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Sample records for au melange co2-ch4

  1. The incorporation of graphene oxide into polysulfone mixed matrix membrane for CO2/CH4 separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahri, K.; Goh, P. S.; Ismail, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is often found as the main impurity in natural gas, where methane (CH4) is the major component. The presence of CO2 in natural gas leads to several problems such as reducing the energy content of natural gas and cause pipeline corrosion. Thus it must be removed to meet specifications (CO2 ≤ 2 mol%) before the gas can be delivered to the pipeline. In this work, hollow fiber mixed matrix membrane (MMM) were fabricated by embedding graphene oxide (GO) into a polysulfone (PSf) polymer matrix to improve membrane properties as well as its separation performance towards CO2/CH4 gas. The membrane properties were investigated for pristine membrane and mixed matrix membrane filled with filler loading of 0.25%. The synthesized GO and properties of fabricated membranes were characterized and studied using TEM, AFM, XRD, FTIR and SEM respectively. The permeance of pure gases and ideal selectivity of CO2/CH4 gas were determined using pure gas permeation experiment. GO has affinity towards CO2 gas. The nanosheet structure creates path for small molecule gas and restricted large molecule gas to pass through the membrane. The incorporation of GO in PSf polymer enhanced the permeance of CO 2 and CO2/CH4 separation from 64.47 to 86.80 GPU and from 19 to 25 respectively.

  2. CO2, CH4, CO and Chlorophyll Fluorescence Retrievals for the Geostationary Carbon Process Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, X.; Natraj, V.; Luo, M.; Shia, R.; Sander, S. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Geostationary Carbon Process Investigation (GCPI) combines an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument with a geostationary Earth orbit vantage point to realize a transformational advance in carbon monitoring beyond the synoptic capabilities of Low Earth Orbit instruments such as SCIAMACHY, GOSAT and OCO-2. GCPI follows the paradigm of numerical weather prediction and aims to provide orders of magnitude improvement in observational density for atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, and new measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF). These new observations could be used to drive and constrain Earth system models, improve our understanding of the underlying carbon cycle processes and evaluate model forecasting capabilities. GCPI is designed to deliver simultaneous measurements of CF and column averaged CO2, CH4 and CO dry air mole fractions to disentangle biogenic and anthropogenic sources of carbon. Here, we perform radiative transfer simulations over a range of conditions expected to be observed by GCPI and estimate prospective performance of retrievals based on results from Bayesian error analysis and characterizations. The potential benefits from the measurements of CF are also investigated.

  3. Simulation of Binary CO2/CH4 Mixture Breakthrough Profiles in MIL-53 (Al

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MIL-53 (Al aluminum terephthalate, a commercial metal-organic framework, has been studied as a potential candidate for pressure swing adsorption separation of CO2/CH4 binary mixtures. Pure gas isotherms of CH4 and CO2 measured over 0–6 MPa and at room temperature are fitted with the Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A model. The D-A model parameters are used in the Doong-Yang Multicomponent adsorption model to predict the binary mixture isotherms. A one-dimensional multicomponent adsorption breakthrough model is then used to perform a parametric study of the effect of adsorbent particle diameter, inlet pressures, feed flow rates, and feed compositions on the breakthrough performance. Commercial MIL-53 with a particle diameter of 20 μm renders high tortuous flow; therefore it is less effective for separation. More effective separation can be achieved if MIL-53 monoliths of diameters above 200 μm are used. Faster separation is possible by increasing the feed pressure or if the starting compositions are richer in CO2. More CH4 is produced per cycle at higher feed pressures, but the shortened time at higher pressures can result in the reduction of the CH4 purity.

  4. Selective Adsorption and Selective Transport Diffusion of CO2-CH4 Binary Mixture in Coal Ultramicropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongliang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-06

    The adsorption and diffusion of the CO2-CH4 mixture in coal and the underlying mechanisms significantly affect the design and operation of any CO2-enhanced coal-bed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM) project. In this study, bituminous coal was fabricated based on the Wiser molecular model and its ultramicroporous parameters were evaluated; molecular simulations were established through Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and Molecular Dynamic (MD) methods to study the effects of temperature, pressure, and species bulk mole fraction on the adsorption isotherms, adsorption selectivity, three distinct diffusion coefficients, and diffusivity selectivity of the binary mixture in the coal ultramicropores. It turns out that the absolute adsorption amount of each species in the mixture decreases as temperature increases, but increases as its own bulk mole fraction increases. The self-, corrected, and transport diffusion coefficients of pure CO2 and pure CH4 all increase as temperature or/and their own bulk mole fractions increase. Compared to CH4, the adsorption and diffusion of CO2 are preferential in the coal ultramicropores. Adsorption selectivity and diffusivity selectivity were simultaneously employed to reveal that the optimal injection depth for CO2-ECBM is 800-1000 m at 308-323 K temperature and 8.0-10.0 MPa.

  5. Airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN in boreal biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Sebastian J.; Bauguitte, Stephane; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Le Breton, Michael; Archibald, Alex; Gallagher, Martin W.; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl J.

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning plays an important role in the budgets of a variety of atmospheric trace gases and particles. For example, fires in boreal Russia have been linked with large growths in the global concentrations of trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and CO (Langenfelds et al., 2002; Simpson et al., 2006). High resolution airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN were made over Eastern Canada onboard the UK Atmospheric Research Aircraft FAAM BAe-146 from 12 July to 4 August 2011. These observations were made as part of the BORTAS project (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites). Flights were aimed at transecting and sampling the outflow from the commonly occurring North American boreal forest fires during the summer months and to investigate and identify the chemical composition and evolution of these plumes. CO2 and CH4 dry air mole fractions were determined using an adapted system based on a Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Model RMT-200) from Los Gatos Research Inc, which uses the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy technique. In-flight calibrations revealed a mean accuracy of 0.57 ppmv and 2.31 ppbv for 1 Hz observations of CO2 and CH4, respectively, during the BORTAS project. During these flights a number of fresh and photochemically-aged plumes were identified using simultaneous HCN measurements. HCN is a distinctive and useful marker for forest fire emissions and it was detected using chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS). In the freshest plumes, strong relationships were found between CH4, CO2 and other tracers for biomass burning. From this we were able to estimate that 8.5 ± 0.9 g of CH4 and 1512 ± 185 g of CO2 were released into the atmosphere per kg of dry matter burnt. These emission factors are in good agreement with estimates from previous studies and can be used to calculate budgets for the region. However for aged plumes the correlations between CH4 and other

  6. Winter greenhouse gas fluxes (CO2, CH4 and N2O from a subalpine grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Merbold

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although greenhouse gas emissions during winter contribute significantly to annual balances, their quantification is still highly uncertain in snow-covered ecosystems. Here, carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes were measured at a subalpine managed grassland in Switzerland using concentration gradients within the snowpack (CO2, CH4, N2O and the eddy covariance method (CO2 during the winter 2010/2011. Our objectives were (1 to identify the temporal and spatial variation of greenhouse gases (GHGs and their drivers, and (2 to estimate the GHG budget of the site during this specific season (1 December–31 March, 121 days. Mean winter fluxes (December–March based on the gradient method were 0.77 ± 0.54 μmol m−2 s−1 for CO2 (1.19 ± 1.05 μmol m−2 s−1 measured by eddy covariance, −0.14 ± 0.09 nmol m−2 s−1 for CH4 and 0.23 ± 0.23 nmol m−2 s−1 for N2O, respectively. In comparison with the CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance, the gradient technique underestimated the effluxes by 50%. While CO2 and CH4 fluxes decreased with the progressing winter season, N2O fluxes did not follow a seasonal pattern. The major variables correlating with the fluxes of CO2 and CH4 were soil temperature and snow water equivalent, which is based on snow height and snow density. N2O fluxes were only explained poorly by any of the measured environmental variables. Spatial variability across the valley floor was smallest for CO2 and largest for N2O. During the winter season 2010/2011, greenhouse gas fluxes ranged between 550 ± 540 g CO2 m−2 estimated by the eddy covariance approach and 543 ± 247 g CO2 m−2, −0.4 ± 0.01 g CH4 m−2 and 0.11 ± 0.1 g N2O m−2 derived by the gradient technique. Total seasonal greenhouse gas emissions from the grassland were between 574 ± 276 and 581 ± 569 g CO2 eq. m−2, with N2O contributing 5% to the overall budget and CH4 reducing the budget by 0.1%. Cumulative budgets of CO2 were

  7. Screening metal-organic framework-based mixed-matrix membranes for CO2/CH4 separations

    OpenAIRE

    Keskin, Seda; Eruçar, İlknur

    2011-01-01

    1 Screening Metal Organic Framework-based Mixed Matrix Membranes for CO2/CH4 Separations Ilknur Erucar† and Seda Keskin‡* †Department of Computational Sciences and Engineering, Koç University, 34450, Istanbul, Turkey ‡Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koç University, 34450, Istanbul, Turkey Submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. Abstract In this study, the challenge of selecting metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as filler particles in high performance mixe...

  8. Amine-Appended Hierarchical Ca-A Zeolite for Enhancing CO2 /CH4 Selectivity of Mixed-Matrix Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien Hoa; Gong, Heqing; Lee, Siew Siang; Bae, Tae-Hyun

    2016-10-18

    An amine-appended hierarchical Ca-A zeolite that can selectively capture CO2 was synthesized and incorporated into inexpensive membrane polymers, in particular polyethylene oxide and Matrimid, to design mixed-matrix membranes with high CO2 /CH4 selectivities. Binary mixture permeation testing reveals that amine-appended mesoporous Ca-A is highly effective in improving CO2 /CH4 selectivity of polymeric membranes. In particular, the CO2 /CH4 selectivity of the polyethylene oxide membrane increases from 15 to 23 by incorporating 20 wt % amine-appended Ca-A zeolite. Furthermore, the formation of filler/polymer interfacial defects, which is typically found in glassy polymer-zeolite pairs, is inhibited owing to the interaction between the amine groups on the external surface of zeolites and polymer chains. Our results suggest that the amine-appended hierarchial Ca-A, which was utilized in membrane fabrication for the first time, is a good filler material for fabricating a CO2 -selective mixed-matrix membrane with defect-free morphology.

  9. CO2, CH4, and DOC Flux During Long Term Thaw of High Arctic Tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, B. T.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Layton, A.; Bennett, P.; Mykytczuk, N.; Lau, C. M.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic regions are expected to experience temperature increases of >4° C by the end of this century. This warming is projected to cause a drastic reduction in the extent of permafrost at high northern latitudes, affecting an estimated 1000 Pg of SOC in the top 3 m. Determining the effects of this temperature change on CO2 and CH4 emissions is critical for defining source constraints to global climate models. To investigate this problem, 18 cores of 1 m length were collected in late spring 2011 before the thawing of the seasonal active layer from an ice-wedge polygon near the McGill Arctic Research Station (MARS) on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45). Cores were collected from acidic soil (pH 5.5) with low SOC (~1%), summertime active layer depth between 40-70 cm (2010-2013), and sparse vegetation consisting primarily of small shrubs and sedges. Cores were progressively thawed from the surface over the course of 14 weeks to a final temperature of 4.5° C and held at that temperature for 15 months under the following conditions: in situ water saturation conditions versus fully water saturated conditions using artificial rain fall, surface light versus no surface light, cores from the polygon edge, and control cores with a permafrost table maintained at 70 cm depth. Core headspaces were measured weekly for CO2, CH4, H2, CO, and O2 flux during the 18 month thaw experiment. After ~20 weeks of thawing maximum, CO2 flux for the polygon edge and dark treatment cores were 3.0×0.7 and 1.7×0.4 mmol CO2 m-2 hr-1, respectively. The CO2 flux for the control, saturated, and in situ saturation cores reached maximums of 0.6×0.2, 0.9×0.5, and 0.9×0.1 mmol CO2 m-2 hr-1, respectively. Field measurements of CO2 flux from an adjacent polygon during the mid-summer of 2011 to 2013 ranged from 0.3 to 3.7 mmol CO2 m-2 hr-1. Cores from all treatments except water saturated were found to consistently oxidize CH4 at ~atmospheric concentrations (2 ppmv) with a maximum

  10. Synergetic effect of carbon nanopore size and surface oxidation on CO2 capture from CO2/CH4 mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Harris, Peter J F

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the synergetic effect of confinement (carbon nanopore size) and surface chemistry (the number of carbonyl groups) on CO2 capture from its mixtures with CH4 at typical operating conditions for industrial adsorptive separation (298 K and compressed CO2-CH4 mixtures). Although both confinement and surface oxidation have an impact on the efficiency of CO2/CH4 adsorptive separation at thermodynamics equilibrium, we show that surface functionalization is the most important factor in designing an efficient adsorbent for CO2 capture. Systematic Monte Carlo simulations revealed that adsorption of CH4 either pure or mixed with CO2 on oxidized nanoporous carbons is only slightly increased by the presence of functional groups (surface dipoles). In contrast, adsorption of CO2 is very sensitive to the number of carbonyl groups, which can be examined by a strong electric quadrupolar moment of CO2. Interestingly, the adsorbed amount of CH4 is strongly affected by the presence of the co-adsorbed CO2. In contrast, the CO2 uptake does not depend on the molar ratio of CH4 in the bulk mixture. The optimal carbonaceous porous adsorbent used for CO2 capture near ambient conditions should consist of narrow carbon nanopores with oxidized pore walls. Furthermore, the equilibrium separation factor was the greatest for CO2/CH4 mixtures with a low CO2 concentration. The maximum equilibrium separation factor of CO2 over CH4 of ~18-20 is theoretically predicted for strongly oxidized nanoporous carbons. Our findings call for a review of the standard uncharged model of carbonaceous materials used for the modeling of the adsorption separation processes of gas mixtures containing CO2 (and other molecules with strong electric quadrupolar moment or dipole moment).

  11. Experimental measurements of vapor-liquid equilibria of the H2O + CO2 + CH4 ternary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Duan, Zhenhao

    2008-01-01

    Reported are the experimental measurements on vapor-liquid equilibria in the H2O + CO2 + CH4 ternary system at temperatures from (324 to 375) K and pressures from (10 to 50) MPa. The results indicate that the CH4 solubility in the ternary mixture is about 10 % to 40 % more than that calculated by interpolation from the Henry's law constants of the binary system, H2O + CH4, and the solubility of CO2 is 6 % to 20 % more than what is calculated by the interpolation from the Henry's law constants of the binary mixture, H 2O + CO2. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  12. Plasticization-resistant hollow fiber membranes for CO2/CH4 separation based on a thermally crosslinkable polyimide

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Chien-Chiang

    2011-10-01

    Decarboxylation-induced thermal crosslinking has been demonstrated to be effective for stabilizing membranes against plasticization in dense films. This study extends this promising crosslinking approach from dense films to industrially relevant asymmetric hollow fiber membranes. Crosslinkable asymmetric hollow fiber membranes were spun from a carboxylic acid containing polyimide, 6FDA-DAM:DABA. Dope and spinning conditions were optimized to obtain fibers with a defect-free selective skin layer. It is found that slightly defective fibers suffered severe selectivity loss after thermal crosslinking, suggesting that defect-free property is essential to the performance of the resulting crosslinked hollow fiber membranes. The crosslinked fibers were tested for CO 2/CH 4 separation. The excellent plasticization resistance under high pressure feeds (with highest CO 2 partial pressure of 400psia) suggests that these robust membranes are promising for aggressive natural gas purification. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Methane: An equation of state with application to the ternary system H 2O-CO 2-CH 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gary K.; Kerrick, Derrill M.

    1981-05-01

    The following hardsphere modified Redlich-Kwong (HSMRK) equation of state was obtained by least squares fitting to available P- V- T data for methane ( P in bars; T in Kelvins; v in cm 3 mol -1; b = 60.00 cm 3 mol -1; R = 83.14 cm 3barmol-1K-1): P RT(1 + y + y 2-y 3/v(1-y) 3) - c(T) + d(T)/v + e(T)/v 2/v(v + b)T 1/2y = b/4vc( T) = 13.403 × 10 6 + (9.28 × 10 4) T + 2.7 T2d( T) = 5.216 × 10 9 - (6.8 × 10 6) T + (3.28 × 10 3) T2e( T) = (-2.3322 × 10 11) + (6.738 × 10 8) T + (3.179 × 10 5) T2 For the P- T range of experimental data used in the fit (50 to 8600 bars and from 320 to 670 K), calculated volumes and fugacity coefficients for CH 4 relative to experimentally determined volumes and fugacity coefficients have average percent deviations of 0.279 and 1.373, respectively. The HSMRK equation, which predicts linear isochores over a wide P- T range, should yield reasonable estimates of fugacity coefficients for CH 4 to pressures and temperatures well outside the P- T range of available P- V- T data. Calculations for the system H2O- CO2- CH4, using the HSMRK equations for H 2O and CO 2 of Kerrick and Jacobs (1981) and the HSMRK equation for CH 4 of this study, indicate that compared to the binary H 2O-CO 2 system, small amounts of CH 4 in the ternary system H 2O-CO 2-CH 4 slightly increases the activity of H 2O, and significantly decreases the activity of CO 2.

  14. Molecular simulations on diameter effect of carbon nanotube for separation of CO2/CH4%不同管径碳纳米管中CO2/CH4分离的分子模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹伟; 吕玲红; 黄亮亮; 王珊珊; 朱育丹

    2014-01-01

    Biomethane route has large potential in emission reduction and energy saving. One of the key issues is separation of biogas in operating conditions of 333 K and 0.1 MPa. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD) were used to compute adsorption loadings and self-diffusivities of CH4/CO2 at various diameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. Single component and equimolar gases were simulated. CO2 always had larger adsorption loading and diffusion coefficient than CH4 as the result of relatively strong interaction between CO2 molecules and tube walls, due to the confined capacity. The permselectivity reached a maximum in closely 1 nm, and under such conditions the separation process was controlled by adsorption rather than diffusion.%生物甲烷路线在CO2减排和节能方面有很大的应用前景。而对生物沼气的分离是此路线的一个关键问题,特别是在60℃和0.1 MPa下。巨正则Monte Carlo(GCMC)和平衡分子动力学(EMD)的分子模拟方法研究CO2和CH4在不同管径的碳纳米管(CNT)中的吸附和扩散,可以从分子层面研究生物沼气的分离机理。分别计算了CO2/CH4二元混合物吸附量、吸附选择性、自扩散系数和渗透选择性等参数。模拟结果表明:由于碳管的受限空间和CO2与碳纳米管壁面分子之间强相互作用,导致二元等物质的量的混合物CO2/CH4的吸附量和扩散系数的差异。CO2的吸附量和自扩散系数都比CH4的大。渗透选择性在碳管管径达到最接近1 nm时达到最大值,此时混合物的分离过程是吸附控制,而非扩散控制。

  15. Continuous CO2/CH4/CO measurements (2012-2014) at Beromünster tall tower station in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, Ece; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Brunner, Dominik; Henne, Stephan; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The understanding of the continental carbon budget is essential to predict future climate change. In order to quantify CO2 and CH4 fluxes at the regional scale, a measurement system was installed at the former radio tower in Beromünster as part of the Swiss greenhouse gas monitoring network (CarboCount CH). We have been measuring the mixing ratios of CO2, CH4 and CO on this tower with sample inlets at 12.5, 44.6, 71.5, 131.6 and 212.5 m above ground level using a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer. The first 2-year (December 2012-December 2014) continuous atmospheric record was analyzed for seasonal and diurnal variations and inter-species correlations. In addition, storage fluxes were calculated from the hourly profiles along the tower. The atmospheric growth rates from 2013 to 2014 determined from this 2-year data set were 1.78 ppm yr-1, 9.66 ppb yr-1 and -1.27 ppb yr-1 for CO2, CH4 and CO, respectively. After detrending, clear seasonal cycles were detected for CO2 and CO, whereas CH4 showed a stable baseline suggesting a net balance between sources and sinks over the course of the year. CO and CO2 were strongly correlated (r2 > 0.75) in winter (DJF), but almost uncorrelated in summer. In winter, anthropogenic emissions dominate the biospheric CO2 fluxes and the variations in mixing ratios are large due to reduced vertical mixing. The diurnal variations of all species showed distinct cycles in spring and summer, with the lowest sampling level showing the most pronounced diurnal amplitudes. The storage flux estimates exhibited reasonable diurnal shapes for CO2, but underestimated the strength of the surface sinks during daytime. This seems plausible, keeping in mind that we were only able to calculate the storage fluxes along the profile of the tower but not the flux into or out of this profile, since no Eddy covariance flux measurements were taken at the top of the tower.

  16. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes from soil of a burned grassland in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Valentini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of fire on soil fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O was investigated in a tropical grassland in Congo Brazzaville during two field campaigns in 2007–2008. The first campaign was conducted in the middle of the dry season and the second at the end of the growing season, respectively one and eight months after burning. Gas fluxes and several soil parameters were measured in each campaign from burned plots and from a close-by control area preserved from fire. Rain events were simulated at each campaign to evaluate the magnitude and duration of the generated gas flux pulses. In laboratory experiments, soil samples from field plots were analysed for microbial biomass, net N mineralization, net nitrification, N2O, NO and CO2 emissions under different water and temperature soil regimes. One month after burning, field CO2 emissions were significantly lower in burned plots than in the control plots, the average daily CH4 flux shifted from net emission in the unburned area to net consumption in burned plots, no significant effect of fire was observed on soil N2O fluxes. Eight months after burning, the average daily fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O measured in control and burned plots were not significantly different. In laboratory, N2O fluxes from soil of burned plots were significantly higher than fluxes from soil of unburned plots only above 70% of maximum soil water holding capacity; this was never attained in the field even after rain simulation. Higher NO emissions were measured in the lab in soil from burned plots at both 10% and 50% of maximum soil water holding capacity. Increasing the incubation temperature from 25 °C to 37 °C negatively affected microbial growth, mineralization and nitrification activities but enhanced N2O and CO2 production. Results indicate that fire did not increase post-burning soil GHG emissions in this tropical grasslands characterized by acidic, well drained and nutrient-poor soil.

  17. Buckybowls as adsorbents for CO2, CH4, and C2H2: Binding and structural insights from computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Althaf; Vijay, Dolly; Sastry, G Narahari

    2016-01-30

    Noncovalent functionalization of buckybowls sumanene (S), corannulene (R), and coronene (C) with greenhouse gases (GGs) such as CO2 , CH4 (M), and C2 H2 (A) has been studied using hybrid density functional theory. The propensity and preferences of these small molecules to interact with the concave and convex surfaces of the buckybowls has been quantitatively estimated. The results indicate that curvature plays a significant role in the adsorption of these small molecules on the π surface and it is observed that buckybowls have higher binding energies (BEs) compared with their planar counterpart coronene. The concave surface of the buckybowl is found to be more feasible for adsorption of small molecules. BEs of small molecules towards π systems is CO2  > A > M and the BEs of π systems toward small molecules is S > R > C. Obviously, the binding preference is dictated by the way in which various noncovalent interactions, such as π···π, lone pair···π, and CH···π manifest themselves on carbaneous surfaces. To delineate the intricate details of the interactions, we have employed Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecule and localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (LMO-EDA). LMO-EDA, which measures the contribution of various components and traces the physical origin of the interactions, indicates that the complexes are stabilized largely by dispersion interactions.

  18. Transport Mechanisms for CO2-CH4 Exchange and Safe CO2 Storage in Hydrate-Bearing Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Arne Birkedal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 injection in hydrate-bearing sediments induces methane (CH4 production while benefitting from CO2 storage, as demonstrated in both core and field scale studies. CH4 hydrates have been formed repeatedly in partially water saturated Bentheim sandstones. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and CH4 consumption from pump logs have been used to verify final CH4 hydrate saturation. Gas Chromatography (GC in combination with a Mass Flow Meter was used to quantify CH4 recovery during CO2 injection. The overall aim has been to study the impact of CO2 in fractured and non-fractured samples to determine the performance of CO2-induced CH4 hydrate production. Previous efforts focused on diffusion-driven exchange from a fracture volume. This approach was limited by gas dilution, where free and produced CH4 reduced the CO2 concentration and subsequent driving force for both diffusion and exchange. This limitation was targeted by performing experiments where CO2 was injected continuously into the spacer volume to maintain a high driving force. To evaluate the effect of diffusion length multi-fractured core samples were used, which demonstrated that length was not the dominating effect on core scale. An additional set of experiments is presented on non-fractured samples, where diffusion-limited transportation was assisted by continuous CO2 injection and CH4 displacement. Loss of permeability was addressed through binary gas (N2/CO2 injection, which regained injectivity and sustained CO2-CH4 exchange.

  19. Fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O from soil of burned grassland savannah of central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Valentini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Grassland savannah ecosystems subject to frequent fires are considered to have an almost neutral carbon balance, as the C released during burning mostly balance the C fixed by the photosynthetic process. However, burning might modify the net soil-atmosphere exchange of GHGs in the post burning phase so that the radiative balance of the site might shift from neutrality. In the present study the impact of fire on soil fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O was investigated in a grassland savannah (Congo Brazzaville where high frequency burning is the typical management form of the region. An area was preserved for one season from annual burning and was used as "unburned" treatment. Two field campaigns were carried on at different time length from the fire event, 1 month, in the middle of the dry season, and 8 months after, at the end of the growing season. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes, as well as several soil parameters, were measured in each campaign from burned and unburned plots. Rain events were simulated at each campaign to evaluate magnitude and length of the generated GHG flux pulses. In laboratory experiments, on soil samples from the two treatments, microbial biomass, net N mineralization, net nitrification, N2O, NO and CO2 emissions were analyzed in function of soil water and/or temperature variations. Results showed that fire had a significant effect on GHG fluxes but the effect was transient, as after 8 months differences between treatments were no longer significant. One month after burning CO2 soil emissions were significantly lower in the burned plots, CH4 fluxes were dominated by net emissions rather than net consumption in the unburned area and fire shifted the CH4 flux distribution towards more negative values. No significant effect of fire was observed in the field on N2O fluxes. It was assumed that the low water content was the main limiting factor as in fact laboratory data showed that only above 75% of water saturation, N2O emissions

  20. Highly stable CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivity in hyper-cross-linked heterocyclic porous polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Muhammad; Lee, Han Myoung; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-05-28

    The largest obstacles for landfill/flue gas separation using microporous materials are small adsorption values and low selectivity ratios. This study demonstrates that these adsorption and selectivity challenges can be overcome by utilizing a series of hyper-cross-linked heterocyclic polymer networks. These microporous organic polymers (MOPs) were synthesized in a single step by inexpensive Friedel-Crafts-catalyzed reactions using dimethoxymethane as an external linker. The amorphous networks show moderate Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas up to 1022 m(2) g(-1), a narrow pore size distribution in the range from 6 to 8 Å, and high physicochemical stability. Owing to the presence of the heteroatomic pore surfaces in the networks, they exhibit maximum storage capacities for CO2 of 11.4 wt % at 273 K and 1 atm. Additionally, remarkable selectivity ratios for CO2 adsorption over N2 (100) and CH4 (15) at 273 K were obtained. More importantly, as compared with any other porous materials, much higher selectivity for CO2/N2 (80) and CO2/CH4 (15) was observed at 298 K, showing that these selectivity ratios remain high at elevated temperature. The very high CO2/N2 selectivity values are ascribed to the binding affinity of abundantly available electron-rich basic heteroatoms, high CO2 isoteric heats of adsorption (49-38 kJ mol(-1)), and the predominantly microporous nature of the MOPs. Binding energies calculated using the high level of ab initio theory showed that the selectivity is indeed attributed to the heteroatom-CO2 interactions. By employing an easy and economical synthesis procedure these MOPs with high thermochemical stability are believed to be a promising candidate for selective CO2 capture.

  1. Thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibria of semi-clathrate hydrates of CO2, CH4, or N2+tetra-n-butylammonium bromide aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eslamimanesh, Ali; Mohammadi, Amir H.; Richon, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of phase equilibria of semi-clathrate hydrates has been very rarely investigated in the literature. In this work, a thermodynamic model is proposed for representation/prediction of phase equilibria of semi-clathrate hydrates of the CO2, CH4, or N2+tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB...

  2. A single gas chromatograph for accurate atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Simpson, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an adapted gas chromatograph capable of measuring simultaneously and semi-continuously the atmospheric mixing ratios of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6 and the trace gas CO with high precision and long-term stability. The novelty of our design is that all species are measured w

  3. Pure- and mixed-gas CO2/CH4 separation properties of PIM-1 and an amidoxime-functionalized PIM-1

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2014-05-01

    The prototypical solution-processable polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, and derivatives thereof offer combinations of permeability and selectivity that make them potential candidate materials for membrane-based gas separations. Paramount to the design and evaluation of PIMs for economical natural gas sweetening is a high and stable CO2/CH4 selectivity under realistic, mixed-gas conditions. Here, amidoxime-functionalized PIM-1 (AO-PIM-1) was prepared and examined for fundamental structure/property relationships. Qualitative NLDFT pore-size distribution analyses of physisorption isotherms (N2 at -196 oC; CO2 at 0 oC) reveal a tightened microstructure indicating size-sieving ultra-microporosity (<7Å). AO-PIM-1 demonstrated a three-fold increase in αD(CO2/CH4) over PIM-1, surpassing the 2008 upper bound with P(CO2)=1153Barrer and ideal α(CO2/CH4)=34. Under a 50:50 CO2:CH4 mixed-gas feed, AO-PIM-1 showed less selectivity loss than PIM-1, maintaining a mixed-gas α(CO2/CH4) ~21 across a 20bar pressure range. Conversely, PIM-1 endured up to 60% increases in mixed-gas CH4 permeability over pure-gas values concurrent with a selectivity of only ~8 at 20bar. A pervasive intermolecular hydrogen bonding network in AO-PIM-1 predominantly yields a rigidified microstructure that mitigates CO2-induced matrix dilations, reducing detrimental mixed-gas CH4 copermeation. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Winter greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4 and N2O from a sub-alpine grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hagedorn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes were measured during the winter 2010/2011 at a~sub-alpine managed grassland in Switzerland using concentration gradients within the snowpack (CO2, CH4, N2O and the eddy covariance method (CO2. Measured snow densities were used to calculate the respective greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes. Mean winter fluxes based on the gradient method were 0.74 ± 0.53 μmol m−2 s−1 for CO2, −0.14 ± 0.09 nmol m−2 s−1 for CH4 and 0.23 ± 0.23 nmol m−2 s−1 for N2O, respectively. While CO2 and CH4 fluxes decreased with progressing winter season N2O fluxes did not follow a~seasonal pattern. Key variables driving the fluxes of CO2 and CH4 were soil surface temperatures and snow-water equivalent. N2O fluxes were only poorly explained by any of the measured factors in the soil and snow. Spatial variability across the valley floor was smallest for CO2 and largest for N2O. During the winter season 2010/2011 (November–April greenhouse gas fluxes accumulated to 631–670 g CO2 m−2, −0.04 g CH4 m−2 and 0.13 g N2O m−2. Total greenhouse gas emissions from the grassland were between 669–709 g CO2 eq. m−2, with N2O contributing 5% to the overall budget and CH4 reducing the budget by less than 1%. In comparison with the CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance, the gradient technique underestimated the effluxes during the main winter period by 40% but yielded similar fluxes on a seasonal basis. Cumulative budgets of CO2 were smaller than emission reported for other sub-alpine meadows in the Swiss Alps and the Rocky Mountains. It remains unclear how GHG emissions are altered by changes in climate and according snow conditions.

  5. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 1. Composition and thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Cressault, Yann; Yang, Fei; Niu, Chunping; Sun, Hao

    2016-10-01

    As the first part of this series of papers, a new calculation method for composition and thermodynamic properties of 2-temperature plasma considering condensed species under local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption is presented. The 2-T mass action law and chemical potential are used to determine the composition of multiphase system. The thermo-physical properties of CO2-CH4 mixture, which may be a possible substitution for SF6, are calculated by this method as an example. The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the thermo-physical properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  6. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 2. Transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chunping; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Yang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohua; Pang, Qingping

    2016-10-01

    The transport coefficients, namely thermal conductivity, viscosity and electrical conductivity, of CO2-CH4 mixture in and out of LTE are calculated in this paper. The calculation was based on local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption. The 2-temperature composition results obtained with consideration of condensed phase in the previous paper (Part I) of this series were used in this calculation. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman-Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The results are presented for different temperatures (300-30 000 K), pressures (0.1-10 atm), non-equilibrium degrees (1-5), and CH4 molar proportions (0-100%). The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the composition and thermodynamic properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  7. Adsorption of CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O, and N(2) on MOF-5, MOF-177, and zeolite 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipendu; Bao, Zongbi; Jia, Feng; Deng, Shuguang

    2010-03-01

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O, and N(2) on two newly discovered adsorbents, metal-organic frameworks MOF-5 and MOF-177 and one traditional adsorbent, zeolite 5A were determined to assess their efficacy for CO(2), CH(4), and N(2)O removal from air and separation of CO(2) from CH(4) in pressure swing adsorption processes. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data for CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O, and N(2) on all three adsorbents were measured volumetrically at 298K and gas pressures up to 800 Torr. Adsorption equilibrium capacities of CO(2) and CH(4) on all three adsorbents were determined gravimetrically at 298 K and elevated pressures (14 bar for CO(2) and 100 bar for CH(4)). The Henry's law and Langmuir adsorption equilibrium models were applied to correlate the adsorption isotherms, and a classical micropore diffusion model was used to analyze the adsorption kinetic data. The adsorption equilibrium selectivity was calculated from the ratio of Henry's constants, and the adsorbent selection parameter for pressure swing adsorption processes were determined by combining the equilibrium selectivity and working capacity ratio. Based on the selectivity and adsorbent selection parameter results, zeolite 5A is a better adsorbent for removing CO(2) and N(2)O from air and separation of CO(2) from CH(4), whereas MOF-177 is the adsorbent of choice for removing CH(4) from air. However, both MOF adsorbents have larger adsorption capacities for CO(2) and CH(4) than zeolite 5A at elevated pressures, suggesting MOF-5 and MOF-177 are better adsorbents for CO(2) and CH(4) storage. The CH(4) adsorption capacity of 22 wt.% on MOF-177 at 298K and 100 bar is probably the largest adsorption uptake of CH(4) on any dry adsorbents. The average diffusivity of CO(2), CH(4) and N(2)O in MOF-5 and MOF-177 is in the order of 10(-9) m(2)/s, as compared to 10(-11) m(2)/s for CO(2), CH(4) and N(2)O in zeolite 5A. The effects of gas pressure on diffusivity for different adsorabte

  8. Pure- and Mixed-Gas Permeation Properties of Highly Selective and Plasticization Resistant Hydroxyl-Diamine-Based 6FDA Polyimides for CO2/CH4 Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alaslai, Nasser Y.

    2016-01-05

    The effect of hydroxyl functionalization on the m-phenylene diamine moiety of 6FDA dianhydride-based polyimides was investigated for gas separation applications. Pure-gas permeability coefficients of He, H2, N2, O2, CH4, and CO2 were measured at 35 °C and 2 atm. The introduction of hydroxyl groups in the diamine moiety of 6FDA-diaminophenol (DAP) and 6FDA-diamino resorcinol (DAR) polyimides tightened the overall polymer structure due to increased charge transfer complex formation compared to unfunctionalized 6FDA-m-phenylene diamine (mPDA). The BET surface areas based on nitrogen adsorption of 6FDA-DAP (54 m2g−1) and of 6FDA-DAR (45 m2g−1) were ~18% and 32% lower than that of 6FDA-mPDA (66 m2g−1). 6FDA-mPDA had a pure-gas CO2 permeability of 14 Barrer and CO2/CH4 selectivity of 70. The hydroxyl-functionalized polyimides 6FDA-DAP and 6FDA-DAR exhibited very high pure-gas CO2/CH4 selectivities of 92 and 94 with moderate CO2 permeability of 11 and 8 Barrer, respectively. It was demonstrated that hydroxyl-containing polyimide membranes maintained very high CO2/CH4 selectivity (~ 75 at CO2 partial pressure of 10 atm) due to CO2 plasticization resistance when tested under high-pressure mixed-gas conditions. Functionalization with hydroxyl groups may thus be a promising strategy towards attaining highly selective polyimides for economical membrane-based natural gas sweetening.

  9. Adsorption kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their equimolar mixture on coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Naney, M.T.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cole, D.R.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150????m, 1-2??mm, and 5-10??mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40????C and 35????C over a pressure range of 1.4-6.9??MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150????m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Naney, Michael {Mike} T [ORNL; Blencoe, James {Jim} G [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Pashin, Jack C. [Geological Survey of Alabama; Carroll, Richard E. [Geological Survey of Alabama

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  11. Role of intrachain rigidity in the plasticization of intrinsically microporous triptycene-based polyimide membranes in mixed-Gas CO2/CH4 separations

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2014-11-11

    Based on high-pressure pure- and mixed-gas (50:50) CO2/CH4 separation properties of two intrinsically microporous triptycene-based polyimides (TPDA-TMPD and TPDA-6FpDA), the intrachain rigidity central to "conventional PIM" design principles is not a singular solution to intrinsic plasticization resistance. Despite the significant intrachain rigidity in TPDA-TMPD, a 300% increase in PMIX(CH4), 50% decrease in α(CO2/CH4) from 24 to 12, and continuous increase in PMIX(CO2) occurred from 4 to 30 bar. On the other hand, the more flexible and densely packed TPDA-6FpDA exhibited a slight upturn in PMIX(CO2) at 20 bar similar to a dense cellulose acetate (CA) film, also reported here, despite a 4-fold higher CO2 sorption capacity. Microstructural investigations suggest that the interconnected O2- and H2-sieving ultramicroporosity of TPDA-TMPD is more sensitive to slight CO2-induced dilations and is the physical basis for a more extensive and accelerated plasticization. Interchain rigidity, potentially by interchain interactions, is emphasized and may be facilitated by intrachain mobility.

  12. Ten years of CO2, CH4, CO and N2O fluxes over Western Europe inferred from atmospheric measurements at Mace Head, Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Jennings

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated CO2, CH4, CO and N2O emission fluxes over the British Isles and Western Europe using atmospheric radon observations and concentrations recorded at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station between 1996 and 2005. We classified hourly concentration data into either long-range European or regional sources from Ireland and UK, by using local wind speed data in conjunction with 222Rn and 212Pb threshold criteria. This leads to the selection of about 7% of the total data for both sectors. We then used continuous 222Rn measurements and assumptions on the surface emissions of 222Rn to deduce the unknown fluxes of CO2, CH4, CO and N2O. Our results have been compared to the UNFCCC, EMEP and EDGAR statistical inventories and to inversion results for CH4. For Western Europe, we found yearly mean fluxes of 4.1±1.5 106 kg CO2 km−2 yr−1 , 11.9±2.0 103 kg CH4 km−2 yr−1, 12.8±4.2 103 kg CO km−2 yr−1 and 520.2±129.2 kg N2O km−2 yr−1, respectively, for CO2, CH4, CO and N2O over the period 1996–2005. The method based upon 222Rn to infer emissions has many sources of systematic errors, in particular its poorly known and variable footprint, uncertainties in 222Rn soil fluxes and in atmospheric mixing of air masses with background air. However, these biases are likely to remain constant in the long-term, which makes the method quite efficient to detect trends in fluxes. Over the last ten years period, the decrease of the anthropogenic CH4, CO and N2O emissions in Europe estimated by inventories (respectively −30%, −35% and −23% is confirmed by the Mace Head data within 2%. Therefore, the 222Rn method provides an independent way of verification of changes in national emissions derived from inventories. Using European-wide estimates of the CO/CO2 emission ratio, we also found that it is possible to separate the fossil fuel CO2 emissions contribution from the one of total CO2 fluxes. The fossil fuel CO2 emissions and their trends

  13. Fluid geochemistry and soil gas fluxes (CO2-CH4-H2S) at a promissory Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System: The Acoculco caldera, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, L.; Bernard-Romero, R.; Mazot, A.; Taran, Y. A.; Guevara, M.; Santoyo, E.

    2014-09-01

    The Acoculco caldera has been recognized by the Mexican Federal Electricity Company (CFE) as a Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System (HDR) and could be a potential candidate for developing an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Apart from hydrothermally altered rocks, geothermal manifestations within the Acoculco caldera are scarce. Close to ambient temperature bubbling springs and soil degassing are reported inside the caldera while a few springs discharge warm water on the periphery of the caldera. In this study, we infer the origin of fluids and we characterize for the first time the soil degassing dynamic. Chemical and isotopic (δ18O-δD) analyses of spring waters indicate a meteoric origin and the dissolution of CO2 and H2S gases, while gas chemical and isotopic compositions (N2/He, 3He/4He, 13C, 15N) reveal a magmatic contribution with both MORB- and arc-type signatures which could be explained by an extension regime created by local and regional fault systems. Gas geothermometry results are in agreement with temperature measured during well drilling (260 °C-300 °C). Absence of well-developed water reservoir at depth impedes re-equilibration of gases upon surface. A multi-gas flux survey including CO2, CH4 and H2S measurements was performed within the caldera. Using the graphical statistical analysis (GSA) approach, CO2 flux measurements were classified in two populations. Population A, representing 95% of measured fluxes is characterized by low values (mean: 18 g m- 2 day- 1) while the remaining 5% fluxes belonging to Population B are much higher (mean: 5543 g m- 2 day- 1). This low degassing rate probably reflects the low permeability of the system, a consequence of the intense hydrothermal alteration observed in the upper 800 m of volcanic rocks. An attempt to interpret the origin and transport mechanism of these fluxes is proposed by means of flux ratios as well as by numerical modeling. Measurements with CO2/CH4 and CO2/H2S flux ratios similar to mass ratios

  14. Transport and transformation of soil-derived CO2, CH4 and DOC sustain CO2 supersaturation in small boreal streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasilo, Terhi; Hutchins, Ryan H S; Ruiz-González, Clara; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    Streams are typically supersaturated in carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), and are recognized as important components of regional carbon (C) emissions in northern landscapes. Whereas there is consensus that in most of the systems the CO2 emitted by streams represents C fixed in the terrestrial ecosystem, the pathways delivering this C to streams are still not well understood. We assessed the contribution of direct soil CO2 injection versus the oxidation of soil-derived dissolved organic C (DOC) and CH4 in supporting CO2 supersaturation in boreal streams in Québec. We measured the concentrations of CO2, CH4 and DOC in 43 streams and adjacent soil waters during summer base-flow period. A mass balance approach revealed that all three pathways are significant, and that the mineralization of soil-derived DOC and CH4 accounted for most of the estimated stream CO2 emissions (average 75% and 10%, respectively), and that these estimated contributions did not change significantly between the studied low order (≤3) streams. Whereas some of these transformations take place in the channel proper, our results suggest that they mainly occur in the hyporheic zones of the streams. Our results further show that stream CH4 emissions can be fully explained by soil CH4 inputs. This study confirms that these boreal streams, and in particular their hyporheic zones, are extremely active processors of soil derived DOC and CH4, not just vents for soil produced CO2.

  15. Technical Note: Latitude-time variations of atmospheric column-average dry air mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and N2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rettinger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM-based chemistry-transport model (ACTM simulation with total column measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. The model is able to capture observed trends, seasonal cycles and inter hemispheric gradients at most sampled locations for all three species. The model-observation agreements are best for CO2, because the simulation uses fossil fuel inventories and an inverse model estimate of non-fossil fuel fluxes. The ACTM captures much of the observed seasonal variability in CO2 and N2O total columns (~81 % variance, R>0.9 between ACTM and TCCON for 19 out of 22 cases. These results suggest that the transport processes in troposphere and stratosphere are well represented in ACTM. Thus the poor correlation between simulated and observed CH4 total columns, particularly at tropical and extra-tropical sites, have been attributed to the uncertainties in surface emissions and loss by hydroxyl radicals. While the upward-looking total column measurements of CO2 contains surface flux signals at various spatial and temporal scales, the N2O measurements are strongly affected by the concentration variations in the upper troposphere and stratosphere.

  16. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (CO2-CH4 From Municipal Solid Waste Management Using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA in Mahdsht City (IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naderi M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Waste production is inevitable in any society and consequently waste management is one of the main roles of any municipality. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate different waste management scenarios. According to the amount and composition of the generated waste, considering environmental, economic and technical issues, several options are existed. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA as a decision support tool has been used in several cases to select the most appropriate option. In this paper, production of greenhouse gases (CO2-CH4 in different waste management options in Mahdasht city (Iran has been studied using IWM software and LCA application. Two scenarios has been defined, the first includes direct and complete transferring of waste to the landfill, and the second includes transferring of 76% of total waste to the landfill and recycling 20% and composting 4%. The questionnaires were fulfilled by the staffs and field surveying. The life cycle inventory cataloging was done using the IWM-1model according to environmental point of view. The amount of produced greenhouse gases in the first scenario is about 9,218 tons and in the second scenario is about 6,801 tons. Results indicate that implementing recycling and composting operation can lead to the 26% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption reduction of a waste management system.

  17. Potential of a geostationary geoCARB mission to estimate surface emissions of CO2, CH4 and CO in a polluted urban environment: case study Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Denis M.; Polonsky, Igor N.; Utembe, Steven R.; Rayner, Peter J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical experiment to test the ability of the proposed geoCARB satellite to estimate emissions of trace gases (CO2, CH4 and CO) in the polluted urban environment of Shanghai. The meteorology over Shanghai is simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for a 9-day period in August 2010. The meteorology includes water and ice clouds. The chemistry version of WRF (WRF-Chem V3.6.1) is used to predict the chemical composition, mass density and number density of aerosol species. Spectra in the bands measured by geoCARB are calculated, including the effects of polarisation and multiple scattering of radiation by clouds, aerosols and molecules. Instrument noise is added, and column-averaged trace-gas mole fractions are estimated from the noisy spectra using an algorithm based on that for the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) but adapted to geoCARB. As expected, the high aerosol loadings are challenging. However, when the retrieval algorithm is provided with regionally adjusted aerosol optical properties, as might be determined from observations of dark targets within the field of regard, the accuracies of retrieved concentrations are comparable to those reported earlier for geoCARB. Statistics of the errors in the retrieved column-averaged concentrations are used to predict the reduction in uncertainty of surface emissions possible with remotely sensed data.

  18. Soil CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes from an afforested lowland raised peatbog in Scotland: implications for drainage and restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. L. Morison

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of tree (lodgepole pine planting with and without intensive drainage on soil greenhouse gas fluxes was assessed after 45 yr at a raised peatbog in West Flanders Moss, central Scotland. Fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O from the soil were monitored over a 2-yr period every 2 to 4 weeks using the static opaque chamber method in a randomised experimental block trial with the following treatments: drained and planted (DP, undrained and planted (uDP, undrained and unplanted (uDuP, and for reference also from an adjoining near pristine area of bog at East Flanders Moss (n-pris. There was a strong seasonal pattern in both CO2 and CH4 effluxes which were significantly higher in late spring and summer months, reflecting seasonal temperature changes. Effluxes of N2O were low and no significant differences were observed between the treatments. Annual CH4 emissions increased with the proximity of the water table to the soil surface across treatments in the order: DP 4 ha−1 yr−1, respectively. For CO2, effluxes increased in the order uDP 2 ha−1 yr−1, respectively. CO2 effluxes dominated the calculated global warming potential (GWP of the net fluxes for each treatment (76–98%, and only in the n-pris site was CH4 a substantial contribution (23%. Based on soil effluxes only, the near pristine (n-pris peatbog had 43% higher net GWP compared with the DP treatment because of high CH4 effluxes and the DP treatment had 33% higher GWP compared with the uDP because drainage increased CO2 effluxes. Restoration is likely to increase CH4 emissions, but reduce CO2 effluxes. Including estimates of CO2 uptake by vegetation from similar peatbog sites suggests that the total GWP of restored peatbog would be about half that of the peatbog covered by woodland.

  19. Effects of hydroxyl-functionalization and sub-Tg thermal annealing on high pressure pure- and mixed-gas CO2/CH4 separation by polyimide membranes based on 6FDA and triptycene-containing dianhydrides

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2015-02-01

    A sub-Tg thermally-annealed (250°C, 24h) ultra-microporous PIM-polyimide bearing a 9,10-diisopropyl-triptycene contortion center and hydroxyl-functionalized diamine (2,2-bis(3-amino-4-hydroxyphenyl)-hexafluoropropane, APAF) exhibited plasticization resistance up to 50bar for a 1:1 CO2/CH4 feed mixture, with a 9-fold higher CO2 permeability (30Barrer) and 2-fold increase in CO2/CH4 permselectivity (~50) over conventional dense cellulose acetate membranes at 10bar CO2 partial pressure. Interestingly, mixed-gas CO2/CH4 permselectivities were 10-20% higher than those evaluated under pure-gas conditions due to reduction of mixed-gas CH4 permeability by co-permeation of CO2. Gas transport, physisorption and fluorescence studies indicated a sieving pore-structure engaged in inter-chain charge transfer complexes (CTCs), similar to that of low-free-volume 6FDA-APAF polyimide. The isosteric heat of adsorption of CO2 as well as CO2/CH4 solubility selectivities varied negligibly upon replacement of OH with CH3 but CTC formation was hindered, CO2 sorption increased, CO2 permeability increased ~3-fold, CO2/CH4 permselectivity dropped to ~30 and CH4 mixed-gas co-permeation increased. These results suggest that hydroxyl-functionalization did not cause preferential polymer-gas interactions but primarily elicited diffusion-dominated changes owing to a tightened microstructure more resistant to CO2-induced dilations. Solution-processable hydroxyl-functionalized PIM-type polyimides provide a new platform of advanced materials that unites the high selectivities of low-free-volume polymers with the high permeabilities of PIM-type materials particularly for natural gas sweetening applications.

  20. Ground-based, integrated path differential absorption LIDAR measurement of CO2, CH4, and H2O near 1.6  μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gerd A; Plusquellic, David F

    2016-08-10

    A ground-based, integrated path, differential absorption light detection and ranging (IPDA LIDAR) system is described and characterized for a series of nighttime studies of CO2, CH4, and H2O. The transmitter is based on an actively stabilized, continuous-wave, single-frequency external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) operating from 1.60 to 1.65 μm. The fixed frequency output of the ECDL is microwave sideband tuned using an electro-optical phase modulator driven by an arbitrary waveform generator and filtered using a confocal cavity to generate a sequence of 123 frequencies separated by 300 MHz. The scan sequence of single sideband frequencies of 600 ns duration covers a 37 GHz region at a spectral scan rate of 10 kHz (100 μs per scan). Simultaneously, an eye-safe backscatter LIDAR system at 1.064 μm is used to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer. IPDA LIDAR measurements of the CO2 and CH4 dry air mixing ratios are presented in comparison with those from a commercial cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument. Differences between the IPDA LIDAR and CRD concentrations in several cases appear to be well correlated with the atmospheric aerosol structure from the backscatter LIDAR measurements. IPDA LIDAR dry air mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 are determined with fit uncertainties of 2.8 μmol/mol (ppm) for CO2 and 22 nmol/mol (ppb) for CH4 over 30 s measurement periods. For longer averaging times (up to 1200 s), improvements in these detection limits by up to 3-fold are estimated from Allan variance analyses. Two sources of systematic error are identified and methods to remove them are discussed, including speckle interference from wavelength decorrelation and the seed power dependence of amplified spontaneous emission. Accuracies in the dry air retrievals of CO2 and CH4 in a 30 s measurement period are estimated at 4 μmol/mol (1% of ambient levels) and 50 nmol/mol (3%), respectively.

  1. Soil-atmospheric exchange of CO2, CH4, and N2O in three subtropical forest ecosystems in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X.; Liu, S.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Zhou, C.

    2006-01-01

    The magnitude, temporal, and spatial patterns of soil-atmospheric greenhouse gas (hereafter referred to as GHG) exchanges in forests near the Tropic of Cancer are still highly uncertain. To contribute towards an improvement of actual estimates, soil-atmospheric CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes were measured in three successional subtropical forests at the Dinghushan Nature Reserve (hereafter referred to as DNR) in southern China. Soils in DNR forests behaved as N2O sources and CH4 sinks. Annual mean CO2, N2O, and CH4 fluxes (mean ?? SD) were 7.7 ?? 4.6MgCO2-Cha-1 yr-1, 3.2 ?? 1.2 kg N2ONha-1 yr-1, and 3.4 ?? 0.9 kgCH4-Cha-1 yr-1, respectively. The climate was warm and wet from April through September 2003 (the hot-humid season) and became cool and dry from October 2003 through March 2004 (the cool-dry season). The seasonality of soil CO2 emission coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with high CO2 emission rates in the hot-humid season and low rates in the cool-dry season. In contrast, seasonal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes were not clear, although higher CH4 uptake rates were often observed in the cool-dry season and higher N2O emission rates were often observed in the hot-humid season. GHG fluxes measured at these three sites showed a clear increasing trend with the progressive succession. If this trend is representative at the regional scale, CO2 and N2O emissions and CH4 uptake in southern China may increase in the future in light of the projected change in forest age structure. Removal of surface litter reduced soil CO2 effluxes by 17-44% in the three forests but had no significant effect on CH4 absorption and N2O emission rates. This suggests that microbial CH4 uptake and N2O production was mainly related to the mineral soil rather than in the surface litter layer. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes in an Ultisol treated with sewage sludge and cultivated with castor bean Fluxos de CO2, CH4 e N2O de um Argissolo tratado com lodo de esgoto e cultivado com mamona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Jacob Chiaradia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic residue application into soil alter the emission of gases to atmosphere and CO2, CH4, N2O may contribute to increase the greenhouse effect. This experiment was carried out in a restoration area on a dystrophic Ultisol (PVAd to quantify greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from soil under castor bean cultivation, treated with sewage sludge (SS or mineral fertilizer. The following treatments were tested: control without N; FertMin = mineral fertilizer; SS5 = 5 t ha-1 SS (37.5 kg ha-1 N; SS10 = 10 t ha-1 SS (75 kg ha-1 N; and SS20 = 20 t ha-1 SS (150 kg ha-1 N. The amount of sludge was based on the recommended rate of N for castor bean (75 kg ha-1, the N level of SS and the mineralization fraction of N from SS. Soil gas emission was measured for 21 days. Sewage sludge and mineral fertilizers altered the CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes. Soil moisture had no effect on GHG emissions and the gas fluxes was statistically equivalent after the application of FertMin and of 5 t ha-1 SS. The application of the entire crop N requirement in the form of SS practically doubled the Global Warming Potential (GWP and the C equivalent emissions in comparison with FertMin treatments.A aplicação de resíduos orgânicos no solo pode alterar a emissão de gases para atmosfera e dentre estes, CO2, CH4 e N2O, podem contribuir para o aumento do efeito estufa. Este ensaio foi realizado com o objetivo de quantificar a emissão de gases do efeito estufa (GEE de um Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico (PVAd tratado com lodo de esgoto (LE e cultivado com mamoneira em área de reforma de canavial. Os tratamentos testados foram: Controle sem N; FertMin = fertilizante mineral; LE5 = 5 t ha-1 de LE, equivalente a 37,5 kg ha-1 de N; LE10 = 10 t ha-1 de LE, equivalente a 75 kg ha-1 de N; e LE20 = 20 t ha-1 de LE, equivalente a 150 kg ha-1 de N. A quantidade de lodo foi baseada na rate recomendada de N para a mamoneira (75 kg ha-1, nas quantidades de N no LE e na fração de mineraliza

  3. Measurements of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO over a 2-km Outdoor Path with Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, G. B.; Giorgetta, F. R.; Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Sinclair, L. C.; Cromer, C.; Baumann, E.; Newbury, N. R.; Kofler, J.; Petron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous sensing of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO over a 2-km outdoor open air path using dual-frequency-comb absorption spectroscopy (DCS). Our implementation of the DCS technique simultaneously offers broad spectral coverage (>8 THz, 267 cm-1) and fine spectral point spacing (100 MHz, 0.0033 cm-1) with a coherent eye-safe beam. The spectrometer, which is adapted from [Zolot et al., 2012], consists of two mutually coherent Erbium-doped fiber frequency-comb lasers which create a broad spectrum of perfectly spaced narrow linewidth frequency elements (';comb teeth') near 1.6 μm. The comb light is transmitted by a telescope and active steering mirrors from the roof of the NIST Boulder laboratory to a 50-cm flat mirror located 1 km away. The return light is received by a second telescope and carried via multimode fiber to a detector. The greenhouse gas absorption attenuates the teeth from the two combs that are coincident with the relevant molecular resonant frequencies. We purposefully offset the frequencies between the two frequency combs in a Vernier-like fashion so that each pair of comb teeth from the two combs results in a unique rf heterodyne beat frequency on the photodiode. The spectral spacing between subsequent comb teeth pairs is 100 MHz, far lower than the ~4 GHz linewidths of small molecule absorption features in the atmosphere. Because of the narrow comb linewidth, there is an essentially negligible instrument lineshape. The measured absorption spectrum can thus resolve neighboring absorption features of different species, and can be compared directly with HITRAN and recent greenhouse gas absorption models developed for satellite- and ground-based carbon observatories to determine the path-integrated concentrations of the absorbing species. Measurements covering the complete 30013←00001 absorption band of CO2 and absorption features of CH4, H2O and HDO between 1.6-1.67 μm were performed under a variety of atmospheric conditions. During

  4. Fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O at two European beech forests: linking soil gas production profiles with soil and stem fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Martin; Machacova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Urban, Otmar; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil and plant surfaces are known to exchange greenhouse gases with the atmosphere. Some gases like nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) can be produced and re-consumed in different soil depths and soil compartments, so that elevated concentrations of CH4 or N2O in the soil do not necessarily mean a net efflux from the soil into the atmosphere. Soil aeration, and thus the oxygen status can underlay a large spatial variability within the soil on the plot and profile scale, but also within soil aggregates. Thus, conditions suitable for production and consumption of CH4 and N2O can vary on different scales in the soil. Plant surfaces can also emit or take up CH4 and N2O, and these fluxes can significantly contribute to the net ecosystem exchange. Since roots usually have large intercellular spaces or aerenchyma they may represent preferential transport ways for soil gases, linking possibly elevated soil gas concentrations in the subsoil in a "shortcut" to the atmosphere. We tested the hypothesis that the spatial variability of the soil-atmosphere fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O is caused by the heterogeneity in soil properties. Therefore, we measured soil-atmosphere gas fluxes, soil gas concentrations and soil diffusivity profiles and did a small scale field assessment of soil profiles on the measurments plots. We further tried to link vertical profiles of soil gas concentrations and diffusivity to derive the production and consumption profiles, and to link these profiles to the stem-atmosphere flux rates of individual trees. Measurements were conducted in two mountain beech forests with different geographical and climatic conditions (White Carpathians, Czech Republic; Black Forest, Germany). Gas fluxes at stem and soil levels were measured simultaneously using static chamber systems and chromatographic and continuous laser analyses. Monitoring simultaneously vertical soil gas profiles allowed to assess the within-soil gas fluxes, and thus to localize the production and

  5. High pressure pure- and mixed-gas separation of CO2/CH4 by thermally-rearranged and carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from a polyimide of intrinsic microporosity

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2013-11-01

    Natural gas sweetening, one of the most promising venues for the growth of the membrane gas separation industry, is dominated by polymeric materials with relatively low permeabilities and moderate selectivities. One strategy towards improving the gas transport properties of a polymer is enhancement of microporosity either by design of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) or by thermal treatment of polymeric precursors. For the first time, the mixed-gas CO2/CH4 transport properties are investigated for a complete series of thermally-rearranged (TR) (440°C) and carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes (600, 630 and 800°C) derived from a polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-6FDA-OH). The pressure dependence of permeability and selectivity is reported up to 30bar for 1:1, CO2:CH4 mixed-gas feeds at 35°C. The TR membrane exhibited ~15% higher CO2/CH4 selectivity relative to pure-gas feeds due to reductions in mixed-gas CH4 permeability reaching 27% at 30bar. This is attributed to increased hindrance of CH4 transport by co-permeation of CO2. Interestingly, unusual increases in mixed-gas CH4 permeabilities relative to pure-gas values were observed for the CMS membranes, resulting in up to 50% losses in mixed-gas selectivity over the applied pressure range. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. 助剂对CO2/CH4重整Ni基催化剂性能的影响%Influence of promoters to the performances of Ni-based catalyst for CO2 reforming of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李基涛; 陈明旦; 严前古; 万惠霖; 区泽棠

    1999-01-01

    用程序升温(TPR、TPO)和活性评价等方法研究助剂(MgO,CaO,La2O3和Ce2O3)对CO2/CH4重整制合成气Ni基催化剂性能的影响.结果表明MgO和Ce2O3能较多地提高CH4和CO2的转化率,助剂Ce2O3能最有效地抑制催化剂的积炭.

  7. Effect of preparation methods on the catalytic performance of Ni-Al2 O3 for CO2-CH4 reforming%制备方法对 Ni-Al2 O3催化剂在 CO2-CH4重整反应中催化性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫文龙; 马凤云; 刘月娥; 刘景梅; 钟梅; 艾沙·努拉洪

    2015-01-01

    为提高镍基催化剂的干法重整活性,采用溶液燃烧法、等体积浸渍法、胶体磨循环浸渍法和水热-沉积法制备了SCM、IMP、T310和HTP四种催化剂,在800℃考察了其在CO2-CH4重整反应中的催化性能,并结合ICP-AES、N2吸附-脱附、XRD、H2-TPR和TEM等表征手段对催化剂进行分析。结果表明,水热-沉积法和胶体磨循环浸渍法制备的催化剂比表面积较大,分别为190.83和182.21 m2/g,可为反应提供较多的接触面积,进而提高催化剂的初始活性( HTP试样CH4和CO2初始转化率相对较高,分别达85.15%和90.84%);而溶液燃烧法和等体积浸渍法制备的催化剂具有较多的NiAl2 O4尖晶石,其还原峰面积占总还原峰面积90%以上,还原后可获得更多晶粒粒径更小的稳定活性组分Ni ( SCM和IMP试样稳定性更好,反应50 h后活性超过HTP和T310试样,100 h后CH4转化率方降至50%以下)。因此,决定催化剂稳定活性的更重要的因素应该是活性组分Ni晶粒粒径的大小及其抗烧结能力的强弱。%To investigate the catalytic performance of nickel-based catalysts for carbon dioxide reforming of methane, four samples, SCM, IMP, T310 and HTP, with same contents of Ni were prepared by solution combustion method, incipient-wetness impregnation method, colloid mill circulating impregnation method and hydrothermal-precipitation method. The catalytic performance was tested at 800 ℃. The samples were characterized with ICP-AES, N2 absorption-desorption method, XRD, H2-TPR and TEM techniques. It was shown that the preparation methods had significant effects on the catalytic performance. The HTP and T310 samples had larger specific surface area, 190. 83 m2/g and 182. 21 m2/g respectively, which could provide more active sites and improve the activity ( the initial conversion of CH4 and CO2 of HTP was up to 85. 15% and 90. 84%). The reduction peak area of NiAl2O4 of the catalysts prepared by solution

  8. Evolution of CO$_2$, CH$_4$, and OCS abundances relative to H$_2$O in the coma of comet 67P around perihelion from Rosetta/VIRTIS-H observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bockelée-Morvan, D; Erard, S; Capaccioni, F; Leyrat, C; Filacchione, G; Drossart, P; Encrenaz, T; Biver, N; de Sanctis, M -C; Schmitt, B; Kührt, E; Capria, M -T; Combes, M; Combi, M; Fougere, N; Arnold, G; Fink, U; Ip, W; Migliorini, A; Piccioni, G; Tozzi, G

    2016-01-01

    Infrared observations of the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko were carried out from July to September 2015, i.e., around perihelion (13 August 2015), with the high-resolution channel of the VIRTIS instrument onboard Rosetta. We present the analysis of fluorescence emission lines of H$_2$O, CO$_2$, $^{13}$CO$_2$, OCS, and CH$_4$ detected in limb sounding with the field of view at 2.7-5 km from the comet centre. Measurements are sampling outgassing from the illuminated southern hemisphere, as revealed by H$_2$O and CO$_2$ raster maps, which show anisotropic distributions, aligned along the projected rotation axis. An abrupt increase of water production is observed six days after perihelion. In the mean time, CO$_2$, CH$_4$, and OCS abundances relative to water increased by a factor of 2 to reach mean values of 32%, 0.47%, and 0.18%, respectively, averaging post-perihelion data. We interpret these changes as resulting from the erosion of volatile-poor surface layers. Sustained dust ablation due to the sublimati...

  9. Evolution of CO 2 , CH 4 , and OCS abundances relative to H 2 O in the coma of comet 67P around perihelion from Rosetta /VIRTIS-H observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Crovisier, J.; Erard, S.; Capaccioni, F.; Leyrat, C.; Filacchione, G.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Biver, N.; de Sanctis, M.-C.; Schmitt, B.; Kührt, E.; Capria, M.-T.; Combes, M.; Combi, M.; Fougere, N.; Arnold, G.; Fink, U.; Ip, W.; Migliorini, A.; Piccioni, G.; Tozzi, G.

    2016-11-01

    Infrared observations of the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko were carried out from July to September 2015, i.e., around perihelion (13 August 2015), with the high-resolution channel of the VIRTIS instrument onboard Rosetta. We present the analysis of fluorescence emission lines of H$_2$O, CO$_2$, $^{13}$CO$_2$, OCS, and CH$_4$ detected in limb sounding with the field of view at 2.7-5 km from the comet centre. Measurements are sampling outgassing from the illuminated southern hemisphere, as revealed by H$_2$O and CO$_2$ raster maps, which show anisotropic distributions, aligned along the projected rotation axis. An abrupt increase of water production is observed six days after perihelion. In the mean time, CO$_2$, CH$_4$, and OCS abundances relative to water increased by a factor of 2 to reach mean values of 32%, 0.47%, and 0.18%, respectively, averaging post-perihelion data. We interpret these changes as resulting from the erosion of volatile-poor surface layers. Sustained dust ablation due to the sublimation of water ice maintained volatile-rich layers near the surface until at least the end of the considered period, as expected for low thermal inertia surface layers. The large abundance measured for CO$_2$ should be representative of the 67P nucleus original composition, and indicates that 67P is a CO$_2$-rich comet. Comparison with abundance ratios measured in the northern hemisphere shows that seasons play an important role in comet outgassing. The low CO$_2$/H$_2$O values measured above the illuminated northern hemisphere are not original, but the result of the devolatilization of the uppermost layers.

  10. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Oil sands comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves and the crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands deposits are second only to Saudi Arabia. The extraction and processing of oil sands is much more challenging than for light sweet crude oils because of the high viscosity of the bitumen contained within the oil sands and because the bitumen is mixed with sand and contains chemical impurities such as sulphur. Despite these challenges, the importance of oil sands is increasing in the energy market. To our best knowledge this is the first peer-reviewed study to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from Alberta's oil sands mining sites. We present high-precision gas chromatography measurements of 76 speciated C2-C10 VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, monoterpenes, oxygenated hydrocarbons, halocarbons and sulphur compounds) in 17 boundary layer air samples collected over surface mining operations in northeast Alberta on 10 July 2008, using the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as a research platform. In addition to the VOCs, we present simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2, which were measured in situ aboard the DC-8. Carbon dioxide, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2 and 53 VOCs (e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons, halocarbons, sulphur species) showed clear statistical enhancements (1.1-397×) over the oil sands compared to local background values and, with the exception of CO, were greater over the oil sands than at any other time during the flight. Twenty halocarbons (e.g., CFCs, HFCs, halons, brominated species) either were not enhanced or were minimally enhanced (extracted bitumen (i.e., C4-C9 alkanes, C5-C6 cycloalkanes, C6-C8 aromatics), together with CO; and (2) emissions associated with the mining effort, such as upgraders (i.e., CO2, CO, CH4, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2, C2-C4 alkanes, C2-C4 alkenes, C9 aromatics, short-lived solvents such as C2Cl4 and C2HCl3, and longer-lived species such as HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b

  11. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2–C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs, CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Weinheimer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves and the crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands deposits are second only to Saudi Arabia. The extraction and processing of oil sands is much more challenging than for light sweet crude oils because of the high viscosity of the bitumen contained within the oil sands and because the bitumen is mixed with sand and contains chemical impurities such as sulphur. Despite these challenges, the importance of oil sands is increasing in the energy market. To our best knowledge this is the first peer-reviewed study to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from Alberta's oil sands mining sites. We present high-precision gas chromatography measurements of 76 speciated C2–C10 VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, monoterpenes, oxygenates, halocarbons, and sulphur compounds in 17 boundary layer air samples collected over surface mining operations in northeast Alberta on 10 July 2008, using the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as a research platform. In addition to the VOCs, we present simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2, which were measured in situ aboard the DC-8. Methane, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2 and 53 VOCs (e.g., halocarbons, sulphur species, NMHCs showed clear statistical enhancements (up to 1.1–397× over the oil sands compared to local background values and, with the exception of CO, were higher over the oil sands than at any other time during the flight. Twenty halocarbons (e.g., CFCs, HFCs, halons, brominated species either were not enhanced or were minimally enhanced (4–C9 alkanes, C5–C6 cycloalkanes, C6–C8 aromatics, together with CO; and (2 emissions associated with the mining effort (i.e., CO2, CO, CH4, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2, C2–C4 alkanes, C2–C4 alkenes, C9 aromatics, short-lived solvents such as C2Cl4 and C2HCl3, and longer-lived species such as HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b. Prominent in the second group, SO2 and NO were

  12. The controlling factors and coupling of soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes in a temperate needle-broadleaved mixed forest%温带针阔混交林土壤碳氮气体通量的主控因子与耦合关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党旭升; 李林森; 王磊; 程淑兰; 方华军; 于贵瑞; 韩士杰; 张军辉; 王淼; 王永生; 徐敏杰

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ( CO2 ) , methane ( CH4 ) and nitrous oxide ( N2 O) are three major greenhouse gases, accounting for 80% of global warming. Forest ecosystems comprise the largest carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems, and function as important sinks and sources of atmospheric CO2 , CH4 and N2 O. Complicated interactions occur during the generation and absorption of soil CO2 , CH4 and N2 O, including synergies, tradeoffs, and randomness. High-latitude forests are experiencing the effects of significant global change ( e. g., warming, changed precipitation, and increased nitrogen deposition) , leading to great uncertainty in estimates of soil greenhouse gas fluxes. Furthermore, the factors controlling the coupling of soil CO2 , CH4 and N2 O fluxes remain unclear. This study was conducted in the temperate needle-broadleaved mixed forest of Changbai Mountain, Northeast China. The net exchange fluxes of soil CO2 , CH4 and N2 O, as well as soil temperature and soil moisture, were measured over four years (2005–2009) using static chamber and gas chromatograph techniques. The results showed that temperate needle-broadleaved mixed forest soils behaved as a source of atmospheric CO2 and N2 O but a sink of atmospheric CH4 over the course of the study. The average soil CH4 , CO2 and N2 O fluxes were estimated at -1.30 kg CH4 hm-2 a-1 , 15102.2 kg CO2 hm-2 a-1 , and 6.13 kg N2 O hm-2 a-1 , respectively. In addition, soil CO2 flux exhibited significant seasonality, and was mainly affected by soil temperature, followed by soil moisture. Seasonal variation in soil CH4 flux was less significant than that of soil CO2 and N2 O fluxes; moreover, it was positively correlated with soil moisture. When soil temperatures were within a threshold range, soil moisture determined CH4 production and oxidation in soil profiles by regulating CH4 and O2 diffusion as well as methanotrophic community activity. Similar to soil CO2 flux, soil N2 O flux was significantly correlated with soil

  13. 北极新奥尔松地区夏季近地面CO2、CH4和N2O浓度的观测研究%SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN CO2, CH4 AND N2O CONCENTRATION IN NY-(A)LESUND, SVALBARD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈清清; 朱仁斌; 徐华

    2013-01-01

    not show evidently higher atmospheric concentrations of CO2,CH4 and N2O concentration.%2008和2009年夏在北极新奥尔松地区(Ny-(A)lesund)不同苔原区域(鸟类保护区、海滩苔原、矿区、人类活动区等)监测CO2、CH4和N2O近地面浓度的时空变化并分析其可能的影响因素.2008年7月25日-8月13日和2009年7月13-26日,在不同观测区域设置常规和非常规采样点采集气体样品共239瓶并妥善保存.实验室内使用气相色谱(GC)测定准确真空瓶中温室气体(CO2、CH4和N2O)的浓度.鸟类保护区的日变化中,2008年鸟类保护区CO2和N2O日变化浓度均大于2009年约30 ppm和25 ppb.2008年海滩苔原CO2浓度均高于2009年约30 ppm;N2O浓度低于2009年11 ppb;2008年鸟类保护区CH4浓度低于2009年,而海滩苔原2008年浓度高于2009年,差值均约为0.7 ppm.这些年际变化可能由环境条件(天气变化等)和地表覆盖情况的变化引起.高海鸟活动区(HB) CO2浓度低于海鸟活动较少的区域(MB和LB);鸟类保护区CO2浓度低于海滩苔原,N2O浓度高于海滩苔原,主要原因是海鸟活动和鸟粪增加了土壤营养元素,影响苔藓植被发育并改变苔原土壤上垫面的覆盖状况.综合不同苔原区域:新奥尔松地区CO2和CH4浓度高于ZEP (Zeppelin Station)监测平均浓度,地表向大气输送CO2和CH4;而N2O低于ZEP监测的平均浓度,地表从大气吸收N2O.不同区域影响因素不同:鸟类保护区、海滩苔原和鸟岛主要是受到海鸟活动影响;矿区主要是受水分和土壤基质影响;站区和机场受到人类活动影响但并不明显,总的来说直接原因是由于地表覆盖情况以及地形不同引起.

  14. Supported Pd-Au Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production: Membrane Preparation, Characterization and Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Adolfo Iulianelli; Marjan Alavi; Giuseppe Bagnato; Simona Liguori; Jennifer Wilcox; Mohammad Reza Rahimpour; Reza Eslamlouyan; Bryce Anzelmo; Angelo Basile

    2016-01-01

    A supported Pd-Au (Au 7wt%) membrane was produced by electroless plating deposition. Permeation tests were performed with pure gas (H2, H2, N2, CO2, CH4) for long time operation. After around 400 h under testing, the composite Pd-Au membrane achieved steady state condition, with an H2/N2 ideal selectivity of around 500 at 420 °C and 50 kPa as transmembrane pressure, remaining stable up to 1100 h under operation. Afterwards, the membrane was allocated in a membrane reactor module for methane s...

  15. Strain development in unconfined coals exposed to CO2, CH4 and Ar: Effect of moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Spiers, C.; Floor, G.; Bots, P.

    2009-01-01

    Field experiments and laboratory studies have shown that swelling of coal takes place upon contact with carbon dioxide at underground pressure and temperature conditions. Understanding this swelling behavior is crucial for predicting the performance of future carbon dioxide sequestration operations

  16. Non-linear response of soil carbon gas (CO2, CH4) flux to oxygen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnicol, G.; Silver, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Soil oxygen (O2) concentration can impact soil carbon (C) fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), and is an important chemical gradient across the terrestrial-aquatic interface that drives large differences in ecosystem C storage. Few studies have established quantitative relationships between gas-phase O2 concentration and soil C fluxes in controlled settings. Though standard Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics would predict a highly non-linear relationship between O2 concentration and microbial consumption, existing studies have imposed coarse changes in O2 concentration that necessarily prevent detection of non-linearity. We report on the results of laboratory incubations designed to explore the short-term sensitivity of soil C emissions to a wide range of gas-phase O2 concentrations. Organic-rich soil was collected from a drained peatland and subjected to seven O2 concentration treatments ranging from 0.03 % - 20 % O2. We compared the fit of the observed C flux response to O2 concentration to linear, log-linear, and Michaelis-Menten functions using MSE and residual fits as performance metrics. We found that both CO2 and CH4 emissions were highly sensitive to O2 concentration, with emission rates increasing and decreasing, respectively, at higher O2. Net CH4 emission rates were attenuated at higher O2 concentrations most likely due to stimulation of gross CH4 consumption. A log-linear or Michaelis-Menten model better fit data than a linear model by both performance metrics, demonstrating, empirically, a non-linear relationship between O2 concentration and soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes. Our results suggest high O2 sensitivity of C-rich soils at the terrestrial-aquatic interface and show that the microbial response to soil redox chemistry must be measured over a biophysically meaningful range of conditions to derive relationships that accurately predict soil C fluxes.

  17. An improved gas chromatography for rapid measurement of CO2,CH4 and N2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-hong; WANG Yue-si; SUN Yang; XU Zhong-jun; LIU Guang-ren

    2006-01-01

    Combining improved injector, gas line and valve-driving modules, a GC equipped with FID and ECD, could simultaneously measure CH4, CO2 and N2O in an air sample within 4 min. Test results showed that the system has high sensitivity, resolution and precision; the linear response range of the system meets the requirement of in situ flux measurements. Thus, the system is suitable for monitoring fluxes of main greenhouse gases in terrestrial ecosystem since it is easy to use, efficacious, stable and reliable to collect data.

  18. Quantum and gravity. Blend or melange?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuethrich, Christian [University of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    Do we need to quantize gravity, as it is tacitly assumed in much of fundamental physics? The standard lore falls short of justifying an affirmative answer. Black hole thermodynamics is widely considered, faint though it may be, our firmest hint at a quantum theory of gravity - despite the failure to date to observe Hawking radiation or any other effect that would require going beyond a classical description of black holes. Hawking radiation hitherto merely enjoys a theoretical derivation in a semi-classical theory combining quantum matter with classical gravity. But how can a semi-classical melange of physical principles possibly justify that the quantum and gravity are blended into a unified fundamental theory when the latter is generally expected to reject at least some of the principles in the former?.

  19. Experiments on neutron-attenuation by water-lead mixtures; Etude experimentale de l'attenuation des neutrons dans les melanges plomb-eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauge, R.; Millot, J.P.; Rastoin, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The penetration of fission neutrons in water-lead mixtures has been investigated in the NAIADE facility. The slopes of the thermal and fast fluxes (the latter measured with a dosimeter) remain similar when the volume proportion of water is greater than 65 per cent. For smaller water contents, the measurements show the evidence of streaming presumably due to slowing-down neutrons of energy smaller than 300 keV. (author) [French] La propagation des neutrons de fission a ete etudiee dans les melanges plomb-eau au moyen du dispositif NAIADE. La pente du flux thermique et la pente du flux rapide (obtenue au moyen d'un dosimetre) restent voisines lorsque la proportion d'eau dans le melange depasse 65 pour cent en volume. Pour des proportions inferieures les mesures mettent en evidence un 'streaming' de neutrons en ralentissement d'energie probablement inferieure a 300 keV. (auteur)

  20. New Yorker Melange: Interactive Brew of Personalized Venue Recommendation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahálka, J.; Rudinac, S.; Worring, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose New Yorker Melange, an interactive city explorer, which navigates New York venues through the eyes of New Yorkers having a similar taste to the interacting user. To gain insight into New Yorkers' preferences and properties of the venues, a dataset of more than a million venu

  1. Etude des melanges co-continus d'acide polylactique et d'amidon thermoplastique (PLA/TPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Garcia, Maria Graciela

    Les melanges co-continus sont des melanges polymeriques ou chaque composant se trouve dans une phase continue. Pour cette raison, les caracteristiques de chacun des composants se combinent et il en resulte un materiau avec une morphologie et des proprietes particulieres. L'acide polylactique (PLA) et l'amidon thermoplastique (TPS) sont des biopolymeres qui proviennent de ressources renouvelables et qui sont biodegradables. Dans ce projet, differents melanges de PLA et TPS a une haute concentration de TPS ont ete prepares dans une extrudeuse bi-vis afin de generer des structures co-continues. Grace a la technique de lixiviation selective, le TPS est enleve pour creer une structure poreuse de PLA qui a pu etre analysee au moyen de la microtomographie R-X et de la microscopie electronique a balayage MEB. L'analyse des images 2D et 3D confirme la presence de la structure co-continue dans les melanges dont la concentration en TPS. se situe entre 66% et 80%. L'effet de deux plastifiants, le glycerol seul et le melange de glycerol et de sorbitol, dans la formulation de TPS est etudie dans ce travail. De plus, nous avons evalue l'effet du PLA greffe a l'anhydride maleique (PLAg) en tant que compatibilisant. On a trouve que la phase de TPS obtenue avec le glycerol est plus grande. L'effet de recuit sur la taille de phases est aussi analyse. Grace aux memes techniques d'analyse, on a etudie l'effet du procede de moulage par injection sur la morphologie. On a constate que les pieces injectees presentent une microstructure heterogene et differente entre la surface et le centre de la piece. Pres de la surface, une peau plus riche en PLA est presente et les phases de TPS y sont allongees sous forme de lamelles. Plus au centre de la piece, une morphologie plus cellulaire est observee pour chaque phase continue. L'effet des formulations sur les proprietes mecaniques a aussi ete etudie. Les pieces injectees dont la concentration de TPS est plus grande presentent une moindre

  2. Distinct Anaerobic Bacterial Consumers of Cellobiose-Derived Carbon in Boreal Fens with Different CO2/CH4 Production Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juottonen, Heli; Eiler, Alexander; Biasi, Christina; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Yrjälä, Kim; Fritze, Hannu

    2017-02-15

    Northern peatlands in general have high methane (CH4) emissions, but individual peatlands show considerable variation as CH4 sources. Particularly in nutrient-poor peatlands, CH4 production can be low and exceeded by carbon dioxide (CO2) production from unresolved anaerobic processes. To clarify the role anaerobic bacterial degraders play in this variation, we compared consumers of cellobiose-derived carbon in two fens differing in nutrient status and the ratio of CO2 to CH4 produced. After [(13)C]cellobiose amendment, the mesotrophic fen produced equal amounts of CH4 and CO2 The oligotrophic fen had lower CH4 production but produced 3 to 59 times more CO2 than CH4 RNA stable-isotope probing revealed that in the mesotrophic fen with higher CH4 production, cellobiose-derived carbon was mainly assimilated by various recognized fermenters of Firmicutes and by Proteobacteria The oligotrophic peat with excess CO2 production revealed a wider variety of cellobiose-C consumers, including Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, but also more unconventional degraders, such as Telmatobacter-related Acidobacteria and subphylum 3 of Verrucomicrobia Prominent and potentially fermentative Planctomycetes and Chloroflexi did not appear to process cellobiose-C. Our results show that anaerobic degradation resulting in different levels of CH4 production can involve distinct sets of bacterial degraders. By distinguishing cellobiose degraders from the total community, this study contributes to defining anaerobic bacteria that process cellulose-derived carbon in peat. Several of the identified degraders, particularly fermenters and potential Fe(III) or humic substance reducers in the oligotrophic peat, represent promising candidates for resolving the origin of excess CO2 production in peatlands.

  3. Temporal and spatial variations of soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at three differently managed grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Imer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A profound understanding of temporal and spatial variabilities of soil carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is needed to reliably quantify these fluxes and to develop future mitigation strategies. For managed grassland ecosystems, temporal and spatial variabilities of these three soil greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes occur due to changes in environmental drivers as well as fertilizer applications, harvests and grazing. To assess how such changes affect soil GHG fluxes at Swiss grassland sites, we studied three sites along an altitudinal gradient that corresponds to a management gradient: from 400 m a.s.l. (intensively managed to 1000 m a.s.l. (moderately intensive managed to 2000 m a.s.l. (extensively managed. The alpine grassland was included to study both effects of extensive management on CH4 and N2O fluxes and the different climate regime occurring at this altitude. Temporal and spatial variabilities of soil GHG fluxes and environmental drivers on various timescales were determined along transects of 16 static soil chambers at each site. All three grasslands were N2O sources, with mean annual soil fluxes ranging from 0.15 to 1.28 nmol m−2 s−1. Contrastingly, all sites were weak CH4 sinks, with soil uptake rates ranging from −0.56 to −0.15 nmol m−2 s−1. Mean annual soil and plant respiration losses of CO2, measured with opaque chambers, ranged from 5.2 to 6.5 μmol m−2 s−1. While the environmental drivers and their respective explanatory power for soil N2O emissions differed considerably among the three grasslands (adjusted r2 ranging from 0.19 to 0.42, CH4 and CO2 soil fluxes were much better constrained (adjusted r2 ranging from 0.46 to 0.80 by soil water content and air temperature, respectively. Throughout the year, spatial heterogeneity was particularly high for soil N2O and CH4 fluxes. We found permanent hot spots for soil N2O emissions as well as locations of permanently lower soil CH4 uptake rates at the extensively managed alpine site. Including hot spots was essential to obtain a representative mean soil flux for the respective ecosystem. At the intensively managed grassland, management effects clearly dominated over effects of environmental drivers on soil N2O fluxes. For CO2 and CH4, the importance of management effects did depend on the status of the vegetation (LAI.

  4. Tree species influence soil-atmosphere fluxes of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Christina; Vesterdal, Lars; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2016-04-01

    In the temperate zone, forests are the greatest terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO2, and tree species affect soil C stocks and soil CO2 emissions. When considering the total greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of the forest soil, the relevant GHGs CH4 and N2O should also be considered as they have a higher global warming potential than CO2. The presented data are first results from a field study in a common garden site in Denmark where tree species with ectomycorrhizal colonization (beech - Fagus sylvatica, oak - Quercus robur) and with arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization (maple - Acer pseudoplatanus, ash - Fraxinus excelsior) have been planted in monocultures in adjacent blocks of about 0.25 ha in the year 1973 on former arable land. The soil-atmosphere fluxes of all three gases were measured every second week since August 2015. The hypothesis is that the total GHG efflux from forest soil would differ between species, and that these differences could be related to the type of mycorrhizal association and leaf litter quality. Preliminary results (August to December 2015) indicate that tree species influence the fluxes (converted to CO2-eq) of the three GHGs. Total soil CO2 efflux was in the low end of the range reported for temperate broadleaved forests but similar to the measurements at the same site approximately ten years ago. It was highest under oak (9.6±2.4 g CO2 m-2 d-1) and lowest under maple (5.2±1.6 g CO2 m-2 d-1). In contrast, soil under oak was a small but significant sink for CH4(-0.005±0.003 g CO2-eq m-2 d-1), while there were almost no detectable CH4 fluxes in maple. Emissions of N2O were highest under beech (0.6±0.6 g CO2-eq m-2 d-1) and oak (0.2±0.09 g CO2-eq m-2 d-1) and lowest under ash (0.03±0.04 g CO2-eq m-2 d-1). In the total GHG balance, soil CH4 uptake was negligible (≤0.1% of total emissions). Emissions of N2O (converted to CO2-eq) contributed mycorrhiza and produce leaf litter with a lower lignin:N ratio.

  5. Tiber delta CO2-CH4 degassing: A possible hybrid, tectonically active Sediment-Hosted Geothermal System near Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotoli, G.; Etiope, G.; Marra, F.; Florindo, F.; Giraudi, C.; Ruggiero, L.

    2016-01-01

    Fiumicino town in the Tiber River delta, near Rome International Airport (Italy), is historically affected by large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ground and gas eruptions triggered by shallow drilling. While it is known that CO2 originates from carbonate thermometamorphism and/or mantle degassing, the origin of methane (CH4) associated with CO2 is uncertain and the outgassing spatial distribution is unknown. Combining isotope gas geochemistry, soil gas, and structural-stratigraphic analyses, we provide evidence for a hybrid fluid source system, classifiable as Sediment-Hosted Geothermal System (SHGS), where biotic CH4 from sedimentary rocks is carried by deep geothermic CO2 through active segments of a half-graben. Molecular and isotopic composition of CH4 and concentration of heavier alkanes (ethane and propane), obtained from gas vents and soil gas throughout the delta area, reveal that thermogenic CH4 (up to 3.7 vol% in soil gas; δ13CCH4: -37 to -40‰ VPDB-Vienna Peedee Belemnite, and δ2HCH4: -162 to -203‰ VSMOW - Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water in gas vents) prevails over possible microbial and abiotic components. The hydrocarbons likely result from known Meso-Cenozoic petroleum systems of the Latium Tyrrhenian coast. Overmaturation of source rocks or molecular fractionation induced by gas migration are likely responsible for increased C1/C2+ ratios. CO2 and CH4 soil gas anomalies are scattered along NW-SE and W-E alignments, which, based on borehole, geomorphologic, and structural-stratigraphic analyses, coincide with active faults of a half-graben that seems to have controlled the recent evolution of the Tiber delta. This SHGS can be a source of considerable greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere and hazards for humans and buildings.

  6. Estimating ice-melange properties with repeat UAV surveys over Store Glacier, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toberg, Nick; Ryan, Johnny; Christoffersen, Poul; Snooke, Neal; Todd, Joe; Hubbard, Alun

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, tidewater outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) have thinned and retreated when compared to the 1980s when the ice sheet was in a state of dynamic balance. With a growing amount of ice discharged into the sea by tidewater glaciers as well as more ice melting on the surface, the Greenland Ice Sheet has become the single largest cryospheric source of global sea level rise. Today, the ice sheet causes sea level rise of 1 mm per year, highlighting the need to understand the ice sheet's response to climate change. Atmospheric warming will inevitably continue to increase surface meltwater production, but the dynamic response, which includes hundreds of fast-flowing tidewater glaciers, is largely unknown. To develop new understanding of ice sheet dynamics, we investigated the mechanism whereby icebergs break off tidewater glaciers and form a proglacial ice melange. This melange is rigid in winter when sea ice and friction along the sidewalls of the fjord, or even at the sea floor, hold it together. The result is a resistive force, which reduces the rate of iceberg calving when the ice melange is rigid and is lost when the melange disappears in the summer. From early May to late July 2014, we launched unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from a basecamp on a bluff overlooking the calving front of Store Glacier, a 5 km wide tidewater glacier flowing into Uummannaq Fjord in West Greenland. The Skywalker X8 UAVs had a wing-span of 2.1m and a payload containing a high resolution camera, an autopilot system and a GPS data logger. We generated almost 70,000 georeferenced images during 63 sorties over the glacier during a 10 week field season starting 13 May 2014. The images were used to construct orhorectified mosaics and digital elevation models of the proglacial melange with Photoscan structure-from-motion software. The imagery and the DEMs were analysed statistically to understand the spatial characteristics of the ice melange. By combining the

  7. Supported Pd-Au Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production: Membrane Preparation, Characterization and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Iulianelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A supported Pd-Au (Au 7wt% membrane was produced by electroless plating deposition. Permeation tests were performed with pure gas (H2, H2, N2, CO2, CH4 for long time operation. After around 400 h under testing, the composite Pd-Au membrane achieved steady state condition, with an H2/N2 ideal selectivity of around 500 at 420 °C and 50 kPa as transmembrane pressure, remaining stable up to 1100 h under operation. Afterwards, the membrane was allocated in a membrane reactor module for methane steam reforming reaction tests. As a preliminary application, at 420 °C, 300 kPa of reaction pressure, space velocity of 4100 h−1, 40% methane conversion and 35% hydrogen recovery were reached using a commercial Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Unfortunately, a severe coke deposition affected irreversibly the composite membrane, determining the loss of the hydrogen permeation characteristics of the supported Pd-Au membrane.

  8. Shipborne solar absorption measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO and comparison with SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Velazco

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available CO, CH4, N2O and CO2 were retrieved from high resolution solar absorption spectra obtained during a ship cruise from Capetown to Bremerhaven in January/February 2003 by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Precisions of better than 0.5% for the column averaged volume mixing ratios (VMR of CH4 and CO2 are achieved using of O2 as a reference gas. Shipborne FTIR-measurements of CO and data from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT retrieved by the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS retrieval algorithm show qualitatively the same latitudinal variations. WFM-DOAS data of CH4, N2O and CO2 measured over sea exhibit a great spread. The spread is significantly reduced for satellite measurements over land and a reasonable agreement can be obtained if the shipborne data is compared with the closest SCIAMACHY measurements over land. The number of comparisons is too small to draw conclusions. However, by including only WFM-DOAS data with small errors the shipborne and WFM-DOAS data compare within 5% for CH4 and CO2 and within 30% for N2O.

  9. Shipborne solar absorption measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO and comparison with SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Warneke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available CO, CH4, N2O and CO2 were retrieved from high resolution solar absorption spectra obtained during a ship cruise from Capetown to Bremerhaven in January/February 2003 by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Precisions of better than 0.5% for the column averaged volume mixing ratios (VMR of CH4 and CO2 are achieved using of O2 as a reference gas. Shipborne FTIR-measurements of CO and data from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT retrieved by the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS retrieval algorithm show qualitatively the same latitudinal variations. WFM-DOAS data of CH4, N2O and CO2 measured over sea exhibit a great spread. The spread is significantly reduced for satellite measurements over land and a reasonable agreement can be obtained if the shipborne data are compared with the closest SCIAMACHY measurements over land. The number of comparisons is too small to draw conclusions. However, by including only WFM-DOAS data with small errors the shipborne and WFM-DOAS data compare within 5% for CH4 and CO2 and within 30% for N2O.

  10. Shipborne solar absorption measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO and comparison with SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, T.; de Beek, R.; Buchwitz, M.; Notholt, J.; Schulz, A.; Velazco, V.; Schrems, O.

    2005-08-01

    CO, CH4, N2O and CO2 were retrieved from high resolution solar absorption spectra obtained during a ship cruise from Capetown to Bremerhaven in January/February 2003 by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Precisions of better than 0.5% for the column averaged volume mixing ratios (VMR) of CH4 and CO2 are achieved using of O2 as a reference gas. Shipborne FTIR-measurements of CO and data from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT retrieved by the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS) retrieval algorithm show qualitatively the same latitudinal variations. WFM-DOAS data of CH4, N2O and CO2 measured over sea exhibit a great spread. The spread is significantly reduced for satellite measurements over land and a reasonable agreement can be obtained if the shipborne data are compared with the closest SCIAMACHY measurements over land. The number of comparisons is too small to draw conclusions. However, by including only WFM-DOAS data with small errors the shipborne and WFM-DOAS data compare within 5% for CH4 and CO2 and within 30% for N2O.

  11. Differences in the Spatial Variability Among CO2, CH 4, and N 2O Gas Fluxes from an Urban Forest Soil in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka Wenhong; Oura, Noriko; Sekikawa, Seiko; Yonemura, Seichiro; Sudo, Shigeto; Hayakawa, Atsushi; Minamikawa, Kazunori; Takata, Yusuke; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The spatial variability of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)), and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) fluxes from forest soil with high nitrogen (N) deposition was investigated at a rolling hill region in Japan. Gas fluxes were measured on July 25th and December 5th, 2008 at 100 points within a 100 × 100 m grid. Slope direction and position influenced soil characteristics and site-specific emissions were found. The CO(2) flux showed no topological difference in July, but was significantly lower in December for north-slope with coniferous trees. Spatial dependency of CH(4) fluxes was stronger than that of CO(2) or N(2)O and showed a significantly higher uptake in hill top, and emissions in the valley indicating strong influence of water status. N(2)O fluxes showed no spatial dependency and exhibited high hot spots at different topology in July and December. The high N deposition led to high N(2)O fluxes and emphasized the spatial variability.

  12. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  13. The IAGOS-core greenhouse gas package : a measurement system for continuous airborne observations of CO2, CH4, H2O and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filges, Annette; Gerbig, Christoph; Chen, Huilin; Franke, Harald; Klaus, Christoph; Jordan, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of IAGOS-ERI (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System - European Research Infrastructure), a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS)-based measurement system for the autonomous measurement of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO2 and CH4, as well as CO and water vapour was desi

  14. Geochemical Monitoring Of The Gas Hydrate Production By CO2/CH4 Exchange In The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Production Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T. D.; Collett, T. S.; Ignik Sikumi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water were collected from production streams at the Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate production test well (TD, 791.6 m), drilled on the Alaska North Slope. The well was drilled to test the feasibility of producing methane by carbon dioxide injection that replaces methane in the solid gas hydrate. The Ignik Sikumi well penetrated a stratigraphically-bounded prospect within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation overlies the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and is restricted to the up-dip portion of a series of nearshore deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the Sagavanirktok Formation. Hydrate-bearing sandstones penetrated by Ignik Sikumi well occur in three primary horizons; an upper zone, ("E" sand, 579.7 - 597.4 m) containing 17.7 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sands, a middle zone ("D" sand, 628.2 - 648.6 m) with 20.4 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands and a lower zone ("C" sand, 678.8 - 710.8 m), containing 32 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands with neutron porosity log-interpreted average gas hydrate saturations of 58, 76 and 81% respectively. A known volume mixture of 77% nitrogen and 23% carbon dioxide was injected into an isolated section of the upper part of the "C" sand to start the test. Production flow-back part of the test occurred in three stages each followed by a period of shut-in: (1) unassisted flowback; (2) pumping above native methane gas hydrate stability conditions; and (3) pumping below the native methane gas hydrate stability conditions. Methane production occurred immediately after commencing unassisted flowback. Methane concentration increased from 0 to 40% while nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations decreased to 48 and 12% respectively. Pumping above the hydrate stability phase boundary produced gas with a methane concentration climbing above 80% while the carbon dioxide and nitrogen concentrations fell to 2 and 18% respectively. Pumping below the gas hydrate stability phase boundary occurred in two periods with the composition of the produced gases continually increasing in methane reaching an excess of 96%, along with carbon dioxide decreasing to <1% and nitrogen to ~3%. The isotopic composition of all the gases was monitored. Methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions remained stable throughout the test, while the carbon dioxide carbon became isotopically heavier. Nitrogen isotopic composition remained stable or became slightly isotopically depleted at the later phase of the test. These results imply that the produced methane was not isotopically fractionated, whereas carbon dioxide was fractionated becoming isotopically heavier at the end of each production phase. In addition, water samples were analyzed during the production phase documenting an increase in salinity.

  15. Calculation of CO2,CH4 and H2S Solubilities in Aquenous Electrolyte Solution at High Prssure and High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation into the characterisation of liquid-vapor electrolyte solutions at high pressure and high temperature,A procedure to enable calculations of methane,carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide solubilities in brines(0-6m.) for temperature from 25 to 350℃ and for pressures from 1 to 1800 bar is presented.The model is based on Helgeson,Kirkham and Flowers modified equations of state(HKF)and on the semi-empirical interaction model introduced by Pitzer,HKF modified equations of state are used to calculate the reference fugacity of gas species,and the Pitzer ionic interaction model is used to calculate the activity coefficient of dissolved species(i.e.ionic or neutral).The efficiency of the combination of the two models is confirmed by several comparisons with data in the literature.

  16. Visualizing MOF Mixed Matrix Membranes at the Nanoscale: Towards Structure-Performance Relationships in CO 2 /CH 4 Separation Over NH 2 -MIL-53(Al)@PI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenas, T.; Van Dalen, M.; Garcia-Perez, E.; Serra-Crespo, P.; Zornoza, B.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) composed of metal organic framework (MOF) fi llers embedded in a polymeric matrix represent a promising alternative for CO 2 removal from natural gas and biogas. Here, MMMs based on NH 2 -MIL-53(Al) MOF and polyimide are successfully synthesized with MOF loadings up to

  17. Spatial variability and temporal dynamics of greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4, N2O concentrations and fluxes along the Zambezi River mainstem and major tributaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Teodoru

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Spanning over 3000 km in length and with a catchment of approximately 1.4 million km2, the Zambezi River is the fourth largest river in Africa and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from the African continent. As part of a~broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Zambezi River basin, we present data on greenhouse gas (GHG, carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O concentrations and fluxes collected along the Zambezi River, reservoirs and several of its tributaries during 2012 and 2013 and over two climatic seasons (dry and wet to constrain the interannual variability, seasonality and spatial heterogeneity along the aquatic continuum. All GHGs concentrations showed high spatial variability (coefficient of variation: 1.01 for CO2, 2.65 for CH4 and 0.21 for N2O. Overall, there was no unidirectional pattern along the river stretch (i.e. decrease or increase towards the ocean, as the spatial heterogeneity of GHGs appeared to be determined mainly by the connectivity with floodplains and wetlands, and the presence of man-made structures (reservoirs and natural barriers (waterfalls, rapids. Highest CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the mainstream river were found downstream of extensive floodplains/wetlands. Undersaturated CO2 conditions, in contrast, were characteristic for the surface waters of the two large reservoirs along the Zambezi mainstem. N2O concentrations showed the opposite pattern, being lowest downstream of floodplains and highest in reservoirs. Among tributaries, highest concentrations of both CO2 and CH4 were measured in the Shire River whereas low values were characteristic for more turbid systems such as the Luangwa and Mazoe rivers. The interannual variability in the Zambezi River was relatively large for both CO2 and CH4, and significantly higher concentrations (up to two fold were measured during wet seasons compared to the dry season. Interannual variability of N2O was less pronounced but generally higher values were found during the dry season. Overall, both concentrations and fluxes of CO2 and CH4 were well below the median/average values reported for tropical rivers, streams and reservoirs. A first-order mass balance suggests that carbon (C transport to the ocean represents the major component (59% of the budget (largely in the form of DIC, while only 38% of total C yield is annually emitted into the atmosphere, mostly as CO2 (98%, and 3% is removed by sedimentation in reservoirs.

  18. On the optimisation of trace gas measurements : A new method for in situ measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, SF6 and N2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan van der, Sander

    2005-01-01

    The release of anthropogenic greenhouse gases into the earth’s atmosphere is by far the largest uncontrolled experiment in the history of the earth. Mankind is drastically modifying the composition of the atmosphere, both in greenhouse gases and aerosols

  19. Post-synthetic modification of porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic materials by cooperative addition of inorganic salts to enhance CO 2/CH 4 selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie

    2012-08-21

    Keeping MOM: Reaction of biphenyl-3,4\\',5-tricarboxylate and Cd(NO 3) 2 in the presence of meso-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetratosylate afforded porph@MOM-11, a microporous metal-organic material (MOM) that encapsulates cationic porphyrins and solvent in alternating open channels. Porph@MOM-11 has cation and anion binding sites that facilitate cooperative addition of inorganic salts (such as M +Cl -) in a stoichiometric fashion. © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Tectonic implications of the Indian Run Formation; a newly recognized sedimentary melange in the northern Virginia Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Avery Ala

    1985-01-01

    Sedimentary melange in the northeastern part of Fairfax County, Virginia, contains both mesoscopic and mappable fragments of Accotink Schist, Lake Barcroft Metasandstone, metagabbro, and ultramafic rocks as well as smaller fragments of other rock types. This melange was originally mapped as the Sykesville Formation, a major precursory sedimentary melange in northern Virginia and Maryland. The fragments of Accotink Schist and Lake Barcroft Metasandstone within the Sykesville were considered to be rip-ups of these units over which the Sykesville slid when finally emplaced. More recent study has shown that fragments of Accotink and Lake Barcroft are restricted to a certain area of sedimentary melange originally defined as Sykesville, and this part of the melange is now considered to be a separate mappable unit, here named the Indian Run Formation. The Indian Run underlies the sequence Accotink Schist and Lake Barcroft Metasandstone which is here formally named the Annandale Group. The Indian Run is intruded by the Occoquan Granite of Cambrian age, so it is of Cambrian or Late Proterozoic age. The Sykesville Formation (restricted) is a much more extensive unit than the Indian Run Formation and is characterized by its contained olistoliths of the Peters Creek Schist, the unit that tectonically overlies it. The Sykesville and Peters Creek constitute a precursory melange-allochthon pair which is here termed a 'tectonic motif.' The Indian Run-Annandale pair then forms a tectonically lower motif, and the overlying pair, the Yorkshire Formation-Piney Branch Complex, forms a tectonically higher motif. The Chopawamsic Formation and underlying sedimentary melange in the area south of Fairfax County may form a tectonic motif beneath the Indian Run-Annandale tectonic motif. Thus, three and perhaps four repetitions of precursory melange-allochthon pairs occur in northern Virginia. Other percursory melanges and motifs may occur in the Maryland Piedmont to the north. The tectonic

  1. Characterization of freeze-dried egg melange long stored after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalivanov, Stefan; Tsvetkova, Eli; Bakalivanova, Todorka; Tsvetkov, Tsvetan [Institute of Cryobiology and Food Technologies, 53 bd. Cherni vrah, 1407 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kaloyanov, Nikolay [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, bd. Kliment Ohridski, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: nikolaykaloyanov@yahoo.com; Grigorova, Stoyanka; Alexieva, Vanja [Institute of Cryobiology and Food Technologies, 53 bd. Cherni vrah, 1407 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-01-15

    During the 4-year period of storage at room temperature of the freeze-dried (control group) and the freeze-dried and gamma-irradiated (2.0 and 3.5 kGy) whole hen's egg melange, no significant changes were found into the sensory and functional characteristics till the 28th month. The change in the number of SH groups was not unidirectional up to the 28th month and then it started to decrease in all investigated samples. During the entire period of investigation the amount of malondialdehyde in all three groups of egg melange was considerably below the allowed limit for foodstuffs. The most significant fractions of the protein spectra showed a general tendency of decrease during the storage.

  2. Some perfect cards shuffles (French title: Quelques m\\'elanges parfaits de cartes)

    CERN Document Server

    Lachal, Aimé

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study some cards shuffles which are used by magicians. We focus ourselves on the possibility to hit eventually the initial state after several shuffles. This is a classical problem arising in discrete dynamical systems. The computations are performed through an elementary approach, so the paper is easily accessible. ----- Dans cet article, on \\'etudie quelques m\\'elanges de cartes bien connus du monde de la magie. On examine en d\\'etail l'\\'eventualit\\'e de reconstituer le jeu de cartes initial apr\\`es plusieurs m\\'elanges cons\\'ecutifs. Il s'agit math\\'ematiquement d'un probl\\`eme de syst\\`emes dynamiques discrets pour lequel on recherche explicitement une p\\'eriode. Les calculs \\'etant pr\\'esent\\'es de mani\\`ere \\'el\\'ementaire, l'article se veut accessible \\`a un large public.

  3. Fluid-rock reactions in an evaporitic melange, Permian Haselgebirge, Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotl, C.; Longstaffe, F.J.; Ramseyer, K.; Kunk, M.J.; Wiesheu, R.

    1998-01-01

    Tectonically isolated blocks of carbonate rocks present within the anhydritic Haselgebirge melange of the Northern Calcareous Alps record a complex history of deformation and associated deep-burial diagenetic to very low-grade metamorphic reactions. Fluids were hot (up to ~ 250 ??C) and reducing brines charged with carbon dioxide. Individual carbonate outcrops within the melange record different regimes of brine-rock reactions, ranging from pervasive dolomite recrystallization to dedolomitization. Early diagenetic features in these carbonates were almost entirely obliterated. Matrix dolomite alteration was related to thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) recognized by the replacement of anhydrite by calcite + pyrite ?? native sulphur. Pyrite associated with TSR is coarsely crystalline and characterized by a small sulphur isotope fractionation relative to the precursor Permian anhydrite. Carbonates associated with TSR show low Fe/Mn ratios reflecting rapid reaction of ferrous iron during sulphide precipitation. As a result, TSR-related dolomite and calcite typically show bright Mn(II)-activated cathodoluminescence in contrast to the dull cathodoluminescence of many (ferroan) carbonate cements in other deep-burial settings. In addition to carbonates and sulphides, silicates formed closely related to TSR, including quartz, K-feldspar, albite and K-mica. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of authigenic K-feldspar yielded mostly disturbed step-heating spectra which suggest variable cooling through the argon retention interval for microcline during the Late Jurassic. This timing coincides with the recently recognized subduction and closure of the Meliata-Hallstatt ocean to the south of the Northern Calcareous Alps and strongly suggests that the observed deep-burial fluid-rock reactions were related to Jurassic deformation and melange formation of these Permian evaporites.

  4. Redução da emissão de CO2, CH4 e H2S através da compostagem de dejetos suínos Reduction emissions of CO2, CH4 and H2S through composting of swine manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana G. Sardá

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Em conjunto com o crescente desenvolvimento da tecnologia para a produção de suínos ocorreu uma forte exploração e degradação do ambiente, razão pela qual a atividade se transformou em fonte poluidora das regiões produtoras. Buscam-se, então, alternativas que minimizem o potencial poluidor do atual sistema de produção. O trabalho proposto foi comparar o perfil de emissão de dióxido de carbono (CO2, metano (CH4 e gás sulfídrico (H2S do manejo de dejetos suínos nas formas sólida (compostagem e líquida (esterqueira, e avaliar a eficiência do processo de compostagem através dos parâmetros físico-químicos. O ensaio foi implantado no campo experimental da EMBRAPA Suínos e Aves, localizada no município de Concórdia, SC. Contatou-se, na compostagem, uma redução de 7 vezes na emissão de CH4, com relação à esterqueira; a emissão de CO2 representou 78,5% do carbono total mineralizado. Considerando-se que a emissão de H2S foi expressiva apenas no manejo dos dejetos na forma líquida, pode-se afirmar que o manejo dos resíduos na forma sólida é uma alternativa para a redução dos impactos ambientais pela mitigação do efeito estufa e pela redução de odores.In conjunction with the development of technologies for the production of swine meat, a strong exploration and degradation of the environment occurred and the activity became a source of pollution in the producing regions. Therefore, there is a need for alternative technologies that minimize the pollutant potential of the current system of production. The proposed work was to analyze and to compare the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S between the management of swine manure in solid form (composting and liquid manure (deep pit, and assess the efficiency of the process of composting through the physical and chemical parameters. The test was implemented in the experimental field of Embrapa Suínos e Aves, located in Concordia (SC. The results have showed that composting reduces 7 times the CH4 emission comparing to deep pit, and emission of CO2 represented 78.5% of total mineralized carbon. Considering that the emission of H2S was significant only in the management of waste in liquid form, then management of waste in solid form can reduce the environmental impacts, which tends to be beneficial in terms of mitigation of greenhouse effect and may contribute to the reduction of odors.

  5. Une alternative au cobalt pour la synthese de nanotubes de carbone monoparoi par plasma inductif thermique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois

    Les nanotubes de carbone de type monoparoi (C-SWNT) sont une classe recente de nanomateriaux qui ont fait leur apparition en 1991. L'interet qu'on leur accorde provient des nombreuses proprietes d'avant-plan qu'ils possedent. Leur resistance mecanique serait des plus rigide, tout comme ils peuvent conduire l'electricite et la chaleur d'une maniere inegalee. Non moins, les C-SWNT promettent de devenir une nouvelle classe de plateforme moleculaire, en servant de site d'attache pour des groupements reactifs. Les promesses de ce type particulier de nanomateriau sont nombreuses, la question aujourd'hui est de comment les realiser. La technologie de synthese par plasma inductif thermique se situe avantageusement pour la qualite de ses produits, sa productivite et les faibles couts d'operation. Par contre, des recherches recentes ont permis de mettre en lumiere des risques d'expositions reliees a l'utilisation du cobalt, comme catalyseur de synthese; son elimination ou bien son remplacement est devenu une preoccupation importante. Quatre recettes alternatives ont ete mises a l'essai afin de trouver une alternative plus securitaire a la recette de base; un melange catalytique ternaire, compose de nickel, de cobalt et d'oxyde d'yttrium. La premiere consiste essentiellement a remplacer la proportion massique de cobalt par du nickel, qui etait deja present dans la recette de base. Les trois options suivantes contiennent de nouveaux catalyseurs, en remplacement au Co, qui sont apparus dans plusieurs recherches scientifiques au courant des dernieres annees: le dioxyde de zircone (ZrO2), dioxyde de manganese (MnO2) et le molybdene (Mo). La methode utilisee consiste a vaporiser la matiere premiere, sous forme solide, dans un reacteur plasma a haute frequence (3 MHz) a paroi refroidi. Apres le passage dans le plasma, le systeme traverse une section dite de "croissance", isolee thermiquement a l'aide de graphite, afin de maintenir une certaine plage de temperature favorable a la

  6. TECTONIC POSITION OF MARBLE MELANGES IN THE EARLY PALEOZOIC ACCRETION-COLLISIONAL SYSTEM OF THE WESTERN PRIBAIKALIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Fedorovsky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Early Paleozoic collisional system located in the Olkhon region at the western shores of Lake Baikal resulted from collision of the Siberian paleocontinent and a complex aggregate composed by fragments of a microcontinent, island arcs, back-arc structures and accretionary prisms. The main events were associated with complete manifestation of shear tectogenesis initiated by oblique collision. The current structure includes tectonically displaced components of ancient geodynamic systems that used to have been located dozens and hundreds of kilometres apart. Horizontal amplitudes of tectonic displacement seem to have been quite high; however, numerical data are still lacking to support this conclusion. Information about the structure of the upper crust in the Paleozoic is also lacking as only deep metamorphic rocks (varying from epidote-amphibolite to granulite facies are currently outcropped. Formations comprising the collisional collage are significantly different in composition and protoliths, and combinations of numerous shifted beds give evidence of a 'bulldozer' effect caused by the collisional shock followed by movements of crushed components of the ocean-continent zone along the margin of the Siberian paleocontinent. As evidenced by the recent cross-section, deep horizons of the Early Paleozoic crust comprise the collisional system between the Siberian craton and the Olkhon composite terrain. A permanent inclusion in the collisional combinations of rocks are unusual synmetamorphic injected bodies of carbonate rocks. Such rocks comprise two groups, marble melanges and crustal carbonate melted rocks. Obviously, carbonate rocks (that composed the original layers and horizons of stratified beds can become less viscous to a certain degree at some locations during the process of oblique collision and acquire unusual properties and can thus intrude into the surrounding rocks of silicate composition. Such carbonate rocks behave as protrusions

  7. Adsorción de CO2 y separación CO2/CH4 en SBA-15 de poro expandido modificada con Ti y funcionalizada con APTES

    OpenAIRE

    Vilarrasa-García, E.; Cecilia, J. A.; Cavalcante, C. L.; Jiménez-Jiménez, J.; Azevedo,D. C. S.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    En este trabajo se han sintetizado diferentes sílices mesoporosas tipo SBA-15 de poro expandido por vía hidrotermal mediante el uso de agentes ensanchadores de poro (trimetilbenceno) y cortadores de canal (NH4F). Se han adicionado diferentes cantidades de Ti para estudiar la influencia de la presencia de un metal del bloque d en la estructura y su efecto sobre el rendimiento en el anclaje (“grafting”) de APTES y adsorción de CO2. Los materiales sintetizados se han caracterizado mediante espec...

  8. How well can we assess impacts of agricultural land management changes on the total greenhouse gas balance (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of tropical rice-cropping systems with biogeochemical models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, David; Weller, Sebastian; Janz, Baldur; Klatt, Steffen; Santabárbara, Ignacio; Haas, Edwin; Werner, Christian; Wassmann, Reiner; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Paddy rice cultivation is increasingly challenged by physical and economic irrigation water scarcity. This already results in the trend of converting paddy rice to upland crop cultivation (e.g., maize, aerobic rice) in large parts of South East Asia. Such land management change from flooded lowland systems to well-aerated upland systems drastically affects soil C and N cycling and related emissions of greenhouse gases. Emissions of methane (CH4) are expected to decrease, while emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) will most likely increase. In addition to such fast evolving 'pollution swapping' it is expected that on longer time scales significant amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks will be lost in form of carbon dioxide (CO2). Within the DFG-funded research unit ICON (Introducing non-flooded crops in rice-dominated landscapes: Impact on carbon, nitrogen and water cycles), we investigated environmental impacts of land management change from historical paddy rice cultivation to the upland crops maize and aerobic rice at experimental sites at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), the Philippines. To present, more than three years of continuous measurement data of CH4 and N2O emissions under different fertilization regimes have been collected. In addition, measurements of SOC contents and bulk densities in different soil horizons allow for an overall very good characterization of the environmental impacts of mentioned land management change. In this contribution we will show how well mentioned land management change effects in tropical agricultural systems can be represented and thus better understood by the help of process-based biogeochemical models. Seasonal emissions of CH4 and N2O are simulated with r2 values of 0.85 and 0.78 and average underestimations of 15 and 14 %, respectively. These underestimations predominantly originate from treatments in which no fertilizer is applied (CH4) as well as uncertainties of soil hydrology (N2O). Long-term development of SOC stocks is highly influenced by the soil oxygen status as well as the growth of photosynthetic active aquatic biomass. Moreover, simulation results demonstrate that short-term GHG balances may considerably differ from long-term balances. Simulated total GHG emissions 2.5 years after land management change are highest for upland crop - paddy rice rotations due to pronounced losses of soil organic carbon. In contrast, over a longer period of several decades total GHG emissions are highest for double cropping of paddy rice clearly dominated by CH4 emissions. Simulation results suggest that approx. 2.8 - 3.4 t C ha-1 yr-1 residue incorporation after harvest is needed in order to sustain stable SOC stocks in mixed upland crop - paddy rice systems.

  9. "Atmospheric Measurements by Ultra-Light SpEctrometer" (AMULSE) dedicated to vertical profile measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4) under stratospheric balloons: instrumental development and field application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamary, Rabih; Joly, Lilian; Decarpenterie, Thomas; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Grouiez, Bruno; Albora, Grégory; Chauvin, Nicolas; Miftah-El-Khair, Zineb; Legain, Dominique; Tzanos, Diane; Barrié, Joel; Moulin, Eric; Ramonet, Michel; Bréon, François-Marie; Durry, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Human activities disrupt natural biogeochemical cycles such as the carbon and contribute to an increase in the concentrations of the greenhouse gases (carbone dioxide and methane) in the atmosphere. The current atmospheric transport modeling (the vertical trade) still represents an important source of uncertainty in the determination of regional flows of greenhouse gases, which means that a good knowledge of the vertical distribution of CO2 is necessary to (1) make the link between the ground measurements and spatial measurements that consider an integrated concentration over the entire column of the atmosphere, (2) validate and if possible improve CO2 transport model to make the link between surface emissions and observed concentration. The aim of this work is to develop a lightweight instrument (based on mid-infrared laser spectrometry principles) for in-situ measuring at high temporal/spatial resolution (5 Hz) the vertical profiles of the CO2 and the CH4 using balloons (meteorological and BSO at high precision levels (logistics flights. These laser spectrometers are built on recent instrumental developments. Several flights were successfully done in the region Champagne-Ardenne and in Canada recently. Aknowledgments: The authors acknowledge financial supports from CNES, CNRS défi instrumental and the region Champagne-Ardenne.

  10. High-Pressure/Low-Temperature Melanges in the Cycladic Blueschist Belt, Greece: Results of an Ionprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröcker, M.; Keasling, A.; Pidgeon, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    The Cycladic blueschist belt (CBB) in the central Aegean Sea has experienced epidote blueschist to eclogite facies metamorphism in the Eocene (c. 50-40 Ma) during collisional processes between the Apulian microplate and Eurasia. The general geological framework is well established, but many details of the tectonometamorphic history still are not fully understood. Unresolved issues concern the importance of pre-Eocene HP metamorphism [1, 2] and the geochronological record that is preserved in melange sequences. These aspects are addressed in an ionprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon study focusing on block-matrix associations from the islands of Syros and Andros. Melanges comprise in variable mixtures eclogites, glaucophanites, meta-gabbros, ultrabasic rocks, meta-acidic gneisses and jadeitites in a serpentinitic and/or metasedimentary matrix. The origin of the block-matrix associations is controversial and in many cases it remains unclear whether these melanges record sedimentary or tectonic processes. A tectonic slab from Syros, consisting of an interlayered meta-acidic gneiss - glaucophanite sequence, yielded 206Pb/238U ages of c. 237-245 Ma, similar to ages determined for rocks collected from structurally coherent sequences on other Cycladic islands. On Syros, we have also studied zircons from a metasomatic alteration profile, which developed around a compound eclogite-jadeitite net-veined block enclosed in a serpentinite matrix. From the outside in, distinct blackwall alteration zones (c. 5-30 cm in thickness) can be distinguished, which predominantly consist either of actinolite- chlorite, glaucophane or omphacite. Zircon from the unaltered jadeitite and all reaction zones yielded 206Pb/238U ages of c. 80 Ma. Across this profile, systematic changes are observed in zircon morphology and CL patterns. U- and Th-concentrations in zircon decrease towards the peripheral rinds. These observations are difficult to reconcile with a magmatic origin of the zircons and instead we

  11. Time evolution of relativistic d + Au and Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolschin, G; Mizoguchi, T; Suzuki, N; Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi; Wolschin, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of charged-particle production in collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies is investigated as function of centrality in a nonequilibrium-statistical framework. Precise agreement with recent d + Au and Au + Au data at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV is found in a Relativistic Diffusion Model with three sources for particle production. Only the midrapidity source comes very close to local equilibrium, whereas the analyses of the overall pseudorapidity distributions show that the systems remain far from statistical equilibrium.

  12. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    and dreams for the future become intertwined with their financial possibilities, limitations and responsibilities. The following three articles employ the notion of relatedness to explore the transnational and local social networks, including family relations, of which the au pairs are part. Arguing...... that Filipina au pairs see their stay abroad as an avenue of personal development and social recognition, I examine how the au pairs re-position themselves within their families at home through migration, and how they navigate between the often conflicting expectations of participation in the sociality...... important remittances back home. Their time in Denmark is also often part of long-term migration trajectories involving future stays in Scandinavia and southern Europe. Based on ten months of fieldwork among current and former au pairs in Denmark and ten weeks of fieldwork among prospective au pairs and au...

  13. Melanges, No. 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanges, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Articles on second language teaching and learning include: "Ethnographie comparee de la salle de classe en France et en grande-Bretagne" (Comparative Ethnography of the Classroom Environment in France and Great Britain) (F. Carton); "Pour une approche micro et macro du francais parle dans la formation des enseignants de FLE" (Toward a Micro and…

  14. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  15. Indicateurs cles au Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Au cours des dernieres annees, on s'est beaucoup interesse sur la scene internationale aux indicateurs cles. Le present document se veut un tour d'horizon des efforts deployes recemment au Canada en vue d'elaborer des indicateurs cles du bien etre economique, social, environnemental et physique. Y sont classifies et examines en detail plus de 40 projets et publications portant sur ce sujet. Y figurent aussi l'enumeration breve de 20 autres projets, ainsi que des renvois a plusieurs enquetes a...

  16. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  17. Counterclockwise P- T evolution of the Aghil Range: Metamorphic record of an accretionary melange between Kunlun and Karakorum (SW Sinkiang, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppo, Chiara; Rolfo, Franco

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the metamorphic evolution and the tectonic significance of the Aghil Range, a poorly known terrane located between Kunlun and Karakorum north of K2 in the framework of western Tibet. The Aghil Range consists of different units separated by syn- to late-metamorphic thrusts and post-metamorphic faults of similar attitude; among other units, the Surukwat Complex is a composite sequence of thrust sheets trending WNW-ESE and steeply dipping SSW showing a general increase of metamorphic grade from lower to higher structural levels. P- T pseudosections and conventional thermobarometry of metapelites at the top of the Surukwat Complex tightly constrain the P- T path of this highest-grade metamorphic portion of the Aghil Range. The prograde path is characterized by an early increase in both P and T and by a later, nearly isothermal, increase in P, from 500 < T < 530 °C and 0.25 < P < 0.40 GPa to 580 < T < 600 °C and 0.80 < P < 0.90 GPa. The peak metamorphic event is constrained at 550 < T < 590 °C and 0.77 < P < 0.91 GPa. The retrograde path is characterized by decompression associated to a slight cooling to T ~ 500 °C and P < 0.5 GPa. Altogether, the petrology of the studied rocks suggests a P- T path with a narrow counterclockwise shape. The studied sequence could represent the result of the early subduction of an accretionary complex, interpreted further eastward according to a melange underthrusting model. As concerning the tectonic setting of this terrane, a number of geologic and petrologic similarities link the Aghil Range and the central Qiangtang metamorphic belt, suggesting that the Aghil Range is the possible NW extension of the Qiangtang microplate separating Kunlun from Karakorum.

  18. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  19. Solid-Phase Equilibria in the Au-As, Au-Ga-Sb, Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb Ternaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-28

    AD6i5 469 SOLID- PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Ru-As AU-GA-SB AU-IN-AS- 1/17 AND AU-IN-SB TERNAR (U) CALIFORNIA UNIV LOS ANGELES DEPT OF CHEMISTRY AND...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED SOLID- PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Au-Ga-As, Au-Ga-Sb Thchnical Report Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb TEARIEIS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGEMI*n Does Entepd) 4./ lie- . .- - - - - -- -- Solid Phase Equilibria in the Au-Ga-As, Au-Ga-Sb, Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb Ternaries C

  20. /Au Back Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Compaan, Alvin D.; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of CdTe thin-film solar cells with Cu-free MoO3- x /Au back contacts. CdTe solar cells with sputtered CdTe absorbers of thicknesses from 0.5 to 1.75 μm were fabricated on Pilkington SnO2:F/SnO2-coated soda-lime glasses coated with a 60- to 80-nm sputtered CdS layer. The MoO3- x /Au back contact layers were deposited by thermal evaporation. The incorporation of MoO3- x layer was found to improve the open circuit voltage ( V OC) but reduce the fill factor of the ultrathin CdTe cells. The V OC was found to increase as the CdTe thickness increased.

  1. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  2. Vehicle emissions of greenhouse gases and related tracers from a tunnel study: : CO: CO2, N2O: CO2, CH4: CO2, O2: CO2 ratios, and the stable isotopes 13C and 18O in CO2 and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, Maria Elena; Vollmer, M. K.; Jordan, A.; Brand, W. A.; Pathirana, S. L.; Rothe, M.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of CO2, CO, N2O and CH4 mole fractions, O2/N2 ratios and the stable isotopes 13C and 18O in CO2 and CO have been performed in air samples from the Islisberg highway tunnel (Switzerland). The molar CO : CO2 ratios, with an average of (4.15 ± 0.34) ppb:ppm, are lower than reported in prev

  3. 农田土壤主要温室气体(CO2、CH4、N2O)的源/汇强度及其温室效应研究进展%Research advances on source/sink intensities and greenhouse effects of CO2,CH4 and N2O in agricultural soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉铭; 胡春胜; 张佳宝; 董文旭; 王玉英; 宋利娜

    2011-01-01

    气候变化是当今全球面临的重大挑战,人类社会生产生活引起的温室气体排放是全球气候变暖的主要原因.大气中CO2、CH4和N2O是最重要的温室气体,对温室效应的贡献率占了近80%.据估计,大气中每年有5%~20%的CO2、15%~30%的CH4、80%~90%的N2O来源于土壤,而农田土壤是温室气体的重要排放源.本文重点阐述了农田土壤温室气体产生、排放或吸收机理及其影响因素,指出土地利用方式和农业生产力水平等人为控制因素通过影响土壤和作物生长条件来影响农田土壤温室气体产生与排放或吸收.所以,我们可以从人类活动对农田生态系统的影响着手,通过改善农业生产方式和作物生长条件来探索温室气体减排措施,达到固碳/氨增汇的目的.对国内外关于农田温室气体排放的源/汇强度及其综合温室效应评估的最新研究进展进行了综述,指出正确估算与评价农田土壤温室气体的源/汇强度及其对大气中主要温室气体浓度变化的贡献,有助于为温室气体减排以及减少气候变化预测的不确定性提供理论依据.%Climate change is an increasing global challenge. Greenhouse gas emission via anthropogenic processes is the main cause of global warming. CO3, CH4, and N2O are the main greenhouse gases, accounting for =80% of greenhouse effect. It is estimated that each year, 5%~20% of CO2, 15%-30% of CR, and 80%~90% of N2O in air are emitted from soils. Agricultural soils are the main sources of greenhouse gas emission. This work expatiated the mechanisms and affecting factors of greenhouse gas formation, emission and absorption in agricultural soils. And the contribution of farmland ecosystem to greenhouse effects was discussed. It was indicated that anthropogenic factors such as land use and agricultural activity influenced greenhouse gas formation, emission and absorption in agricultural soils. Because anthropogenic processes affected agricultural ecosystems, greenhouse gas emission reductions for stabilized carbon and nitrogen were possible through improved agricultural cultivation and production systems. This study summarized the latest research advances in source/sink intensities of greenhouse gas emissions from farmlands and how that contributes to greenhouse effect. The study suggested that accurate estimation of source/sink intensities of greenhouse gases and ap-propriate assessments of greenhouse gas effects were the theoretical basis for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and uncertainties inpredicting climate change.

  4. Au pairs on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Ethnographers are increasingly making use of Facebook to acquire access and general acquaintance with their field of study. However, little has been written on how Facebook is used methodologically in research that does not have social media sites as the main focus of interest. This article argues...... that engagement with Facebook as a methodological tool can be useful in research among migrants in highly politicised fields. Pointing to a discursive construction of Filipina au pairs as victims of labour exploitation, the article shows how fieldwork on Facebook enables the exploration of the ways in which...... and on Facebook....

  5. ITS au Japon

    OpenAIRE

    JANIN, JF; LOUETTE, E; MALLEJACQ, P; PAGNY, R; YGNACE, JL

    2003-01-01

    Dans le cadre de l'accord de coopération signe entre les ministres des transports français et japonais en janvier 2002, des échanges de mission sont organisés de manière à comparer de façon concrète les développements des programmes its dans les deux pays. La première mission française avait eu lieu en mai 2002 à Tokyo. Elle a permis d'organiser un premier séminaire à l'arche de la défense il y a un an au cours duquel les experts japonais ont présenté leurs projets. Un second séminaire s'est ...

  6. Centrality dependence of antiproton production in Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)]|[A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)]|[University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles California (United States)]|[National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)]|[University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley California (United States)]|[Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)]|[University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley California (United States)]|[Universities Space Sciences Research Association/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)]|[Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University, Irvington, New York (United States)]|[Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); (E878 Collaboration)

    1995-11-13

    We have measured the yields of antiprotons in Au+Au interactions in the rapidity range 1.2{lt}{ital y}{lt}2.8 as a function of centrality using a beam line spectrometer. The shapes of the invariant multiplicity distributions at {ital p}{sub {ital t}}=0 are used to explore the dynamics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  7. Face au risque

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian; November, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Ce volume collectif sur le risque inaugure la collection L'ÉQUINOXE. Ancré dans l'histoire pour mesurer les continuités et les ruptures, il illustre la manière dont les sciences humaines évaluent et mesurent les enjeux collectifs du risque sur les plans politiques, scientifiques, énergétiques, juridiques et éthiques. Puisse-t-il nourrir la réflexion sur la culture et la prévention du risque. Ses formes épidémiques, écologiques, sociales, terroristes et militaires nourrissent les peurs actuelles, structurent les projets sécuritaires et constituent - sans doute - les défis majeurs à notre modernité. Dans la foulée de la richesse scientifique d'Equinoxe, L'ÉQUINOXE hérite de son esprit en prenant à son tour le pari de contribuer - non sans risque - à enrichir en Suisse romande et ailleurs le champ éditorial des sciences humaines dont notre société a besoin pour forger ses repères. Après Face au risque suivra cet automne Du sens des Lumières. (MICHEL PORRET Professeur Ordinaire à la F...

  8. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-Zr system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志华; 金展鹏; 刘华山

    2003-01-01

    Au-Zr binary system was reassessed by using the calculation phase diagram (CALPHAD) technique based on experimental thermodynamic data and newly reported phase diagrams. The excess Gibbs energies of the three terminal solutions and the liquid phases were formulated with Redlich-Kister polynomial. All the intermetallic phases were treated as stoichiometric compounds with the exception of ZrAu which is modeled by a two-sublattice model, (Au,Zr) : (Au, Zr). The results show that there exist seven intermetallics: Zr3Au, Zr2Au, Zr5Au4,Zr7Au10, ZrAu2 , ZrAu3, and ZrAu4 in the system. The eutectoid reaction: β(Zr) →α(Zr)+Zr3Au takes place at 1 048 K and the maximal solubility of Au in α-Zr is 4.7 % (mole fraction). The maximal solubility of Zr in Au is 6.0%(mole fraction) at 1 347 K. The homogeneity range of ZrAu phase is about 44.5%-52.9%(mole fraction) of Au. The present assessment fits experimental data very well.

  9. Electrochemical study of chemical properties in ethanolamine and its mixtures with water; Etude electrochimique de proprietes chimiques dans l'ethanolamine et ses melanges avec l'eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grall, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-12-01

    This work is concerned with the study of acid-base reactions and of complex formation in ethanolamine and its mixtures with water. The ionic product of the solvent has been determined by an electro-chemical study of the H{sup +}/H{sub 2} system. The reduction curves for ethanolamine-water mixtures, for different acidities, have made it possible to follow the variations in the size of the pH domain as a function of the composition of the solvent. The form of this variation has been explained on the basis of the dielectric constant and the solvation of the proton by the ethanolamine. In the second part, the electrochemical systems of mercury have been studied by anodic polarography. In order to establish a parallel between the acid-base reactions and complex formation reactions, we have studied the stability of Hg (CN){sub 2} in water-ethanolamine mixtures. It has been possible to deduce the law for the variation of pK{sub c} with solvent composition. The representative graph of this function passes through a minimum for a proportion of about 50 per cent of ethanolamine as in the case of acids. This variation has been explained by the predominating influence of {epsilon} for ethanolamine propositions of over 50 per cent and by that of the solvation of Hg{sup 2+} for proportions of under 50 per cent. (author) [French] Ce travail porte sur l'etude des reactions acides-bases et de formation de complexes dans l'ethanolamine et ses melanges avec l'eau. Le produit ionique du solvant a pu etre determine par l'etude electro-chimique du systeme H{sup +}/H{sub 2}. Les courbes de reduction des melanges ethanolamine-eau, pour des acidites variables, ont permis de suivre les variations de l'etendue du domaine de pH, en fonction de la composition du solvant. L'allure de cette variation a ete expliquee en faisant intervenir la constante dielectrique et la solvatation du proton par l'ethanolamine. Dans une deuxieme partie, les systemes

  10. L’apprentissage au cern

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    pour les professions d’électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L’apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l’examen de fin d’apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat fédéral de capacité suisse (CFC). 6 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L’apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l’apprentissage ; avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9e du Cycle d’orientation genevois (3e en France) ; être ressortissant d’un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, Royaume-Uni, République tchèque, République slovaque , Suède, Suisse) ; pour les résidents en Suisse : être ressortissant su...

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Au-Island Ripening on Au(100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kleiner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multiscale modeling hierarchy for the particular case of Au-island ripening on Au(100. Starting at the microscopic scale, density functional theory was used to investigate a limited number of self-diffusion processes on perfect and imperfect Au(100 surfaces. The obtained structural and energetic information served as basis for optimizing a reactive forcefield (here ReaxFF, which afterwards was used to address the mesoscopic scale. Reactive force field simulations were performed to investigate more diffusion possibilities at a lower computational cost but with similar accuracy. Finally, we reached the macroscale by means of kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC simulations. The reaction rates for the reaction process database used in the kMC simulations were generated using the reactive force field. Using this strategy, we simulated nucleation, aggregation, and fluctuation processes for monoatomic high islands on Au(100 and modeled their equilibrium shape structures. Finally, by calculating the step line tension at different temperatures, we were able to make a direct comparison with available experimental data.

  12. Relative Distribution of Au48+ ~ Au52+ in Au Plasma by Ionization Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-Yan; ZHU Zheng-He; JIANG Gang

    2003-01-01

    The present work proposes a theoretical method called ionization dynamics to derive the ionic charge state distribution. Using relativistic quantum mechanics to calculate the energy level lifetime and average ionic lifetime of each ion, the first-order ionization rate constant can be obtained. Based on these data, from the solution of differential equations for consecutive-irreversible ionization reactions, one will be able to derive the ionic charge state distribution.The calculated average positive charge 49.24 of Au48+ ~ Au52+ and their relative distribution are in good agreement with the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. AU Political Solution in Libya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    May 3,2011 The African Union(AU),through its High-Level ad hoc Committee on the Situation in Libya and the Commission, is driven by the conviction that, ultimately,only a political solution will make it possible to promote,in a sustainable way,the legitimate aspira-

  14. Comparative study of anchoring groups for molecular electronics: structure and conductance of Au-S-Au and Au-NH2-Au junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Iben Sig; Mowbray, Duncan; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    The electrical properties of single-molecule junctions, consisting of an organic molecule coupled to metal electrodes, are sensitive to the detailed atomic structure of the molecule-metal contact. This, in turn, is determined by the anchoring group linking the molecule to the metal. With the aim...... of identifying and comparing the intrinsic properties of two commonly used anchoring groups, namely thiol and amine groups, we have calculated the atomic structure and conductance traces of different Au-S-Au and Au-NH2-Au nanojunctions using density functional theory (DFT). Whereas NH2 shows a strong structural...... selectivity towards atop-gold configurations, S shows large variability in its bonding geometries. As a result, the conductance of the Au-NH2-Au junction is less sensitive to the structure of the gold contacts than the Au-S-Au junction. These findings support recent experiments which show that amine...

  15. Spiral Patterning of Au Nanoparticles on Au Nanorod Surface to Form Chiral AuNR@AuNP Helical Superstructures Templated by DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenqi; Lan, Xiang; Zhu, Chenggan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Qiangbin

    2017-02-20

    Plasmonic motifs with precise surface recognition sites are crucial for assembling defined nanostructures with novel functionalities and properties. In this work, a unique and effective strategy is successfully developed to pattern DNA recognition sites in a helical arrangement around a gold nanorod (AuNR), and a new set of heterogeneous AuNR@AuNP plasmonic helices is fabricated by attaching complementary-DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the predesigned sites on the AuNR surface. AuNR is first assembled to one side of a bifacial rectangular DNA origami, where eight groups of capture strands are selectively patterned on the other side. The subsequently added link strands make the rectangular DNA origami roll up around the AuNR into a tubular shape, therefore giving birth to a chiral patterning of DNA recognition sites on the surface of AuNR. Following the hybridization with the AuNPs capped with the complementary strands to the capture strands on the DNA origami, left-handed and right-handed AuNR@AuNP helical superstructures are precisely formed by tuning the pattern of the recognition sites on the AuNR surface. Our strategy of nanoparticle surface patterning innovatively realizes hierarchical self-assembly of plasmonic superstructures with tunable chiroptical responses, and will certainly broaden the horizon of bottom-up construction of other functional nanoarchitectures with growing complexity.

  16. Charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Xu(蔡勖); ZHOU; Daimei(周代梅); SA; Benhao(萨本豪)

    2003-01-01

    A hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, together with the corresponding Monte Carlo eventgenerator, has been employed in this paper to investigate further the charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at√Snn= 130 GeV. The default JPCIAE calculations are in good agreement with PHENIX and STAR data. Wefound that the thermal predictions for the π gas, the resonance π gas and quark matter deviate, respectively,from the corresponding dynamical simulations from the JPCIAE model. The discrepancies were also foundbetween the π charge fluctuations and the charge fluctuations of all species of hadrons. However the chargefluctuations for "π from ρ and ω decay" and for all the hadrons from resonance decay are close to each other,indicating the correlation between positively and negatively charged hadrons is not sensitive to the species ofhadrons. This work shows further that it is questionable to use the charge fluctuations as a signature of QGP.

  17. Onset of nuclear matter expansion in Au+Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Crochet, Philippe; Gobbi, A; Donà, R; Coffin, J P; Fintz, P; Guillaume, G; Jundt, F; Kühn, C E; Roy, C; De Schauenburg, B; Tizniti, L; Wagner, P; Alard, J P; Amouroux, V; Andronic, A; Basrak, Z; Bastid, N; Belyaev, I; Best, D; Biegansky, J; Butà, A; Caplar, R; Cindro, N; Dupieux, P; Dzelalija, M; Fan, Z G; Fodor, Z; Fraysse, L; Freifelder, R P; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Hong, B H; Jeong, S C; Kecskeméti, J; Kirejczyk, M; Koncz, P; Korolija, M; Kotte, R; Lebedev, A; Leifels, Y; Man'ko, V I; Moisa, D; Mösner, J; Neubert, W; Pelte, D; Petrovici, M; Pinkenburg, C H; Pras, P; Ramillien, V; Reisdorf, W; Ritman, J L; Sadchikov, A G; Schüll, D; Seres, Z; Sikora, B; Simion, V; Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Sodan, U; Teh, K M; Trzaska, M; Vasilev, M A; Wang, G S; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Wisniewski, K; Wohlfarth, D; Zhilin, A V

    1997-01-01

    Using the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, excitation functions of collective flow components were measured for the Au+Au system, in the reaction plane and out of this plane, at seven incident energies ranging from 100AMeV to 800AMeV. The threshold energies, corresponding to the onset of sideward-flow (balance energy) and squeeze-out effect (transition energy), are extracted from extrapolations of these excitation functions toward lower beam energies for charged products with Z>2. The transition energy is found to be larger than the balance energy. The impact parameter dependence of both balance and transition energies, when extrapolated to central collisions, suggests comparable although slightly higher values than the threshold energy for the radial flow. The relevant parameter seems to be the energy deposited into the system in order to overcome the attractive nuclear forces.

  18. Onset of nuclear matter expansion in Au+Au collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, P.; Rami, F.; Gobbi, A.; Dona, R.; Coffin, J. P.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Roy, C.; de Schauenburg, B.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Best, D.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cindro, N.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fan, Z. G.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Freifelder, R. P.; Berrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hong, B.; Jeong, S. C.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koncz, P.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Moisa, D.; Mösner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pras, P.; Ramillien, V.; Reisdorf, W.; Ritman, J. L.; Sadchikov, A. G.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K. M.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wang, G. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.; FOPI Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Using the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, excitation functions of collective flow components were measured for the Au+Au system, in the reaction plane and out of this plane, at seven incident energies ranging from 100 A MeV to 800 A MeV. The threshold energies, corresponding to the onset of sideward-flow (balance energy) and squeeze-out effect (transition energy), are extracted from extrapolations of these excitation functions toward lower beam energies for charged products with Z ⩾ 2. The transition energy is found to be larger than the balance energy. The impact parameter dependence of both balance and transition energies, when extrapolated to central collisions, suggests comparable although slightly higher values than the threshold energy for the radial flow. The relevant parameter seems to be the energy deposited into the system in order to overcome the attractive nuclear forces.

  19. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickles, Anne M., E-mail: anne@bnl.gov

    2014-06-15

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v{sub 2} at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v{sub 2} in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  20. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  1. Ferromagnetism of polythiophene-capped Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K.; Zhang, H.; Saito, K.; Garitaonandia, J. S.; Goikolea, E.; Insausti, M.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic and electrical transport properties of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) doped with iodine have been investigated to clarify the effectiveness of conductive polymer capping on the induction of ferromagnetism in Au. The room-temperature magnetization curve of the undoped polythiophene-capped Au NPs exhibits a clear hysteresis behavior with a coercive force of 160 Oe. The spontaneous magnetization normalized by the mass of Au is 2.0 × 10-2 emu/g. The spontaneous magnetization was found virtually unaffected by iodine doping, whereas the electrical conductivity is enhanced dramatically to ˜10 S/cm. Our results show that polythiophene capping could lead to spontaneous magnetic polarization in Au NPs, and the conductivity of the polymer capping does not affect the ferromagnetism of the Au nanoparticles, opening a possibility for further investigation into the magnetotransport behavior of ferromagnetic Au NPs.

  2. Introduction au filtre de Kalman

    OpenAIRE

    Alazard, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Ce document est une introduction au filtre optimal de Kalman appliquée aux systèmes linéaires. On suppose connues la théorie des asservissements linéaires et du filtrage fréquentiel (continu et discret) ainsi que les notions d'états pour représenter les systèmes dynamiques linéaires.

  3. L’apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    En 1961, sur la base du constat que l’évolution du marché du travail nécessitait un besoin croissant de personnel qualifié, le 1er accord entre la République et canton de Genève et le CERN fut signé. Cet accord avait notamment pour objet la formation professionnelle de jeunes électroniciens et techniciens de laboratoires en physique. Le CERN, acteur local économique d’importance, soulignait par cet accord sa volonté de participer au développement économique et social local. Le 1er apprenti arriva au CERN en 1965. En 1971, le centre d’apprentissage fut créé ; il accueille aujourd’hui plus d’une vingtaine d’apprentis au total, à raison d’environ six nouveaux apprentis chaque année. Cet apprentissage est dédié aux jeunes âgés e...

  4. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  5. High Pt Suppression at Forward Rapidities in d+Au and Au+Au at $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ristea, C; Bearden, I G; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Lystad, R; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S; Ristea, Catalin

    2005-01-01

    We present centrality dependent charged hadron yields at several pseudorapidities from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=200GeV measured with BRAHMS spectrometers. Nuclear modification factors RAA and RCP for charged hadrons at forward angles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC will be discussed.

  6. Structure and stress in Cu/Au and Fe/Au systems: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zientarski, Tomasz, E-mail: martom@dyzio.umcs.lublin.pl [Department for the Modelling of Physico-Chemical Processes, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, ul. Gliniana 33, 20-614 Lublin (Poland); Chocyk, Dariusz [Department of Applied Physics, Lublin University of Technology, ul. Nadbystrzycka 38, 20-618 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Growth of Fe and Cu thin films on Au substrate and stress evolution were modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The interactions in the system are described by embedded atom method. The kinematical theory of scattering is performed to identify the structure obtained from simulations. The gold layers undergo reconstruction before deposition. The deposited copper atoms do not disturb the atoms in the reconstructed gold layer, but the deposited iron atoms cause the disappearance of the reconstructed gold surfaces. In both systems Cu/Au and Fe/Au, in the early stage of growth one observes compressive stress. Next, Cu/Au systems have the compressive stress, while in the case of Fe/Au the tensile stress is observed. In the Fe/Au system, the body-centered cubic lattice of Fe changes its orientation relative to the Au layer. In the Fe/Au system we observed a larger diffusion of Au atoms than in Cu/Au systems. - Highlights: • The kinematical theory of scattering is performed to identify the structure. • The correlation between the stress and the deformation is observed. • The relaxation of the stress depends on the orientation of layers. • The lattice of Fe changes its orientation relative to the Au layer in the Fe/Au system. • The Cu layer continues the lattice of Au in the Cu/Au system.

  7. Theory of the separation of a gaseous mixture by diffusion through a porous wall (1962); Theorie de la separation d'un melange gazeux par diffusion a travers une paroi poreuse (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-06-15

    The present-day theories of separation by gaseous diffusion (Present and de BETHUNE, KYNCH, BOSANQUET) are all based on the same model in which the pores are cylindrical capillaries. In the theory presented here, we substitute for this model that of a disordered and isotropic bed of identical spheres, which describes more accurately most of the porous media. We take as our starting point DERIAGUINE and BAKANOV'S permeability theory, which expresses the flow of a simple gas in such a bed when the latter is of high porosity. We first generalise this theory in the case of medium and low porosities; then, we go on to a mixture of two gases, from which we deduce our separation theory. Finally we compare our results with those of Present and de BETHUNE. (author) [French] Les theories actuelles de la separation par diffusion gazeuse (PRESENT et de BETHUNE, KYNCH, BOSANQUET) reposent toutes sur le modele des pores capillaires cylindriques. Dans la theorie presentee ici, nous substituons a ce modele celui d'un empilement desordonne et isotropes de spheres identiques, qui decrit plus correctement la plupart des milieux poreux. Nous partons de la theorie de la permeabilite de DERIAGUINE et BAKANOV, qui exprime l'ecoulement d'un gaz simple dans un tel empilement dans le cas ou la porosite en est elevee. Nous generalisons d'abord cette theorie du cas des porosites moyennes ou faibles, puis, passant a un melange de deux gaz, nous en deduisons une theorie de la separation. Pour terminer, nous comparons nos resultats a ceux de PRESENT et de BETHUNE. (auteur)

  8. Filipino au pairs on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial interdep...... by including the migrants’ broader social network within the frame of research.......Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial...... interdependence, whilst they continuously form their trajectories in relation to opportunities and restraints posed along the way by their local and transnational social relations. The article argues that examinations of migration trajectories benefit from broadening the research out in both time and space...

  9. Becoming independent through au pair migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    . This article argues that, despite this critique, au pairing does play an important formative role for young Filipinas because it opens up for experiences abroad that enable them to be recognised as independent adults in Philippine society. Rather than autonomy, however, au pairs define their independence......Over the past decade, growing numbers of young Filipinas have entered Denmark on the au pair scheme. While its official aim is to broaden the cultural horizons of youth, researchers generally view Filipina au pairing as a form of labour migration using au pairs as inexpensive domestic workers...... in terms of their capacity to assume responsibility for others, thereby achieving a position of social respect. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Denmark and the Philippines, this article explores how young Filipinas use the social, economic, and cultural resources they gain from their au pair stay abroad...

  10. L’olivier au Maroc

    OpenAIRE

    El Mouhtadi Issam; Agouzzal Mohamed; Guy François

    2014-01-01

    L’olivier est une culture traditionnelle sur le pourtour de la Méditerranée. Il est donc naturel de trouver cet arbre au Maroc où il est présent depuis des siècles. Cultivé surtout traditionnellement jusqu’à ses dernières années, il fait l’objet maintenant d’un plan de valorisation très ambitieux pour non seulement garder le Royaume à son niveau actuel (2e producteur mondial pour l’olive de conserve et 6e pour l’huile d’olive) mais pour conq...

  11. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  12. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  13. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  14. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for all mesophotic corals in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to...

  15. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Montipora Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Montipora in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  16. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  17. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is located between the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe, and includes the Au'au Channel as well as parts of the Kealaikahiki, Alalakeiki...

  18. L’olivier au Maroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mouhtadi Issam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available L’olivier est une culture traditionnelle sur le pourtour de la Méditerranée. Il est donc naturel de trouver cet arbre au Maroc où il est présent depuis des siècles. Cultivé surtout traditionnellement jusqu’à ses dernières années, il fait l’objet maintenant d’un plan de valorisation très ambitieux pour non seulement garder le Royaume à son niveau actuel (2e producteur mondial pour l’olive de conserve et 6e pour l’huile d’olive mais pour conquérir de nouveaux marchés au niveau mondial et profiter ainsi de l’engouement que connaît cette huile reconnue pour ses bienfaits. Le plan national « Maroc Vert » permet ainsi, grâce à des subventions conséquentes, non seulement de renouveler les vergers existant avec la variété traditionnelle picholine du Maroc, mais également la plantation de nouvelles variétés en super-intensif dans le but d’industrialiser au maximum de nouveaux vergers. Il en est de même pour la transformation des olives en huile de bonne qualité avec la mise en place d’unités de trituration modernes qui doivent supplanter à terme la multitude de « maâsra » et réduire ainsi l’impact environnemental dû aux margines. L’olive ne sera plus dans l’avenir que représentée par son huile et ses formes comestibles, mais les résidus de son extraction seront valorisés soit sous forme de combustible élaboré pour le grignon, soit sous forme d’une base de chimie verte pour les sous-produits du raffinage. D’autres applications sont actuellement à l’étude, car le Maroc à compris, comme tous les autres grands pays producteurs, que l’olive était un nouveau gisement de richesses.

  19. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  20. English for au pairs the au pair's guide to learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    English for Au Pairs has interlinked stories about a group of au pairs new to England. Marta, an 18-year-old from Poland arrives in the UK to work as an au pair. Throughout her year-long stay she has many different experiences - some bad, some good - but with the support of her host family she finds new friends and improves her English. English for Au Pairs offers insight into the joys and difficulties of being an au pair while at the same time reinforcing English language learning through grammar explanations and exercises.

  1. Chemisorption of Au on Si(001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Shu-Yi; Wang Jian-Guang; Ma Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ The chemisorption of one monolayer of Au atoms on an ideal Si(001) surface is studied by using the self-consistent tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. Energies of the adsorption system of a Au atom on different sites are calculated. It is found that the most stable position is A site (top site) for the adsorbed Au atoms above the Si(001)surface. It is possible for the adsorbed Au atoms to sit below the Si(001) surface at the B1 site(bridge site), resulting in a Au-Si mixed layer. This is in agreement with the experiment results. The layer projected density of states is calculated and compared with that of the clean surface. The charge transfer is also investigated.

  2. Chahla Chafiq, Demande au Miroir

    OpenAIRE

    Guilyardi, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Le regard est omniprésent dans le premier roman en français de Chahla Chafiq, écrivain et sociologue iranienne exilée en France depuis 1983, reconnue pour ses travaux sur l’islamisme. Le personnage central de Demande au miroir, Guita Salim, regarde la vie de sa fenêtre. « Entre la fenêtre et le voir, il y a toujours un écart », écrit Forough Farrokhzâd, poétesse persane qui illumina les années 1950-1960, dont la poésie traverse ce roman. Adolescente, dans une ruelle de Téhéran, la jeune héroï...

  3. Strain distributions of confined Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄红华; 章英; 刘晓山; 骆兴芳; 袁彩雷; 叶双莉

    2015-01-01

    The strain distributions of Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles confined in the Al2O3 matrix with different core sizes are investigated by using the finite element method, respectively. The simulation results clearly indicate that the compressive strains exerted on the Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles can be induced by the Al2O3 matrix. Moreover, it can be found that the strain gradient existing in a Au/Ag nanoparticle is much larger than that in a Ag/Au nanoparticle, which could be due to the larger Young’s modulus of Au than that of Ag. With the core size increasing, the strain gradient existing in the Au/Ag nanoparticle becomes larger, while the strain gradient existing in the Ag/Au nanoparticle keeps constant. These different strain distributions may have significant infl uences on the structures and morphologies of the Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles, leading to the different physical properties for potential applications.

  4. Enhanced activity for supported Au clusters: Methanol oxidation on Au/TiO2(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Samuel A.; Cagg, Brett A.; Levine, Mara S.; He, Wei; Manandhar, Kedar; Chen, Donna A.

    2012-08-01

    Gold clusters supported on TiO2(110) exhibit unusual activity for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. Temperature programmed desorption studies of methanol on Au clusters show that both Au and titania sites are necessary for methanol reaction. Isotopic labeling experiments with CD3OH demonstrate that reaction occurs via Osbnd H bond scission to form a methoxy intermediate. When the TiO2 surface is oxidized with 18O2 before or after Au deposition, methanol reaction produces H218O below 300 K, indicating that oxygen from titania promotes Osbnd H bond scission and is incorporated into desorbing products. XPS experiments provide additional evidence that during methanol reaction on the Au/TiO2 surface, methanol adsorption occurs on TiO2, given that the titania support becomes slightly oxidized after exposure to methanol in the presence of Au clusters. While the role of TiO2 is to dissociate the Osbnd H bond and form the reactive methoxy intermediate, the role of the Au sites is to remove hydrogen from the surface as H2, thus preventing the recombination of methoxy and hydrogen to methanol. The decrease in formaldehyde yield with increasing Au coverage above 0.25 ML suggests that reaction occurs at Au-titania interfacial sites; scanning tunneling microscopy images of various Au coverages confirm that the number of interfacial sites at the perimeter of the Au clusters decreases as the Au coverage is increased between 0.25 and 5 ML.

  5. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  6. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Vinod; K.G.Gopchandran

    2014-01-01

    Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  7. Investigation of the Phase Equilibria of Sn-Cu-Au Ternary and Ag-Sn-Cu-Au Quaternary Systems and Interfacial Reactions in Sn-Cu/Au Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yee-Wen; Jao, Chien-Chung; Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yung; Lee, Chiapyng

    2007-02-01

    The phase equilibria of the Sn-Cu-Au ternary, Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary systems and interfacial reactions between Sn-Cu alloys and Au were experimentally investigated at specific temperatures in this study. The experimental results indicated that there existed three ternary intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and a complete solid solubility between AuSn and Cu6Sn5 phases in the Sn-Cu-Au ternary system at 200°C. No quaternary IMC was found in the isoplethal section of the Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary system. Three IMCs, AuSn, AuSn2, and AuSn4, were found in all couples. The same three IMCs and (Au,Cu)Sn/(Cu,Au)6Sn5 phases were found in all Sn-Cu/Au couples. The thickness of these reaction layers increased with increasing temperature and time. The mechanism of IMC growth can be described by using the parabolic law. In addition, when the reaction time was extended and the Cu content of the alloy was increased, the AuSn4 phase disappeared gradually. The (Au, Cu)Sn and (Cu,Au)6Sn5 layers played roles as diffusion barriers against Sn in Sn-Cu/Au reaction couple systems.

  8. Au Fixed Point Development at NRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedyulin, S. N.; Gotoh, M.; Todd, A. D. W.

    2017-04-01

    Two Au fixed points filled using metal of different nominal purities in carbon crucibles have been developed at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). The primary motivation behind this project was to provide the means for direct thermocouple calibrations at the Au freezing point (1064.18°C). Using a Au fixed point filled with the metal of maximum available purity [99.9997 % pure according to glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS)], multiple freezing plateaus were measured in a commercial high-temperature furnace. Four Pt/Pd thermocouples constructed and calibrated in-house were used to measure the freezing plateaus. From the calibration at Sn, Zn, Al and Ag fixed points, the linear deviation function from the NIST-IMGC reference function (IEC 62460:2008 Standard) was determined and extrapolated to the freezing temperature of Au. For all the Pt/Pd thermocouples used in this study, the measured EMF values agree with the extrapolated values within expanded uncertainty, thus substantiating the use of 99.9997 % pure Au fixed point cell for thermocouple calibrations at NRC. Using the Au fixed point filled with metal of lower purity (99.99 % pure according to GDMS), the effect of impurities on the Au freezing temperature measured with Pt/Pd thermocouple was further investigated.

  9. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-La and Au-Er binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, H.Q., E-mail: hongqun.dong@aalto.fi [Department of Electronics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, FIN-02601 Espoo (Finland); Tao, X.M. [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Liu, H.S. [Scientific Center of Phase Diagrams and Materials Design, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Laurila, T.; Paulastro-Kroeckel, M. [Department of Electronics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, FIN-02601 Espoo (Finland)

    2011-03-31

    Research highlights: > It's the first time that Au-La and Au-Er binary systems were thermodynamically assessed since 1985. > Besides, in the present work, the ab initio approach has been employed to calculate the formation enthalpies of the IMCs involved in Au-Er and Au-La binary systems, and then, by combining with all of the available experimental information, these two-system were thermodynamically optimized via CALPHAD method. Therefore, a more reliable thermodynamic description has been obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Phase relationships in Au-La and Au-Er binary systems have been thermodynamically assessed by using the CALPHAD technique. The existing thermodynamic descriptions of the systems were improved by incorporating the ab initio calculated enthalpies of formation of the intermetallic compounds, except for the Au{sub 51}La{sub 14} and Au{sub 10}Er{sub 7} phases. All the binary intermetallic compounds were treated as stoichiometric phases, while the solution phases, including liquid, fcc, bcc, and dhcp, were treated as substitutional solution phases and the excess Gibbs energies were formulated with Redlich-Kister polynomial function. As a result, two self-consist thermodynamic data sets for describing the Au-La and Au-Er binary systems were obtained.

  10. Engineered fabrication of ordered arrays of Au-NiO-Au nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Daniele; Franz, Silvia; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Laura; Brivio, Stefano; Tallarida, Grazia; Spiga, Sabina

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, a novel method to fabricate ordered arrays of Au/NiO/Au nanowires is described, with the aim of filling the gap between the fundamental study of the electrical properties of scattered single nanowires and the engineered fabrication of nanowire arrays. This approach mainly consists of the following steps: (a) electrodeposition of Au/Ni/Au nanowires into an ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide template; (b) mechanical polishing of the sample to expose the gold tips of Au/Ni/Au nanowires to the template surface; (c) in situ annealing of the Au/Ni/Au nanowires without removing the template. The resulting structure consists in an ordered array of Au/NiO/Au nanowires slightly protruding out of a flat aluminum oxide template. Unlike current approaches, with the described method it is not necessary to remove the template in order to oxidize the middle metal, thus allowing the availability of an entire set of metal/oxide/metal nanowires ordered in a two-dimensional matrix and where single heterojunctions can be accessed individually.

  11. Engineered fabrication of ordered arrays of Au-NiO-Au nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Daniele; Franz, Silvia; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Laura; Brivio, Stefano; Tallarida, Grazia; Spiga, Sabina

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, a novel method to fabricate ordered arrays of Au/NiO/Au nanowires is described, with the aim of filling the gap between the fundamental study of the electrical properties of scattered single nanowires and the engineered fabrication of nanowire arrays. This approach mainly consists of the following steps: (a) electrodeposition of Au/Ni/Au nanowires into an ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide template; (b) mechanical polishing of the sample to expose the gold tips of Au/Ni/Au nanowires to the template surface; (c) in situ annealing of the Au/Ni/Au nanowires without removing the template. The resulting structure consists in an ordered array of Au/NiO/Au nanowires slightly protruding out of a flat aluminum oxide template. Unlike current approaches, with the described method it is not necessary to remove the template in order to oxidize the middle metal, thus allowing the availability of an entire set of metal/oxide/metal nanowires ordered in a two-dimensional matrix and where single heterojunctions can be accessed individually.

  12. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f-oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase transformation from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) is observed upon coating the hcp Au square sheets with Pt or Pd under ambient conditions. The prepared fcc Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates demonstrate unique (101)f orientation (picture shows a typical fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplate). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Et pourquoi pas au CERN ?

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Télétravail ou travail à distance, aménagement des horaires de travail et autres évolutions favorables à un meilleur équilibre vie privée et vie professionnelle sont adoptés par nombre d’entreprises et d’organisations !   Rendu possible grâce au développement de nouvelles technologies dont Internet, le travail à distance séduit de plus en plus de personnels, ainsi que de plus en plus de sociétés qui y trouvent des avantages en matière de gestion de l’espace, de sécurité (moins de trajets domicile-entreprise), de développement durable (moins de pollution), de motivation et de bien-être de leurs personnels. Les horaires aménagés, voire les « core-hours1 », sont également des pratiques de plus e...

  14. Longitudinal scaling of net-protons in AuAu and pp collisions at RHIC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Flemming

    2008-10-01

    BRAHMS has studied net-protons distributions in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Net-proton distributions reflect the net-baryon yields and can be used to extract the nuclear stopping in the collisions, thus providing information on baryon number transport and energy available for particle production. The talk will present final and preliminary results from the above mentioned systems. It will be shown that in p+p and in Au+Au central collisions that net-proton distributions exhibit longitudinal scaling once the target contribution to the projectile rapidity range is corrected for. The difference between p+p and Au+Au will be discussed. Aspects of future measurements at the LHC of net-baryons at mid-rapidity will be brought forth.

  15. PHENIX results on jets in d + Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, J. Ali

    2016-12-01

    We present recently published results [A. Adare, et al., arxiv:arXiv:1509.04657] on fully reconstructed R=0.3 anti-kt jets measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy. The jet yields for four centrality classes along with the p+p reference are presented, as well as both the minimum bias RdAu and centrality dependent RdAu and RCP. We find that while the minimum bias RdA is consistent with unity, providing a strong constraint on models including cold-nuclear-matter effects or energy loss in small systems, the centrality dependent RdAu show a striking variation which presents a challenge to models attempting to describe the interplay between soft and hard processes in these systems.

  16. Centrality Dependent Particle Production at $y=0$ and $y \\sim1$ in Au+Au Collisions at $y=0$ and $y \\sim1$ in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, I; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Lystad, R; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2005-01-01

    Particle production of identified charged hadrons, $\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$, and $\\bar{p}$ in Au+Au collisions at $\\snn =$ 200 GeV has been studied as a function of transverse momentum and collision centrality at $y=0$ and $y\\sim1$ by the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC. Significant collective transverse flow at kinetic freeze-out has been observed in the collisions. The magnitude of the flow rises with the collision centrality. Proton and kaon yields relative to the pion production increase strongly as the transverse momentum increases and also increase with centrality. Particle yields per participant nucleon show a weak dependence on the centrality for all particle species. Hadron production remains relatively constant within one unit around midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\snn =$ 200 GeV.

  17. Unravelling Thiol’s Role in Directing Asymmetric Growth of Au Nanorod–Au Nanoparticle Dimers

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-12-15

    Asymmetric nanocrystals have practical significance in nanotechnologies but present fundamental synthetic challenges. Thiol ligands have proven effective in breaking the symmetric growth of metallic nanocrystals but their exact roles in the synthesis remain elusive. Here, we synthesized an unprecedented Au nanorod-Au nanoparticle (AuNR-AuNP) dimer structure with the assistance of a thiol ligand. On the basis of our experimental observations, we unraveled for the first time that the thiol could cause an inhomogeneous distribution of surface strains on the seed crystals as well as a modulated reduction rate of metal precursors, which jointly induced the asymmetric growth of monometallic dimers. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  18. Bipolar resistive switching of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au heterostructure nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, S.; Perego, D.; Tallarida, G.; Bestetti, M.; Franz, S.; Spiga, S.

    2013-10-01

    Arrays of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm were characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy, which was used to probe the electrical behavior of single nanowires still included in the array. A bipolar switching of the single Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires is demonstrated and is attributed to the choice of an asymmetric couple of electrode materials and, possibly, to a non-uniform Ni oxidation profile inside the NiOx segments. An analysis of the conduction mechanism in a single nanowire is presented to further support this conclusion.

  19. Apprentissages techniques : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGES TECHNIQUES GESTION ET DEVELOPPEMENT DU PERSONNEL HR/PMD L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 7 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L'apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9ème du Cycle d'orientation genevois (3ème en France) • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgiqu...

  20. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  1. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    PHENIX Collaboration; Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1

  2. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V. [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin A., E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Bakakin, Vladimir V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag{sub 2−x}Au{sub x}Se with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag{sub 2}Se – Ag{sub 1.94}Au{sub 0.06}Se, fischesserite Ag{sub 3}AuSe{sub 2} - Ag{sub 3.2}Au{sub 0.8}Se{sub 2} and gold selenide AuSe - Au{sub 0.94}Ag{sub 0.06}Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe. - Highlights: • Au-Ag selenides were synthesized. • Limited Ag-Au isomorphism in the selenides is affected by structural features. • Some new phases were introduced to the phase diagram Ag-Au-Se.

  3. Observation of anisotropic event shapes and transverse flow in ultrarelativistic Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette, J.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cleland, W.E.; Clemen, M.; Cole, J.; Cormier, T.M.; David, G.; Dee, J.; Dietzsch, O.; Drigert, M.; Gilbert, S.; Hall, J.R.; Hemmick, T.K.; Herrmann, N.; Hong, B.; Jiang, C.L.; Kwon, Y.; Lacasse, R.; Lukaszew, A.; Li, Q.; Ludlam, T.W.; McCorkle, S.; Mark, S.K.; Matheus, R.; O' Brien, E.; Panitkin, S.; Piazza, T.; Pruneau, C.; Rao, M.N.; Rosati, M.; daSilva, N.C.; Sedykh, S.; Sonnadara, U.; Stachel, J.; Takai, H.; Takagui, E.M.; Voloshin, S.; Wang, G.; Wessels, J.P.; Woody, C.L.; Xu, N.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zou, C. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 (United States) McGill Univesity, Montreal, H3A 2T8 (Canada) University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States) SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 11794 (United States) University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (B; (E877 Collaboration)

    1994-11-07

    Event shapes for Au + Au collisions at 11.4 GeV/[ital c] per nucleon were studied over nearly the full solid angle with the E877 apparatus. The analysis was performed by Fourier expansion of azimuthal distributions of the transverse energy ([ital E][sub [ital T

  4. EVENT STRUCTURE AT RHIC FROM P-P TO AU-AU.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRAINOR,T.A.; (FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION)

    2004-03-15

    Several correlation analysis techniques are applied to p-p and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. Strong large-momentum-scale correlations are observed which can be related to local charge and momentum conservation during hadronization and to minijet (minimum-bias parton fragment) correlations.

  5. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fauad Rami

    2003-05-01

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed.

  6. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy; Su, Dangshen [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Wang, Di [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  7. Collective motion in selected central collisions of Au on Au at 150A MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. C.; Herrmann, N.; Fan, Z. G.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Krämer, M.; Randrup, J.; Reisdorf, W.; Schüll, D.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Pelte, D.; Trzaska, M.; Wienold, T.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belayev, I. M.; Berger, L.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Boussange, S.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Dona, R.; Dupieux, P.; Erö, J.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Frolov, S.; Grigorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Kuhn, C.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Maurenzig, P.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Morel, P.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Ramillien, V.; Sadchikov, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Tezkratt, R.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.

    1994-05-01

    Using the FOPI facility at GSI Darmstadt complete data of Au on Au collisions at 150A MeV were collected for charged products (Z=1-15) at laboratory angles 1°=3) are used to determine the collective energy which is found to be at least 10A MeV.

  8. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Trzeciakiewicz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides.

  9. LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormaza, M.; Fernández, L.; Lafuente, S.; Corso, M.; Schiller, F.; Xu, B.; Diakhate, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Ortega, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the crystal structure and electronic bands of LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111). By scanning-tunneling microscopy we study the formation of different alloy phases as a function of growth temperature and lanthanide coverage. We determine the specific growth conditions to achieve monolayers and bilayers of LaAu2 and CeAu2 with high crystalline quality. Due to lattice mismatch with the underlying Au substrate, both LaAu2 and CeAu2 exhibit long-range moiré patterns, which can serve as templates for further nanostructure growth. By angle-resolved photoemission we map the two-dimensional band structure of these surface alloys, discussing the nature of the different spectral features in the light of first-principles calculations.

  10. Influence of Au Nanoparticle Shape on Au@Cu2O Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of metal-semiconductor heterostructures may allow the combination of function of the corresponding components and/or the enhanced performance resulting from the interactions between all the components. In this paper, Au@Cu2O core-shell heterostructures are prepared by a seed-growth method, using different-shaped Au nanocrystals as the seeds such as nanorods, octahedra, decahedra, dots, and nanocubes. The results revealed that the final structure of Au@Cu2O was greatly influenced by the shape of the seeds used. Exposure of Cu2O{111} and Cu2O{001} favored when the overgrowth happened on Au{111} and Au{001} surface, respectively. The size of the product can also be tuned by the amount of the seeds. The results reported here provide a thinking clue to modulate the shape and size of core-shell nanocrystals, which is useful in developing new materials with desired performance.

  11. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  12. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S

    2013-01-01

    The transverse momentum (p_T) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (\\pi^+/-, K^+/-, p, p^bar) produced in sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to p_T=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to p_T=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate p_T region, between 2--5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon to meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions, and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The p_T dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

  13. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2013-08-01

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (π±, K±, p, p¯) produced in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to pT=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to pT=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate pT region, between 2 and 5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon-to-meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The pT-dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

  14. Relative Distribution of Au48+~Au52+ in Au Plasma by Ionization Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUZhi-Yan; ZHUZheng-He; JIANGGang

    2003-01-01

    The present work proposes a theoretical method called ionization dynamics to derive the ionic charge state distribution. Using relativistic quantum mechanics to calculate the energy level lifetime and average ionic lifetime of each ion, the first-order ionization rate constant can be obtained. Based on these data, from the solution of differential equations for consecutive-irreversible ionization reactions, one will be able to derive the ionic charge state distribution.The calculated average positive charge 49.24 of Au48+ ~ Au52+ and their relative distribution are in good agreement with the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction of Au nanoparticle-bound primers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hebai; HU Min; YANG Zhongnan; WANG Chen; ZHU Longzhang

    2005-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a useful technique for in vitro amplification of a DNA fragment. In this paper, a PCR procedure using Au nanoparticle (AuNP) -bound primers was systemically studied. The 5′-SH- (CH2)6-modified primers were covalently attached to the AuNP surface via Au-S bonds, and plasmid pBluescript SK was used as a template. The effects of the concentration of AuNP-bound primers, annealing temperature and PCR cycles were evaluated, respectively. The results indicate that PCR can proceed successfully under optimized condition, with either forward or reverse primers bound to the AuNP surface or with both the two primers bound to the AuNP surface. Development of PCR procedure based on AuNPs not only makes the isolation of PCR products very convenient, but also provides novel methods to prepare AuNP-bound ssDNA and nanostructured material.

  16. Engineering the strain in graphene layers with Au decoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannu, Compesh, E-mail: compesh@gmail.com; Singh, Udai B.; Kumar, Sunil; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Avasthi, D.K., E-mail: dka4444@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    Graphene sheets decorated with Au nanodots are synthesized by deposition of Au of three different thicknesses and subsequent annealing at 400 °C. Different thicknesses of Au film for the formation of Au nanodots on graphene are measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and morphology is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy indicates 3–6-fold increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio depending on the content of Au deposited on graphene. The increase in disorder in Au decorated graphene layers is explained on the basis of interaction of Au atoms with Π bonds of graphene. The splitting and blueshift in G band signifies compressive strain in Au deposited graphene. X-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation source confirm compressive strain in graphene, which increases with increase of Au film thickness.

  17. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelo, T.E., E-mail: tenovelo@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua, Chihuahua Mexico (Mexico); Amézaga-Madrid, P. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua, Chihuahua Mexico (Mexico); Maldonado, R.D. [Universidad Anáhuac-Mayab, Carretera Mérida-Progreso Km. 15.5 A.P. 96-Cordemex, CP. 97310 Mérida, Yucatán Mexico (Mexico); Oliva, A.I. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados el IPN Unidad Mérida, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Km 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán Mexico (Mexico); Alonzo-Medina, G.M. [Universidad Anáhuac-Mayab, Carretera Mérida-Progreso Km. 15.5 A.P. 96-Cordemex, CP. 97310 Mérida, Yucatán Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-03-15

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} and Au{sub 3}Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au{sub 3}Cu and Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation.

  18. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales Perez, M; Delgado Macuil, R; Rojas Lopez, M; Gayou, V L [Centro de Investigacion en BiotecnologIa Aplicada del IPN, Tepetitla Tlaxcala Mexico C.P. 90700 (Mexico); Sanchez Ramirez, J F, E-mail: mrosalespe@ipn.m [CICATA Legaria Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm{sup -1} due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  19. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  20. Plasmonic Au islands on polymer nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoben, Wout; Brongersma, Sywert H; Crego-Calama, Mercedes, E-mail: wout.knoben@imec-nl.nl [Holst Centre/IMEC, High Tech Campus 31, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-07-22

    The refractive index sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance sensors can be improved by placing the plasmonic metal particles on pillars instead of on a planar substrate. In this paper, a simple and versatile colloidal lithography method for the fabrication of plasmonic Au islands on top of polymer nanopillars is described. The pillar height is controlled by varying the thickness of the initial polymer film. An increased pillar height results in a blue shift of the absorption spectrum of the Au islands. This is explained by a decreased effective refractive index around the islands. For pillars higher than approximately 40 nm no further blue shift is observed, in agreement with the decay length of the electromagnetic field around the islands. Pillar-supported Au islands were also fabricated on a flexible foil, demonstrating the potential of the method described here for the fabrication of flexible plasmonic substrates. Benefits and limitations of the method and of using polymers as the pillar material are discussed.

  1. A velocity map imaging study of gold-rare gas complexes: Au-Ar, Au-Kr, and Au-Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, W. Scott; Woodham, Alex P.; Plowright, Richard J.; Wright, Timothy G.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2010-06-01

    The ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the gold-rare gas atom van der Waals complexes (Au-RG, RG=Ar, Kr, and Xe) have been studied by velocity map imaging. Photofragmentation of Au-Ar and Au-Kr at several wavelengths permits extrapolation to zero of the total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra as monitored in the Au(P23/2∘[5d106p]) fragment channel, facilitating the determination of ground state dissociation energies of D0″(Au-Ar)=149±13 cm-1 and D0″(Au-Kr)=240±19 cm-1, respectively. In the same spectral region, transitions to vibrational levels of an Ω'=1/2 state of the Au-Xe complex result in predissociation to the lower Au(P21/2∘[5d106p])+Xe(S10[5p6]) fragment channel for which TKER extrapolation yields a value of D0″(Au-Xe)=636±27 cm-1. Asymmetric line shapes for transitions to the v'=14 level of this state indicate coupling to the Au(P23/2∘[5d106p])+Xe(S10[5p6]) continuum, which allows us to refine this value to D0″(Au-Xe)=607±5 cm-1. The dissociation dynamics of this vibrational level have been studied at the level of individual isotopologues by fitting the observed excitation spectra to Fano profiles. These fits reveal a remarkable variation in the predissociation dynamics for different Au-Xe isotopologues. For Au-Ar and Au-Xe, the determined ground state dissociation energies are in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations; the agreement of the Au-Kr value with theory is less satisfactory.

  2. Au/Au2S复合纳米球壳微粒的发光特性%Luminescence Properties of Au/Au2S Nanoshell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席聪; 刁佳杰; 陈光德; 邱复生

    2003-01-01

    观测了金纳米球壳微粒(纳米级Au2S介质外包裹一层纳米级厚的金壳)的荧光光谱,与块状Au2S的荧光峰相比,金纳米球壳的荧光峰蓝移到蓝绿区域.蓝移的主要原因是核壳纳米复合结构中的表面态和量子尺寸效应.

  3. Au-Ag@Au Hollow Nanostructure with Enhanced Chemical Stability and Improved Photothermal Transduction Efficiency for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tongtong; Song, Jiangluqi; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hao; Li, Xiaodong; Xia, Ruixiang; Zhu, Lixin; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2015-10-07

    Despite the fact that Au-Ag hollow nanoparticles (HNPs) have gained much attention as ablation agents for photothermal therapy, the instability of the Ag element limits their applications. Herein, excess Au atoms were deposited on the surface of a Au-Ag HNP by improving the reduction power of l-ascorbic acid (AA) and thereby preventing the reaction between HAuCl4 and the Ag element in the Au-Ag alloy nanostructure. Significantly, the obtained Au-Ag@Au HNPs show excellent chemical stability in an oxidative environment, together with remarkable increase in extinction peak intensity and obvious narrowing in peak width. Moreover, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) was used to simulate the optical properties and electric field distribution of HNPs. The calculated results show that the proportion of absorption cross section in total extinction cross section increases with the improvement of Au content in HNP. As predicted by the theoretical calculation results, Au-Ag@Au nanocages (NCs) exhibit a photothermal transduction efficiency (η) as high as 36.5% at 808 nm, which is higher than that of Au-Ag NCs (31.2%). Irradiated by 808 nm laser at power densities of 1 W/cm(2), MCF-7 breast cancer cells incubated with PEGylated Au-Ag@Au NCs were seriously destroyed. Combined together, Au-Ag@Au HNPs with enhanced chemical stability and improved photothermal transduction efficiency show superior competitiveness as photothermal agents.

  4. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and e...

  5. Extaraction par solvant du zinc(II) en milieu acetate par le PhDBP, TBP et D2EHPA. Etude de l'extraction synergique du zinc (II) par les melanges.

    OpenAIRE

    GUEZZEN, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Aterme de notre étude , les diverses observations tout au long des expériences effectuées nous ont permis de metre en valeur les principales conclusions qui sont les suiveantes : Concernant la synthèse et la caractérisation du phDBP, on retient que le phényl dibutyl phosphate " phDBP" procède par substitution nucléophile entre le dichlorophényl phosphate et le ....

  6. Nanoporous Au structures by dealloying Au/Ag thermal- or laser-dewetted bilayers on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.; Grillo, R.; Cacciato, G.; Zimbone, M.; Piccitto, G.; Grimaldi, M. G.

    2017-03-01

    Nanoporous Au attracts great technological interest and it is a promising candidate for optical and electrochemical sensors. In addition to nanoporous Au leafs and films, recently, interest was focused on nanoporous Au micro- and nano-structures on surfaces. In this work we report on the study of the characteristics of nanoporous Au structures produced on surfaces. We developed the following procedures to fabricate the nanoporous Au structures: we deposited thin Au/Ag bilayers on SiO2 or FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide) substrates with thickness xAu and xAg of the Au and Ag layers; we induced the alloying and dewetting processes of the bilayers by furnace annealing processes of the bilayers deposited on SiO2 and by laser irradiations of the bilayers deposited on FTO; the alloying and dewetting processes result in the formation of AuxAgy alloy sub-micron particles being x and y tunable by xAu and xAg. These particles are dealloyed in HNO3 solution to remove the Ag atoms. We obtain, so, nanoporous sub-micron Au particles on the substrates. Analyzing the characteristics of these particles we find that: a) the size and shape of the particles depend on the nature of the dewetting process (solid-state dewetting on SiO2, molten-state dewetting on FTO); b) the porosity fraction of the particles depends on how the alloying process is reached: about 32% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the furnace annealing at 900 °C, about 45% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the laser irradiation at 0.5 J/cm2, in both cases independently on the Ag concentration in the alloy; c) After the dealloying process the mean volume of the Au particles shrinks of about 39%; d) After an annealing at 400 °C the nanoporous Au particles reprise their initial volume while the porosity fraction is reduced. Arguments to justify these behaviors are presented.

  7. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and eta in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, R_AA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  8. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  9. Surface structure of AU3Cu(001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, G.A.; Maupai, S.; Dakkouri, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The surface morphology, composition, and structure of Au3Cu(001) as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and surface x-ray diffraction are presented. Atomic resolution STM images reveal distinctive geometric features. The analysis of the surface x-ray diffraction data provides clear evidence...... for the surface structure. [S0163-1829(99)04535-X]....

  10. 370 emplois auraient ete supprimes au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit-Godet, S

    2002-01-01

    "La FTMH demande un plan social pour les salaries des sous-traitants.  Environ 370 postes ont ete supprimes au CERN ces douze derniers mois.» Alain Perrat, secretaire de la FTMH, tire la sonnette d'alarme" (1 page).

  11. Melamine structures on the Au(111) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silly, Fabien; Shaw, Adam Q.; Castell, Martin R.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Mura, Manuela; Martsinovich, Natalia; Kantorovich, Lev

    2008-01-01

    We report on a joint experimental and theoretical study of the ordered structures of melamine molecules formed on the Au(111)-(22 x root 3) surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images taken under UHV conditions reveal two distinct monolayers one of which has never been reported before on gol

  12. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... her prior experience, skills, or training in the care of special needs children and the host family has reviewed and acknowledged in writing the au pair's prior experience, skills, or training so... participant with more than one host family; (4) A report by a certified public accountant, conducted...

  13. La photographie au temps de Baudelaire

    OpenAIRE

    Nachtergael, Magali

    2010-01-01

    Conférence prononcée à l'Alliance Française de Turin dans le cadre de l'exposition "Paris au temps de Baudelaire" (25 mai-26 juin 2010, Turin, Italie).; Ce texte revient sur l'histoire des relations qu'entretenait Charles Baudelaire et la photographie mais aussi Nadar.

  14. Didaktik des außerschulischen Lernens

    CERN Document Server

    Sauerborn, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Kernprobleme schulischer Bildung sind die zunehmenden Verluste an Realitäts- und Praxisbezug sowie die einseitige Betonung der fachwissenschaftlichen Kenntnisse. In jüngster Zeit werden insbesondere moderne didaktisch-methodische Konzepte näher diskutiert und praktiziert. So finden sich etwa die Stichwörter Handlungsorientierter Unterricht und Offener Unterricht in der fachdidaktischen Diskussion wieder. Eine wesentlich aktuellere Form stellt das außerschulische Lernen dar. Ein modernes pädagogisches Verständnis sieht den Unterricht heute nicht mehr als ausschließliche Tätigkeit des Lehrers an, sondern als Aktivität der Lernenden. Außerschulisches Lernen beschreibt die originale Begegnung im Unterricht außerhalb des Klassenzimmers. An außerschulischen Lernorten findet eine unmittelbare AuseinanderSetzung des Lernenden mit seiner räumlichen Umgebung statt. Charakteristisch sind hierbei vor allem die aktive(Mit-)Gestaltung sowie die eigenständige Wahrnehmung mehrperspektivischer Bildungsinhalte d...

  15. 2010 Port-au-Prince, Haiti Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — According to official estimates, 222,570 people killed, 300,000 injured, 1.3 million displaced, 97,294 houses destroyed and 188,383 damaged in the Port-au-Prince...

  16. Order twins in (111)-evaporated thin films of CuAu I. [Cu-Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.; Broitman, E. (Dept. de Fisica, Univ. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Harriague, S.; Terlisky, S. (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1990-10-15

    The structure of evaporated CuAu I films in (111) orientation was studied by electron transmission and diffraction microscopy. The single-crystal films of Cu-Au alloy were prepared by vacuum evaporation and CuAu I ordered alloy was obtained by heating the disordered f.c.c. alloy to a temperature of 350deg C for 1 h. The electron micrograph revealed the presence of an intricate pattern of antiphase domain boundaries and the presence of twin lamellae. No microtwinning was observed. The CuAu I films exhibit a complex diffraction pattern. The geometry of the expected (111) reciprocal lattice plane has been calculated and described in detail. Extra reflections were identified as {l brace}101{r brace} twin spots and double-diffraction spots which originated from the twins. (orig.).

  17. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prachi Chandrachud; Kavita Joshi; Sailaja Krishnamurty; D G Kanhere

    2009-05-01

    We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the stability of the smallest gold cages, namely Au16 and Au17, at finite temperatures. First, we obtain the ground state structure along with at least 50 distinct isomers for both the clusters. This is followed by the finite temperature simulations of these clusters. Each cluster is maintained at 12 different temperatures for a time period of at least 150 ps. Thus, the total simulation time is of the order of 2.4 ns for each cluster. We observe that the cages are stable at least up to 850 K. Although both clusters melt around the same temperature, i.e. around 900 K, Au17 shows a peak in the heat capacity curve in contrast to the broad peak seen for Au16.

  18. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu to UU collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloczynski, John [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Huang, Xu-Guang, E-mail: huangxuguang@fudan.edu.cn [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Physics Department and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Xilin [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Liao, Jinfeng [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation with the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.

  19. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  20. Contribution to the study of the biological properties of compounds labeled with radio-chromium {sup 51}Cr; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes biologiques des composes marques au radiochrome {sup 51}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingrand, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-15

    Among the radioisotopes commonly used in biology and medicine which are controlled Individually in the Radioelement Departement of the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre before being sent to the users, the author has chosen chromium 51 incorporated in inorganic salts or in organic substrates for a study of the biological properties of the compounds. In the first part, he has compared the pathways followed by the radioactive sodium chromate and chromic chloride mixed with blood or given to the whole animal, the object being to determine whether a reduction of hexavalent chromium occurs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the second part, the author has tried to show the validity of using, various substrates labeled with chromium 51, red cells, haemoglobin, plasma proteins and cytochrome c. The results obtained have contributed to underline the interest of using such compounds for biological applications. (author) [French] Parmi les radioisotopes d'utilisation courants en biologie et en medecine qui sont l'objet d'un controle particulier dans le Departement des Radioelements du Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay avant leur diffusion aux utilisateurs, l'auteur a choisi le chrome 51 incorpore a des sels mineraux ou a des substrats organiques, afin d'en etudier les proprietes biologiques. Dans la premiere partie, il a compare le sort du chromate de sodium et du chlorure chromique radioactifs melanges a du sang ou administres a l'animal entier en s'efforcant de mettre en evidence une reduction du chrome hexavalent aussi bien in vitro qu'in vivo. Dans la deuxieme partie, il a cherche a etablir la validite de l'emploi de differents substrats marques au chrome 51, l'hematie, l'hemoglobine, les proteines plasmatiques et le cytochrome c. Les resultats obtenus ont permis de souligner le reel interet des applications biologiques des composes marques par le radioisotope. (auteur)

  1. Comparative toxicity study of Ag, Au, and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles on Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Albee, Brian; Alemayehu, Matti; Diaz, Rocio; Ingham, Leigha; Kamal, Shawn; Rodriguez, Maritza; Bishnoi, Sandra Whaley

    2010-09-01

    A comparative assessment of the 48-h acute toxicity of aqueous nanoparticles synthesized using the same methodology, including Au, Ag, and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles, was conducted to determine their ecological effect in freshwater environments through the use of Daphnia magna, using their mortality as a toxicological endpoint. D. magna are one of the standard organisms used for ecotoxicity studies due to their sensitivity to chemical toxicants. Particle suspensions used in toxicity testing were well-characterized through a combination of absorbance measurements, atomic force or electron microscopy, flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering to determine composition, aggregation state, and particle size. The toxicity of all nanoparticles tested was found to be dose and composition dependent. The concentration of Au nanoparticles that killed 50% of the test organisms (LC(50)) ranged from 65-75 mg/L. In addition, three different sized Ag nanoparticles (diameters = 36, 52, and 66 nm) were studied to analyze the toxicological effects of particle size on D. magna; however, it was found that toxicity was not a function of size and ranged from 3-4 μg/L for all three sets of Ag nanoparticles tested. This was possibly due to the large degree of aggregation when these nanoparticles were suspended in standard synthetic freshwater. Moreover, the LC(50) values for Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles were found to be between that of Ag and Au but much closer to that of Ag. The bimetallic particles containing 80% Ag and 20% Au were found to have a significantly lower toxicity to Daphnia (LC(50) of 15 μg/L) compared to Ag nanoparticles, while the toxicity of the nanoparticles containing 20% Ag and 80% Au was greater than expected at 12 μg/L. The comparison results confirm that Ag nanoparticles were much more toxic than Au nanoparticles, and that the introduction of gold into silver nanoparticles may lower their environmental impact by lowering the amount

  2. Critical Behavior in Peripheral Au + Au Collisions at 35 MeV/u

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, M; Belkacem, M; Agostino, M D; Milazzo, P M; Vannini, G; Bowman, D R; Dinius, J D; Ferrero, A; Fiandri, M L; Gelbke, C K; Glasmacher, T; Gramegna, F; Handzy, D O; Horn, D; Hsi, W C; Huang, M; Iori, I; Kunde, G J; Lisa, M A; Lynch, W G; Margagliotti, G V; Montoya, C P; Moroni, A; Peaslee, G F; Rui, R; Schwarz, C; Tsang, M B; Williams, C; Latora, V; Bonasera, A

    1996-01-01

    The signals theoretically predicted for the occurrence of a critical behavior (conditional moments of charge distributions, Campi scatter plot, fluctuations of the size of the largest fragment, power law in the charge distribution, intermittency) have been found for peripheral events in the reaction Au+Au at 35 MeV/u. The same signals have been studied with a dynamical model which foresees phase transition, like the Classical Molecular Dynamics.

  3. Net baryon density in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, S A; Srivastava, D K; Bass, Steffen A.; Müller, Berndt; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the net baryon rapidity distribution in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the framework of the Parton Cascade Model (PCM). Parton rescattering and fragmentation leads to a substantial increase in the net baryon density at mid-rapidity over the density produced by initial primary parton-parton scatterings. The PCM is able to describe the measured net baryon density at RHIC.

  4. Baryonic Effect on XcJ Suppression in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ru; XU Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Dai-Cui

    2004-01-01

    @@ We predict that xcJ mesons at low transverse momentum in the central rapidity region are almost dissociated by nucleons and antinucleons in hadronic matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at relativistic high-ion collider (RHIC) energies √SNN = 130 and 200 GeV. In the calculations the nucleon and antinucleon distributions in hadronic matter are results of evolution from their freeze-out distributions which well fit the experimental transverse momentum spectra of proton and antiproton.

  5. Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-Wei; JIANG Zhi-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Glauber model, we present the formulas for calculating the numbers of participants,spectators and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. Based on this work, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles as the function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations made by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV in different centrality bins over the whole pseudorapidity range.

  6. Anti-flow of K$^0_s$ Mesons in 6 AGeV Au + Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, P; Alexander, J M; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J L; Cole, B; Crowe, K M; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Klay, J L; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lauret, J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L; Srivastava, B; BStone, N T; Symons, T J M; Wienold, T; Whitfield, R W J; Wood, L; Zhang Wei Ning

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the sideward flow of neutral strange ($K^0_s$) mesons in 6 AGeV Au + Au collisions. A prominent anti-flow signal is observed for an impact parameter range (b $\\lesssim 7$ fm) which spans central and mid-central events. Since the $K^0_s$ scattering cross section is relatively small in nuclear matter, this observation suggests that the in-medium kaon vector potential plays an important role in high density nuclear matter.

  7. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Borggren, N; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Cassano, N; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Orazio, L D; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1Au+Au collisions, the R_AA of phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is lin...

  8. Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hill, K; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wimsatt, G; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.67 +/- 0.12 (stat.) +/- 0.04 (sys.) +/- 0.08 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.36 +/- 0.09 (stat.) +/- 0.01 (sys.) +/- 0.04 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matte...

  9. Magnetism of Au Nanoparticles on Sulfolubus Acidocaldarius S-Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Juan; Bartolome, F.; Garcia, L. M.; Figueroa, A. I.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Skrotzki, R.; Schoenemann, R.; Wosnitza, J.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Geissler, A.; Reitz, T.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2011-03-01

    Au nanoparticles (NP) with diameters of a few nm have been synthesized on a protein S-layer of Sulfolobus Acidocaldarius bacteria. SQUID magnetization (1.8 K T 300 Kand 0 B 7 T) showssuperparamagneticbehavioratlow - T . ItsoriginlaysattheAuNP ' s , ashasbeenprovenbyAuL 2,3- edgeXMCDspectroscopy , performedintherange 2.2 T 20 KanduptoB app = 17 T . XMCDanalysisyieldsatotalmagneticmomentperAuatom μAu = 0.050 (1) μB , aparticleaveragemomentm part = 2.3 μB , Auorbitaltospinmomentratioofm L / m S = 0.29 Curie and - like superparamagnetism. Au - S bonds are detected by S K - edge XAS measurements. Besides , EXAFS at the Au L 3 -edge shows that the Au NP internal structure is fcc, and Au-S bonds are located at the particle surface. An increase of the hole charge carrier density in the Au 5d band due to electron transfer with the S-layer explains the Au magnetism. The observed magnetic moment per Au atom is 25 times larger than those previously found by XMCD in Au-thiol capped NPs.

  10. Au pair på ulige vilkår

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2008-01-01

    Antallet af au pairs i Danmark fra Fillipinerne er steget markant i de seneste år. Mens danske myndigheder betragter au pair-ordningen som kulturudveksling blandt unge mennesker, ser fillipinske au pairs derimod den som en mulighed for at tjene penge så de kan forsørge deres egen familie i Fillip...

  11. The point-defect of carbon nanotubes anchoring Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Y. A.; Cui, Y. H.; Li, X. N.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of the interaction between Au and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is very important since Au/CNTs composites have wide applications in many fields. In this study, we investigated the dispersion of Au nanoparticles on the CNTs by transmission electron microscopy and the bonding mechanism...... of states, charge transfer and frontier molecular orbitals. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN}=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutíerrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D P; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Sen-Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang Sheng Li; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Leontiev, V M; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, Thomas W; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de, M M; Moura, A A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A M; Vasilev, A N; Vasilev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zolnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2004-01-01

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for sqrt{s_NN}=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y|<0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  13. Bonding, Luminescence, Metallophilicity in Linear Au3 and Au2Ag Chains Stabilized by Rigid Diphosphanyl NHC Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Carrara, Serena; De Cola, Luisa; Tobon, Yeny; Giovanella, Umberto; Botta, Chiara; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-09-06

    The heterofunctional and rigid ligand N,N'-diphosphanyl-imidazol-2-ylidene (PCNHCP; P = P(t-Bu)2), through its phosphorus and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors, stabilizes trinuclear chain complexes, with either Au3 or AgAu2 cores, and dinuclear Au2 complexes. The two oppositely situated PCNHCP (L) ligands that "sandwich" the metal chain can support linear and rigid structures, as found in the known tricationic Au(I) complex [Au3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 (OTf = CF3SO3; [Au3L2](OTf)3; Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 103-105) now also obtained by transmetalation from [Ag3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Ag3L2](OTf)3), or in the mixed-metal tricationic [Au2Ag(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Au2AgL2](OTf)3). The latter was obtained stepwise by the addition of AgOTf to the digold(I) complex [Au2(μ2-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC)2](OTf)2 ([Au2L2](OTf)2). The latter contains two dangling P donors and displays fluxional behavior in solution, and the Au···Au separation of 2.8320(6) Å in the solid state is consistent with metallophilic interactions. In the solvento complex [Au3Cl2(tht)(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)](OTf)·MeCN ([Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN), which contains only one L and one tht ligand (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the metal chain is bent (148.94(2)°), and the longer Au···Au separation (2.9710(4) Å) is in line with relaxation of the rigidity due to a more "open" structure. Similar features were observed in [Au3Cl2(SMe2)L](OTf)·2MeCN. A detailed study of the emission properties of [Au3L2](OTf)3, [Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN, [Au2L2](OTf)2, and [Au2AgL2](OTf)3 was performed by means of steady state and time-resolved photophysical techniques. The complex [Au3L2](OTf)3 displays a bright (photoluminescence quantum yield = 80%) and narrow emission band centered at 446 nm with a relatively small Stokes' shift and long-lived excited-state lifetime on the microsecond timescale, both in solution and in the solid state. In line with the very narrow emission

  14. Microwave Synthesis of Au Nanoparticles with the System of AuCl4-CH3CH2OH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Au nanoparticles has been prepared by microwave high-pressure procedure with alcohol as the reducing agent. The color of colloidal Au nanoparticles is blue-violet. The maximum absorption spectrum of colloidal Au is at 580 nm, and the resonance scattering peak is at 580 nm. Using this method, the colloidal Au of long-time stability can be prepared simply and quickly.

  15. Centrality Dependence of Direct Photon Production in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, S S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Yu A; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S R; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L A; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V P; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A G; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarjan, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torie, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszpremi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L S

    2005-01-01

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au+Au collision centrality and compared to NLO pQCD calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

  16. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  17. La chasse au guépard et au lynx en Syrie et en Irak au Moyen Âge

    OpenAIRE

    Buquet, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    http://ifpo.hypotheses.org/1916; Billet sur les Carnets de l'Ifpo (La recherche en train de faire à l'Institut français du Proche-Orient), blog sur Hypotheses.org; Le guépard était encore présent au Moyen Âge à l'état sauvage au Proche-Orient. On trouvait des guépards sur la côte, notamment dans la région d'Antioche et dans le nord de la Syrie médiévale, dans les déserts de l'actuelle Jordanie et dans ceux situés à l'ouest de l'Euphrate (région de la Samāwa) et en Irak. Le billet présente les...

  18. Seed-mediated growth and manipulation of Au nanorods via size-controlled synthesis of Au seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Juncheng; Duggan, Jennifer N.; Morgan, Joshua; Roberts, Christopher B., E-mail: croberts@eng.auburn.edu [Auburn University, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Seed-mediated growth of gold (Au) nanorods with highly controllable length, width, and aspect ratio was accomplished via carefully size-controlled synthesis of the original Au seeds. A slow dynamic growth of Au nanoparticle seeds was observed after reduction of the Au salt (i.e., hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) hydrate) by sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in the presence of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). As such, the size of the Au nanoparticle seeds can therefore be manipulated through control over the duration of the reaction period (i.e., aging times of 2, 8, 48, 72, and 144 h were used in this study). These differently sized Au nanoparticles were subsequently used as seeds for the growth of Au nanorods, where the additions of Au salt, CTAB, AgNO{sub 3}, and ascorbic acid were employed. Smaller Au nanoparticle seeds obtained via short growth/aging time resulted in Au nanorods with higher aspect ratio and thus longer longitudinal surface plasmon wavelength (LSPW). The larger Au nanoparticle seeds obtained via longer growth/aging time resulted in Au nanorods with lower aspect ratio and shorter LSPW.

  19. In-situ STM study of phosphate adsorption on Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu/Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaup, Christian; Horch, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu-covered Au(111) electrodes with a neutral phosphate buffer solution has been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM). Under low potential conditions, both the Cu(111) and the Au(111...

  20. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  1. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions at STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Adamczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum-bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  2. Di-Hadron Correlations with Identified Leading Hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelwahab, N M; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    The STAR collaboration presents new two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of quark recombination. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the \\emph{ridge region}, is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  3. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow 30-059 (Poland); Adkins, J.K. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40506-0055 (United States); Agakishiev, G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141 980 (Russian Federation); Aggarwal, M.M. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Ahammed, Z. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Alekseev, I. [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Aparin, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141 980 (Russian Federation); Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Averichev, G.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141 980 (Russian Federation); Bai, X. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Bairathi, V. [National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Banerjee, A. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bellwied, R. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Bhasin, A. [University of Jammu, Jammu 180001 (India); Bhati, A.K. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Bhattarai, P. [University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bielcik, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague, 115 19 (Czech Republic); Bielcikova, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, 250 68 Řež/Prague (Czech Republic); Bland, L.C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); and others

    2015-12-17

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  4. Variation of the Melang Glacier in Mount Kawa Karpo in the Past 40 Years,Based on Dendrochronolog%近40a来基于树轮年代学的梅里雪山明永冰川变化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝永如; 刘高焕; 邵雪梅

    2011-01-01

    由于冰川观测资料在时空分布上的匮乏,关于梅里雪山地区冰川进退的研究很少,限制了对该区冰川进退的时间和规模及其与气候间相关性等方面的认知.树轮年代学方法作为冰川进退历史定年的有效手段,在世界上已经被广泛采用.通过对采自冰川末端冰碛上的树轮样本进行分析,利用GIS结合地形图与野外GPS点冰川边界确定,研究和分析了明永冰川年近40a来的冰川进退变化.为进一步的树轮冰川学研究提供支持,也为预估未来变化趋势提供重要的科学基本数据.%In Mount Kawa Karpo,the variation of glaciers,as well as the correlation between glaciers and climate change,is rarely known,because there is lack of data about spatial and temporal variation of glaciers,and less research about the variation has been done.Dendrochonology is a world-famous tool to reconstruct glacier fluctuation.In this study,the tree-ring samples from the moraine by the glacier terminus are analyzed,and then variation of the Melang Glacier in the past 40 years is determined by means of topographic map and latest GPS boundaries in GIS.Using the dendrochronology,the age of Picea likiangensis living on the moraine by the glacier terminus and the forming age of the moraine are determined.It is found that the latest event about glacier variation occurred in 1987,after a topographic map being completed in 1971.Derived from the ages of spruces living inside and outside the moraine,it is believed that from 1987 to 1993 the glacier terminus had existed stably at the position where spruces begun to grew in 1998.Because the youngest tree has grown,it is inferred that the glacier retreated about 1993.There is a glacier close to the Melang Glacier,whose terminus was thought at the steady state until 1959,and in the GIS map of 1971,the glacier terminus is outside the area where trees live.

  5. Photoswitchable Faraday effect in EuS-Au nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Akira; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika [Division of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13 West-8, Kita-ku, 060-8628, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Effective photoswitchable europium sulfide nanocrystals with gold nanoparticles using dithiol (DDT: 1,10-decanedithiol) joint molecules, EuS-Au nanosystems, are demonstrated. The TEM image indicates the formation of EuS-Au nanosystems composed of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals and spherical Au nanoparticles. Under visible-light irradiation, a drastic change of absorption band of EuS-Au nanosystems at around 600 nm was observed. The Faraday effects of EuS-Au nanosystems were estimated using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The effective change of the MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems under visible-light irradiation was successfully observed at around 670 nm for the first time. The effective reversible changes in MCD spectra with the alternative irradiation cycles of visible light (>440 nm) and dark are also presented. The decrease rate of rotation angle at 670 nm of EuS-Au nanosystems is larger than that of absorbance. These results indicate that the effective change of MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems would be dominated not only by a drastic change of absorption band related to enhanced LSPR of Au nanoparticles but also by specific interaction between EuS and Au in nanosystem under irradiation. Illustration of photoswitch and TEM image of EuS-Au nanosystems. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  7. Tunable VO2/Au hyperbolic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayakarao, S.; Mendoza, B.; Devine, A.; Kyaw, C.; van Dover, R. B.; Liberman, V.; Noginov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is known to have a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition at ˜68 °C. Therefore, it can be used as a tunable component of an active metamaterial. The lamellar metamaterial studied in this work is composed of subwavelength VO2 and Au layers and is designed to undergo a temperature controlled transition from the optical hyperbolic phase to the metallic phase. VO2 films and VO2/Au lamellar metamaterial stacks have been fabricated and studied in electrical conductivity and optical (transmission and reflection) experiments. The observed temperature-dependent changes in the reflection and transmission spectra of the metamaterials and VO2 thin films are in a good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The demonstrated optical hyperbolic-to-metallic phase transition is a unique physical phenomenon with the potential to enable advanced control of light-matter interactions.

  8. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svorcik, V., E-mail: vaclav.svorcik@vscht.c [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Chaloupka, A. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Rezanka, P. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Slepicka, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [Department of Chemistry, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasalkova, N.; Hubacek, T.; Siegel, J. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  9. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švorčík, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Řezanka, P.; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Kasálková, N.; Hubáček, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-03-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  10. Unidirectional thermal diffusion in bimetallic Cu@Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shoujie; Sun, Zhihu; Liu, Qinghua; Wu, Lihui; Huang, Yuanyuan; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Ge, Mengran; Hu, Fengchun; Xie, Zhi; Pan, Guoqiang; Wei, Shiqiang

    2014-02-25

    Understanding the atomic diffusions at the nanoscale is important for controlling the synthesis and utilization of nanomaterials. Here, using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with theoretical calculations, we demonstrate a so far unexplored unidirectional diffusion from the Au shell to the Cu core in thermally alloying Cu@Au core@shell architecture of ca. 7.1 nm. The initial diffusion step at 423 K is found to be characterized by the formation of a diffusion layer composed of a Au-dilute substitutional CuAu-like intermetallic compound with short Cu-Au bond length (2.61 Å). The diffusion further happens by the migration of the Au atoms with large disorder into the interior Cu matrix at higher temperatures (453 and 553 K). These results suggest that the structural preference of a CuAu-like compound, along with the nanosized effect, plays a critical role in determining the atomic diffusion dynamics.

  11. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  12. Electric Field Induced Surface Modification of Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erchak, A.A.; Franklin, G.F.; Houston, J.E.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-02-15

    We discuss the role of localized high electric fields in the modification of Au surfaces with a W probe using the Interfacial Force Microscope. Upon bringing a probe close to a Au surface, we measure both the interfacial force and the field emission current as a function of separation with a constant potential of 100 V between tip and sample. The current initially increases exponentially as the separation decreases. However, at a distance of less than {approximately} 500{angstrom} the current rises sharply as the surface begins to distort and rapidly close the gap. Retraction of the tip before contact is made reveals the formation of a mound on the surface. We propose a simple model, in which the localized high electric field under the tip assists the production of mobile Au adatoms by detachment from surface steps, and a radial field gradient causes a net flux of atoms toward the tip by surface diffusion. These processes give rise to an unstable surface deformation which, if left unchecked, results in a destructive mechanical contact. We discuss our findings with respect to earlier work using voltage pulses in the STM as a means of nanofabrication.

  13. Structure-activity relationships in cytotoxic Au(I)/Au(III) complexes derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiore, Laura; Aragoni, Maria Carla; Deiana, Carlo; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Pintus, Anna; Serratrice, Maria; Arca, Massimiliano

    2014-04-21

    Gold(I) and gold(III) complexes derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (pbiH) were proven to be a promising class of in vitro antitumor agents against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. In this paper, a comparative electrochemical, UV-vis absorption, and emission spectroscopic investigation is reported on pbiH, the two mononuclear Au(III) complexes [(pbi)AuX2] (X = Cl (1), AcO (2)), the four mononuclear Au(I) derivatives [(pbiH)AuCl] (3), [(pbiH)Au(PPh3)]PF6 ((4(+))(PF6(-))), [(pbi)Au(PPh3)] (5), and [(pbi)Au(TPA)] (6), the three mixed-valence Au(III)/Au(I) complexes [(μ-pbi)Au2Cl3] (7), [(Ph3P)Au(μ-pbi)AuX2]PF6 (X = Cl ((8(+))(PF6(-))), AcO ((9(+))(PF6(-)))), and the binuclear Au(I)-Au(I) compound [(μ-pbi)Au2(PPh3)2]PF6 ((10(+))(PF6(-))). All complexes feature irreversible reduction processes related to the Au(III)/Au(I) or Au(I)/Au(0) processes and peculiar luminescent emission at about 360-370 nm in CH2Cl2, with quantum yields that are remarkably lower ((0.7-14.5) × 10(-2)) in comparison to that determined for the free pbiH ligand (31.5 × 10(-2)) in the same solvent. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of all complexes were interpreted on the grounds of time-dependent PBE0/DFT calculations carried out both in the gas phase and in CH2Cl2 implicitly considered within the IEF-PCM SCRF approach. The electronic structure of the complexes, and in particular the energy and composition of the Kohn-Sham LUMOs, can be related to the antiproliferative properties against the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line, providing sound quantitative structure-activity relationships and shedding a light on the role played by the global charge and nature of ancillary ligands in the effectiveness of Au-based antitumor drugs.

  14. Shell Thickness-Dependent Strain Distributions of Confined Au/Ag and Ag/Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Liu; Honghua Huang; Ying Zhang; Ting Yu; Cailei Yuan; Shuangli Ye

    2015-01-01

    The shell thickness-dependent strain distributions of the Au/Ag and Ag/Au core-shell nanoparticles embedded in Al2O3 matrix have been investigated by finite element method (FEM) calculations, respectively. The simulation results clearly indicate that there is a substantial strain applied on both the Au/Ag and Ag/Au core-shell nanoparticles by the Al2O3 matrix. For the Au/Ag nanoparticles, it can be found that the compressive strain existing in the shell is stronger than that on the center of ...

  15. Suppression of high transverse momentum π0 spectra in Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2008-02-01

    Au + Au, s1/2 = 200 GeV measurements at RHIC, obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors, have all indicated a suppression of high p⊥ particle production, relative to an appropriately normalized NN level. For central collisions and vanishing pseudo-rapidity these experiments exhibit suppression in charged meson production, especially at medium-to-large transverse momenta. In the PHENIX experiment similar behaviour has been reported for π0 spectra. In a recent work [1] on the simpler D + Au interaction, to be considered perhaps as a tune-up for Au + Au, we reported on a pre-hadronic cascade mechanism which can explain the mixed observation of moderately reduced p⊥ suppression at higher pseudo-rapidity as well as the Cronin enhancement at mid-rapidity. Here, we present the extension of this work to the more massive ion-ion collisions. Our major thesis is that much of the suppression is generated in a late stage cascade of colourless pre-hadrons produced after an initial short-lived coloured phase. We present a pQCD argument to justify this approach and to estimate the time duration τp of this initial phase. Of essential importance is the brevity in time of the coloured phase existence relative to that of the strongly interacting pre-hadron phase, the latter essentially an interactive cascade. These distinctions in phase are of course not strict, but adequate for treating the suppression of moderate and high p⊥ mesons.

  16. Structural, electrical and magnetic properties of single Au-Ni/NiO-Au nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, Corinna; Sewcz, Rene; Baldus, Sabrina; Fischer, Saskia F. [Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Daub, Mihaela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany); Nielsch, Kornelius [Multifunctional Nanostructures, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Ferromagnetic metallic nanowires are of high interest for magnetic sensing and storage applications. However, due to surface oxidation of the nanowires electrical contacts easily lead to high-contact resistances of a few k{omega}. Here, we present multisegmented Au-Ni(NiO)-Au nanowires with a direct Au-Ni interface. Individual nanowires were laterally contacted in a four-terminal geometry via optical lithography, electron-beam lithography, thermal evaporation and lift-off patterning. The nanowires exhibit low-ohmic contacts of about 20 {omega}. The resistivity decreases with the temperature (300 K to 4.2 K) and is in the order of that of high-purity bulk nickel. The longitudinal anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is about 1.5 % at 80 K and decreases with higher temperatures, 0.5 % at 300 K. The coercive field and the AMR are investigated for different angles between the current and magnetic field.

  17. Charge transport through O-deficient Au-MgO-Au junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M. M.

    2009-12-29

    Metal-oxide heterostructures have been attracting considerable attention in recent years due to various technological applications. We present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for the Au-MgO-Au (metal-insulator-metal) heterostructure based on density-functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green’s functions method. The dependence of the conductance of the heterostructure on the thickness of the MgO interlayer and the interface spacing is studied. In addition, we address the effects of O vacancies. We observe deviations from an exponentially suppressed conductance with growing interlayer thickness caused by Au-O chemical bonds. Electronic states tracing back to O vacancies can increase the conductance. Furthermore, this effect can be enhanced by enlarging the interface spacing as the vacancy induced Mg states are shifted toward the Fermi energy.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of Au@Pt nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; WU Gang; XU Boqing

    2005-01-01

    Aucore-Ptshell (Au@Pt) nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature by reducing K2PtCl6 with hydrogen in the solution containing Au colloids and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The particles obtained were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM and XPS techniques. UV-Vis spectra show that the surface plasmon absorption feature of Au colloids is significantly reduced with increasing the amount of reduced Pt. TEM images that the metals are found always appear as spherical nanoparticles and their sizes grow apparently due to the reduction of PtCl62- ions, indicating that Pt is deposited from solution onto Au particle surface and forms a Pt-layer with uniform thickness. In the XPS spectra, the signals of Au metal decrease due to the reductive deposition of Pt on the surface of the Au colloids. UV-Vis and XPS data are consistent in showing that when the amount of Pt in the AuPt colloids is increased to reach an overall atomic ratio of Pt/Au=2, the Pt deposits form a shell covering completely the surface of Au particles, demonstrating the core-shell structure of the synthesized AuPt particles.

  19. Electron beam induced evolution in Au, Ag, and interfaced heterogeneous Au/Ag nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzi; Sun, Yugang

    2015-08-28

    A sintering process of nanoparticles made of Ag, Au, and interfaced Ag/Au heterodimers was investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy at room temperature. Such a process is driven by the illumination of a high-energy electron beam accelerated at 200 kV that promotes atom diffusion in the nanoparticles that are in physical contact. Upon electron illumination, adjacent Au nanoparticles gradually merge together to form a larger particle along with the reduction of the surface area despite the fact that orientated attachment is not observed. According to the detailed analysis of the size change of the particles and the contact area, it was found that the nanoparticle fusion process is significantly different from the well-established thermal diffusion mechanism. In addition to the similar fusion process of Au nanoparticles, Ag nanoparticles undergo apparent sublimation induced by knock on damage because the transferred energy from the electron beam to nanoparticles is higher than the surface binding energy of Ag atoms when the electron scattering angle is larger than 112°. The particles with a smaller size diffuse faster. Surface diffusion dominates at the beginning of the fusion process followed by slower lattice diffusion. Electron beam illumination can transform the interfaced Au/Ag dimers to Au@Ag core-shell particles followed by a slow removal of the Ag shells. This process under normal electron beam illumination is a lot faster than the thermally driven process. Both diffusion and sublimation of Ag atoms are dependent on the intensity of the electron beam, i.e., a higher beam intensity is favorable to accelerate both the processes.

  20. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$=130 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, K H; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A R; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O Yu; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M E; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M A; Blyth, C O; Böhm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A B; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chathopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; De Mello, M; Deng, W S; Derevshchikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Díaz, H; De Young, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, Wojciech; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelyanov, V I; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, Kenneth J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O A; Grau, M; Greiner, D E; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D P; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E M; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J L; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I V; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kühn, C E; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T J; Leonhardt, W; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; Le Vine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, Jean Robert; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R S; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; Matyushevsky, E A; McParland, C P; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D M; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E D; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N T; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E V; Prindle, D J; Pruneau, C A; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J E; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Röhrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V L; Sakrejda, I; Sánchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlüter, R; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J E; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimansky, S S; Shuman, D B; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Ströbele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Symons, T J M; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tonse, S R; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V N; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A; Vanyashin, A V; Vasilevskii, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T J; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=130 GeV using the STAR TPC at RHIC. The elliptic flow signal, v_2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  1. D and $^{3}He$ production in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 GeV Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, C; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O Yu; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A B; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; De Mello, M; Deng, W S; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Foley, Kenneth J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O A; Greiner, D E; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Guschin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A V; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T J; Lednicky, R; Leontiev, V M; Le Vine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Oson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E D; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E V; Prindle, D J; Pruneau, C A; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V L; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J E; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A; Vanyashin, A V; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T J; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.262301

    2001-01-01

    The first measurements of light antinucleus production in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider are reported. The observed production rates for d and /sup 3/He are much larger than in lower energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. A coalescence model analysis of the yields indicates that there is little or no increase in the antinucleon freeze-out volume compared to collisions at CERN SPS energy. These analyses also indicate that the 3He freeze-out volume is smaller than the d freeze-out volume. (22 refs).

  2. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-07

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  3. Low-power resistive switching in Au/NiO/Au nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, S.; Tallarida, G.; Perego, D.; Franz, S.; Deleruyelle, D.; Muller, C.; Spiga, S.

    2012-11-01

    Arrays of vertical nanowires structured in Au/NiO/Au segments with 50 nm diameter are characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy to investigate unipolar resistive switching in NiO at the nanoscale. The switching cycles are characterized by extremely low power consumption down to 1.3 nW, which constitutes a significant improvement in nanowire-based resistive switching memory devices. The trend of the reset current as a function of the set resistance, typical of unipolar memories, is extended to a much wider current range than what is reported in literature, confirming the role of Joule heating in the reset process for very low reset currents.

  4. Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations on Au64+ - Au69+ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2006-03-31

    Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are an adequate tool for the description of the structure of highly charged multi-electron ions and for the analysis of their spectra. They demonstrate this by way of a re-investigation of n=3, {Delta}n=0 transitions in the EUV spectra of Na-, Mg-, Al-like, and Si-like ions of Au that have been obtained previously by heavy-ion accelerator based beam-foil spectroscopy. They discuss the evidence and propose several revisions on the basis of the multi-reference many-body perturbation theory calculations of Ne- through P-like ions of Au.

  5. Nuclear Stopping in Central Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear stopping in central Au+Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC energies is studied in the framework of a cascade mode and the modified ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD transport model. In the modified mode, the mean field potentials of both formed and “preformed” hadrons (from string fragmentation are considered. It is found that the nuclear stopping is increasingly influenced by the mean-field potentials in the projectile and target regions with the increase of the reaction energy. In the central region, the calculations of the cascade model considering the modifying factor can describe the experimental data of the PHOBOS collaboration.

  6. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in multifragmentation of Au + Au

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, C. L; Ma, Y. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Li, S.X.; G.Q. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of the shear viscosity ($\\eta$) to entropy density ($s$) for the intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo method in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The theoretical curve of $\\eta/s$ as a function of the incident energy for the head-on Au+Au collisions displays that a minimum region of $\\eta/s$ has been approached at higher incident energies, where the minimum $\\eta/s$ value is about 7 times Kovtun-Son- Starinets (KSS...

  7. Manipulation of superparamagnetic beads on patterned Au/Co/Au multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, A.; Holzinger, D.; Urbaniak, M.; Ehresmann, A.; Stobiecki, F.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetophoresis of water-suspended 4 μm-diameter superparamagnetic beads above topographically patterned, sputter deposited Ti(4 nm)/Au(60 nm)/[Co(0.7 nm)/Au(1 nm)] × 3 multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated. The results impressively demonstrate that the magnetic stray field landscape above the stripe structure when superimposed with an external, slowly rotating, field enables the directed transport of magnetic beads across the stripe panel with velocities up to 12 μm s-1.

  8. Beam Energy Scan a Case for the Chiral Magnetic Effect in Au-Au Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-01-05

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is predicted for Au-Au collisions at RHIC. However, many backgrounds can give signals that make the measurement hard to interpret. The STAR experiment has made measurements at different collisions energy ranging from √(sNN)=7.7 GeV to 62.4 GeV. In the analysis that is presented we show that the CME turns on with energy and is not present in central collisions where the induced magnetic is small.

  9. Charged Pion Production in 2 to 8 AGeV Central Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Klay, J L; Alexander, J M; Anderson, M G; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K; Das, A C; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lauret, J; Law, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Srivastava, B; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Wells, R; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Zhang Wei Ning

    2003-01-01

    Momentum spectra of charged pions over nearly full rapidity coverage from target to beam rapidity have been measured in the 0-5% most central Au+Au collisions in the beam energy range from 2 to 8 AGeV by the E895 Experiment. Using a thermal parameterization to fit the transverse mass spectra, rapidity density distributions are extracted. The observed spectra are compared with predictions from the RQMD v2.3 cascade model and also to a thermal model including longitudinal flow. The total 4$pi$ yields of the charged pions are used to infer an initial state entropy produced in the collisions.

  10. Sideward Flow in Au + Au Collisions Between 2 AGeV and 8 AGeV

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, H; Alexander, J; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K M; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J; Klay, J L; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lisa, M A; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L S; Srivastava, B; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Yang, X; Zhang Wei Ning; Zhang, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the large acceptance Time Projection Chamber of experiment E895 at Brookhaven, measurements of collective sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at beam energies of 2, 4, 6 and 8A GeV are presented in the form of in-plane transverse momentum and the first Fourier coefficient of azimuthal anisotropy v_1. These measurements indicate a smooth variation of sideward flow as a function of beam energy. The data are compared with four nuclear transport models which have an orientation towards this energy range. All four exhibit some qualitative trends similar to those found in the data, although none shows a consistent pattern of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  11. Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

    2008-09-01

    Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

  12. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  13. Effect of Au clustering on ferromagnetism in Au doped TiO2 films: theory and experiments investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhaorui; Zhou, Zhongpo; Wang, Haiying; Yang, Zongxian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the physical properties especially the magnetic properties of the TiO2 films and Au cluster doped TiO2 films fabricated by sol-gel and sputtering methods combined experiments and first-principles calculations. All the samples annealed under air and N2 atmosphere respectively exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism with the crystal phase of anatase. The values of the saturation magnetizations are in the order of Au δ-doped TiO2 (annealed in N2)>undoped TiO2 (annealed in air)>Au δ-doped TiO2 (annealed in air). The first principles calculation results show that the formation energy of Au cluster doped TiO2 films is lower than that of the oxygen vacancy and Au cluster codoped TiO2 films. The effects of the Au cluster dopant are the retard of the formation of surface oxygen vacancy and the electrons transfer from 3d states of Ti atoms to Au 5d states in Au cluster doped TiO2 films. The codoping of surface oxygen vacancies, bulk oxygen vacancies and Au clusters led to the spin-split of Ti 3d and O 2p in Au cluster doped TiO2 films (annealed in N2) which yield the highest saturation magnetization.

  14. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Ultrathin Au/Pt Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, X.; Feygenson, M; Wang, Q; He, J; Du, W; Frenkel, A; Han, W; Aronson, M

    2009-01-01

    We have reported the synthesis of Au25Pt75 and Au48Pt52 alloyed ultrathin nanowires with average widths of less than 3 nm via a wet chemistry approach at room temperature. Using a combination of techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies, we identified the stoichiometry-dependent heterogeneous crystalline structures, as well as electronic structures with respect to the charge transfer between Pt and Au within both nanowires. In particular, we observed d-charge depletion at the Au site and the d-charge gain at the Pt site in Au48Pt52 nanowires, which accounted for its ferromagnetic magnetic behavior, in contrast to the paramagnetism and diamagnetism appearing respectively in bulk Pt and Au.

  15. Electronic and magnetic properties of ultrathin Au/Pt nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xiaowei; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wang, Qi; He, Jiaqing; Du, Wenxin; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Han, Weiqiang; Aronson, Meigan

    2009-09-01

    We have reported the synthesis of Au(25)Pt(75) and Au(48)Pt(52) alloyed ultrathin nanowires with average widths of less than 3 nm via a wet chemistry approach at room temperature. Using a combination of techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies, we identified the stoichiometry-dependent heterogeneous crystalline structures, as well as electronic structures with respect to the charge transfer between Pt and Au within both nanowires. In particular, we observed d-charge depletion at the Au site and the d-charge gain at the Pt site in Au(48)Pt(52) nanowires, which accounted for its ferromagnetic magnetic behavior, in contrast to the paramagnetism and diamagnetism appearing respectively in bulk Pt and Au.

  16. 40 CFR 98.278 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based emissions factors (kg/mmBtu HHV) Kraft lime kilns CO2 CH4 N2O Kraft calciners CO2 CH4 N2O Residual Oil...

  17. Que faisons-nous au CERN ?

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Le CERN a pour vocation la science pure, l'étude des questions les plus fondamentales de la nature:Qu'est-ce que la matière ?D'ou vient-elle ? Comment s'agglomère-t-elle en formes complexes comme les étoiles, les planètes et les êtres humains ? Au CERN, les collisions de particules servent à sonder le coeur de la matière et les chercheurs du Laboratoire étudient ces millions de collisions de particules afin de trouver des réponses à ces questions.

  18. Caroline Datchary, La Dispersion au travail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lecoeur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impression de ne pas pouvoir faire totalement son travail, insatisfaction, Trouble Musculo- Squelettique, mais aussi sentiment d’efficacité, d’excitation et parfois de plénitude. Ces sensations, bien qu’ambivalentes, ont néanmoins un point commun selon Caroline Datchary : elles sont engendrées par des situations de « dispersion au travail ». Mutation du travail oblige, les toujours Nouvelles Technologies de l’Information et de la Communication (NTIC ont fait leur apparition, la pression conc...

  19. Formation of Au-Silane Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Yochelis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many intriguing aspects of molecular electronics are attributed to organic-inorganic interactions, yet charge transfer through such junctions still requires fundamental study. Recently, there is a growing interest in anchoring groups, which considered dominating the charge transport. With this respect, we choose to investigate self-assembly of disilane molecules sandwiched between gold surface and gold nanoparticles. These assemblies are found to exhibit covalent bonds not only between the anchoring Si groups and the gold surfaces but also in plane crosslinks that increase the monolayer stability. Finally, using scanning tunneling spectroscopy we demonstrate that the disilane molecules provide strong electrical coupling between the Au nanoparticles and a superconductor substrate.

  20. Nonlinear optical properties of Au/PVP composite thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Hong; Cheng Bo-Lin; Lu Guo-Wei; Wang Wei-Tian; Guan Dong-Yi; Chen Zheng-Hao; Yang Guo-Zhen

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal Au and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) composite thin films are fabricated by spin-coating method. Linear optical absorption measurements of the Au/PVP composite films indicate an absorption peak around 530 nm due to the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles. Nonlinear optical properties are studied using standard Z-scan technique, and experimental results show large optical nonlinearities of the Au/PVP composite films. A large value of films.

  1. Enhanced Photoresponse of Conductive Polymer Nanowires Embedded with Au Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junchang; Zhong, Liubiao; Sun, Yinghui; Li, Anran; Huang, Jing; Meng, Fanben; Chandran, Bevita K; Li, Shuzhou; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-04-20

    A conductive polymer nanowire embedded with a 1D Au nanoparticle chain with defined size, shape, and interparticle distance is fabricated which demonstrates enhanced photoresponse behavior. The precise and controllable positioning of 1D Au nanoparticle chain in the conductive polymer nanowire plays a critical role in modulating the photoresponse behavior by excitation light wavelength or power due to the coupled-plasmon effect of 1D Au nanoparticle chain.

  2. Evaluation of the Olympus AU 400 clinical chemistry analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić, A; Alpeza, I; Rukavina, A S

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the Olympus AU 400 clinical chemistry analyzer was evaluated according to the guidelines of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The following analytes were tested: glucose, urea, creatinine, calcium, AST, ALT, CK, LDH, ALP and amylase. The Olympus AU 400 was compared with the Olympus AU 800. Coefficients of correlation showed high correlation between the compared analyzers. Other performances (intra- and inter-assay variation, carry-over and interferences) of the analyzer were satisfactory.

  3. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  4. Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, Joana T.; Savenije, Tom J.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect

  5. Charged-particle rapidity density in Au+Au collisions in a quark combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Yao, Tao; Xie, Qu-Bing

    2007-03-01

    Rapidity/pseudorapidity densities for charged particles and their centrality, rapidity, and energy dependence in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are studied in a quark combination model. Using a Gaussian-type rapidity distribution for constituent quarks as a result of Landau hydrodynamic evolution, the data at sNN=130,200 GeV at various centralities in full pseudorapidity range are well described, and the charged-particle multiplicities are reproduced as functions of the number of participants. The energy dependence of the shape of the dNch/dη distribution is also described at various collision energies sNN=200,130,62.4 GeV in central collisions with same value of parameters except 19.6 GeV. The calculated rapidity distributions and yields for the charged pions and kaons in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are compared with experimental data of the BRAHMS Collaboration.

  6. Laser nanostructuring of Au/Ag and Au/Ni films for application in SERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikov, Ru. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Grochowska, K.; Iwulska, A.; Sliwinski, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper results on laser nanostructuring of Au/Ag and Au/Ni thin films are presented. The nanostructuring leads to formation of arrays of bimetallic nanoparticles. The fabrication of the these structures is made using a two step procedure. Initially, thin films are deposited on quartz substrates by classical pulsed laser deposition method. In order to produce Au/Ag or Au/Ni thin films, targets with two sections consist the different metals are used. Thin films with different concentrations of the two metals are obtained by changing the area of the different sections in the target. The as prepared films are then annealed by nanosecond laser pulses delivered by Nd:YAG laser system operated at λ = 355 nm. It is found that the laser annealing may lead to nanostructuring of the deposited films as at certain conditions decomposition into monolayers of nanoparticles with narrow size distribution is obtained. The performed EDX analyses indicate that the fabricated particles are composed by a bimetallic system of the basic metals used. The transmission spectra of the obtained structures show evidences of plasmon excitations. The bimetal nanostructures are covered with Rhodamine 6G and then tested as active substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS).

  7. Nanostructuring thin Au films on transparent conductive oxide substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Center for Materials and Technologies for Information Communication and Solar Energy (MATIS CNR-IMM), via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Crupi, I. [Center for Materials and Technologies for Information Communication and Solar Energy (MATIS CNR-IMM), via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Carria, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Center for Materials and Technologies for Information Communication and Solar Energy (MATIS CNR-IMM), via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Kimiagar, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Islamic Azad University, Central Tehran Branch, Forsat Shirazi St. North Eskanari St. Azadi Rd. No 136, 13185/768 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simone, F.; Grimaldi, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Center for Materials and Technologies for Information Communication and Solar Energy (MATIS CNR-IMM), via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Thermal-induced morphology evolution of Au nanoclusters on ITO is studied. ► Laser irradiation-induced morphology evolution of thin Au film on ITO is studied. ► Au nanorings formation on ITO is presented. ► Au nanoclusters formation on ITO is presented. -- Abstract: Fabrication processes of Au nanostructures on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) surface by simple, versatile, and low-cost bottom-up methodologies are investigated in this work. A first methodology exploits the patterning effects induced by nanosecond laser irradiations on thin Au films deposited on ITO surface. We show that after the laser irradiations, the Au film break-up into nanoclusters whose mean size and surface density are tunable by the laser fluence. A second methodology exploits, instead, the patterning effects of standard furnace thermal processes on the Au film deposited on the ITO. We observe, in this case, a peculiar shape evolution from pre-formed nanoclusters during the Au deposition stage on the ITO, to holed nanostructures (i.e. nanorings), during the furnace annealing processes. The nanorings depth, height, width, and surface density are shown to be tunable by annealing temperature and time.

  8. Au nanostructures: an emerging prospect in cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xin; Chen, Chunying

    2012-10-01

    Au nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications since ancient times. However, the rapid development of nanotechnology over the past century has led to recognition of the great potential of Au nanoparticles in a wide range of applications. Advanced fabrication techniques allow us to synthesize a variety of Au nanostructures possessing physiochemical properties that can be exploited for different purposes. Functionalization of the surface of Au nanoparticles further eases their application in various roles. These advantages of Au nanoparticles make them particularly suited for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The small size of Au particles enables them to preferentially accumulate at tumor sites to achieve in vivo targeting after systemic administration. Efficient light absorption followed by rapid heat conversion makes them very promising in photothermal therapy. The facile surface chemistry of Au nanoparticles eases delivery of drugs, ligands or imaging contrast agents in vivo. In this review, we summarize recent development of Au nanoparticles in cancer theranostics including imaging-based detection, photothermal therapy, chemical therapy and drug delivery. The multifunctional nature of Au nanoparticles means they hold great promise as novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

  9. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  10. The self assembly of thymine at Au(110)/liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Contreras, J.R. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica y Electronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Mexico (Mexico); Smith, C.I.; Bowfield, A.; Weightman, P. [Physics Department, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Tillner, F. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We show that thymine self-assembles into an ordered structure when adsorbed at a Au(110)/liquid interface. Reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) shows that as found for cytosine and adenine the adsorbed thymine molecules are oriented essentially vertically on the Au(110) surface with the molecule aligned along one of the principal axes of the Au(110) surface. Simulations of the RA spectra to an empirical model indicates that as found for adsorbed cytosine and adenine, thymine is aligned along the [1 anti 10] direction on the Au(110) surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Structural and optical studies of Au doped titanium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E., E-mail: ealves@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Franco, N.; Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, B. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Lopes, J. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEC-CEMUC - Universidade de Coimbra, Dept. Eng. Mecanica, Polo II, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Torrell, M.; Cunha, L.; Vaz, F. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2012-02-01

    Thin films of TiO{sub 2} were doped with Au by ion implantation and in situ during the deposition. The films were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and deposited in silicon and glass substrates at a temperature around 150 Degree-Sign C. The undoped films were implanted with Au fluences in the range of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Au/cm{sup 2}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} Au/cm{sup 2} with a energy of 150 keV. At a fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Au/cm{sup 2} the formation of Au nanoclusters in the films is observed during the implantation at room temperature. The clustering process starts to occur during the implantation where XRD estimates the presence of 3-5 nm precipitates. After annealing in a reducing atmosphere, the small precipitates coalesce into larger ones following an Ostwald ripening mechanism. In situ XRD studies reveal that Au atoms start to coalesce at 350 Degree-Sign C, reaching the precipitates dimensions larger than 40 nm at 600 Degree-Sign C. Annealing above 700 Degree-Sign C promotes drastic changes in the Au profile of in situ doped films with the formation of two Au rich regions at the interface and surface respectively. The optical properties reveal the presence of a broad band centered at 550 nm related to the plasmon resonance of gold particles visible in AFM maps.

  12. Magnetic holes in the solar wind between 0.3 AU and 17 AU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sperveslage

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic holes (MHs are depressions of the magnetic field magnitude. Turner et al. (1977 identified the first MHs in the solar wind and determined an occurrence rate of 1.5 MHs/d. Winterhalter et al. (1994 developed an automatic identification criterion to search for MHs in Ulysses data in the solar wind between 1 AU and 5.4 AU. We adopt their criterion to expand the search to the heliocentric distances down to 0.3 AU using data from Helios 1 and 2 and up to 17 AU using data from Voyager 2. We relate our observations to two theoretical approaches which describe the so-called linear MHs in which the magnetic vector varies in magnitude rather than direction. Therefore we focus on such linear MHs with a directional change less than 10º. With our observations of about 850 MHs we present the following results: Approximately 30% of all the identified MHs are linear. The maximum angle between the initial magnetic field vector and any vector inside the MH is 20º in average and shows a weak relation to the depth of the MHs. The angle between the initial magnetic field and the minimum variance direction of those structures is large and very probably close to 90º. The MHs are placed in a high β environment even though the average solar wind shows a smaller β. The widths decrease from about 50 proton inertial length in a region between 0.3 AU and 0.4 AU heliocentric distance to about 15 proton inertial length at distances larger than 10 AU. This quantity is correlated with the β of the MH environments with respect to the heliocentric distance. There is a clear preference for the occurrence of depressions instead of compressions. We discuss these results with regard to the main theories of MHs, the mirror instability and the alternative soliton approach. Although our observational results are more consistent with the soliton theory we favour a combination of both. MHs might be the remnants of initial mirror mode structures which can be described as

  13. The Modification of high-$p_{T}$ hadro-chemistry in Au+Au collisions relative to p+p

    CERN Document Server

    Timmins, Anthony R

    2009-01-01

    We present high transverse momentum, $p_{T}$, pion ($\\pi$), proton ($p$), kaon ($K$), and rho ($\\rho$) spectra measured with the STAR experiment from p+p and Au+Au collisions with \\sNN{200}. We find the $K/\\pi$ ratio to be enhanced in Au+Au \\sNN{200} collisions relative to p+p \\sNN{200} collisions at $p_{T} > 5$ GeV/c. The enhancement persists until $p_{T} \\sim 12$ GeV/c for central Au+Au 200 GeV collisions. We also show the nuclear modification factor, $R_{AA}$, measured at the same center of mass energy, and find $R_{AA}(K)$ and $R_{AA}(p)$ to be higher than $R_{AA}(\\pi)$ at $p_T > 5$ GeV/c. Implications for medium induced modifications of jet chemistry is discussed.

  14. Baryon Stopping in Au+Au and p+p collisions at 62 and 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing

    2009-01-01

    BRAHMS has measured rapidity density distributions of protons and antiprotons in both p+p and Au+Au collisions at 62 GeV and 200 GeV. From these distributions the yields of so-called "net-protons", that is the difference between the proton and antiproton yields, can be determined. The rapidity dependence of the net-proton yields from peripheral Au+Au collisions is found to have a similar behaviour to that found for the p+p results, while a quite different rapidity dependence is found for central Au+Au collisions. The net-proton distributions can be used together with model calculations to find the net-baryon yields as a function of rapidity, thus yielding information on the average rapidity loss of beam particles, the baryon transport properties of the medium, and the amount of "stopping" in these collisions.

  15. Baryon Stopping in Au+Au and p+p collisions at 62 and 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahms Collaboration; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    BRAHMS has measured rapidity density distributions of protons and antiprotons in both p+p and Au+Au collisions at 62 GeV and 200 GeV. From these distributions the yields of so-called ‘net-protons’, that is the difference between the proton and antiproton yields, can be determined. The rapidity dependence of the net-proton yields from peripheral Au+Au collisions is found to have a similar behaviour to that found for the p+p results, while a quite different rapidity dependence is found for central Au+Au collisions. The net-proton distributions can be used together with model calculations to find the net-baryon yields as a function of rapidity, thus yielding information on the average rapidity loss of beam particles, the baryon transport properties of the medium, and the amount of ‘stopping’ in these collisions.

  16. Approche historiographique des pratiques sportives au Cameroun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biwole M. Claude Emmanuel Abolo

    2016-01-01

    En 50 ans d'indépendance, le sport camerounais a beaucoup évolué. De 11 en 1970, les fédérations sportives sont passées à plus de 40 aujourd'hui et les titres, trophées et médailles ne se comptent plus depuis lors. Le Cameroun est devenu progressivement une nation où le sport compte et où l'exploit sportif n'est plus méprisé, rejeté, voire vilipendé. Hier assimilés à des brutes épaisses, les sportifs sont aujourd'hui admirés et adulés. Finie l'image négative de marginaux qui leur collait au corps : finis les sous-entendus ridicules où ils étaient classés au bas de l'échelle sociale, juste bons pour bander les muscles et réaliser des performances. C'est cela la plus grande victoire du sport camerounais en 50 ans d'existence. Il a réussi à faire l'unanimité et les performances des sportifs devenues pour toute la nation un modèle, une référence et un réel motif de fierté.

  17. Apprentissage administratif : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGE ADMINISTRATIF FORMATION ET DEVELOPPEMENT HR/PMD/RCC L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'employé(e) de commerce et d'assistant(e) en information documentaire L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 1 place est offerte pour la formation d'employé(e) de commerce 2 places sont offertes pour la formation d'assistant(e) en information documentaire L'apprentissage dure 3 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne,Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège...

  18. Modeling the Accretion Structure of AU Mon

    CERN Document Server

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Richards, Mercedes T; Budaj, Jan; Peters, Geraldine J

    2012-01-01

    AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 d) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked H-alpha emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over several years with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including H-alpha, H-beta, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R_sun, thickness of 5.2 R_sun, density of 1.0e-13 g/cm^3, and maximum temperature of 14000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of ~8000 K transferring ~2.4e-9 M_sun/yr. We show H-alpha Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions...

  19. Facet selective etching of Au microcrystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gangaiah Mettela and Giridhar U. Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    High-symmetry crystals exhibit isotropic properties. Inducing anisotropy, e.g., by facet selective etching, is considered implausible in face-centered cubic (FCC) metals, particularly gold, which, in addition to being an FCC, is noble. We report for the first time the facet selective etching of Au microcrystals obtained in the form of cuboctahedra and pentagonal rods from the thermolysis of a gold- organic precursor. The selective etching of {111} and {100} facets was achieved using a capping method in which tetraoctylammonium cations selectively cap the {111} facets while Br- ions protect the {100} facets. The exposed facets are oxidized by O2/C1-, yielding a variety of interesting geometries. The facet selective etching of the Au microcrystallites is governed only by the nature of the facets; the geometry of the microcystallite does not appear to play a significant role. The etched surfaces appear rough, but a closer examination reveals well-defined corrugations that are indexable to high hkl values. Such surfaces exhibit enhanced Raman activity.

  20. Imaging Prominence Eruptions Out to 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Brian E; Linton, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3-D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed ...

  1. Reduction of Fermi level pinning at Au-MoS2 interfaces by atomic passivation on Au surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Ah; Park, Jinwoo; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Hong, Suklyun

    2017-03-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which is a semiconducting material with direct band gap of ˜1.8 eV, has drawn much attention for application in field effect transistors (FETs). In this connection, it is very important to understand the Fermi level pinning (FLP) which occurs at metal-semiconductor interfaces. It is known that MoS2 has an n-type contact with Au, which is a high work function metal, representing the strong FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces. However, such FLP can obstruct the attainment of high performance of field effect devices. In this study, we investigate the reduction of FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces by atomic passivation on Au(111) using first-principles calculations. To reduce the FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces, we consider sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, fluorine, and hydrogen atoms that can passivate the surface of Au(111). Calculations show that passivating atoms prevent the direct contact between Au(111) and MoS2, and thus FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces is reduced by weak interaction between atom-passivated Au(111) and MoS2. Especially, FLP is greatly reduced at sulfur-passivated Au-MoS2 interfaces with the smallest binding energy. Furthermore, fluorine-passivated Au(111) can form ohmic contact with MoS2, representing almost zero Schottky barrier height (SBH). We suggest that SBH can be controlled depending on the passivating atoms on Au(111).

  2. Hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2012-09-27

    Hybrid alloys among gold, palladium and platinum become a new category of catalysts primarily due to their enhanced catalytic effects. Enhancement means not only their effectiveness, but also their uniqueness as catalysts for the reactions that individual metals may not catalyze. Here, preparation of hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and their use as electrocatalysts are reported. Galvanic displacement with Ag NPs is used to obtain hollow NPs, and higher reduction potential of Au compared to Ag, Pd, and Pt helps to produce hollow Au cores first, followed by Pd or Pt shell growth. Continuous and highly crystalline shell growth was observed in Au@Pd core-shell NPs, but the sporadic and porous-like structure was observed in Au@Pt core-shell NPs. Along with hollow core-shell NPs, hollow porous Pt and hollow Au NPs are also prepared from Ag seed NPs. Twin boundaries which are typically observed in large size (>20 nm) Au NPs were not observed in hollow Au NPs. This absence is believed to be due to the role of the hollows, which significantly reduce the strain energy of edges where the two lattice planes meet. In ethanol oxidation reactions in alkaline medium, hollow Au@Pd core-shell NPs show highest current density in forward scan. Hollow Au@Pt core-shell NPs maintain better catalytic activities than metallic Pt, which is thought to be due to the better crystallinity of Pt shells as well as the alloy effect of Au cores. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Microstructural evolution of Au/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films: The influence of Au concentration and thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J., E-mail: joelborges@fisica.uminho.pt [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Kubart, T.; Kumar, S.; Leifer, K. [Solid-State Electronics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, Uppsala SE-751 21 (Sweden); Rodrigues, M.S. [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Duarte, N.; Martins, B.; Dias, J.P. [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Vaz, F. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite thin films consisting of a dielectric matrix, such as titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), with embedded gold (Au) nanoparticles were prepared and will be analysed and discussed in detail in the present work. The evolution of morphological and structural features was studied for a wide range of Au concentrations and for annealing treatments in air, for temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 °C. Major findings revealed that for low Au atomic concentrations (at.%), there are only traces of clustering, and just for relatively high annealing temperatures, T ≥ 500 °C. Furthermore, the number of Au nanoparticles is extremely low, even for the highest annealing temperature, T = 800 °C. It is noteworthy that the TiO{sub 2} matrix also crystallizes in the anatase phase for annealing temperatures above 300 °C. For intermediate Au contents (5 at.% ≤ C{sub Au} ≤ 15 at.%), the formation of gold nanoclusters was much more evident, beginning at lower annealing temperatures (T ≥ 200 °C) with sizes ranging from 2 to 25 nm as the temperature increased. A change in the matrix crystallization from anatase to rutile was also observed in this intermediate range of compositions. For the highest Au concentrations (> 20 at.%), the films tended to form relatively larger clusters, with sizes above 20 nm (for T ≥ 400 °C). It is demonstrated that the structural and morphological characteristics of the films are strongly affected by the annealing temperature, as well as by the particular amounts, size and distribution of the Au nanoparticles dispersed in the TiO{sub 2} matrix. - Highlights: • Au:TiO{sub 2} films were produced by magnetron sputtering and post-deposition annealing. • The Au concentration in the films increases with the Au pellet area. • Annealing induced microstructural changes in the films. • The nanoparticle size evolution with temperature depends on the Au concentration.

  4. Partial oxidation of methanol catalyzed with Au/TiO2, Au/ZrO2 and Au/ZrO2-TiO2 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, E.; Wang, J. A.; Chen, L. F.; Valenzuela, M. A.; Dalai, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    Mesoporous TiO2, ZrO2 and ZrO2-TiO2 mixed oxides were synthesized by the sol-gel method and the Au/TiO2, Au/ZrO2 and Au/ZrO2-TiO2 catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation method using urea solution as a precipitating agent. These materials were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in situ FTIR-pyridine (FTIR-Py) adsorption. XRD patterns of the samples confirmed the formation of ZrTiO4 phase in the ZrO2-TiO2 mixed oxides. TEM micrographs showed that nanosized gold particles on the catalyst had an average diameter smaller than 5 nm. Metallic gold (Au0) and oxidized Au species (Aunδ+) on the surface of the catalysts were evidenced by UV-vis and XPS characterization. In the partial oxidation of methanol (POM) reaction, among the six catalysts, the high metallic Au0/Au+ ratio and low surface acidity in the Au/ZrO2 catalysts are chiefly responsible for the highest hydrogen production rate in the whole temperature range between 210 and 300 °C. Methanol decomposition as secondary reaction was favored on TiO2-based catalysts at higher temperature, producing a large amount of CO. Formation of ZrO2-TiO2 solid solution resulted in generation of both Brønsted and Lewis acid sites; as a result, dehydrogenation and oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol was allowed over Au/ZrO2-TiO2 catalysts.

  5. Measurement of Direct Photons in Au plus Au Collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R.; T.C. Awes; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the measurement of direct photons at midrapidity in Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV. The direct photon signal was extracted for the transverse momentum range of 4 GeV/c < pT < 22 GeV/c, using a statistical method to subtract decay photons from the inclusive photon sample. The direct photon nuclear modification factor R-AA was calculated as a function of p(T) for different Au + Au collision centralities using the measured p + p direct photon spectrum and compared to ...

  6. EFFECT OF LASER INPUT ENERGY ON AuSnx INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS FORMATION IN SOLDER JOINTS WITH DIFFERENT THICKNESS OF Au SURFACE FINISH ON PADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Liu; C.Q.Wang; Y.H.Tian; M.Y.Li

    2008-01-01

    Formation of AuSnx intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in laser reflowed solder joints was investigated. The results showed that few IMCs formed at the solder/0.1 μm Au interface. Needlelike AuSn4 IMCs were observed at the solder/0.5 μm Au interface.In Sn-2.0Ag-0.75Cu-3.0Bi and Sn-3.5Ag-O.75Cu solder joints, when the laser input energy was increased, AuSn4 IMCs changed from a layer to needlelike or dendritic distribution at the solder/0.9 μm Au interface. As for the solder joints with 4.0 μm thickness of Au surface finish on pads, AuSn4 , AuSn2, AuSn IMCs, and Au2 Sn phases formed at the interface. Moreover, the content of AuSnx IMCs, such as, AuSn4 and AuSn2, which contained high Sn concentration, would become larger as the laser input energy increased. In the Sn-37Pb solder joints with 0.9 μm or 4.0 μm thickness of the Au surface finish on pads, AuSn4 IMCs were in netlike distribution. The interspaces between them were filled with Pb-rich phases.

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of the Au-Sb-Si ternary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J., E-mail: jiang.wang@empa.ch [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, Duebendorf, Zuerich CH-8600 (Switzerland); Liu, Y.J. [Western Transportation Institute, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States); Liu, L.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhou, H.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Jin, Z.P. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2011-02-10

    Research highlights: > Thermodynamic optimization of the Au-Sb binary system was updated. > The Si-Sb binary system was assessed from critical review of experimental information. > Thermodynamic modeling of the Au-Sb-Si ternary system was performed. > The phase relations of this ternary system are useful to design Au-based solders. - Abstract: Thermodynamic optimization of the Au-Sb binary system was updated as well as the Si-Sb binary system was assessed thermodynamically using the CALPHAD method based on the critical review of the available experimental information from the published literature. The solution phases including liquid, fcc{sub A}1(Au), diamond{sub A}4(Si) and rhombohedral{sub A}7(Sb), are modeled as substitutional solutions and their excess Gibbs energies are expressed by a Redlich-Kister polynomial. The solubility of Si in the intermetallic compound AuSb{sub 2} is not taken into account because of the lack of experimental information. Combined with previous assessment of the Au-Si binary system, thermodynamic modeling of the Au-Sb-Si ternary system was performed to reproduce well the measured phase equilibria. The liquidus projection and several vertical sections of this ternary system were calculated, which are in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental data.

  8. Registration of ‘AU-1101’ peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    AU-1101’ (Reg. No. CV-xxx, PI 661498) is a large-seeded virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) with high yield and medium maturity, uniform pod size and shape, high grade, superior shelling characters, low oil content, normal oleic acid content, and good flavor. AU-...

  9. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya, E-mail: satoh@appi.keio.ac.jp

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10{sup −2} μ{sub B}/Au atom, respectively. - Highlights: • Au nanoparticles with clean surface were prepared by the gas evaporation method. • The spontaneous magnetization was observed in Au nanoparticles. • Temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization of smaller Au particles was not monotonic. • The magnetic behavior was interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell model. • The shell thickness and the magnetic moment per Au atom were estimated.

  10. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  11. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Geon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  12. Growth and structure of Co/Au magnetic thin films; Croissance et structure des couches minces magnetiques Co/Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot, N

    1999-01-14

    We have studied the growth and the crystallographic structure of magnetic ultra thin cobalt/gold films (Co/Au), in order to investigate the correlations between their magnetic and structural properties. Room temperature (R.T.) Co growth on Au (111) proceeds in three stages. Up to 2 Co monolayers (ML), a bilayer island growth mode is observed. Between 2 and 5 ML, coalescence of the islands occurs, covering the substrate surface and a Co/Au mixing is observed resulting from the de-construction of the Herringbone reconstruction. Finally, beyond 5 ML, the CoAu mixing is buried and the Co growth continues in a 3-D growth. Annealing studies at 600 K on this system show a smoothing effect of the Co film, and at the same time, segregation of Au atoms. The quality of the Co/Au interface (sharpness) is not enhanced by the annealing. The local order was studied by SEXAFS and the long range order by GIXRD showing that the Co film has a hexagonal close packed structure, with an easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the surface. From a local order point of view, the Co grows with an incoherent epitaxy and keeps its own bulk parameters. The GIXRD analysis shows a residual strain in the Co film of 4%. The difference observed between the local order analysis and the long range order results is explained in terms of the low dimensions of the diffracting domains. The evolution of film strains, as a function of the Co coverage, shows a marked deviation from the elastic strain theory. Modification of the strain field in the Co film as a function of the Au coverage is studied by GIXRD analysis. The Au growth study, at R.T., shows no evidence of a Au/Co mixing in the case of the Au/Co interface. The Au overlayer adopts a twinned face centred cubic structure on the rough Co film surface. (author)

  13. Formation of CuxAu1− x phases by cold homogenization of Au/Cu nanocrystalline thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkova, Alona; Katona, Gabor L; Langer, Gabor A; Sidorenko, Sergey I; Voloshko, Svetlana M

    2014-01-01

    Summary It is shown, by using depth profiling with a secondary neutral mass spectrometer and structure investigations by XRD and TEM, that at low temperatures, at which the bulk diffusion is frozen, a complete homogenization can take place in the Cu/Au thin film system, which leads to formation of intermetallic phases. Different compounds can be formed depending on the initial thickness ratio. The process starts with grain boundary interdiffusion, which is followed by a formation of reaction layers at the grain boundaries that leads to the motion of the newly formed interfaces perpendicular to the grain boundary plane. Finally, the homogenization finishes when all the pure components have been consumed. The process is asymmetric: It is faster in the Au layer. In Au(25nm)/Cu(50nm) samples the final state is the ordered AuCu3 phase. Decrease of the film thicknesses, as expected, results in the acceleration of the process. It is also illustrated that changing the thickness ratio either a mixture of Cu-rich AuCu and AuCu3 phases (in Au(25nm)/Cu(25nm) sample), or a mixture of disordered Cu- as well as Au-rich solid solutions (in Au(25nm)/Cu(12nm) sample) can be produced. By using a simple model the interface velocity in both the Cu and Au layers were estimated from the linear increase of the average composition and its value is about two orders of magnitude larger in Au (ca. 10−11 m/s) than in Cu (ca. 10−13 m/s). PMID:25247132

  14. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions.

  15. Emission characteristics of AuSiBe field ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drandarov, N.; Georgieva, St.; Nikolov, B.; Donchev, T. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika)

    A ribbon type AuSiBe alloy field ion source, which combines the advantages of both hairpin type sources and reservoir type sources, has been constructed. The current-voltage characteristics of this source have been investigated. Hysteresis and four differentiated emission regions have been observed for them. By means of scanning electronic microscopy, it has been established that this complicated behaviour of the I-V curves and the angular distribution of the extracted ions are associated with the shape of the emitting surface. The mass spectrum of the emitted ions has been determined by means of an E x B mass filter. Considerable emission of Au[sup +], AuBe[sub 3][sup 2+], Si[sup 2+], Be[sup 2+], AuBe[sub 3][sup +], Be[sup +], Si[sup +], and Au[sup 2+] has been observed. (author).

  16. Viscoelastic nature of Au nanoparticle–PDMS nanocomposite gels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ritu Gupta; Hima K Nagamanasa; Rajesh Ganapathy; Giridhar U Kulkarni

    2015-08-01

    A stable gel of Au nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanocomposite is prepared by employing the curing agent of PDMS elastomer as a reducing agent for the formation of Au nanoparticles by an in-situ process. The viscoelastic nature of these gels is very sensitive to the Au nanoparticle loading and the synthetic temperature conditions. Even a very low Au content of 0.09 wt% is sufficient enough to bring in the transition from sponge state to gel state at room temperature. Higher synthetic temperature also forms sponge formation. Infrared and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy measurements have provided insight into PDMS crosslinking and nanoparticle formation, respectively. The optimization of the gel properties can have direct influence on the processability of Au nanoparticle–PDMS nanocomposite gels, with interesting implications in electronic, optical and microfluidic devices.

  17. Interface stress in Au/Ni multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweitz, K.O.; Böttiger, J.; Chevallier, J.;

    2000-01-01

    The effect of intermixing on the apparent interface stress is studied in -textured dc-magnetron sputtered Au/Ni multilayers by use of two methods commonly used for determining interface stress. The method using profilometry and in-plane x-ray diffraction does not take intermixing...... into account and yields an apparent interface stress of -8.46 +/- 0.99 J m(-2). However, observed discrepancies between model calculations and measured high-angle x-ray diffractograms indicate intermixing, and by use of the profilometry and sin(2) psi method the real interface stress value of -2.69 +/- 0.43 J...... m(-2) is found. This method also reveals a significant and systematic change of the stress-free lattice parameter of both constituents as a function of modulation period which is shown to account for the difference between the two findings. The method using in-plane diffraction is thus shown...

  18. The AuScope Geodetic VLBI Array

    CERN Document Server

    Lovell, J E J; Reid, P B; McCulloch, P M; Baynes, B E; Dickey, J M; Shabala, S S; Watson, C S; Titov, O; Ruddick, R; Twilley, R; Reynolds, C; Tingay, S J; Shield, P; Adada, R; Ellingsen, S P; Morgan, J S; Bignall, H E; 10.1007/s00190-013-0626-3

    2013-01-01

    The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12 m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia will enable the improved measurement of intrapl...

  19. Panorama du roman policier au Mexique

    OpenAIRE

    Lara-Alengrin, Alba

    2013-01-01

    Malgré sa diffusion depuis les années quarante par des collections de poche autochtones, le roman policier fut longtemps, au Mexique, un genre méprisé par la critique et les écrivains. Paco Ignacio Taibo II est le premier écrivain mexicain a légitimer et valoriser le genre policier, en particulier le roman noir, qui connaît simultanément un regain d’intérêt critique et commercial. Ce changement de perception vis-à-vis du roman noir s’accompagne de la création d’un nouveau terme pour le qualif...

  20. Dynamiques sectorielles et emploi au Maroc

    OpenAIRE

    Palméro, Sandra; Roux, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Plus de dix ans après la mise en place des accords de Barcelone, le constat des effets de l’ouverture des Pays méditerranéens est décevant quant à leur impact sur la croissance et la dynamique d’emploi. Il s’agit dans ce papier d’identifier les secteurs dynamiques d’emploi et de richesse au Maroc et d’apprécier si les choix de spécialisation permettent une croissance de longue période qui absorberait l’excédent de main-d’œuvre. Dans un premier temps, nous analysons les potentiels d’emploi des...

  1. Experimental study of heat exchange coefficients, critical heat flux and charge losses, using water-steam mixtures in turbulent flow in a vertical tube; Etude experimentale des coefficients d'echanges thermiques, des flux de chaleur critiques et des pertes de charge avec des melanges eau-vapeur en ecoulement turbulent dans un tube vertical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perroud, P.; De La Harpe, A.; Rebiere, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-12-15

    Two stainless steel tubes were used (with diameters of 5 and 10 mm, lengths 400 and 600 mm respectively), heated electrically (50 Hz). The mixture flows from top to bottom. The work was carried out mainly on mixtures of high concentration (x > 0.1), at pressures between 50 and 60 kg/cm{sup 2}, flowing as a liquid film on the walls of the tube with droplets suspended in the central current of steam. By analysis of the heat transfer laws the exchange mechanisms were established, and the conditions under which the critical heat flux may be exceeded without danger of actual burnout were determined. In this way high output concentrations (x{sub s} > 0.9) may be obtained. An attempt has been made to find out to what extent existing correlation formulae can be used to account for the phenomena observed. It is shown that those dealing with exchange coefficients can only be applied in a first approximation in cases where exchange by convection is preponderant, and only below the critical flux. The formulae proposed by WAPD and CISE do not give a satisfactory estimation of the critical heat flux, and the essential reasons for this inadequacy are explained. Lastly, the Martinelli and Nelson method may be used to an approximation of 30 per cent for the calculation of charge losses. (author) [French] On a utilise deux tubes en acier inox (avec des diametres de 5 et 10 mm, et des longueurs respectives 400 et 600 mm) chauffes electriquement (50 Hz). Le melange s'ecoule de haut en bas. Les etudes ont porte plus specialement sur des melanges de titres eleves (x > 0,1) a des pressions comprises entre 60 et 90 kg/cm{sup 2} dont l'ecoulement se fait avec film liquide annulaire et gouttelettes en suspension dans le coeur de vapeur. Par l'analyse des lois de transfert de chaleur, on a precise les mecanismes d'echanges et l'on a d'autre part determine dans quelles conditions le flux de chaleur critique peut etre depasse sans danger de &apos

  2. Anisotropy analysis of energy in Au/Si twist interface%Au/Si扭转界面能各向异性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛红; 张建民

    2007-01-01

    采用改进型嵌入原子法(modified embedded atom method,MEAM),计算了(001)Au/(111)Si、(011)Au/(111)Si、(111)Au/(111)Si、(001)Au/(001)Si、(011)Au/(001)Si、(111)Au/(001)Si六个扭转界面的界面能.结果表明,不论是对于(111)Si还是(001)Si基底,相同基底的界面均按照(111)Au/Si、(001)Au/Si、(011)Au/Si顺序依次增加;从界面能的最小化考虑,Au在(111)Si或(001)Si基底上的外延生长,Au(111)面为择优晶面,择优扭转角分别为θ=2.68°和θ=2.42°.

  3. A Terrestrial Planet in a ~1 AU Orbit Around One Member of a ~15 AU Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A; Shin, I -G; Porritt, I; Skowron, J; Han, C; Yee, J C; Kozłowski, S; Choi, J -Y; Poleski, R; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Mróz, P; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Gaudi, B S; Christie, G W; Drummond, J; McCormick, J; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Tan, T -G; Albrow, M; DePoy, D L; Hwang, K -H; Jung, Y K; Lee, C -U; Park, H; Pogge, R W; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Fukunaga, D; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Larsen, P; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Philpott, L; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Tsurumi, N; Wada, K; Yamai, N; Yock, P C M; Yonehara, A; Shvartzvald, Y; Maoz, D; Kaspi, S; Friedmann, M

    2014-01-01

    We detect a cold, terrestrial planet in a binary-star system using gravitational microlensing. The planet has low mass (2 Earth masses) and lies projected at $a_{\\perp,ph}$ ~ 0.8 astronomical units (AU) from its host star, similar to the Earth-Sun distance. However, the planet temperature is much lower, T<60 Kelvin, because the host star is only 0.10--0.15 solar masses and therefore more than 400 times less luminous than the Sun. The host is itself orbiting a slightly more massive companion with projected separation $a_{\\perp,ch}=$10--15 AU. Straightforward modification of current microlensing search strategies could increase their sensitivity to planets in binary systems. With more detections, such binary-star/planetary systems could place constraints on models of planet formation and evolution. This detection is consistent with such systems being very common.

  4. Propagation of Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions at FAIR energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, S; Bashir, S; jahan, H; Ahmad, N; Chattopadhyay, S

    2014-01-01

    Event by event fluctuations of particle multiplicities and their ratios are considered to be sensitive probes to the exotic phenomena in high energy heavy ion collisions like phase transtion or the occurence of critical point. These phenomena might take place at different time after the collision based on fulfilling the required conditions at a particular time. Fluctuations are therefore expected to show non-monotonic behaviour at the of time of occurence of these phenomena. Experimentally, fluctuations are measured at freezeout. In this work, using the hybrid version of the UrQMD event generator, we have investigated the propagation of fluctuations of particle multiplicities, their ratios and the ratio of total positive and negative charges in AuAu collisions at E_{lab} < 90 AGeV. Two commonly used experimental measures i.e., {\\sigma^2}/mean and {\

  5. On the thermalization of dense hadronic matter in Au + Au collisions at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    De, Somnath; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    The conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium of baryons (non-strange, strange) and mesons (strange) are presented for central Au + Au collisions at FAIR energies using the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The net particle density, longitudinal-to-transverse pressure anisotropy and inverse slope parameters of the energy spectra of non-strange and strange hadrons are calculated inside a cell in the central region within rapidity window $|y| < 1.0$ at different time steps after the collision. We observed that the strangeness content is dominated by baryons at all energies, however contribution from mesons become significant at higher energies. The time scale obtained from local pressure (momentum) isotropization and thermalization of energy spectra are nearly equal and found to decrease with increase in laboratory energy. The equilibrium thermodynamic properties of the system are obtained with statistical thermal model. The time evolution of the entropy densities at FAIR energies are found very similar...

  6. Charge-Asymmetry Dependence of Proton Elliptic Flow in 200 GeV Au +Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The chiral magnetic wave (CMW) is predicted to manifest a finite electric quadrupole moment in the quark-gluon plasma produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. This quadrupole moment generates a divergence in the azimuthal anisotropy (v2) of positively and negatively charged particles such that v2(+) charge asymmetry (Ach) of particles in the same rapidity window. The Ach dependence of v 2 has already been observed in the cases of charged pions and kaons. We present preliminary STAR measurements of v 2 for protons and anti-protons as a function of Ach from √sNN = 200 GeV Au +Au collisions for different centrality classes. The results are then compared with the previously reported results of pions and kaons. For the STAR Collaboration.

  7. 200 A GeV Au + Au collisions serve a nearly perfect quark-gluon liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huichao; Bass, Steffen A; Heinz, Ulrich; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Shen, Chun

    2011-05-13

    A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity (η/s)(QGP) of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T(c) QGP with a microscopic transport model for hadronic freeze-out we find for 200 A GeV Au + Au collisions that v2/ε is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN(ch)/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity ε. Comparing with measurements we find 1QGP) < 2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of ε used to normalize the measured v2.

  8. Collective global dynamics in Au+Au collisions at the BNL AGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravina, L.; Csernai, L. P.; Lévai, P.; Strottman, D.

    1994-10-01

    Signatures of collective effects are studied in the quark gluon string model and in the fluid dynamical model for Au+Au collisions at 11.6A GeV/c. In the fluid dynamical model the dependence of observables on the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation in the equation of state is pointed out although the maximal total amount of pure QGP formed is only about 8 fm3 in these reactions. In contrast to the baryon rapidity distribution, the in-plane transverse flow and especially the squeeze-out effect are particularly sensitive to the EOS. In the QGSM the lifetime and extent of baryon density in strings are studied. The QGSM picture is very similar to the one obtained in the fluid dynamical model with a pure hadronic EOS.

  9. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  10. DEPENDENCE OF DOMAIN STRUCTURES ON Au THICKNESS IN Co/Au MULTILAYER FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic force images and surface topography images of sputtered Co/Au multilayer films in remnant state were measured by magnetic force microscopy. From the surface magnetic structures shown in the magnetic force images it can be seen that the domain pattern and size vary with the increase of the thickness t of the non-ferromagnetic Au layer remarkably. With the measurements of the effective perpendicular anisotropy Ku and the domain period d, it was found that there are similar trends of d and Ku as functions of t. The variations of the domain pattern and size were qualitatively interpreted in terms of magnetic domain theory, the theoretical relations of d and the domain wall energy ow vs t were calculated. As t = 8.5 AL(1AL=0.235nm), the largest ow is 11mJ/m2.

  11. Strangeness Production in Au+Au Reactions at √ {SNN} = 62.4\\ GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsene, Ionut-Cristian

    The measurement of strangeness is a valuable tool for understanding the reaction mechanism of nuclear collisions since all the strange particles need to be created during the reaction. Also, strangeness enhancement is one of the predicted signals of the QGP. In the present work we will discuss the behaviour of the strangeness production (i.e. K/π ratio) with rapidity and baryo-chemical potential in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 A GeV. In this particular reaction, BRAHMS is able to identify particles over 3.5 rapidity units and thereby cover a wide range of bar {p}/p ratios, including the fragmentation region. We will show spectra and ratios of identified particles as a function of pT and rapidity.

  12. Sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at 400 A.MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, V.; Dupieux, P.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Bastid, N.; Berger, L.; Boussange, S.; Fraysse, L.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Pras, P.; Basrak, Z.; Belayev, I. M.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Buta, A.; Caplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Donà, R.; Erö, J.; Fan, Z. G.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Freifelder, R.; Frolov, S.; Gobbi, A.; Gregorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Hartnack, C.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jeong, S. C.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Krämer, M.; Khun, C.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Maurenzig, P.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; Sadchikov, A.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Tezkratt, R.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.; FOPI Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    We present new experimental data obtained with the FOPI detector at SIS, for the Au + Au heavy-ion collisions at 400 A MeV incident energy. The sideward flow, determined from a method without reaction-plane reconstruction, and the nuclear stopping are studied as a function of the centrality of the collisions. In order to study the nuclear in-medium effects, which act on the NN cross sections and potential and hence on experimental observables like the nuclear-matter flow and stopping, these results are compared with the predictions of two different QMD versions. The first one offers a fully microscopic calculation of the cross sections and potential in the G-matrix formalism and naturally includes the in-medium effects (this version is for the first time confronted with experiment). The second one uses a standard Skyrme potential plus a momentum-dependent term in order to mimic the in-medium effects.

  13. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, D.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

  14. Degree of Chemical Non-equilibrium in Central Au-Au Collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Habashy, D M; Mohamed, M T; Abbas, Ehab

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the difference between hadron resonance gas (HRG) calculations for chemical freeze-out parameters at fully and partly chemical equilibria. To this end, the results are compared with the particle ratios measured in central Au-Au collisions at a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies, \\hbox{$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7-200 $GeV} as offered by the STAR experiment. We restrict the discussion to STAR, because of large statistics and overall homogeneity of STAR measurements (one detector) against previous experiments. We find that the matter produced at these energies is likely in fully chemical equilibrium, which is consistent with recent lattice QCD results. The possible improvements by partial chemical equilibrium ($\\gamma_S\

  15. Nuclear Stopping in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bearden, I G; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Hansen, O; Holm, A; Holme, A K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Nielsen, B S; Norris, J; Olchanski, K; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2004-01-01

    Transverse momentum spectra and rapidity densities, dN/dy, of protons, anti-protons, and net--protons (p-pbar) from central (0-5%) Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV were measured with the BRAHMS experiment within the rapidity range 0 < y < 3. The proton and anti-proton dN/dy decrease from mid-rapidity to y=3. The net-proton yield is roughly constant for y<1 at dN/dy~7, and increases to dN/dy~12 at y~3. The data show that collisions at this energy exhibit a high degree of transparency and that the linear scaling of rapidity loss with rapidity observed at lower energies is broken. The energy loss per participant nucleon is estimated to be 73 +- 6 GeV.

  16. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; De Moura, M M; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Foley, K J; Fomenko, K; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang Sheng Li; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, Thomas; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Urkinbaev, A R; Van Buren, G; Van, M; Leeuwen; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, V P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zolnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2004-01-01

    The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow ($v_1$), elliptic flow ($v_2$), and the fourth harmonic ($v_4$) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution of particles from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrtsNN = 200$ GeV are summarized and compared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results for identified particles are presented and fit with a Blast Wave model. For $v_2$, scaling with the number of constituent quarks and parton coalescence is discussed. For $v_4$, scaling with $v_2^2$ and quark coalescence predictions for higher harmonic flow is discussed. The different anisotropic flow analysis methods are compared and nonflow effects are extracted from the data.

  17. Differential flow of protons in Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, P.K. E-mail: pradip@iopb.res.in; Cassing, W

    2002-12-30

    We study the proton sideward and elliptic differential flow for Au+Au collisions at AGS energies (2-8 A GeV) in a microscopic relativistic transport model that includes all baryon resonances up to a mass of 2 GeV as well as string degrees of freedom for the higher hadronic excitations. In order to explore the sensitivity of the various differential flows to the nuclear equation of state (EoS) we use three different parameterizations of the scalar and vector mean-fields, i.e., NL2 (soft), NL23 (medium) and NL3 (hard), with their momentum dependence fitted to the experimental Schroedinger equivalent potential (at normal nuclear matter density {rho}{sub 0}) up to kinetic energies of 1 GeV. We calculate the excitation function of sideward and elliptic flow within these parameter sets for Au+Au collisions and compare with the recent data from the E895 Collaboration as a function of rapidity, impact parameter and transverse momentum, respectively. We find that the best description of the differential data is provided by a rather 'stiff' EoS at 2 A GeV (NL3) while at higher bombarding energies (4-8 A GeV) a 'medium' EoS leads to the lowest {chi}{sup 2} with respect to the data. However, the differences in the transverse and elliptic flows (from the different parameter sets) become of minor significance at 4-8 A GeV. We attribute this insensitivity to a similar reduction of the vector potential in all models and to the dominance of string degrees of freedom at these bombarding energies.

  18. Autopistas: AU-1 25 de Mayo y AU-6 Perito Moreno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1981-02-01

    Full Text Available Highways AU-1 and AU-6, approximately 17 km. long, were constructed for the purpose of solving the serious traffic problems in Buenos Aires, a city of nine million inhabitants and an evergrowing number of cars. A computer program was created for the design based on the geometric shape of the highway and the position of the supports. Using this, all elements composing the structure were calculated and the framework was sized. This programme made it possible to complete a stretch of 150 metres per week. The very rapid construction was carried out through self-supporting arches made of metallic beams held in place by brackets. The brackets were fitted in specially designed grooves in the major supports of the highway.

    Las autopistas AU-1 y AU-6, con una longitud aproximada de 17 km, se realizaron con objeto de resolver el grave problema de infraestructura vial del Municipio de Buenos Aires, ciudad de nueve millones de habitantes y con un parque de vehículos en rápido crecimiento. Para el proyecto se creó un programa de ordenador con el que, partiendo de la definición geométrica de la autopista y de la posición de las pilas, se calculan todos los elementos que componen la estructura y se dimensionan las armaduras. Este programa permitió proyectar un tramo (150 m por semana. La construcción, a un ritmo muy rápido, se llevó a cabo mediante cimbras autoportantes compuestas por vigas metálicas apoyadas sobre ménsulas, las cuales a su vez apoyan en unos nichos dejados en las pilas.

  19. Thiophenol and thiophenol radical and their complexes with gold clusters Au 5 and Au 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, F.; Kryachko, E. S.

    2004-12-01

    The longstanding controversy between experiment and theory regarding which conformer of thiophenol, planar or perpendicular, is the most stable and what is the magnitude of the corresponding rotational barrier of the S-H group is discussed. We propose a variety of rather modest high-level computational methods within the density theory, which corroborate the experimental data. These methods demonstrate that the planar structure of thiophenol is the most stable and the magnitude of the rotational barrier falls within the experimental range of 3.35±0.84 kJ mol -1. However, the barrier is of the order of RT at room temperature, which might prevent to clearly identify the most stable conformer of thiophenol in experiments and leads to a large-amplitude motion of the thiolic hydrogen. On the other hand, such low value of the barrier may lead to some error in evaluating the thermodynamic properties of thiophenol within the rigid-rotor-harmonic oscillator model, in particular for the bond dissociation enthalpy. We also show the existence of a large entropy contribution to the Gibbs free energy difference between the planar and perpendicular conformers which is the order of the rotational barrier (≈4 kJ mol -1). This might be of interest for experimental study. The most stable complexes of thiophenol with the gold clusters Au 5 and Au 6 are also investigated. It is shown that the sulfur atom prefers to anchor to two- and three-coordinated atoms of gold in these clusters to form a strongly directional gold-sulfur bond. The hydrogen abstraction from the S-H group of thiophenol bonded to the two-coordinated gold atom in Au 5 yields the bridging Au-S dibond and results in a spectacular reduction of the bond dissociation energy of thiophenol by nearly a factor of three.

  20. Direct observation of Dijets in central Au+Au Ccllisions at VsNN=200  GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Botje, M.A.J.; Castillo, J.; Grebenyuk, O.; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; Russcher, M.J.; Snellings, R.J.M.; van der Kolk, N.

    2006-01-01

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider reports measurements of azimuthal correlations of high transverse momentum (pT) charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at higher pT than reported previously. As pT is increased, a narrow, back-to-back peak emerges above the decreasing backgr

  1. Structure and magnetic anisotropy evolution in Au/Co/Au sandwiches upon thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawro, A.; Kurant, Z.; Baczewski, L.T.; Pankowski, P.; Pelka, J.B.; Maneikis, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Bojko, A.; Zablotskii, V.; Maziewski, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Bialystok, ul. Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok (Poland)

    2006-01-01

    The correlation between structural and magnetic properties of Au(111)/Co(0001)/Au(111) sandwiches with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, has been studied in details. Thermal treatment in the range between room temperature and 300 C at various stages of samples growth process as well as after its completion is applied as a factor modifying the structure of studied specimens. Annealing at 150 C does not affect substantially either crystalline structure or perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. At 250 C the RHEED pattern of Co layers reveals the loss of the lattice coherence with Au underlayer and the analysis of synchrotron radiation reflectometry leads to the conclusion that the continuity of Co layers is lost. Structural evolution upon thermal treatment is well correlated with changes of magnetic anisotropy studied by magnetooptical Kerr effect. After annealing at 250 C magnetization switches from out-of-plane to in-plane orientation, which is explained in terms of interfacial and magnetoelastic contributions to the sample magnetic anisotropy. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Ford, Michael J.; Halder, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method......The synthetic chemistry and spectroscopy of sulfur-protected gold surfaces and nanoparticles is analyzed, indicating that the electronic structure of the interface is Au(0)-thiyl, with Au(I)-thiolates identified as high-energy excited surface states. Density-functional theory indicates...... for quantifying these contributions is presented, revealing that a driving force for nanoparticle growth is nobleization, minimizing Au(I)-thiolate involvement. Predictions that Brust-Schiffrin reactions involve thiolate anion intermediates are verified spectroscopically, establishing a key feature needed...

  3. Ionic Charge State Distribution of Au Plasma for 7-Ion System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The present work extends the previous work[2] on 5-ion system to consider 7-ion system (i.e., Au47+ ~ Au53+). It is found that more highly charged ions, e.g., Au53+, Au54+ etc., could be able to be neglected, however, less highly charged ions, e.g., Au47+, Au46+ etc., are rather important. Therefore, a new idea to consider 8-ion system, i.e., Au46+ ~ Au53+, is under way. As a supplement, we discuss the simultaneous reaction, which would be important in this sort of works.

  4. Au@AuPt nanoparticles embedded in B-doped graphene: A superior electrocatalyst for determination of rutin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianlan; Yang, Guangming; Feng, Shaoping; Shi, Ling; Huang, Zhaolong; Pan, Haibo; Liu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    A hydrothermal approach was used to prepare B-doped graphene with B2O3 as reductant and boron source. Results reveal that the boron atoms have been successfully embedded into graphene with a high content of a total B species (2.85 at.%). Then, B-doped graphene was exfoliated further into monolayer nanosheet by impregnating Au@AuPt core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AuPt NPs) because boron atom creates a net positive charge, which facilitates Au@AuPt NPs adsorption to form Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped graphene hybrid nanocatalysts. After that, the Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped hybrid suspension was dropped on glassy carbon electrode for sensing rutin. In this way, the dispersed carboxyl units of B-doped graphene can form hydrogen bonding with the phenolic hydroxyl groups of rutin, making rutin enrich easily on modified electrode surface to enhance the electrochemical response. At the same time, its electrochemical mechanism on the modified electrode was elucidated using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that its electrochemical behavior on modified electrode surface was a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process, and the charge transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer number (n) were 0.296 and 2, respectively. This electrochemical sensor for rutin provided a wide linear response range of 2.00 × 10-9-4.00 × 10-6 M with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 2.84 × 10-10 M. The proposed method was applied successfully to selective determination of rutin in Tablets with acceptable recovery range (97.23-101.65%).

  5. 从头计算方法比较研究B2Au4,Al2Au4和BAlAu4的几何和电子结构%A Comparative Ab initio Study of the Geometric and Electronic Structures of B2Au4, Al2Au4 and BAlAu4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚文志; 卢章辉; 李思殿

    2014-01-01

    Au/H similarity is a hot topic in chemistry. Here, we report the theoretical prediction of new members of the Au/H analogy family:covalent B2Au4, ionic Al2Au4, and BAlAu4. A comparative study of the geometric and electronic structures of electron-deficient B2Au4, Al2Au4, and BAlAu4 was performed based on density and wave functional theories. Detailed orbital analyses, adaptive natural density partitioning (AdNDP), and electron localization function (ELF) analyses were performed. Ab initio theoretical evidence strongly suggests that the ground state of slightly distorted C2 B2Au4 is a covalent complex containing two B―Au―B three centers-two electrons (3c-2e) bonds. Unexpectedly, C3v Al+(AlAu4)-and C3v Al+(BAu4)-are predicted to have a salt-like composition with three X―Au―Al 3c-2e bonds (X=Al in Al2Au4, X=B in BAlAu4). Al2Au4 and BAlAu4 represent the first examples of bridging gold bonds in ionic-deficient systems. The adiabatic and vertical detachment energies of the anions were calculated to facilitate their future experimental characterization. Bridging gold addressed in this work provides an interesting bonding mode for covalent and ionic-deficient systems, and may aid in designing new materials and catalysts with highly dispersed Au atoms.%Au/H相似性的研究是现代化学中的一个热门话题.我们从理论上报道Au/H相似的新成员:共价化合物B2Au4,离子化合物Al2Au4和BAlAu4.采用密度泛函和波函数理论方法对比研究了缺电子体系B2Au4、Al2Au4和BAlAu4的几何和电子结构.详细讨论了它们基态结构的轨道、适应性自然密度划分(AdNDP)和电子局域函数(ELF)分析.计算结果表明稍微扭曲变形的C2 B2Au4是基态结构,在这个共价化合物中含有两个B―Au―B三中心二电子(3c-2e)键.然而C3v Al+(AlAu4)-和C3v Al+(BAu4)-被研究证明是含有三个X―Au―Al三中心二电子键的类盐化合物(在Al2Au4中X=Al, BAlAu4中X=B). Al2Au4和BAlAu4是至今为止首例

  6. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  7. Theoretical studies of acrolein hydrogenation on Au20 nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Chen, Zhao-Xu; He, Xiang; Kang, Guo-Jun

    2010-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles play a key role in catalytic processes. We investigated the kinetics of stepwise hydrogenation of acrolein on Au20 cluster model and compared with that on Au(110) surface. The rate-limiting step barrier of CC reduction is about 0.5 eV higher than that of CO hydrogenation on Au(110) surface. On Au20 nanoparticle, however, the energy barrier of the rate-determining step for CC hydrogenation turns out to be slightly lower than the value for the CO reduction. The selectivity difference on the two substrate models are attributed to different adsorption modes of acrolein: via the CC on Au20, compared to through both CC and CO on Au(110). The preference switch implies that the predicted selectivity of competitive hydrogenation depends on substrate model sensitively, and particles with more low-coordinated Au atoms than flat surfaces are favorable for CC hydrogenation, which is in agreement with experimental result.

  8. Deep level anomalies in silicon doped with radioactive Au atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Bollmann, J; Henry, M O; McGlynn, E; Knack, S

    1999-01-01

    DLTS investigations on n- and p-type silicon samples implanted with various radioactive Hg isotopes which decay fully or partly through the series Au/Pt/(Ir) are reported. The deep Au-donor level at E/sub v/+0.374(3) eV is observed in all cases. In p-type silicon its energy differs significantly (E/sub v/+0.438(3) eV). Both Au and Pt are found to produce two acceptor levels in n-type material. An additional donor-like level at E/sub v/+0.499(4) eV is shown to be due to Au. In all detected levels, one atom of Au or Pt is involved and the concentration decreases towards crystal surface. A key result is that, despite the presence of the Au donor in the samples, for all decay series involving Au to Pt conversion we have never observed the appearance of the Pt-donor. (6 refs).

  9. First principles calculations of the optical and plasmonic response of Au alloys and intermetallic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keast, V J; Barnett, R L; Cortie, M B

    2014-07-30

    Pure Au is widely used in plasmonic applications even though its use is compromised by significant losses due to damping. There are some elements that are less lossy than Au (e.g. Ag or Al) but they will normally oxidize or corrode under ambient conditions. Here we examine whether alloying Au with a second element would be beneficial for plasmonic applications. In order to evaluate potential alternatives to pure Au, the density of states (DOS), dielectric function and plasmon quality factor have been calculated for alloys and compounds of Au with Al, Cd, Mg, Pd, Pt, Sn, Ti, Zn and Zr. Substitutional alloying of Au with Al, Cd, Mg and Zn was found to slightly improve the plasmonic response. Of the large number of intermetallic compounds studied, only AuAl2, Au3Cd, AuMg, AuCd and AuZn were found to be suitable for plasmonic applications.

  10. Controlling Au Photodeposition on Large ZnO Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Joseph F S; Shortell, Matthew P; Noble, Christopher J; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Jaatinen, Esa A; Waclawik, Eric R

    2016-06-08

    This study investigated how to control the rate of photoreduction of metastable AuCl2(-) at the solid-solution interface of large ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (50-100 nm size). Band-gap photoexcitation of electronic charge in ZnO by 370 nm UV light yielded Au NP deposition and the formation of ZnO-Au NP hybrids. Au NP growth was observed to be nonepitaxial, and the patterns of Au photodeposition onto ZnO NPs observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were consistent with reduction of AuCl2(-) at ZnO facet edges and corner sites. Au NP photodeposition was effective in the presence of labile oleylamine ligands attached to the ZnO surface; however, when a strong-binding dodecanethiol ligand coated the surface, photodeposition was quenched. Rates of interfacial electron transfer at the ZnO-solution interface were adjusted by changing the solvent, and these rates were observed to strongly depend on the solvent's permittivity (ε) and viscosity. From measurements of electron transfer from ZnO to the organic dye toluidine blue at the ZnO-solution interface, it was confirmed that low ε solvent mixtures (ε ≈ 9.5) possessed markedly higher rates of photocatalytic interfacial electron transfer (∼3.2 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)) compared to solvent mixtures with high ε (ε = 29.9, ∼1.9 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)). Dissolved oxygen content in the solvent and the exposure time of ZnO to band-gap, near-UV photoexcitation were also identified as factors that strongly affected Au photodeposition behavior. Production of Au clusters was favored under conditions that caused electron accumulation in the ZnO-Au NP hybrid. Under conditions where electron discharge was rapid (such as in low ε solvents), AuCl2(-) precursor ions photoreduced at ZnO surfaces in less than 5 s, leading to deposition of several small, isolated ∼6 nm Au NP on the ZnO host instead.

  11. Optical Behaviour of ZnO/Au Nanojunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shital V. Kahane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO/Au nanojunctions were prepared by electrochemical method at room temperature. Nanojunction formation is vivid from appearance of ZnO and Au features in x-ray diffraction pattern. Optical absorption spectra reveal excitonic as well as surface plasmon resonance (SPR feature in case of nanojunctions. Bleaching of the excitonic feature associated with the blue shift, is a signature of charge transfer from Au to ZnO at the interface of nanojunction. An increase in intensity of band edge luminescence and quenching of green emission indicates the passivation of surface defects due to formation of nanojunctions.

  12. Magnetic Anisotropic Energy Gap and Strain Effect in Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Po-Hsun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the observation of the size effect of thermal magnetization in Au nanoparticles. The thermal deviation of the saturation magnetization departs substantially from that predicted by the Bloch T3/2-law, indicating the existence of magnetic anisotropic energy. The results may be understood using the uniaxial anisotropy Heisenberg model, in which the surface atoms give rise to polarized moments while the magnetic anisotropic energy decreases as the size of the Au nanoparticles is reduced. There is a significant maximum magnetic anisotropic energy found for the 6 nm Au nanoparticles, which is associated with the deviation of the lattice constant due to magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  13. Thermodynamic description of Au-Ag-Si ternary system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the available experimental information, the Ag-Si binary system was thermodynamically assessed using the CALPHAD method. The solution phases, including liquid, fcc-Al and diamond-A4, were modeled as substitutional solutions, of which the excess Gibbs energies were expressed by Redlich-Kister polynomial functions. Combined with previous assessment of the Ag-Au and Au-Si binary systems, thermodynamic description of the Au-Ag-Si ternary system was performed to reproduce the reported phase equilibria. Thermodynamic properties of liquid alloys, liquidus projection and several vertical and isothermal sections of this ternary system were calculated, which are in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental data.

  14. AuScope VLBI Project and Hobart 26-m Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Jim; Dickey, John; Reid, Brett; McCallum, Jamie; Shabala, Stas; Watson, Christopher; Ellingsen, Simon; Memin, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on the activities carried out at the three AuScope VLBI observatories and the Hobart 26-m antenna. In 2012 the three AuScope 12-m antennas at Hobart (Hb), Katherine (Ke), and Yarragadee (Yg) completed their first full year of operations as an array. The Hobart 26-m antenna (Ho) continued to make a contribution to IVS, providing overlap with the Hb time series. In total the AuScope antennas and the Hobart 26 m observed for 146 antenna days in 2012. In this report we also briefly highlight our research activities during 2012 and our plans for 2013.

  15. Au plasmonics in a WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} photocatalyst for significantly enhanced hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Zhongzhou [CAS Key Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Zhenxing, E-mail: wangzx@nanoctr.cn, E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Zhan, Xueying; Xu, Kai; He, Jun, E-mail: wangzx@nanoctr.cn, E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Quanlin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-11-30

    Promoting the activities of photocatalysts is still the critical challenge in H{sub 2} generation area. Here, a Au plasmon enhanced photocatalyst of WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} is developed by inserting Au nanoparticles between WS{sub 2} nanotubes and CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles. Due to the localized surface plasmonic resonance properties from Au nanoparticles, WS{sub 2}-Au-CIS shows the best performance as compared to Au-CIS, CIS, WS{sub 2}-CIS, CIS-Au, WS{sub 2}-Au, and WS{sub 2}-CIS-Au. The surface plasmonic resonance effects dramatically intensify the absorption of visible light and help to inject hot electrons into the semiconductors. Our findings open up an efficient method to optimize the type-II structures for photocatalytic water splitting.

  16. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ford, Michael J; Halder, Arnab; Ulstrup, Jens; Hush, Noel S

    2016-03-15

    The synthetic chemistry and spectroscopy of sulfur-protected gold surfaces and nanoparticles is analyzed, indicating that the electronic structure of the interface is Au(0)-thiyl, with Au(I)-thiolates identified as high-energy excited surface states. Density-functional theory indicates that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method for quantifying these contributions is presented, revealing that a driving force for nanoparticle growth is nobleization, minimizing Au(I)-thiolate involvement. Predictions that Brust-Schiffrin reactions involve thiolate anion intermediates are verified spectroscopically, establishing a key feature needed to understand nanoparticle growth. Mixing of preprepared Au(I) and thiolate reactants always produces Au(I)-thiolate thin films or compounds rather than monolayers. Smooth links to O, Se, Te, C, and N linker chemistry are established.

  17. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-Pt system%Au-Pt二元合金的热力学评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓宁; 任玉平; 李长发; 李松; 秦高梧

    2012-01-01

    基于最近实验测得的Au-Pt二元体系相平衡数据,利用Calphad方法重新评估Au-Pt二元体系的热力学参数.采用亚正规溶体模型Redlich-Kister等式描述液相和面心立方相的Gibbs自由能.考虑热力学第三定律的限定,以再现相平衡数据和固相热力学性质,包括活度和混合焓,优化Au-Pt二元系统热力学参数.优化结果表明:Au-Pt合金系统的溶解度间隙边界向富Au侧偏移,其顶点位置在1200 °c,Au-56%Pt.%The thermodynamic re-assessment of Au-Pt binary system was carded out by using the Calphad method and based on the recent experimental data.The Gibbs energies of face-centred cubic and liquid phases were described by a sub-regular solution model with the Redlich-Kister equation.Much effort was taken to reproduce the phase equilibrium results and thermodynamic properties of the solid phase,including the activity and mixing enthalpy.The constraint of the third law of thermodynamics was also considered in the assessment.According to the presently assessed results,the miscibility gap region in the Au-Pt system slightly shifts to the Au-rich side,and the critical point of the miscibility gap is about 1200 °C and Au-56% Pt.

  18. Evaluation of the Olympus AU-510 analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, C; Velasco, J; Ramón, F

    1991-01-01

    The selective multitest Olympus AU-510 analyser was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Comision de Instrumentacion de la Sociedad Española de Quimica Clinica and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: an examination of the analytical units and then an evaluation in routine work conditions. The operational characteristics of the system were also studied.THE FIRST STAGE INCLUDED A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY: dependent on the absorbance, the inaccuracy varies between +0.5% to -0.6% at 405 nm and from -5.6% to 10.6% at 340 nm; the imprecision ranges between -0.22% and 0.56% at 405 nm and between 0.09% and 2.74% at 340 nm. Linearity was acceptable, apart from a very low absorbance for NADH at 340 nm; and the imprecision of the serum sample pipetter was satisfactory.TWELVE SERUM ANALYTES WERE STUDIED UNDER ROUTINE CONDITIONS: glucose, urea urate, cholesterol, triglycerides, total bilirubin, creatinine, phosphate, iron, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.The within-run imprecision (CV%) ranged from 0.67% for phosphate to 2.89% for iron and the between-run imprecision from 0.97% for total bilirubin to 7.06% for iron. There was no carryover in a study of the serum sample pipetter. Carry-over studies with the reagent and sample pipetters shows some cross contamination in the iron assay.

  19. De l’individu postcommuniste au citoyen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasteva

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available L’article analyse le paradoxe de la conception communiste du citoyen engagé : au niveau idéologique, citoyenneté et engagement sont intrinsèquement liés, au niveau politique ils sont souvent radicalement dissociés. Le citoyen communiste est plus engagé que citoyen. La citoyenneté était dépourvue de plusieurs de ses attributs : de la jouissance de la loi qui établit « l’égalité arithmétique » et minorise les maîtres ; de la citoyenneté active – civile et politique – pour ne jouir que la protection sociale ; de la participation au profit de l’appartenance. L’individu communiste était engagé, non pas parce qu’il l’avait choisi dans la liberté, mais parce qu’il n’avait pas la liberté de se désengager. L’article compare l’engagement communiste et postcommuniste en analysant le second au croisement de l’individualité et de la citoyenneté et en distinguant trois formes de désengagement – contestataire, « bonapartiste » et individualiste et trois formes d’engagement – mimétique, héroïque, civique.From the postcommunist individual to the citizenThe article analysis the paradox of the communist conception of the engaged citizen: at ideological level, citizenship and participation are closely linked; at political level, they are radically dissociated. The communist citizen is more engaged than citizen. The citizenship is deprived of several of its attributes: of the law which establishes "the arithmetic equality" and minimises the masters; of the active citizenship, civic and political, enjoying just the social one; of the participation for emphasizing on the belonging. The communist individual is engaged not because he has chosen freely to be such, but because he had not the freedom to disengage him/herself. The article compares the communist and the post communist participation analysing the latter at the intersection of individuality and citizenship and distinguishing three forms

  20. Althusser en Haïti. De Port-au-Prince au polder Marie-Anne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Anne Paveau

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cette contribution formule un témoignage personnel de Marie-Anne Paveau. L'auteure est intervenue à Port-au-Prince en 2006 auprès des étudiants de la Faculté de Linguistique appliquée, alors administrée par Pierre Vernet. Marie-Anne Paveau y présente notamment les éléments du cours qu'elle y a dispensé, illustrant de ce fait la collaboration conduite de 2005 à 2009 entre la Faculté et plusieurs universités de l'étranger.

  1. Les invitations au banquet d’un homme ordinaire au XXe siècle

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitz, Arlette

    2004-01-01

    Inscrite entre une cuisine ordinaire soumise au savoir faire ancestral et une cuisine savante faisant appel à l’invention des cuisiniers, la cuisine des banquets campagnards s’inspire largement des recettes bourgeoises. La centaine de cartes menus, rassemblés par un marchand de grains entre 1906 et 1970, ont été composés par des « traiteurs cuisiniers » de la région chinonaise et de Beuxes. L’homogénéité de la source offre l’avantage d’une analyse fine de la composition des repas en fonction ...

  2. Distributions of charged hadrons associated with high transverse momentum particles in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vandermolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2005-10-07

    Charged hadrons in [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] associated with particles of [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV. The associated multiplicity and p magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not much harder than that of inclusive hadrons. The results, consistent with jet quenching, suggest that the awayside fragments approach equilibration with the medium traversed.

  3. Comparison of the space-time extent of the emission source in $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Black, D; Blau, D S; Bok, J; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Hasegawa, S; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, E; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kihara, K; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, H -J; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kofarago, M; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, A J; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozaki, H; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, M; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; Whitaker, S; White, S N; Winter, D; Wolin, S; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xie, W; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-01-01

    Two-pion interferometry measurements in $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}=200$ GeV are used to extract and compare the Gaussian source radii R$_{{\\rm out}}$, R$_{{\\rm side}}$, and R$_{{\\rm long}}$, which characterize the space-time extent of the emission sources. The comparisons, which are performed as a function of collision centrality and the mean transverse momentum for pion pairs, indicate strikingly similar patterns for the $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au systems. They also indicate a linear dependence of R$_{{\\rm side}}$ on the initial transverse geometric size $\\bar{R}$, as well as a smaller freeze-out size for the $d$$+$Au system. These patterns point to the important role of final-state rescattering effects in the reaction dynamics of $d$$+$Au collisions.

  4. Ordered Au Nanodisk and Nanohole Arrays: Fabrication and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized nanosphere lithography (NSL) to fabricate ordered Au nanodisk and nanohole arrays on substrates and have studied the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the arrays. Through these investigations, we demonstrate that the angle- dependent behavior of the LSPR in the Au nanodisk arrays enables real-time observation of exciton-plasmon couplings. In addition, we show that the NSL-fabricated Au nanohole arrays can be applied as templates for patterning micro-/nanoparticles under capillary force. The unique structural and plasmonic characteristics of the Au nanodisk and nano- hole arrays, as well as the low-cost and high-throughput NSL-based nanofabrication technique, render these arrays excellent platforms for numerous engineering applications. © 2010 by ASME.

  5. Formation of Au/Pd Alloy Nanoparticles on TMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sun Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A gold-palladium (AuPd solid solution alloy was successfully deposited on the genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV1Cys by the biosorption of Au(III and Pd(II precursors and the reduction of the Au(III and Pd(II to their respective metals or metal alloy. The resulting morphologies of alloy nanoparticles deposited on the TMV1Cys were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and the AuPd alloy formation was supported with surface plasmon resonance (SPR and selected area electron diffraction (SAED. In addition, selected alloy nanoparticles on the TMV1Cys were analyzed further with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS to confirm the presence of gold and palladium. Our result implies that biotemplated metal mineralization is a potentially useful methodology to prepare alloy nanoparticles.

  6. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  7. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarathi Kundu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001 substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  8. Coexistence of multiple conformations in cysteamine monolayers on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Bilic, A; Reimers, JR

    2005-01-01

    The structural organization, catalytic function, and electronic properties of cysteamine monolayers on Au(111) have been addressed comprehensively by voltammetry, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in anaerobic environment, and a priori molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and STM image si...

  9. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the chargedinterfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits shortrange in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  10. EST Table: AU004617 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AU004617 ws20666 10/09/28 54 %/178 aa ref|XP_002430772.1| tyrosine-protein phosphatase corkscrew..., putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] gb|EEB18034.1| tyrosine-protein phosphatase corkscrew,

  11. Ethylene binding to Au/Cu alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammage, Michael D.; Stauffer, Shannon; Henkelman, Graeme; Becker, Michael F.; Keto, John W.; Kovar, Desiderio

    2016-11-01

    Weak chemisorption of ethylene has been shown to be an important characteristic in the use of metals for the separation of ethylene from ethane. Previously, density functional theory (DFT) has been used to predict the binding energies of various metals and alloys, with Ag having the lowest chemisorption energy amongst the metals and alloys studied. Here Au/Cu alloys are investigated by a combination of DFT calculations and experimental measurements. It is inferred from experiments that the binding energy between a Au/Cu alloy and ethylene is lower than to either of the pure metals, and DFT calculations confirm that this is the case when Au segregates to the particle surface. Implications of this work suggest that it may be possible to further tune the binding energy with ethylene by compositional and morphological control of films produced from Au-surface segregated alloys.

  12. Solvent: A Key in Digestive Ripening for Monodisperse Au Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Xuan; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Tieqiang; Li, Yunong; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Shuang; Zhou, Jun; Fu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work has mainly investigated the influence of the solvent on the nanoparticles distribution in digestive ripening. The experiments suggested that the solvents played a key role in digestive ripening of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). For the benzol solvents, the resulting size distribution of Au NPs was inversely related to the solvent polarity. It may be interpreted by the low Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles in the high polarity medium, which was supposedly in favor of reducing the nanoparticles distribution. Through digestive ripening in the highly polar benzol solvent of p-chlorotoluene, monodisperse Au NPs with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.8% were achieved. This indicated that digestive ripening was an effective and practical way to prepare high-quality nanoparticles, which holds great promise for the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  13. Production des centres historiques et action publique patrimoniale au Mexique

    OpenAIRE

    Melé, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Ce texte reprend les principales conclusions d'un ouvrage publié en français en 1998, Patrimoine et action publique au centre des villes mexicaines, et sous une forme actualisée et remaniée en espagnol en 2006, La producción del patrimonio urbano. Voir ces ouvrages pour une présentation précise des politiques de protection du patrimoine au Mexique

  14. Intrinsic spin Seebeck effect in Au/YIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, D; Huang, S Y; Hu, Jun; Wu, Ruqian; Chien, C L

    2013-02-08

    The acute magnetic proximity effects in Pt/YIG compromise the suitability of Pt as a spin current detector. We show that Au/YIG, with no anomalous Hall effect and a negligible magnetoresistance, allows the measurements of the intrinsic spin Seebeck effect with a magnitude much smaller than that in Pt/YIG. The experiment results are consistent with the spin polarized density functional calculations for Pt with a sizable and Au with a negligible magnetic moment near the interface with YIG.

  15. Wetting of Au and Ag particles on monocrystalline graphite substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joonho Lee; Toshihiro Tanaka; Kazufumi Seo; Nobumitsu Hirai; Jung-Goo Lee; Hirotaro Mori

    2006-01-01

    The wetting behavior of Au and Ag particles on a monocrystalline graphite substrate was investigated using the microscopic sessile drop method under a purified Ar atmosphere at 1300 K. The measured contact angles of the liquid Au and Ag on monocrystalline graphite substrates of (0001) face were 129° and 124°, respectively. It is believed that the interaction at the interface is dominated by the physical bonding (van der Waal's interaction).

  16. EST Table: AU002834 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ombyx mori Macula-like latent virus] 10/08/28 n.h 10/08/27 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h AU002754 n ... ...AU002834 n0548 10/09/28 99 %/247 aa dbj|BAD35017.1| RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [B

  17. EST Table: AU003057 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ombyx mori Macula-like latent virus] 10/08/28 n.h 10/08/27 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h AU002754 n ... ...AU003057 n0899 10/09/28 94 %/226 aa dbj|BAD35017.1| RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [B

  18. Außerirdische im amerikanischen Sciencefiction-Film

    OpenAIRE

    Eijk, Natalie van

    2003-01-01

    Die vorliegende Dissertation untersucht die Darstellung von außerirdischen Lebensformen im amerikanischen Sciencefiction-Film in Form eines filmhistorischen Gesamtüberblicks.Noch bevor der 1. Weltkrieg begann, waren die meisten Genremerkmale, die den Sciencefiction-Film bis heute charakterisieren, bereits erdacht. Die wenigen Sciencefiction-Filme, die Außerirdische zeigten, fügten sich jedoch sehr gut in den verspielten, märchenhaften Sciencefiction-Film der Vorkriegszeit. Bis sich das Topos ...

  19. Study on antibacterial activity of chemically synthesized PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomi, Pandi [Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Prabu, Halliah Gurumallesh, E-mail: hgprabu2010@gmail.com [Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Manisankar, Paramasivam [Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Ravikumar, Sundaram [Department of Oceanography and Coastal Area Studies, School of Marine Sciences, Alagappa University, Thondi Campus 623 409, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New method of synthesizing PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite. • Surface Plasmon resonance and formation of composite at nano level were analyzed. • HR-TEM study revealed uniform distribution of nanoparticles. • PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite exhibited good antibacterial activity. - Abstract: Pristine polyaniline (PANI), PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization method using aniline as monomer, ammonium persulphate as oxidant and metal (Ag, Au and Ag-Au) colloids. UV-Vis analysis exhibited surface Plasmon resonances of Ag, Au, Ag-Au nanoparticles. FT-IR spectra revealed the shift in peak position of N-H stretching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the presence of Ag, Au and Au-Ag nanoparticles. HR-TEM images show nanosizes of Ag, Au, Ag-Au and the incorporation of such nanoparticles into the PANI matrix. Pristine PANI, PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites were tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method. PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite exhibited higher antibacterial activity against both gram-positive [Streptococcus sp. (MTCC 890), Staphylococcus sp. (MTCC 96)] and gram-negative bacteria [Escherichia coli (MTCC 1671) and Klebsiella sp. (MTCC 7407)] when compared with PANI-Ag nanocomposite, PANI-Au nanocomposite and pristine PANI. The novelty of this study is the polymer-bimetal synthesis and its antibacterial potential.

  20. Alloying Au surface with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Kun

    2016-03-30

    © 2016. Various Au-Pd/SiO2 catalysts with a fixed Au loading but different Au:Pd molar ratios were prepared via deposition-precipitation method followed by H2 reduction. The structures were characterized and the catalytic activities in CO oxidation were evaluated. The formation of Au-Pd alloy particles was identified. The Au-Pd alloy particles exhibit enhanced dispersions on SiO2 than Au particles. Charge transfer from Pd to Au within Au-Pd alloy particles. Isolated Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with large Au:Pd molar ratios while contiguous Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with small Au:Pd molar ratios. Few synergetic effect of Au-Pd alloy occurs on catalyzing CO oxidation under employed reaction conditions. Alloying Au with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation, and contiguous Pd atoms on the Au-Pd alloy particles are capable of catalyzing CO oxidation while isolated Pd atoms are not. These results advance the fundamental understandings of Au-Pd alloy surfaces in catalyzing CO oxidation.

  1. Spin Polarization and Quantum Spins in Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsien Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on investigating the magnetic properties and the critical particle size for developing sizable spontaneous magnetic moment of bare Au nanoparticles. Seven sets of bare Au nanoparticle assemblies, with diameters from 3.5 to 17.5 nm, were fabricated with the gas condensation method. Line profiles of the X-ray diffraction peaks were used to determine the mean particle diameters and size distributions of the nanoparticle assemblies. The magnetization curves M(Ha reveal Langevin field profiles. Magnetic hysteresis was clearly revealed in the low field regime even at 300 K. Contributions to the magnetization from different size particles in the nanoparticle assemblies were considered when analyzing the M(Ha curves. The results show that the maximum particle moment will appear in 2.4 nm Au particles. A similar result of the maximum saturation magnetization appearing in 2.3 nm Au particles is also concluded through analysis of the dependency of the saturation magnetization MP on particle size. The MP(d curve departs significantly from the 1/d dependence, but can be described by a log-normal function. Magnetization can be barely detected for Au particles larger than 27 nm. Magnetic field induced Zeeman magnetization from the quantum confined Kubo gap opening appears in Au nanoparticles smaller than 9.5 nm in diameter.

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of liquid Al-Au alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H. L.; Voigtmann, Th.; Kolland, G.; Kobatake, H.; Brillo, J.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate temperature- and composition-dependent structural and dynamical properties of Al-Au melts. Experiments are performed to obtain accurate density and viscosity data. The system shows a strong negative excess volume, similar to other Al-based binary alloys. We develop a molecular-dynamics (MD) model of the melt based on the embedded-atom method (EAM), gauged against the available experimental liquid-state data. A rescaling of previous EAM potentials for solid-state Au and Al improves the quantitative agreement with experimental data in the melt. In the MD simulation, the admixture of Au to Al can be interpreted as causing a local compression of the less dense Al system, driven by less soft Au-Au interactions. This local compression provides a microscopic mechanism explaining the strong negative excess volume of the melt. We further discuss the concentration dependence of self- and interdiffusion and viscosity in the MD model. Al atoms are more mobile than Au, and their increased mobility is linked to a lower viscosity of the melt.

  3. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  4. Shape of collective flow in highly central Au(150 A MeV)+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, C. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Kuhn, C. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Coffin, J.P. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Crochet, P. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Fintz, P. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Guillaume, G. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Jundt, F. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Maazouzi, C. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Rami, F. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Tizniti, L. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Wagner, P. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Recherches Nucl.; Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Best, D.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Caplar, R.; Cindro, N.; Dona, R.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Fan, Z.G.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hoelbling, S.; Hong, B.; Jeong, S.C.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Legrand, I.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Moisa, D.; Moesner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pras, P.; Reisdorf, W.; Ritman, J.L.; Sadchikov, A.G.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, V.; Sodan, U.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wang, G.S.; Wessels, J.P.; Wienold, T.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.; Konopka, J.; Stoecker, H.

    1997-06-01

    Using the FOPI facility at GSI, charged particles (1{<=}Z{<=}6) produced in the Au(150 A MeV)+Au reaction have been measured at laboratory angles 1.2{sup 0}<{Theta}{sub lab}<30{sup 0}. Highly central collisions have been selected with two criteria, both dealing with the longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom of the reaction. The relevance of this selection method is supported by QMD calculations which indicate that such criteria are able to select mean impact parameters less than 2 fm. Bias effects introduced by the criteria have been evaluated. The centre-of-mass polar angle distributions of low energy clusters emitted in these central collisions, have been extracted: the intensity ratio deduced for a transverse to longitudinal emission is found to be R=1.4{sup +0.2}{sub -0.4}. Model comparisons using QMD are presented. The value of R appears to depend sensitively on the nucleon-nucleon cross section, {sigma}{sub nn}. Within this model, a value of {sigma}{sub nn}=25{+-}5 mb is derived. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  5. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  6. A first look at Au + Au collisions at RHIC energies using the PHOBOS detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Birger Back; M D Baker; D S Barton; R R Betts; R Bindel; A Budzanowski; W Busza; A Carroll; J Corbo; M P Decowski; E Garcia; N George; K Gulbrandsen; S Gushue; C Halliwell; J Hamblen; G A Heintzelman; C Henderson; D Hicks; D J Hofman; R Hollis; R Holyńiski; B Holzman; A Iordanova; E Johnson; J L Kane; J Katzy; N Khan; W Kucewicz; P Kulinich; C M Kuo; W T Lin; S Manly; D McLeod; J Michalowski; A C Mignerey; J Mülmenstädt; R Nouicer; A Olszewski; R Pak; I C Park; H Pernegger; M Rafelski; M Rbeiz; C Reed; L P Remsberg; M Reuter; C Roland; G Roland; L Rosenberg; J Sagerer; P Sarin; P Sawicki; W Skulski; S G Steadman; P Steinberg; G S F Stephans; M Stodulski; A Sukhanov; J-L Tang; R Teng; A Trzupek; C Vale; G J van Nieuwenhuizen; R Verdier; B Wadsworth; F L H Wolfs; B Wosiek; K Woźniak; A H Wuosmaa; B Wyslouch

    2003-05-01

    The PHOBOS detector has been used to study Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=56$, 130, and 200 GeV. Several global observables have been measured and the results are compared with theoretical models. These observables include the charged-particle multiplicity measured as a function of beam energy, pseudo-rapidity, and centrality of the collision. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its almost complete angular coverage such that these quantities can be studied over a pseudo-rapidity interval of ||≤ 5.4. This allows for an almost complete integration of the total charged particle yield, which is found to be about $N^{\\text{tot}}_{\\text{ch}}=4500± 470$ at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=130$ GeV and $N^{\\text{tot}}_{\\text{ch}}=5300± 530$ at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$ GeV. The ratio of anti-particles to particles emitted in the mid-rapidity region has also been measured using the PHOBOS magnetic spectrometer. Of particular interest is the ratio of anti-protons to protons in the mid-rapidity region, which was found to be $\\overline{p}/p= 0.6± 0.04$(stat) ± 0.06(syst) at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=130$ GeV. This high value suggests that an almost baryon-free region has been produced in the collisions.

  7. Entropy in central Au+Au reactions between 100 and 400{ital A} MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzelalija, M.; Cindro, N.; Basrak, Z.; Caplar, R.; Hoelbling, S.; Bini, M.; Maurenzig, P.R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Taccetti, N.; Cerruti, C.; Coffin, J.P.; Dona, R.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Rami, F.; Tezkratt, R.; Wagner, P.; Biegansky, J.; Kotte, R.; Moesner, J.; Neubert, W.; Wohlfarth, D.; Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V.; Bastid, N.; Berger, L.; Belayev, I.; Boussange, S.; Buta, A.; Dupieux, P.; Eroe, J.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kraemer, M.; Lebedev, A.; Legrand, I.; Manko, V.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Moisa, D.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pras, P.; Ramillien, V.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Sodan, U.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M.A.; Wessels, J.P.; Wienold, T.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Zhilin, A.V. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)]|[Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary)]|[Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Clermont-Ferrand (France)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[I.N.F.N. and University of Florence, Florence (Italy)]|[Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Kurchatov Institute for Atomic Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Forschungzentrum, Rossendorf (Germany)]|[Department of Physics, University of Split, Split (Croatia)]|[Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)]|[Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1995-07-01

    The ratio of the total charge bound in fragments with {ital Z} between 2 and 15 to the hydrogen yield, ({ital tsum}{sub 2}{sup 15}{ital M}{sub {ital i}{ital Z}{ital i}})/{ital M}{sub {ital H}}, has been measured, and the neutron-to-proton ratio {ital n}/{ital p} has been estimated from the data of central Au + Au reactions between 100 and 400{ital A} MeV, measured with the phase I setup of the detector system FOPI and GSI, Darmstadt, in the polar-angle range between 7{degree} and 30{degree}. These two quantities were used to determine the entropy per nucleon {ital S}/{ital A} by comparing them with the predictions of the FREESCO code. The analysis allows the simulataneous extraction of the values of the baryonic entropy, temperature, and collective flow. The extracted values are in good agreement with the values obtained in earlier FOPI studies, and, for the baryonic entropy, with recent hydrodynamic calculations.

  8. Dielectron production in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belmont, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dairaku, S; Danley, D; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamilton, H F; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hollis, R S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Issah, M; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Král, A; Krizek, F; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Lewis, B; Li, X; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Masumoto, S; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Okada, K; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, M; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tsuji, T; Vale, C; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; White, A S; White, S N; Winter, D; Wolin, S; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J H; Yoon, I; You, Z; Younus, I; Yu, H; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S; Zou, L

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of $e^+e^-$ production at midrapidity in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV. The invariant yield is studied within the PHENIX detector acceptance over a wide range of mass ($m_{ee} <$ 5 GeV/$c^2$) and pair transverse momentum ($p_T$ $<$ 5 GeV/$c$), for minimum bias and for five centrality classes. The \\ee yield is compared to the expectations from known sources. In the low-mass region ($m_{ee}=0.30$--0.76 GeV/$c^2$) there is an enhancement that increases with centrality and is distributed over the entire pair \\pt range measured. It is significantly smaller than previously reported by the PHENIX experiment and amounts to $2.3\\pm0.4({\\rm stat})\\pm0.4({\\rm syst})\\pm0.2^{\\rm model}$ or to $1.7\\pm0.3({\\rm stat})\\pm0.3({\\rm syst})\\pm0.2^{\\rm model}$ for minimum bias collisions when the open-heavy-flavor contribution is calculated with {\\sc pythia} or {\\sc mc@nlo}, respectively. The inclusive mass and $p_T$ distributions as well as the centrality dependence are well repr...

  9. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  10. Rapidity dependency of (Anti)-deuteron Coalescence in Au-Au collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The coalescence of protons and neutrons into deuterons is sensitive to the space-time extent of the baryon freeze-out region. The coalescence parameter and the phase space density recast the information contained in the proton and deuteron spectra into ``chemical" and ``dynamic" terms. The phase space density is sensitive to the chemical potential and the temperature of the system. The coalescence parameter B2 can be interpreted in terms of a ``volume of homogeniety" which depends upon the temperature of the system and the radial flow. The large rapidity and pT coverage with good particle identification of the BRAHMS spectrometers allow us to measure the rapidity dependence of the volume, which is proportional to 1/B2, and the phase space density of the (anti)-proton source for central Au+Au collisions. We find that B2(pT) is almost independent of rapidity and beam energy. Interpreting 1/B2 as a volume gives numbers that are very close to HBT data and a size which steadily drops with pT. We find that B2(pT) is the same for protons and antiprotons. The phase space density has a weak rapidity dependence but varies rapidily with energy. These results in conjunction with other forward rapidity data start to give us a picture of the longitudinal evolution of the source at RHIC energies. Supported by NSF CAREER award 0449913

  11. Thermal photon production in Au + Au collisions: Viscous corrections in two different hydrodynamic formalisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta-Ramos, J., E-mail: jperalta@ift.unesp.b [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Doutor Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nakwacki, M.S., E-mail: sole@iafe.uba.a [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-02-01

    We calculate the spectra of produced thermal photons in Au + Au collisions taking into account the nonequilibrium contribution to photon production due to finite shear viscosity. The evolution of the fireball is modeled by second-order as well as by divergence-type 2+1 dissipative hydrodynamics, both with an ideal equation of state and with one based on Lattice QCD that includes an analytical crossover. The spectrum calculated in the divergence-type theory is considerably enhanced with respect to the one calculated in the second-order theory, the difference being entirely due to differences in the viscous corrections to photon production. Our results show that the differences in hydrodynamic formalisms are an important source of uncertainty in the extraction of the value of {eta}/s from measured photon spectra. The uncertainty in the value of {eta}/s associated with different hydrodynamic models used to compute thermal photon spectra is larger than the one occurring in matching hadron elliptic flow to RHIC data.

  12. Interplay of correlations and fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kopytine, M L

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic fluctuations in the local density of non-identified hadron tracks reconstructed in the STAR TPC are studied using the discrete wavelet transform power spectrum technique which involves mixed event reference sample comparison. The two-dimensional event-by-event analysis is performed in pseudo-rapidity (eta) and azimuthal angle (phi). HIJING simulations indicate that jets and mini-jets result in signals, visible without high pT selection, when the dynamic texture analysis is applied. Scanning a broad range of event multiplicities, we study the dependence of the signals on the initial conditions. Event structures are studied separately with positive and negative tracks, as well as both charges. A change of regime is observed in AuAu collisions at sqrt(S_NN}=130 GeV as event multiplicity is increased: a long range eta correlation (or suppressed fluctuation vis-a-vis mixed events) is seen in same charge data. This effect is qualitatively similar to one of the predicted manifestations of the Color Glass Con...

  13. Thermal Description of Particle Production in Au-Au Collisions at STAR Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2013-01-01

    The hadron ratios measured in central Au-Au collisions are analysed by means of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model over a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies ranging from 7.7 to 200 GeV as offered by the STAR Beam Energy Scan I (BES-I). We restrict the discussion on STAR BES-I, because of large statistics and over all homogeneity of STAR measurements (one detector) against previous experiments. Over the last three decades, various heavy-ion experiments utilizing different detectors (different certainties) have been carried out. Regularities in produced particles at different energies haven been studied. The temperature and baryon chemical potential are deduced from fits of experimental ratios to thermal model calculations assuming chemical equilibrium. We find that the resulting freeze-out parameters using single hard-core value and point-like constituents of HRG are identical. This implies that the excluded-volume comes up with no effect on the extracted parameters. We compare the results wit...

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Bairathi, V; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, W; Li, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, R; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, X; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, $v_2\\{2\\}$ and $v_2\\{4\\}$, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the amount of energy deposited by spectators in the STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of $v_2\\{2\\}$ on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. An initial-state model with gluon saturation describes the slope of $v_2\\{2\\}$ as a function of multiplicity in central collisions better than one based on Glauber with a two-component multiplicity model.

  15. Controlled building of CdSe@ZnS/Au and CdSe@ZnS/ Au2S/Au nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel E. Galian[1; Pilar Diaz[1; Antonio Ribera[1; Alejandro Rincon-Bertolin[1; Said Agouram[2; Julia Perez-Prieto[1

    2015-01-01

    The addition of Au3. to spherical amine-capped CdSe@ZnS nanoparticles in toluene at room temperature and under darkness can lead to ternary CdSe@ZnS/Au nanohybrids. We demonstrate that this happens only when the nanoparticles possess a relatively thin ZnS shell, thus showing that thickness plays a key role in gold deposition on the CdSe@ZnS nanoparticle surface. Our hypothesis is that the amine ligand acts as the reductant of Au3+ ions into Au+ ions, whose affinity for sulfur would keep them at the CdSe@ZnS surface. This interaction stabilizes the Au+ ion, making it less prone to reduction than a non-coordinated Au+ ion. In CdSe@ZnS with a thin shell, Au+ ions at the surface of, or most probably within, the ZnS shell cause the transfer of Cd2+ ions into the solution. Subsequently, the core Se2- anion, which is a better reductant than the shell S2- reduces Au+ ions to Au(0), and large gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are quickly deposited on the CdSe@ZnS surface in room temperature process, leading to ternary CdSe@ZnS/Au nanohybrids. In solution, these ternary nanohybrids progressively transform into quaternary CdSe@ZnS/Au2S/Au nanohybrids due to the reaction of the shell S2- anion with the remaining Au+ at the CdSe@ZnS surface, thus leading to the growth of Au2S nanoparticles on the CdSe@ZnS surface while Zn concomitantly leaches from the nanohybrid into the solution. Photoirradiation of the heterostructures with visible light enhances their emission efficiency. Comparatively, irradiation of the precursors, i.e., CdSe@ZnS nanoparticles, causes a drastic decrease in their emission accompanied by a blue shift of their emission maximum. The optical properties of these nanohybrids were analyzed by absorption and fluorescence (steady-state and time-resolved) spectroscopy, and the composition of the samples and the chemical states were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  16. The use of bimetallic Au(Cu)-coated microelectrodes for improved detection of cystine

    OpenAIRE

    Papadimitriou, Sofia; Mintsouli, Ioanna; Kokkinidis, Georgios; Sotiropoulos, Sotiris

    2011-01-01

    Au shell – (Au-Cu) core coatings on carbon microdisc electrodes (30 m diameter) have been prepared by a two-step technique whereby Cu particles electrodeposited onto carbon supports(first step) had their surface layers replaced by Au (second step). The latter has been achieved by means of spontaneous partial replacement of the non-precious metal deposits of Cu by Au upon their immersion in the chlorolaurate-based solution: 3 Cu/C + 2 AuCl4 2 Au (Cu)/C + 3 Cu2+ + 8 Cl . The Au-Cu coated ...

  17. Maximization of surface-enhanced transversal magneto-optic Kerr effect in Au/Co/Au thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Herreño-Fierro, César Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    In order to maximize the transversal magneto-optic Kerr effect (T-MOKE) of a Au/Co/Au structure, we propose a method to obtain the optimum thickness values. A criteria based on preserving good plasmonic properties has been included as part of this method. Using the theoretical prediction, we grew Au/Co/Au trilayers and perform optical andMO characterization using the Kretschmann configuration. The results admit very easy interpretation in terms of the interaction between the magneto-optical and plasmonic properties dictating the optimal thicknesses of the structure. Moreover, we have grown and characterized the optimized structure finding good agreement with theory reaching, for a 532nm green laser, amaximal surface magneto-optic (MO) signal enhancement of close to nine folds with respect to the signal without plasmonic excitation.

  18. Structure and Mobility of Metal Clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd Clusters in MOF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Walton, Krista S.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-01-01

    functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au8, Pd8, and Au4Pd4 we find that the organic part of the MOF......Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal–organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density...... is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster’s...

  19. Centrality Dependence of Direct Photons in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Fries, R J; Srivastava, D K

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the spectra of high energy photons emitted in relativistic Au+Au collisions for various centralities and compare to data recently collected at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider by the PHENIX collaboration. Our results for photons from primary hard scatterings and photons from interactions of jets with the medium are consistent with the measurements of neutral pion and direct photon production in p+p collisions and give a good description of direct photon spectra measured in Au+Au collisions. The contribution of photons from jet-to-photon conversion in the medium can be as large as the photon yield from hard scatterings in the momentum range p_T = 2...6 GeV/c. We show that this novel mechanism is not ruled out by any existing data.

  20. Synthesis of Au/C and Au/Pani for anode electrodes in glucose microfluidic fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra-Balcazar, M.; Morales-Acosta, D.; Castaneda, F.; Arriaga, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, 76703 Queretaro (Mexico); Ledesma-Garcia, J. [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, 76010 Queretaro (Mexico)

    2010-06-15

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared by two methods: chemical (ex-situ, Au/C) by two phase protocol, and electrochemical (in-situ, Au/Pani) by electroreduction of gold ions on a polyaniline film and compared as anode catalysts in a glucose microfluidic fuel cell. In this paper the structural characteristics and electrocatalytic properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction and electrochemical measurements. The catalytic behavior of both anodes was tested in a microfluidic fuel cell with a reference electrode incorporated, by means of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), showing a cathodic shift in the glucose oxidation peak for Au/Pani. Results show a higher power density (0.5 mW cm{sup -} {sup 2}) for Au/C anode compared with an already reported value, where a glucose microfluidic fuel cell was used in similar conditions. (author)

  1. An ultrafast look at Au nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Sung Hei; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2013-07-16

    In the past 20 years, researchers studying nanomaterials have uncovered many new and interesting properties not found in bulk materials. Extensive research has focused on metal nanoparticles (>3 nm) because of their potential applications, such as in molecular electronics, image markers, and catalysts. In particular, the discovery of metal nanoclusters (properties for nanomaterials are intriguing, because for metal nanosystems in this size regime both size and shape determine electronic properties. Remarkably, changes in the optical properties of nanomaterials have provided tremendous insight into the electronic structure of nanoclusters. The success of synthesizing monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) in the condensed phase has allowed scientists to probe the metal core directly. Au MPCs have become the "gold" standard in nanocluster science, thanks to the rigorous structural characterization already accomplished. The use of ultrafast laser spectroscopy on MPCs in solution provides the benefit of directly studying the chemical dynamics of metal nanoclusters (core), and their nonlinear optical properties. In this Account, we investigate the optical properties of MPCs in the visible region using ultrafast spectroscopy. Based on fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we propose an emission mechanism for these nanoclusters. These clusters behave differently from nanoparticles in terms of emission lifetimes as well as two-photon cross sections. Through further investigation of the transient (excited state) absorption, we have found many unique phenomena of nanoclusters, such as quantum confinement effects and vibrational breathing modes. In summary, based on the differences in the optical properties, the distinction between nanoclusters and nanoparticles appears at a size near 2.2 nm. This is consistent with simulations from a free-electron model proposed for MPCs. The use of ultrafast techniques on these nanoclusters can answer many of the fundamental questions about

  2. Measurement of inclusive antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; de Toledo, A S; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-12-24

    We report the first measurement of inclusive antiproton production at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The antiproton transverse mass distributions in the measured transverse momentum range of 0.25

  3. Strangeness in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV observed with the STAR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnby, Lee S.; STAR Collaboration; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Curto, G. Lo; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lynn, D.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, M. L.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Mitchell, J.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Radomski, S.; Rai, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schüttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; umbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Thomas, J. H.; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, J. W.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zborovský, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2002-07-01

    The STAR detector has made a variety of measurements of strange and other hadronic species in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV. A comparison of kaon and pion production enables an examination of the systematics of strangeness production with energy by comparing them to lower energy collisions. Anti-baryon to baryon ratios indicate a much reduced net-baryon density and transverse momentum spectra show that a picture of transverse expansion seems appropriate.

  4. Proton and pion production in Au+Au collisions at 10.8A GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette, J. [McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 2T8 (Canada); Bellwied, R. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Bennett, S. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Bersch, R. [SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Braun-Munzinger, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt, (Germany); Chang, W. C. [SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Cleland, W. E. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Clemen, M. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Cole, J. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 (United States); Cormier, T. M. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-08-01

    We present proton and pion tranverse momentum spectra and rapidity distributions for Au+Au collisions at 10.8A GeV/c. The proton spectra exhibit collective transverse flow effects. Evidence of the influence of the Coulomb interaction from the fireball is found in the pion transverse momentum spectra. The data are compared with the predictions of the RQMD event generator. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Elliptic flow of identified hadrons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN =200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2003-10-31

    The anisotropy parameter (v(2)), the second harmonic of the azimuthal particle distribution, has been measured with the PHENIX detector in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV for identified and inclusive charged particle production at central rapidities (|eta|2 GeV/c, in marked contrast to the predictions of a hydrodynamical model. A quark-coalescence model is also investigated.

  6. NUCLEAR AND HEAVY ION PHYSICS: Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeng-Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Jin

    2009-04-01

    Using the Glauber model, we present the formulas for calculating the numbers of participants, spectators and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. Based on this work, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles as the function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations made by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at GeV in different centrality bins over the whole pseudorapidity range.

  7. Production and collective behavior of strange particles in Au + Au collisions at 2-8 AGeV

    CERN Document Server

    Pinkenburg, C H; Alexander, J M; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K M; Das, A C; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Klay, J L; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Law, C; Lauret, J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R L; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L S; Srivastava, B; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Whitfield, J; Witt, R; Wood, L; Zhang Wei Ning

    2002-01-01

    The E895 experiment at the AGS measured strange particle production and collective behavior in Au+Au collisions between 2--8 AGeV. The production of $\\Lambda$ Baryons and K$^0$ Mesons as function of energy rises smoothly and exhibits a nonlinear impact parameter dependence. Neutral and positively charged Kaons exhibit a strong anti-flow behavior. $\\Lambda$ Baryons show a smaller flow signal than protons.

  8. Amperometric Immunosensor for Carbofuran Detection Based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-Antibody Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyou Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3. The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication.

  9. Amperometric immunosensor for carbofuran detection based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-antibody conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Cao, Yaoyao; Sun, Xia; Wang, Xiangyou

    2013-04-19

    In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au) nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE) via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab) and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3). The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication.

  10. Effect of Au Content on Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of Au-Cu-Ag-Si Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H.; Zhang, W.; Chen, M. W.; Saotome, Y.; Fukuhara, M.; Inoue, A.

    2011-06-01

    The thermal stability, glass-forming ability (GFA), and mechanical and electrical properties of Au-based Au x Si17Cu75.5- x Ag7.5 ( x = 40 to 75.5 at. pct) metallic glasses were investigated. The glass transition temperature ( T g ) and crystallization temperature ( T x ) decreased with increasing Au content. The ultralow T g values below 373 K (100 °C) were obtained for alloys with x = 55 to 75.5. The alloys with x = 45 to 70 exhibited a high stabilization of supercooled liquid and a high GFA, and the supercooled liquid region and critical sample diameter for glass formation were in the range of 31 K to 50 K and 2 to 5 mm, respectively. The compressive fracture strength ( σ c,f ), Young's modulus ( E), and Vicker's hardness ( H v ) of the bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) decreased with increasing Au content. A linear correlation between Au concentration and the characteristic temperature, i.e., T g and T x , and mechanical properties, i.e., σ c,f , E, and H v , as well as electrical resistivity can be found in the BMGs, which will be helpful for the composition design of the desirable Au-based BMGs with tunable physical properties.

  11. Quantitative Interpretation of the Low-Bias Conductance of Au-Mesitylene-Au Molecular Junctions Formed from Mesitylene Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Yongfeng; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2016-07-18

    The atomic structure and electronic transport properties of Au-mesitylene-Au molecular junctions formed from a mesitylene monolayer without any anchoring groups are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The intermolecular and adsorbate-substrate interactions are described by the non-local optB88 van der Waals functional. Two types of Au-mesitylene-Au molecular junctions are constructed, in which either an isolated mesitylene molecule or a mesitylene molecule embedded into a monolayer lying flat on one electrode surface is in contact with an atomic protrusion of the other electrode surface. The calculated low-bias conductance values of these two junctions are both in quantitative agreement with the reported experimental values [S. Afsari, Z. Li, and E. Borguet, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 9771; Angew. Chem. 2014, 126, 9929]. This indicates that the measured conductance is intrinsic at the single-molecule Au-mesitylene-Au junction and that the intermolecular interactions in the mesitylene monolayer have little effect.

  12. Disappearance of back-to-back high p {sub T} hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li (Wayne State U.), Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; et al.

    2002-10-25

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudo-rapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at = {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes already observed in elementary collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au + Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  13. Disappearance of back-to-back high-pT hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN ] =200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-02-28

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudorapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes previously observed in high-energy collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au+Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  14. Jet-Hadron Correlations in sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai,; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks,; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan,; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased towards jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum ($p_{T}^{assoc}$) and enhanced at low $p_{T}^{assoc}$ in Au+Au collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Jet-hadron correlations in √[s(NN)]=200  GeV p+p and central Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-03-28

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √[s(NN)]=200  GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au+Au collisions compared to p+p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Formation of one-dimensional Ag-Au solid solution colloids with Au nanorods as seeds, their alloying mechanisms, and surface plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao; Tan, Yiwei

    2012-12-01

    In this work, one dimensional (1D) Ag-Au solid solution nanoalloys were synthesized by rapidly diffusing Ag into the preformed Au nanorod (AuNR) seeds at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. By varying the molar ratio of AgCl/AuNR (in gold atoms), two kinds of 1D Ag-Au alloy nanostructures with a narrow size distribution--AgAu nanowires and Ag33Au67 nanorods--could be obtained in high yields when NaCl and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used as an additive and capping reagent, respectively. Based on HRTEM imaging combined with a series of control experiments, it is conceivable that vacancy/defect-motivated interdiffusion of Ag and Au atoms coupled with oxidative etching is a crucial stage in the mechanism responsible for this room-temperature alloying process, and the subsequent conjugation of the fused Ag-Au alloyed nanostructures is associated with the formation of the AgAu nanowires. The resulting 1D Ag-Au nanoalloys form stable colloidal dispersions and show unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks in the ensemble extinction spectra.In this work, one dimensional (1D) Ag-Au solid solution nanoalloys were synthesized by rapidly diffusing Ag into the preformed Au nanorod (AuNR) seeds at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. By varying the molar ratio of AgCl/AuNR (in gold atoms), two kinds of 1D Ag-Au alloy nanostructures with a narrow size distribution--AgAu nanowires and Ag33Au67 nanorods--could be obtained in high yields when NaCl and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used as an additive and capping reagent, respectively. Based on HRTEM imaging combined with a series of control experiments, it is conceivable that vacancy/defect-motivated interdiffusion of Ag and Au atoms coupled with oxidative etching is a crucial stage in the mechanism responsible for this room-temperature alloying process, and the subsequent conjugation of the fused Ag-Au alloyed nanostructures is associated with the formation of the AgAu nanowires. The resulting 1D Ag-Au

  17. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-19

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  18. Au-Ag合金真空蒸馏分离的理论探讨%Theoretical study on separation of Au-Ag alloy with vacuum distilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国元; 刘大春

    2005-01-01

    文中比较了Au-Ag 合金中Au、Ag在不同温度下的蒸气压及其蒸气压比值,用分离系数讨论了Au-Ag合金组分真空分离的可能性,并通过计算Au-Ag气液相平衡成分,分析了适合进行真空蒸馏分离的Au-Ag合金成分.

  19. Transverse-energy distributions at midrapidity in $p$$+$$p$, $d$$+$Au, and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=62.4$--200~GeV and implications for particle-production models

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R.; T.C. Awes; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the midrapidity transverse energy distribution, $d\\Et/d\\eta$, are presented for $p$$+$$p$, $d$$+$Au, and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV and additionally for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=62.4$ and 130 GeV. The $d\\Et/d\\eta$ distributions are first compared with the number of nucleon participants $N_{\\rm part}$, number of binary collisions $N_{\\rm coll}$, and number of constituent-quark participants $N_{qp}$ calculated from a Glauber model based on th...

  20. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  1. Au rendez-vous allemand (2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Bouvier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La parution en 1857 des Études d’histoire religieuse d’Ernest Renan marque l’entrée en France des conceptions allemandes du mythe appliquées à l’histoire des textes sacrés. Or, cette date est aussi celle de la rencontre intellectuelle entre Renan et Flaubert, rencontre qui se matérialisera deux ans plus tard : au moment où Flaubert entreprend Salammbô, il accède aux travaux philologiques de la « nouvelle école » représentée en France par Renan. La supériorité de l’école allemande tient essentiellement selon Renan à sa capacité de penser le mythe comme un tout « indivis » irréductible à toute interprétation univoque : en dépit de certaines outrances des « rationalistes » et des « mythologues », dont il distingue nettement les deux types d’approche, Renan envisage l’exégèse allemande comme un progrès dont il montre les étapes et qu’il se propose d’achever en développant ce qu’il appelle une critique « sympathique ». Davantage qu’une méthode, il définit une posture critique d’adhésion à l’objet que Flaubert pourra mettre en oeuvre dans son roman.The publication in 1857 of Ernest Renan’s Études d’histoire religieuse signals the introduction in France of German ideas about myths applied to the history of religious texts. Now this date is also that of the intellectual encounter between Renan and Flaubert. Their actual meeting came about two years later. Indeed, while Flaubert was starting Salammbô, he discovered the philological studies of the “New School” represented in France by Renan. According to Renan the superiority of the German School was due to its capacity to comprehend the myth as an undivided whole irreducible to a univocal interpretation. Thus, despite the excesses of the “rationalists” and “mythologs”, whose methods he clearly distinguished, Renan considered the German exegesis a progress. He outlined its stages which he sought to complete by

  2. Au3+/Au0 Supported on Chromium(III Terephthalate Metal Organic Framework (MIL-101 as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalystfor Three-Component Coupling Synthesis of Propargylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-synthesis modification is a useful method for the functionalization of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs. A novel catalyst Au@MIL-101-ED-SA (ED = ethylenediamine, SA = salicylaldehyde, containing coexisting Au3+ ions and Au0 nanoparticles, was prepared successfully by post-synthesis modification with ethylenediamine, salicylaldehyde and gold. Gold nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 (Au@MIL-101 were prepared successfully by the impregnation method. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were applied as environmentally friendly catalysts in the three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, amines, and alkynes for the preparation of diverse propargylamines. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA contained a fraction of cationic gold (Au3+/Au0 = 0.9 and showed higher catalytic activity than Au@MIL-101, which was prepared by the impregnation method. Furthermore, the reactions were performed under heterogeneous conditions and the novel catalyst was successfully recycled for four consecutive runs.

  3. A simple electrochemical biosensor based on AuNPs/MPS/Au electrode sensing layer for monitoring carbamate pesticides in real samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yonghai; Chen, Jingyi; Sun, Min; Gong, Coucong; Shen, Yuan; Song, Yonggui; Wang, Li

    2016-03-01

    A simple electrochemical biosensor for quantitative determination of carbamate pesticide was developed based on a sensing interface of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)/(3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (MPS)/gold electrode (Au). The biosensor was fabricated by firstly assembling three-dimensional (3D) MPS networks on Au electrode and subsequently assembling citrate-capped AuNPs on 3D MPS network via AuS bond. The interface of AuNPs/MPS/Au was negatively charged originating from the citrate coated on AuNPs that would repulse the negatively charged ferricyanide ([Fe(CN)6](3-/4-)) to produce a negative response. In the presence of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and acetylthiocholine (ATCl), the AChE catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATCl into positively charged thiocholine which would replace the citrate on AuNPs through the strong AuS bond and convert the negative charged surface to be positively charged. The resulted positively charged AuNPs/MPS/Au then attracted the [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) to produce a positive response. Based on the inhibition of carbamate pesticides on the activity of AChE, the pesticide could be quantitatively determined at a very low potential. The linear range was from 0.003 to 2.00 μM. The sensing platform was also proved to be suitable for carbamate pesticides detection in practical sample.

  4. Transverse Momentum Spectra in Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at $sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV and the Pseudorapidity Dependence of High p$_T$ Suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, I; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Hansen, O; Holm, A; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Lystad, G; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; McBreen, B; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Norris, J; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2003-01-01

    We present spectra of charged hadrons from Au+Au and d+Au collisions at $sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV measured with the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC. The spectra for different collision centralities are compared to spectra from ${rm p}+bar{{rm p}}$ collisions at the same energy scaled by the number of binary collisions. The resulting ratios (nuclear modification factors) for central Au+Au collisions at $eta=0$ and $eta=2.2$ evidence a strong suppression in the high $p_{T}$ region ($>$2 GeV/c). In contrast, the d+Au nuclear modification factor (at $eta=0$) exhibits an enhancement of the high $p_T$ yields. These measurements indicate a high energy loss of the high $p_T$ particles in the medium created in the central Au+Au collisions. The lack of suppression in d+Au collisions makes it unlikely that initial state effects can explain the suppression in the central Au+Au collisions.

  5. Optical and electrical properties of colloidal (spherical Au)-(spinel ferrite nanorod) heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Chandramohan; Genovese, Alessandro; Qiao, Fen; Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; Comin, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Marras, Sergio; Roig, Anna; Zhang, Yang; Krahne, Roman; Manna, Liberato

    2011-11-01

    We report here a simple synthetic route to Au-FexOy heterostructures in which spinel ferrite (FexOy) grows as a nanorod on a spherical gold (Au) seed. The large red shift in the plasmon resonance in the heterostructures could be explained by a dielectric effect (although we could not entirely exclude a contribution due to electron transfer from Au to defect states at the Au-FexOy interface), while the magnetic properties of the Au-FexOy heterostructures were basically the same as those of the corresponding nanocrystals after Au leaching. In films of Au-FexOy heterostructures the electrical conductivity appeared to be mediated by the Au domains.We report here a simple synthetic route to Au-FexOy heterostructures in which spinel ferrite (FexOy) grows as a nanorod on a spherical gold (Au) seed. The large red shift in the plasmon resonance in the heterostructures could be explained by a dielectric effect (although we could not entirely exclude a contribution due to electron transfer from Au to defect states at the Au-FexOy interface), while the magnetic properties of the Au-FexOy heterostructures were basically the same as those of the corresponding nanocrystals after Au leaching. In films of Au-FexOy heterostructures the electrical conductivity appeared to be mediated by the Au domains. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM/HRTEM images of (i) aliquots at the earliest stages of the growth of Au-FexOy HSs; (ii) Au-FexOy HSs synthesized at low DDAB concentrations; (iii) spherical iron oxide nanocrystals synthesized under the same conditions as the HSs, but in the absence of Au seeds; (iv) Au-FexOy urchin like nanostructures, also after attempts to leach out Au; (v) Au-FexOy HSs after treatment with hydrazine; (vi) FexOy HSs after Au leaching from Au-FexOy HSs; additional optical absorption spectra; additional I-V curves, also from films made of Au-FexOy dumbbells; and additional SEM images; vii) X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of a sample of Au

  6. DU TABLEAU DE BORD AU PILOTAGE : L'ENTREPRISE AU RISQUE DE SE PERDRE

    OpenAIRE

    Bessire, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Co-écrit avec le C.R.I. : Le C.R.I. (Collectif de Recherche sur l'Immatériel) est un groupe informel de recherche qui réunit des universitaires (J. Meunier et D. Bessire, Université de Paris I-Panthéon-Sorbonne ; F. Gautier, Université de Paris X-Nanterre) et des consultants (G. Nifle, Vocations ; R. Nifle, Institut Cohérences ; B. Noir, conseil en qualité). Le présent article s'appuie sur les réflexions menées au sein de ce groupe, prolongées et mises en forme par D. Bessire. La rédaction fi...

  7. Structure investigation of organic molecules on Au(111) surfaces; Strukturuntersuchung organischer Molekuele auf Au(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazempoor, Michel

    2009-02-02

    The present work covers two topics namely the coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) and the structure of biphenylalkanthiole SAMs on Au(111) surfaces. The coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) surfaces has been investigated by means of vibrational and photoelectron spectroscopy (HREELS, XPS). Formic acid adsorbs at 90 K molecularly with vibrational modes characteristic for flat lying zig-zag chains in the mono- and multilayer regime, like in solid formic acid. The structure of the flat lying formic acid chains was determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as a (2r3 x r19) unit cell. Annealing results in a complete desorption at 190 K. Sequential adsorption of formic acid and water at 90 K shows no significant chemical interaction. Upon annealing the coadsorbed layer to 140 K a hydrogenbonded cyclic complex of formic acid with one water molecule could be identified using isotopically labelled adsorbates. Upon further annealing this complex decomposes leaving molecularly adsorbed formic acid on the surface at 160 K, accompanied by a proton exchange between formic acid and water. The influence of the alkane spacer chain length on the structure of biphenylalkanethiols on Au(111) surfaces was investigated as well. A systematic study was done on BPn-SAMs deposited from the gas phase. For every chain length a structure was found by LEED. Furthermore the influence of temperature on the structure was investigated in the range from room temperature up to about 400 K. To obviate influences from different preparation methods BP3 and BP4 was deposited from gas phase and from solution. No LEED spots were observed on BP4 SAMs deposited from solution. For BP3 an influence of the preparation could be excluded. For all BPn-SAMs a good agreement between LEED and STM data's was found. Nevertheless different unit cells were determined by LEED and STM consistent structures could be suggested considering the unit cell size given by LEED and the

  8. Massignon and Zionism Massignon face au sionisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Mayeres

    2010-03-01

    sioniste qui, pour lui, est avant tout un problème de politique orientale.Sous l’influence de Aaron Aaronsohn, l’islamologue éprouve d’abord pour les pionniers d’Eretz Israel, au regard de leurs réalisations agricoles, une sympathie enthousiaste qui lui fait souhaiter la réussite de l’établissement du Foyer national juif en Palestine. Son engagement l’incite notamment à rédiger, conjointement avec Maritain, un « rapport sur le sionisme », adressé à Pie XI en 1925, dans le but d’obtenir du Saint-Siège un soutien pour les Juifs convertis au catholicisme qui souhaiteraient participer à l’œuvre commune de la résurrection d’Israël. Cependant, les procédés « colonisateurs » et l’athéisme affiché de nombreux dirigeants sionistes, allant à l’encontre des convictions religieuses des Arabes autochtones chrétiens et musulmans, provoquent peu à peu chez Massignon un revirement total qui lui dicte à l’égard des Juifs des « propos excessifs ». Massignon considère qu’en Terre Sainte, il est impossible de séparer le temporel du spirituel et que les faits doivent être lus à la lumière des événements de l’histoire religieuse qui s’y sont déroulés depuis Abraham, « premier héros de l’hospitalité ».La prise de conscience de la pureté de Marie lui paraît la condition nécessaire à une reconnaissance juive dans l’esprit du Patriarche, bien plus, un préalable à toute paix. Massignon voit dans l’Immaculée Conception le « signe marial » de ralliement des diverses confessions de la famille abrahamique.

  9. Massignon face au sionisme Massignon and Zionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Mayeres

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En 1916, Louis Massignon participe aux négociations franco-britanniques qui envisagent, dans la perspective de la capitulation probable des empires centraux, le futur partage de l’Empire ottoman. Dans ce contexte, Massignon cherche à se situer face la question sioniste qui, pour lui, est avant tout un problème de politique orientale.Sous l’influence d'Aaron Aaronsohn, l’islamologue éprouve d’abord pour les pionniers d’Eretz Israel, au regard de leurs réalisations agricoles, une sympathie enthousiaste qui lui fait souhaiter la réussite de l’établissement du Foyer national juif en Palestine. Son engagement l’incite notamment à rédiger, conjointement avec Maritain, un « rapport sur le sionisme », adressé à Pie XI en 1925, dans le but d’obtenir du Saint-Siège un soutien pour les Juifs convertis au catholicisme qui souhaiteraient participer à l’œuvre commune de la résurrection d’Israël. Cependant, les procédés « colonisateurs » et l’athéisme affiché de nombreux dirigeants sionistes, allant à l’encontre des convictions religieuses des Arabes autochtones chrétiens et musulmans, provoquent peu à peu chez Massignon un revirement total qui lui dicte à l’égard des Juifs des « propos excessifs ». Massignon considère qu’en Terre Sainte, il est impossible de séparer le temporel du spirituel et que les faits doivent être lus à la lumière des événements de l’histoire religieuse qui s’y sont déroulés depuis Abraham, « premier héros de l’hospitalité ».La prise de conscience de la pureté de Marie lui paraît la condition nécessaire à une reconnaissance juive dans l’esprit du Patriarche, bien plus, un préalable à toute paix. Massignon voit dans l’Immaculée Conception le « signe marial » de ralliement des diverses confessions de la famille abrahamique.In 1916, facing the probable capitulation of the Central Powers, Louis Massignon participates in French

  10. Relégation au village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Renahy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Les thèses de l’individualisation des sociétés occidentales, ou de l’exclusion de ceux qui resteraient en marge d’une vaste classe moyenne aux modes de vie homogénéisés, ont sans doute permis de sortir d’une grille de lecture rigide héritée du marxisme. Mais elles résistent aujourd’hui mal aux faits et sont vivement contredites par le renouvellement des études sur les inégalités sociales pensées en termes de stratification. Enquêtant la population ouvrière d’un village industriel de Bourgogne au cours des années 1990, l’auteur a pu mesurer tout autant la force socialisatrice continue du groupe ouvrier sur sa jeunesse que le lent processus de délitement de ses cadres de références, longtemps stabilisés autour d’une mono-industrie métallurgique, provoquant une crise dans la reproduction de ce monde ouvrier. C’est cette crise de reproduction qui est évoquée ici. Dans un premier temps sont explicitées les formes passées de la présence industrielle au village, qui n’a jamais été celle d’un bastion de la grande industrie – la population locale n’est pas structurellement différenciée de celle de son environnement rural immédiat. L’exemple d’une lignée familiale d’artisans montre pour finir l’étroit maillage entre usine et structures sociales plus classiquement rurales, favorisant la constitution d’un capital d’autochtonie, déclinaison populaire du capital social.Relegation to the villageArguments demonstrating the individualisation of western societies, or the exclusion of those who stay on the margins of a vast middle class homogeneous life style, have no doubt allowed the move away from the rigid interpretations inherited from Marxism. However, these arguments resist today in spite of the facts and they are even keenly contradicted by the renewal of stratification studies on social inequalities. Analyzing the working population of an industrial village in Bourgogne during the

  11. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Au-Ag Alloy Nanoparticles and Ag@Au Nanoparticles%Au-Ag、Ag@Au纳米颗粒的制备及光学性能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婵; 蒋青松

    2015-01-01

    通过改进的Frens法,制备出含金量不同的Au-Ag合金纳米颗粒和Ag@Au纳米颗粒. 通过测试,UV-Vis光谱结果表明,Au-Ag合金纳米颗粒只有一个介于Au、Ag峰值之间的等离子体共振峰;且峰值与金的摩尔分数呈线性关系. SEM、TEM结果表明Ag@Au纳米颗粒有约为13 nm的壳层;而Au-Ag合金纳米颗粒没有核壳结构,说明是合金,并且随着Au-Ag合金中Au的成分的逐渐增加,粒径趋于均匀、形貌趋于稳定的类球型.%Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles and Ag@Au nanoparticles were synthesized by using a modified Frens method. Only one plasmon resonance peak of Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles was observed between that of AuNPS and AgNPS in their UV-Vis spectra and the peak has a near linear relation with the Au content. Due to SEM and TEM ,the apparent Au shell of Ag@Au nanoparticles are about 13 nm,but Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles are lack of core-shell structure. Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles shift to be uniform by increasing the Au content.

  12. L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGES TECHNIQUES FORMATION ET DEVELOPPEMENT HR/TD/AP L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 7 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L'apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : - avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire - être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, République slovaque, République tchèque, Royaume-Uni, Suède, Suisse) - avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage - avoir un niveau scolaire correspondant à la 9ème générale ou moderne...

  13. Observations of high spin states in {sup 179}Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    As part of a current study on the properties of the {pi} i{sub 13/2} intruder state in the A = 175-190 region, we conducted an experiment at ATLAS to observe high spin states in {sup 179}Au utilizing the reaction {sup 144}Sm({sup 40}Ar,p4n) at beam energies of 207 MeV and 215 MeV. To aid in the identification of {sup 179}Au, and to filter out the large amount of events from fission by-products, the Fragment Mass Analyzer was utilized in conjunction with ten Compton-suppression germanium detectors. In total, 11 x 10{sup 6} {gamma}-{gamma} and 4 x 10{sup 5} {gamma}-recoil events were collected. By comparing {gamma}-rays in coincidence with an A = 179 recoil mass gate and {gamma}-rays in coincidence with Au K{alpha} and K{beta} X-rays, ten {gamma}-rays were identified as belonging to {sup 179}Au. Based on {gamma}-ray coincidence relationships and on comparisons with neighboring odd-A Au nuclei, we constructed a tentative level scheme and assigned a rotational-like sequence to the {pi} i{sub 13/2} proton configuration.

  14. Simulation of Au particle interaction on graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcleod, A.; Vernon, K. C.; Rider, A. E.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of Au particles with few layer graphene is of interest for the formation of the next generation of sensing devices 1. In this paper we investigate the coupling of single gold nanoparticles to a graphene sheet, and multiple gold nanoparticles with a graphene sheet using COMSOL Multiphysics. By using these simulations we are able to determine the electric field strength and associated hot-spots for various gold nanoparticle-graphene systems. The Au nanoparticles were modelled as 8 nm diameter spheres on 1.5 nm thick (5 layers) graphene, with properties of graphene obtained from the refractive index data of Weber 2 and the Au refractive index data from Palik 3. The field was incident along the plane of the sheet with polarisation tested for both s and p. The study showed strong localised interaction between the Au and graphene with limited spread; however the double particle case where the graphene sheet separated two Au nanoparticles showed distinct interaction between the particles and graphene. An offset was introduced (up to 4 nm) resulting in much reduced coupling between the opposed particles as the distance apart increased. Findings currently suggest that the graphene layer has limited interaction with incident fields with a single particle present whilst reducing the coupling region to a very fine area when opposing particles are involved. It is hoped that the results of this research will provide insight into graphene-plasmon interactions and spur the development of the next generation of sensing devices.

  15. Study of electrodepositing Au on hollow polystyrene microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Rong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Xihua University, Chengdu 610039 (China); Zhang Yunwang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang Lin, E-mail: zhlmy@sina.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wei Chengfu, E-mail: wcf@mail.xhu.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Xihua University, Chengdu 610039 (China); Guo Jianjun [School of Material Science and Engineering, Xihua University, Chengdu 610039 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gold is electrodeposited on hollow polystyrene microspheres by self-designed setup in this paper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Au electrodeposit is finer and more uniform on account of the microspheres freely move on the cathode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology, thickness and roughness of Au electrodeposits were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope, respectively. - Abstract: The electrodeposited Au film on hollow polystyrene microspheres is successfully prepared by a set of self-designed device. The film is more compact and uniform on account of the microspheres freely moving on the cathode. These experiments mainly focus on the analysis of spherical symmetry, thickness and roughness of electrodeposited Au film. Under conditions of current density 1.5-3 mA cm{sup -2}, the temperature 25 Degree-Sign C, and the stirring rate 150 rpm, the electrodeposited microsphere is coated with a considerably orbicular film. The morphology, thickness and roughness of Au electrodeposits are studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), respectively.

  16. Collisional modelling of the AU Microscopii debris disc

    CERN Document Server

    Schüppler, Ch; Krivov, A V; Ertel, S; Marshall, J P; Wolf, S; Wyatt, M C; Augereau, J -C; Metchev, S A

    2015-01-01

    The spatially resolved AU Mic debris disc is among the most famous and best-studied debris discs. We aim at a comprehensive understanding of the dust production and the dynamics of the disc objects with in depth collisional modelling including stellar radiative and corpuscular forces. Our models are compared to a suite of observational data for thermal and scattered light emission, ranging from the ALMA radial surface brightness profile at 1.3mm to polarisation measurements in the visible. Most of the data can be reproduced with a planetesimal belt having an outer edge at around 40au and subsequent inward transport of dust by stellar winds. A low dynamical excitation of the planetesimals with eccentricities up to 0.03 is preferred. The radial width of the planetesimal belt cannot be constrained tightly. Belts that are 5au and 17au wide, as well as a broad 44au-wide belt are consistent with observations. All models show surface density profiles increasing with distance from the star as inferred from observatio...

  17. Au-Au2S Nanoshell Cavity Resonance and Parameters Discussion%Au-Au2S复合纳米球壳微粒的空腔谐振及参量讨论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋岩; 席聪; 陈光德; 刁佳杰; 景轩

    2002-01-01

    Au-Au2S复合纳米球壳微粒(金纳米球壳),是一种新型复合结构的纳米微粒,其结构为纳米级的Au2S介质球外包裹了一层几个纳米厚的黄金球壳.这种复合纳米球壳微粒可以被抽象为球型谐振腔.报道了它的空腔谐振吸收的实验结果,并且运用经典理论结合介观结构特性,讨论了有关Au-Au2S复合纳米球壳微粒空腔谐振吸收的一些重要参量,其中包括谐振吸收波长、品质因数、谐振能量等.另外,还讨论了金球壳的厚度对这些重要参量的影响.

  18. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-09

    The structure and chemical ordering of PtAu nanoclusters of 79, 135, and 201 atoms are studied via a combination of a basin hopping atom-exchange technique (to locate the lowest energy homotops at fixed composition), a symmetry orbit technique (to find the high symmetry isomers), and density functional theory local reoptimization (for determining the most stable homotop). The interatomic interactions between Pt and Au are derived from the empirical Gupta potential. The lowest energy structures show a marked tendency toward PtcoreAushell chemical ordering by enrichment of the more cohesive Pt in the core region and of Au in the shell region. We observe a preferential segregation of Pt atoms to (111) facets and Au atoms to (100) facets of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active sites. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Interaction Kinetics between Sn-Pb Solder Droplet and Au/Ni/Cu Pad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuquan LI; Chunqing WANG; Yanhong TIAN

    2006-01-01

    The interfacial phenomena of the Sn-Pb solder droplet on Au/Ni/Cu pad are investigated. A continuous AuSn2and needle-like AuSn4 are formed at the interface after the liquid state reaction (soldering). The interfacial reaction between the solder and Au layer continues during solid state aging with AuSn4 breaking off from the interface and felling into the solder. The kinetics of Au layer dissolution and diffusion into the solder during soldering and aging is analyzed to elucidate intermetallic formation mechanism at the solder/Au pad interface.The concentration of Au near the solder/pad interface is identified to increase and reach the solubility limit during the period of liquid state reaction. During solid state reaction, the thickening of Au-Sn compound is mainly controlled by element diffusion.

  20. Arnaud Cathrine : des autres au moi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Antonellis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nos vies romancées est un essai autobiographique où Arnaud Cathrine mélange des souvenirs personnels aux vies et aux livres de six de ses écrivains préférés (Carson McCullers, Françoise Sagan, Roland Barthes, Fritz Zorn, Sarah Kane et Jean Rhys pour s’interroger sur la littérature, sur l’écriture intime et sur la question identitaire. Cet article analyse d'abord l’aspect autobiographique du livre d’Arnaud Cathrine pour en dévoiler les stratégies stylistiques et thématiques aptes à créer une écriture personnelle, comme la présence du je, l’utilisation du temps présent, ainsi que la fonction des adjectifs, des adverbes et du discours direct. Il dévoile ensuite les modalités par lesquelles notre écrivain approche autrui par deux mécanismes en particulier : l’identification et la projection. La rencontre avec l’autre est souvent une défaite mais, malgré tout, l’homme continue sa recherche de quelqu’un auquel appartenir parce qu’« on ne peut pas exister sans double de soi-même ». Existe-t'il alors un lieu où le sujet découvre, par le biais de l’autre, une identité unique et en même temps multiple ? Arnaud Cathrine nous suggère que c’est la littérature qui permet le passage du je au nous : chacun a une vie mais peut la partager et vivre celle d'autrui grâce à la lecture.Nos vies romancées is an autobiographical essay where Arnaud Cathrine blends the personal memories to the life and to the books of his favourite authors (Carson McCullers, Françoise Sagan, Roland Barthes, Fritz Zorn, Sarah Kane and Jean Rhys to talk about literature, private writing and identity. In this text we’ll analyze first the autobiographical side of Arnaud Cathrine’s book to reveal stylistic and thematic strategies used to create a personal writing, such as the presence of I, the use of simple present, the function of adjectives, adverbs and direct speech. Then we’ll show us the modalities to come up to others

  1. Au rendez-vous allemand (1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Bouvier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Comment traduire, transporter un monde dans un autre, et y faire croire ? La solution de Flaubert pour Salammbô a été d’investir cette difficulté en se plaçant du côté des discours et récits de l’Antiquité, depuis les Anciens et avec eux, retrouvant la parole de l’autre à partir d’une attitude « sympathique » au savoir recueilli. Cette attitude est conforme aux injonctions contemporaines de la « nouvelle école » critique et historique venue d’Allemagne où la pensée de Herder, relayée par Renan, occupe de ce point de vue une place centrale. L’Histoire de la poésie des Hébreux de Herder, paru en 1783, est traduit en français en 1845. Il s’agit d’un ouvrage fondateur de la critique allemande en ce qu’il aborde le texte sacré dans sa dimension exclusivement textuelle. Son titre même est une invitation à envisager la Bible du point de vue de l’art, c’est-à-dire du côté de ses effets : l’exégèse biblique selon Herder doit passer par le déplacement du lieu critique et le développement chez le lecteur moderne d’une sensibilité esthétique identique à celle du lecteur original.How can you translate or transpose one world into another and make it believable?  Flaubert’s solution for Salammbô was to adopt the point of view of Antiquity.  Going back to Antiquity’s speeches and tales, from and with the Classics and our knowledge of them, he chose a sympathetic stance.  This attitude is in line with contemporary admonitions of the “new” critical and historical school that came from Germany where Herder’s thought, passed on by Renan, had a central role.  Herder’s History of Hebrew Poetry, published in 1783, was translated in 1845.  It is a seminal text of German criticism in that it approaches the sacred text in an exclusively textual dimension.  Even the title of his book is an invitation to consider the Bible from the point of view of art, that is, for its effects.

  2. Density functional theory investigation of benzenethiol adsorption on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nara, Jun; Higai, Shin’ichi; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of benzenethiol molecules on the Au(111) surface by using first principles total energy calculations. A single thiolate molecule is adsorbed at the bridge site slightly shifted toward the fcc-hollow site, and is tilted by 61degrees from the surface normal. As for th......We have studied the adsorption of benzenethiol molecules on the Au(111) surface by using first principles total energy calculations. A single thiolate molecule is adsorbed at the bridge site slightly shifted toward the fcc-hollow site, and is tilted by 61degrees from the surface normal...... angle of 21degrees, which is much smaller compared with the single molecule adsorption. The van der Waals interaction plays an important role in forming the SAM structure. The adsorption of benzenethiolates induces the repulsive interaction between surface Au atoms, which facilitates the formation...

  3. Hydrogen evolution on Au(111) covered with submonolayers of Pd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten; Karlberg, Gustav; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    . The energetics of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on/from different types of sites on the Pd-Au(111) surface are assessed by means of density functional theory calculations combined with thermodynamic modeling. Based on the density functional and Monte Carlo data, the hydrogen evolution activity......A theoretical investigation of electrochemical hydrogen evolution on Au(111) covered with submonolayers of Pd is presented. The size and shape of monoatomically high Pd islands formed on the Au(111) surface are determined using Monte Carlo simulations, for Pd coverages varying from 0.02 to 0.95 ML...... line defects for Pd island formation and hydrogen evolution are discussed. It is argued, with support from theoretical data, that this kind of defects is likely to be responsible for a dramatic increase in activity observed experimentally [ChemPhysChem 7, 985 (2006); Electrochim. Acta 52, 5548 (2007...

  4. Preparation and evaluation of Au nanoparticle–silica aerogel nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruhito Katagiri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A Au nanoparticle–silica aerogel nanocomposite was prepared by the gelling of a tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS/ethanol solution together with Au nanoparticles and drying the wet gel in supercritical carbon dioxide. The aerogel nanocomposite contained Au nanoparticles at a concentration of 0.268 ppm. The bulk density, porosity, and specific surface area of the obtained nanocomposite were 0.126 g/cm3, 94%, and 890 m2/g, respectively. The nanocomposite was reddish-violet in color and transparent, and had a relative permittivity of approximately 6 with a dielectric loss of ca. 1 × 10−3 in the range of 10 MHz to 1 GHz.

  5. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  6. Controlled electrodeposition of Au monolayer film on ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Pang, Liuqing; Li, Man; Zhang, Yunxia; Ren, Xianpei; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-05-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles have been attractive for centuries for their vibrant appearance enhanced by their interaction with sunlight. Nowadays, there have been tremendous research efforts to develop them for high-tech applications including therapeutic agents, sensors, organic photovoltaics, medical applications, electronics and catalysis. However, there remains to be a challenge to fabricate a monolayer Au coating with complete coverage in controlled fashion. Here we present a facile method to deposit a uniform Au monolayer (ML) film on the [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid substrate using an electrochemical deposition process. It demonstrates that it is feasible to prepare a solid phase coating on the liquid-based substrate. Moreover, the thickness of the monolayer coating can be controlled to a layer-by-layer accuracy.

  7. Neutral atom transport from the termination shock to 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Bzowski, M; Bzowski, Maciej; Tarnopolski, Slawomir

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of H, D, and heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) between the termination shock and 1 AU is discussed in the context of the forthcoming NASA SMEX mission IBEX. In particular, effects of the velocity-dependent radiation pressure on atomic trajectories are considered and ionization losses between TS and 1 AU are studied. It is shown, among others, that most of the dynamical effects and ionization losses are induced within a few AU from the Sun, which translates to the time domain into $\\sim 1 - 3$ solar rotations before detection. This loosens considerably time requirements for tracking the ionization and radiation pressure history to just prior 3 months. ENA seem excellent tracers of the processes within the heliospheric interface, with the transport effects between the termination shock and detector relatively mild and easy to account for.

  8. Au-Ag hollow nanostructures with tunable SERS properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, S. G.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2017-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow Au-Ag nanoparticles is done by the sequential action of galvanic replacement and Kirkendall effect. Polyol synthesized silver nanoparticles were used as templates and the size of cavities is controlled by the systematic addition of the HAuCl4. Au-Ag nanoparticles carved in different depths were tested for application as substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Two medically important Raman active analytes-Nile blue chloride and Crystal violet were used in the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performance analysis. A systematic study has been made on the Raman enhancement of hollow nanoparticles fabricated with different cavity dimensions and compared with that of the silver templates used. The enhancement observed for these hollow substrates with cavities is of interest since Au protected hollow nanostructures are vital and an active area of interest in drug delivery systems.

  9. Angela Merkel en visite au CERN Mardi 29 avril 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2008-01-01

    Le mardi 29 avril, Angela Merkel, la chancelière de la République fédérale d’Allemagne, s’est rendue au CERN. À l’approche du démarrage du LHC, Angela Merkel est venue au CERN pour marquer son soutien au projet ; la visite a été courte mais sa portée n’est pas des moindres. Jusqu’ici, le Laboratoire n’avait reçu la visite d’aucun chancelier allemand. Robert Aymar, le directeur général, a chaleureusement accueilli Mme Merkel et lui a présenté son successeur, Rolf-Dieter Heuer, ainsi que les membres de la Direction générale du CERN.

  10. Measurement of Direct Photons in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J -S; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2012-01-01

    We report the measurement of direct photons at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV. The direct photon signal was extracted for the transverse-momentum range of 4 GeV/c < p_T < 22 GeV/c, using a statistical method to subtract decay photons from the inclusive-photon sample. The direct-photon nuclear-modification factor R_AA was calculated as a function of p_T for different Au+Au collision centralities using the measured p+p direct-photon spectrum and compared to theoretical predictions. R_AA was found to be consistent with unity for all centralities over the entire measured p_T range. Theoretical models that account for modifications of initial-direct-photon production due to modified-parton-distribution functions in Au and the different isospin composition of the nuclei, predict a modest change of R_AA from unity and are consistent with the data. Models with compensating effects of the quark-gluon plasma on high-energy photons, such as suppression of jet-fragmentation photons and indu...

  11. Potential energies of characteristic atoms on basis of experimental heats of formation of AuCu and AuCu_3 compounds (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE You-qing; LIU Xin-bi; LI Xiao-bo; PENG Hong-jian; NIE Yao-zhuang

    2009-01-01

    The systematic science of alloys(SSA) is a framework of the total energy and total volume able to be separated. The potential energy sequences of characteristic atoms at the central sites of the basic clusters in the fcc-based lattice Au-Cu system are separated out from smaller experimental heats of formation of L10-AuCu and L1_2-AuCu_3 compounds only, by nine potential energy E-functions and through the use of structural unit inversion method. From these potential energy sequences, the potential energies and heats of formation of the disordered Au1-xCux alloys at 0 K are calculated. The potential energies, heats of formation and Tc-temperatures of order-disorder transitions of the L1_0-AuCu, L1_2-Au_3Cu and L1_2-AuCu_3 compounds, as well as the Au_3Cu-, AuCu- and AuCu_3~- type ordered alloys with maximal ordering degrees are calculated too. The results show that the 5th E-function may be chosen for developing it into the free energy-, enthalpy-, vibrational energy- and vibrational entropy-functions for describing thermodynamic properties of the compounds, ordered and disordered phases and for establishing the phase diagram of the Au-Cu system in the future.

  12. Common Suppression Pattern of eta and pi^0 Mesons at High Transverse Momentum in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, S S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S R; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, frontmatter@1T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Sahlmueller, B; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarjan, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszpremi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of eta mesons have been measured within p_T = 2-10 GeV/c at mid-rapidity by the PHENIX experiment in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. In central Au+Au the eta yields are significantly suppressed compared to peripheral Au+Au, d+Au and p+p yields scaled by the corresponding number of nucleon-nucleon collisions. The magnitude, centrality and p_T dependence of the suppression is common, within errors, for eta and pi^0. The ratio of eta to pi^0 spectra at high p_T amounts to 0.40 < R_eta/pi^0 < 0.48 for the three systems in agreement with the world average measured in hadronic and nuclear reactions and, at large scaled momentum, in e^+e^- collisions.

  13. Tuning the chemical activity through PtAu nanoalloying: a first principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-06-21

    The electronic structure and adsorption properties of 1.5 nm sized Pt, Au, and PtAu nanoclusters are studied by density functional theory. We explain the recent experimental finding that 20% Au content in PtAu nanoparticles is optimal to induce a dramatically different catalytic behavior. Our results show that the d-band center together with the density of states at the Fermi energy can be used as an indicator of the chemical activity of PtAu nanoclusters. The most favorable adsorption sites on the cluster surfaces as a function of the Pt/Au ratio are identified using atomic H as a probe.

  14. Graphene nanoribbons synthesized from molecular precursor polymerization on Au(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimi, Lorenzo; Ourdjini, Oualid; Della Pia, Ada; Mariani, Carlo; Betti, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I - 00185 Roma (Italy); Cavaliere, Emanuele; Gavioli, Luca [i-LAMP & Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica, 25121 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    A spectroscopic study of 10,10-dibromo-9,9 bianthracene (DBBA) molecules deposited on the Au(110) surface is presented, by means of ultraviolet and X-ray photoemission, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through a thermally activated procedure, these molecular precursors polymerize and eventually form graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with atomically controlled shape and width, very important building blocks for several technological applications. The GNRs observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) appear as short segments on top of the gold surface reconstruction, pointing out the delicate balance among surface diffusion and surface corrugation in their synthesis on the Au(110) surface.

  15. Light nuclei production in relativistic Au+nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M. J. [Yale Univ., A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Pope, J. K. [Yale Univ., A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Beavis, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, J. B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chiba, J. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Chikanian, A. [Yale Univ., A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Crawford, H. J. [Univ. of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cronqvist, M. [Univ. of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dardenne, Y. [Univ. of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kumar, B. S. [Yale Univ., A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Nagle, J. L. [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Debbe, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Doke, T. [Waseda Univ., Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Engelage, J. [Univ. of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greiner, L. [Univ. of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hayano, R S [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Hallman, Timothy J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Heckman, H. H. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kashiwagi, T. [Waseda Univ., Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Kikuchi, J. [Waseda Univ., Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Tanaka, K. H. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Kumar, B. S. [Yale Univ., A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Kuo, C. [Univ. of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lindstrom, P. J. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mitchell, J. W. [USRA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Nagamiya, S. [Columbia Univ., Nevis Laboratory, Irvington, NY (United States); Nagle, J. L. [Yale Univ., A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Stankus, P. [Columbia Univ., Nevis Laboratory, Irvington, NY (United States); Tanaka, K. H. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Welsh, R. C. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhan, W. [Columbia Univ., Nevis Laboratory, Irvington, NY (United States)

    1998-08-01

    We have measured the yields of protons and A=2-4 nuclei in collisions between 10.8 A GeV/ c Au beams and targets of Al, Cu, and Au. The data, which cover a broad rapidity range at low transverse momenta, were measured as a function of collision centrality using a focusing beam line spectrometer and a high-rate centrality detector. We investigate the dependence of coalescence parameters on event geometry. The data are compared with the predictions of an RQMD+coalescence model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. NEUROMARKETING ET NEUROSCIENCES AU SERVICE DES PUBLICITAIRES : QUESTIONNEMENTS ETHIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    Courbet, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Le neuromarketing et les neurosciences au service des publicitaires soulèvent immanquablement des questions éthiques relatives aux finalités de cette nouvelle discipline mais également aux moyens utilisés. L'objectif de ce papier est donc de discuter certaines de ces questions. La première partie s'intéressera aux principaux débats éthiques entre les personnes adeptes du neuromarketing (les "pro-neuromarketing") et les "anti-neuromarketing". La deuxième partie expliquera qu'au stade actuel de...

  17. Rational design and synthesis of excavated trioctahedral Au nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiaoli; Jia, Yanyan; Shen, Wei; Xie, Shuifen; Yang, Yanan; Cao, Zhenming; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2015-06-01

    Excavated polyhedral nanostructures, possessing the features of high surface area and well-defined surface structure with a specific crystal facet and avoidance of aggregation, could be one of the best choices for the purpose of reducing consumption and improving performance of noble metals in many application fields. However, the formation of the excavated structures is thermodynamically unfavourable and its rational synthesis is far beyond our knowledge. In this work, taking overgrowth of Pd onto trioctahedral Au nanocrystals as a model, we present a deep insight study for synthesizing an excavated structure relying on the protection role of surfactants under suitable crystal growth kinetics. Based on the abovementioned understanding, we designed a simple and effective strategy to synthesize Au nanocrystals with excavated trioctahedral structure in one step. Due to the novel feature of the excavated structure and exposed high energy {110} facets, excavated trioctahedral Au NCs exhibited optical extinction at the near-infrared region and showed high catalytic activity towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol. Moreover, the synthetic strategy can be extended to the synthesis of excavated Au-Pd alloys.Excavated polyhedral nanostructures, possessing the features of high surface area and well-defined surface structure with a specific crystal facet and avoidance of aggregation, could be one of the best choices for the purpose of reducing consumption and improving performance of noble metals in many application fields. However, the formation of the excavated structures is thermodynamically unfavourable and its rational synthesis is far beyond our knowledge. In this work, taking overgrowth of Pd onto trioctahedral Au nanocrystals as a model, we present a deep insight study for synthesizing an excavated structure relying on the protection role of surfactants under suitable crystal growth kinetics. Based on the abovementioned understanding, we designed a simple and effective

  18. Self-assembly of flagellin on Au(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Orive, Alejandro; Pissinis, Diego E; Diaz, Carolina; Miñán, Alejandro; Benítez, Guillermo A; Rubert, Aldo; Daza Millone, Antonieta; Rumbo, Martin; Hernández Creus, Alberto; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Schilardi, Patricia L

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of flagellin monomers from Pseudomonas fluorescens on Au(111) has been studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. Results show that flagellin monomers spontaneously self-assemble forming a monolayer thick protein film bounded to the Au surface by the more hydrophobic subunit and exposed to the environment the hydrophilic subunit. The films are conductive and allow allocation of electrochemically active cytochrome C. The self-assembled films could be used as biological platforms to build 3D complex molecular structures on planar metal surfaces and to functionalize metal nanoparticles.

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of Au film around single pulse threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochang Ni; Ching-Yue Wang; Yinzhong Wu; Li Yang; Wei Jia; Lu Chai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Ablation process of 1-kHz femtosecond lasers (pulse duration of 148 fs, wavelength of 775 nm) of Au film on silica substrates is studied. The thresholds for single and multi pulses can be obtained directly from the relation between the squared diameter D2 of the ablated craters and the laser fluence φo. From the plot of the accumulated laser fluence Nφth(N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film is obtained to be 0.765. Some experimental data obtained around the single pulse threshold are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation.

  20. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  1. Beyond 3 AU from the Sun: "Hypervolatiles" in Distant Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Paganini, Lucas; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Lippi, Manuela; Gibb, Erika L.; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Kawakita, Hideyo; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2016-10-01

    Our understanding of inner coma composition in comets has long been biased towards heliocentric distances (Rh) smaller than 2-3 AU. However, observations far from the Sun are also of high value for better understanding the nucleus structure and outgassing of volatiles. Substantial and very important evidence for the activity of distant comets has been accumulated from photometry and analyses of light curves, but direct detections of primary (parent) volatiles are still rare. For example, comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) remained outside 3.1 AU throughout its apparition, yet it presented the best opportunity since Hale-Bopp (1997) for detailed spectroscopic studies in a distant comet. C/2006 W3 was observed from several space- and ground-based facilities using both infrared and radio techniques. CO, CH4, and C2H6 were measured via infrared spectroscopy at ESO-VLT at Rh = 3.25 AU. Production rates were found to exceed those measured for each of these species in most other comets, despite those comets being observed much closer to the Sun. With its relatively high CO/CO2 ratio, C/2006 W3 also appears as an outlier in the AKARI comet survey of 18 comets. The detections of H2O (Herschel Space Observatory) and CO (ESO-VLT) allow for constraining the coma abundance ratio H2O/CO at Rh = 5 AU.We will compare the C2H6/CH4/CO ratios in C/2006 W3 with those in other comets spanning a large range in Rh: from D/2012 S1 ISON (~0.7 AU) to 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (~ 6.3 AU). Notably in situ measurements by the Rosetta mission were performed in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at a very similar heliocentric distance to C/2006 W3 (3.15 AU). While comparisons of column-integrated remote sensing measurements and abundances from in-situ mass spectrometry (as performed by the ROSINA instrument) are not straightforward, both types of measurement are of high value for constraining models of nucleus outgassing beyond 3 AU from the Sun, where the inferred nucleus structure and

  2. Canis, Konrad, Bismarcks Außenpolitik 1870-1890

    OpenAIRE

    Burgaud, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Le dernier ouvrage de K.C., Bismarcks Außenpolitik 1870-1890 (1ère édition, 2004) reprend le titre bien connu d’Andreas Hillgruber (1972, réédition en 1993) mais là s’arrête la comparaison. Certes l’auteur ne surprendra pas par son approche : la politique extérieure de l’Allemagne impériale se confond avec les intentions, les desseins, les calculs, les reculs de son fondateur et chancelier Bismarck. Et si les aspects économiques et sociaux prennent un peu plus de place au fil de l’analyse, ce...

  3. Nuclear Shadowing and Select d+Au Observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-04-01

    Much of the complexity of the description of d+Au collisions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) derives from effects of the nuclear environment. Here we investigate the effects of the most recent available nuclear shadowing parametrization, the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) and the updated Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) fragmentation functions on three select d+Au collision observables. We compare our results to available experimental data from the STAR and BRAHMS collaborations.

  4. Towards Ultra-Low-NoiseMoAu Transition Edge Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Goldie, D J; Glowacka, D M; Withington, S

    2014-01-01

    We report initial measurements on our firstMoAu Transition Edge Sensors (TESs). The TESs formed from a bilayer of 40 nm of Mo and 106 nm of Au showed transition temperatures of about 320 mK, higher than identical TESs with a MoCu bilayer which is consistent with a reduced electron transmission coefficient between the bilayer films. We report measurements of thermal conductance in the 200 nm thick silicon nitride SiNx support structures at this temperature, TES dynamic behaviour and current noise measurements.

  5. Bimodal pattern in the fragmentation of Au quasi-projectiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, M; D'Agostino, M; Gramegna, F; Gulminelli, F; Vannini, G

    2006-01-01

    Signals of bimodality have been investigated in experimental data of quasi-projectile decay produced in Au+Au collisions at 35 AMeV. This same data set was already shown to present several signals characteristic of a first order, liquid-gas-like phase transition. For the present analysis, events are sorted in bins of transverse energy of light charged particles emitted by the quasi-target source. A sudden change in the fragmentation pattern is observed from the distributions of the asymmetry of the two largest fragments, and the charge of the largest fragment. This latter distribution shows a bimodal behavior. The interpretation of this signal is discussed.

  6. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Magnetization reversal dynamics in Au/Co/Au(111) ultrathin films: Effect of roughness of the buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanlete Adjanoh, A. [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire le Belvedere, Tunis 1060 (Tunisia); Belhi, R., E-mail: Rachid.Belhi@fst.rnu.t [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire le Belvedere, Tunis 1060 (Tunisia); Vogel, J.; Fruchart, O. [Institut Neel (CNRS and UJF), 25 rue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ayadi, M.; Abdelmoula, K. [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire le Belvedere, Tunis 1060 (Tunisia)

    2010-09-15

    We present a study of the magnetization reversal dynamics in ultrathin Au/Co/Au films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, for a Co thickness of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 nm. In these films, the magnetization reversal is dominated by domain nucleation for t{sub Co}=0.5, 0.7 nm and by domain wall propagation for t{sub Co}=1 nm. The prevalence of domain nucleation for the thickness range 0.5-0.7 nm is different from results reported in the literature, for the same system and for the same thickness range, where the magnetization reversal took place mainly by domain wall motion. We attribute this difference to the effect of roughness of the Au buffer layer on the morphology of the magnetic layer.

  8. (-Λ)-Hyperon Global Polarization in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC%(-Λ)-超子在RHIC的Au+Au碰撞中的整体极化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We present the (-Λ)-hyperon global polarization in Au+Au collisions at (√SNN)=62GeV and 200GeV measured with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed (-Λ)-hyperon global polarization is consistent with zero,what is in agreement with recent measurements of A global polarization, as well as φ(1020) and K*0(892) vector mesons spin alignment with respect to the reaction plane. The possible dependence of the global polarization on relative azimuthal angle between the orbital momentum of the system and the hyperon 3-momentum is discussed. The corresponding systematic uncertainty due to detector acceptance is found to be less than 20%.

  9. VORTEX LINGUARUM : DU POST- AU TRANS-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Lamy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Résumé : Cette étude se propose de mettre en perspective la transformation progressive de la problématique postcoloniale vers une dérive baroque et rhizomatique évoluant sous le signe de la transversalité et répudiant toute référence à un passé colonial. Les travaux de Homi Bhabha et de Gayatri Spivak sont examinés. Une démarcation plus nette est ensuite introduite en considération du débordement du schème arborescent hérité de l'épistémologie aristotélicienne au profit d'une vision holistique et labyrinthique qu'Umberto Eco a analysée comme la dislocation d'une sémantique en forme de dictionnaire proliférant en une sémantique en forme d'encyclopédie. L'amplitude de cette démarcation est considérablement élargie avec le modèle du rhizome, la dynamique non linéaire de déterritorialisation et de reterritorialisation développée dans Milles plateaux par Gilles Deleuze et Félix Guattari. Jumelées à une recrudescence du baroque observable chez nombre d'auteurs latino-américains, ce sont là les prémisses d'une théorie générale de la dérive ou de la traduction généralisée chez le poète brésilien Haroldo de Campos et de sa notion de « transcréation » (A tradução como transcriação, relayant l'optique anthropophage d'Oswald de Andrade et qui est ici comparée aux stratégies de remix dans le champ expérimental de la musique électro-acoustique. Mots clé : postcolonialité, transversalité, rhizome, déterritorialisation, reterritorialisation, transcréation. VORTEX LINGUARUM : FROM POST- TO TRANS- Abstract: This paper intends to underscore the gradual shift from the issues of the postcolonial stance towards a baroque and rhizomatic drifting advocating transversal manoeuvres and a clear departure from any reference to a colonial ancestry. Homi Bhabha's and Gayatri Spivak's works are scrutinized. A more acute departure is proposed with the overcoming of the tree-like schematic hierarchy inherited

  10. Excitation function of elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions and the nuclear matter equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A; Basrak, Z; Bastid, N; Benabderrahmane, L; Berek, G; Caplar, R; Cordier, E; Crochet, Philippe; Dupieux, P; Dzelalija, M; Fodor, Z; Gasparic, I; Grishkin, Yu; Hartmann, O N; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Hong, B; Kecskeméti, J; Kim, Y J; Kirejczyk, M; Koczón, P; Korolija, M; Kotte, R; Kress, T; Lebedev, A; Leifels, Y; López, X; Mangiarotti, A; Merschmeyer, M; Neubert, W; Pelte, D; Petrovici, M; Rami, F; Reisdorf, W; de Schauenburg, B; Schüttauf, A; Seres, Z; Sikora, B; Sim, K S; Simion, V; Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Smolyankin, V T; Stockmeier, M R; Stoicea, G; Tyminski, Z; Wagner, P; Wisniewski, K; Wohlfarth, D; Xiao, Z G; Yushmanov, I E; Zhilin, A

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of the excitation function of elliptic flow at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at beam energies from 0.09 to 1.49 GeV per nucleon. For the integral flow, we discuss the interplay between collective expansion and spectator shadowing for three centrality classes. A complete excitation function of transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow is presented for the first time in this energy range, revealing a rapid change with incident energy below 0.4 AGeV, followed by an almost perfect scaling at the higher energies. The equation of state of compressed nuclear matter is addressed through comparisons to microscopic transport model calculations.

  11. Narrowing of the balance function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at √(sNN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Alder, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E..; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Corral, M. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.. J; Fu, J..; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S. M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A.C.; Landgraf, J. M..; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H. [et al.

    2003-05-01

    The balance function is a new observable based on the principle that charge is locally conserved when particles are pair produced. Balance functions have been measured for charged particle pairs and identified charged pion pairs in Au + Au collisions at √(sNN) = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using STAR. Balance functions for peripheral collisions have widths consistent with model predictions based on a superposition of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Widths in central collisions are smaller, consistent with trends predicted by models incorporating late hadronization.

  12. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Sch