caused human deaths. This information allowed the creation of strategies to protect the world population and mainly the most vulnerable groups such as pregnant women. In this group the lung complications specially the pneumonia cases, leads to the patient hospitalization with a higher perinatal mortality rates. The signs and symptoms of seasonal influenza as well as A H1N1 influenza in pregnant women are always more serious, and this is why they need intensive treatments. However, not all patients need to be hospitalized nor to check with sophisticated exams the presence of the virus. Every unhealthy women need to be classified by their signs and symptoms according Triage scale, and their hospitalization has to be only if the situation gets worse or if a chronic disease complicate it such as diabetes, AIDS, heart condition, asthma, obesity, etc. According to the scale in which the patient has been classified, she needs to be isolated in her home and start a symptomatic treatment and add antiviral medications only in suspicious pandemic influenza cases. However if respiratory pathology gets worse the patient should be hospitalized immediately in a unit with the proper equipment. Every citizen must receive the A H1N1 vaccine, but pregnant women and breastfeeding women particularly. Pregnant women should receive the vaccine in any trimester of pregnancy, but especially in the last to prevent maternal and fetal complications as well as elevation of perinatal mortality.

  5. Incidence of adverse events among healthcare workers following H1N1 Mass immunization in Ghana

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    Ankrah, Daniel N A; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; De Bruin, Marie L

    2013-01-01

    of this study was to determine the distribution and types of adverse events reported following immunization of healthcare workers at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital from the day vaccination started until 1 week after the end of vaccination. METHODS: Safety data collected during the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza...... muscle of the left arm. Each vaccinee was issued with a card and was advised to report any adverse events following immunization (AEFI) to designated health workers for follow-up. Incidence rates of adverse events were estimated and compared with the Pandemrix(®) Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC......) RESULTS: A total of 5870 people (64.9 % females) with a mean age of 34.0 years were vaccinated. In total, 140 vaccinees reported adverse events. The mean age among vaccinees reporting adverse events was 36.1 years. The overall incidence of vaccinees reporting adverse events and the overall incidence...

  6. Cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell immunity between the pandemic H1N1-2009 and H1N1-1918 influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Laurie, Karen; Liu, Yu Chih; Denholm, Justin T; Richards, Michael J; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Kelso, Anne; Doherty, Peter C; Turner, Stephen J; Rossjohn, Jamie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2010-07-13

    Preexisting T-cell immunity directed at conserved viral regions promotes enhanced recovery from influenza virus infections, with there being some evidence of cross-protection directed at variable peptides. Strikingly, many of the immunogenic peptides derived from the current pandemic A(H1N1)-2009 influenza virus are representative of the catastrophic 1918 "Spanish flu" rather than more recent "seasonal" strains. We present immunological and structural analyses of cross-reactive CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity directed at a variable (although highly cross-reactive) immunodominant NP(418-426) peptide that binds to a large B7 family (HLA-B*3501/03/0702) found throughout human populations. Memory CD8(+) T-cell specificity was probed for 12 different NP(418) mutants that emerged over the 9 decades between the 1918 and 2009 pandemics. Although there is evidence of substantial cross-reactivity among seasonal NP(418) mutants, current memory T-cell profiles show no preexisting immunity to the 2009-NP(418) variant or the 1918-NP(418) variant. Natural infection with the A(H1N1)-2009 virus, however, elicits CD8(+) T cells specific for the 2009-NP(418) and 1918-NP(418) epitopes. This analysis points to the potential importance of cross-reactive T-cell populations that cover the possible spectrum of T-cell variants and suggests that the identification of key residues/motifs that elicit cross-reactive T-cell sets could facilitate the evolution of immunization protocols that provide a measure of protection against unpredicted pandemic influenza viruses. Thus, it is worth exploring the potential of vaccines that incorporate peptide variants with a proven potential for broader immunogenicity, especially to those that are not recognized by the current memory T-cell pool generated by exposure to influenza variants that cause successive seasonal epidemics.

  7. Self-reported adverse reactions in 4337 healthcare workers immunizations against novel H1N1 influenza

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    Seybold Joachim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The use of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine has generated much debate concerning safety issues among the general population and physicians. It was questioned if this is a safe vaccine. Therefore, we investigated the safety of an inactivated monovalent H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Methods We focused on the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Pandemrix® and applied a self reporting questionnaire in a population of healthcare workers (HCWs and medical students at a major university hospital. Results In total, 4337 individuals were vaccinated, consisting of 3808 HCWs and 529 medical students. The vaccination rate of the employees was higher than 40%. The majority of individuals were vaccinated in November 2009. In total, 291 of the 4337 vaccinations were reported to lead to one or more adverse reactions (6.7%. Local reactions were reported in 3.8%, myalgia and arthralgia in 3.7%, fatigue in 3.7%, headache in 3.1%. Conclusions Our data together with available data from several national and international institutions points to a safe pandemic influenza vaccine.

  8. Agglutination of human O erythrocytes by influenza A(H1N1) viruses freshly isolated from patients.

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    Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Seto, Y; Kimura, T; Minoshiro, S; Shibe, K

    1991-04-01

    The hemagglutinin titers of 10 influenza A (H1N1) viruses were examined using the erythrocytes of several species. Human O erythrocytes showed the highest agglutination titer to the viruses, whereas chicken erythrocytes showed a low titer. These findings were noted for at least 10 passages by serial dilutions of the viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. All influenza A(H1N1) viruses, plaque-cloned directly from throat-washing specimens of patients, also agglutinated human O but not chicken erythrocytes. The results of a hemadsorption test indicated that chicken erythrocytes possess less affinity to MDCK cells infected with the A/Osaka City/2/88(H1N1) stain than to those infected with the A/Yamagata/120/86(H1N1) strain which is used as an inactivated influenza vaccine in Japan. However, there were no significant differences between the A/Osaka City/2/88 and the A/Yamagata/120/86 strains in the hemagglutination inhibition test. Since human O erythrocytes have high agglutination activity to influenza A(H1N1) and also to A(H3N2) and B viruses in MDCK cells, these erythrocytes may be useful for the serological diagnosis of influenza.

  9. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's maternal health response to 2009 H1N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Laura G; Ellington, Sascha R; Forhan, Sara E; Yeung, Lorraine F; Perez, Mirna; Shah, Melisa M; MacFarlane, Kitty; Laird, Susan K; House, Lawrence D; Jamieson, Denise J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the efforts of the Maternal Health Team, which was formed to address the needs of pregnant and breastfeeding women during the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) 2009 pandemic influenza A (2009 H1N1) emergency response. We examined the team's activities, constructed a timeline of key pandemic events, and analyzed the Maternal Health 2009 H1N1 inquiry database. During the pandemic response, 9 guidance documents that addressed the needs of pregnant and breastfeeding women and their providers were developed by the Maternal Health Team. The Team received 4661 maternal health-related inquiries that came primarily from the public (75.5%) and were vaccine related (69.3%). Peak inquiry volume coincided with peak hospitalizations (October-November 2009). The Maternal Health 2009 H1N1 inquiry database proved useful to identify information needs of the public and health care providers during the pandemic. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus infection associated with purpuric skin lesions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagioli Daniele

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The influenza virus infection may be severe in non-immune people. Common complications of influenza virus include upper and lower respiratory tract infections, otitis media, myocarditis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure. There have been cases of vasculitis following influenza vaccination, and rash and acute purpura may occur in certain viral infections. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports concerning cases of systemic vasculitis associated with pandemic 2009 (H1N1 infection. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian woman was hospitalized at the "L. Spallanzani" National Institute for Infectious Diseases in Rome, Italy. Clinical and radiological features including laboratory findings of this case are illustrated. Notably, the patient had fever, severe abdominal pain, hematuria, arthritis, and purpuric manifestations associated with a normal platelet count. Nasopharyngeal and rectal swabs revealed pandemic 2009 (H1N1 virus by reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assay. Routine laboratory analyses showed elevated inflammatory parameters. The autoimmune panel tests were normal. Steroid therapy associated with oseltamivir achieved an evident and rapid improvement. On day seven the patient chose to leave the hospital against medical advice. Conclusion Complications related to influenza infection can be life threatening, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Henoch-Schönlein purpura triggered by the novel influenza virus infection could be an attractive pathogenetic hypothesis. We have discussed both the diagnosis and the challenge of therapy protocols. Steroid therapy is part of the management of severe vasculitis. Our case suggests that steroid therapy associated with antivirals can prevent the risk of further complications such as hemorrhage and multi-organ failure during severe vasculitis, without enhancing the virulence of the influenza virus. The possible role of

  11. Long-term respiratory follow-up of H1N1 infection

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    Kerenidi Theodora

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus infection was documented in our Hospital on 10th August 2009. Metdods and findings Real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR testing was used to confirm the diagnosis. All patients were treated with oseltamivir from the first day of hospitalization. Upon admission 12/44 had local patchy shadowing in their chest x-ray and additionally antibiotic regimen was added to these patients as pneumonia was suspected based on clinical evidence. In total 44 patients were hospitalized 15/44 had asthma, 6/44 COPD, 5/44 leukemia. Lung function was evaluated with forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec and diffused carbon monoxide upon discharge and every 3 months, until 6 months of observation was completed after discharge. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate whether influenza A (H1N1 had an impact on the respiratory capacity of the infected patients. Conclusions An improvement of pulmonary function tests was observed between the first two measurements, implicating an inflammatory pathogenesis of influenza A (H1N1 to the respiratory tract. This inflammation was not associated with the severity or clinical outcome of the patients. All patients had a mild clinical course and their respiratory capacity was stable between the second and third measurement, suggesting that the duration of respiratory inflammation was two months. Early treatment with antiviral agents and vaccination represent the mainstay of management.

  12. EFSA Panel Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW); Scientific Opinion on the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza and its potential implications for animal health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Brown, Ian; Capua, Ilaria

    . Such vaccines efficiently prevent disease by reducing virus replication in the lungs. However, voluntary vaccination of swine with these vaccines has not halted the circulation of SIV in swine. There is no urgency for vaccination of pigs against pH1N1 virus. Currently, no vaccines against H1 viruses for poultry...

  13. Chalcones as novel influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza inflata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Lee, Hong Sik

    2011-01-01

    -8) chalcones were isolated as active principles from the acetone extract of Glycyrrhiza inflata. Compounds 3 and 6 without prenyl group showed strong inhibitory effects on various neuraminidases from influenza viral strains, H1N1, H9N2, novel H1N1 (WT), and oseltamivir-resistant novel H1N1 (H274Y) expressed...

  14. Initial psychological responses to Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Felix

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The outbreak of the pandemic flu, Influenza A H1N1 (Swine Flu in early 2009, provided a major challenge to health services around the world. Previous pandemics have led to stockpiling of goods, the victimisation of particular population groups, and the cancellation of travel and the boycotting of particular foods (e.g. pork. We examined initial behavioural and attitudinal responses towards Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu" in the six days following the WHO pandemic alert level 5, and regional differences in these responses. Methods 328 respondents completed a cross-sectional Internet or paper-based questionnaire study in Malaysia (N = 180 or Europe (N = 148. Measures assessed changes in transport usage, purchase of preparatory goods for a pandemic, perceived risk groups, indicators of anxiety, assessed estimated mortality rates for seasonal flu, effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccination, and changes in pork consumption Results 26% of the respondents were 'very concerned' about being a flu victim (42% Malaysians, 5% Europeans, p Conclusion Initial responses to Influenza A show large regional differences in anxiety, with Malaysians more anxious and more likely to reduce travel and to buy masks and food. Discussions with family and friends may reinforce existing anxiety levels. Particular groups (homosexuals, prostitutes, the homeless are perceived as at greater risk, potentially leading to increased prejudice during a pandemic. Europeans underestimated mortality of seasonal flu, and require more information about the protection given by seasonal flu inoculation.

  15. A surveillance system to reduce transmission of pandemic H1N1 (2009 influenza in a 2600-bed medical center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsui-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concerns have been raised about how the transmission of emerging infectious diseases from patients to healthcare workers (HCWs and vice versa could be recognized and prevented in a timely manner. An effective strategy to block transmission of pandemic H1N1 (2009 influenza in HCWs is important. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An infection control program was implemented to survey and prevent nosocomial outbreaks of H1N1 (2009 influenza at a 2,600-bed, tertiary-care academic hospital. In total, 4,963 employees at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital recorded their temperature and received online education on control practices for influenza infections. Administration records provided vaccination records and occupational characteristics of all HCWs. Early recognition of a pandemic H1N1 (2009 influenza case was followed by a semi-structured questionnaire to analyze possible routes of patient contact, household contact, or unspecified contact. Surveillance spanned August 1, 2009 to January 31, 2010; 51 HCWs were confirmed to have novel H1N1 (2009 influenza by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Prevalence of patient contact, household contact, or unspecified contact infection was 13.7% (7/51, 13.7% (7/51, and 72.5% (37/51, respectively. The prevalence of the novel H1N1 infection was significantly lower among vaccinated HCWs than among unvaccinated HCWs (p<0.001. Higher viral loads in throat swabs were found in HCWs with patient and household contact infection than in those with unspecified contact infection (4.15 vs. 3.53 copies/mL, log(10, p = 0.035. CONCLUSION: A surveillance system with daily temperature recordings and online education for HCWs is important for a low attack rate of H1N1 (2009 influenza transmission before H1N1 (2009 influenza vaccination is available, and the attack rate is further decreased after mass vaccination. Unspecified contact infection rates were significantly higher than

  16. Influenza A/H1N1/2009 outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagris, V; Nika, A; Kyriakou, D; Kapetanakis, I; Harahousou, E; Stripeli, F; Maltezou, H; Tsolia, M

    2012-05-01

    Outbreaks of influenza A/H1N1/2009 in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have been reported only rarely. Annual vaccination of all healthcare workers (HCWs) against seasonal influenza is recommended but compliance is low and exposure to infected staff as the source of nosocomial outbreaks has been described. To report an outbreak of influenza A/H1N1/2009 in a tertiary level NICU that resulted in considerable morbidity. When the first influenza case was identified, a prospective study was conducted and control measures were implemented to reduce the spread of infection throughout the NICU. Neonates who developed influenza were treated with oseltamivir, and exposed neonates were given prophylaxis with oseltamivir. Two infected infants who were immature by gestational age and birth weight developed pneumonitis requiring respiratory support, and a third full-term neonate had a mild uncomplicated illness. No significant adverse effects were noted during antiviral treatment or prophylaxis. The investigation identified infected HCWs as the likely source of the outbreak. There was a very low influenza vaccination rate of 15% among nursing staff. Nosocomial influenza can cause considerable morbidity, especially in high risk neonates, and is readily transmissible in the NICU setting by unvaccinated staff members who contract influenza. To prevent outbreaks, in addition to infection control measures, the implementation of HCW vaccination is very important. Oseltamivir treatment was well-tolerated even among premature infants and appeared to be effective, because neonates with influenza had complete recovery and only one of those who received prophylaxis developed the infection. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Yin, Yanbo; Sun, Zhongsheng; Gao, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Sidang; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2010-11-01

    H1N1 is the main subtype influenza A virus circulating in human and swine population, and has long been a threat to economy and public health. To explore the genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses. Three new H1N1 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated and genomes sequencing were conducted followed by phylogenetic and molecular analysis of all swine and human H1N1 influenza viruses isolated in China in the past five years. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three isolates possessed different characteristics: the genome of A/Swine/Shandong/1112/2008 was closely related to that of classical H1N1 SIV, while A/Swine/Shandong/1123/2008 was a reassortant with NS gene from the human-like H3N2 influenza virus and other genes from the classical H1N1 SIV, and A/Swine/Fujian/0325/2008 fell into a lineage of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses. Genetically, 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses (2009 H1N1) in China were contiguous to the SIV lineages rather than the seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus's lineage. Furthermore, molecular analysis among human and swine influenza viruses provided more detail information for understanding their genetic correlation. These results suggested that in China in the past five years, the classical, avian-like and human-like H1N1 SIV existed in swine herds and the reassortment between H1N1 swine and H3N2 human influenza viruses was identified. In addition, the present data showed no evidence to support a strong correlation between the 2009 H1N1 and the swine influenza virus circulating in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial psychological responses to Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robin; Haque, Shamsul; Neto, Felix; Myers, Lynn B

    2009-10-06

    The outbreak of the pandemic flu, Influenza A H1N1 (Swine Flu) in early 2009, provided a major challenge to health services around the world. Previous pandemics have led to stockpiling of goods, the victimisation of particular population groups, and the cancellation of travel and the boycotting of particular foods (e.g. pork). We examined initial behavioural and attitudinal responses towards Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu") in the six days following the WHO pandemic alert level 5, and regional differences in these responses. 328 respondents completed a cross-sectional Internet or paper-based questionnaire study in Malaysia (N = 180) or Europe (N = 148). Measures assessed changes in transport usage, purchase of preparatory goods for a pandemic, perceived risk groups, indicators of anxiety, assessed estimated mortality rates for seasonal flu, effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccination, and changes in pork consumption 26% of the respondents were 'very concerned' about being a flu victim (42% Malaysians, 5% Europeans, p immune compromised (mentioned by 87% respondents), pig farmers (70%), elderly (57%), prostitutes/highly sexually active (53%), and the homeless (53%). In data collected only in Europe, 64% greatly underestimated the mortality rates of seasonal flu, 26% believed seasonal flu vaccination gave protection against swine flu. 7% had reduced/stopped eating pork. 3% had purchased anti-viral drugs for use at home, while 32% intended to do so if the pandemic worsened. Initial responses to Influenza A show large regional differences in anxiety, with Malaysians more anxious and more likely to reduce travel and to buy masks and food. Discussions with family and friends may reinforce existing anxiety levels. Particular groups (homosexuals, prostitutes, the homeless) are perceived as at greater risk, potentially leading to increased prejudice during a pandemic. Europeans underestimated mortality of seasonal flu, and require more information about the protection given by

  19. Yeast expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of Novel H1N1 elicits neutralising antibodies in rabbits and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmaram TN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently available vaccines for the pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 2009 produced in chicken eggs have serious impediments viz limited availability, risk of allergic reactions and the possible selection of sub-populations differing from the naturally occurring virus, whereas the cell culture derived vaccines are time consuming and may not meet the demands of rapid global vaccination required to combat the present/future pandemic. Hemagglutinin (HA based subunit vaccine for H1N1 requires the HA protein in glycosylated form, which is impossible with the commonly used bacterial expression platform. Additionally, bacterial derived protein requires extensive purification and refolding steps for vaccine applications. For these reasons an alternative heterologous system for rapid, easy and economical production of Hemagglutinin protein in its glycosylated form is required. The HA gene of novel H1N1 A/California/04/2009 was engineered for expression in Pichia pastoris as a soluble secreted protein. The full length HA- synthetic gene having α-secretory tag was integrated into P. pastoris genome through homologous recombination. The resultant Pichia clones having multiple copy integrants of the transgene expressed full length HA protein in the culture supernatant. The Recombinant yeast derived H1N1 HA protein elicited neutralising antibodies both in mice and rabbits. The sera from immunised animals also exhibited Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI activity. Considering the safety, reliability and also economic potential of Pichia expression platform, our preliminary data indicates the feasibility of using this system as an alternative for large-scale production of recombinant influenza HA protein in the face of influenza pandemic threat.

  20. SPATIOTEMPORAL TRENDS OF CASES OF PANDEMIC INFLUENZA A(H1N1)PDM09 IN ARGENTINA, 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEVEAU, Carlos M.; UEZ, Osvaldo; VACCHINO, Marta N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze the spatiotemporal variations of cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Argentina. A space-time permutation scan statistic was performed to test the non-randomness in the interaction between space and time in reported influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases. In 2009, two clusters were recorded in the east of Buenos Aires Province (May and June) and in the central and northern part of Argentina (July and August). Between 2011 and 2012, clusters near areas bordering other countries were registered. Within the clusters, in 2009, the high notification rates were first observed in the school-age population and then extended to the older population (15-59 years). From 2011 onwards, higher rates of reported cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 occurred in children under five years in center of the country. Two stages of transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 can be characterized. The first stage had high rates of notification and a possible interaction with individuals from other countries in the major cities of Argentina (pattern of hierarchy), and the second stage had an increased interaction in some border areas without a clear pattern of hierarchy. These results suggest the need for greater coordination in the Southern Cone countries, in order to implement joint prevention and vaccination policies. PMID:25923892

  1. Novel Influenza A (H1N1)-Associated Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Sook; Chang, Hyun Jung; Suh, Miri; Rha, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Several cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) with influenza A (H1N1) have been reported to date. The prognosis of ANE associated with H1N1 is variable; some cases resulted in severe neurologic complication, whereas other cases were fatal. Reports mostly focused on the diagnosis of ANE with H1N1 infection, rather than functional recovery. We report a case of ANE with H1N1 infection in a 4-year-old Korean girl who rapidly developed fever, seizure, and altered mentality, as well as ha...

  2. Caveolin-1 influences human influenza A virus (H1N1 multiplication in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemgård Gun-Viol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threat of recurring influenza pandemics caused by new viral strains and the occurrence of escape mutants necessitate the search for potent therapeutic targets. The dependence of viruses on cellular factors provides a weak-spot in the viral multiplication strategy and a means to interfere with viral multiplication. Results Using a motif-based search strategy for antiviral targets we identified caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a putative cellular interaction partner of human influenza A viruses, including the pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 strains of swine origin circulating from spring 2009 on. The influence of Cav-1 on human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 virus replication was determined in inhibition and competition experiments. RNAi-mediated Cav-1 knock-down as well as transfection of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant results in a decrease in virus titre in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK, a cell line commonly used in basic influenza research as well as in virus vaccine production. To understand the molecular basis of the phenomenon we focussed on the putative caveolin-1 binding domain (CBD located in the lumenal, juxtamembranal portion of the M2 matrix protein which has been identified in the motif-based search. Pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that caveolin-1 binds to M2. The data suggest, that Cav-1 modulates influenza virus A replication presumably based on M2/Cav-1 interaction. Conclusion As Cav-1 is involved in the human influenza A virus life cycle, the multifunctional protein and its interaction with M2 protein of human influenza A viruses represent a promising starting point for the search for antiviral agents.

  3. Specific Inhibitory Effect of κ-Carrageenan Polysaccharide on Swine Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Shao

    Full Text Available The 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic placed unprecedented demands on antiviral drug resources and the vaccine industry. Carrageenan, an extractive of red algae, has been proven to inhibit infection and multiplication of various enveloped viruses. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of κ-carrageenan to inhibit swine pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus to gain an understanding of antiviral ability of κ-carrageenan. It was here demonstrated that κ-carrageenan had no cytotoxicity at concentrations below 1000 μg/ml. Hemagglutination, 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 and cytopathic effect (CPE inhibition assays showed that κ-carrageenan inhibited A/Swine/Shandong/731/2009 H1N1 (SW731 and A/California/04/2009 H1N1 (CA04 replication in a dose-dependent fashion. Mechanism studies show that the inhibition of SW731 multiplication and mRNA expression was maximized when κ-carrageenan was added before or during adsorption. The result of Hemagglutination inhibition assay indicate that κ-carrageenan specifically targeted HA of SW731 and CA04, both of which are pandemic H1N/2009 viruses, without effect on A/Pureto Rico/8/34 H1N1 (PR8, A/WSN/1933 H1N1 (WSN, A/Swine/Beijing/26/2008 H1N1 (SW26, A/Chicken/Shandong/LY/2008 H9N2 (LY08, and A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 H9N2 (ZB07 viruses. Immunofluorescence assay and Western blot showed that κ-carrageenan also inhibited SW731 protein expression after its internalization into cells. These results suggest that κ-carrageenan can significantly inhibit SW731 replication by interfering with a few replication steps in the SW731 life cycles, including adsorption, transcription, and viral protein expression, especially interactions between HA and cells. In this way, κ-carrageenan might be a suitable alternative approach to therapy meant to address anti-IAV, which contains an HA homologous to that of SW731.

  4. Communicating uncertainty--how Australian television reported H1N1 risk in 2009: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Andrea S; Holland, Kate; Imison, Michelle; Blood, R Warwick; Chapman, Simon; Holding, Simon

    2011-03-24

    Health officials face particular challenges in communicating with the public about emerging infectious diseases of unknown severity such as the 2009 H1N1(swine 'flu) pandemic (pH1N1). Statements intended to create awareness and convey the seriousness of infectious disease threats can draw accusations of scare-mongering, while officials can be accused of complacency if such statements are not made. In these communication contexts, news journalists, often reliant on official sources to understand issues are pivotal in selecting and emphasising aspects of official discourse deemed sufficiently newsworthy to present to the public. This paper presents a case-study of news communication regarding the emergence of pH1N1. We conducted a content analysis of all television news items about pH1N1. We examined news and current affairs items broadcast on 5 free-to-air Sydney television channels between April 25 2009 (the first report) and October 9 (prior to the vaccine release) for statements about [1] the seriousness of the disease [2] how the public could minimise contagion [3] government responses to emerging information. pH1N1 was the leading health story for eight of 24 weeks and was in the top 5 for 20 weeks. 353 news items were identified, yielding 3086 statements for analysis, with 63.4% related to the seriousness of the situation, 12.9% providing advice for viewers and 23.6% involving assurances from government. Coverage focused on infection/mortality rates, the spread of the virus, the need for public calm, the vulnerability of particular groups, direct and indirect advice for viewers, and government reassurances about effective management. Overall, the reporting of 2009 pH1N1 in Sydney, Australia was generally non-alarmist, while conveying that pH1N1 was potentially serious. Daily infection rate tallies and commentary on changes in the pandemic alert level were seldom contextualised to assist viewers in understanding personal relevance. Suggestions are made about

  5. Atopic conditions other than asthma and risk of the 2009 novel H1N1 infection in children: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan Salas, Carlos F; Mehra, Sonia; Pardo Crespo, Maria R; Juhn, Young J

    2013-01-01

    A recent study showed an increased risk of 2009 novel H1N1 influenza (H1N1) infection among asthmatic children. Little is known whether this is true for other atopic conditions. This study was designed to determine the association between atopic dermatitis and/or allergic rhinitis and the risk of H1N1 infection among children. We conducted a case-control study in Olmsted County, MN. We randomly selected children ≤18 years of age with a positive test for H1N1. Controls were randomly selected from a pool of residents with negative H1N1 tests and were matched to cases with regard to birthday, gender, clinic registration date, diagnostic test, and month of influenza testing using frequency matching. We compared the frequency of atopic conditions other than asthma between cases and their matched controls. We enrolled 168 cases and 172 controls. Among cases, 91 (54.2%) were male patients, and 106 (63.1%) were white. The median age of cases was 6.3 years (interquartile range, 3.1-11.5). Among cases, 79 (47.0%) had atopic dermatitis and/or allergic rhinitis diagnosed before or after the index date, whereas 54 (31.4%) controls had such conditions (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; 95% CI, 1.15-3.12; p = 0.012, adjusting for asthma status, 2008-2009 seasonal influenza vaccine, time of illness at index date, and other comorbid conditions). History of receiving 2008-2009 seasonal influenza vaccine was associated with H1N1 infection (adjusted OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.32-3.28; p = 0.002). Our results suggest an association between H1N1 infection and atopic conditions other than asthma. The association between 2008-2009 seasonal influenza vaccinations and the risk of H1N1 requires further investigation.

  6. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1 mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: an ecological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The influenza A (H1N1 pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. METHODS: Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply. While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase. CONCLUSION: While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics.

  7. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1) mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paula E; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Hubbard, Roderick J; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W; Rolfes, Melissa A; Penn, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    The influenza A (H1N1) pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR) = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply). While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase). While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics.

  8. Pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in Danish pigs: Diagnosis and lack of surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Nielsen, L. P.; Breum, Solvej Østergaard

    in swine with a genetic profile similar to older circulating strains implied a challenge for the veterinary diagnostic laboratories. We report the development, validation and implementation of a diagnostic strategy for specific diagnosis of H1N1v in pigs and the results of tests of pigs performed...... likely would recognize the H1N1v virus and this was further confirmed in the laboratory by test of samples from pvH1N1 infected humans. However, these assays could not discriminate between the typical circulating strains and the H1N1v subtype. For specific detection of the H1N1v subtype, an rRT-PCR assay...... targeting the HA gene developed at the Staten Serum Institute for diagnosis of H1N1v in humans was validated for use on pig specimens. In silico analysis showed that the probe and primers had 100% identity to published H1N1v strains and 80- 95% identity to classical-swine H1N1 which do not circulate...

  9. Life threatening severe Influenza A Virus (H1N1) infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of H1N1 influenza in a 23-year old female with 28 weeks of gestation, who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, required mechanical ventilation and eventually recovered. KEYWORDS: H1N1; Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome; Pregnancy; Influenza Internet Journal of Medical Update 2012 ...

  10. A retrospective evaluation of critically ill patients infected with H1N1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: H1N1 influenza A virus infections were first reported in April 2009 and spread rapidly, resulting in mortality worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with H1N1 infection treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) in Bursa, Turkey. Methods: Demographic characteristics, clinical features, and outcome ...

  11. Influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Vitis amurensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Anh; Dao, Trong Tuan; Tung, Bui Thanh

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel H1N1 influenza A virus (H1N1/09 virus) was identified and considered a strong candidate for a novel influenza pandemic. As part of an ongoing anti-influenza screening programme on natural products, eight oligostilbenes were isolated as active principles from the methanol extract...

  12. A retrospective evaluation of critically ill patients infected with H1N1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-12

    Nov 12, 2009 ... Abstract. Background: H1N1 influenza A virus infections were first reported in April 2009 and spread rapidly, resulting in mortality worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with H1N1 infection treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) in. Bursa, Turkey. Methods: Demographic characteristics ...

  13. H1N1 Flu & U.S. Schools: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A severe form of influenza known as H1N1, commonly being called swine flu, has health officials around the world concerned. In the United States, the outbreak of H1N1 has prompted school closures and cancellation of school-related events. As the flu spreads, the Department of Education encourages school leaders, parents and students to know how to…

  14. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak on pig farm, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, Ariel; Cappuccio, Javier; Quiroga, Maria A; Baumeister, Elsa; Insarralde, Lucas; Ibar, Mariela; Sanguinetti, Ramon; Cannilla, Maria L; Franzese, Debora; Escobar Cabrera, Oscar E; Craig, Maria I; Rimondi, Agustina; Machuca, Mariana; Debenedetti, Rosa T; Zenobi, Carlos; Barral, Leonardo; Balzano, Rodrigo; Capalbo, Santiago; Risso, Adriana; Perfumo, Carlos J

    2010-02-01

    In June-July 2009, an outbreak of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection occurred on a pig farm in Argentina. Molecular analysis indicated that the virus was genetically related to the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus strain. The outbreak presumably resulted from direct human-to-pig transmission.

  15. Implicações da influenza A/H1N1 no período gestacional = Implications of H1N1 influenza during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastore, Ana Paula Winter

    2012-01-01

    Conclusões: Os estudos apontam que os possíveis fatores de morbidade e mortalidade entre gestantes acometidas pelo vírus influenza A/H1N1 foram síndrome de desconforto respiratório do adulto, embolia pulmonar, edema pulmonar, pneumonia bacteriana secundária e insuficiência renal. Além disso, as complicações durante a gravidez tendem a acontecer mais no segundo e terceiro trimestre. Medidas preventivas e um adequado tratamento provavelmente diminuirão o número de casos futuros de influenza pandêmica A/H1N1

  16. Diversity of the murine antibody response targeting influenza A(H1N1pdm09) hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason R; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Spesock, April; Music, Nedzad; Guo, Zhu; Barrington, Robert; Stevens, James; Donis, Ruben O; Katz, Jacqueline M; York, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We infected mice with the 2009 influenza A pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09), boosted with an inactivated vaccine, and cloned immunoglobulins (Igs) from HA-specific B cells. Based on the redundancy in germline gene utilization, we inferred that between 72-130 unique IgH VDJ and 35 different IgL VJ combinations comprised the anti-HA recall response. The IgH VH1 and IgL VK14 variable gene families were employed most frequently. A representative panel of antibodies were cloned and expressed to confirm reactivity with H1N1pdm09 HA. The majority of the recombinant antibodies were of high avidity and capable of inhibiting H1N1pdm09 hemagglutination. Three of these antibodies were subtype-specific cross-reactive, binding to the HA of A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1), and one further reacted with A/swine/Iowa/15/1930(H1N1). These results help to define the genetic diversity of the influenza anti-HA antibody repertoire profile induced following infection and vaccination, which may facilitate the development of influenza vaccines that are more protective and broadly neutralizing. Protection against influenza viruses is mediated mainly by antibodies, and in most cases this antibody response is narrow, only providing protection against closely related viruses. In spite of this limited range of protection, recent findings indicate that individuals immune to one influenza virus may contain antibodies (generally a minority of the overall response) that are more broadly reactive. These findings have raised the possibility that influenza vaccines could induce a more broadly protective response, reducing the need for frequent vaccine strain changes. However, interpretation of these observations is hampered by the lack of quantitative characterization of the antibody repertoire. In this study, we used single-cell cloning of influenza HA-specific B cells to assess the diversity and nature of the antibody response to influenza hemagglutinin in mice. Our findings help to put bounds on the

  17. Novel Influenza A (H1N1)-Associated Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Sook; Chang, Hyun Jung; Suh, Miri

    2013-01-01

    Several cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) with influenza A (H1N1) have been reported to date. The prognosis of ANE associated with H1N1 is variable; some cases resulted in severe neurologic complication, whereas other cases were fatal. Reports mostly focused on the diagnosis of ANE with H1N1 infection, rather than functional recovery. We report a case of ANE with H1N1 infection in a 4-year-old Korean girl who rapidly developed fever, seizure, and altered mentality, as well as had neurologic sequelae of ataxia, intentional tremor, strabismus, and dysarthria. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed lesions in the bilateral thalami, pons, and left basal ganglia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ANE caused by H1N1 infection and its long-term functional recovery in Korea. PMID:23705127

  18. Health costs from hospitalization with H1N1 infection during the 2009–2010 influenza pandemic compared with non-H1N1 respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courcoutsakis N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Paul Zarogoulidis1, Dimitrios Glaros2,3, Theodoros Kontakiotis1, Marios Froudarakis4, loannis Kioumis1, loannis Kouroumichakis3, Anastasios Tsiotsios1, Anastasios Kallianos5, Paschalis Steiropoulos4, Konstantinos Porpodis1, Evagelia Nena6, Despoina Papakosta1, Aggeliki Rapti5, Theodoros C Constantinidis6, Theodora Kerenidi7, Maria Panopoulou8, Georgia Trakada9, Nikolaos Courcoutsakis10, Evangelia Fouka11, Konstantinos Zarogoulidis1, Efstratios Maltezos2,31Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Pulmonary Department, "G Papanikolaou" Hospital, Exochi, Thessaloniki, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, General University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, 3Second Department of Internal Medicine, 4Pulmonary Department, General University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 52nd Pulmonology Clinic, Hospital of Chest Diseases "SOTIRIA," Athens, 6Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Occupational Medicine Section, Teaching Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece, Alexandroupolis, 7Pulmonary Department, University of Larissa, Larissa, 8Microbiology Department, General University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 9Pulmonary Department, University of Athens, Athens, 10Radiology Department, General University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 111st Pulmonary Department, "G Papanikolaou" Hospital, Exochi, Thessaloniki, GreeceBackground: The first positive patient with influenza A (H1N1 was recorded in March 2009 and the pandemic continued with new outbreaks throughout 2010. This study's objective was to quantify the total cost of inpatient care and identify factors associated with the increased cost of the 2009–2010 influenza A pandemic in comparison with nonviral respiratory infection.Methods: In total, 133 positive and 103 negative H1N1 patients were included from three tertiary

  19. Novel influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in vitro reassortant viruses with oseltamivir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Michèle; Duchamp, Maude Bouscambert; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Frobert, Emilie; Moulès, Vincent; Ferraris, Olivier; Valette, Martine; Escuret, Vanessa; Lina, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    With the recent emergence of the novel A(H1N1) virus in 2009, the efficacy of available drugs, such as neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, is of great concern for good patient care. Influenza viruses are known to be able to acquire resistance. In 2007, A(H1N1) viruses related to A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) (A[H1N1] Brisbane-like virus), which are naturally resistant to oseltamivir, emerged. Resistance to oseltamivir can be acquired either by spontaneous mutation in the NA (H275Y in N1), or by reassortment with a mutated NA. It is therefore crucial to determine the risk of pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus acquiring resistance against oseltamivir by reassortment. We estimated the capacity of reassortment between the A(H1N1) 2009 virus and an oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus by in vitro coinfections of influenza-permissive cells. The screening and the analysis of reassortant viruses was performed by specific reverse transcriptase PCRs and by sequencing. Out of 50 analysed reassortant viruses, two harboured the haemagglutinin (HA) segment from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and the mutated NA originated from the A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus. The replicating capacities of these viruses were measured, showing no difference as compared to the two parental strains, suggesting that acquisition of the mutated NA segment did not impair viral fitness in vitro. Our results suggest that the novel A(H1N1) 2009 virus can acquire by in vitro genetic reassortment the H275Y mutated NA segment conferring resistance to oseltamivir.

  20. Epidemiology and clinical complication patterns of influenza A (H1N1 virus in northern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheder Mohamed Altayep

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to describe epidemiologic and clinical presentation, clinical complications and outcomes of patients diagnosed with influenza A infection (H1N1 during a one-year period. We retrospectively investigated 300 patients with influenza-like clinical presentation during the period January 2015 − January 2016 in King Khalid Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Fifty-four patients out of 300 (18% were diagnosed with H1N1 virus infection; their age ranged from 7 months to 85 years, with a mean age of 25 years. Among them, 34 (63% were males and 20 (37% were females, with a M:F ratio of 1.70. The findings of this study show the great spread of influenza A outside the main holy cities of Saudi Arabia, and underline the absolute need for strict prevention strategies including vaccinations, public awareness and hygiene measures.

  1. Epidemiology and Clinical Complication Patterns of Influenza A (H1N1 Virus) in Northern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altayep, Kheder Mohamed; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelakrim; A Tallaa, Amjad Tallaa; Alzayed, Ahmad Soud; Alshammari, Aqeel Jazzaa; Ali Talla, Ayman Talla

    2017-05-31

    The aim of the present study is to describe epidemiologic and clinical presentation, clinical complications and outcomes of patients diagnosed with influenza A infection (H1N1) during a one-year period. We retrospectively investigated 300 patients with influenza-like clinical presentation during the period January 2015 - January 2016 in King Khalid Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Fifty-four patients out of 300 (18%) were diagnosed with H1N1 virus infection; their age ranged from 7 months to 85 years, with a mean age of 25 years. Among them, 34 (63%) were males and 20 (37%) were females, with a M:F ratio of 1.70. The findings of this study show the great spread of influenza A outside the main holy cities of Saudi Arabia, and underline the absolute need for strict prevention strategies including vaccinations, public awareness and hygiene measures.

  2. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  3. Plasma metabolomics for the diagnosis and prognosis of H1N1 influenza pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad M; Vogel, Hans J; Weljie, Aalim M; Kumar, Anand; Yende, Sachin; Angus, Derek C; Winston, Brent W

    2017-04-19

    Metabolomics is a tool that has been used for the diagnosis and prognosis of specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine if metabolomics could be used as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool for H1N1 pneumonia. Our hypothesis was that metabolomics can potentially be used early for the diagnosis and prognosis of H1N1 influenza pneumonia. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to profile the metabolome in 42 patients with H1N1 pneumonia, 31 ventilated control subjects in the intensive care unit (ICU), and 30 culture-positive plasma samples from patients with bacterial community-acquired pneumonia drawn within the first 24 h of hospital admission for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. We found that plasma-based metabolomics from samples taken within 24 h of hospital admission can be used to discriminate H1N1 pneumonia from bacterial pneumonia and nonsurvivors from survivors of H1N1 pneumonia. Moreover, metabolomics is a highly sensitive and specific tool for the 90-day prognosis of mortality in H1N1 pneumonia. This study demonstrates that H1N1 pneumonia can create a quite different plasma metabolic profile from bacterial culture-positive pneumonia and ventilated control subjects in the ICU on the basis of plasma samples taken within 24 h of hospital/ICU admission, early in the course of disease.

  4. Enhanced viral replication and modulated innate immune responses in infant airway epithelium following H1N1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Candice C; Reader, J Rachel; Gerriets, Joan E; Wang, Theodore T; Harrod, Kevin S; Miller, Lisa A

    2014-07-01

    Influenza is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric populations. The contribution of pulmonary host defense mechanisms to viral respiratory infection susceptibility in very young children is poorly understood. As a surrogate to compare mucosal immune responses of infant and adult lungs, rhesus monkey primary airway epithelial cell cultures were infected with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus in vitro. Virus replication, cytokine secretion, cell viability, and type I interferon (IFN) pathway PCR array profiles were evaluated for both infant and adult cultures. In comparison with adult cultures, infant cultures showed significantly increased levels of H1N1 replication, reduced alpha interferon (IFN-α) protein synthesis, and no difference in cell death following infection. Age-dependent differences in expression levels of multiple genes associated with the type I IFN pathway were observed in H1N1-infected cultures. To investigate the pulmonary and systemic responses to H1N1 infection in early life, infant monkeys were inoculated with H1N1 by upper airway administration. Animals were monitored for virus and parameters of inflammation over a 14-day period. High H1N1 titers were recovered from airways at day 1, with viral RNA remaining detectable until day 9 postinfection. Despite viral clearance, bronchiolitis and alveolitis persisted at day 14 postinfection; histopathological analysis revealed alveolar septal thickening and intermittent type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. Our overall findings are consistent with the known susceptibility of pediatric populations to respiratory virus infection and suggest that intrinsic developmental differences in airway epithelial cell immune function may contribute to the limited efficacy of host defense during early childhood. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first report of intrinsic developmental differences in infant airway epithelial cells that may contribute to the increased

  5. The Neurological Manifestations of H1N1 Influenza Infection; Diagnostic Challenges and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Asadi-Pooya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Health Organization declared pandemic phase of human infection with novel influenza A (H1N1 in April 2009. There are very few reports about the neurological complications of H1N1 virus infection in the literature. Occasionally, these complications are severe and even fatal in some individuals. The aims of this study were to report neurological complaints and/or complications associated with H1N1 virus infection. Methods: The medical files of all patients with H1N1 influenza infection admitted to a specified hospital in the city of Shiraz, Iran from October through November 2009 were reviewed. More information about the patients were obtained by phone calls to the patients or their care givers. All patients had confirmed H1N1 virus infection with real-time PCR assay. Results: Fifty-five patients with H1N1 infection were studied. Twenty-three patients had neurological signs and/or symptoms. Mild neurological complaints may be reported in up to 42% of patients infected by H1N1 virus. Severe neurological complications occurred in 9% of the patients. The most common neurological manifestations were headache, numbness and paresthesia, drowsiness and coma. One patient had a Guillain-Barre syndrome-like illness, and died in a few days. Another patient had focal status epilepticus and encephalopathy. Conclusions: The H1N1 infection seems to have been quite mild with a self-limited course in much of the world, yet there appears to be a subset, which is severely affected. We recommend performing diagnostic tests for H1N1influenza virus in all patients with respiratory illness and neurological signs/symptoms. We also recommend initiating treatment with appropriate antiviral drugs as soon as possible in those with any significant neurological presentation accompanied with respiratory illness and flu-like symptoms

  6. Antigenic drift of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1 influenza virus in A ferret model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teagan Guarnaccia

    Full Text Available Surveillance data indicate that most circulating A(H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses have remained antigenically similar since they emerged in humans in 2009. However, antigenic drift is likely to occur in the future in response to increasing population immunity induced by infection or vaccination. In this study, sequential passaging of A(H1N1pdm09 virus by contact transmission through two independent series of suboptimally vaccinated ferrets resulted in selection of variant viruses with an amino acid substitution (N156K, H1 numbering without signal peptide; N159K, H3 numbering without signal peptide; N173K, H1 numbering from first methionine in a known antigenic site of the viral HA. The N156K HA variant replicated and transmitted efficiently between naïve ferrets and outgrew wildtype virus in vivo in ferrets in the presence and absence of immune pressure. In vitro, in a range of cell culture systems, the N156K variant rapidly adapted, acquiring additional mutations in the viral HA that also potentially affected antigenic properties. The N156K escape mutant was antigenically distinct from wildtype virus as shown by binding of HA-specific antibodies. Glycan binding assays demonstrated the N156K escape mutant had altered receptor binding preferences compared to wildtype virus, which was supported by computational modeling predictions. The N156K substitution, and culture adaptations, have been detected in human A(H1N1pdm09 viruses with N156K preferentially reported in sequences from original clinical samples rather than cultured isolates. This study demonstrates the ability of the A(H1N1pdm09 virus to undergo rapid antigenic change to evade a low level vaccine response, while remaining fit in a ferret transmission model of immunization and infection. Furthermore, the potential changes in receptor binding properties that accompany antigenic changes highlight the importance of routine characterization of clinical samples in human A(H1N1pdm09 influenza

  7. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza and indigenous populations of the Americas and the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ruche, G; Tarantola, A; Barboza, P; Vaillant, L; Gueguen, J; Gastellu-Etchegorry, M

    2009-10-22

    There are few structured data available to assess the risks associated with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v infection according to ethnic groups. In countries of the Americas and the Pacific where these data are available, the attack rates are higher in indigenous populations, who also appear to be at approximately three to six-fold higher risk of developing severe disease and of dying. These observations may be associated with documented risk factors for severe disease and death associated with pandemic H1N1 influenza infection (especially the generally higher prevalence of diabetes, obesity, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pregnancy in indigenous populations). More speculative factors include those associated with the risk of infection (e.g. family size, crowding and poverty), differences in access to health services and, perhaps, genetic factors. Whatever the causes, this increased vulnerability of indigenous populations justify specific immediate actions in the control of the current pandemic including primary prevention (intensified hygiene promotion, chemoprophylaxis and vaccination) and secondary prevention (improved access to services and early treatment following symptoms onset) of severe pandemic H1N1 influenza infection.

  8. Framing risk: communication messages in the Australian and Swedish print media surrounding the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Tiffany; Sebar, Bernadette; Harris, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Australia and Sweden have similar immunisation rates. However, during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the uptake of immunisation was 60% in Sweden and 18% in Australia. During pandemics, perceptions of risk are largely formed by media communication which may influence the public's response. The study aimed to compare the differences in how the media framed the 2009 H1N1 pandemic message and the associated public perceptions of risk as expressed through the uptake of vaccinations in Australia and Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on 81 articles from the Australian and Swedish print media: 45 and 36, respectively. The risk of H1N1 was communicated similarly in Australia and Sweden. However, major differences were found in how the Australian and Swedish media framed the pandemic in terms of responsibility, self-efficacy, and uncertainty. In Australia, responsibility was predominantly reported negatively, blaming various organisations for a lack of information, compared to Sweden where responsibility was placed on the community to help protect public health. Furthermore, there was limited self-efficacy measures reported in the Australian media compared to Sweden and Sweden's media was more transparent about the uncertainties of the pandemic. This study affirms the association between the framing of health messages in the media and the public's perception of risk and related behaviour. Governments need to actively incorporate the media into pandemic communication planning.

  9. New genetic variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 detected in Cuba during 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Amely; Acosta, Belsy; Muné, Mayra; Valdés, Odalys; Fernandez, Leandro; Medina, Isel; Savón, Clara; Oropesa, Suset; Gonzalez, Grehete; Roque, Rosmery; Gonzalez, Guelsys; Hernández, Bárbara; Goyenechea, Angel; Piñón, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus has evolved continually since its emergence in 2009. For influenza virus strains, genetic changes occurring in HA1 domain of the hemagglutinin cause the emergence of new variants. The aim of our study is to establish genetic associations between 35 A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in Cuba in 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 seasons, and A/California/07/2009 strain recommended by WHO as the H1N1 component of the influenza vaccine. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of clades 3, 6A, 6B, 6C and 7. Mutations were detected in the antigenic site or in the receptor-binding domains of HA1 segment, including S174P, S179N, K180Q, S202T, S220T and R222K. Substitutions S174P, S179N, K180Q and R222K were detected in Cuban strains for the first time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Issues in pharmacotherapy of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pandemic caused by the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has been a cause of great concern for healthcare professionals and the scientific community worldwide. Due to the widespread resistance of the virus to adamantanes, pharmacotherapy is currently limited to neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir. The use of neuraminidase inhibitors in India is primarily associated with issues of patient and physician awareness, variability in disease management guidelines, safety and efficacy in the Indian population, need for active drug safety monitoring, and development of resistance due to possible misuse. In addition, other issues like availability of the drugs in retail and stockpiling by the public health authorities need careful introspection. The development of influenza vaccines in India and its adequate availability to the country′s populace also poses significant challenges in the management of the pandemic. In light of the limited therapeutic options available for the management of the disease, research on novel targets and pharmacological agents would also be beneficial in addressing the challenges of future outbreaks.

  11. Issues in pharmacotherapy of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y K; Padhy, B M

    2010-01-01

    The pandemic caused by the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has been a cause of great concern for healthcare professionals and the scientific community worldwide. Due to the widespread resistance of the virus to adamantanes, pharmacotherapy is currently limited to neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir. The use of neuraminidase inhibitors in India is primarily associated with issues of patient and physician awareness, variability in disease management guidelines, safety and efficacy in the Indian population, need for active drug safety monitoring, and development of resistance due to possible misuse. In addition, other issues like availability of the drugs in retail and stockpiling by the public health authorities need careful introspection. The development of influenza vaccines in India and its adequate availability to the country's populace also poses significant challenges in the management of the pandemic. In light of the limited therapeutic options available for the management of the disease, research on novel targets and pharmacological agents would also be beneficial in addressing the challenges of future outbreaks.

  12. Large Scale Genome Analysis Shows that the Epitopes for Broadly Cross-Reactive Antibodies Are Predominant in the Pandemic 2009 Influenza Virus A H1N1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Lara-Ramírez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The past pandemic strain H1N1 (A (H1N1pdm09 has now become a common component of current seasonal influenza viruses. It has changed the pre-existing immunity of the human population to succeeding infections. In the present study, a total of 14,210 distinct sequences downloaded from National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database were used for the analysis. The epitope compositions in A (H1N1pdm09, classic seasonal strains, swine strains as well as highly virulent avian strain H5N1, identified with the aid of the Immune Epitope DataBase (IEDB, were compared at genomic level. The result showed that A (H1N1 pdm09 contains the 90% of B-cell epitopes for broadly cross-reactive antibodies (EBCA, which is in consonance with the recent reports on the experimental identification of new epitopes or antibodies for this virus and the binding tests with influenza virus protein HA of different subtypes. Our analysis supports that high proportional EBCA depends on the epitope pattern of A (H1N1pdm09 virus. This study may be helpful for better understanding of A (H1N1pdm09 and the production of new influenza vaccines.

  13. From where did the 2009 'swine-origin' influenza A virus (H1N1) emerge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus that appeared in 2009 and was first found in human beings in Mexico, is a reassortant with at least three parents. Six of the genes are closest in sequence to those of H1N2 'triple-reassortant' influenza viruses isolated from pigs in North America around 1999-2000. Its other two genes are from different Eurasian 'avian-like' viruses of pigs; the NA gene is closest to H1N1 viruses isolated in Europe in 1991-1993, and the MP gene is closest to H3N2 viruses isolated in Asia in 1999-2000. The sequences of these genes do not directly reveal the immediate source of the virus as the closest were from isolates collected more than a decade before the human pandemic started. The three parents of the virus may have been assembled in one place by natural means, such as by migrating birds, however the consistent link with pig viruses suggests that human activity was involved. We discuss a published suggestion that unsampled pig herds, the intercontinental live pig trade, together with porous quarantine barriers, generated the reassortant. We contrast that suggestion with the possibility that laboratory errors involving the sharing of virus isolates and cultured cells, or perhaps vaccine production, may have been involved. Gene sequences from isolates that bridge the time and phylogenetic gap between the new virus and its parents will distinguish between these possibilities, and we suggest where they should be sought. It is important that the source of the new virus be found if we wish to avoid future pandemics rather than just trying to minimize the consequences after they have emerged. Influenza virus is a very significant zoonotic pathogen. Public confidence in influenza research, and the agribusinesses that are based on influenza's many hosts, has been eroded by several recent events involving the virus. Measures that might restore confidence include establishing a unified international administrative framework coordinating

  14. Value for Money in H1N1 Influenza: A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Pandemic Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini-Descomps, Hélène; Brender, Nathalie; Maradan, David

    2017-06-01

    The 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic generated additional data and triggered new studies that opened debate over the optimal strategy for handling a pandemic. The lessons-learned documents from the World Health Organization show the need for a cost estimation of the pandemic response during the risk-assessment phase. Several years after the crisis, what conclusions can we draw from this field of research? The main objective of this article was to provide an analysis of the studies that present cost-effectiveness or cost-benefit analyses for A/H1N1 pandemic interventions since 2009 and to identify which meas