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Sample records for atypical yersinia pestis

  1. Pestoides F, and Atypical Yersinia pestis Strain from the Former Soviet Union

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    Garcia, E; Worsham, P; Bearden, S; Malfatti, S; Lang, D; Larimer, F; Lindler, L; Chain, P

    2007-01-05

    Unlike the classical Yersinia pestis strains, members of an atypical group of Y. pestis from Central Asia, denominated Y. pestis subspecies caucasica (also known as one of several pestoides types), are distinguished by a number of characteristics including their ability to ferment rhamnose and melibiose, their lacking the small plasmid encoding the plasminogen activator (pla) and pesticin, and their exceptionally large variants of the virulence plasmid pMT (encoding murine toxin and capsular antigen). We have obtained the entire genome sequence of Y. pestis Pestoides F, an isolate from the former Soviet Union that has enabled us to carryout a comprehensive genome-wide comparison of this organism's genomic content against the six published sequences of Y. pestis and their Y. pseudotuberculosis ancestor. Based on classical glycerol fermentation (+ve) and nitrate reduction (+ve) Y. pestis Pestoides F is an isolate that belongs to the biovar antiqua. This strain is unusual in other characteristics such as the fact that it carries a non-consensus V antigen (lcrV) sequence, and that unlike other Pla{sup -} strains, Pestoides F retains virulence by the parenteral and aerosol routes. The chromosome of Pestoides F is 4,517,345 bp in size comprising some 3,936 predicted coding sequences, while its pCD and pMT plasmids are 71,507 bp and 137,010 bp in size respectively. Comparison of chromosome-associated genes in Pestoides F with those in the other sequenced Y. pestis strains, reveals a series of differences ranging from strain-specific rearrangements, insertions, deletions, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a unique distribution of insertion sequences. There is a single {approx}7 kb unique region in the chromosome not found in any of the completed Y. pestis strains sequenced to date, but which is present in the Y. pseudotuberculosis ancestor. Taken together, these findings are consistent with Pestoides F being derived from the most ancient lineage of Y. pestis yet

  2. 3a-Negative Yersinia Pestis, China

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    Zhizhen Qi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor, As the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis has killed millions of people in the three major historical pandemics and remains endemic in many natural foci around the world today. This Gram-negative bacterium is transmitted to humans and susceptible animals from the natural rodent reservoirs through the bites of infected fleas, contact with infected animals or persons, or aerosols. Because of its respiratory transmission and high pathogenicity, the potential use of Y. pestis as a bioterrorism agent is a major concern. The specific and rapid detection of Y. pestis is the key step in implementing effective countermeasures during plague epidemics. The standard culture and biochemical identification methods for Y. pestis are relatively time-consuming, so PCR assays are frequently used because they are rapid. However, the amplification targets are usually based on three plasmids, which may be lost in atypical strains, causing false-negative results. Therefore, Radnedge et al. identified a signature sequence, designated “3a”, in a chromosomal region of Y. pestis, based on the results of suppression subtractive hybridization, which was later confirmed with a microarray-based analysis. A positive 3a result has been shown to be an effective marker for the identification of Y. pestis isolates. However, the recent isolation of 3a-negative Y. pestis in China suggests that this indicator is unreliable.

  3. Yersinia pestis lineages in Mongolia.

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    Julia M Riehm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole genome sequencing allowed the development of a number of high resolution sequence based typing tools for Yersinia (Y. pestis. The application of these methods on isolates from most known foci worldwide and in particular from China and the Former Soviet Union has dramatically improved our understanding of the population structure of this species. In the current view, Y. pestis including the non or moderate human pathogen Y. pestis subspecies microtus emerged from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis about 2,600 to 28,600 years ago in central Asia. The majority of central Asia natural foci have been investigated. However these investigations included only few strains from Mongolia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Prokaryotic Repeats (CRISPR analysis and Multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR analysis (MLVA with 25 loci was performed on 100 Y. pestis strains, isolated from 37 sampling areas in Mongolia. The resulting data were compared with previously published data from more than 500 plague strains, 130 of which had also been previously genotyped by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis. The comparison revealed six main clusters including the three microtus biovars Ulegeica, Altaica, and Xilingolensis. The largest cluster comprises 78 isolates, with unique and new genotypes seen so far in Mongolia only. Typing of selected isolates by key SNPs was used to robustly assign the corresponding clusters to previously defined SNP branches. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that Mongolia hosts the most recent microtus clade (Ulegeica. Interestingly no representatives of the ancestral Y. pestis subspecies pestis nodes previously identified in North-western China were identified in this study. This observation suggests that the subsequent evolution steps within Y. pestis pestis did not occur in Mongolia. Rather, Mongolia was most likely re-colonized by more recent clades coming back from

  4. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR OF YERSINIA PESTIS

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    V. V. Evseeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plague has been the cause of three pandemics and has led to the death of millions of people. Plague is a typical zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis that circulates in populations of wild rodents inhabiting natural plague foci on all continents except for Australia. Transmission of plague is provided by flea bites. Circulation of Y. pestis in natural plague foci is supported by a numerous of pathogenicity factors. This review explores one of them, plasminogen activator Pla. This protein is one of representatives of omptins, a family of enterobacterial outer membrane proteases that are responsible for colonization of specific organs or even infection generalization as a result of successful overcoming of the host innate immunity. The review reflects the history of its discovery and studying of its genetic control, biosynthesis, isolation and purification, physicochemical properties. Highly purified preparations of plasminogen activator are deficient in enzymatic activities but renaturation in the presence of Y. pestis lipooligosaccharide restores enzymatic properties of Pla. This pathogenicity factor is absent in representatives of the most ancient phylogenetic group of the plague pathogen, bv. caucasica, while the ancestor of other groups of Y. pestis subsp. microtus obtained in result of horizontal transfer Pla isoform with characteristics similar to properties of omptins from the less virulent enterobacteria. After that in the course of microevolution the “classic” isoform of Pla with increased protease activity was selected that is typical of all highly virulent for humans strains of Y. pestis subsp. pestis. The “classic” isoform of Pla Y. pestis is functionally similar to mammalian plasminogen activators transforming plasminogen into plasmin with the help of limited proteolysis. Pla protease activating plasminogen and also degrading the main plasmin inhibitor — α2-antiplasmin and, respectively, determining Y. pestis ability to lyse

  5. Selective isolation of Yersinia pestis from plague-infected fleas

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    Sarovich, Derek S.; Colman, Rebecca E.; Price, Erin P.; Chung, Wai Kwan; Lee, Judy; Schupp, James M.; Alexander, James; Keim, Paul; Wagner., David M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated Yersinia CIN agar for the isolation of Yersinia pestis from infected fleas. CIN media is effective for the differentiation of Y. pestis from flea commensal flora and is sufficiently inhibitory to other bacteria that typically outcompete Y. pestis after 48 hours of growth using less selective media. PMID:20385178

  6. Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection: a regulatory RNA perspective

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    Viveka eVadyvaloo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, responsible for causing fulminant plague, has evolved clonally from the enteric pathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, which in contrast, causes a relatively benign enteric illness. An approximately 97% nucleotide identity over 75% of their shared protein coding genes is maintained between these two pathogens, leaving much conjecture regarding the molecular determinants responsible for producing these vastly different disease etiologies, host preferences and transmission routes. One idea is that coordinated production of distinct factors required for host adaptation and virulence in response to specific environmental cues could contribute to the distinct pathogenicity distinguishing these two species. Small non-coding RNAs that direct posttranscriptional regulation have recently been identified as key molecules that may provide such timeous expression of appropriate disease enabling factors. Here the burgeoning field of small non-coding regulatory RNAs in Yersinia pathogenesis is reviewed from the viewpoint of adaptive colonization, virulence and divergent evolution of these pathogens.

  7. Global Expression Studies of Yersinia Pestis Pathogenicity

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    Garcia, E; Motin, V; Brubaker, R; Fitch, P

    2002-10-15

    The aim of these studies continues to be the investigation into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the virulence process in Yersinia pestis. In particular, the focus of this work centers on the identification of novel genes and pathways responsible for the pathogenic properties of this organism. In spite of more than four decades of intense investigation in this field, the dilemma as to what makes Y. pestis such a virulent and lethal pathogen remains unanswered. The method being employed makes use microarray technology (DNA chip) that enables the examination of the global activities of the whole complement of genes in this pathogen. Two primary resources available to the investigators (one directly obtained from a separate CBNP-funded project) make these studies possible: (1) Whole genome comparisons of the genes in Y. pestis and its near neighbors with attenuated or non pathogenic characteristics, and (2) the ability to duplicate in vitro, conditions that mimic the infection process of this pathogen. This year we have extended our studies from the original work of characterizing the global transcriptional regulation in Y. pestis triggered during temperature transition from 26 C to 37 C (roughly conditions found in the flea vector and the mammalian host, respectively) to studies of regulation encountered during shift between growth from conditions of neutral pH to acidic pH (the latter conditions, those mimic the environment found inside macrophages, a likely environment found by these cells during infection.). For this work, DNA arrays containing some 5,000 genes (the entire genome of Y. pestis plus those genes found uniquely in the enteropathogen, and near neighbor, Y. pseudotuberculosis) are used to monitor the simultaneous expression levels of each gene of known and unknown function in Y. pestis. Those genes that are up-regulate under the experimental conditions represent genes potentially involved in the pathogenic process. The ultimate role in

  8. СAPSULAR ANTIGEN OF YERSINIA PESTIS

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    L. A. Kadnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a zoonosis caused by gram-negative bacteria Yersinia pestis, which, as a rule, is transmitted to humans from septicemic rodents by the bites of infected fleas. This microbe killed more people than all of the wars in the human history. Y. pestis circulation in the natural plague foci is ensured by the whole number of pathogenicity factors with differing functional orientation. This review is devoted to one of them, Y. pestis capsular antigen (F1 or Caf1. The history of its discovery and studying of its genetic control, biosynthesis, isolation and purification, and physicochemical properties are reviewed. Its roles in plague pathogenesis and its application as a main component of plague vaccines are also discussed. Y. pestis capsule under light microscopy is visually amorphous, while high-resolution electron microscopy displays the structure formed from separate fimbria-like cords up to 200 nm long, diverging from the bacterial surface in different directions. At 37°C Y. pestis produce 800–1000 times more capsular antigen than at 28°C. Genes coding for 17.6-kD Caf1 protein, which contains 170 amino acids, are located in caf1 operon of pFra plasmid. Analysis of caf1 operon nucleotide sequence testified its close phylogenetic relationship with the gene clusters coding for pilus adhesins that were secreted with the help of chaperone/usher systems in enterobacteria including six additional adhesins in Y. pestis. Y. pestis multiplication within macrophages is the obligatory stage of plague pathogenesis, and the plague pathogen virulence correlates not with resistance to phagocyte ingesting but with bacterial ability to survive and multiply within phagolysosomes of phagocytes due to neutralization of antibacterial functions of eukaryotic cells. The capsule formed out of the Caf1 aggregates protects Y. pestis from ingestion by naïve host’s phagocytes and prevents from initiation of the alternative pathway of the complement system

  9. Proteomic Characterization of Yersinia pestis Virulence

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    Chromy, B; Murphy, G; Gonzales, A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2005-01-05

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, functions via the Type III secretion mechanism whereby virulence factors are induced upon interactions with a mammalian host. Here, the Y. pestis proteome was studied by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) under physiologically relevant growth conditions mimicking the calcium concentrations and temperatures that the pathogen would encounter in the flea vector and upon interaction with the mammalian host. Over 4100 individual protein spots were detected of which hundreds were differentially expressed in the entire comparative experiment. A total of 43 proteins that were differentially expressed between the vector and host growth conditions were identified by mass spectrometry. Expected differences in expression were observed for several known virulence factors including catalase-peroxidase (KatY), murine toxin (Ymt), plasminogen activator (Pla), and F1 capsule antigen (Caf1), as well as putative virulence factors. Chaperone proteins and signaling molecules hypothesized to be involved in virulence due to their role in Type III secretion were also identified. Other differentially expressed proteins not previously reported to contribute to virulence are candidates for more detailed mechanistic studies, representing potential new virulence determinants. For example, several sugar metabolism proteins were differentially regulated in response to lower calcium and higher temperature, suggesting these proteins, while not directly connected to virulence, either represent a metabolic switch for survival in the host environment or may facilitate production of virulence factors. Results presented here contribute to a more thorough understanding of the virulence mechanism of Y. pestis through proteomic characterization of the pathogen under induced virulence.

  10. Homology analysis and cross-immunogenicity of OmpA from pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis.

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    Chen, Yuhuang; Duan, Ran; Li, Xu; Li, Kewei; Liang, Junrong; Liu, Chang; Qiu, Haiyan; Xiao, Yuchun; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is one of the intra-species conserved proteins with immunogenicity widely found in the family of Enterobacteriaceae. Here we first confirmed OmpA is conserved in the three pathogenic Yersinia: Yersinia pestis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, with high homology at the nucleotide level and at the amino acid sequence level. The identity of ompA sequences for 262 Y. pestis strains, 134 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains and 219 pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains are 100%, 98.8% and 97.7% similar. The main pattern of OmpA of pathogenic Yersinia are 86.2% and 88.8% identical at the nucleotide and amino acid sequence levels, respectively. Immunological analysis showed the immunogenicity of each OmpA and cross-immunogenicity of OmpA for pathogenic Yersinia where OmpA may be a vaccine candidate for Y. pestis and other pathogenic Yersinia.

  11. Homology analysis of pathogenic Yersinia species Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Yersinia pestis based on multilocus sequence typing.

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    Duan, Ran; Liang, Junrong; Shi, Guoxiang; Cui, Zhigang; Hai, Rong; Wang, Peng; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Kewei; Qiu, Haiyan; Gu, Wenpeng; Du, Xiaoli; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme and used it to study the population structure and evolutionary relationships of three pathogenic Yersinia species. MLST of these three Yersinia species showed a complex of two clusters, one composed of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis and the other composed of Yersinia enterocolitica. Within the first cluster, the predominant Y. pestis sequence type 90 (ST90) was linked to Y. pseudotuberculosis ST43 by one locus difference, and 81.25% of the ST43 strains were from serotype O:1b, supporting the hypothesis that Y. pestis descended from the O:1b serotype of Y. pseudotuberculosis. We also found that the worldwide-prevalent serotypes O:1a, O:1b, and O:3 were predominated by specific STs. The second cluster consisted of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, two of which may not have identical STs. The pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains formed a relatively conserved group; most strains clustered within ST186 and ST187. Serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 were separated into three distinct blocks. Nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica STs were more heterogeneous, reflecting genetic diversity through evolution. By providing a better and effective MLST procedure for use with the Yersinia community, valuable information and insights into the genetic evolutionary differences of these pathogens were obtained.

  12. Detection of a Yersinia pestis gene homologue in rodent samples

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    Timothy A. Giles

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A homologue to a widely used genetic marker, pla, for Yersinia pestis has been identified in tissue samples of two species of rat (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus and of mice (Mus musculus and Apodemus sylvaticus using a microarray based platform to screen for zoonotic pathogens of interest. Samples were from urban locations in the UK (Liverpool and Canada (Vancouver. The results indicate the presence of an unknown bacterium that shares a homologue for the pla gene of Yersinia pestis, so caution should be taken when using this gene as a diagnostic marker.

  13. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ST42 (O:1) Strain Misidentified as Yersinia pestis by Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

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    Gérôme, Patrick; Le Flèche, Philippe; Blouin, Yann; Scholz, Holger C; Thibault, François M; Raynaud, Françoise; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2014-06-12

    We report here the draft sequence of strain CEB14_0017, alias HIAD_DUP, recovered from a human patient and initially identified as Yersinia pestis by mass spectrometry analysis. Genotyping based on tandem repeat polymorphism assigned the strain to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis sequence type 42 (ST42). The total assembly length is 4,894,739 bp.

  14. Pseudogene accumulation might promote the adaptive microevolution of Yersinia pestis

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    Tong, Zongzhong; Zhou, Dongsheng; Song, Yajun

    2005-01-01

    Plague is a natural focus-based disease, and for better understanding of this disease it is crucial to determine the molecular mechanisms of its pathogen, Yersinia pestis, for adapting to different foci. Gene inactivation, loss and acquisition are the main mechanisms that contribute to a pathogen....... pestis from different natural plague foci in China based on pseudogene profiles. Twenty-four mutations that led to inactivation in the corresponding genes were analysed, and a PCR-based screening method was employed to investigate the distribution of these mutations among Y. pestis isolates from...

  15. Genotyping, Orientalis-like Yersinia pestis, and plague pandemics.

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    Drancourt, Michel; Roux, Véronique; Dang, La Vu; Tran-Hung, Lam; Castex, Dominique; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Crubézy, Eric; Raoult, Didier

    2004-09-01

    Three pandemics have been attributed to plague in the last 1,500 years. Yersinia pestis caused the third, and its DNA was found in human remains from the second. The Antiqua biovar of Y. pestis may have caused the first pandemic; the other two biovars, Medievalis and Orientalis, may have caused the second and third pandemics, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we designed an original genotyping system based on intergenic spacer sequencing called multiple spacer typing (MST). We found that MST differentiated every biovar in a collection of 36 Y. pestis isolates representative of the three biovars. When MST was applied to dental pulp collected from remains of eight persons who likely died in the first and second pandemics, this system identified original sequences that matched those of Y. pestis Orientalis. These data indicate that Y. pestis caused cases of Justinian plague. The two historical plague pandemics were likely caused by Orientalis-like strains.

  16. Insights into the genome evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

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    Souza, B; Stoutland, P; Derbise, A; Georgescu, A; Elliott, J; Land, M; Marceau, M; Motin, V; Hinnebusch, J; Simonet, M; Medigue, C; Dacheux, D; Chenal-Francisque, V; Regala, W; Brubaker, R R; Carniel, E; Chain, P; Verguez, L; Fowler, J; Garcia, E; Lamerdin, J; Hauser, L; Larimer, F

    2004-01-24

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a highly uniform clone that diverged recently from the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Despite their close genetic relationship, they differ radically in their pathogenicity and transmission. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and its use for detailed genome comparisons to available Y. pestis sequences. Analyses of identified differences across a panel of Yersinia isolates from around the world reveals 32 Y. pestis chromosomal genes that, together with the two Y. pestis-specific plasmids, represent the only new genetic material in Y. pestis acquired since the divergence from Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, 149 new pseudogenes (doubling the previous estimate) and 317 genes absent from Y. pestis were detected, indicating that as many as 13% of Y. pseudotuberculosis genes no longer function in Y. pestis. Extensive IS-mediated genome rearrangements and reductive evolution through massive gene loss, resulting in elimination and modification of pre-existing gene expression pathways appear to be more important than acquisition of new genes in the evolution of Y. pestis. These results provide a sobering example of how a highly virulent epidemic clone can suddenly emerge from a less virulent, closely related progenitor.

  17. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis through biotinylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smither, S.J.; Hill, J.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Titball, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria contains proteins that might be good targets for vaccines, antimicrobials or detection systems. The identification of surface located proteins using traditional methods is often difficult. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, was labelled with

  18. Role of the Yersinia pestis yersiniabactin iron acquisition system in the incidence of flea-borne plague.

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    Florent Sebbane

    Full Text Available Plague is a flea-borne zoonosis caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mutants lacking the yersiniabactin (Ybt siderophore-based iron transport system are avirulent when inoculated intradermally but fully virulent when inoculated intravenously in mice. Presumably, Ybt is required to provide sufficient iron at the peripheral injection site, suggesting that Ybt would be an essential virulence factor for flea-borne plague. Here, using a flea-to-mouse transmission model, we show that a Y. pestis strain lacking the Ybt system causes fatal plague at low incidence when transmitted by fleas. Bacteriology and histology analyses revealed that a Ybt-negative strain caused only primary septicemic plague and atypical bubonic plague instead of the typical bubonic form of disease. The results provide new evidence that primary septicemic plague is a distinct clinical entity and suggest that unusual forms of plague may be caused by atypical Y. pestis strains.

  19. Proteomic Characterization of Host Response to Yersinia pestis

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    Chromy, B; Perkins, J; Heidbrink, J; Gonzales, A; Murhpy, G; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-05-11

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  20. Constitutive uptake and degradation of fatty acids by Yersinia pestis.

    OpenAIRE

    Moncla, B. J.; Hillier, S L; Charnetzky, W T

    1983-01-01

    Yersinia pestis was found to utilize palmitic acid as a primary carbon and energy source. No inhibition of growth by palmitic acid was observed. Comparison of palmitic acid uptake by cells pregrown either with or without palmitic acid demonstrated that fatty acid uptake was constitutive. High basal levels of two enzymes of beta-oxidation, beta-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase and thiolase, and the two enzymes of the glyoxylate shunt, isocitrate lyase and malate synthase, were found in cel...

  1. Investigating the ?Trojan Horse? Mechanism of Yersinia pestis Virulence

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    McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Fitch, J P

    2005-02-08

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is a Gram-negative, highly communicable, enteric bacterium that has been responsible for three historic plague pandemics. Currently, several thousand cases of plague are reported worldwide annually, and Y. pestis remains a considerable threat from a biodefense perspective. Y. pestis infection can manifest in three forms: bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. Of these three forms, pneumonic plague has the highest fatality rate ({approx}100% if left untreated), the shortest intervention time ({approx}24 hours), and is highly contagious. Currently, there are no rapid, widely available vaccines for plague and though plague may be treated with antibiotics, the emergence of both naturally occurring and potentially engineered antibiotic resistant strains makes the search for more effective therapies and vaccines for plague of pressing concern. The virulence mechanism of this deadly bacterium involves induction of a Type III secretion system, a syringe-like apparatus that facilitates the injection of virulence factors, termed Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops), into the host cell. These virulence factors inhibit phagocytosis and cytokine secretion, and trigger apoptosis of the host cell. Y. pestis virulence factors and the Type III secretion system are induced thermally, when the bacterium enters the mammalian host from the flea vector, and through host cell contact (or conditions of low Ca{sup 2+} in vitro). Apart from the temperature increase from 26 C to 37 C and host cell contact (or low Ca{sup 2+} conditions), other molecular mechanisms that influence virulence induction in Y. pestis are largely uncharacterized. This project focused on characterizing two novel mechanisms that regulate virulence factor induction in Y. pestis, immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding and quorum sensing, using a real-time reporter system to monitor induction of virulence. Incorporating a better understanding of the mechanisms of virulence

  2. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

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    Stephanie Haensch

    Full Text Available From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  3. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

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    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-10-07

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  4. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of Yersinia pestis by MLVA: insights into the worldwide expansion of Central Asia plague foci.

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    Yanjun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The species Yersinia pestis is commonly divided into three classical biovars, Antiqua, Medievalis, and Orientalis, belonging to subspecies pestis pathogenic for human and the (atypical non-human pathogenic biovar Microtus (alias Pestoides including several non-pestis subspecies. Recent progress in molecular typing methods enables large-scale investigations in the population structure of this species. It is now possible to test hypotheses about its evolution which were proposed decades ago. For instance the three classical biovars of different geographical distributions were suggested to originate from Central Asia. Most investigations so far have focused on the typical pestis subspecies representatives found outside of China, whereas the understanding of the emergence of this human pathogen requires the investigation of strains belonging to subspecies pestis from China and to the Microtus biovar. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multi-locus VNTR analysis (MLVA with 25 loci was performed on a collection of Y. pestis isolates originating from the majority of the known foci worldwide and including typical rhamnose-negative subspecies pestis as well as rhamnose-positive subspecies pestis and biovar Microtus. More than 500 isolates from China, the Former Soviet Union (FSU, Mongolia and a number of other foci around the world were characterized and resolved into 350 different genotypes. The data revealed very close relationships existing between some isolates from widely separated foci as well as very high diversity which can conversely be observed between nearby foci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results obtained are in full agreement with the view that the Y. pestis subsp. pestis pathogenic for humans emerged in the Central Asia region between China, Kazakhstan, Russia and Mongolia, only three clones of which spread out of Central Asia. The relationships among the strains in China, Central Asia and the rest of the world based on the MLVA

  5. Microevolution and history of the plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtman, Mark; Morelli, Giovanna; Zhu, Peixuan; Wirth, Thierry; Diehl, Ines; Kusecek, Barica; Vogler, Amy J; Wagner, David M; Allender, Christopher J; Easterday, W Ryan; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Worsham, Patricia; Thomson, Nicholas R; Parkhill, Julian; Lindler, Luther E; Carniel, Elisabeth; Keim, Paul

    2004-12-21

    The association of historical plague pandemics with Yersinia pestis remains controversial, partly because the evolutionary history of this largely monomorphic bacterium was unknown. The microevolution of Y. pestis was therefore investigated by three different multilocus molecular methods, targeting genomewide synonymous SNPs, variation in number of tandem repeats, and insertion of IS100 insertion elements. Eight populations were recognized by the three methods, and we propose an evolutionary tree for these populations, rooted on Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The tree invokes microevolution over millennia, during which enzootic pestoides isolates evolved. This initial phase was followed by a binary split 6,500 years ago, which led to populations that are more frequently associated with human disease. These populations do not correspond directly to classical biovars that are based on phenotypic properties. Thus, we recommend that henceforth groupings should be based on molecular signatures. The age of Y. pestis inferred here is compatible with the dates of historical pandemic plague. However, it is premature to infer an association between any modern molecular grouping and a particular pandemic wave that occurred before the 20th century.

  6. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (Michigan); (NIH); (Michigan-Med)

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  7. Research concerning Yersinia pestis and its significance in military medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-fu YANG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the military medicine progresses, the scope of protective medicine against biological threats should be extended to any facets that can cause biological threats, including biowarfare, bioterrorisms, invasion of alien organisms, loss of biological resources, genetically modified organisms, and emerging infectious diseases. Yersinia pestis is the pathogen for a typical zoonotic disease, plague, and it is also one of important biowarfare or bioterrorism agents. In history, this pathogen once caused three pandemics, and it was employed several times in war causing infection of military personnels many times. Currently, plague is distributed in Asia, former Soviet Union region, Africa and America. In China, there are 12 kinds of natural plague foci at present, distributing in 19 provinces (regions and covering about 15% of our land area. Plague surveillance demonstrated that animal plague is active in some natural foci, area of plague foci is increasing gradually and extending to the border of cities, indicating that we have faced a great challenge for plague prevention and control. After 9/11 terrorist attack in U. S. A., studies on Y. pestis grew very rapidly and the progress has laid a solid foundation for researches on other bioterrorism-associated pathogens. Source-tracing database for microbial forensics analysis of Y. pestis and the rapid no-site detection method for this pathogen are also excellent experience for establishing other bioterrorism agents.

  8. Yersinia pestis: new evidence for an old infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten I Bos

    Full Text Available The successful reconstruction of an ancient bacterial genome from archaeological material presents an important methodological advancement for infectious disease research. The reliability of evolutionary histories inferred by the incorporation of ancient data, however, are highly contingent upon the level of genetic diversity represented in modern genomic sequences that are publicly accessible, and the paucity of available complete genomes restricts the level of phylogenetic resolution that can be obtained. Here we add to our original analysis of the Yersinia pestis strain implicated in the Black Death by consolidating our dataset for 18 modern genomes with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data for an additional 289 strains at over 600 positions. The inclusion of this additional data reveals a cluster of Y. pestis strains that diverge at a time significantly in advance of the Black Death, with divergence dates roughly coincident with the Plague of Justinian (6(th to 8(th century AD. In addition, the analysis reveals further clues regarding potential radiation events that occurred immediately preceding the Black Death, and the legacy it may have left in modern Y. pestis populations. This work reiterates the need for more publicly available complete genomes, both modern and ancient, to achieve an accurate understanding of the history of this bacterium.

  9. A bibliography of literature pertaining to plague (Yersinia pestis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Laura E.; Frank, Megan K. Eberhardt

    2011-01-01

    Plague is an acute and often fatal zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mainly cycles between small mammals and their fleas; however, it has the potential to infect humans and frequently causes fatalities if left untreated. It is often considered a disease of the past; however, since the late 1800s, plagueis geographic range has expanded greatly, posing new threats in previously unaffected regions of the world, including the Western United States. A literature search was conducted using Internet resources and databases. The keywords chosen for the searches included plague, Yersinia pestis, management, control, wildlife, prairie dogs, fleas, North America, and mammals. Keywords were used alone or in combination with the other terms. Although this search pertains mostly to North America, citations were included from the international research community, as well. Databases and search engines used included Google (http://www.google.com), Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com), SciVerse Scopus (http://www.scopus.com), ISI Web of Knowledge (http://apps.isiknowledge.com), and the USGS Library's Digital Desktop (http://library.usgs.gov). The literature-cited sections of manuscripts obtained from keyword searches were cross-referenced to identify additional citations or gray literature that was missed by the Internet search engines. This Open-File Report, published as an Internet-accessible bibliography, is intended to be periodically updated with new citations or older references that may have been missed during this compilation. Hence, the authors would be grateful to receive notice of any new or old papers that the audience (users) think need to be included.

  10. Analysis of Autoinducer-2 Quorum Sensing in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Madsen, Melissa L.; Carruthers, Michael D.; Phillips, Gregory J.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Boyd, Jeff M.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    The autoinducer-2 (AI-2) quorum-sensing system has been linked to diverse phenotypes and regulatory changes in pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we performed a molecular and biochemical characterization of the AI-2 system in Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. In strain CO92, the AI-2 signal is produced in a luxS-dependent manner, reaching maximal levels of 2.5 μM in the late logarithmic growth phase, and both wild-type and pigmentation (pgm) mutant strains made equivalent levels of AI-2. Strain CO92 possesses a chromosomal lsr locus encoding factors involved in the binding and import of AI-2, and confirming this assignment, an lsr deletion mutant increased extracellular pools of AI-2. To assess the functional role of AI-2 sensing in Y. pestis, microarray studies were conducted by comparing Δpgm strain R88 to a Δpgm ΔluxS mutant or a quorum-sensing-null Δpgm ΔypeIR ΔyspIR ΔluxS mutant at 37°C. Our data suggest that AI-2 quorum sensing is associated with metabolic activities and oxidative stress genes that may help Y. pestis survive at the host temperature. This was confirmed by observing that the luxS mutant was more sensitive to killing by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting a potential requirement for AI-2 in evasion of oxidative damage. We also show that a large number of membrane protein genes are controlled by LuxS, suggesting a role for quorum sensing in membrane modeling. Altogether, this study provides the first global analysis of AI-2 signaling in Y. pestis and identifies potential roles for the system in controlling genes important to disease. PMID:23959719

  11. Fur is a repressor of biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjun Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis synthesizes the attached biofilms in the flea proventriculus, which is important for the transmission of this pathogen by fleas. The hmsHFRS operons is responsible for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide (the major component of biofilm matrix, which is activated by the signaling molecule 3', 5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP synthesized by the only two diguanylate cyclases HmsT, and YPO0449 (located in a putative operonYPO0450-0448. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The phenotypic assays indicated that the transcriptional regulator Fur inhibited the Y. pestis biofilm production in vitro and on nematode. Two distinct Fur box-like sequences were predicted within the promoter-proximal region of hmsT, suggesting that hmsT might be a direct Fur target. The subsequent primer extension, LacZ fusion, electrophoretic mobility shift, and DNase I footprinting assays disclosed that Fur specifically bound to the hmsT promoter-proximal region for repressing the hmsT transcription. In contrast, Fur had no regulatory effect on hmsHFRS and YPO0450-0448 at the transcriptional level. The detection of intracellular c-di-GMP levels revealed that Fur inhibited the c-di-GMP production. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Y. pestis Fur inhibits the c-di-GMP production through directly repressing the transcription of hmsT, and thus it acts as a repressor of biofilm formation. Since the relevant genetic contents for fur, hmsT, hmsHFRS, and YPO0450-0448 are extremely conserved between Y. pestis and typical Y. pseudotuberculosis, the above regulatory mechanisms can be applied to Y. pseudotuberculosis.

  12. Gr1(+) Cells Control Growth of YopM-Negative Yersinia pestis during Systemic Plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Z.; Kerschen, E.J.; Cohen, D.; Kaplan, A.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Straley, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    YopM, a protein toxin of Yersinia pestis, is necessary for virulence in a mouse model of systemic plague. We previously reported YopM-dependent natural killer (NK) cell depletion from blood and spleen samples of infected mice. However, in this study we found that infection with Y. pestis KIM5 (YopM(

  13. Bacteriophage-Resistant Mutants in Yersinia pestis: Identification of Phage Receptors and Attenuation for Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    pseudotuberculosis or Yersinia enterocolitica and has a low plaquing efficiency on E. coli K-12 (A.A. Filippov, Y. He, and K.V. Sergueev, unpublished...were shown to affect Y. pestis virulence (Table 7). It has been previously found that mutants of Yersinia enterocolitica [84], Salmonella enterica [85...44. Al-Hendy A, Toivanen P, Skurnik M (1991) Expression cloning of the Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 rfb gene cluster in Escherichia coli K12. Microb

  14. Early Divergent Strains of Yersinia pestis in Eurasia 5,000 Years Ago

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Nielsen, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria Yersinia pestis is the etiological agent of plague and has caused human pandemics with millions of deaths in historic times. How and when it originated remains contentious. Here, we report the oldest direct evidence of Yersinia pestis identified by ancient DNA in human teeth from Asi...

  15. Yersinia pestis intracellular parasitism of macrophages from hosts exhibiting high and low severity of plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Ponnusamy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis causes severe disease in natural rodent hosts, but mild to inapparent disease in certain rodent predators such as dogs. Y. pestis initiates infection in susceptible hosts by parasitizing and multiplying intracellularly in local macrophages prior to systemic dissemination. Thus, we hypothesize that Y. pestis disease severity may depend on the degree to which intracellular Y. pestis overcomes the initial host macrophage imposed stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, the progression of in vitro infection by Y. pestis KIM62053.1+ of mouse splenic and RAW264.7 tissue culture macrophages and dog peripheral blood-derived and DH82 tissue culture macrophages was studied using microscopy and various parameters of infection. The study showed that during the early stage of infection, intracellular Y. pestis assumed filamentous cellular morphology with multiple copies of the genome per bacterium in both mouse and dog macrophages. Later, in mouse macrophages, the infection elicited spacious vacuolar extension of Yersinia containing vacuoles (YCV, and the filamentous Y. pestis reverted to coccobacillary morphology with genomic equivalents approximately equaling colony forming units. In contrast, Y. pestis infected dog macrophages did not show noticeable extension of YCV, and intracellular Y. pestis retained the filamentous cellular morphology for the entire experiment in DH82 cells or were killed by blood-derived macrophages. In addition, during the later stage of infection, Y. pestis infected mouse macrophages exhibited cell lysis whereas dog macrophages did not. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Y. pestis in mouse macrophages can overcome the initial intracellular stress necessary for subsequent systemic infection. However, in dogs, failure of Y. pestis to overcome macrophage imposed stress may result in mild or in apparent disease in dogs.

  16. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis Determined by Broth Microdilution following CLSI Methods

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 45 antibiotics were determined for 30 genetically and geographically diverse strains of Yersinia pestis by the broth microdilution method at two temperatures, 28°C and 35°C, following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The Y. pestis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactams, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Only a 1-well shift was observed for the majority of antibiotics between the two te...

  17. Rapid identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis by chip-based continuous flow PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzsch, Michael; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2012-06-01

    To combat the threat of biological agents like Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis in bioterroristic scenarios requires fast, easy-to-use and safe identification systems. In this study we describe a system for rapid amplification of specific genetic markers for the identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis. Using chip based PCR and continuous flow technology we were able to amplify the targets simultaneously with a 2-step reaction profile within 20 minutes. The subsequent analysis of amplified fragments by standard gel electrophoresis requires another 45 minutes. We were able to detect both pathogens within 75 minutes being much faster than most other nucleic acid amplification technologies.

  18. Dynamics of CRISPR Loci in Microevolutionary Process of Yersinia pestis Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Maria Paloma S.; França, Camila T.; Lins, Rosanny Holanda F. B.; Santos, Milena Danda V.; Silva, Ednaldo J.; Oliveira, Maria Betânia M.; Silveira-Filho, Vladimir M.; Rezende, Antônio M.; Balbino, Valdir Q.; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The potential use of CRISPR loci genotyping to elucidate population dynamics and microevolution of 146 Yersinia pestis strains from different biovars and locations was investigated in this work. The majority of strains from the Orientalis biovar presented specific spacer arrays, allowing for the establishment of a CRISPR signature for their respective isolates. Twenty-one new spacers were found in the Y. pestis strains from plague foci in Brazil. Ninety-three (64%) strains were grouped in the G1 genotype, whereas the others were distributed in 35 genotypes. This study allowed observing a microevolutionary process in a group of Y. pestis isolated from Brazil. We also identified specific genotypes of Y. pestis that were important for the establishment of the bacteria in plague foci in Brazil. The data have provided supporting evidence for the diversity and dynamics of CRISPR loci present in the genome of Y. pestis strains from plague foci in Brazil. PMID:25265542

  19. Phenotypic characterization of OmpX, an Ail homologue of Yersinia pestis KIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejek, Anna M; Sinclair, Dylan J; Seo, Keun S; Schnider, Darren R; Deobald, Claudia F; Rohde, Harold N; Viall, Austin K; Minnich, Scott S; Hovde, Carolyn J; Minnich, Scott A; Bohach, Gregory A

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the Yersinia pestis KIM OmpX protein. Yersinia spp. provide a model for studying several virulence processes including attachment to, and internalization by, host cells. For Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Ail, YadA and Inv, have been implicated in these processes. In Y. pestis, YadA and Inv are inactivated. Genomic analysis of two Y. pestis strains revealed four loci with sequence homology to Ail. One of these genes, designated y1324 in the Y. pestis KIM database, encodes a protein designated OmpX. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 17.47 kDa, shares approximately 70 % sequence identity with Y. enterocolitica Ail, and has an identical homologue, designated Ail, in the Y. pestis CO92 database. The present study compared the Y. pestis KIM6(+) parental strain with a mutant derivative having an engineered disruption of the OmpX structural gene. The parental strain (and a merodiploid control strain) expressed OmpX at 28 and 37 degrees C, and the protein was detectable throughout all phases of growth. OmpX was required for efficient adherence to, and internalization by, cultured HEp-2 cell monolayers and conferred resistance to the bactericidal effect of human serum. Deletion of ompX resulted in a significantly reduced autoaggregation phenotype and loss of pellicle formation in vitro. These results suggest that Y. pestis OmpX shares functional homology with Y. enterocolitica Ail in adherence, internalization into epithelial cells and serum resistance.

  20. Different region analysis for genotyping Yersinia pestis isolates from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DFR (different region analysis has been developed for typing Yesinia pestis in our previous study, and in this study, we extended this method by using 23 DFRs to investigate 909 Chinese Y. pestis strains for validating DFR-based genotyping method and better understanding adaptive microevolution of Y. pestis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On the basis of PCR and Bionumerics data analysis, 909 Y. pestis strains were genotyped into 32 genomovars according to their DFR profiles. New terms, Major genomovar and Minor genomovar, were coined for illustrating evolutionary relationship between Y. pestis strains from different plague foci and different hosts. In silico DFR profiling of the completed or draft genomes shed lights on the evolutionary scenario of Y. pestis from Y. pseudotuberculosis. Notably, several sequenced Y. pestis strains share the same DFR profiles with Chinese strains, providing data for revealing the global plague foci expansion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Distribution of Y. pestis genomovars is plague focus-specific. Microevolution of biovar Orientalis was deduced according to DFR profiles. DFR analysis turns to be an efficient and inexpensive method to portrait the genome plasticity of Y. pestis based on horizontal gene transfer (HGT. DFR analysis can also be used as a tool in comparative and evolutionary genomic research for other bacteria with similar genome plasticity.

  1. Dermal neutrophil, macrophage and dendritic cell responses to Yersinia pestis transmitted by fleas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G Shannon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is typically transmitted by the bite of an infected flea. Many aspects of mammalian innate immune response early after Y. pestis infection remain poorly understood. A previous study by our lab showed that neutrophils are the most prominent cell type recruited to the injection site after intradermal needle inoculation of Y. pestis, suggesting that neutrophil interactions with Y. pestis may be important in bubonic plague pathogenesis. In the present study, we developed new tools allowing for intravital microscopy of Y. pestis in the dermis of an infected mouse after transmission by its natural route of infection, the bite of an infected flea. We found that uninfected flea bites typically induced minimal neutrophil recruitment. The magnitude of neutrophil response to flea-transmitted Y. pestis varied considerably and appeared to correspond to the number of bacteria deposited at the bite site. Macrophages migrated towards flea bite sites and interacted with small numbers of flea-transmitted bacteria. Consistent with a previous study, we observed minimal interaction between Y. pestis and dendritic cells; however, dendritic cells did consistently migrate towards flea bite sites containing Y. pestis. Interestingly, we often recovered viable Y. pestis from the draining lymph node (dLN 1 h after flea feeding, indicating that the migration of bacteria from the dermis to the dLN may be more rapid than previously reported. Overall, the innate cellular host responses to flea-transmitted Y. pestis differed from and were more variable than responses to needle-inoculated bacteria. This work highlights the importance of studying the interactions between fleas, Y. pestis and the mammalian host to gain a better understanding of the early events in plague pathogenesis.

  2. Novel genetic tools for diaminopimelic acid selection in virulence studies of Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Bland

    Full Text Available Molecular studies of bacterial virulence are enhanced by expression of recombinant DNA during infection to allow complementation of mutants and expression of reporter proteins in vivo. For highly pathogenic bacteria, such as Yersinia pestis, these studies are currently limited because deliberate introduction of antibiotic resistance is restricted to those few which are not human treatment options. In this work, we report the development of alternatives to antibiotics as tools for host-pathogen research during Yersinia pestis infections focusing on the diaminopimelic acid (DAP pathway, a requirement for cell wall synthesis in eubacteria. We generated a mutation in the dapA-nlpB(dapX operon of Yersinia pestis KIM D27 and CO92 which eliminated the expression of both genes. The resulting strains were auxotrophic for diaminopimelic acid and this phenotype was complemented in trans by expressing dapA in single and multi-copy. In vivo, we found that plasmids derived from the p15a replicon were cured without selection, while selection for DAP enhanced stability without detectable loss of any of the three resident virulence plasmids. The dapAX mutation rendered Y. pestis avirulent in mouse models of bubonic and septicemic plague which could be complemented when dapAX was inserted in single or multi-copy, restoring development of disease that was indistinguishable from the wild type parent strain. We further identified a high level, constitutive promoter in Y. pestis that could be used to drive expression of fluorescent reporters in dapAX strains that had minimal impact to virulence in mouse models while enabling sensitive detection of bacteria during infection. Thus, diaminopimelic acid selection for single or multi-copy genetic systems in Yersinia pestis offers an improved alternative to antibiotics for in vivo studies that causes minimal disruption to virulence.

  3. Whole genome multilocus sequence typing as an epidemiologic tool for Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingry, Luke C; Rowe, Lori A; Respicio-Kingry, Laurel B; Beard, Charles B; Schriefer, Martin E; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2016-04-01

    Human plague is a severe and often fatal zoonotic disease caused by Yersinia pestis. For public health investigations of human cases, nonintensive whole genome molecular typing tools, capable of defining epidemiologic relationships, are advantageous. Whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST) is a recently developed methodology that simplifies genomic analyses by transforming millions of base pairs of sequence into character data for each gene. We sequenced 13 US Y. pestis isolates with known epidemiologic relationships. Sequences were assembled de novo, and multilocus sequence typing alleles were assigned by comparison against 3979 open reading frames from the reference strain CO92. Allele-based cluster analysis accurately grouped the 13 isolates, as well as 9 publicly available Y. pestis isolates, by their epidemiologic relationships. Our findings indicate wgMLST is a simplified, sensitive, and scalable tool for epidemiologic analysis of Y. pestis strains.

  4. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, David A; Molineux, Ian J; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific 'bioluminescent' reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method.

  5. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, David A.; Molineux, Ian J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific ‘bioluminescent’ reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method. PMID:22579583

  6. Early Divergent Strains of Yersinia pestis in Eurasia 5,000 Years Ago

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Nielsen, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria Yersinia pestis is the etiological agent of plague and has caused human pandemics with millions of deaths in historic times. How and when it originated remains contentious. Here, we report the oldest direct evidence of Yersinia pestis identified by ancient DNA in human teeth from Asia...... and Europe dating from 2,800 to 5,000 years ago. By sequencing the genomes, we find that these ancient plague strains are basal to all known Yersinia pestis. We find the origins of the Yersinia pestis lineage to be at least two times older than previous estimates. We also identify a temporal sequence of...... genetic changes that lead to increased virulence and the emergence of the bubonic plague. Our results show that plague infection was endemic in the human populations of Eurasia at least 3,000 years before any historical recordings of pandemics....

  7. Transit through the flea vector induces a pretransmission innate immunity resistance phenotype in Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is transmitted to mammals by infected fleas. Y. pestis exhibits a distinct life stage in the flea, where it grows in the form of a cohesive biofilm that promotes transmission. After transmission, the temperature shift to 37 degrees C induces many known virulence factors of Y. pestis that confer resistance to innate immunity. These factors are not produced in the low-temperature environment of the flea, however, suggesting that Y. pestis is vulnerable to the initial encounter with innate immune cells at the flea bite site. In this study, we used whole-genome microarrays to compare the Y. pestis in vivo transcriptome in infective fleas to in vitro transcriptomes in temperature-matched biofilm and planktonic cultures, and to the previously characterized in vivo gene expression profile in the rat bubo. In addition to genes involved in metabolic adaptation to the flea gut and biofilm formation, several genes with known or predicted roles in resistance to innate immunity and pathogenicity in the mammal were upregulated in the flea. Y. pestis from infected fleas were more resistant to phagocytosis by macrophages than in vitro-grown bacteria, in part attributable to a cluster of insecticidal-like toxin genes that were highly expressed only in the flea. Our results suggest that transit through the flea vector induces a phenotype that enhances survival and dissemination of Y. pestis after transmission to the mammalian host.

  8. A comprehensive study on the role of the Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Hawkey, S.; Kleij, D. van der; Broekhuijsen, M.P.; Silman, N.J.; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    We determined the role of Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague. Eleven strains of Y. pestis were characterized using PCR assays to detect the presence of known virulence genes both encoded by the three plasmids as well as chromosomal markers. The virulence of all

  9. A comprehensive study on the role of the Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Hawkey, S.; van der Kleij, D.; Broekhuijsen, M.P.; Silman, N.J.; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the Gram-negative bacterial agent of plague, is a zoonotic pathogen that primarily infects wild rodents and is transmitted by fleas. Y. pestis is one of the most invasive and virulent bacterial pathogens and has caused devastating pandemics, including the Black Death of 14th century

  10. A comprehensive study on the role of the Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Kaman (Wendy); S. Hawkey; D. van der Kleij (Desiree); M.P. Broekhuijsen; N.J. Silman; F.J. Bikker (Floris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe determined the role of Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague. Eleven strains of Y. pestis were characterized using PCR assays to detect the presence of known virulence genes both encoded by the three plasmids as well as chromosomal markers. The virul

  11. Preliminary validation of real-time PCR assays for the identification of Yersinia pestis (Authors' personal document)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaso, H.; Jacobs, D.; Eickhoff, M.; Scholz, H.C.; Dahouk, S.al; Kattar, M.M.; Reischl, U.; Plicka, H.; Strand Olsen, J.; Nikkari, S.; Matero, P.; Beuret, C.; Ciammaruconi, A.; Lista, F.; Gala, J.-L.; Broll, H.; Appel, B.; Sellek Cano, R.E.; Ybarra de Villavicencio, M.d.C.; Broekhuijsen, M.P.; Indra, A.; Petersen, R.; Neubauer, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) is a zoonotic bacterium mainly circulating among rodents and their fleas. Transmission to humans can cause bubonic, pneumonic or septicemic plague with a high case-fatality rate. Therefore, rapid and reliable diagnostic tools are crucial. The objective of this

  12. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Connor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH.

  13. Genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Yersinia pestis, strain 91001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navid, A; Almaas, E

    2009-01-13

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, the aetiological agent of bubonic plague, is one the deadliest pathogens known to man. Despite its historical reputation, plague is a modern disease which annually afflicts thousands of people. Public safety considerations greatly limit clinical experimentation on this organism and thus development of theoretical tools to analyze the capabilities of this pathogen is of utmost importance. Here, we report the first genome-scale metabolic model of Yersinia pestis biovar Mediaevalis based both on its recently annotated genome, and physiological and biochemical data from literature. Our model demonstrates excellent agreement with Y. pestis known metabolic needs and capabilities. Since Y. pestis is a meiotrophic organism, we have developed CryptFind, a systematic approach to identify all candidate cryptic genes responsible for known and theoretical meiotrophic phenomena. In addition to uncovering every known cryptic gene for Y. pestis, our analysis of the rhamnose fermentation pathway suggests that betB is the responsible cryptic gene. Despite all of our medical advances, we still do not have a vaccine for bubonic plague. Recent discoveries of antibiotic resistant strains of Yersinia pestis coupled with the threat of plague being used as a bioterrorism weapon compel us to develop new tools for studying the physiology of this deadly pathogen. Using our theoretical model, we can study the cell's phenotypic behavior under different circumstances and identify metabolic weaknesses which may be harnessed for the development of therapeutics. Additionally, the automatic identification of cryptic genes expands the usage of genomic data for pharmaceutical purposes.

  14. [Plague in Algeria: about five strains of Yersinia pestis isolated during the outbreak of June 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounici, M; Lazri, M; Rahal, K

    2005-02-01

    In this study, we isolated and identified five strains of Yersinia pestis during an epidemic occurred in west of Algeria in June 2003. The bacteriological identification was confirmed by bacteriophage susceptibility. All these strains belonged to the biovar Orientalis (they did not ferment glycerol but did reduce nitrate to nitrite) which caused the current pandemic. The in vitro activities of antimicrobial agents used to treat plague and recommended for prophylaxis, showed that they are active against all strains. The comparison of these strains by plasmid profile analyse demonstrated that all isolates had three plasmids: 110, 70 and 9.5 kb, which are present in Y. pestis strains.

  15. Inactivation of Peroxiredoxin 6 by the Pla Protease of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbler, Daniel L; Eddy, Justin L; Schroeder, Jay A; Lathem, Wyndham W

    2015-11-09

    Pneumonic plague represents the most severe form of disease caused by Yersinia pestis due to its ease of transmission, rapid progression, and high mortality rate. The Y. pestis outer membrane Pla protease is essential for the development of pneumonic plague; however, the complete repertoire of substrates cleaved by Pla in the lungs is not known. In this study, we describe a proteomic screen to identify host proteins contained within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice that are cleaved and/or processed by Y. pestis in a Pla-dependent manner. We identified peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), a host factor that contributes to pulmonary surfactant metabolism and lung defense against oxidative stress, as a previously unknown substrate of Pla. Pla cleaves Prdx6 at three distinct sites, and these cleavages disrupt both the peroxidase and phospholipase A2 activities of Prdx6. In addition, we found that infection with wild-type Y. pestis reduces the abundance of extracellular Prdx6 in the lungs compared to that after infection with Δpla Y. pestis, suggesting that Pla cleaves Prdx6 in the pulmonary compartment. However, following infection with either wild-type or Δpla Y. pestis, Prdx6-deficient mice exhibit no differences in bacterial burden, host immune response, or lung damage from wild-type mice. Thus, while Pla is able to disrupt Prdx6 function in vitro and reduce Prdx6 levels in vivo, the cleavage of Prdx6 has little detectable impact on the progression or outcome of pneumonic plague.

  16. Gene flow in a Yersinia pestis vector, Oropsylla hirsuta, during a plague epizootic

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    Philip H. Jones , Leigh R. Washburn & Hugh B. Britten

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Appreciating how Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, spreads amongblack-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus colonies (BTPD, is vital to wildlife conservation programsin North American grasslands. A little-studied aspect of the system is the role of Y. pestis vectors, i.e. fleas,play in the spreading of plague in natural settings. We investigated the genetic structure and variability of acommon prairie dog flea (Oropsylla hirsuta in BTPD colonies in order to examine dispersal patterns. Giventhat this research took place during a widespread plague epizootic, there was the added advantage of gaininginformation on the dynamics of sylvatic plague.Methods & Results: Oropsylla hirsuta were collected from BTPD burrows in nine colonies from May 2005 toJuly 2005, and eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to generate genotypic data from them.Gene flow estimates revealed low genetic differentiation among fleas sampled from different colonies. NestedPCR plague assays confirmed the presence of Y. pestis with the average Y. pestis prevalence across all ninecolonies at 12%. No significant correlations were found between the genetic variability and gene flow of O.hirsuta and Y. pestis prevalence on a per-colony basis.Conclusion: Oropsylla hirsuta dispersal among BTPD colonies was high, potentially explaining the rapidspread of Y. pestis in our study area in 2005 and 2006.

  17. Cell envelope components of Yersinia pestis grown in intraperitoneal diffusion chambers

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    Rita C. C. Ferreira

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrophoretic profiles of penicillin binding proteins (PBPs and outer membrane proteins (OMPs of Yersinia pestis EV 76 were determined following in vivo growth in diffusion chambers implanted in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In contrast to Y. pestis grown under in vitro conditions which activate the low calcium response (LCR regulon there was no significant qualitative or quantitative change of the PBP profile of Y. pestis cells during growth in diffusion chambers for up to 72 h following implantation in mice. Three OMPs, with molecular weight of 100, 60 and 58 kDa, were expressed in Y. pestis cells grown for 24 h, but not at 48 h or at 72 h, in diffusion chambers. These results indicate that growth of Y. pestis in intraperitoneal diffusion chambers activates genes which might be relevant to the growth in the mammal host.Os perfis eletroforéticos de proteínas ligadoras de penicilina (PLPs e proteínas de membrana externa (PMEs de Yersinia pestis EV 76 foram determinados após crescimento in vivo em câmaras de difusão implantadas na cavidade peritoneal de camundongos. Em contraste com o observado em amostras de Y. pestis crescidas in vitro em condições que ativem a resposta ao baixo nível de cálcio (RBC, não houve mudanças qualitativas ou quantitativas no perfil de PLPs de Y. pestis durante o crescimento em câmaras de difusão por até 72 h após a implantação em camundongos. Três PMEs, com peso molecular de 100, 60 e 58 kDa, foram expressas por células de Y. pestis em 24 h, mas não em 48 e 72 h, após a implantação das câmaras de difusão. Estes resultados indicam que o crescimento de células de Y. pestis em câmaras de difusão intraperitoniais podem resultar na ativação de genes relevantes para o crescimento no hospedeiro mamífero.

  18. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis experimental infection in wild Rattus rattus, reservoir of plague in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C., Pernechele, B., Mäkinen, H., Parratt, S., Nemeth, M., Kovacs, G., Levente, K. Tack, A.; Rahalison, L.; Ranjalahy, M.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahelinirina, S.; Telfer, S.; Brouat, Carine

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between rat populations from the plague focus (central highlands) and those from the plague-free zone (low altit...

  19. [PCR-derived technology in gene identification and typing of Yersinia pestis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Tang, Xinyuan; Wang, Zuyun

    2015-01-01

    Application of the PCR-derived technology in gene identification and genotypes of different ecotype Yersinia pestis to make the high-throughput experimental results can reflect the epidemic history and compare the diversity in genome, pathogenicity, so that results from these experiments provide an important basis for clinical diagnosis, treatment and origin. But the experiment should be considered typing ability, practicality, budget and other experimental factors or conditions, because each PCR-derivative technology has advantages and disadvantages.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing regulation in Yersinia pestis [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRock, Christopher N; Yu, Jing; Horswill, Alexander R; Parsek, Matthew R; Minion, F Chris

    2013-01-01

    The etiologic agent of bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis, senses self-produced, secreted chemical signals in a process named quorum sensing. Though the closely related enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis uses quorum sensing system to regulate motility, the role of quorum sensing in Y. pestis has been unclear. In this study we performed transcriptional profiling experiments to identify Y. pestis quorum sensing regulated functions. Our analysis revealed that acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing controls the expression of several metabolic functions. Maltose fermentation and the glyoxylate bypass are induced by acyl-homoserine lactone signaling. This effect was observed at 30°C, indicating a potential role for quorum sensing regulation of metabolism at temperatures below the normal mammalian temperature. It is proposed that utilization of alternative carbon sources may enhance growth and/or survival during prolonged periods in natural habitats with limited nutrient sources, contributing to maintenance of plague in nature.

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis of Yersinia pestis in response to hyperosmotic and high-salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Pang, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Song, Yajun; Tong, Zongzhong; Bao, Jingyue; Dai, Erhei; Wang, Jin; Guo, Zhaobiao; Zhai, Junhui; Du, Zongmin; Wang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Jian; Huang, Peitang; Yang, Ruifu

    2005-04-01

    DNA microarray was used as a tool to investigate genome-wide transcriptional responses of Yersinia pestis to hyperosmotic and high-salinity stress. Hyperosmotic stress specifically upregulated genes responsible for ABC-type transport and the cytoplasmic accumulation of certain polysaccharides, while high-salinity stress induced the transcription of genes encoding partition proteins and several global transcriptional regulators. Genes whose transcription was enhanced by both kinds of stress comprised those encoding osmoprotectant transport systems and a set of virulence determinants. The number of genes downregulated by the two kinds of stress was much lower than that of upregulated genes, suggesting that neither kind of stress severely depresses cellular processes in general. Many differentially regulated genes still exist whose functions remain unknown. Y. pestis recognized high-salinity and hyperosmotic stress as different kinds of environmental stimuli, and different mechanisms enabled acclimation to these two kinds of stress, although Y. pestis still executed common mechanisms to accommodate both types of stress.

  2. Differences in the stability of the plasmids of Yersinia pestis cultures in vitro: impact on virulence

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    TC Leal-Balbino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid and chromosomal genes encode determinants of virulence for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. However, in vitro, Y. pestis genome is very plastic and several changes have been described. To evaluate the alterations in the plasmid content of the cultures in vitro and the impact of the alterations to their pathogenicity, three Y. pestis isolates were submitted to serial subculture, analysis of the plasmid content, and testing for the presence of characteristic genes in each plasmid of colonies selected after subculture. Different results were obtained with each strain. The plasmid content of one of them was shown to be stable; no apparent alteration was produced through 32 subcultures. In the other two strains, several alterations were observed. LD50 in mice of the parental strains and the derived cultures with different plasmid content were compared. No changes in the virulence plasmid content could be specifically correlated with changes in the LD50.

  3. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis determined by broth microdilution following CLSI methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Henry S; Hershfield, Jeremy; Marchand, Charles; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K; Worsham, Patricia L

    2015-04-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 45 antibiotics were determined for 30 genetically and geographically diverse strains of Yersinia pestis by the broth microdilution method at two temperatures, 28°C and 35°C, following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The Y. pestis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactams, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Only a 1-well shift was observed for the majority of antibiotics between the two temperatures. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of Y. pestis strains by standardized methods and establishing population ranges and MIC50 and MIC90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and also provide a baseline for use in monitoring any future emergence of resistance.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing regulation in Yersinia pestis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N LaRock

    Full Text Available The etiologic agent of bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis, senses self-produced, secreted chemical signals in a process named quorum sensing. Though the closely related enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis uses quorum sensing system to regulate motility, the role of quorum sensing in Y. pestis has been unclear. In this study we performed transcriptional profiling experiments to identify Y. pestis quorum sensing regulated functions. Our analysis revealed that acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing controls the expression of several metabolic functions. Maltose fermentation and the glyoxylate bypass are induced by acyl-homoserine lactone signaling. This effect was observed at 30°C, indicating a potential role for quorum sensing regulation of metabolism at temperatures below the normal mammalian temperature. It is proposed that utilization of alternative carbon sources may enhance growth and/or survival during prolonged periods in natural habitats with limited nutrient sources, contributing to maintenance of plague in nature.

  5. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

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    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  6. Phylogeography and molecular epidemiology of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar.

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    Amy J Vogler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plague was introduced to Madagascar in 1898 and continues to be a significant human health problem. It exists mainly in the central highlands, but in the 1990s was reintroduced to the port city of Mahajanga, where it caused extensive human outbreaks. Despite its prevalence, the phylogeography and molecular epidemiology of Y. pestis in Madagascar has been difficult to study due to the great genetic similarity among isolates. We examine island-wide geographic-genetic patterns based upon whole-genome discovery of SNPs, SNP genotyping and hypervariable variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR loci to gain insight into the maintenance and spread of Y. pestis in Madagascar. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed a set of 262 Malagasy isolates using a set of 56 SNPs and a 43-locus multi-locus VNTR analysis (MLVA system. We then analyzed the geographic distribution of the subclades and identified patterns related to the maintenance and spread of plague in Madagascar. We find relatively high levels of VNTR diversity in addition to several SNP differences. We identify two major groups, Groups I and II, which are subsequently divided into 11 and 4 subclades, respectively. Y. pestis appears to be maintained in several geographically separate subpopulations. There is also evidence for multiple long distance transfers of Y. pestis, likely human mediated. Such transfers have resulted in the reintroduction and establishment of plague in the port city of Mahajanga, where there is evidence for multiple transfers both from and to the central highlands. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The maintenance and spread of Y. pestis in Madagascar is a dynamic and highly active process that relies on the natural cycle between the primary host, the black rat, and its flea vectors as well as human activity.

  7. An experimentally-supported genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction for Yersinia pestis CO92

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    Motin Vladimir L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes plague, a disease linked historically to the Black Death in Europe during the Middle Ages and to several outbreaks during the modern era. Metabolism in Y. pestis displays remarkable flexibility and robustness, allowing the bacterium to proliferate in both warm-blooded mammalian hosts and cold-blooded insect vectors such as fleas. Results Here we report a genome-scale reconstruction and mathematical model of metabolism for Y. pestis CO92 and supporting experimental growth and metabolite measurements. The model contains 815 genes, 678 proteins, 963 unique metabolites and 1678 reactions, accurately simulates growth on a range of carbon sources both qualitatively and quantitatively, and identifies gaps in several key biosynthetic pathways and suggests how those gaps might be filled. Furthermore, our model presents hypotheses to explain certain known nutritional requirements characteristic of this strain. Conclusions Y. pestis continues to be a dangerous threat to human health during modern times. The Y. pestis genome-scale metabolic reconstruction presented here, which has been benchmarked against experimental data and correctly reproduces known phenotypes, provides an in silico platform with which to investigate the metabolism of this important human pathogen.

  8. Vulnerabilities in Yersinia pestis caf operon are unveiled by a Salmonella vector.

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    Ling Cao

    Full Text Available During infection, Yersinia pestis uses its F1 capsule to enhance survival and cause virulence to mammalian host. Since F1 is produced in large quantities and secreted into the host tissues, it also serves as a major immune target. To hold this detrimental effect under proper control, Y. pestis expresses the caf operon (encoding the F1 capsule in a temperature-dependent manner. However, additional properties of the caf operon limit its expression. By overexpressing the caf operon in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under a potent promoter, virulence of Salmonella was greatly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, expression of the caf operon under the regulation of its native promoter exhibited negligible impairment of Salmonellae virulence. In-depth investigation revealed all individual genes in the caf operon attenuated Salmonella when overexpressed. The deleterious effects of caf operon and the caf individual genes were further confirmed when they were overexpressed in Y. pestis KIM6+. This study suggests that by using a weak inducible promoter, the detrimental effects of the caf operon are minimally manifested in Y. pestis. Thus, through tight regulation of the caf operon, Y. pestis precisely balances its capsular anti-phagocytic properties with the detrimental effects of caf during interaction with mammalian host.

  9. Vulnerabilities in Yersinia pestis caf operon are unveiled by a Salmonella vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Thornburg, Theresa; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-01-01

    During infection, Yersinia pestis uses its F1 capsule to enhance survival and cause virulence to mammalian host. Since F1 is produced in large quantities and secreted into the host tissues, it also serves as a major immune target. To hold this detrimental effect under proper control, Y. pestis expresses the caf operon (encoding the F1 capsule) in a temperature-dependent manner. However, additional properties of the caf operon limit its expression. By overexpressing the caf operon in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under a potent promoter, virulence of Salmonella was greatly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, expression of the caf operon under the regulation of its native promoter exhibited negligible impairment of Salmonellae virulence. In-depth investigation revealed all individual genes in the caf operon attenuated Salmonella when overexpressed. The deleterious effects of caf operon and the caf individual genes were further confirmed when they were overexpressed in Y. pestis KIM6+. This study suggests that by using a weak inducible promoter, the detrimental effects of the caf operon are minimally manifested in Y. pestis. Thus, through tight regulation of the caf operon, Y. pestis precisely balances its capsular anti-phagocytic properties with the detrimental effects of caf during interaction with mammalian host.

  10. Resistance to Innate Immunity Contributes to Colonization of the Insect Gut by Yersinia pestis.

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    Shaun C Earl

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, is typically a zoonotic vector-borne disease of wild rodents. Bacterial biofilm formation in the proventriculus of the flea contributes to chronic infection of fleas and facilitates efficient disease transmission. However prior to biofilm formation, ingested bacteria must survive within the flea midgut, and yet little is known about vector-pathogen interactions that are required for flea gut colonization. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model system to gain insight into Y. pestis colonization of the insect vector. We show that Y. pestis establishes a stable infection in the anterior midgut of fly larvae, and we used this model system to study the roles of genes involved in biofilm production and/or resistance to gut immunity stressors. We find that PhoP and GmhA both contribute to colonization and resistance to antimicrobial peptides in flies, and furthermore, the data suggest biofilm formation may afford protection against antimicrobial peptides. Production of reactive oxygen species in the fly gut, as in fleas, also serves to limit bacterial infection, and OxyR mediates Y. pestis survival in both insect models. Overall, our data establish the fruit fly as an informative model to elucidate the relationship between Y. pestis and its flea vector.

  11. Subcellular proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions using human monocytes exposed to Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C G; Gonzales, A D; Choi, M W; Chromy, B A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2004-05-20

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is of concern to human health both from an infectious disease and a civilian biodefense perspective. While Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis share more than 90% DNA homology, they have significantly different clinical manifestations. Plague is often fatal if untreated, yet Y. pseudotuberculosis causes severe intestinal distress and is rarely fatal. A better understanding of host response to these closely related pathogens may help explain the different mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis that result in such different clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize host protein expression changes in human monocyte-like U937 cells after exposure to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. In order to gain global proteomic coverage of host response, proteins from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions of host cells were studied by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and relative protein expression differences were quantitated. Differentially expressed proteins, with at least 1.5 fold expression changes and p values of 0.01 or less, were identified by MALDI-MS or LC/MS/MS. With these criteria, differential expression was detected in 16 human proteins after Y. pestis exposure and 13 human proteins after Y. pseudotuberculosis exposure, of which only two of the differentially expressed proteins identified were shared between the two exposures. Proteins identified in this study are reported to be involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions and host defense mechanisms including apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA replication and transcription, metabolism, protein folding, and cell signaling. Notably, the differential expression patterns observed can distinguish the two pathogen exposures from each other and from unexposed host cells. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins identified provide insight on the different

  12. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis KIM as a vaccine against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Six, David; Kuang, Xiaoying; Roland, Kenneth L; Raetz, Christian R H; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-04-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a potential weapon of bioterrorism. Y. pestis evades the innate immune system by synthesizing tetra-acylated lipid A with poor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-stimulating activity at 37°C, whereas hexa-acylated lipid A, a potent TLR4 agonist, is made at lower temperatures. Synthesis of Escherichia coli LpxL, which transfers the secondary laurate chain to the 2'-position of lipid A, in Y. pestis results in production of hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C, leading to significant attenuation of virulence. Previously, we described a Y. pestis vaccine strain in which crp expression is under the control of the arabinose-regulated araC P(BAD) promoter, resulting in a 4-5 log reduction in virulence. To reduce the virulence of the crp promoter mutant further, we introduced E. coli lpxL into the Y. pestis chromosome. The χ10030(pCD1Ap) (ΔlpxP32::P(lpxL)lpxL ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD)crp) construct likewise produced hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C and was significantly more attenuated than strains harboring each individual mutation. The LD(50) of the mutant in mice, when administered subcutaneously or intranasally was >10(7)-times and >10(4)-times greater than wild type, respectively. Mice immunized subcutaneously with a single dose of the mutant were completely protected against a subcutaneous challenge of 3.6×10(7) wild-type Y. pestis and significantly protected (80% survival) against a pulmonary challenge of 1.2×10(4) live cells. Intranasal immunization also provided significant protection against challenges by both routes. This mutant is an immunogenic, highly attenuated live Y. pestis construct that merits further development as a vaccine candidate.

  13. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

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    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  14. Duration of plague (Yersinia pestis) outbreaks in black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies of northern Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Romain, Krista; Tripp, Daniel W; Salkeld, Daniel J; Antolin, Michael F

    2013-09-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, triggers die-offs in colonies of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), but the time-frame of plague activity is not well understood. We document plague activity in fleas from prairie dogs and their burrows on three prairie dog colonies that suffered die-offs. We demonstrate that Y. pestis transmission occurs over periods from several months to over a year in prairie dog populations before observed die-offs.

  15. Immunization of mice with YscF provides protection from Yersinia pestis infections

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    Bradley David S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a pathogen with a tremendous ability to cause harm and panic in populations. Due to the severity of plague and its potential for use as a bioweapon, better preventatives and therapeutics for plague are desirable. Subunit vaccines directed against the F1 capsular antigen and the V antigen (also known as LcrV of Y. pestis are under development. However, these new vaccine formulations have some possible limitations. The F1 antigen is not required for full virulence of Y. pestis and LcrV has a demonstrated immunosuppressive effect. These limitations could damper the ability of F1/LcrV based vaccines to protect against F1-minus Y. pestis strains and could lead to a high rate of undesired side effects in vaccinated populations. For these reasons, the use of other antigens in a plague vaccine formulation may be advantageous. Results Desired features in vaccine candidates would be antigens that are conserved, essential for virulence and accessible to circulating antibody. Several of the proteins required for the construction or function of the type III secretion system (TTSS complex could be ideal contenders to meet the desired features of a vaccine candidate. Accordingly, the TTSS needle complex protein, YscF, was selected to investigate its potential as a protective antigen. In this study we describe the overexpression, purification and use of YscF as a protective antigen. YscF immunization triggers a robust antibody response to YscF and that antibody response is able to afford significant protection to immunized mice following challenge with Y. pestis. Additionally, evidence is presented that suggests antibody to YscF is likely not protective by blocking the activity of the TTSS. Conclusion In this study we investigated YscF, a surface-expressed protein of the Yersinia pestis type III secretion complex, as a protective antigen against experimental plague infection. Immunization of

  16. Tandem repeats analysis for the high resolution phylogenetic analysis of Yersinia pestis

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    Ramisse F

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is a young and highly monomorphic species. Three biovars, each one thought to be associated with the last three Y. pestis pandemics, have been defined based on biochemical assays. More recently, DNA based assays, including DNA sequencing, IS typing, DNA arrays, have significantly improved current knowledge on the origin and phylogenetic evolution of Y. pestis. However, these methods suffer either from a lack of resolution or from the difficulty to compare data. Variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs provides valuable polymorphic markers for genotyping and performing phylogenetic analyses in a growing number of pathogens and have given promising results for Y. pestis as well. Results In this study we have genotyped 180 Y. pestis isolates by multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA using 25 markers. Sixty-one different genotypes were observed. The three biovars were distributed into three main branches, with some exceptions. In particular, the Medievalis phenotype is clearly heterogeneous, resulting from different mutation events in the napA gene. Antiqua strains from Asia appear to hold a central position compared to Antiqua strains from Africa. A subset of 7 markers is proposed for the quick comparison of a new strain with the collection typed here. This can be easily achieved using a Web-based facility, specifically set-up for running such identifications. Conclusion Tandem-repeat typing may prove to be a powerful complement to the existing phylogenetic tools for Y. pestis. Typing can be achieved quickly at a low cost in terms of consumables, technical expertise and equipment. The resulting data can be easily compared between different laboratories. The number and selection of markers will eventually depend upon the type and aim of investigations.

  17. Insight into microevolution of Yersinia pestis by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

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    Yujun Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis, the pathogen of plague, has greatly influenced human history on a global scale. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR, an element participating in immunity against phages' invasion, is composed of short repeated sequences separated by unique spacers and provides the basis of the spoligotyping technology. In the present research, three CRISPR loci were analyzed in 125 strains of Y. pestis from 26 natural plague foci of China, the former Soviet Union and Mongolia were analyzed, for validating CRISPR-based genotyping method and better understanding adaptive microevolution of Y. pestis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using PCR amplification, sequencing and online data processing, a high degree of genetic diversity was revealed in all three CRISPR elements. The distribution of spacers and their arrays in Y. pestis strains is strongly region and focus-specific, allowing the construction of a hypothetic evolutionary model of Y. pestis. This model suggests transmission route of microtus strains that encircled Takla Makan Desert and ZhunGer Basin. Starting from Tadjikistan, one branch passed through the Kunlun Mountains, and moved to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Another branch went north via the Pamirs Plateau, the Tianshan Mountains, the Altai Mountains and the Inner Mongolian Plateau. Other Y. pestis lineages might be originated from certain areas along those routes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CRISPR can provide important information for genotyping and evolutionary research of bacteria, which will help to trace the source of outbreaks. The resulting data will make possible the development of very low cost and high-resolution assays for the systematic typing of any new isolate.

  18. Yersinia pestis with regulated delayed attenuation as a vaccine candidate to induce protective immunity against plague.

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    Sun, Wei; Roland, Kenneth L; Kuang, Xiaoying; Branger, Christine G; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Two mutant strains of Yersinia pestis KIM5+, a Deltacrp mutant and a mutant with arabinose-dependent regulated delayed-shutoff crp expression (araC P(BAD) crp), were constructed, characterized in vitro, and evaluated for virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice. Both strains were highly attenuated by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. The 50% lethal doses (LD(50)s) of the Deltacrp and araC P(BAD) crp mutants were approximately 1,000,000-fold and 10,000-fold higher than those of Y. pestis KIM5+, respectively, indicating that both strains were highly attenuated. Mice vaccinated s.c. with 3.8 x 10(7) CFU of the Deltacrp mutant developed high anti-Y. pestis and anti-LcrV serum IgG titers, both with a strong Th2 bias, and induced protective immunity against subcutaneous challenge with virulent Y. pestis (80% survival) but no protection against pulmonary challenge. Mice vaccinated with 3.0 x 10(4) CFU of the araC P(BAD) crp mutant also developed high anti-Y. pestis and anti-LcrV serum IgG titers but with a more balanced Th1/Th2 response. This strain induced complete protection against s.c. challenge and partial protection (70% survival) against pulmonary challenge. Our results demonstrate that arabinose-dependent regulated crp expression is an effective strategy to attenuate Y. pestis while retaining strong immunogenicity, leading to protection against the pneumonic and bubonic forms of plague.

  19. The role of relA and spoT in Yersinia pestis KIM5 pathogenicity.

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    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available The ppGpp molecule is part of a highly conserved regulatory system for mediating the growth response to various environmental conditions. This mechanism may represent a common strategy whereby pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, regulate the virulence gene programs required for invasion, survival and persistence within host cells to match the capacity for growth. The products of the relA and spoT genes carry out ppGpp synthesis. To investigate the role of ppGpp on growth, protein synthesis, gene expression and virulence, we constructed a Delta relA Delta spoT Y. pestis mutant. The mutant was no longer able to synthesize ppGpp in response to amino acid or carbon starvation, as expected. We also found that it exhibited several novel phenotypes, including a reduced growth rate and autoaggregation at 26 degrees C. In addition, there was a reduction in the level of secretion of key virulence proteins and the mutant was > 1,000-fold less virulent than its wild-type parent strain. Mice vaccinated subcutaneously (s.c. with 2.5x10(4 CFU of the Delta relA Delta spoT mutant developed high anti-Y. pestis serum IgG titers, were completely protected against s.c. challenge with 1.5x10(5 CFU of virulent Y. pestis and partially protected (60% survival against pulmonary challenge with 2.0x10(4 CFU of virulent Y. pestis. Our results indicate that ppGpp represents an important virulence determinant in Y. pestis and the Delta relA Delta spoT mutant strain is a promising vaccine candidate to provide protection against plague.

  20. Imaging of bubonic plague dynamics by in vivo tracking of bioluminescent Yersinia pestis.

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    Toan Nham

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis dissemination in a host is usually studied by enumerating bacteria in the tissues of animals sacrificed at different times. This laborious methodology gives only snapshots of the infection, as the infectious process is not synchronized. In this work we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI to follow Y. pestis dissemination during bubonic plague. We first demonstrated that Y. pestis CO92 transformed with pGEN-luxCDABE stably emitted bioluminescence in vitro and in vivo, while retaining full virulence. The light produced from live animals allowed to delineate the infected organs and correlated with bacterial loads, thus validating the BLI tool. We then showed that the first step of the infectious process is a bacterial multiplication at the injection site (linea alba, followed by a colonization of the draining inguinal lymph node(s, and subsequently of the ipsilateral axillary lymph node through a direct connection between the two nodes. A mild bacteremia and an effective filtering of the blood stream by the liver and spleen probably accounted for the early bacterial blood clearance and the simultaneous development of bacterial foci within these organs. The saturation of the filtering capacity of the spleen and liver subsequently led to terminal septicemia. Our results also indicate that secondary lymphoid tissues are the main targets of Y. pestis multiplication and that colonization of other organs occurs essentially at the terminal phase of the disease. Finally, our analysis reveals that the high variability in the kinetics of infection is attributable to the time the bacteria remain confined at the injection site. However, once Y. pestis has reached the draining lymph nodes, the disease progresses extremely rapidly, leading to the invasion of the entire body within two days and to death of the animals. This highlights the extraordinary capacity of Y. pestis to annihilate the host innate immune response.

  1. Genome sequence of the deep-rooted Yersinia pestis strain Angola reveals new insights into the evolution and pangenome of the plague bacterium.

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    Eppinger, Mark; Worsham, Patricia L; Nikolich, Mikeljon P; Riley, David R; Sebastian, Yinong; Mou, Sherry; Achtman, Mark; Lindler, Luther E; Ravel, Jacques

    2010-03-01

    To gain insights into the origin and genome evolution of the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, we have sequenced the deep-rooted strain Angola, a virulent Pestoides isolate. Its ancient nature makes this atypical isolate of particular importance in understanding the evolution of plague pathogenicity. Its chromosome features a unique genetic make-up intermediate between modern Y. pestis isolates and its evolutionary ancestor, Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our genotypic and phenotypic analyses led us to conclude that Angola belongs to one of the most ancient Y. pestis lineages thus far sequenced. The mobilome carries the first reported chimeric plasmid combining the two species-specific virulence plasmids. Genomic findings were validated in virulence assays demonstrating that its pathogenic potential is distinct from modern Y. pestis isolates. Human infection with this particular isolate would not be diagnosed by the standard clinical tests, as Angola lacks the plasmid-borne capsule, and a possible emergence of this genotype raises major public health concerns. To assess the genomic plasticity in Y. pestis, we investigated the global gene reservoir and estimated the pangenome at 4,844 unique protein-coding genes. As shown by the genomic analysis of this evolutionary key isolate, we found that the genomic plasticity within Y. pestis clearly was not as limited as previously thought, which is strengthened by the detection of the largest number of isolate-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) currently reported in the species. This study identified numerous novel genetic signatures, some of which seem to be intimately associated with plague virulence. These markers are valuable in the development of a robust typing system critical for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies.

  2. MOLECULAR AND EVOLUTIONARY INSIGHTS INTO YERSINIA PESTIS; HARBINGER OF PLAGUE

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    Stephen Anderson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plague has been the scourge of mankind for millennia; yet it was not until the late 18th Century that its causative agent was identified. Prokaryotic Y. pestis is responsible for plague; bacilli are consumed through arthropod feeding on infected rodential reservoirs. Arthropod uptake is essential for transmission as the bacilli proliferate within their gut before being refluxed into new mammalian hosts. Genomic analysis has elucidated the mechanisms facilitating this cycle along with the means by which bacilli acquire their characteristic virulence. Increasing our understanding of the evolution of Y. pestis provides putative avenues for future research. Whilst plague is considered a disease of the past by many, it interaction with humanity continues across various geographic foci. The rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria threatens to bring this ancient foe once again to the fore through the acquisition of drug resistance. This review will detail notable advances of the past decade enabling the elusive possibility of a universal vaccine for the three manifestations of plague. Development of suitable vaccines before drug resistant strains emerge is paramount. Researchers are pitted in an on-going race against bacterial evolution.

  3. Evidence of Yersinia pestis DNA from fleas in an endemic plague area of Zambia

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    Hang'ombe Bernard M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a bacterium that causes plague which infects a variety of mammals throughout the world. The disease is usually transmitted among wild rodents through a flea vector. The sources and routes of transmission of plague are poorly researched in Africa, yet remains a concern in several sub-Saharan countries. In Zambia, the disease has been reported on annual basis with up to 20 cases per year, without investigating animal reservoirs or vectors that may be responsible in the maintenance and propagation of the bacterium. In this study, we undertook plague surveillance by using PCR amplification of the plasminogen activator gene in fleas. Findings Xenopsylla species of fleas were collected from 83 rodents trapped in a plague endemic area of Zambia. Of these rodents 5 had fleas positive (6.02% for Y. pestis plasminogen activator gene. All the Y. pestis positive rodents were gerbils. Conclusions We conclude that fleas may be responsible in the transmission of Y. pestis and that PCR may provide means of plague surveillance in the endemic areas of Zambia.

  4. Silencing urease: a key evolutionary step that facilitated the adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the flea-borne transmission route.

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    Chouikha, Iman; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2014-12-30

    The arthropod-borne transmission route of Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, is a recent evolutionary adaptation. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the closely related food-and water-borne enteric species from which Y. pestis diverged less than 6,400 y ago, exhibits significant oral toxicity to the flea vectors of plague, whereas Y. pestis does not. In this study, we identify the Yersinia urease enzyme as the responsible oral toxin. All Y. pestis strains, including those phylogenetically closest to the Y. pseudotuberculosis progenitor, contain a mutated ureD allele that eliminated urease activity. Restoration of a functional ureD was sufficient to make Y. pestis orally toxic to fleas. Conversely, deletion of the urease operon in Y. pseudotuberculosis rendered it nontoxic. Enzymatic activity was required for toxicity. Because urease-related mortality eliminates 30-40% of infective flea vectors, ureD mutation early in the evolution of Y. pestis was likely subject to strong positive selection because it significantly increased transmission potential.

  5. Further development of raccoon poxvirus-vectored vaccines against plague (Yersinia pestis)

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    Rocke, T.E.; Iams, Keith P.; Dawe, S.; Smith, S.R.; Williamson, J.L.; Heisey, D.M.; Osorio, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated protection against plague in mice and prairie dogs using a raccoon pox (RCN) virus-vectored vaccine that expressed the F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis. In order to improve vaccine efficacy, we have now constructed additional RCN-plague vaccines containing two different forms of the lcrV (V) gene, including full-length (Vfull) and a truncated form (V307). Mouse challenge studies with Y. pestis strain CO92 showed that vaccination with a combination of RCN-F1 and the truncated V construct (RCN-V307) provided the greatest improvement (P = 0.01) in protection against plague over vaccination with RCN-F1 alone. This effect was mediated primarily by anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies and both contributed independently to increased survival of vaccinated mice.

  6. Effect of MarA-like proteins on antibiotic resistance and virulence in Yersinia pestis.

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    Lister, Ida M; Mecsas, Joan; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-01-01

    MarA, an AraC/XylS transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli, affects drug susceptibility and virulence. Two MarA-like proteins have been found in Yersinia pestis: MarA47 and MarA48. Deletion or overexpression of these proteins in the attenuated KIM 1001 Deltapgm strain led to a change in multidrug susceptibility (including susceptibility to clinically relevant drugs). Additionally, lung colonization by the marA47 or marA48 deletion mutant was decreased about 10-fold in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Complementation of the deletions by replacing the deleted genes on the chromosome restored wild-type characteristics. These findings show that two MarA homologs in Y. pestis affect antibiotic susceptibility and virulence.

  7. Early host cell targets of Yersinia pestis during primary pneumonic plague.

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    Roger D Pechous

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Yersinia pestis causes primary pneumonic plague, a highly lethal syndrome with mortality rates approaching 100%. Pneumonic plague progression is biphasic, with an initial pre-inflammatory phase facilitating bacterial growth in the absence of host inflammation, followed by a pro-inflammatory phase marked by extensive neutrophil influx, an inflammatory cytokine storm, and severe tissue destruction. Using a FRET-based probe to quantitate injection of effector proteins by the Y. pestis type III secretion system, we show that these bacteria target alveolar macrophages early during infection of mice, followed by a switch in host cell preference to neutrophils. We also demonstrate that neutrophil influx is unable to limit bacterial growth in the lung and is ultimately responsible for the severe inflammation during the lethal pro-inflammatory phase.

  8. Temporal Global Changes in Gene Expression during Temperature Transition in Yersinia pestis

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    Motin, Vladimir L; Georgescu, Anca M.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Gu, Pauline P.; Nelson, David O.; Mabery, Shalini L.; Garnham, Janine B.; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Ott, Linda L.; Matthew A Coleman; Elliott, Jeffrey M.; Kegelmeyer, Laura M.; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Brubaker, Robert R.

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarrays encompassing the entire genome of Yersinia pestis were used to characterize global regulatory changes during steady-state vegetative growth occurring after shift from 26 to 37°C in the presence and absence of Ca2+. Transcriptional profiles revealed that 51, 4, and 13 respective genes and open reading frames (ORFs) on pCD, pPCP, and pMT were thermoinduced and that the majority of these genes carried by pCD were downregulated by Ca2+. In contrast, Ca2+ had little effect on chrom...

  9. Proteomic analysis of iron acquisition, metabolic and regulatory responses of Yersinia pestis to iron starvation

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    Fleischmann Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the bubonic plague. Efficient iron acquisition systems are critical to the ability of Y. pestis to infect, spread and grow in mammalian hosts, because iron is sequestered and is considered part of the innate host immune defence against invading pathogens. We used a proteomic approach to determine expression changes of iron uptake systems and intracellular consequences of iron deficiency in the Y. pestis strain KIM6+ at two physiologically relevant temperatures (26°C and 37°C. Results Differential protein display was performed for three Y. pestis subcellular fractions. Five characterized Y. pestis iron/siderophore acquisition systems (Ybt, Yfe, Yfu, Yiu and Hmu and a putative iron/chelate outer membrane receptor (Y0850 were increased in abundance in iron-starved cells. The iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster assembly system Suf, adapted to oxidative stress and iron starvation in E. coli, was also more abundant, suggesting functional activity of Suf in Y. pestis under iron-limiting conditions. Metabolic and reactive oxygen-deactivating enzymes dependent on Fe-S clusters or other iron cofactors were decreased in abundance in iron-depleted cells. This data was consistent with lower activities of aconitase and catalase in iron-starved vs. iron-rich cells. In contrast, pyruvate oxidase B which metabolizes pyruvate via electron transfer to ubiquinone-8 for direct utilization in the respiratory chain was strongly increased in abundance and activity in iron-depleted cells. Conclusions Many protein abundance differences were indicative of the important regulatory role of the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Iron deficiency seems to result in a coordinated shift from iron-utilizing to iron-independent biochemical pathways in the cytoplasm of Y. pestis. With growth temperature as an additional variable in proteomic comparisons of the Y. pestis fractions (26°C and 37°C, there was

  10. Amino acid and structural variability of Yersinia pestis LcrV protein

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    Anisimov, A P; Dentovskaya, S V; Panfertsev, E A; Svetoch, T E; Kopylov, P K; Segelke, B W; Zemla, A; Telepnev, M V; Motin, V L

    2009-11-09

    The LcrV protein is a multifunctional virulence factor and protective antigen of the plague bacterium which is generally conserved between the epidemic strains of Yersinia pestis. They investigated the diversity in the LcrV sequences among non-epidemic Y. pestis strains which have a limited virulence in selected animal models and for humans. Sequencing of lcrV genes from ten Y. pestis strains belonging to different phylogenetic groups (subspecies) showed that the LcrV proteins possess four major variable hotspots at positions 18, 72, 273, and 324-326. These major variations, together with other minor substitutions in amino acid sequences, allowed them to classify the LcrV alleles into five sequence types (A-E). They observed that the strains of different Y. pestis subspecies can have the same typ of LcrV, and different types of LcrV can exist within the same natural plague focus. The LcrV polymorphisms were structurally analyzed by comparing the modeled structures of LcrV from all available strains. All changes except one occurred either in flexible regions or on the surface of the protein, but local chemical properties (i.e. those of a hydrophobic, hydrophilic, amphipathic, or charged nature) were conserved across all of the strains. Polymorphisms in flexible and surface regions are likely subject to less selective pressure, and have a limited impact on the structure. In contrast, the substitution of tryptophan at position 113 with either glutamic acid or glycine likely has a serious influence on the regional structure of the protein, and these mutations might have an effect on the function of LcrV. The polymorphisms at positions 18, 72 and 273 were accountable for differences in oligomerization of LcrV. The importance of the latter property in emergence of epidemic strains of Y. pestis during evolution of this pathogen will need to be further investigated.

  11. Feeding Behavior Modulates Biofilm-Mediated Transmission of Yersinia pestis by the Cat Flea, Ctenocephalides felis.

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    David M Bland

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is prevalent worldwide, will parasitize animal reservoirs of plague, and is associated with human habitations in known plague foci. Despite its pervasiveness, limited information is available about the cat flea's competence as a vector for Yersinia pestis. It is generally considered to be a poor vector, based on studies examining early-phase transmission during the first week after infection, but transmission potential by the biofilm-dependent proventricular-blocking mechanism has never been systematically evaluated. In this study, we assessed the vector competence of cat fleas by both mechanisms. Because the feeding behavior of cat fleas differs markedly from important rat flea vectors, we also examined the influence of feeding behavior on transmission dynamics.Groups of cat fleas were infected with Y. pestis and subsequently provided access to sterile blood meals twice-weekly, 5 times per week, or daily for 4 weeks and monitored for infection, the development of proventricular biofilm and blockage, mortality, and the ability to transmit. In cat fleas allowed prolonged, daily access to blood meals, mimicking their natural feeding behavior, Y. pestis did not efficiently colonize the digestive tract and could only be transmitted during the first week after infection. In contrast, cat fleas that were fed intermittently, mimicking the feeding behavior of the efficient vector Xenopsylla cheopis, could become blocked and regularly transmitted Y. pestis for 3-4 weeks by the biofilm-mediated mechanism, but early-phase transmission was not detected.The normal feeding behavior of C. felis, more than an intrinsic resistance to infection or blockage by Y. pestis, limits its vector competence. Rapid turnover of midgut contents results in bacterial clearance and disruption of biofilm accumulation in the proventriculus. Anatomical features of the cat flea foregut may also restrict transmission by both early-phase and

  12. Inactivation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, as a surrogate for Yersinia pestis, by liquid biocides in the presence of food residue.

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    Hilgren, J; Swanson, K M J; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Cords, B

    2009-02-01

    The efficacy of liquid biocides is influenced by surface cleanliness, treatment time, and temperature. Experiments were completed to measure the impact of these variables on the ability of commercial biocides to inactivate Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ATCC 29910, as a surrogate for Yersinia pestis, in the presence of food residues. The test organism was mixed with water, milk, flour, or egg yolk and then dried onto stainless steel coupons. Coupons were then exposed to sodium hypochlorite, acidified sodium chlorite, a quaternary ammonium compound, an iodophor, hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacetic acid, or a peroxy-fatty acid mixture, for 10 or 30 min at 10, 20, or 30 degrees C. For all biocides except the iodophor, manufacturer-recommended disinfection levels applied for 10 min at 20 degrees C resulted in 5-log reductions of the test organism dried alone or with flour. However, in the presence of whole milk or egg yolk residue, markedly higher sodium hypochlorite, peroxyacetic acid, peroxy-fatty acid mixture, quaternary ammonium compound, and iodophor concentrations were needed to achieve the 5-log reductions. Further, the quaternary ammonium compound was incapable of achieving 5-log reductions in 10 min in the presence of milk and egg yolk residues. Hydrogen peroxide and acidified sodium chlorite disinfection levels (7.5% and 2500 ppm, respectively) achieved 5-log reductions under all test conditions. These results suggest that commercial disinfectants can adequately decontaminate clean surfaces contaminated with Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis. These results also provide guidance on the feasibility of overcoming the negative influence of food residues on disinfection by adjusting biocide exposure time, temperature, and concentration.

  13. Kinetic analysis of Yersinia pestis DNA adenine methyltransferase activity using a hemimethylated molecular break light oligonucleotide.

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    Robert J Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in several critical bacterial processes including mismatch repair, the timing of DNA replication and the transcriptional control of gene expression. The dependence of bacterial virulence on DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam has led to the proposal that selective Dam inhibitors might function as broad spectrum antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the expression and purification of Yersinia pestis Dam and the development of a continuous fluorescence based assay for DNA adenine methyltransferase activity that is suitable for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and for high throughput screening against potential Dam inhibitors. The assay utilised a hemimethylated break light oligonucleotide substrate containing a GATC methylation site. When this substrate was fully methylated by Dam, it became a substrate for the restriction enzyme DpnI, resulting in separation of fluorophore (fluorescein and quencher (dabcyl and therefore an increase in fluorescence. The assays were monitored in real time using a fluorescence microplate reader in 96 well format and were used for the kinetic characterisation of Yersinia pestis Dam, its substrates and the known Dam inhibitor, S-adenosylhomocysteine. The assay has been validated for high throughput screening, giving a Z-factor of 0.71+/-0.07 indicating that it is a sensitive assay for the identification of inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay is therefore suitable for high throughput screening for inhibitors of DNA adenine methyltransferases and the kinetic characterisation of the inhibition.

  14. Yersinia pestis endowed with increased cytotoxicity is avirulent in a bubonic plague model and induces rapid protection against pneumonic plague.

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    Ayelet Zauberman

    Full Text Available An important virulence strategy evolved by bacterial pathogens to overcome host defenses is the modulation of host cell death. Previous observations have indicated that Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague disease, exhibits restricted capacity to induce cell death in macrophages due to ineffective translocation of the type III secretion effector YopJ, as opposed to the readily translocated YopP, the YopJ homologue of the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica Oratio8. This led us to suggest that reduced cytotoxic potency may allow pathogen propagation within a shielded niche, leading to increased virulence. To test the relationship between cytotoxic potential and virulence, we replaced Y. pestis YopJ with YopP. The YopP-expressing Y. pestis strain exhibited high cytotoxic activity against macrophages in vitro. Following subcutaneous infection, this strain had reduced ability to colonize internal organs, was unable to induce septicemia and exhibited at least a 10(7-fold reduction in virulence. Yet, upon intravenous or intranasal infection, it was still as virulent as the wild-type strain. The subcutaneous administration of the cytotoxic Y. pestis strain appears to activate a rapid and potent systemic, CTL-independent, immunoprotective response, allowing the organism to overcome simultaneous coinfection with 10,000 LD(50 of virulent Y. pestis. Moreover, three days after subcutaneous administration of this strain, animals were also protected against septicemic or primary pneumonic plague. Our findings indicate that an inverse relationship exists between the cytotoxic potential of Y. pestis and its virulence following subcutaneous infection. This appears to be associated with the ability of the engineered cytotoxic Y. pestis strain to induce very rapid, effective and long-lasting protection against bubonic and pneumonic plague. These observations have novel implications for the development of vaccines/therapies against Y. pestis and shed

  15. Inactivation of avirulent Yersinia pestis in Butterfield's phosphate buffer and frankfurters by UVC (254 nm) and gamma radiation.

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    Sommers, Christopher H; Cooke, Peter H

    2009-04-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague. Although rare, pharyngeal plague in humans has been associated with consumption or handling of meat prepared from infected animals. The risks of contracting plague from consumption of deliberately contaminated food are currently unknown. Gamma radiation is a penetrating form of electromagnetic radiation, and UVC radiation is used for decontamination of liquids or food surfaces. Gamma radiation D10-values (the radiation dose needed to inactivate 1 log unit pathogen) were 0.23 (+/-0.01) and 0.31 (+/-0.03) kGy for avirulent Y. pestis inoculated into Butterfield's phosphate buffer and onto frankfurter surfaces, respectively, at 0 degree C. A UVC radiation dose of 0.25 J/cm2 inactivated avirulent Y. pestis suspended in Butterfield's phosphate buffer. UVC radiation doses of 0.5 to 4.0 J/cm2 inactivated 0.97 to 1.20 log units of the Y. pestis surface inoculated onto frankfurters. A low gamma radiation dose of 1.6 kGy could provide a 5-log reduction and a UVC radiation dose of 1 to 4 J/cm2 would provide a 1-log reduction of Y. pestis surface inoculated onto frankfurters. Y. pestis was capable of growth on frankfurters during refrigerated storage (10 degrees C). Gamma radiation of frankfurters inhibited the growth of Y. pestis during refrigerated storage, and UVC radiation delayed the growth of Y. pestis.

  16. Fieldable genotyping of Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis based on 25-loci Multi Locus VNTR Analysis

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    Carattoli Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthrax and plague are diseases caused by Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis respectively. These bacteria are etiological agents for worldwide zoonotic diseases and are considered among the most feared potential bioterror agents. Strain differentiation is difficult for these microorganisms because of their high intraspecies genome homogeneity. Moreover, fast strain identification and comparison with known genotypes may be crucial for naturally occurring outbreaks versus bioterrorist events discrimination. Results Thirty-nine B. anthracis and ten Y. pestis strains, representative of the species genetic diversity, were genotyped by Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer using previously described Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis assays (MLVA. Results were compared to previous data obtained by standard genotyping system (capillary electrophoresis on automatic sequencer and, when necessary, direct amplicon sequencing. A reference comparison table containing actual fragment sizes, sequencer sizes and Agilent sizes was produced. Conclusion In this report an automated DNA electrophoresis apparatus which provides a cheaper alternative compared to capillary electrophoresis approaches was applied for genotyping of B. anthracis and Y. pestis. This equipment, uses pre-cast gels and provides easy transportation, low maintenance and overall general logistic requirements and costs, is easy to set up and provides rapid analysis. This platform is a candidate for on-site MLVA genotyping of biothreat agents as well as other bacterial pathogens. It is an alternative to the more expensive and demanding capillary electrophoresis methods, and to the less expensive but more time-consuming classical gel electrophoresis approach.

  17. Comparative genomics of 2009 seasonal plague (Yersinia pestis in New Mexico.

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    Henry S Gibbons

    Full Text Available Plague disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis routinely affects animals and occasionally humans, in the western United States. The strains native to the North American continent are thought to be derived from a single introduction in the late 19(th century. The degree to which these isolates have diverged genetically since their introduction is not clear, and new genomic markers to assay the diversity of North American plague are highly desired. To assay genetic diversity of plague isolates within confined geographic areas, draft genome sequences were generated by 454 pyrosequencing from nine environmental and clinical plague isolates. In silico assemblies of Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR loci were compared to laboratory-generated profiles for seven markers. High-confidence SNPs and small Insertion/Deletions (Indels were compared to previously sequenced Y. pestis isolates. The resulting panel of mutations allowed clustering of the strains and tracing of the most likely evolutionary trajectory of the plague strains. The sequences also allowed the identification of new putative SNPs that differentiate the 2009 isolates from previously sequenced plague strains and from each other. In addition, new insertion points for the abundant insertion sequences (IS of Y. pestis are present that allow additional discrimination of strains; several of these new insertions potentially inactivate genes implicated in virulence. These sequences enable whole-genome phylogenetic analysis and allow the unbiased comparison of closely related isolates of a genetically monomorphic pathogen.

  18. The human-bacterial pathogen protein interaction networks of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

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    Matthew D Dyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis are bacterial pathogens that can cause anthrax, lethal acute pneumonic disease, and bubonic plague, respectively, and are listed as NIAID Category A priority pathogens for possible use as biological weapons. However, the interactions between human proteins and proteins in these bacteria remain poorly characterized leading to an incomplete understanding of their pathogenesis and mechanisms of immune evasion. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we used a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assay to identify physical interactions between human proteins and proteins from each of these three pathogens. From more than 250,000 screens performed, we identified 3,073 human-B. anthracis, 1,383 human-F. tularensis, and 4,059 human-Y. pestis protein-protein interactions including interactions involving 304 B. anthracis, 52 F. tularensis, and 330 Y. pestis proteins that are uncharacterized. Computational analysis revealed that pathogen proteins preferentially interact with human proteins that are hubs and bottlenecks in the human PPI network. In addition, we computed modules of human-pathogen PPIs that are conserved amongst the three networks. Functionally, such conserved modules reveal commonalities between how the different pathogens interact with crucial host pathways involved in inflammation and immunity. SIGNIFICANCE: These data constitute the first extensive protein interaction networks constructed for bacterial pathogens and their human hosts. This study provides novel insights into host-pathogen interactions.

  19. Discerning Viable from Nonviable Yersinia pestis pgm- and Bacillus anthracis Sterne using Propidium Monoazide in the Presence of White Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Becky M.; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Sydor, Michael A.; Wunschel, David S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2015-12-23

    ABSTRACT Aims To develop and optimize an assay to determine viability status of Bacillus anthracis Sterne and Yersinia pestis pgm- strains in the presence of white powders by coupling propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment with real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. Methods and Results PMA selectively enters nonviable cells and binds DNA, thereby increasing qPCR assay cycle threshold (CT) values compared to untreated samples. Dye concentration, cell number and fitness, incubation time, inactivation methods, and assay buffer were optimized for B. anthracis Sterne and Y. pestis pgm-. Differences in CT values in nonviable cells compared to untreated samples were consistently > 9 for both B. anthracis Sterne vegetative cells and Y. pestis pgm- in the presence and absence of three different white powders. Our method eliminates the need for a DNA extraction step prior to detection by qPCR. Conclusions The developed assay enables simultaneous identification and viability assessment for B. anthracis Sterne and Y. pestis pgm- under laboratory conditions, even in the presence of white powders. Eliminating the DNA extraction step that is typically used reduces total assay time and labor requirements for sample analysis. Significance and Impact of the Study The method developed for simultaneous detection and viability assessment for B. anthracis and Y. pestis can be employed in forming decisions about the severity of a biothreat event or the safety of food. Keywords Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Propidium Monoazide, qPCR, White Powders, Rapid Viability Detection

  20. Investigation of Yersinia pestis Laboratory Adaptation through a Combined Genomics and Proteomics Approach.

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    Owen P Leiser

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague in humans and animals, normally has a sylvatic lifestyle, cycling between fleas and mammals. In contrast, laboratory-grown Y. pestis experiences a more constant environment and conditions that it would not normally encounter. The transition from the natural environment to the laboratory results in a vastly different set of selective pressures, and represents what could be considered domestication. Understanding the kinds of adaptations Y. pestis undergoes as it becomes domesticated will contribute to understanding the basic biology of this important pathogen. In this study, we performed a parallel serial passage experiment (PSPE to explore the mechanisms by which Y. pestis adapts to laboratory conditions, hypothesizing that cells would undergo significant changes in virulence and nutrient acquisition systems. Two wild strains were serially passaged in 12 independent populations each for ~750 generations, after which each population was analyzed using whole-genome sequencing, LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, and GC/MS metabolomics. We observed considerable parallel evolution in the endpoint populations, detecting multiple independent mutations in ail, pepA, and zwf, suggesting that specific selective pressures are shaping evolutionary responses. Complementary LC-MS/MS proteomic data provide physiological context to the observed mutations, and reveal regulatory changes not necessarily associated with specific mutations, including changes in amino acid metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis. Proteomic data support hypotheses generated by genomic data in addition to suggesting future mechanistic studies, indicating that future whole-genome sequencing studies be designed to leverage proteomics as a critical complement.

  1. Strategy for sensitive and specific detection of Yersinia pestis in skeletons of the black death pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lisa; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Hoke, Nadja; Zöller, Lothar; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Grupe, Gisela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis has been identified as the causative agent of the Black Death pandemic in the 14(th) century. However, retrospective diagnostics in human skeletons after more than 600 years are critical. We describe a strategy following a modern diagnostic algorithm and working under strict ancient DNA regime for the identification of medieval human plague victims. An initial screening and DNA quantification assay detected the Y. pestis specific pla gene of the high copy number plasmid pPCP1. Results were confirmed by conventional PCR and sequence analysis targeting both Y. pestis specific virulence plasmids pPCP1 and pMT1. All assays were meticulously validated according to human clinical diagnostics requirements (ISO 15189) regarding efficiency, sensitivity, specificity, and limit of detection (LOD). Assay specificity was 100% tested on 41 clinically relevant bacteria and 29 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains as well as for DNA of 22 Y. pestis strains and 30 previously confirmed clinical human plague samples. The optimized LOD was down to 4 gene copies. 29 individuals from three different multiple inhumations were initially assessed as possible victims of the Black Death pandemic. 7 samples (24%) were positive in the pPCP1 specific screening assay. Confirmation through second target pMT1 specific PCR was successful for 4 of the positive individuals (14%). A maximum of 700 and 560 copies per µl aDNA were quantified in two of the samples. Those were positive in all assays including all repetitions, and are candidates for future continuative investigations such as whole genome sequencing. We discuss that all precautions taken here for the work with aDNA are sufficient to prevent external sample contamination and fulfill the criteria of authenticity. With regard to retrospective diagnostics of a human pathogen and the uniqueness of ancient material we strongly recommend using a careful strategy and validated assays as presented in our study.

  2. Strategy for sensitive and specific detection of Yersinia pestis in skeletons of the black death pandemic.

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    Lisa Seifert

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis has been identified as the causative agent of the Black Death pandemic in the 14(th century. However, retrospective diagnostics in human skeletons after more than 600 years are critical. We describe a strategy following a modern diagnostic algorithm and working under strict ancient DNA regime for the identification of medieval human plague victims. An initial screening and DNA quantification assay detected the Y. pestis specific pla gene of the high copy number plasmid pPCP1. Results were confirmed by conventional PCR and sequence analysis targeting both Y. pestis specific virulence plasmids pPCP1 and pMT1. All assays were meticulously validated according to human clinical diagnostics requirements (ISO 15189 regarding efficiency, sensitivity, specificity, and limit of detection (LOD. Assay specificity was 100% tested on 41 clinically relevant bacteria and 29 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains as well as for DNA of 22 Y. pestis strains and 30 previously confirmed clinical human plague samples. The optimized LOD was down to 4 gene copies. 29 individuals from three different multiple inhumations were initially assessed as possible victims of the Black Death pandemic. 7 samples (24% were positive in the pPCP1 specific screening assay. Confirmation through second target pMT1 specific PCR was successful for 4 of the positive individuals (14%. A maximum of 700 and 560 copies per µl aDNA were quantified in two of the samples. Those were positive in all assays including all repetitions, and are candidates for future continuative investigations such as whole genome sequencing. We discuss that all precautions taken here for the work with aDNA are sufficient to prevent external sample contamination and fulfill the criteria of authenticity. With regard to retrospective diagnostics of a human pathogen and the uniqueness of ancient material we strongly recommend using a careful strategy and validated assays as presented in our study.

  3. Molecular Survey of Bartonella Species and Yersinia pestis in Rodent Fleas (Siphonaptera) From Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Adriana M; Kosoy, Michael Y; Rubio, André V; Graham, Christine B; Montenieri, John A; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Bai, Ying; Acosta-Gutiérrez, Roxana; Ávila-Flores, Rafael; Gage, Kenneth L; Suzán, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Rodent fleas from northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed for the presence of Bartonella and Yersinia pestis. In total, 760 fleas belonging to 10 species were tested with multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the gltA (338-bp) and pla genes (478-bp) of Bartonella and Y. pestis, respectively. Although none was positive for Y. pestis, 307 fleas were infected with Bartonella spp., resulting in an overall prevalence of 40.4%. A logistic regression analysis indicated that the presence of Bartonella is more likely to occur in some flea species. From a subset of Bartonella-positive fleas, phylogenetic analyses of gltA gene sequences revealed 13 genetic variants clustering in five phylogroups (I–V), two of which were matched with known pathogenic Bartonella species (Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis and Bartonella washoensis) and two that were not related with any previously described species or subspecies of Bartonella. Variants in phylogroup V, which were mainly obtained from Meringis spp. fleas, were identical to those reported recently in their specific rodent hosts (Dipodomys spp.) in the same region, suggesting that kangaroo rats and their fleas harbor other Bartonella species not reported previously. Considering the Bartonella prevalence and the flea genotypes associated with known pathogenic Bartonella species, we suggest that analysis of rodent and flea communities in the region should continue for their potential implications for human health. Given that nearby locations in the United States have reported Y. pestis in wild animals and their fleas, we suggest conducting larger-scale studies to increase our knowledge of this bacterium.

  4. Short report: Exposing laboratory-reared fleas to soil and wild flea feces increases transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Vetter, Sara M; Gage, Kenneth L

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-reared Oropsylla montana were exposed to soil and wild-caught Oropsylla montana feces for 1 week. Fleas from these two treatments and a control group of laboratory-reared fleas were infected with Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague. Fleas exposed to soil transmitted Y. pestis to mice at a significantly greater rate (50.0% of mice were infected) than control fleas (23.3% of mice were infected). Although the concentration of Y. pestis in fleas did not differ among treatments, the minimum transmission efficiency of fleas from the soil and wild flea feces treatments (6.9% and 7.6%, respectively) were more than three times higher than in control fleas (2.2%). Our results suggest that exposing laboratory-reared fleas to diverse microbes alters transmission of Y. pestis.

  5. Yersinia pestis DNA from skeletal remains from the 6(th century AD reveals insights into Justinianic Plague.

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    Michaela Harbeck

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of the disease plague, has been implicated in three historical pandemics. These include the third pandemic of the 19(th and 20(th centuries, during which plague was spread around the world, and the second pandemic of the 14(th-17(th centuries, which included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death. Previous studies have confirmed that Y. pestis caused these two more recent pandemics. However, a highly spirited debate still continues as to whether Y. pestis caused the so-called Justinianic Plague of the 6(th-8(th centuries AD. By analyzing ancient DNA in two independent ancient DNA laboratories, we confirmed unambiguously the presence of Y. pestis DNA in human skeletal remains from an Early Medieval cemetery. In addition, we narrowed the phylogenetic position of the responsible strain down to major branch 0 on the Y. pestis phylogeny, specifically between nodes N03 and N05. Our findings confirm that Y. pestis was responsible for the Justinianic Plague, which should end the controversy regarding the etiology of this pandemic. The first genotype of a Y. pestis strain that caused the Late Antique plague provides important information about the history of the plague bacillus and suggests that the first pandemic also originated in Asia, similar to the other two plague pandemics.

  6. Yersinia pestis DNA from skeletal remains from the 6(th) century AD reveals insights into Justinianic Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, Michaela; Seifert, Lisa; Hänsch, Stephanie; Wagner, David M; Birdsell, Dawn; Parise, Katy L; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Grupe, Gisela; Thomas, Astrid; Keim, Paul; Zöller, Lothar; Bramanti, Barbara; Riehm, Julia M; Scholz, Holger C

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of the disease plague, has been implicated in three historical pandemics. These include the third pandemic of the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries, during which plague was spread around the world, and the second pandemic of the 14(th)-17(th) centuries, which included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death. Previous studies have confirmed that Y. pestis caused these two more recent pandemics. However, a highly spirited debate still continues as to whether Y. pestis caused the so-called Justinianic Plague of the 6(th)-8(th) centuries AD. By analyzing ancient DNA in two independent ancient DNA laboratories, we confirmed unambiguously the presence of Y. pestis DNA in human skeletal remains from an Early Medieval cemetery. In addition, we narrowed the phylogenetic position of the responsible strain down to major branch 0 on the Y. pestis phylogeny, specifically between nodes N03 and N05. Our findings confirm that Y. pestis was responsible for the Justinianic Plague, which should end the controversy regarding the etiology of this pandemic. The first genotype of a Y. pestis strain that caused the Late Antique plague provides important information about the history of the plague bacillus and suggests that the first pandemic also originated in Asia, similar to the other two plague pandemics.

  7. Detection of Rickettsia felis, Rickettsia typhi, Bartonella Species and Yersinia pestis in Fleas (Siphonaptera from Africa.

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    Hamza Leulmi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the presence/absence and prevalence of Rickettsia spp, Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis in domestic and urban flea populations in tropical and subtropical African countries.Fleas collected in Benin, the United Republic of Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo were investigated for the presence and identity of Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis using two qPCR systems or qPCR and standard PCR. In Xenopsylla cheopis fleas collected from Cotonou (Benin, Rickettsia typhi was detected in 1% (2/199, and an uncultured Bartonella sp. was detected in 34.7% (69/199. In the Lushoto district (United Republic of Tanzania, R. typhi DNA was detected in 10% (2/20 of Xenopsylla brasiliensis, and Rickettsia felis was detected in 65% (13/20 of Ctenocephalides felis strongylus, 71.4% (5/7 of Ctenocephalides canis and 25% (5/20 of Ctenophthalmus calceatus calceatus. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, R. felis was detected in 56.5% (13/23 of Ct. f. felis from Kinshasa, in 26.3% (10/38 of Ct. f. felis and 9% (1/11 of Leptopsylla aethiopica aethiopica from Ituri district and in 19.2% (5/26 of Ct. f. strongylus and 4.7% (1/21 of Echidnophaga gallinacea. Bartonella sp. was also detected in 36.3% (4/11 of L. a. aethiopica. Finally, in Ituri, Y. pestis DNA was detected in 3.8% (1/26 of Ct. f. strongylus and 10% (3/30 of Pulex irritans from the villages of Wanyale and Zaa.Most flea-borne infections are neglected diseases which should be monitored systematically in domestic rural and urban human populations to assess their epidemiological and clinical relevance. Finally, the presence of Y. pestis DNA in fleas captured in households was unexpected and raises a series of questions regarding the role of free fleas in the transmission of plague in rural Africa, especially in remote areas where the flea density in houses is high.

  8. Structures of OppA and PstS from Yersinia pestis indicate variability of interactions with transmembrane domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanabe, Mikio; Mirza, Osman; Bertrand, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    -infective development. Here, the crystallization of five proteins (OppA, PstS, PiuA, YrbD and CysP) from Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, are reported that diffracted to resolution limits ranging from 1.6 to 5 A. The first crystal structures of ABC system components from Y. pestis, OppA and Pst...

  9. Inhibition of expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pestis in Escherichia coli by external guide sequences and RNase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-hyeong; Izadjoo, Mina; Altman, Sidney

    2008-08-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) targeting virulence genes from Yersinia pestis were designed and tested in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. Linear EGSs and M1 RNA-linked EGSs were designed for the yscN and yscS genes that are involved in type III secretion in Y. pestis. RNase P from E. coli cleaves the messages of yscN and yscS in vitro with the cognate EGSs, and the expression of the EGSs resulted in the reduction of the levels of these messages of the virulence genes when those genes were expressed in E. coli.

  10. No evidence of deer mouse involvement in plague (Yersinia pestis) epizootics in prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Stapp, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can have devastating impacts on black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies. One suggested mechanism behind sporadic prairie dog die-offs involves an alternative mammal host, such as the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), which often inhabits prairie dog colonies. We examined the flea populations of deer mice to investigate the potential of flea-borne transmission of plague between deer mice and prairie dogs in northern Colorado, where plague is active in prairie dog colonies. Deer mice were predominantly infested with the flea Aetheca wagneri, and were rarely infested with prairie dog fleas, Oropsylla hirsuta. Likelihood of flea infestation increased with average monthly temperature, and flea loads were higher in reproductive animals. These results suggest that the deer mouse is an unlikely maintenance host of plague in this region.

  11. Lipopolysaccharides from Yersinia pestis. Studies on lipid A of lipopolysaccharides I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Venezia, N; Minka, S; Bruneteau, M; Mayer, H; Michel, G

    1985-09-01

    The chemical structure of the lipid A of lipopolysaccharide I and II from Yersinia pestis, strain EV 40, was studied. It consists of a (1 ---- 6), beta-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide which carries two phosphate groups; one phosphate is linked glycosidically with a glucosamine unit, the other one is linked to the non-reducing glucosamine. Various degradation methods combined with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that the ester-bound phosphate group is linked to a 4-aminoarabinosyl residue and the glycosidically linked phosphate group is linked to a D-arabinofuranosyl residue in lipopolysaccharide II and to the phosphorylethanolamine in lipopolysaccharide I. The hydroxyl groups of the disaccharide are acylated by dodecanoic, hexadecenoic, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids. The amino groups of the disaccharide carry 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids. In addition smaller amounts of 3-tetradecanoyloxyltetradecanoic and 3-hexadecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids are present in ester linkage.

  12. Using a bacteriocin structure to engineer a phage lysin that targets Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J; Buchanan, Susan K

    2012-12-01

    Purified phage lysins present an alternative to traditional antibiotics and work by hydrolysing peptidoglycan. Phage lysins have been developed against Gram-positive pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, where the peptidoglycan layer is exposed on the cell surface. Addition of the lysin to a bacterial culture results in rapid death of the organism. Gram-negative bacteria are resistant to phage lysins because they contain an outer membrane that protects the peptidoglycan from degradation. We solved crystal structures of a Yersinia pestis outer-membrane protein and the bacteriocin that targets it, which informed engineering of a bacterial-phage hybrid lysin that can be transported across the outer membrane to kill specific Gram-negative bacteria. This work provides a template for engineering phage lysins against a wide variety of bacterial pathogens.

  13. Temporal global changes in gene expression during temperature transition in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Vladimir L; Georgescu, Anca M; Fitch, Joseph P; Gu, Pauline P; Nelson, David O; Mabery, Shalini L; Garnham, Janine B; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Ott, Linda L; Coleman, Matthew A; Elliott, Jeffrey M; Kegelmeyer, Laura M; Wyrobek, Andrew J; Slezak, Thomas R; Brubaker, Robert R; Garcia, Emilio

    2004-09-01

    DNA microarrays encompassing the entire genome of Yersinia pestis were used to characterize global regulatory changes during steady-state vegetative growth occurring after shift from 26 to 37 degrees C in the presence and absence of Ca2+. Transcriptional profiles revealed that 51, 4, and 13 respective genes and open reading frames (ORFs) on pCD, pPCP, and pMT were thermoinduced and that the majority of these genes carried by pCD were downregulated by Ca2+. In contrast, Ca2+ had little effect on chromosomal genes and ORFs, of which 235 were thermally upregulated and 274 were thermally downregulated. The primary consequence of these regulatory events is profligate catabolism of numerous metabolites available in the mammalian host.

  14. Seroprevalence of hantavirus and Yersinia pestis antibodies in professionals from the Plague Control Program

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    Erika de Cassia Vieira da Costa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Professionals who handle rodents in the field and in the laboratory are at risk of infection by the microorganisms harbored by these animals. Methods Serum samples from professionals involved in rodent and Yersinia pestis handling in field or laboratory work were analyzed to determine hantavirus and plague seroprevalence and to establish a relationship between these activities and reports of illnesses. Results Two individuals had antibodies against hantavirus, and two harbored antibodies against the plague; none of the individuals had experienced an illness related to their duties. Conclusions These results confirm the risks of hantavirus- and plague-related field and laboratory activities and the importance of protective measures for such work.

  15. Development of Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres vaccine against plague

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    Huang SS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Shih-shiung Huang,1 I-Hsun Li,2,3 Po-da Hong,1 Ming-kung Yeh1,2,41Biomedical Engineering Program, Graduate Institute of Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide/polyethylene glycol (PEG (PLGA/PEG microspheres were produced using a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion/solvent extraction technique and assayed for their percent yield, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro release properties, and in vivo animal protect efficacy. The Y. pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres (mean particle size 3.8 µm exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w, yield (85.2%, and entrapment efficiency (38.1%, and presented a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%, then continued to release Y. pestis F1 antigen over 70 days. The distribution (% of Y. pestis F1 on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core was 3.1%, 28.9%, and 60.7%, respectively. A steady release rate was noticed to be 0.55 µg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres/day of Y. pestis F1 antigen release maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at the 1st, 28th, and 42nd days was 8.2, 26.7, and 31.0 µg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres, respectively. The 100 times median lethal dose 50% (LD50 of Y. pestis Yokohama-R strain by intraperitoneal injection challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 40 µg F1 antigen content of PLGA/PEG microspheres, F1 antigen in Al(OH3, and in comparison with F1 antigen in Al(OH3 vaccine in two doses, was evaluated after given by subcutaneous

  16. Rapid and sensitive detection of Yersinia pestis using amplification of plague diagnostic bacteriophages monitored by real-time PCR.

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    Kirill V Sergueev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, has caused many millions of human deaths and still poses a serious threat to global public health. Timely and reliable detection of such a dangerous pathogen is of critical importance. Lysis by specific bacteriophages remains an essential method of Y. pestis detection and plague diagnostics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this work was to develop an alternative to conventional phage lysis tests--a rapid and highly sensitive method of indirect detection of live Y. pestis cells based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR monitoring of amplification of reporter Y. pestis-specific bacteriophages. Plague diagnostic phages phiA1122 and L-413C were shown to be highly effective diagnostic tools for the detection and identification of Y. pestis by using qPCR with primers specific for phage DNA. The template DNA extraction step that usually precedes qPCR was omitted. phiA1122-specific qPCR enabled the detection of an initial bacterial concentration of 10(3 CFU/ml (equivalent to as few as one Y. pestis cell per 1-microl sample in four hours. L-413C-mediated detection of Y. pestis was less sensitive (up to 100 bacteria per sample but more specific, and thus we propose parallel qPCR for the two phages as a rapid and reliable method of Y. pestis identification. Importantly, phiA1122 propagated in simulated clinical blood specimens containing EDTA and its titer rise was detected by both a standard plating test and qPCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, we developed a novel assay for detection and identification of Y. pestis using amplification of specific phages monitored by qPCR. The method is simple, rapid, highly sensitive, and specific and allows the detection of only live bacteria.

  17. Forensic Signature Detection of Yersinia Pestis Culturing Practices Across Institutions Using a Bayesian Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Corley, Courtney D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Clowers, Brian H.; Dowling, Chase P.; Wahl, Karen L.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2014-03-21

    The field of bioforensics is focused on the analysis of evidence from a biocrime. Existing laboratory analyses can identify the specific strain of an organism in the evidence, as well signatures of the specific culture batch of organisms, such as low-frequency contaminants or indicators of growth and processing methods. To link these disparate types of physical data to potential suspects, investigators may need to identify institutions or individuals whose access to strains and culturing practices match those identified from the evidence. In this work we present a Bayesian statistical network to fuse different types of analytical measurements that predict the production environment of a Yersinia pestis sample under investigation with automated test processing of scientific publications to identify institutions with a history of growing Y. pestis under similar conditions. Furthermore, the textual and experimental signatures were evaluated recursively to determine the overall sensitivity of the network across all levels of false positives. We illustrate that institutions associated with several specific culturing practices can be accurately selected based on the experimental signature from only a few analytical measurements. These findings demonstrate that similar Bayesian networks can be generated generically for many organisms of interest and their deployment is not prohibitive due to either computational or experimental factors.

  18. Insight into bacterial virulence mechanisms against host immune response via the Yersinia pestis-human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-11-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP.

  19. Isolamento da Yersinia pestis nos focos pestosos do Nordeste do Brasil no período de 1966 a 1982

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    Alzira Maria Paiva de Almeida

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available No período de 1966 a 1982 foram isoladas 861 cepas de Yersinia pestis sendo 471 originadas de material de roedores e outros pequenos mamíferos, 236 de lotes de pulgas, 2 de lotes de Ornithodorus e 152 de seres humanos dos focos pestosos do Nordeste do Brasil. Entre os roedores, a espécie que concorreu para o maior número de isolamentos foi o Zygodontomys lasiurus pixuna que, também, forneceu o maior número de lotes de pulgas naturalmente infectados, principalmente do gênero Polygenis. O isolamento da Yersinia pestis de material proveniente de 13 Municípios do Estado de Pernambuco, 7 do Ceará, 3 da Paraíba, 1 do Piauí e 1 da Bahia, evidencia que o problema da peste nos focos brasileiros é bastante atual e merecedor de atenção. O maior número de cepas isoladas e de localidades afetadas, registradas no Estado de Pernambuco não significa maior incidência da peste no mesmo, mas é conseqüência da pesquisa mais intensa da Yersinia pestis e da existência de laboratórios melhor preparados para o seu diagnóstico neste Estado.

  20. Rapid detection and simultaneous antibiotic susceptibility analysis of Yersinia pestis directly from clinical specimens by use of reporter phage.

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    Vandamm, J P; Rajanna, C; Sharp, N J; Molineux, I J; Schofield, D A

    2014-08-01

    Yersinia pestis is a tier 1 agent due to its contagious pneumopathogenicity, extremely rapid progression, and high mortality rate. As the disease is usually fatal without appropriate therapy, rapid detection from clinical matrices is critical to patient outcomes. We previously engineered the diagnostic phage ΦA1122 with luxAB to create a "light-tagged" reporter phage. ΦA1122::luxAB rapidly detects Y. pestis in pure culture and human serum by transducing a bioluminescent signal response. In this report, we assessed the analytical specificity of the reporter phage and investigated diagnostic utility (detection and antibiotic susceptibility analysis) directly from spiked whole blood. The bioreporter displayed 100% (n = 59) inclusivity for Y. pestis and consistent intraspecific signal transduction levels. False positives were not obtained from species typically associated with bacteremia or those relevant to plague diagnosis. However, some non-pestis Yersinia strains and Enterobacteriaceae did elicit signals, albeit at highly attenuated transduction levels. Diagnostic performance was assayed in simple broth-enriched blood samples and standard aerobic culture bottles. In blood, antibiotics facilitated simultaneous antimicrobial susceptibility profiling. Consequently, the reporter phage demonstrated rapid detection and antibiotic susceptibility profiling directly from clinical samples, features that may improve patient prognosis during plague outbreaks.

  1. Evaluation of the Role of the opgGH Operon in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Its Deletion during the Emergence of Yersinia pestis.

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    Quintard, Kévin; Dewitte, Amélie; Reboul, Angéline; Madec, Edwige; Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Marceau, Michaël; Simonet, Michel; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Sebbane, Florent

    2015-09-01

    The opgGH operon encodes glucosyltransferases that synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from UDP-glucose, using acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a cofactor. OPGs are required for motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in various bacteria. OpgH also sequesters FtsZ in order to regulate cell size according to nutrient availability. Yersinia pestis (the agent of flea-borne plague) lost the opgGH operon during its emergence from the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. When expressed in OPG-negative strains of Escherichia coli and Dickeya dadantii, opgGH from Y. pseudotuberculosis restored OPGs synthesis, motility, and virulence. However, Y. pseudotuberculosis did not produce OPGs (i) under various growth conditions or (ii) when overexpressing its opgGH operon, its galUF operon (governing UDP-glucose), or the opgGH operon or Acp from E. coli. A ΔopgGH Y. pseudotuberculosis strain showed normal motility, biofilm formation, resistance to polymyxin and macrophages, and virulence but was smaller. Consistently, Y. pestis was smaller than Y. pseudotuberculosis when cultured at ≥ 37°C, except when the plague bacillus expressed opgGH. Y. pestis expressing opgGH grew normally in serum and within macrophages and was fully virulent in mice, suggesting that small cell size was not advantageous in the mammalian host. Lastly, Y. pestis expressing opgGH was able to infect Xenopsylla cheopis fleas normally. Our results suggest an evolutionary scenario whereby an ancestral Yersinia strain lost a factor required for OPG biosynthesis but kept opgGH (to regulate cell size). The opgGH operon was presumably then lost because OpgH-dependent cell size control became unnecessary.

  2. Characterization of late acyltransferase genes of Yersinia pestis and their role in temperature-dependent lipid A variation.

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    Rebeil, Roberto; Ernst, Robert K; Jarrett, Clayton O; Adams, Kristin N; Miller, Samuel I; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Yersinia pestis is an important human pathogen that is maintained in flea-rodent enzootic cycles in many parts of the world. During its life cycle, Y. pestis senses host-specific environmental cues such as temperature and regulates gene expression appropriately to adapt to the insect or mammalian host. For example, Y. pestis synthesizes different forms of lipid A when grown at temperatures corresponding to the in vivo environments of the mammalian host and the flea vector. At 37 degrees C, tetra-acylated lipid A is the major form; but at 26 degrees C or below, hexa-acylated lipid A predominates. In this study, we show that the Y. pestis msbB (lpxM) and lpxP homologs encode the acyltransferases that add C12 and C(16:1) groups, respectively, to lipid IV(A) to generate the hexa-acylated form, and that their expression is upregulated at 21 degrees C in vitro and in the flea midgut. A Y. pestis deltamsbB deltalpxP double mutant that did not produce hexa-acylated lipid A was more sensitive to cecropin A, but not to polymyxin B. This mutant was able to infect and block fleas as well as the parental wild-type strain, indicating that the low-temperature-dependent change to hexa-acylated lipid A synthesis is not required for survival in the flea gut.

  3. Isolation of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis from Blood Cultures by Plasma Purification and Immunomagnetic Separation Accelerates Antibiotic Susceptibility Determination

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    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Schuster, Ofir; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Ber, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    The early symptoms of tularemia and plague, which are caused by Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis infection, respectively, are common to other illnesses, resulting in a low index of suspicion among clinicians. Moreover, because these diseases can be treated only with antibiotics, rapid isolation of the bacteria and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) are preferable. Blood cultures of patients may serve as a source for bacteria isolation. However, due to the slow growth rates of F. tularensis and Y. pestis on solid media, isolation by plating blood culture samples on proper agar plates may require several days. Thus, improving the isolation procedure prior to antibiotic susceptibility determination is a major clinically relevant need. In this study, we developed a rapid, selective procedure for the isolation of F. tularensis and Y. pestis from blood cultures. We examined drop-plating and plasma purification followed by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) as alternative isolation methods. We determined that replacing the classical isolation method with drop-plating is advantageous with respect to time at the expense of specificity. Hence, we also examined isolation by IMS. Sub-localization of F. tularensis within blood cultures of infected mice has revealed that the majority of the bacteria are located within the extracellular fraction, in the plasma. Y. pestis also resides within the plasma. Therefore, the plasma fraction was isolated from blood cultures and subjected to an IMS procedure using polyclonal anti-F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) or anti-Y. pestis antibodies conjugated to 50-nm nano-beads. The time required to reach an inoculum of sufficient bacteria for AST was shortest when using the plasma and IMSs for both bacteria, saving up to 2 days of incubation for F. tularensis and 1 day for Y. pestis. Our isolation procedure provides a proof of concept for the clinical relevance of rapid isolation for AST from F. tularensis- and Y. pestis

  4. The NlpD lipoprotein is a novel Yersinia pestis virulence factor essential for the development of plague.

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    Avital Tidhar

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague. Previously we have isolated an attenuated Y. pestis transposon insertion mutant in which the pcm gene was disrupted. In the present study, we investigated the expression and the role of pcm locus genes in Y. pestis pathogenesis using a set of isogenic surE, pcm, nlpD and rpoS mutants of the fully virulent Kimberley53 strain. We show that in Y. pestis, nlpD expression is controlled from elements residing within the upstream genes surE and pcm. The NlpD lipoprotein is the only factor encoded from the pcm locus that is essential for Y. pestis virulence. A chromosomal deletion of the nlpD gene sequence resulted in a drastic reduction in virulence to an LD(50 of at least 10(7 cfu for subcutaneous and airway routes of infection. The mutant was unable to colonize mouse organs following infection. The filamented morphology of the nlpD mutant indicates that NlpD is involved in cell separation; however, deletion of nlpD did not affect in vitro growth rate. Trans-complementation experiments with the Y. pestis nlpD gene restored virulence and all other phenotypic defects. Finally, we demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of the nlpD mutant could protect animals against bubonic and primary pneumonic plague. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Y. pestis NlpD is a novel virulence factor essential for the development of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Further, the nlpD mutant is superior to the EV76 prototype live vaccine strain in immunogenicity and in conferring effective protective immunity. Thus it could serve as a basis for a very potent live vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

  5. Environmental drivers of Yersinia pestis - a holistic perspective on Medieval Europe

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    Buentgen, U.

    2009-09-01

    Recent studies have indicated some evidence for a link between climate variability and plague (Yersinia pestis) dynamics in Central Asia and during most of the 20th century. An intensification of plague outbreaks via population peaks in its host-species, the great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) and its fleas (Xenopsylla spp) has been found to occur during periods of warmer spring and wetter summer climate. This is important, as human epidemics of plague ultimately originate in its wildlife reservoirs. Given the fact that Medieval Europe was strongly devastated by the Black Death - the second pandemic after the Justinian plague ~540AD, and that the worldwide highest quality and quantity of climate proxy data exist for Europe, we here present, for the first time, a holistic approach to enhance understanding of the mid-14th century Black Death. This is of primary importance not only for medical/epidemiological research, but also for other scientific communities, because the Black Death disease had a sustainable impact on the socio-economic development, culture, art, and religion of Medieval Europe. Palaeoclimatic records of annually resolved European temperature and drought variability are compiled, a high-resolution time-series of anthropogenic deforestation is utilized, documentary archives of socio-economic relevance are considered, and the animal-born plague bacterium is placed in the ecological web. Considering the European/North Atlantic sector and the last millennium, periods of high solar radiation and reduced volcanic activity shift the North Atlantic Oscillation into a generally positive mode, yielding towards warmer temperatures and an intensification of the hydrological cycle. We now argue that increased internal circulation resulted in an overall wetter and warmer climate ~1350AD, which most likely was able to promote the prevalence of existing and widespread Yersinia pestis bacillus. Resulting outbreaks of bubonic plague could have been also supported by the

  6. Extraction of Aerosol-Deposited Yersinia pestis from Indoor Surfaces To Determine Bacterial Environmental Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Ryan A.; Yeager, John J.; Leroux, Brian; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Dabisch, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Public health and decontamination decisions following an event that causes indoor contamination with a biological agent require knowledge of the environmental persistence of the agent. The goals of this study were to develop methods for experimentally depositing bacteria onto indoor surfaces via aerosol, evaluate methods for sampling and enumerating the agent on surfaces, and use these methods to determine bacterial surface decay. A specialized aerosol deposition chamber was constructed, and methods were established for reproducible and uniform aerosol deposition of bacteria onto four coupon types. The deposition chamber facilitated the control of relative humidity (RH; 10 to 70%) following particle deposition to mimic the conditions of indoor environments, as RH is not controlled by standard heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Extraction and culture-based enumeration methods to quantify the viable bacteria on coupons were shown to be highly sensitive and reproducible. To demonstrate the usefulness of the system for decay studies, Yersinia pestis persistence as a function of surface type at 21°C and 40% RH was determined to be >40%/min for all surfaces. Based upon these results, at typical indoor temperature and RH, a 6-log reduction in titer would expected to be achieved within 1 h as the result of environmental decay on surfaces without active decontamination. The developed approach will facilitate future persistence and decontamination studies with a broad range of biological agents and surfaces, providing agent decay data to inform both assessments of risk to personnel entering a contaminated site and decontamination decisions following biological contamination of an indoor environment. IMPORTANCE Public health and decontamination decisions following contamination of an indoor environment with a biological agent require knowledge of the environmental persistence of the agent. Previous studies on Y. pestis persistence have

  7. Toward a molecular pathogenic pathway for Yersinia pestis YopM

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    Annette M. Uittenbogaard

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available YopM is one of the six effector Yops of the human-pathogenic Yersinia, but its mechanism has not been defined. After delivery to J774A.1 monocyte-like cells, YopM can rapidly bind and activate the serine/threonine kinases RSK1 and PRK2. However, in infected mice, effects of Y. pestis YopM have been seen only after 24 to 48 h post infection (p.i.. To identify potential direct effects of YopM in vivo we tested for effects of YopM at 1h and 16-18h p.i. in mice infected systemically with 106 bacteria. At 16 h p.i., there was a robust host response to both parent and yopM-1 Y. pestis KIM5. Compared to cells from non-infected mice, CD11b+ cells from spleens of infected mice produced more than 100-fold greater IFN. In the corresponding sera there were more than 100-fold greater amounts of IFN, G-CSF, and CXCL9, as well as more than 10-fold greater amounts of IL-6, CXCL10, and CXCL1. The only YopM-related differences were slightly lower CXCL10 and IL-6 in sera from mice infected 16 h with parent compared to yopM-1 Y. pestis. Microarray analysis of the CD11b+ cells did not identify consistent transcriptional differences of > 4 fold at 18 h p.i. However, at 1 h p.i. mRNA for early growth response transcription factor 1 (Egr1 was decreased when YopM was present. Bone marrow-derived macrophages infected for 1 h also expressed lower Egr1 message when YopM was present. Infected J774A.1 cells showed greater expression of Egr1 at 1 h p.i. when YopM was present, but this pattern reversed at 3 h. At 6 h p.i., Cxcl10 mRNA was lower in parent-strain infected cells. We conclude that decreased Egr1 expression is a very early transcriptional effect of YopM and speculate that a pathway may exist from RSK1 through Egr1. These studies revealed novel early transcriptional effects of YopM but point to a time after 18 h of infection when critical transitional events lead to later major effects on cytokine gene transcription.

  8. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis experimental infection in wild Rattus rattus, reservoir of plague in Madagascar.

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    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Duplantier, J-M; Rahelinirina, S; Telfer, S; Brouat, C

    2010-06-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between rat populations from the plague focus (central highlands) and those from the plague-free zone (low altitude area) was confirmed to be a widespread phenomenon. In rats from the plague focus, we observed that sex influenced plague susceptibility, with males slightly more resistant than females. Other individual factors investigated (weight and habitat of sampling) did not affect plague resistance. When infected at high bacterial dose (more than 10⁵ bacteria injected), rats from the plague focus died mainly within 3-5 days and produced specific antibodies, whereas after low-dose infection (plague resistance level and the course of infection in the black rat would contribute to a better understanding of plague circulation in Madagascar.

  9. [Isolation and chemical characterization of type R lipopolysaccharides of a hypovirulent strain of Yersinia pestis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, S; Bruneteau, M

    1998-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharides LPS I and LPS II, isolated from the hypovirulent EV40 strain of Yersinia pestis, are composed only of type R lipopolysaccharides. This type consists of two forms a and b, depending on their solubility pattern in a solvent mixture containing varying proportions of chloroform, methanol, hexane, and hydrochloric acid. LPS I consists of one subtype, RIb, while LPS II consists of two subtypes, RIIa and RIIb. Analysis by gel electrophoresis shows that the mass of these lipopolysaccharide forms are in the vicinity of 2000-3000 Da. The RIb and RIIb subtypes, which are found in the majority of lipopolysaccharide I and II fractions, are composed of ketoses and amines that are similar to those occurring in LPS I and LPS II. In contrast, the two subtypes RIIa and RIIb are different both in terms of the composition of lipid A and the extent of its substitution. Certain fractions of RIIa contain only lipid A and 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO), while other fractions of RIIb possess a lipid A, which is not substituted by arabinose. The whole set of these R-type lipopolysaccharide forms are excellent models for the study of the role of the primary structure of the polysaccharide region, and for the effect of lipid A substitution on the biological activity of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

  10. Identification of chromosomal genes in Yersinia pestis that influence type III secretion and delivery of Yops into target cells.

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    Andrew S Houppert

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Yersinia species possess a type III secretion system, which is required for the delivery of effector Yop proteins into target cells during infection. Genes encoding the type III secretion machinery, its substrates, and several regulatory proteins all reside on a 70-Kb virulence plasmid. Genes encoded in the chromosome of yersiniae are thought to play important roles in bacterial perception of host environments and in the coordinated activation of the type III secretion pathway. Here, we investigate the contribution of chromosomal genes to the complex regulatory process controlling type III secretion in Yersinia pestis. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified five chromosomal genes required for expression or secretion of Yops in laboratory media. Four out of the five chromosomal mutants were defective to various extents at injecting Yops into tissue culture cells. Interestingly, we found one mutant that was not able to secrete in vitro but was fully competent for injecting Yops into host cells, suggesting independent mechanisms for activation of the secretion apparatus. When tested in a mouse model of plague disease, three mutants were avirulent, whereas two strains were severely attenuated. Together these results demonstrate the importance of Y. pestis chromosomal genes in the proper function of type III secretion and in the pathogenesis of plague.

  11. Hijacking of the pleiotropic cytokine interferon-γ by the type III secretion system of Yersinia pestis.

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    Claire Gendrin

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, employs its type III secretion system to inject toxins into target cells, a crucial step in infection establishment. LcrV is an essential component of the T3SS of Yersinia spp, and is able to associate at the tip of the secretion needle and take part in the translocation of anti-host effector proteins into the eukaryotic cell cytoplasm. Upon cell contact, LcrV is also released into the surrounding medium where it has been shown to block the normal inflammatory response, although details of this mechanism have remained elusive. In this work, we reveal a key aspect of the immunomodulatory function of LcrV by showing that it interacts directly and with nanomolar affinity with the inflammatory cytokine IFNγ. In addition, we generate specific IFNγ mutants that show decreased interaction capabilities towards LcrV, enabling us to map the interaction region to two basic C-terminal clusters of IFNγ. Lastly, we show that the LcrV-IFNγ interaction can be disrupted by a number of inhibitors, some of which display nanomolar affinity. This study thus not only identifies novel potential inhibitors that could be developed for the control of Yersinia-induced infection, but also highlights the diversity of the strategies used by Y. pestis to evade the immune system, with the hijacking of pleiotropic cytokines being a long-range mechanism that potentially plays a key role in the severity of plague.

  12. Effect of deletion of the lpxM gene on virulence and vaccine potential of Yersinia pestis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Andrey P; Shaikhutdinova, Rima Z; Pan'kina, Lyudmila N; Feodorova, Valentina A; Savostina, Elena P; Bystrova, Ol'ga V; Lindner, Buko; Mokrievich, Aleksandr N; Bakhteeva, Irina V; Titareva, Galina M; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V; Kocharova, Nina A; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Holst, Otto; Devdariani, Zurab L; Popov, Yuriy A; Pier, Gerald B; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2007-04-01

    Yersinia pestis undergoes an obligate flea-rodent-flea enzootic life cycle. The rapidly fatal properties of Y. pestis are responsible for the organism's sustained survival in natural plague foci. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays several roles in Y. pestis pathogenesis, prominent among them being resistance to host immune effectors and induction of a septic-shock state during the terminal phases of infection. LPS is acylated with 4-6 fatty acids, the number varying with growth temperature and affecting the molecule's toxic properties. Y. pestis mutants were constructed with a deletion insertion in the lpxM gene in both virulent and attenuated strains, preventing the organisms from synthesizing the most toxic hexa-acylated lipid A molecule when grown at 25 degrees C. The virulence and/or protective potency of pathogenic and attenuated Y. pestis DeltalpxM mutants were then examined in a mouse model. The DeltalpxM mutation in a virulent strain led to no change in the LD(50) value compared to that of the parental strain, while the DeltalpxM mutation in attenuated strains led to a modest 2.5-16-fold reduction in virulence. LPS preparations containing fully hexa-acylated lipid A were ten times more toxic in actinomycin D-treated mice then preparations lacking this lipid A isoform, although this was not significant (P>0.05). The DeltalpxM mutation in vaccine strain EV caused a significant increase in its protective potency. These studies suggest there is little impact from lipid A modifications on the virulence of Y. pestis strains but there are potential improvements in the protective properties in attenuated vaccine strains.

  13. Determination of sRNA expressions by RNA-seq in Yersinia pestis grown in vitro and during infection.

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    Yanfeng Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs facilitate host-microbe interactions. They have a central function in the post-transcriptional regulation during pathogenic lifestyles. Hfq, an RNA-binding protein that many sRNAs act in conjunction with, is required for Y. pestis pathogenesis. However, information on how Yersinia pestis modulates the expression of sRNAs during infection is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used RNA-seq technology to identify the sRNA candidates expressed from Y. pestis grown in vitro and in the infected lungs of mice. A total of 104 sRNAs were found, including 26 previously annotated sRNAs, by searching against the Rfam database with 78 novel sRNA candidates. Approximately 89% (93/104 of these sRNAs from Y. pestis are shared with its ancestor Y. pseudotuberculosis. Ninety-seven percent of these sRNAs (101/104 are shared among more than 80 sequenced genomes of 135 Y. pestis strains. These 78 novel sRNAs include 62 intergenic and 16 antisense sRNAs. Fourteen sRNAs were selected for verification by independent Northern blot analysis. Results showed that nine selected sRNA transcripts were Hfq-dependent. Interestingly, three novel sRNAs were identified as new members of the transcription factor CRP regulon. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that Y. pestis from the infected lungs induced the expressions of six sRNAs including RyhB1, RyhB2, CyaR/RyeE, 6S RNA, RybB and sR039 and repressed the expressions of four sRNAs, including CsrB, CsrC, 4.5S RNA and sR027. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first attempt to subject RNA from Y. pestis-infected samples to direct high-throughput sequencing. Many novel sRNAs were identified and the expression patterns of relevant sRNAs in Y. pestis during in vitro growth and in vivo infection were revealed. The annotated sRNAs accounted for the most abundant sRNAs either expressed in bacteria grown in vitro or differentially expressed in the infected lungs

  14. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis

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    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments. PMID:27375563

  15. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  16. Characterization of pPCP1 Plasmids in Yersinia pestis Strains Isolated from the Former Soviet Union

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    Chythanya Rajanna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete sequences of 9.5-kb pPCP1 plasmids in three Yersinia pestis strains from the former Soviet Union (FSU were determined and compared with those of pPCP1 plasmids in three well-characterized, non-FSU Y. pestis strains (KIM, CO92, and 91001. Two of the FSU plasmids were from strains C2614 and C2944, isolated from plague foci in Russia, and one plasmid was from strain C790 from Kyrgyzstan. Sequence analyses identified four sequence types among the six plasmids. The pPCP1 plasmids in the FSU strains were most genetically related to the pPCP1 plasmid in the KIM strain and least related to the pPCP1 plasmid in Y. pestis 91001. The FSU strains generally had larger pPCP1 plasmid copy numbers compared to strain CO92. Expression of the plasmid's pla gene was significantly (P≤.05 higher in strain C2944 than in strain CO92. Given pla's role in Y. pestis virulence, this difference may have important implications for the strain's virulence.

  17. Differential regulation of c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes by environmental signals modulates biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis

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    Gai-Xian eRen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs, HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of nonlethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfonate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulates their DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  18. Prevalence and abundance of fleas in black-tailed prairie dog burrows: implications for the transmission of plague (Yersinia pestis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Dan J; Stapp, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can have devastating impacts on North American wildlife. Epizootics, or die-offs, in prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) occur sporadically and fleas (Siphonaptera) are probably important in the disease's transmission and possibly as maintenance hosts of Y. pestis between epizootics. We monitored changes in flea abundance in prairie dog burrows in response to precipitation, temperature, and plague activity in shortgrass steppe in northern Colorado. Oropsylla hirsuta was the most commonly found flea, and it increased in abundance with temperature. In contrast, Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris declined with rising temperature. During plague epizootics, flea abundance in burrows increased and then subsequently declined after the extirpation of their prairie dog hosts.

  19. 鼠疫噬菌体研究概述%Overview of research on Yersinia pestis bacteriophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梅

    2011-01-01

    鼠疫噬菌体是一种特异性很强的鼠疫耶尔森菌(Yersinia pestis,鼠疫菌)的细菌病毒,一直被用来进行鼠疫病原体的鉴定.鼠疫噬菌体的早期研究主要以如何在自然界分离、生物学特性、诊断和治疗鼠疫,近年来,随着微生物基因组和蛋白质组学技术的发展,揭示了鼠疫噬菌体在鼠疫菌进化过程中所发生的作用.现就鼠疫噬菌体的研究进展,尤其是基因组的结构、与宿主菌在致病和免疫相关研究做一些介绍,为研发新型分子生物学技术和鼠疫治疗药物提供帮助.%Yersinia pestis bacteriophage, a strongly specific bacterial virus, is commonly used for identification of the plague pathogen. Early research on this bacteriophage has focused mainly on the natural isolation, biological characteristics, and diagnostic or therapeutic applications. In recent years, advances in microbial genomics and proteomics have shed light on the role of this bacteriophage in the evolution of Y. pestis. This paper summarizes recent progress in Y. pestis bacteriophage research regarding genome structure and related pathogenicity and immunology, for the development of new molecular-based diagnostic modalities and medicines.

  20. A tandem repeats database for bacterial genomes: application to the genotyping of Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denoeud France

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some pathogenic bacteria are genetically very homogeneous, making strain discrimination difficult. In the last few years, tandem repeats have been increasingly recognized as markers of choice for genotyping a number of pathogens. The rapid evolution of these structures appears to contribute to the phenotypic flexibility of pathogens. The availability of whole-genome sequences has opened the way to the systematic evaluation of tandem repeats diversity and application to epidemiological studies. Results This report presents a database (http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr of tandem repeats from publicly available bacterial genomes which facilitates the identification and selection of tandem repeats. We illustrate the use of this database by the characterization of minisatellites from two important human pathogens, Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis. In order to avoid simple sequence contingency loci which may be of limited value as epidemiological markers, and to provide genotyping tools amenable to ordinary agarose gel electrophoresis, only tandem repeats with repeat units at least 9 bp long were evaluated. Yersinia pestis contains 64 such minisatellites in which the unit is repeated at least 7 times. An additional collection of 12 loci with at least 6 units, and a high internal conservation were also evaluated. Forty-nine are polymorphic among five Yersinia strains (twenty-five among three Y. pestis strains. Bacillus anthracis contains 30 comparable structures in which the unit is repeated at least 10 times. Half of these tandem repeats show polymorphism among the strains tested. Conclusions Analysis of the currently available bacterial genome sequences classifies Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis as having an average (approximately 30 per Mb density of tandem repeat arrays longer than 100 bp when compared to the other bacterial genomes analysed to date. In both cases, testing a fraction of these sequences for

  1. pH6 antigen (PsaA protein) of Yersinia pestis, a novel bacterial Fc-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Abramov, V M; Cherepanov, P G; Spirina, G V; Chernovskaya, T V; Vasiliev, A M; Zav'yalova, G A

    1996-05-01

    It was found that recombinant pH6 antigen (rPsaA protein) forming virulence-associated fimbriae on the surface of Yersinia pestis at pH 6.7 in host macrophage phagolysosomes or extracellularly in abscesses such as buboes, is a novel bacterial Fc-receptor. rPsaA protein displays reactivity with human IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses but does not react with rabbit, mouse and sheep IgG.

  2. Real-Time Characterization of Virulence Factor Expression in Yersinia pestis Using a Green Fluorescent Protein Reporter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forde, C; Rocco, J; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-06-09

    A real-time reporter system was developed to monitor the thermal induction of virulence factors in Yersinia pestis. The reporter system consists of a plasmid in Y. pestis in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is under the control of the promoters for six virulence factors, yopE, sycE, yopK, yopT, yscN, and lcrE/yopN, which are all components of the Type III secretion virulence mechanism of Y. pestis. Induction of the expression of these genes in vivo was determined by the increase in fluorescence intensity of GFP in real time. Basal expression levels observed for the Y. pestis promoters, expressed as percentages of the positive control with GFP under the control of the lac promoter, were: yopE (15%), sycE (15%), yopK (13%), yopT (4%), lcrE (3.3%) and yscN (0.8%). The yopE reporter showed the strongest gene induction following temperature transition from 26 C to 37 C. The induction levels of the other virulence factors, expressed as percentages of yopE induction, were: yopK (57%), sycE (9%), yscN (3%), lcrE (3%), and yopT (2%). The thermal induction of each of these promoter fusions was repressed by calcium, and the ratios of the initial rates of thermal induction without calcium supplementation compared to the rate with calcium supplementation were: yopE (11 fold), yscN (7 fold), yopK (6 fold), lcrE (3 fold), yopT (2 fold), and sycE (2 fold). This work demonstrates a novel approach to quantify gene induction and provides a method to rapidly determine the effects of external stimuli on expression of Y. pestis virulence factors in real time, in living cells.

  3. TyrR, the regulator of aromatic amino acid metabolism, is required for mice infection of Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang eDeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, poses a serious health threat to rodents and human beings. TyrR is a transcriptional regulator that controls the metabolism of aromatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. In this paper, TyrR played an important role in Y. pestis virulence. Inactivation of tyrR did not seem to affect the in vitro growth of this organism, but resulted in at least 10,000-fold attenuation compared with the wild-type (WT strain upon subcutaneous infection to mice. In addition, loads of tyrR mutant within mice livers and spleens significantly decreased compared with the WT strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that TyrR, directly or indirectly, regulated 29 genes encoded on Y. pestis chromosome or plasmids under in vitro growth condition. Similar to the regulatory function of this protein in E. coli, five aromatic-pathway genes (aroF-tyrA, aroP, aroL, and tyrP were significantly reduced upon deletion of the tyrR gene. Two genes (glnL and glnG that encode sensory histidine kinase and regulator in a two-component regulatory system involved in nitrogen assimilation were downregulated in the tyrR mutant. Several genes encoding type III secretion proteins were transcribed by 2.0- to 4.2-fold in a tyrR mutant relative to the WT strain. Interestingly, the acid-stressed genes, hdeB and hdeD, were downregulated, and such downregulation partly accounted for the decrease in tolerance of the tyrR mutant under acidic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of TyrR in Y. pestis is similar to, but distinct from, that in E. coli. TyrR is a metabolic virulence determinant in Y. pestis that is important for extracellular survival and/or proliferation.

  4. Entry of Yersinia pestis into the viable but nonculturable state in a low-temperature tap water microcosm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Pawlowski

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has caused several pandemics throughout history and remains endemic in the rodent populations of the western United States. More recently, Y. pestis is one of several bacterial pathogens considered to be a potential agent of bioterrorism. Thus, elucidating potential mechanisms of survival and persistence in the environment would be important in the event of an intentional release of the organism. One such mechanism is entry into the viable but non-culturable (VBNC state, as has been demonstrated for several other bacterial pathogens. In this study, we showed that Y. pestis became nonculturable by normal laboratory methods after 21 days in a low-temperature tap water microcosm. We further show evidence that, after the loss of culturability, the cells remained viable by using a variety of criteria, including cellular membrane integrity, uptake and incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids, and protection of genomic DNA from DNase I digestion. Additionally, we identified morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of Y. pestis VBNC cells, such as cell rounding and large periplasmic spaces, by electron microscopy, which are consistent with entry into the VBNC state in other bacteria. Finally, we demonstrated resuscitation of a small number of the non-culturable cells. This study provides compelling evidence that Y. pestis persists in a low-temperature tap water microcosm in a viable state yet is unable to be cultured under normal laboratory conditions, which may prove useful in risk assessment and remediation efforts, particularly in the event of an intentional release of this organism.

  5. CRP-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Regulation of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation Is Enhanced by the Carbon Storage Regulator Protein, CsrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Lo, Chien-Chi; Chain, Patrick S G; Motin, Vladimir L

    2015-01-01

    The natural transmission of Yersinia pestis is reliant upon biofilm blockage of the flea vector. However, the environmentally-responsive adaptive regulators which facilitate Y. pestis biofilm production in accordance with the flea midgut milieu are not well understood. We seek to establish the impact of available carbon source metabolism and storage upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Our findings demonstrate that Y. pestis biofilm production is subject to carbon catabolite regulation in which the presence of glucose impairs biofilm production; whereas, the sole metabolism of alternate carbon sources promotes robust biofilm formation. This observation is facilitated by the cAMP receptor protein, CRP. In accordance with a stark growth defect, deletion of crp in both CO92 and KIM6+ Y. pestis strains significantly impaired biofilm production when solely utilizing alternate carbon sources. Media supplementation with cAMP, a small-molecule activator of CRP, did not significantly alter Y. pestis biofilm production. Furthermore, CRP did not alter mRNA abundance of previously-characterized hms biofilm synthesis and regulation factors. Therefore, our findings indicate CRP does not confer a direct stimulatory effect, but may indirectly promote Y. pestis biofilm production by facilitating the alternate carbon source expression profile. Additionally, we assessed the impact of the carbon storage regulator protein, CsrA, upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Contrary to what has been described for E. coli, Y. pestis biofilm formation was found to be enhanced by CsrA. Regardless of media composition and available carbon source, deletion of csrA significantly impaired Y. pestis biofilm production. CsrA was found to promote Y. pestis biofilm production independent of glycogen regulation. Loss of csrA did not significantly alter relative hmsH, hmsP, or hmsT mRNA abundance. However, deletion of hmsP in the csrA-deficient mutant enabled excessive biofilm production, suggesting Csr

  6. A refrigeration temperature of 4 degrees C does not prevent static growth of Yersinia pestis in heart infusion broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosian, Stephen D; Regan, Patrick M; Doran, Tara; Taylor, Michael A; Margolin, Aaron

    2009-09-01

    Multiple barriers such as inspections, testing, and proper storage conditions are used to minimize the risk of contaminated food. Knowledge of which barriers, such as refrigeration, are effective in preventing pathogen growth and persistence, can help direct the focus of efforts during food sampling. In this study, the doubling times were evaluated for 10 strains of Yersinia pestis of different genetic background cultured in heart infusion broth (HIB) kept at 4 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C under static conditions. Nine out of the 10 strains were able to grow at 4 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C. Apparent doubling times for 7 of the strains ranged from 41 to 50 h. Strain Harbin and strain D1 had apparent doubling times of 65 and 35 h, respectively, and strain O19 Ca-6 did not grow at all. Analysis of variance showed that the averaged growth data (colony forming units per mL) between strains that grew were not significantly different. The data presented here demonstrate that refrigeration alone is not an effective barrier to prevent static growth of Y. pestis in HIB. These findings provide the preliminary impetus to investigate Y. pestis growth in a variety of food matrices that may provide a similar environment as HIB.

  7. Genomic comparison of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by combination of suppression subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Dongsheng; Qin, Long

    2006-01-01

    a combination of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and comparative genomic hybridization with DNAs from a diverse panel of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains. SSH followed by BLAST analysis revealed 112 SSH fragments specific to strain ATCC29833, compared to the genomic sequence data of Y....... pestis strains CO92, KIM and 91001. We identified 17 SSH fragments that appeared to be newly determined genetic contents of Y. pseudotuberculosis. The combination of SSH and microarray analysis showed that the parallel loss of genes contributed greatly not only to the significant genomic divergence...

  8. Development of In Vitro Correlate Assays of Immunity to Infection with Yersinia Pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    to Yersinia enterocolitica in mice. Med. Microbiol. Immunol. 181:333–338. 5. Boise, L. H., and C. M. Collins. 2001. Salmonella-induced cell lysis...666. 28. Mills, S. D., A. Boland, M. P. Sory, P. van der Smissen, C. Kerbourch, B. B. Finlay, and G. R. Cornelis. 1997. Yersinia enterocolitica induces...Heesemann, and B. Rouot. 1997. Interaction of Yersinia enterocolitica with macrophages leads to macrophage cell death through apoptosis. Infect. Immun

  9. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey D. Nanson; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M. D.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II f...

  10. A Noise Trimming and Positional Significance of Transposon Insertion System to Identify Essential Genes in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Bullifent, Helen L.; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Saint, Richard J.; Southern, Stephanie J.; Champion, Olivia L.; Senior, Nicola J.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Titball, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technology coupled with saturation mutagenesis has provided new and global insights into gene functions and roles. At a simplistic level, the frequency of mutations within genes can indicate the degree of essentiality. However, this approach neglects to take account of the positional significance of mutations - the function of a gene is less likely to be disrupted by a mutation close to the distal ends. Therefore, a systematic bioinformatics approach to improve the reliability of essential gene identification is desirable. We report here a parametric model which introduces a novel mutation feature together with a noise trimming approach to predict the biological significance of Tn5 mutations. We show improved performance of essential gene prediction in the bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. This method would have broad applicability to other organisms and to the identification of genes which are essential for competitiveness or survival under a broad range of stresses. PMID:28165493

  11. A Noise Trimming and Positional Significance of Transposon Insertion System to Identify Essential Genes in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Bullifent, Helen L.; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Saint, Richard J.; Southern, Stephanie J.; Champion, Olivia L.; Senior, Nicola J.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Titball, Richard W.

    2017-02-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technology coupled with saturation mutagenesis has provided new and global insights into gene functions and roles. At a simplistic level, the frequency of mutations within genes can indicate the degree of essentiality. However, this approach neglects to take account of the positional significance of mutations - the function of a gene is less likely to be disrupted by a mutation close to the distal ends. Therefore, a systematic bioinformatics approach to improve the reliability of essential gene identification is desirable. We report here a parametric model which introduces a novel mutation feature together with a noise trimming approach to predict the biological significance of Tn5 mutations. We show improved performance of essential gene prediction in the bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. This method would have broad applicability to other organisms and to the identification of genes which are essential for competitiveness or survival under a broad range of stresses.

  12. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  13. Evaluation of the FilmArray® system for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiner, Derrick R.; Colburn, Heather A.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Straub, Tim M.; Victry, Kristin D.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-04-29

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the Idaho Technologies FilmArray® Biothreat Panel for the detection of Bacillus anthracis (Ba), Francisella tularensis (Ft), and Yersinia pestis (Yp) DNA, and demonstrate the detection of Ba spores. Methods and Results: DNA samples from Ba, Ft and Yp strains and near-neighbors, and live Ba spores were analyzed using the Biothreat Panel, a multiplexed PCR-based assay for 17 pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity studies with DNA suggest a limit of detection of 250 genome equivalents (GEs) per sample. Furthermore, the correct call of Ft, Yp or Bacillus species was made in 63 of 72 samples tested at 25 GE or less. With samples containing 25 Ba Sterne spores, at least one of the two possible Ba markers were identified in all samples tested. We observed no cross-reactivity with near-neighbor DNAs.

  14. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org; Ding, Yi [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology (United States); Tian, Ye; Yao, Yong [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential.

  15. [Macro- and microevolution as related to the problem of origin and global expansion of the plague pathogen Yersinia pestis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntsov, V V; Suntsova, N I

    2008-01-01

    The ratio of macro- and microevolutionary processes is considered with reference to the ecological scenario of the origin of the plague pathogen and its subsequent natural and anthropogenic global expansion. The macroevolutionary transformation of the ancestral pseudotuberculosis microbe clone into the initial plague microbe Yersinia pestis tarbagani occurred in Central Asia at the end of the Late Pleistocene by a "vertical" Darwinian way in an inadaptive heterothermal continual intermediate environment--the Mongolian marmot Marmota sibirica-flea Oropsylla silantiewi system--via a sequence of unstable and currently extinct intermediate forms. Its natural geographic expansion on the "oil spot" principle in the postglacial time led to the microevolutionary formation of 20-30 hostal subspecies circulating in populations of the background species of burrowing rodents and pikas in arid areas of Eurasia. The intercontinental spread of the "marmot" and "rat" pathogen subspecies in the past few centuries has been exclusively anthropogenic, with the involvement of synanthropic (ship) rats.

  16. Evaluation of the murine immune response to Xenopsylla cheopis flea saliva and its effect on transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Bosio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne pathogens are transmitted into a unique intradermal microenvironment that includes the saliva of their vectors. Immunomodulatory factors in the saliva can enhance infectivity; however, in some cases the immune response that develops to saliva from prior uninfected bites can inhibit infectivity. Most rodent reservoirs of Yersinia pestis experience fleabites regularly, but the effect this has on the dynamics of flea-borne transmission of plague has never been investigated. We examined the innate and acquired immune response of mice to bites of Xenopsylla cheopis and its effects on Y. pestis transmission and disease progression in both naïve mice and mice chronically exposed to flea bites.The immune response of C57BL/6 mice to uninfected flea bites was characterized by flow cytometry, histology, and antibody detection methods. In naïve mice, flea bites induced mild inflammation with limited recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages to the bite site. Infectivity and host response in naïve mice exposed to flea bites followed immediately by intradermal injection of Y. pestis did not differ from that of mice infected with Y. pestis without prior flea feeding. With prolonged exposure, an IgG1 antibody response primarily directed to the predominant component of flea saliva, a family of 36-45 kDa phosphatase-like proteins, occurred in both laboratory mice and wild rats naturally exposed to X. cheopis, but a hypersensitivity response never developed. The incidence and progression of terminal plague following challenge by infective blocked fleas were equivalent in naïve mice and mice sensitized to flea saliva by repeated exposure to flea bites over a 10-week period.Unlike what is observed with many other blood-feeding arthropods, the murine immune response to X. cheopis saliva is mild and continued exposure to flea bites leads more to tolerance than to hypersensitivity. The immune response to flea saliva had no detectable effect on Y

  17. Znu is the predominant zinc importer in Yersinia pestis during in vitro growth but is not essential for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Daniel C; Bearden, Scott W; Mier, Ildefonso; Abney, Jennifer; Paulley, James T; Fetherston, Jacqueline D; Salazar, Juan C; Radolf, Justin D; Perry, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Little is known about Zn homeostasis in Yersinia pestis, the plague bacillus. The Znu ABC transporter is essential for zinc (Zn) uptake and virulence in a number of bacterial pathogens. Bioinformatics analysis identified ZnuABC as the only apparent high-affinity Zn uptake system in Y. pestis. Mutation of znuACB caused a growth defect in Chelex-100-treated PMH2 growth medium, which was alleviated by supplementation with submicromolar concentrations of Zn. Use of transcriptional reporters confirmed that Zur mediated Zn-dependent repression and that it can repress gene expression in response to Zn even in the absence of Znu. Virulence testing in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague found only a modest increase in survival in low-dose infections by the znuACB mutant. Previous studies of cluster 9 (C9) transporters suggested that Yfe, a well-characterized C9 importer for manganese (Mn) and iron in Y. pestis, might function as a second, high-affinity Zn uptake system. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that YfeA, the solute-binding protein component of Yfe, binds Mn and Zn with comparably high affinities (dissociation constants of 17.8 ± 4.4 nM and 6.6 ± 1.2 nM, respectively), although the complete Yfe transporter could not compensate for the loss of Znu in in vitro growth studies. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Yfe interfered with the znu mutant's ability to grow in low concentrations of Zn, while excess Zn interfered with the ability of Yfe to import iron at low concentrations; these results suggest that YfeA can bind Zn in the bacterial cell but that Yfe is incompetent for transport of the metal. In addition to Yfe, we have now eliminated MntH, FetMP, Efe, Feo, a substrate-binding protein, and a putative nickel transporter as the unidentified, secondary Zn transporter in Y. pestis. Unlike other bacterial pathogens, Y. pestis does not require Znu for high-level infectivity and virulence; instead, it appears to possess a novel class of transporter

  18. Rapid focused sequencing: a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and strain typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary S Turingan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed "Rapid Focused Sequencing," allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental

  19. Yersinia pestis YopD 150-287 Fragment is Partially Unfolded in the Native State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-17

    Hoiczyk, G. Blobel, Polymerization of a single protein of the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica into needles punctures eukaryotic cells, Proc. Natl...12] C.B. Trame, D.B. McKay, Structure of the Yersinia enterocolitica molecular-chaperone protein SycE, Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crys- tallogr. 59

  20. Production of Recombinant Injectosome and Outer Membrane Proteins from Yersinia Pestis KIM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    446-448. Heesemann, Jurgen, Bernd Algermissen and Rainer Laufs. "Genetically Manipulated Virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica ." Infection and...Immunity (1984): 105-110. Hoiczyk, Egbert and Gunter Blobel. "Polymerization of a Single Protein of the Pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica into Needles

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Yersinia pestis Strains Antiqua andNepal516: Evidence of Gene Reduction in an Emerging Pathogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Patrick S.G.; Hu, Ping; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Radnedge,Lyndsay; Larimer, Frank; Vergez, Lisa M.; Worsham, Patricia; Chu, May C.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-01-16

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic andpneumonicplague, has undergone detailed study at the molecular level. Tofurther investigate the genomic diversity among this group and to helpcharacterize lineages of the plague organism that have no sequencedmembers, we present here the genomes of two isolates of the "classical"Antiqua biovar, strains Antiqua and Nepal516. The genomes of Antiqua andNepal516 are 4.7 Mb and 4.5 Mb and encode 4,138 and 3,956 open readingframes respectively. Though both strains belong to one of the threeclassical biovars, they represent separate lineages defined by recentphylogenetic studies. We compare all five currently sequenced Y. pestisgenomes and the corresponding features in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Thereare strain-specific rearrangements, insertions, deletions, singlenucleotide polymorphisms and a unique distribution of insertionsequences. We found 453 single nucleotide polymorphisms in protein codingregions, which were used to assess evolutionary relationships of these Y.pestis strains. Gene reduction analysis revealed that the gene deletionprocesses are under selective pressure and many of the inactivations areprobably related to the organism s interaction with its host environment.The results presented here clearly demonstrate the differences betweenthe two Antiqua lineages and support the notion that grouping Y. pestisstrains based strictly on the classical definition of biovars (predicatedupon two biochemical assays) does not accurately reflect the phylogeneticrelationships within this species. Comparison of four virulent Y. pestisstrains with the human-avirulent strain 91001 provides further insightinto the genetic basis of virulence to humans.

  2. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  3. Surveillance of Egyptian fleas for agents of public health significance: Anaplasma, Bartonella, Coxiella, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Amanda D; Reeves, Will K; Szumlas, Daniel E; Abbassy, Magda M; Helmy, Ibrahim M; Moriarity, John R; Dasch, Gregory A

    2006-07-01

    Serologic surveys in Egypt have documented human and animal exposure to vector-borne bacterial pathogens, but the presence and distribution of these agents in arthropods has not been determined. Between July 2002 and July 2003, fleas were collected from 221 mammals trapped in 17 cities throughout Egypt. A total of 987 fleas were collected, representing four species (Ctenocephalides felis, Echidnophaga gallinacea, Leptopsylla segnis, and Xenopsylla cheopis); 899 of these fleas were X. cheopis from rats (Rattus spp.). Fleas were tested for DNA from Anaplasma spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Ehrlichia spp., Rickettsia spp., and Yersinia pestis. Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was detected in X. cheopis and L. segnis from rats from nine cities. A spotted-fever group Rickettsia sp. similar to "RF2125" was detected in E. gallinacea, and two unidentified spotted fever group Rickettsia were detected in two X. cheopis. Novel Bartonella genotypes were detected in X. cheopis and L. segnis from three cities. Coxiella burnetii was detected in two fleas. Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Y. pestis were not detected.

  4. Two-step source tracing strategy of Yersinia pestis and its historical epidemiology in a specific region.

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    Yanfeng Yan

    Full Text Available Source tracing of pathogens is critical for the control and prevention of infectious diseases. Genome sequencing by high throughput technologies is currently feasible and popular, leading to the burst of deciphered bacterial genome sequences. Utilizing the flooding genomic data for source tracing of pathogens in outbreaks is promising, and challenging as well. Here, we employed Yersinia pestis genomes from a plague outbreak at Xinghai county of China in 2009 as an example, to develop a simple two-step strategy for rapid source tracing of the outbreak. The first step was to define the phylogenetic position of the outbreak strains in a whole species tree, and the next step was to provide a detailed relationship across the outbreak strains and their suspected relatives. Through this strategy, we observed that the Xinghai plague outbreak was caused by Y. pestis that circulated in the local plague focus, where the majority of historical plague epidemics in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau may originate from. The analytical strategy developed here will be of great help in fighting against the outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, by pinpointing the source of pathogens rapidly with genomic epidemiological data and microbial forensics information.

  5. Structural Characterisation of FabG from Yersinia pestis, a Key Component of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis.

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    Jeffrey D Nanson

    Full Text Available Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (FabG are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that catalyse the reduction of acyl carrier protein (ACP linked thioesters within the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII pathway. The products of these enzymes, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, are essential components of the bacterial cell envelope. The FASII reductase enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI has been the focus of numerous drug discovery efforts, some of which have led to clinical trials, yet few studies have focused on FabG. Like FabI, FabG appears to be essential for survival in many bacteria, similarly indicating the potential of this enzyme as a drug target. FabG enzymes are members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family, and like other SDRs, exhibit highly conserved secondary and tertiary structures, and contain a number of conserved sequence motifs. Here we describe the crystal structures of FabG from Yersinia pestis (YpFabG, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, and three human pandemics. Y. pestis remains endemic in many parts of North America, South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa, and a threat to human health. YpFabG shares a high degree of structural similarity with bacterial homologues, and the ketoreductase domain of the mammalian fatty acid synthase from both Homo sapiens and Sus scrofa. Structural characterisation of YpFabG, and comparison with other bacterial FabGs and the mammalian fatty acid synthase, provides a strong platform for virtual screening of potential inhibitors, rational drug design, and the development of new antimicrobial agents to combat Y. pestis infections.

  6. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III secretion system YscN ATPase.

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    Wieslaw Swietnicki

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC(50 values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species.

  7. Targeted enrichment of ancient pathogens yielding the pPCP1 plasmid of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, Verena J; Bos, Kirsten; DeWitte, Sharon; Schmedes, Sarah; Jamieson, Joslyn; Mittnik, Alissa; Forrest, Stephen; Coombes, Brian K; Wood, James W; Earn, David J D; White, William; Krause, Johannes; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2011-09-20

    Although investigations of medieval plague victims have identified Yersinia pestis as the putative etiologic agent of the pandemic, methodological limitations have prevented large-scale genomic investigations to evaluate changes in the pathogen's virulence over time. We screened over 100 skeletal remains from Black Death victims of the East Smithfield mass burial site (1348-1350, London, England). Recent methods of DNA enrichment coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing subsequently permitted reconstruction of ten full human mitochondrial genomes (16 kb each) and the full pPCP1 (9.6 kb) virulence-associated plasmid at high coverage. Comparisons of molecular damage profiles between endogenous human and Y. pestis DNA confirmed its authenticity as an ancient pathogen, thus representing the longest contiguous genomic sequence for an ancient pathogen to date. Comparison of our reconstructed plasmid against modern Y. pestis shows identity with several isolates matching the Medievalis biovar; however, our chromosomal sequences indicate the victims were infected with a Y. pestis variant that has not been previously reported. Our data reveal that the Black Death in medieval Europe was caused by a variant of Y. pestis that may no longer exist, and genetic data carried on its pPCP1 plasmid were not responsible for the purported epidemiological differences between ancient and modern forms of Y. pestis infections.

  8. Oropsylla hirsuta (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae) can support plague epizootics in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) by early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Aryn P; Eisen, Rebecca J; Bearden, Scott W; Montenieri, John A; Gage, Kenneth L; Antolin, Michael F

    2008-06-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, often leads to rapid decimation of black-tailed prairie dog colonies. Flea-borne transmission of Y. pestis has been thought to occur primarily via blocked fleas, and therefore studies of vector efficiency have focused on the period when blockage is expected to occur (> or =5 days post-infection [p.i.]). Oropsylla hirsuta, a prairie dog flea, rarely blocks and transmission is inefficient > or =5 days p.i.; thus, this flea has been considered incapable of explaining rapid dissemination of Y. pestis among prairie dogs. By infecting wild-caught fleas with Y. pestis and exposing naïve mice to groups of fleas at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h p.i., we examined the early-phase (1-4 days p.i.) efficiency of O. hirsuta to transmit Y. pestis to hosts and showed that O. hirsuta is a considerably more efficient vector at this largely overlooked stage (5.19% of fleas transmit Y. pestis at 24 h p.i.) than at later stages. Using a model of vectorial capacity, we suggest that this level of transmission can support plague at an enzootic level in a population when flea loads are within the average observed for black-tailed prairie dogs in nature. Shared burrows and sociality of prairie dogs could lead to accumulation of fleas when host population is reduced as a result of the disease, enabling epizootic spread of plague among prairie dogs.

  9. Purificación y control de calidad de la fracción antigénica F1 de Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    S Seraylán; L. Vargas

    1999-01-01

    Se ha desarrollado la extracción y purificación de la fracción antigénica F1 de Yersinia pestis que se utilizará en la producción de un kit para el diagnóstico de peste. El proceso se realizó a partir de biomasa de una cepa patógena de Yersinia pestis, aislada en Chiclayo (1999), cuyos factores de virulencia fueron comprobados con la finalidad de determinar la presencia del antígeno en mención. La biomasa bacteriana fue inactivada con acetona fría, y la purificación parcial del antígeno se re...

  10. Rapid Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis from Food Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Pyrosequencing

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    Kingsley K. Amoako

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest has recently been renewed in the possible use of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague, as a biological weapon by terrorists. The vulnerability of food to intentional contamination coupled with reports of humans having acquired plague through eating infected animals that were not adequately cooked or handling of meat from infected animals makes the possible use of Y. pestis in a foodborne bioterrorism attack a reality. Rapid, efficient food sample preparation and detection systems that will help overcome the problem associated with the complexity of the different matrices and also remove any ambiguity in results will enable rapid informed decisions to be made regarding contamination of food with biothreat agents. We have developed a rapid detection assay that combines the use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing in generating results for the unambiguous identification of Y. pestis from milk (0.9 CFU/mL, bagged salad (1.6 CFU/g, and processed meat (10 CFU/g. The low detection limits demonstrated in this assay provide a novel tool for the rapid detection and confirmation of Y. pestis in food without the need for enrichment. The combined use of the iCropTheBug system and pyrosequencing for efficient capture and detection of Y. pestis is novel and has potential applications in food biodefence.

  11. CRP-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Regulation of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation Is Enhanced by the Carbon Storage Regulator Protein, CsrA.

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    Stephan P Willias

    Full Text Available The natural transmission of Yersinia pestis is reliant upon biofilm blockage of the flea vector. However, the environmentally-responsive adaptive regulators which facilitate Y. pestis biofilm production in accordance with the flea midgut milieu are not well understood. We seek to establish the impact of available carbon source metabolism and storage upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Our findings demonstrate that Y. pestis biofilm production is subject to carbon catabolite regulation in which the presence of glucose impairs biofilm production; whereas, the sole metabolism of alternate carbon sources promotes robust biofilm formation. This observation is facilitated by the cAMP receptor protein, CRP. In accordance with a stark growth defect, deletion of crp in both CO92 and KIM6+ Y. pestis strains significantly impaired biofilm production when solely utilizing alternate carbon sources. Media supplementation with cAMP, a small-molecule activator of CRP, did not significantly alter Y. pestis biofilm production. Furthermore, CRP did not alter mRNA abundance of previously-characterized hms biofilm synthesis and regulation factors. Therefore, our findings indicate CRP does not confer a direct stimulatory effect, but may indirectly promote Y. pestis biofilm production by facilitating the alternate carbon source expression profile. Additionally, we assessed the impact of the carbon storage regulator protein, CsrA, upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Contrary to what has been described for E. coli, Y. pestis biofilm formation was found to be enhanced by CsrA. Regardless of media composition and available carbon source, deletion of csrA significantly impaired Y. pestis biofilm production. CsrA was found to promote Y. pestis biofilm production independent of glycogen regulation. Loss of csrA did not significantly alter relative hmsH, hmsP, or hmsT mRNA abundance. However, deletion of hmsP in the csrA-deficient mutant enabled excessive biofilm production

  12. Rapid Detection of Yersinia Pestis Antigen from Decomposed Rodent Viscera Using An Up-Converting Phosphor Technology-Based Lateral-Flow Assay

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    Pingping Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor, Plague, a seriously infectious zoonotic disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, has claimed millions of lives during three major historic pandemics. Y. pestis, with a minimum infectious dose for mammals of less than 100 organisms (even less than 10 by the subcutaneous route, can proliferate in mammalian macrophages and migrate to internal organs within days. To date, with rodents as reservoirs and fleas as vectors, Y. pestis is widely and persistently distributed in natural foci on most continents (except Australia and poses a high risk to humans. Therefore, surveillance and control of local plague hosts, including decomposed ones, are important in plague-endemic regions. Furthermore, inexpensive, convenient, and reliable point-of-care testing (POCT is essential in resource-limited areas.

  13. Identification and characterization of PhoP regulon members in Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus

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    Du Zongmin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription regulator PhoP has been shown to be important for Y. pestis survival in macrophages and under various in vitro stresses. However, the mechanism by which PhoP promotes bacterial intracellular survival is not fully understood. Our previous microarray analysis suggested that PhoP governed a wide set of cellular pathways in Y. pestis. A series of biochemical experiments were done herein to study members of the PhoP regulon of Y. pestis biovar Microtus. Results By using gel mobility shift assay and quantitative RT-PCR, a total of 30 putative transcription units were characterized as direct PhoP targets. The primer extension assay was further used to determine the transcription start sites of 18 PhoP-dependent promoters and to localize the -10 and -35 elements. The DNase I footprinting was used to identify the PhoP-binding sites within 17 PhoP-dependent promoters, enabling the identification of PhoP box and matrix that both represented the conserved signals for PhoP recognition in Y. pestis. Data presented here providing a good basis for modeling PhoP-promoter DNA interactions that is crucial to the PhoP-mediated transcriptional regulation. Conclusion The proven direct PhoP targets include nine genes encoding regulators and 21 genes or operons with functions of detoxification, protection against DNA damages, resistance to antimicrobial peptides, and adaptation to magnesium limitation. We can presume that PhoP is a global regulator that controls a complex regulatory cascade by a mechanism of not only directly controlling the expression of specific genes, but also indirectly regulating various cellular pathways by acting on a set of dedicated regulators. These results help us gain insights into the PhoP-dependent mechanisms by which Y. pestis survives the antibacterial strategies employed by host macrophages.

  14. Histopathological observation of immunized rhesus macaques with plague vaccines after subcutaneous infection of Yersinia pestis.

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    Guang Tian

    Full Text Available In our previous study, complete protection was observed in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques immunized with SV1 (20 µg F1 and 10 µg rV270 and SV2 (200 µg F1 and 100 µg rV270 subunit vaccines and with EV76 live attenuated vaccine against subcutaneous challenge with 6×10(6 CFU of Y. pestis. In the present study, we investigated whether the vaccines can effectively protect immunized animals from any pathologic changes using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the glomerular basement membranes (GBMs of the immunized animals and control animals were checked by electron microscopy. The results show no signs of histopathological lesions in the lungs, livers, kidneys, lymph nodes, spleens and hearts of the immunized animals at Day 14 after the challenge, whereas pathological alterations were seen in the corresponding tissues of the control animals. Giemsa staining, ultrastructural examination, and immunohistochemical staining revealed bacteria in some of the organs of the control animals, whereas no bacterium was observed among the immunized animals. Ultrastructural observation revealed that no glomerular immune deposits on the GBM. These observations suggest that the vaccines can effectively protect animals from any pathologic changes and eliminate Y. pestis from the immunized animals. The control animals died from multi-organ lesions specifically caused by the Y. pestis infection. We also found that subcutaneous infection of animals with Y. pestis results in bubonic plague, followed by pneumonic and septicemic plagues. The histopathologic features of plague in rhesus macaques closely resemble those of rodent and human plagues. Thus, Chinese-origin rhesus macaques serve as useful models in studying Y. pestis pathogenesis, host response and the efficacy of new medical countermeasures against plague.

  15. Comparative Global Gene Expression Profiles of Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant at Flea and Human Body Temperatures

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    Cristi L. Galindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp is involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. We previously characterized a Δlpp mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 and found that this mutant was defective in surviving in macrophages and was attenuated in a mouse inhalation model of plague when compared to the highly virulent wild-type (WT bacterium. We performed global transcriptional profiling of WT Y. pestis and its Δlpp mutant using microarrays. The organisms were cultured at 26 and 37 degrees Celsius to simulate the flea vector and mammalian host environments, respectively. Our data revealed vastly different effects of lpp mutation on the transcriptomes of Y. pestis grown at 37 versus 26C. While the absence of Lpp resulted mainly in the downregulation of metabolic genes at 26C, the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant cultured at 37C exhibited profound alterations in stress response and virulence genes, compared to WT bacteria. We investigated one of the stress-related genes (htrA downregulated in the Δlpp mutant relative to WT Y. pestis. Indeed, complementation of the Δlpp mutant with the htrA gene restored intracellular survival of the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant. Our results support a role for Lpp in Y. pestis adaptation to the host environment, possibly via transcriptional activation of htrA.

  16. Differential control of Yersinia pestis biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector by two c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases.

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    Yi-Cheng Sun

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis forms a biofilm in the foregut of its flea vector that promotes transmission by flea bite. As in many bacteria, biofilm formation in Y. pestis is controlled by intracellular levels of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP. Two Y. pestis diguanylate cyclase (DGC enzymes, encoded by hmsT and y3730, and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, encoded by hmsP, have been shown to control biofilm production in vitro via their opposing c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation activities, respectively. In this study, we provide further evidence that hmsT, hmsP, and y3730 are the only three genes involved in c-di-GMP metabolism in Y. pestis and evaluated the two DGCs for their comparative roles in biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector. As with HmsT, the DGC activity of Y3730 depended on a catalytic GGDEF domain, but the relative contribution of the two enzymes to the biofilm phenotype was influenced strongly by the environmental niche. Deletion of y3730 had a very minor effect on in vitro biofilm formation, but resulted in greatly reduced biofilm formation in the flea. In contrast, the predominant effect of hmsT was on in vitro biofilm formation. DGC activity was also required for the Hms-independent autoaggregation phenotype of Y. pestis, but was not required for virulence in a mouse model of bubonic plague. Our results confirm that only one PDE (HmsP and two DGCs (HmsT and Y3730 control c-di-GMP levels in Y. pestis, indicate that hmsT and y3730 are regulated post-transcriptionally to differentially control biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector, and identify a second c-di-GMP-regulated phenotype in Y. pestis.

  17. Analysis of the three Yersinia pestis CRISPR loci provides new tools for phylogenetic studies and possibly for the investigation of ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnaud, Gilles; Li, Yanjun; Gorgé, Olivier; Cui, Yujun; Song, Yajun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Grissa, Ibtissem; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V; Platonov, Mikhail E; Rakin, Alexander; Balakhonov, Sergey V; Neubauer, Heinrich; Pourcel, Christine; Anisimov, Andrey P; Yang, Ruifu

    2007-01-01

    The precise nature of the pathogen having caused early plague pandemics is uncertain. Although Yersinia pestis is a likely candidate for all three plague pandemics, the very rare direct evidence that can be deduced from ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis is controversial. Moreover, which of the three biovars, Antiqua, Medievalis or Orientalis, was associated with these pandemics is still debated. There is a need for phylogenetic analysis performed on Y. pestis strains isolated from countries from which plague probably arose and is still endemic. In addition there exist technical difficulties inherent to aDNA investigations and a lack of appropriate genetic targets. The recently described CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) may represent such a target. CRISPR loci consist of a succession of highly conserved regions separated by specific "spacers" usually of viral origin. To be of use, data describing the mechanisms of evolution and diversity of CRISPRs in Y. pestis, its closest neighbors, and other species which might contaminate ancient DNA, are necessary. The investigation of closely related Y. pestis isolates has revealed recent mutation events in which elements constituting CRISPRs were acquired or lost, providing essential insight on their evolution. Rules deduced represent the basis for subsequent interpretation. In the present study, the CRISPR loci from representative Y. pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains were investigated by PCR amplification and sequence analysis. The investigation of this wider panel of strains, including other subspecies or ecotypes within Y. pestis and also Y. pseudotuberculosis strains provides a database of the existing CRISPR spacers and helps predict the expected CRISPR structure of the Y. pestis ancestor. This knowledge will open the way to the development of a spoligotyping assay, in which spacers can be amplified even from highly degraded DNA samples. The data obtained show that CRISPR

  18. New Insights into How Yersinia pestis Adapts to Its Mammalian Host during Bubonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Elizabeth; Lemaître, Nadine; Merchez, Maud; Ricard, Isabelle; Reboul, Angéline; Dewitte, Amélie; Sebbane, Florent

    2014-01-01

    Bubonic plague (a fatal, flea-transmitted disease) remains an international public health concern. Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of bubonic plague has improved significantly over the last few decades, researchers have still not been able to define the complete set of Y. pestis genes needed for disease or to characterize the mechanisms that enable infection. Here, we generated a library of Y. pestis mutants, each lacking one or more of the genes previously identified as being up-regulated in vivo. We then screened the library for attenuated virulence in rodent models of bubonic plague. Importantly, we tested mutants both individually and using a novel, “per-pool” screening method that we have developed. Our data showed that in addition to genes involved in physiological adaption and resistance to the stress generated by the host, several previously uncharacterized genes are required for virulence. One of these genes (ympt1.66c, which encodes a putative helicase) has been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Deletion of ympt1.66c reduced Y. pestis' ability to spread to the lymph nodes draining the dermal inoculation site – probably because loss of this gene decreased the bacteria's ability to survive inside macrophages. Our results suggest that (i) intracellular survival during the early stage of infection is important for plague and (ii) horizontal gene transfer was crucial in the acquisition of this ability. PMID:24675805

  19. New insights into how Yersinia pestis adapts to its mammalian host during bubonic plague.

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    Elizabeth Pradel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bubonic plague (a fatal, flea-transmitted disease remains an international public health concern. Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of bubonic plague has improved significantly over the last few decades, researchers have still not been able to define the complete set of Y. pestis genes needed for disease or to characterize the mechanisms that enable infection. Here, we generated a library of Y. pestis mutants, each lacking one or more of the genes previously identified as being up-regulated in vivo. We then screened the library for attenuated virulence in rodent models of bubonic plague. Importantly, we tested mutants both individually and using a novel, "per-pool" screening method that we have developed. Our data showed that in addition to genes involved in physiological adaptation and resistance to the stress generated by the host, several previously uncharacterized genes are required for virulence. One of these genes (ympt1.66c, which encodes a putative helicase has been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Deletion of ympt1.66c reduced Y. pestis' ability to spread to the lymph nodes draining the dermal inoculation site--probably because loss of this gene decreased the bacteria's ability to survive inside macrophages. Our results suggest that (i intracellular survival during the early stage of infection is important for plague and (ii horizontal gene transfer was crucial in the acquisition of this ability.

  20. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Goulding, Celia W., E-mail: celia.goulding@uci.edu [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); UC Irvine, 2302 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  1. Biochemical, structural and molecular dynamics analyses of the potential virulence factor RipA from Yersinia pestis.

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    Rodrigo Torres

    Full Text Available Human diseases are attributed in part to the ability of pathogens to evade the eukaryotic immune systems. A subset of these pathogens has developed mechanisms to survive in human macrophages. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the bubonic plague, is a predominately extracellular pathogen with the ability to survive and replicate intracellularly. A previous study has shown that a novel rip (required for intracellular proliferation operon (ripA, ripB and ripC is essential for replication and survival of Y. pestis in postactivated macrophages, by playing a role in lowering macrophage-produced nitric oxide (NO levels. A bioinformatics analysis indicates that the rip operon is conserved among a distally related subset of macrophage-residing pathogens, including Burkholderia and Salmonella species, and suggests that this previously uncharacterized pathway is also required for intracellular survival of these pathogens. The focus of this study is ripA, which encodes for a protein highly homologous to 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA transferase; however, biochemical analysis suggests that RipA functions as a butyryl-CoA transferase. The 1.9 Å X-ray crystal structure reveals that RipA belongs to the class of Family I CoA transferases and exhibits a unique tetrameric state. Molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with RipA tetramer formation and suggest a possible gating mechanism for CoA binding mediated by Val227. Together, our structural characterization and molecular dynamic simulations offer insights into acyl-CoA specificity within the active site binding pocket, and support biochemical results that RipA is a butyryl-CoA transferase. We hypothesize that the end product of the rip operon is butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory, which has been shown to lower NO levels in macrophages. Thus, the results of this molecular study of Y. pestis RipA provide a structural platform for rational inhibitor design, which may lead to a greater understanding of the

  2. A LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator, RovM, Senses Nutritional Cues Suggesting that It Is Involved in Metabolic Adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the Flea Gut.

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    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis has evolved as a clonal variant of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause flea-borne biofilm-mediated transmission of the bubonic plague. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator, RovM, is highly induced only during Y. pestis infection of the flea host. RovM homologs in other pathogens regulate biofilm formation, nutrient sensing, and virulence; including in Y. pseudotuberculosis, where RovM represses the major virulence factor, RovA. Here the role that RovM plays during flea infection was investigated using a Y. pestis KIM6+ strain deleted of rovM, ΔrovM. The ΔrovM mutant strain was not affected in characteristic biofilm gut blockage, growth, or survival during single infection of fleas. Nonetheless, during a co-infection of fleas, the ΔrovM mutant exhibited a significant competitive fitness defect relative to the wild type strain. This competitive fitness defect was restored as a fitness advantage relative to the wild type in a ΔrovM mutant complemented in trans to over-express rovM. Consistent with this, Y. pestis strains, producing elevated transcriptional levels of rovM, displayed higher growth rates, and differential ability to form biofilm in response to specific nutrients in comparison to the wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that rovA was not repressed by RovM in fleas, but that elevated transcriptional levels of rovM in vitro correlated with repression of rovA under specific nutritional conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that RovM likely senses specific nutrient cues in the flea gut environment, and accordingly directs metabolic adaptation to enhance flea gut colonization by Y. pestis.

  3. Evaluation of Yersinia pestis Transmission Pathways for Sylvatic Plague in Prairie Dog Populations in the Western U.S.

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    Richgels, Katherine L D; Russell, Robin E; Bron, Gebbiena M; Rocke, Tonie E

    2016-06-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is periodically responsible for large die-offs in rodent populations that can spillover and cause human mortalities. In the western US, prairie dog populations experience nearly 100% mortality during plague outbreaks, suggesting that multiple transmission pathways combine to amplify plague dynamics. Several alternate pathways in addition to flea vectors have been proposed, such as transmission via direct contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, consumption of carcasses, and environmental sources of plague bacteria, such as contaminated soil. However, evidence supporting the ability of these proposed alternate pathways to trigger large-scale epizootics remains elusive. Here we present a short review of potential plague transmission pathways and use an ordinary differential equation model to assess the contribution of each pathway to resulting plague dynamics in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and their fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta). Using our model, we found little evidence to suggest that soil contamination was capable of producing plague epizootics in prairie dogs. However, in the absence of flea transmission, direct transmission, i.e., contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, could produce enzootic dynamics, and transmission via contact with or consumption of carcasses could produce epizootics. This suggests that these pathways warrant further investigation.

  4. Evaluation of Yersinia pestis transmission pathways for sylvatic plague in prairie dog populations in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richgels, Katherine L. D.; Russell, Robin E.; Bron, Gebbiena; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2016-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is periodically responsible for large die-offs in rodent populations that can spillover and cause human mortalities. In the western US, prairie dog populations experience nearly 100% mortality during plague outbreaks, suggesting that multiple transmission pathways combine to amplify plague dynamics. Several alternate pathways in addition to flea vectors have been proposed, such as transmission via direct contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, consumption of carcasses, and environmental sources of plague bacteria, such as contaminated soil. However, evidence supporting the ability of these proposed alternate pathways to trigger large-scale epizootics remains elusive. Here we present a short review of potential plague transmission pathways and use an ordinary differential equation model to assess the contribution of each pathway to resulting plague dynamics in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and their fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta). Using our model, we found little evidence to suggest that soil contamination was capable of producing plague epizootics in prairie dogs. However, in the absence of flea transmission, direct transmission, i.e., contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, could produce enzootic dynamics, and transmission via contact with or consumption of carcasses could produce epizootics. This suggests that these pathways warrant further investigation.

  5. Monitoring biothreat agents (Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis) with a portable real-time PCR instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Katz, Anna; Niemimaa, Jukka; Forbes, Kristian M; Huitu, Otso; Stuart, Peter; Henttonen, Heikki; Nikkari, Simo

    2015-08-01

    In the event of suspected releases or natural outbreaks of contagious pathogens, rapid identification of the infectious agent is essential for appropriate medical intervention and disease containment. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a novel portable real-time PCR thermocycler, PikoReal™, to the standard real-time PCR thermocycler, Applied Biosystems® 7300 (ABI 7300), for the detection of three high-risk biothreat bacterial pathogens: Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis. In addition, a novel confirmatory real-time PCR assay for the detection of F. tularensis is presented and validated. The results show that sensitivity of the assays, based on a dilution series, for the three infectious agents ranged from 1 to 100 fg of target DNA with both instruments. No cross-reactivity was revealed in specificity testing. Duration of the assays with the PikoReal and ABI 7300 systems were 50 and 100 min, respectively. In field testing for F. tularensis, results were obtained with the PikoReal system in 95 min, as the pre-PCR preparation, including DNA extraction, required an additional 45 min. We conclude that the PikoReal system enables highly sensitive and rapid on-site detection of biothreat agents under field conditions, and may be a more efficient alternative to conventional diagnostic methods.

  6. The Role of Transition Metal Transporters for Iron, Zinc, Manganese, and Copper in the Pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis

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    Perry, Robert D.; Bobrov, Alexander G.; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic plague, encodes a multitude of Fe transport systems. Some of these are defective due to frameshift or IS element insertions, while others are functional in vitro but have no established role in causing infections. Indeed only 3 Fe transporters (Ybt, Yfe and Feo) have been shown to be important in at least one form of plague. The yersiniabactin (Ybt) system is essential in the early dermal/lymphatic stages of bubonic plague, irrelevant in the septicemic stage, and critical in pneumonic plague. Two Mn transporters have been characterized (Yfe and MntH). These two systems play a role in bubonic plague but the double yfe mntH mutant is fully virulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. The same in vivo phenotype occurs with a mutant lacking two (Yfe and Feo) of four ferrous transporters. A role for the Ybt siderophore in Zn acquisition has been revealed. Ybt-dependent Zn acquisition uses a transport system completely independent of the Fe-Ybt uptake system. Together Ybt components and ZnuABC play a critical role in Zn acquisition in vivo. Single mutants in either system retain high virulence in a mouse model of septicemic plague while the double mutant is completely avirulent. PMID:25891079

  7. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

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    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  8. Recombinant F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against virulent Yersinia pestis infection

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    Rocke, T.E.; Mencher, J.; Smith, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Andrews, G.P.; Baeten, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) are highly susceptible to sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, and this disease has severely hampered efforts to restore ferrets to their historic range. A study was conducted to assess the efficacy of vaccination of black-footed ferrets against plague using a recombinant protein vaccine, designated F1-V, developed by personnel at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Seven postreproductive black-footed ferrets were immunized with the vaccine, followed by two booster immunizations on days 23 and 154; three control black-footed ferrets received a placebo. After the second immunization, antibody titers to both F1 and V antigen were found to be significantly higher in vaccinates than controls. On challenge with 7,800 colony-forming units of virulent plague by s.c. injection, the three control animals died within 3 days, but six of seven vaccinates survived with no ill effects. The seventh vaccinate died on day 8. These results indicate that black-footed ferrets can be immunized against plague induced by the s.c. route, similar to fleabite injection.

  9. Pesquisa de Yersinia pestis em roedores e outros pequenos mamíferos nos focos pestosos do Nordeste do Brasil no período 1966 a 1982 Detection of Yersinia pestis in rodents and other small mammals in the northeast of Brazil during the period from 1966 to 1982

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    Alzira Maria Paiva de Almeida

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi feita análise da metodologia empregada e dos resultados alcançados em pesquisa de Yersinia pestis, em material de 24.703 roedores e outros pequenos mamíferos oriundos dos focos pestosos do Nordeste do Brasil, no período de 1966 a 1982. Concluiu-se ser necessário haver maior rapidez na realização dos exames para que os dados obtidos sejam convenientemente aplicados nas atividades de vigilância e controle da peste.The analysis of the methods employed and the results obtained in the research into Yersinia pestis in 24.703 rodents and other small mammals from plague foci in the Northeast of Brazil during the period from 1966 to 1982, shows that the examinations should be carried out more guickly, to make prompter use of the data obtained in the activities of plague surveillance and control possible.

  10. Plasmid composition and virulence-associated factors of Yersinia pestis isolates from a plague outbreak at the Paraíba State, Brazil Composição plasmidial e fatores associados à virulência em cepas de Yersinia pestis de um surto de peste no Estado da Paraíba, Brasil

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    Nilma Cintra Leal

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Yersinia pestis isolates were collected during a plague outbreak at the Paraiba State in 1986. The Y. pestis isolates were investigated for the presence of virulence-associated factors and plasmid content. All strains analysed were proficient in the expression of the VW and fraction 1 antigens, pigment adsorption and pesticin-fibronolysin-coagulase production. A similar plasmid profile composed by four plasmid with molecular weight of 60, 44, 14.9, and 6.4 Megadaltons (MD was found in all strains. DNA cleavage with EcoRI restriction enzyme further demonstrated the uniform plasmid content of the Y. pestis isolates. Seven additional Y. pestis strains, previously isolated in the same region but in an endemic state, showed the same plasmid fingerprint. The lack of any detectable difference between epidemic and endemic isolates as well as the value of plasmid fingerprints in epidemiology of Y. pestis is discussed.Cepas patogênicas de Yersinia pestis foram coletadas durante um surto de peste no Estado da Paraíba em 1986. Os isolados de Y. pestis foram analisados quanto a presença de fatores associados à virulência e conteúdo plasmidial. Todas as linhagens analisadas foram proficientes na expressão dos antígenos VW e fração 1, além de possuírem capacidade de adsorção de pigmentos e produção de pesticina-fibrinolisina-coagulase. Um perfil plasmidial semelhante composto por quatro plasmídeos com peso molecular de 60, 44, 14.9, e 6.4 MD foi encontrado em todas as linhagens. A clivagem do DNA plasmidial com a enzima de restrição EcoRI demonstrou o conteúdo plasmidial uniforme dos isolados de Y. pestis. Sete outras linhagens de Y. pestis, isoladas previamente no mesmo local mas em condição endêmica, mostraram o mesmo perfil plasmidial. A falta de diferenças entre os isolados epidêmicos e endêmicos assim como o uso do perfil plasmidial na epidemiologic de Y. pestis e discutida.

  11. Yersinia pestis insecticidal-like toxin complex (Tc family proteins: characterization of expression, subcellular localization, and potential role in infection of the flea vector

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    Spinner Justin L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxin complex (Tc family proteins were first identified as insecticidal toxins in Photorhabdus luminescens and have since been found in a wide range of bacteria. The genome of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, contains a locus that encodes the Tc protein homologues YitA, YitB, YitC, and YipA and YipB. Previous microarray data indicate that the Tc genes are highly upregulated by Y. pestis while in the flea vector; however, their role in the infection of fleas and pathogenesis in the mammalian host is unclear. Results We show that the Tc proteins YitA and YipA are highly produced by Y. pestis while in the flea but not during growth in brain heart infusion (BHI broth at the same temperature. Over-production of the LysR-type regulator YitR from an exogenous plasmid increased YitA and YipA synthesis in broth culture. The increase in production of YitA and YipA correlated with the yitR copy number and was temperature-dependent. Although highly synthesized in fleas, deletion of the Tc proteins did not alter survival of Y. pestis in the flea or prevent blockage of the proventriculus. Furthermore, YipA was found to undergo post-translational processing and YipA and YitA are localized to the outer membrane of Y. pestis. YitA was also detected by immunofluorescence microscopy on the surface of Y. pestis. Both YitA and YipA are produced maximally at low temperature but persist for several hours after transfer to 37°C. Conclusions Y. pestis Tc proteins are highly expressed in the flea but are not essential for Y. pestis to stably infect or produce a transmissible infection in the flea. However, YitA and YipA localize to the outer membrane and YitA is exposed on the surface, indicating that at least YitA is present on the surface when Y. pestis is transmitted into the mammalian host from the flea.

  12. SELECTION OF PHYLOGENETICALLY CLOSELY-RELATED YERSINIA PESTIS STRAINS DIFFERING IN THEIR VIRULENCE FOR GUINEA PIGS

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    N. V. Anisimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic, transcriptome or (and proteomic comparison of closely related virulent and avirulent microbial strains underlies the search for new pathogenicity factors, potential molecular targets for etiotropic therapy, vaccine prevention and immunotherapy of infectious diseases. This investigation was aimed in testing the ability of method of testicular animalization to select phylogenetically close pairs of Y. pestis strains, which dramatically differ in their pathogenicity for guinea pigs, from the populations of as a rule subcutaneously avirulent for guinea pigs “vole” strains of the plague pathogen. Animalization of Y. pestis cultures were performed on guinea pig males by fourfold testicular passage with reducing infective dose. There was no correlation between the ability to cause generalized infectious process (death after testicular and subcutaneous infection of guinea pigs, but testicular passages made it possible to enrich bacterial culture with a portion of microbes displaying high virulence after subcutaneous infection of this animal species. The methodical approach under study can be successfully applied for selection of pairs of phylogenetically closely related bacterial strains, dramatically differing in their degrees of selective virulence. 

  13. Prevalence of Yersinia pestis in rodents and fleas associated with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming.

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    Thiagarajan, Bala; Bai, Ying; Gage, Kenneth L; Cully, Jack F

    2008-07-01

    Rodents (and their fleas) that are associated with prairie dogs are considered important for the maintenance and transmission of the bacterium (Yersinia pestis) that causes plague. Our goal was to identify rodent and flea species that were potentially involved in a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs at Thunder Basin National Grassland. We collected blood samples and ectoparasites from rodents trapped at off- and on-colony grids at Thunder Basin National Grassland between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples were tested for antibodies to Y. pestis F-1 antigen by a passive hemagglutination assay, and fleas were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of the plague bacterium. Only one of 1,421 fleas, an Oropsylla hirsuta collected in 2002 from a deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, tested positive for Y. pestis. Blood samples collected in summer 2004 from two northern grasshopper mice, Onychomys leucogaster, tested positive for Y. pestis antibodies. All three positive samples were collected from on-colony grids shortly after a plague epizootic occurred. This study confirms that plague is difficult to detect in rodents and fleas associated with prairie dog colonies, unless samples are collected immediately after a prairie dog die-off.

  14. Yersinia pestis requires the 2-component regulatory system OmpR-EnvZ to resist innate immunity during the early and late stages of plague.

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    Reboul, Angéline; Lemaître, Nadine; Titecat, Marie; Merchez, Maud; Deloison, Gaspard; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Marceau, Michaël; Sebbane, Florent

    2014-11-01

    Plague is transmitted by fleas or contaminated aerosols. To successfully produce disease, the causal agent (Yersinia pestis) must rapidly sense and respond to rapid variations in its environment. Here, we investigated the role of 2-component regulatory systems (2CSs) in plague because the latter are known to be key players in bacterial adaptation to environmental change. Along with the previously studied PhoP-PhoQ system, OmpR-EnvZ was the only one of Y. pestis' 23 other 2CSs required for production of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In vitro, OmpR-EnvZ was needed to counter serum complement and leukocytes but was not required for the secretion of antiphagocyte exotoxins. In vivo, Y. pestis lacking OmpR-EnvZ did not induce an early immune response in the skin and was fully virulent in neutropenic mice. We conclude that, throughout the course of Y. pestis infection, OmpR-EnvZ is required to counter toxic effectors secreted by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the tissues.

  15. Prevalence of Yersinia pestis in rodents and fleas associated with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, B.; Bal, Y.; Gage, K.L.; Cully, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Rodents (and their fleas) that are associated with prairie dogs are considered important for the maintenance and transmission of the bacterium (Yersinia pestis) that causes plague. Our goal was to identify rodent and flea species that were potentially involved in a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs at Thunder Basin National Grassland. We collected blood samples and ectoparasites from rodents trapped at off- and on-colony grids at Thunder Basin National Grassland between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples were tested for antibodies to Y. pestis F-1 antigen by a passive hemagglutination assay, and fleas were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of the plague bacterium. Only one of 1,421 fleas, an Oropsylla hirsuta collected in 2002 from a deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, tested positive for Y. pestis. Blood samples collected in summer 2004 from two northern grasshopper mice, Onychomys leucogaster, tested positive for Y. pestis antibodies. All three positive samples were collected from on-colony grids shortly after a plague epizootic occurred. This study confirms that plague is difficult to detect in rodents and fleas associated with prairie dog colonies, unless samples are collected immediately after a prairie dog die-off. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  16. Histopatologia da infecção por Yersinia pestis em roedores de focos de peste do Nordeste brasileiro Histopathology of Yersinia pestis infection in rodents from plague foci of Brazilian Northeast

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    Eridan M. Coutinho

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho mostra a histopatologia da infecção pela Yersinia pestis, entre as diferentes espécies de roedores silvestres e comensais (cricetídeos, equimídeos, murídeos e cavídeos que ocorrem na zona endêmica de peste do Nordeste do Brasil. Estes roedores foram encontrados naturalmente infectados nos campos ou inoculados experimentalmente no laboratório (vias percutânea, subcutânea ou picada de pulgas com cepas locais e/ou estrangeiras de Yersiniapestis. Quase todos os animais, exceto alguns dos cavídeos, desenvolveram a forma bubosepticêmica da peste. Entre as lesões encontradas, a necrose coagulativa multifocal do fígado, a pneumonite intersticial aguda difusa e a atrofia linfoide do baço, podem, por sua constância, ser consideradas como os principais indicadores histológicos da infecção pestosa, embora estas lesões não sejam exclusivas da peste. A diversidade e a intensidade das lesões entre os Zygodontomys lasiurus pixuna, podem explicar a mortalidade elevada desta espécie e a disseminação da peste nos focos naturais do Nordeste brasileiro. Cricetídeos e murídeos mostraram alterações histopatológicas qualitativamente semelhantes. A resistência dos cavídeos à infecção pestosa foi evidenciada pela sobrevida desses roedores à fase aguda da infecção e pelo desenvolvimento de uma reação histiocitária interna, delimitando as áreas abscedadas. è possível que estas lesões crônicas abriguem bacilos virulentos, que permitirão a reinfecção periódica das pulgas e conseqüente reativação do processo epizoótico.In this paper, the histopathological aspects of plague infection in different species of wild and domestic rodents (cricetidae, echymidae, muridae and cavidae are described. All of them had been trapped in endemic plague areas and harboured natural infection, while others were laboratory infected by different routes (percutaneous, subcutaneous rout, fleas bite. Several national and

  17. Host stress and immune responses during aerosol challenge of Brown Norway rats with Yersinia pestis

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    Susan T Gater

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation exposure models are becoming the preferred method for the comparative study of respiratory infectious diseases due to their resemblance to the natural route of infection. To enable precise delivery of pathogen to the lower respiratory tract in a manner that imposes minimal biosafety risk, nose-only exposure systems have been developed. Early inhalation exposure technology for infectious disease research grew out of technology used in asthma research where predominantly the Collison nebulizer is used to generate an aerosol by beating a liquid sample against glass. Although infectious aerosol droplets of 1-5µm in size can be generated, the Collison often causes loss of viability. In this work, we evaluate a gentler method for aerosolization of living cells and describe the use of the Sparging Liquid Aerosol Generator (SLAG in a rat pneumonic plague model. The SLAG creates aerosols by continuous dripping of liquid sample on a porous metal disc. We show the generation of 0.5 to 1µm Y. pestis aerosol particles using the SLAG with spray factors typically ranging from 10-7 to 10-8 with no detectable loss of bacterial viability. Delivery of these infectious particles via nose-only exposure led to the rapid development of lethal pneumonic plague. Further, we evaluated the effect of restraint-stress imposed by the nose-only exposure chamber on early inflammatory responses and bacterial deposition. Elevated serum corticosterone which peaked at 2 hrs post-procedure indicated the animals experienced stress as a result of restraint in the nose-only chamber. However, we observed no correlation between elevated corticosterone and the amount of bacterial deposition or inflammation in the lungs. Together these data demonstrate the utility of the SLAG and the nose-only chamber for aerosol challenge of rodents by Y. pestis.

  18. Structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence of the periplasmic chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, D A; Zavialov, A V; Chernovskaya, T V; Karlyshev, A V; Zav'yalova, G A; Vasiliev, A M; Dudich, I V; Abramov, V M; Zav'yalov, V P; MacIntyre, S

    1999-04-01

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis is a typical representative of a subfamily of specific chaperones involved in assembly of surface adhesins with a very simple structure. One characteristic feature of this Caf1M-like subfamily is possession of an extended, variable sequence (termed FGL) between the F1 and subunit binding G1 beta-strands. In contrast, FGS subfamily members, characterized by PapD, have a short F1-G1 loop and are involved in assembly of complex pili. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence, a mutant Caf1M molecule (dCaf1M), in which the 27 amino acid residues between the F1 and G1 beta-strands had been deleted, was constructed. Expression of the mutated caf1M in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of high levels of dCaf1M. The far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the mutant and wild-type proteins were indistinguishable and exhibited practically the same temperature and pH dependencies. Thus, the FGL sequence of Caf1M clearly does not contribute significantly to the stability of the protein conformation. Preferential cleavage of Caf1M by trypsin at Lys-119 confirmed surface exposure of this part of the FGL sequence in the isolated chaperone and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complex. There was no evidence of surface-localized Caf1 subunit in the presence of the Caf1A outer membrane protein and dCaf1M. In contrast to Caf1M, dCaf1M was not able to form a stable complex with Caf1 nor could it protect the subunit from proteolytic degradation in vivo. This demonstration that the FGL sequence is required for stable chaperone-subunit interaction, but not for folding of a stable chaperone, provides a sound basis for future detailed molecular analyses of the FGL subfamily of chaperones.

  19. Systematic identification of a suspicious Yersinia pestis isolate%对1株疑似鼠疫耶尔森氏菌的系统鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何建; 杨瑞馥; 宋亚军; 李艳君; 祁芝珍; 崔玉军; 任玲玲; 代瑞霞; 王效义; 崔百忠; 张青雯

    2011-01-01

    目的 对1株可疑菌株进行系列验证实验,以确定其是否为鼠疫耶尔森氏菌(以下简称鼠疫菌).方法 用鼠疫细菌学常规方法和分子生物学手段确定其生物学表型特征、特异性基因及基因组特征.结果 该菌株具备鼠疫菌的典型形态特征;能被鼠疫噬菌体完全裂解;主要生化特性为阿胶糖(+)、鼠李糖(-)、麦芽糖(+)、蜜二糖(-)、甘油(+)、脱氮(+),与典型鼠疫菌一致.毒力因子检查结果为均为阴性;对实验动物小白鼠完全无致死能力.全基因组芯片杂交实验和PCR扩增表明55023菌株没有鼠疫菌的三个质粒;也不具鼠疫标识基因;pgm位点代表性基因YPO1954扩增阳性,YPO1908扩增阴性,表明其pgm位点不完整;差异片段(DFR)分型结果表明该菌株缺失了14个DFR,不符合鼠疫菌的特征;多位点序列分型(MLST)分析结果表明该菌株与鼠疫存在16个碱基的差异,而与血清III型假结核耶尔森氏菌仅相差两个碱基.结论 尽管55023菌株具备鼠疫菌的一些表型特征,但基因组特征表明其不是鼠疫菌,而可能是血清III型的假结核耶尔森氏菌;噬菌体裂解结果等表型不能作为鼠疫菌鉴定的最终标准.%A handful of traditional and molecular assays were applied to decipher the phenotypic and genomic characteristics of a suspicious Yersinia pestis strain 55023.Strain 55023 showed typical colony morphism and microscopic features of Y.pestis.It can be lysed by the diagnostic phage of Y.pestis at 22℃, 28℃ and 37℃, which resembles typical Y.pestis isolates.Strain 55023 was positive for utilizing arabinose, glucosylglucose, glycerine and denitrification, while negative for rhamnose and melibiose, which was also identical to reference Y.pestis strains.Known virulence factors for Y.pestis (F1 antigen, VW antigen, pgm and Pst 1) were all absent from strain 55023, and all mice survived even challenged by 17.5 billion CFU of 55023.Both microarray and PCR verified

  20. Purificación y Control de Calidad de la Fracción Antigénica F1 de Yersinia pestis

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    S Seraylán

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Se ha desarrollado la extracción y purificación de la fracción antigénica F1 de Yersinia pestis que se utilizará en la producción de un kit para el diagnóstico de peste. El proceso se realizó a partir de biomasa de una cepa patógena de Yersinia pestis, aislada en Chiclayo (1999, cuyos factores de virulencia fueron comprobados con la finalidad de determinar la presencia del antígeno en mención. La biomasa bacteriana fue inactivada con acetona fría, y la purificación parcial del antígeno se realizó mediante procesos de precipitación con sales y diálisis. Para confirmar la pureza del antígeno, éste se sometió a una electroforesis en gel de poliacrilamida (SDS-PAGE al 15% y se evidenció la presencia de una banda de 17 kDa. Se sensibilizó glóbulos rojos de carnero, con la fracción antigénica F1, para la titulación de un suero Anti-F1 por hemaglutinación pasiva e inhibición de la hemaglutinación.

  1. Pesquisa da infecção natural por Yersinia pestis, em pulicídeos provenientes de focos pestosos do nordeste do Brasil

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    Darci Pascoal Brasil

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliados três processos de acondicionamento e transporte de pulgas, objetivando análise bacteriológica para isolamento da Yersinia pestis. As três abordagens testadas foram: pulgas vivas em tubos de ensaio com tiras dobradas de papel de filtro; pulgas em solução salina; macerados de pulgas em meio de Cary-Blair. Os dois últimos métodos foram quase iguais e superiores ao primeiro. Foram analisadas pelas três técnicas, um total de 29.512 "pools" de pulicideos provenientes de focos de peste do Nordeste do Brasil no período de 1966 a 1982. Deste total, 236 (0,80% dos "pools" foram positivos por cultura e/ou inoculação em animais sensíveis.Three different containment transport processes of fleas were evaluated as an approach to the bacteriologic isolation of Yersinia pestis. The three methods employed were: live fleas in glass tubes containing pieces of wrapped filter paper; dead fleas in saline solution; and maceratedfleas in Cary-Blair culture medium. The two latter methods were almost equal and superior to the first method. A total of 29512 flea pools, from plague foci in Northeast Brazil collected during 1966 to 1982 were evaluated by the three methods. Among these samples, 236 (0.80% flea pools were positive with regard to bacteriological cultivation and/or infection of susceptible animals.

  2. Vaccination with F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against plague upon oral challenge with Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.; Marinari, Paul E.; Kreeger, J.; Enama, J.T.; Powell, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have established that vaccination of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) with F1-V fusion protein by subcutaneous (SC) injection protects the animals against plague upon injection of the bacterium Yersinia pestis. This study demonstrates that the F1-V antigen can also protect ferrets against plague contracted via ingestion of a Y. pestis-infected mouse, a probable route for natural infection. Eight black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated with F1-V protein by SC injection at approximately 60 days-of-age. A booster vaccination was administered 3 mo later via SC injection. Four additional ferret kits received placebos. The animals were challenged 6 wk after the boost by feeding each one a Y. pestis-infected mouse. All eight vaccinates survived challenge, while the four controls succumbed to plague within 3 days after exposure. To determine the duration of antibody postvaccination, 18 additional black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated and boosted with F1-V by SC injection at 60 and 120 days-of-age. High titers to both F1 and V (mean reciprocal titers of 18,552 and 99,862, respectively) were found in all vaccinates up to 2 yr postvaccination, whereas seven control animals remained antibody negative throughout the same time period. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  3. Genetic variability of Yersinia pestis isolates as predicted by PCR-based IS100 genotyping and analysis of structural genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Vladimir L; Georgescu, Anca M; Elliott, Jeffrey M; Hu, Ping; Worsham, Patricia L; Ott, Linda L; Slezak, Tomas R; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Regala, Warren M; Brubaker, Robert R; Garcia, Emilio

    2002-02-01

    A PCR-based genotyping system that detects divergence of IS100 locations within the Yersinia pestis genome was used to characterize a large collection of isolates of different biovars and geographical origins. Using sequences derived from the glycerol-negative biovar orientalis strain CO92, a set of 27 locus-specific primers was designed to amplify fragments between the end of IS100 and its neighboring gene. Geographically diverse members of the orientalis biovar formed a homogeneous group with identical genotype with the exception of strains isolated in Indochina. In contrast, strains belonging to the glycerol-positive biovar antiqua showed a variety of fingerprinting profiles. Moreover, strains of the biovar medievalis (also glycerol positive) clustered together with the antiqua isolates originated from Southeast Asia, suggesting their close phylogenetic relationships. Interestingly, a Manchurian biovar antiqua strain Nicholisk 51 displayed a genotyping pattern typical of biovar orientalis isolates. Analysis of the glycerol pathway in Y. pestis suggested that a 93-bp deletion within the glpD gene encoding aerobic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase might account for the glycerol-negative phenotype of the orientalis biovar. The glpD gene of strain Nicholisk 51 did not possess this deletion, although it contained two nucleotide substitutions characteristic of the glpD version found exclusively in biovar orientalis strains. To account for this close relationship between biovar orientalis strains and the antiqua Nicholisk 51 isolate, we postulate that the latter represents a variant of this biovar with restored ability to ferment glycerol. The fact that such a genetic lesion might be repaired as part of the natural evolutionary process suggests the existence of genetic exchange between different Yersinia strains in nature. The relevance of this observation on the emergence of epidemic Y. pestis strains is discussed.

  4. The Hemophore HasA from Yersinia pestis (HasAyp) Coordinates Hemin with a Single Residue, Tyr75, and with Minimal Conformational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Lovell, Scott; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Battaile, Kevin P.; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Rivera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Hemophores from Serratia marcescens (HasAsm) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp) bind hemin between two loops, which harbor the axial ligands H32 and Y75. Hemin binding to the Y75 loop triggers closing of the H32 loop and enables binding of H32. Because Yersinia pestis HasA (HasAyp) presents a Gln at position 32, we determined the structures of apo-and holo-HasAyp. Surprisingly, the Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is already in the closed conformation but no residue from the Q32 loop binds hemin in holo-HasAyp. In agreement with the minimal reorganization between the apo-and holo-structures, the hemin on-rate is too fast to detect by conventional stopped-flow measurements. PMID:23578210

  5. [Experimental observation on the histopathological and ultrastructural pathology of Great Gerbils (Rhombomys opimus) in the Junggar Basin by subcutaneous injecting of Yersinia pestis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Azhati, Rehemu; Meng, W W; Luo, T; Li, B; Abulimiti, Maituohuti; Wang, X H; Dai, X; Zhang, Y J

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To understand the histopathological and ultrastructural pathology changes of great gerbils in the Junggar Basin to Yersinia pestis infection. Methods: Forty captured great gerbils from the Junggar Basin that tested negative for anti-F1 antibodies were infected. The Y. pestis strain 2504, isolated from a live great gerbil in the natural plague foci of the Junggar Basin in 2005 with a median lethal dose (LD(50)) of CFU/ml, was used in this study. Forty great gerbils were divided into seven infection groups and were subcutaneously infected with 7.4×10(5), 7.4×10(6), 7.4×10(7), 7.4×10(8), 7.4×10(9), 7.4×10(10), or 3.0×10(11) CFU/ml of 2504. One milliliter of physiological saline was injected in the noninfected group as a control. We collected the liver, spleen, heart, and lung from all animals for histopathologic and ultrastructural pathology examination. Results: Great gerbils in the 7.4×10(8)-3.0×10(11) CFU/ml groups did not survive and exhibited pathological changes and altered ultrastructural pathology. The liver tissue of infected great gerbils showed spotty necrosis and fatty degeneration, intranuclear canaliculi with increased hepatocytes, and uneven distribution of organelles. Additionally, reactive proliferation of lymphoid tissue in the spleen, blood sinusoid lacunae with neutrophil infiltration, and phagocytosed bacteria in phagocyte cells were observed. Myocardial fiber hypertrophy and interstitial indistinction, nuclear matrices decreased in cardiac myocytes, and loose arrangement of myogenic fibers in myocardial cells were also observed. Angiectasia, capillary congestion, and tissue necrosis were found in the lung. No significant difference in histopathological and ultrastructural pathology in the parenchymal organ was observed between the 7.4×10(5)-7.4×10(7) CFU/ml groups and the 7.4×10(8)-3.0×10(11) CFU/ml groups, and no specific death caused by Y. pestis infection was apparent in the 7.4×10(5)-7.4×10(7) CFU/ml groups

  6. A New Generation Microarray for the Simultaneous Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis in Food

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    Noriko Goji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of microarrays as a multiple analytic system has generated increased interest and provided a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of pathogens in a single experiment. A wide array of applications for this technology has been reported. A low density oligonucleotide microarray was generated from the genetic sequences of Y. pestis and B. anthracis and used to fabricate a microarray chip. The new generation chip, consisting of 2,240 spots in 4 quadrants with the capability of stripping/rehybridization, was designated as “Y-PESTIS/B-ANTHRACIS 4x2K Array.” The chip was tested for specificity using DNA from a panel of bacteria that may be potentially present in food. In all, 37 unique Y. pestis-specific and 83 B. anthracis-specific probes were identified. The microarray assay distinguished Y. pestis and B. anthracis from the other bacterial species tested and correctly identified the Y. pestis-specific oligonucleotide probes using DNA extracted from experimentally inoculated milk samples. Using a whole genome amplification method, the assay was able to detect as low as 1 ng genomic DNA as the start sample. The results suggest that oligonucleotide microarray can specifically detect and identify Y. pestis and B. anthracis and may be a potentially useful diagnostic tool for detecting and confirming the organisms in food during a bioterrorism event.

  7. The absence of concordant population genetic structure in the black-tailed prairie dog and the flea, Oropsylla hirsuta, with implications for the spread of Yersinia pestis.

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    Jones, Philip H; Britten, Hugh B

    2010-05-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a keystone species on the mid- and short-grass prairies of North America. The species has suffered extensive colony extirpations and isolation as a result of human activity including the introduction of an exotic pathogen, Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of sylvatic plague. The prairie dog flea, Oropsylla hirsuta, is the most common flea on our study colonies in north-central Montana and it has been shown to carry Y. pestis. We used microsatellite markers to estimate the level of population genetic concordance between black-tailed prairie dogs and O. hirsuta in order to determine the extent to which prairie dogs are responsible for dispersing this potential plague vector among prairie dog colonies. We sampled fleas and prairie dogs from six prairie dog colonies in two regions separated by about 46 km. These colonies were extirpated by a plague epizootic that began months after our sampling was completed in 2005. Prairie dogs showed significant isolation-by-distance and a tendency toward genetic structure on the regional scale that the fleas did not. Fleas exhibited higher estimated rates of gene flow among prairie dog colonies than the prairie dogs sampled from the same colonies. While the findings suggested black-tailed prairie dogs may have contributed to flea dispersal, we attributed the lack of concordance between the population genetic structures of host and ectoparasite to additional flea dispersal that was mediated by mammals other than prairie dogs that were present in the prairie system.

  8. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages.

  9. Virulence Plasmid (pYV-Associated Expression of Phenotypic Virulent Determinants in Pathogenic Yersinia Species: A Convenient Method for Monitoring the Presence of pYV under Culture Conditions and Its Application for Isolation/Detection of Yersinia pestis in Food

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    Saumya Bhaduri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, phenotypic expression of virulence plasmid (pYV: 70-kb-associated genetic determinants may include low-calcium response (Lcr, pinpoint colony, size = 0.36 mm, colony morphology (size = 1.13 mm, crystal violet (CV binding (dark-violet colony, Congo Red (CR uptake (red pinpoint colony, size = 0.36 mm, autoagglutination (AA = cells agglutinate, and hydrophobicity (HP = clumping of cells. Y. pseudotuberculosis is chromosomally closely related to Y. pestis; whereas, Y. enterocolitica is chromosomally more distantly related to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. All three species demonstrate Lcr, CV binding, and CR uptake. The colony morphology/size, AA, and HP characteristics are expressed in both Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica but not in Y. pestis. Congo red uptake in Y. pestis was demonstrated only on calcium-deficient CR magnesium oxalate tryptic soy agar (CR-MOX, whereas this phenotype was expressed on both CR-MOX and low-calcium agarose media in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica. These phenotypes were detectable at 37°C within 24 h in Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis but did not appear until 48 h in Y. pestis due to its slower growth rate at 37°C. The pYV is unstable (i.e., easily lost under a variety of culture conditions in all three species but is more unstable in Y. pestis. The specific CR uptake by Y. pestis in CR-MOX and the delayed time interval to express Lcr and CR uptake provide a means to differentiate Y. pestis from Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis. These differences in pYV expression in Y. pestis can be used for its isolation and detection in food.

  10. Fine-tuning synthesis of Yersinia pestis LcrV from runaway-like replication balanced-lethal plasmid in a Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium vaccine induces protection against a lethal Y. pestis challenge in mice.

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    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Gunn, Bronwyn M; Branger, Christine G; Tinge, Steven A; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-06-01

    A balanced-lethal plasmid expression system that switches from low-copy-number to runaway-like high-copy-number replication (pYA4534) was constructed for the regulated delayed in vivo synthesis of heterologous antigens by vaccine strains. This is an antibiotic resistance-free maintenance system containing the asdA gene (essential for peptidoglycan synthesis) as a selectable marker to complement the lethal chromosomal DeltaasdA allele in live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines (RASVs) such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain chi9447. pYA4534 harbors two origins of replication, pSC101 and pUC (low and high copy numbers, respectively). The pUC replication origin is controlled by a genetic switch formed by the operator/promoter of the P22 cro gene (O/P(cro)) (P(R)), which is negatively regulated by an arabinose-inducible P22 c2 gene located on both the plasmid and the chromosome (araC P(BAD) c2). The absence of arabinose, which is unavailable in vivo, triggers replication to a high-copy-number plasmid state. To validate these vector attributes, the Yersinia pestis virulence antigen LcrV was used to develop a vaccine against plague. An lcrV sequence encoding amino acids 131 to 326 (LcrV196) was optimized for expression in Salmonella, flanked with nucleotide sequences encoding the signal peptide (SS) and the carboxy-terminal domain (CT) of beta-lactamase, and cloned into pYA4534 under the control of the P(trc) promoter to generate plasmid pYA4535. Our results indicate that the live Salmonella vaccine strain chi9447 harboring pYA4535 efficiently stimulated a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that protected mice against lethal challenge with Y. pestis strain CO92 introduced through either the intranasal or subcutaneous route.

  11. Klebsiella pneumoniae multiresistance plasmid pMET1: similarity with the Yersinia pestis plasmid pCRY and integrative conjugative elements.

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    Alfonso J C Soler Bistué

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes has become an important public health and biodefense threat. Plasmids are important contributors to the rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance by pathogenic bacteria. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The nucleotide sequence of the Klebsiella pneumoniae multiresistance plasmid pMET1 comprises 41,723 bp and includes Tn1331.2, a transposon that carries the bla(TEM-1 gene and a perfect duplication of a 3-kbp region including the aac(6'-Ib, aadA1, and bla(OXA-9 genes. The replication region of pMET1 has been identified. Replication is independent of DNA polymerase I, and the replication region is highly related to that of the cryptic Yersinia pestis 91001 plasmid pCRY. The potential partition region has the general organization known as the parFG locus. The self-transmissible pMET1 plasmid includes a type IV secretion system consisting of proteins that make up the mating pair formation complex (Mpf and the DNA transfer (Dtr system. The Mpf is highly related to those in the plasmid pCRY, the mobilizable high-pathogenicity island from E. coli ECOR31 (HPI(ECOR31, which has been proposed to be an integrative conjugative element (ICE progenitor of high-pathogenicity islands in other Enterobacteriaceae including Yersinia species, and ICE(Kp1, an ICE found in a K. pneumoniae strain causing primary liver abscess. The Dtr MobB and MobC proteins are highly related to those of pCRY, but the endonuclease is related to that of plasmid pK245 and has no significant homology with the protein of similar function in pCRY. The region upstream of mobB includes the putative oriT and shares 90% identity with the same region in the HPI(ECOR31. CONCLUSIONS: The comparative analyses of pMET1 with pCRY, HPI(ECOR31, and ICE(Kp1 show a very active rate of genetic exchanges between Enterobacteriaceae including Yersinia species, which represents a high public health and biodefense threat due to transfer of multiple resistance

  12. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

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    Joel Bozue

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  13. Entry of Yersinia Pestis into the Viable but Nonculturable State in a Low-Temperature Tap Water Microcosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    to enter the VBNC state [17,18,19,20]. In addition, many other bacterial pathogens, including Francisella tularensis, Vibrio cholerae , and Escherichia... Vibrio cholerae , and Escherichia coli enter the VBNC state [12,21]. In addition, the two closest pathogenic relatives of Y. pestis, namely Y...2001) Viability of the Nonculturable Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139. Systematic and Applied Microbiology 24: 331–341. 38. Jang KI, Kim MG, Ha SD, Kim KS

  14. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Yersinia pestis Using Amplification of Plague Diagnostic Bacteriophages Monitored by Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    pseudotuberculosis 32 ( IVA ) 2 (24uC) 2 Yersinia intermedia ATCC 29909 2 2 Y. pseudotuberculosis Ikegaki (IVB) 2 2 Y. intermedia Y229 2 2 Y. pseudotuberculosis R2...Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mexico . Clin Microbiol 39: 3883–3888. 38. Schofield DA, Westwater C (2009) Phage-mediated bioluminescent detection of

  15. 长尾黄鼠带鼠疫菌越冬实验观察%Experimental observation on the yellow mice(Citellus undulatus) infected with Yersinia pestis over the winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯玉明; 张晓雪; 林纪春; 王诚; 雷刚; 钱存宁

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analysis and determine the possibility of the Citellus undulatus infected with Yersinia pestis surviving the winter in an experimental study, and to provide scientific experimental basis for the study on the mechanism of Yersinia pestis preservation. Method In 2006,09 to 2007,04 and 2007,09 to 2008,04 in Xinjiang Wusu-Gurtu natural foci of plague, under natural conditions, the over the winter process of Citellus undulatus carrying the plague bacteria was simulated, and 178 Citellus undulatus were infected with Yersinia pestis (1×107 Bacteria/mouse) using artificial injection method. One hundred seventy-eight Citellus undulatus infected with Yersinia pestis were kept into a construction of the black (1-5 ℃) basement (2 meters under the ground) in the plague focus. In doing so, these Citellus undulatuses almost simultaneously stepped into hibernation. After waking up from hibernation in following year in April, the survived mice carrying the plague bacteria were observed. Results Sixty-eight mice survived among the 178 infected with Yersinia pestis after 6 months of hibernation (through October to the following year in April), and the remaining 110 were all dead without pulling through the hibernation period. The survival rate was 38.2% (68/178). The organ culture of Yersinia pestis of the 110 dead mice(Citellus undnlatus) were tested, 67 were negative(-), 43 positive(+), with a positive rate of 39.1%(43/110). Among the rats with positive plague bacteria, the congestive pulmonary edema and the pathological changes of the hemorrhagic inflammation of the heart, liver, spleen, kidney and injection site could be seen clearly; the plague-free mice were not found to have any pathological changes. The survived 68 mice over the winter were autopsied and observed after being fed up for 20 days. No any pathological changes were found among these mice, and culturing of Yersinia pestis of the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and the tissue of injection site of these

  16. Structural analysis of Pla protein from the biological warfare agent Yersinia pestis: docking and molecular dynamics of interactions with the mammalian plasminogen system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruback, Eduardo; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Pascutti, Pedro Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis protein Pla is a plasmid-coded outer membrane protein with aspartic-protease activity. Pla exhibits a plasminogen (Plg) activator activity (PAA) that promotes the cleavage of Plg to the active serine-protease form called plasmin. Exactly how Pla activates Plg into plasmin remains unclear. To investigate this event, we performed the interactions between the predicted Plg and Pla protein structures by rigid-body docking with the HEX program and evaluated the complex stability by molecular dynamics (MD) using the GROMACS package programs. The predicted docked complex of Plg-Pla shows the same interaction site predicted by experimental site-direct mutagenesis in other studies. After a total of 8 ns of MD simulation, we observed the relaxation of the beta-barrel structure of Pla and the progressive approximation and stabilization between the cleavage site of Plg into the extracellular loops of Pla, followed by the increase in the number of H bonds. We also report here the aminoacids that participate in the active site and the sub sites of interaction. The total understanding of these interactions can be an important tool for drug design against bacterial proteases.

  17. Multiple Roles of Myd88 in the Immune Response to the Plague F1-V Vaccine and in Protection against an Aerosol Challenge of Yersinia pestis CO92 in Mice

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    Jennifer L. Dankmeyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current candidate vaccine against Yersinia pestis infection consists of two subunit proteins: the capsule protein or F1 protein and the low calcium response V protein or V-antigen. Little is known of the recognition of the vaccine by the host’s innate immune system and how it affects the acquired immune response to the vaccine. Thus, we vaccinated Toll-like receptor (Tlr 2, 4, and 2/4-double deficient, as well as signal adaptor protein Myd88-deficient mice. We found that Tlr4 and Myd88 appeared to be required for an optimal immune response to the F1-V vaccine but not Tlr2 when compared to wild-type mice. However, there was a difference between the requirement for Tlr4 and MyD88 in vaccinated animals. When F1-V vaccinated Tlr4 mutant (lipopolysaccharide tolerant and Myd88-deficient mice were challenged by aerosol with Y. pestis CO92, all but one Tlr4 mutant mice survived the challenge, but no vaccinated Myd88-deficient mice survived the challenge. Spleens from these latter nonsurviving mice showed that Y. pestis was not cleared from the infected mice. Our results suggest that MyD88 appears to be important for both an optimal immune response to F1-V and in protection against a lethal challenge of Y. pestis CO92 in F1-V vaccinated mice.

  18. Evaluation of up-converting phosphor technology-based lateral flow strips for rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis Spore, Brucella spp., and Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Zhang

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis, Brucella spp., and Yersinia pestis are zoonotic pathogens and biowarfare- or bioterrorism-associated agents that must be detected rapidly on-site from various samples (e.g., viscera and powders. An up-converting phosphor technology-based lateral flow (UPT-LF strip was developed as a point-of-care testing (POCT to satisfy the requirements of first-level emergency response. We developed UPT-LF POCT to quantitatively detect the three pathogens within 15 min. Sample and operation-error tolerances of the assay were comprehensively evaluated. The sensitivity of UPT-LF assay to bacterial detection reached 10(4 cfu · mL(-1 (100 cfu/test, with a linear quantitative range of 4 to 6 orders of magnitude. Results revealed that the UPT-LF assay exhibited a high specificity with the absence of false-positive results even at 10(9 cfu · mL(-1 of non-specific bacterial contamination. The assay could tolerate samples with a wide pH range (2 to 12, high ion strengths (≥ 4 mol · L(-1 of NaCl, high viscosities (≤ 25 mg · mL(-1 of PEG20000 or ≥ 20% of glycerol, and high concentrations of bio-macromolecule (≤ 200 mg · mL(-1 of bovine serum albumin or ≥ 80 mg · mL(-1 of casein. The influence of various types of powders and viscera (fresh and decomposed on the performance of UPT-LF assay was determined. The operational error of liquid measurement exhibited few effects on sensitivity and specificity. The developed UPT-LF POCT assay is applicable under field conditions with excellent tolerance to sample complexity and operational error.

  19. 鼠疫菌全基因组单核苷酸多态性研究进展%Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism of Yersinia pestis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娜

    2011-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mainly refer to the polymorphism of DNA sequence caused by a single nucleotide mutation, including the synonymous SNPs and non- synonymous SNPs. With the rapid development of sequencing technology, a large number of bacterial genome sequences are available. So, it's possible to identify potential SNPs sites by sequencing technology and bioinformatics methods. Also, SNPs, because of their own characteristics, have been widely used as a new molecular marker in bacterial genotyping, evolution and epidemiology research. In this paper, advances in the research on the genome-wide search of SNPs sites and analysis of the Yersinia pestis microevolution based on SNPs data are reviewed.%单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNPs)主要是指在基因组水平上由单个核苷酸的变异所引起的DNA序列多态性,包括同义SNPs(synonymous SNPs,sSNPs)和非同义SNPs(non-synonymous SNPs,nSNPs).随着测序技术的迅速发展,获得了大量细菌全基因组序列,使得通过测序技术及生物信息学方法寻找潜在的SNPs位点成为可能.并且,由于SNPs本身的特性,使其作为一种新的分子标记,在细菌分型与进化、流行病学调查研究中得到广泛应用.该文主要阐述基于全基因组寻找SNPs位点,并建立以SNPs数据为基础的鼠疫菌微进化研究分析的研究进展状况.

  20. Rapid Degradation of Hfq-Free RyhB in Yersinia pestis by PNPase Independent of Putative Ribonucleolytic Complexes

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    Zhongliang Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq in bacteria stabilizes sRNAs by protecting them from the attack of ribonucleases. Upon release from Hfq, sRNAs are preferably degraded by PNPase. PNPase usually forms multienzyme ribonucleolytic complexes with endoribonuclease E and/or RNA helicase RhlB to facilitate the degradation of the structured RNA. However, whether PNPase activity on Hfq-free sRNAs is associated with the assembly of RNase E or RhlB has yet to be determined. Here we examined the roles of the main endoribonucleases, exoribonucleases, and ancillary RNA-modifying enzymes in the degradation of Y. pestis RyhB in the absence of Hfq. Expectedly, the transcript levels of both RyhB1 and RyhB2 increase only after inactivating PNPase, which confirms the importance of PNPase in sRNA degradation. By contrast, the signal of RyhB becomes barely perceptible after inactivating of RNase III, which may be explained by the increase in PNPase levels resulting from the exemption of pnp mRNA from RNase III processing. No significant changes are observed in RyhB stability after deletion of either the PNPase-binding domain of RNase E or rhlB. Therefore, PNPase acts as a major enzyme of RyhB degradation independent of PNPase-containing RNase E and RhlB assembly in the absence of Hfq.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PsaA, the adhesive pilin subunit that forms the pH 6 antigen on the surface of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Sadhukhan, Annapurna; Nair, Manoj K M; Schifferli, Dieter M; Xia, Di

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis has been responsible for a number of high-mortality epidemics throughout human history. Like all other bacterial infections, the pathogenesis of Y. pestis begins with the attachment of bacteria to the surface of host cells. At least five surface proteins from Y. pestis have been shown to interact with host cells. Psa, the pH 6 antigen, is one of them and is deployed on the surface of bacteria as thin flexible fibrils that are the result of the polymerization of a single PsaA pilin subunit. Here, the crystallization of recombinant donor-strand complemented PsaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.9 Å resolution from a native crystal and to 1.5 Å resolution from a bromide-derivatized crystal. These crystals displayed the symmetry of the orthorhombic space group P222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 26.3, b = 54.6, c = 102.1 Å. Initial phases were derived from single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments, resulting in an electron-density map that showed a single molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignment was aided by residues binding to bromide ions of the heavy-atom derivative.

  2. Homology among extra-cryptic DNA bands and the typical plasmids in Brazilian Yersinia pestis strains Homologia entre bandas extras de DNA críptico e os plasmídios típicos em cepas brasileiras de Yersinia pestis

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    Nilma Cintra Leal

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, harbors three well-characterized plasmids: pFra (90-110kb, pYV (70 kb and pPst (9.5 kb. Furthermore, some extra-cryptic DNA bands have been observed in a number of wild strains from several foci of the world. Additional bands have also been reported in Brazilian strains. Looking for any relationship among these cryptic DNA bands and the three-prototypical plasmids, we analyzed twelve strains displaying different plasmid content. The DNA bands were hybridized by southern blot with probes directed at the genes caf1, lcrV and pla located respectively on the plasmids pFra, pYV and pPst. The probes were constructed by PCR amplification and labeled with digoxigenin. The Pla probe hybridized with its target (pPst and with bands of about 35 kb suggesting some homology among them. The Caf1 probe hybridized with the target (pFra as well as with higher bands. The LcrV also hybridized with the target (pYV and both with the bands higher than pFra and the bands between pFra and pYV. These results suggest that the large-cryptic bands could represent some rearrangement, open circular or linearized forms of the pFra and pYV plasmids.Yersinia pestis, o agente causador da peste, possui três plasmídios bem caracterizados: pFra (90-110 kb, pYV (70 kb e pPst (9.5 kb. Adicionalmente, algumas bandas extras de DNA críptico têm sido observadas em numerosas cepas selvagens em vários focos do mundo. Bandas extras também foram observadas em cepas brasileiras. Para verificar se existe alguma homologia entre as bandas extras de DNA críptico e os três plasmídios típicos, foram analisadas 12 culturas de Y. pestis através de hibridização com sondas dirigidas aos genes caf1, lcrV e pla localizados respectivamente nos plasmídios pFra, pYV e pPst. As sondas foram construídas através de amplificação por PCR e marcadas com digoxigenina. A sonda Pla reconheceu seu alvo (pPst e bandas de cerca de 35 kb sugerindo que

  3. Development of multiplex real-time PCR for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Legionella pneumophila%烈性呼吸道细菌多重荧光PCR检测方法建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦海; 陈文琦; 朱进; 吕恒; 顾海涛; 王平《中文作者八》=鲁娟东《中文作者九》=王长军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a mutiplex real-time PCR for the detection of specific structural genes and virulence genes of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Legionella pneumophila. Methods Six pairs of specific primers and six fluorogen-labled probes were designed and synthesized according to cap A and PA genes of Bacillus anthracis, pla and cafl genes of Yersinia pesris,and pilE and Mip genes of Legionella pneumophila. The reaction parameters such as the concentration of primers,probes and the reaction buffer were optimized to develop two sets of multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis,Yersinia pestis, and Legionella pneumophila simultaneously. By using the same method, the duplex real-time PCR for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis,and Legionella pneumophila were also estimated. Results The detectable concentration for the multiplex real-time PCR and duplex real-time PCR was 100 template copy per reaction and 20 template copy per reaction,respectively,and the detection had good specificity, stability,and reproducibility. Conclusion The multiplex real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR assay developed in the study has good specificity and sensitivity and could to be applied for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis,and Legionella pneumophila.%目的 建立多重实时荧光PCR检测炭疽杆菌、鼠疫耶尔森菌及嗜肺军团菌的方法.方法设计分别针对炭疽杆菌、鼠疫耶尔森菌、嗜肺军团菌毒力因子基因和特异性结构基因的引物和荧光双标记探针,优化反应体系,建立2套均可同时检测3种细菌的多重实时荧光PCR方法,以及3种分别针对上述单一细菌的二重实时荧光定量PCR方法.结果构建的多重和二重实时荧光PCR方法,检测敏感性分别达到100模板拷贝每反应和20模板拷贝每反应,并且高浓度模板对低浓度模板的扩增检测干扰不明显,对阳性菌株均100%检出,对常见杆菌检测

  4. Systematic identification of 31 Yersinia Pestis strains and survey of plague foci in Guangxi%广西31株鼠疫耶尔森氏菌鉴定及鼠疫疫源地性质的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周树武; 林新勤; 梁江明; 秦石英; 黄德蕙

    2013-01-01

    目的 对31株鼠疫耶尔森菌进行系统的鉴定,探讨广西鼠疫自然疫源地的结构及性质,为今后防治措施的制定提供依据. 方法 采用鼠疫细菌学常规方法和分子生物学手段确定其生物学表型特征及基因组特征. 结果 31株菌株均具备鼠疫菌的典型形态特征,能被鼠疫噬菌体完全裂解,主要生化特性为阿胶糖(+)、鼠李糖(-)、麦芽糖(+)、甘油(+)、脱氮(+),毒力因子(Pgm)呈阳性、弱阳性和阴性的比例为6:5:4;对Lawton和Glu呈半依赖,对Phe依赖;对22种常用的抗生素敏感,有4种抗生素耐药;含有相对分子量为4MD、6MD、45MD、65MD和111MD五种质粒. 结论 广西鼠疫菌属E群滇闽居民区型,推测广西的鼠疫流行可能是滇黔桂三省区交界地区相同鼠疫自然疫源地的内源性复燃.%Objective To identify 31 Yersinia Pestis strains and survey the plague foci in Guangxi. Methods Traditional and molecular assays were applied to decipher the biological phenotypic and genomic characteristics of 31 Yersinia Pestis strains. Results The 31 Yersinia Pestis strains possessed typical morphological and microscopic features of Y. Pestis,and they could be lysed by the diagnostic phage of Y. Peslis. The main biochemical properties were positive for arabinose(+),rhamnose(-),glucosylglucose(+), glycerine(+)and denitrification(+),the ratios of positive:weak positive: negative (Pgm+,Pgm ± and Pgm-)were 6:5:4,the nutritional needs were characterized by lawtom and glutamic acid semi-dependence,Phenylalanine dependence,the strains were sensitive to 22 commonly used antibiotics and resistant to 4 antibiotics. And the strains contained five plasmids with the molecular size of 4MD,6MD,45MD,65MD and 111MD. Conclusions The Y. Pestis in Guangxi belongs to Group E of the type of Yunnan and Fujian residential area. Thus it is suggested that epidemic of plague in Guangxi might be the endogenous recrudescence in the same natural plague foci of the

  5. Caspase-3 mediates the pathogenic effect of Yersinia pestis YopM in liver of C57BL/6 mice and contributes to YopM's function in spleen.

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    Zhan Ye

    Full Text Available The virulence protein YopM of the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis has different dominant effects in liver and spleen. Previous studies focused on spleen, where YopM inhibits accumulation of inflammatory dendritic cells. In the present study we focused on liver, where PMN function may be directly undermined by YopM without changes in inflammatory cell numbers in the initial days of infection, and foci of inflammation are easily identified. Mice were infected with parent and ΔyopM-1 Y. pestis KIM5, and effects of YopM were assessed by immunohistochemistry and determinations of bacterial viable numbers in organs. The bacteria were found associated with myeloid cells in foci of inflammation and in liver sinusoids. A new in-vivo phenotype of YopM was revealed: death of inflammatory cells, evidenced by TUNEL staining beginning at d 1 of infection. Based on distributions of Ly6G(+, F4/80(+, and iNOS(+ cells within foci, the cells that were killed could have included both PMNs and macrophages. By 2 d post-infection, YopM had no effect on distribution of these cells, but by 3 d cellular decomposition had outstripped acute inflammation in foci due to parent Y. pestis, while foci due to the ΔyopM-1 strain still contained many inflammatory cells. The destruction depended on the presence of both PMNs in the mice and YopM in the bacteria. In mice that lacked the apoptosis mediator caspase-3 the infection dynamics were novel: the parent Y. pestis was limited in growth comparably to the ΔyopM-1 strain in liver, and in spleen a partial growth limitation for parent Y. pestis was seen. This result identified caspase-3 as a co-factor or effector in YopM's action and supports the hypothesis that in liver YopM's main pathogenic effect is mediated by caspase-3 to cause apoptosis of PMNs.

  6. Validation of inverse seasonal peak mortality in medieval plagues, including the Black Death, in comparison to modern Yersinia pestis-variant diseases.

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    Mark R Welford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have noted myriad qualitative and quantitative inconsistencies between the medieval Black Death (and subsequent "plagues" and modern empirical Y. pestis plague data, most of which is derived from the Indian and Chinese plague outbreaks of A.D. 1900+/-15 years. Previous works have noted apparent differences in seasonal mortality peaks during Black Death outbreaks versus peaks of bubonic and pneumonic plagues attributed to Y. pestis infection, but have not provided spatiotemporal statistical support. Our objective here was to validate individual observations of this seasonal discrepancy in peak mortality between historical epidemics and modern empirical data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compiled and aggregated multiple daily, weekly and monthly datasets of both Y. pestis plague epidemics and suspected Black Death epidemics to compare seasonal differences in mortality peaks at a monthly resolution. Statistical and time series analyses of the epidemic data indicate that a seasonal inversion in peak mortality does exist between known Y. pestis plague and suspected Black Death epidemics. We provide possible explanations for this seasonal inversion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results add further evidence of inconsistency between historical plagues, including the Black Death, and our current understanding of Y. pestis-variant disease. We expect that the line of inquiry into the disputed cause of the greatest recorded epidemic will continue to intensify. Given the rapid pace of environmental change in the modern world, it is crucial that we understand past lethal outbreaks as fully as possible in order to prepare for future deadly pandemics.

  7. 鼠疫耶尔森氏菌 YopD 抗原基因在大肠杆菌中的克隆表达%Yersinia pestis YopD antigen gene cloning and expression in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭荣; 申小娜; 李博; 陈艳; 张渝疆

    2014-01-01

    目的:利用 DNA 重组技术,在大肠杆菌中获得融合表达的鼠疫耶尔森氏菌 YopD 抗原基因。方法根据查找文献及基因比对选取了鼠疫菌重要功能蛋白-YopD 蛋白。利用分子克隆技术克隆后,在原核系统中进行表达。根据云南玉龙菌株(D106004)全基因组序列设计引物,PCR 扩增目的基因片段。采用 pET-32a(+)作为表达载体,通过双酶切和连接反应,将目的基因片段定向插入载体中,构建重组表达质粒。IPTG 诱导,使重组质粒在其宿主菌 E .coli BL21(DE3)中表达。结果在大肠杆菌中成功获得了融合表达蛋白,即重组 YopD 蛋白。结论以质粒 pET-32a(+)作为表达载体,鼠疫菌重要功能蛋白 YopD 能够在大肠杆菌 E .coli BL21(DE3)中稳定高效地表达,为鼠疫潜在诊断靶点及新型疫苗选择的可能性奠定了基础。%Objective To obtain YopD protein of Yersinia pestis in vitro by DNA recombination techniques. Methods According to the literature review and genes comparison,the important functional protein of Yersinia pestis,YopD was selected,and cloned by using molecular cloning techniques,in prokaryotic sys-tems for expression.According to the complete gcnome sequence of Yersinia pestis strain D106004,detec-tion primers were designed.The target DNA fragments were amplificated by polymerase chain reaction. Plasmid DNA pET-32a(+)acted as expression vector.By two different restriction enzymes and T4 DNA Ligase,the PCR products were cloned into pET-32a(+)in correct direction.The reconstructed plasmid was then transformed into E.coli BL 21.The fusion proteins were induced by IPTG to be expressed in E.coli BL21.Result In E.coli BL21 one fusion protein,namely restructured YopD was successfully obtained. Conclusion Y.pestis important functional protein YopD was stably and effectively expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3)by means of the expression vector of Plasmid pET-32a (+),and it

  8. 地高辛标记的Northern blot检测鼠疫菌sRNA%Detection of Yersinia pestis sRNA by digoxigenin-labeled Northern blot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓仲良; 苏山春; 孟祥荣; 吴移谋; 杨瑞馥; 韩延平

    2013-01-01

    [目的]随着高通量测序方法的应用,越来越多的sRNA (small non-coding RNA,sRNA)需验证.本研究建立用地高辛标记Northern blot检测鼠疫菌sRNA的技术,为细菌sRNA验证提供一种灵敏、特异的方法.[方法]在低铁条件下,提取鼠疫菌总RNA,10% dPAGE分离后电转到尼龙膜上并用紫外线交联RNA.膜经地高辛标记RyhB1或RyhB2寡核苷酸RNA探针过夜杂交后洗脱、封闭和免疫检测,最后曝光显影.[结果]地高辛标记的Northern blot曝光时间为20 s-3 min,RyhB1或RyhB2检测灵敏度分别为0.005 μg和0.05 μg.RyhB1或RyhB2探针特异性好,相互间无交叉反应.带正电或中性的尼龙膜都适用于杂交反应.RNA探针在42℃-65℃内杂交均可,提高温度可减少非特异性反应;而DNA探针杂交温度需摸索.[结论]本研究成功构建一种地高辛标记Northern blot检测鼠疫菌sRNA技术,具有特异性好、灵敏度高、探针易保存、曝光时间短等优点,为细菌sRNA验证和功能研究提供有利工具.%[Objective] With the application of high-throughput sequencing methods, more and more sRNAs are required to be verified.In this study, we developed the digoxigenin-labeled Northern blot method for detection of Yersinia pestis sRNA.[Methods] Total RNAs extracted from Yersinia.pestis grown under low-iron conditions were loaded onto 10% denaturing urea polyacrylamide gel (dPAGE) , electrophoresed and transferred to nylon membranes.Northern blots were fixed to the membrane by UV cross-linking and subjected to hybridization with 3 ' -end digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotides RNA probe for RyhBl and RyhB2 overnight and followed by washing, blocking, immunological detection and finally exposed to film.[Results] Exposure time of digoxigenin-labelled Northern blot was 20s-3min.The detection sensitivity of RyhBl and RyhB2 was 0.005μg and 0.05 μg, respectively.RyhBl and RyhB2 probe specificity was high and no cross reaction with each other was found

  9. 鼠疫耶尔森菌与表面抗体相互作用的原子力显微镜观测研究%Imaging study of interaction between Yersinia pestis and its surface antibody by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    索华倩; 胡孔新; 杨蕴秋; 刘燕飞; 岳启安; 王静

    2008-01-01

    目的 以原子力显微镜(atomic force microscopy,AFM)观察比较鼠疫耶尔森菌EV76株与正常兔血清以及兔抗F1抗体反应后微观形态变化,探讨以原子力显微镜为工具的鼠疫耶尔森菌的免疫检测方法.方法 用兔抗F1抗体及正常兔血清处理鼠疫耶尔森菌菌液,并与对照菌一起制样后在原子力显微镜下观察鼠疫耶尔森菌的表面结构的改变,并对其主要指标,包括Ra、Rq改变进行测量比较.结果 正常菌体组细胞呈椭圆形,两端钝圆,长为1.1~1.3 μm,宽为0.8~1.0 μm,阶高为0.04~0.06 μm,细胞形状规则,表面相对比较光滑;对照抗体及F1抗体加入组,细菌阶高均明显增高;F1抗体结合株菌体形状不规则,表面粗糙度明显增加.结论 获得原子力显微镜下的鼠疫耶尔森菌形态特征;表面抗体与鼠疫耶尔森菌结合后,对鼠疫耶尔森菌的表面超微结构有显著的影响,其中粗糙度可以作为原子力显微镜免疫检测的指标.%Objective To observe and compare the atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Yersinia pestis EV76 and the changes in the morphology of the bacteria treated with normal serum and F1 antibody from rabbit,and to explore the immunoassay method to detect Yersinia pestis by AFM. Methods The Yersinia pestis were treated with normal serum and F1 antibody from rabbit and control buffer. All the prepared samples were observed and analyzed by AFM. The changes in the cell surface structures were probed and characterized through sectional analysis,especially the changes of Ra and Rq value. Results The normal morphology of Yersinia pestis was oval in shape with a relatively smooth surface, the size dimension of which was about 1.1-1.3 μm in length with a section profile of 0.8-1.0 μm in width and 0.04-0.06 μm in step height. The step height of the bacteria treated with the normal serum and F1 antibody was obviously enlarged. The shape of the bacteria treated with F1 antibody changed

  10. Influence of the conserved disulphide bond, exposed to the putative binding pocket, on the structure and function of the immunoglobulin-like molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Chernovskaya, T V; Chapman, D A; Karlyshev, A V; MacIntyre, S; Zavialov, A V; Vasiliev, A M; Denesyuk, A I; Zav'yalova, G A; Dudich, I V; Korpela, T; Abramov, V M

    1997-06-01

    The Yersinia pestis protein Caf1M is a typical representative of a subfamily of periplasmic molecular chaperones with characteristic structural and functional features, one of which is the location of two conserved cysteine residues close to the putative binding pocket. We show that these residues form a disulphide bond, the reduction and alkylation of which significantly increases the dissociation constant of the Caf1M-Caf1 (where Caf 1 is a polypeptide subunit of the capsule) complex [from a Kd of (4.77+/-0.50)x10(-9) M for the intact protein to one of (3.68+/-0.68)x10(-8) M for the modified protein]. The importance of the disulphide bond for the formation of functional Caf1M in vivo was demonstrated using an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant carrying the Y. pestis f1 operon. In accordance with the CD and fluorescence measurements, the disulphide bond is not important for maintenance of the overall structure of the Caf1M molecule, but would appear to affect the fine structural properties of the subunit binding site. A three-dimensional model of the Caf1M-Caf1 complex was designed based on the published crystal structure of PapD (a chaperone required for Pap pili assembly) complexed with a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of the papG subunit. In the model the disulphide bond is in close proximity to the invariant Caf1M Arg-23 and Lys-142 residues that are assumed to anchor the C-terminal group of the subunit. The importance of this characteristic disulphide bond for the orchestration of the binding site and subunit binding, as well as for the folding of the protein in vivo, is likely to be a common feature of this subfamily of Caf1M-like chaperones. A possible model for the role of the disulphide bond in Caf1 assembly is discussed.

  11. 云南省鼠疫菌FseⅠ酶切分型及其流行病学意义%Genotyping and its epidemiological significance on Yunnan Yersinia pestis under FseⅠ enzyme digestion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石丽媛; 叶蕊; 董珊珊; 郭英; 杨光璨; 张蓉; 崔志刚; 李伟; 王鹏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create the fingerprint library ofYunnan Yersiniapestis by pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with Fse Ⅰ enzyme digestion method and to study its epidemiological significance.Methods We used rare cutting restriction enzyme Fse Ⅰ to digest Yunnan Yersinia pestis strains that were isolated from loci including Rattus flavipectus Plague Focus,Apodemus chevrieri-Eothenomys miletus Plague Focus and Yulong Plague Focus.Fingerprints to Bionumerics software were used for cluster analysis.Results 30 tested strains were divided into 16 genotypes with the similarity value as 79.8%-100.0%.16 genotypes wee formed into 4 clusters,with one consisted of only EV76 while the other three belonged to Rattusflavipectus,Apodemus chevrieri-Eothenomys miletus and Yulong clusters,respectively.Conclusions PFGE genotypes of Yunnan Yersinia pestis accorded with its ecotypes and biovars,with clustered regional features.The strains isolated from Yulong showed an unique PFGE type,indicating a new clone group was identified.%目的 构建云南省鼠疫菌Fse Ⅰ酶切的脉冲场凝胶电泳(PFGE)图谱库并探讨其流行病学意义.方法 采用限制性内切酶Fse Ⅰ对云南家、野鼠型及丽江玉龙鼠疫菌株进行酶切分析,并聚类分析电泳图谱.结果 30株被试菌株分为16种PFGE型别,其相似性系数为79.8%~100.0%; 16种PFGE基因型可以分为4个簇,除EV76自成一簇,其余3个簇分别为家鼠型基因簇、野鼠型基因簇及玉龙基因簇.结论 云南省鼠疫菌PFGE基因型与生态型、生物型相吻合,具有一定的区域聚集性,而丽江玉龙鼠疫菌为一个独立基因簇.

  12. Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed Murine GeneChips to delineate the global transcriptional profiles of the livers, lungs, and spleens in a mouse pneumonic plague infection model with wild-type (WT Y. pestis CO92 and its Braun lipoprotein (Δlpp mutant with reduced virulence. These organs showed differential transcriptional responses to infection with WT Y. pestis, but the overall host functional processes affected were similar across all three tissues. Gene expression alterations were found in inflammation, cytokine signaling, and apoptotic cell death-associated genes. Comparison of WT and Δlpp mutant-infected mice indicated significant overlap in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- associated gene expression, but the absence of Lpp perturbed host cell signaling at critical regulatory junctions resulting in altered immune response and possibly host cell apoptosis. We generated a putative signaling pathway including major inflammatory components that could account for the synergistic action of LPS and Lpp and provided the mechanistic basis of attenuation caused by deletion of the lpp gene from Y. pestis in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

  13. PCR衍生技术在鼠疫耶尔森菌基因鉴定和分型中的应用%PCR-derived technology in gene identification and typing of Yersinia pestis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梅; 唐新元; 王祖郧

    2015-01-01

    Application of the PCR-derived technology in gene identification and genotypes of different ecotype Yersinia pestis to make the high-throughput experimental resuhs can reflect the epidemic history and compare the diversity in genome,pathogenicity,so that results from these experiments provide an important basis for clinical diagnosis,treatment and origin.But the experiment should be considered typing ability,practicality,budget and other experimental factors or conditions,because each PCR-derivative technology has advantages and disadvantages.%运用PCR衍生技术对不同生态型的鼠疫耶尔森菌(简称鼠疫菌)进行基因鉴定和分型,使高通量实验结果能反映鼠疫流行历史,易于比较其基因组、致病力等方面的差异,为鼠疫菌的临床诊断、治疗和溯源提供重要依据.但每种PCR衍生技术各有优缺点,实验需综合考虑分型的能力、可操作性、经费预算等因素和实验条件.

  14. Lipopolysaccharides of bacterial pathogens from the genus Yersinia: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneteau, Maud; Minka, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    This review summarizes the state of knowledge on the composition and structure of the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from three species of Yersinia known to produce disease in humans: Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica and Y. pestis. We also mention recent data on the genome sequence of Yersinia pestis and the role of LPS in relation to the virulence of this bacteria.

  15. 鼠疫菌OxyR调控子蛋白对dps的转录调控机制%Transcriptional regulation of dps by OxyR protein in Yersinia pestis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪斌; 张义全; 黄新祥; 杨瑞馥; 周冬生

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To study the transcriptional regulation mechanism of dps by OxyR in Yersinia pestis.[Methods]Total RNAs were extracted from the wide-type (WT) strain and the oxyR null mutant (ΔoxyR).Primer extension assay was used to detect the promoter activity (the amount of primer extension product) of dps in WT and that in ΔoxyR.Then,quantitative RT-PCR was done to calculate the transcriptional variation of dps between the WT and ΔoxyR.The entire promoter-proximal region of the dps gene was amplified by PCR from Y.pestis strain 201.Over-expressed His-OxyR was purified under native conditions with nickel loaded HiTrap Chelating Sepharose columns (Amersham).Then,the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was applied to analyze the DNA-binding activity of His-OxyR to dps promoter region in vitro.Finally,Escherichia coli OxyR consensus was deployed to predict the OxyR binding site to dps promoter region.[Results] The primer extension assay detected only one transcriptional start site located at 40bp uptream of dps,whose transcript was under positive regulation by OxyR.The bioinformatics analysis indicated that His-OxyR bound to a single region from 111bp to 78bp upstream of dps.[Conclusion] The transcription of dps was directly activated by OxyR in Yersinia pestis.%[目的]利用分子生物学实验研究鼠疫菌调控子OxyR对dps的转录调控机制.[方法]提取鼠疫菌野生株(WT)和oxyR突变株(ΔoxyR)的总RNA,采用引物延伸实验研究dps的转录起始位点,并根据产物的丰度判断OxyR对dps的调控关系.进一步采用实时定量RT-PCR的方法验证OxyR对dps的调控关系.PCR扩增dps的整个启动子区DNA序列,并纯化His-OxyR蛋白,通过凝胶阻滞实验(EMSA)验证OxyR对dps启动子区是否具有直接的相互作用.利用大肠杆菌OxyR识别基序,预测鼠疫菌OxyR对dps启动子区的结合位点,从而得出鼠疫菌OxyR对dps的转录调控机制.[结果]鼠疫菌dps有一个转录起始位点G(-40)(

  16. 鼠疫耶尔森菌的研究及其军事医学意义%Progress in research concerning Yersinia pestis and its significance in military medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑞馥

    2012-01-01

    As the military medicine progresses, the scope of protective medicine against biological threats should be extended to any facets that caused biological threats, including biowarfare, bioterrorisms, invasion of alien organisms, loss of biological resources, geneticany modified organisms, and emerging infectious diseases. Yersinia pestis is the pathogen for a typical zoonotic disease, plague, and it is also one of important biowarfare or bioterrorism agents. In history, this pathogen once caused three pandemics, and it was employed several time in war causing infection of military personnels many times. Currently, plague is distributed in Asia, former Soviet Union region, Africa and America. In China, there are 12 kinds of natural plague foci at present, distributing in 19 provincinal regions and covering about 1596 of our land area. Plague surveillance demonstrated that animal plagueis active in some foci, area of plague foci is increasing gradually and extending to the border of cities, indicating that we have faced a great challenge for plague prevention and control. After terrorism attack in U. S. A. In 2001, studies on Y. Pestis grew very rapidly and the progress has laid a solid foundation for researches on other bioterrorism-associated pathogens. Source-tracing database for microbial forensics analysis of Y. Pestis and the rapid no-site detection method for this pathogen are also excellent experience for establishing other bioterrorism agents.%随着军事医学的发展,防生物危害医学学科研究的范畴应当包括目前认识到的所有可以导致生物危害的领域,包括生物战、生物恐怖、外来有害生物入侵、生物资源流失、转基因生物安全和研发、突发疫情的应对研究等.鼠疫耶尔森菌是导致自然疫源性疾病鼠疫的病原菌,也是重要的生物战和生物恐怖剂之一,历史上曾3次导致世界鼠疫大流行,多次被用于战争,并多次在战争中导致军队感染.目前鼠疫主

  17. 鼠疫耶尔森菌Ⅲ型分泌系统相关基因的功能研究%Study on the functions of potential new genes of Yersinia pestis type three secretion system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷婷; 彭广能; 杨慧盈; 谭亚芳; 崔明全; 韦娜; 韩伟; 杜宗敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the functional relations between the putative proteins YpCD1.08,YpCD1.09,YpCD1.16 encoded in pCD1 plasmid of Yersinia pestis and its type Ⅲ secretion system (T3SS).Methods Mutants of YpCD1.08,YpCD1.09,YpCD1.16 were constructed using λ-Red recombinant system.The growth curves of the mutant strains cultivated in TMH medium with or without calcium at 26 ℃ and 37 ℃ were determined to analyze the low calcium response phenotype.The transcription levels of △YpCD1.08,△YpCD1.09,△YpCD1.16 in Yersinia pestis and the dependence to temperature were determined using real time RT-PCR after cultivation at 26 ℃ and 37 ℃ and extraction of RNA.A β-1actamases reporter system was adopted to study the influence of these genes on the translocation of effector YopE of T3SS.Results When grown in TMH medium without calcium at 26 ℃ and 37 ℃,the growth curve of the YpCD1.08,YpCD1.09,YpCD1.16 mutants were similar to that of the wild-type strain,indicating that the low calcium response of all the mutants were normal.The ratios of YpCD1.08,YpCD1.09,YpCD1.16 gene transcriptional level at 37 ℃ and 26 ℃ were 2.3 ± 0.3,2.3 ± 0.5 and 3.2 ± 0.7,respectively,indicating that these genes were transcribed in Yesinia pestis and their transcription regulations showed a temperature-dependence that was consistent with the well established temperature-dependent expression of YersiniaT3SS genes.The β-lactamases reporter assays demonstrated that AYpCD1.08 could translocate much higher level of YopE into HeLa cells,since that the light intensity ratio of 477/520 nm at 140 min was 2.5,whereas it was 1.8 for the wild-type strain,and the values in >YpCD1.09 and >YpCD1.16 were similar to the wild-type strain.Conclusion YpCD1.08,YpCD1.09,YpCD1.16 gene are likely to be the new members of T3SS,and the putative protein YpCD1.08 could play some roles in YopE secretion and translocation.%目的 研究鼠疫耶尔森菌pCD1质粒上编码的假定蛋白YpCD1.08

  18. Rare Infections: Yersinia Enterocolitica and Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Text Size Email Print Share Rare Infections: Yersinia Enterocolitica and Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis Page Content Article Body Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are bacterial infections that are ...

  19. Development of a Procedure for Preparation of Recombinant Yersinia pestis LcrV Antigen%重组鼠疫耶尔森菌LcrV抗原制备工艺的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡丽娜; 王秉翔; 常娅莉; 魏东; 万艳; 马维民; 傅林锋; 王革; 吴智远; 韩少波

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立稳定、高效的重组鼠疫耶尔森菌LcrV抗原工程菌的发酵与纯化工艺.方法 研究LcrV工程菌pET-V/BL21 (DE3)在试管和三角摇瓶中的生长和表达规律,对种子培养基、IPTG诱导时机、诱导时间及诱导浓度进行优化,并放大至30 L发酵罐培养,建立稳定的发酵工艺.收获菌体,经冻融、离心收集蛋白溶液,高压匀浆处理后,分别采用Q.Sepharose HP阴离子交换层析、Phenyl Sepharose 6 FF(hs)疏水层析及Superdex 75 pg凝胶过滤层析三步柱层析纯化,建立稳定的纯化工艺,连续纯化3批,并按《中国药典》三部(2010版)的相关要求进行全面检定.结果 经优化的条件培养及诱导表达,工程菌的收菌密度(A600值)可达34,LcrV抗原的表达量达36%,含量为1.6 g/L.发酵产物经柱层析纯化,LcrV产量高于140 mg,纯度大于95%,蛋白总回收率达8.5%以上.各项检定指标均符合《中国药典》三部(2010版)的相关要求.结论 已建立了稳定的、适合规模化生产的LcrV制备工艺,为新型鼠疫组分疫苗的研制奠定了基础.%Objective To develop a stable and effective procedure for fermentation of recombinant Yersinia pestis and purification of LcrV antigen. Methods The regularity of growth of recombinant E. Coli strain pET-V/BL21 (DE3) in tube and in conical flask as well as expression of LcrV antigen were investigated, based on which the medium, time point and duration for induction with IPTG and IPTG concentration were optimized and scaled up to a 30 L fermenter to develop a stable fermentation procedure. The harvested bacteria were subjected to freeze-thawing, from which protein solution was collected by centrifugation and treated by high pressure homogenization, the purified by Q. Sepharose HP anion exchange chromatography, Phenyl Sepharose 6 FF (hs) hydrophobic chromatography and Superdex 75 pg gel filtration chromatography, based on which a stable purification procedure was developed

  20. Yersinia enterocolitica organism (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture shows the organism Yersinia enterocolitica . Yersinia organisms cause a wide range of disease but are most often associated with diarrhea or gastrointestinal symptoms. Yersinia infection is ...

  1. Yersinia adhesins: An arsenal for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nandini; Wrobel, Agnieszka; Skurnik, Mikael; Leo, Jack C

    2016-10-01

    The Yersiniae are a group of Gram-negative coccobacilli inhabiting a wide range of habitats. The genus harbors three recognized human pathogens: Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, which both cause gastrointestinal disease, and Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague. These three organisms have served as models for a number of aspects of infection biology, including adhesion, immune evasion, evolution of pathogenic traits, and retracing the course of ancient pandemics. The virulence of the pathogenic Yersiniae is heavily dependent on a number of adhesin molecules. Some of these, such as the Yersinia adhesin A and invasin of the enteropathogenic species, and the pH 6 antigen of Y. pestis, have been extensively studied. However, genomic sequencing has uncovered a host of other adhesins present in these organisms, the functions of which are only starting to be investigated. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on the adhesin molecules present in the Yersiniae, and their functions and putative roles in the infection process.

  2. Development of a Chemoenzymatic-like and Photoswitchable Method for the High-Throughput creation of Protein Microarrays. Application to the Analysis of the Protein/Protein Interactions Involved in the YOP Virulon from Yersinia pestis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2006-12-07

    Protein arrays are ideal tools for the rapid analysis of whole proteomes as well as for the development of reliable and cheap biosensors. The objective of this proposal is to develop a new ligand assisted ligation method based in the naturally occurring protein trans-splicing process. This method has been used for the generation of spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components by standard micro-lithographic techniques. Key to our approach is the use of the protein trans-splicing process. This naturally occurring process allows the development of a truly generic and highly efficient method for the covalent attachment of proteins through its C-terminus to any solid support. This technology has been used for the creation of protein chips containing several virulence factors from the human pathogen Y. pestis.

  3. Dynamics and potential application of F1 antibody and immunoglobulin M in cat after infected with Yersinia pestis%猫感染鼠疫菌后F1抗体及其IgM变化与在监测中的应用前景分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王信惠; 温娟; 王鹏; 阿不力米提·买托呼提; 热娜·吐尔地; 廖力夫; 徐秉臣

    2016-01-01

    目的 观察猫接种鼠疫菌后鼠疫F1抗体及其免疫球蛋白M(IgM)变化,探讨F1抗体及IgM在动物鼠疫监测中的意义.方法 猫3只,在猫背部采用多点皮下注射法接种鼠疫菌,于接种后3 ~ 521 d,定期股静脉采血,酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)夹心法检测鼠疫F1抗体,捕获法检测鼠疫IgM.结果 猫接种鼠疫菌后第3天,F1抗体及IgM出现弱阳性反应,平均滴度分别为1∶22.00和1∶20.33.鼠疫F1抗体滴度,第4天升高到1∶25.33,第97天达到高峰,为1∶29.67,第521天仍保持在1∶25.33;IgM滴度,第7~10天出现高峰,为1∶212.00,其后快速降低,第30天后降到阳性反应标准以下.结论 ELISA夹心法检测猫鼠疫F1抗体,可追溯较长时间的动物鼠疫流行,适用于鼠疫疫源地调查;捕获法检测猫鼠疫IgM,单份血清可判定早期动物鼠疫.两种方法同步检测F1抗体及IgM,判定动物感染鼠疫的时间可精确到3~7d.%Objective To observe the dynamics of F1 antibody and immunoglobulin M (IgM) in cats after vaccinated Yersinia pestis,to discuss the significance of detection of F1 antibody and IgM in surveillance of animal plague.Methods The 3 cats were vaccinated Yersinia pestis on their backs with muhipoint hypodermic injection and blood samples were collected via femoral vein on 3rd to 521st days after injection.F1 antibody was detected by sandwich Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA),and IgM of F1 antibody was determined with a capture antibody.Results After vaccinated Yersinia pestis for 3rd days,F1 antibody and IgM appeared slightly positive,with the titer of 1 ∶ 22.00 and 1 ∶ 20.33,respectively.The titer of F1 antibody increased to 1 ∶ 25.33 on the 4th day,and reached the peak of 1 ∶ 29.67 on the 97th day,kept 1 ∶ 25.33 on the 521st day.While the titer of IgM reached peak of 1 ∶ 212.00 on the 7th to 10th days,and decreased rapidly to below the positive standard on the 30th day.Conclusions Detection of F1 antibody in cats

  4. Yersinia enterocolitica

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of plasmid-bearing (pYV) human pathogenic strains of Yersinia enterocolitica depends on the expression of various pYV-associated virulence characteristics. However, diagnostic techniques based on pYV encoded phenotypes have limited reliability due to the unstable nature of pYV. Two r...

  5. [Detection of Yersinia Enterocolitica Bacteriophage PhiYe-F10 Lysis Spectrum and Analysis of the Relationship between Lysis Ability and Virulence Gene of Yersinia Enterocolitica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Tao; Liang, Junrong; Xiao, Yuchun; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-03-01

    To determine the lysis spectrum of Yersinia enterocolitica bacteriophage phiYe-F10 and to analyze the relationship between the lysis ability of phiYe-F10 and the virulence gene of Yersinia enterocolitica. To observe the lysis ability of the phage phiYe-F10 to the different Yersinia strains with the double-layer technique. The strains used in this study including 213 of Yersinia enterocolitica and 36 of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and 1 of Yersinia pestis. The virulence genes of these Yersinia enterocolitica (attachment invasion locus (ail) and enterotoxin (ystA, ystB) and yersinia adhesin A (yadA), virulence factor (virF), specific gene for lipopolysaccharide O-side chain of serotype O : 3 (rfbc) were all detected. Among the 213 Yersinia enterocolitica, 84 strains were O : 3 serotype (78 strains with rfbc gene), 10 were serotype O : 5, 13 were serotype O : 8, 34 were serotype O : 9 and 72 were other serotypes. Of these, 77 were typical pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica harboring with virulence plasmid (ail+, ystA+, ystB-, yadA+, virF+), and 15 were pathogenic bacterial strains deficiency virulence plasmid (ail+, ystA+, ystB-, yadA-, virF-) and the rest 121 were non pathogenic genotype strains. PhiYe-F10 lysed the 71 serotype O : 3 Yersinia enterocolitica strains which were all carried with rfbc+, including 52 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, 19 nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica. The phiYe-F10 can not lysed serotype O : 5, O : 9 and other serotype Y. enterocolitica, the lysis rate of serotype O : 3 was as high as 84.5%. The phiYe-F10 can not lysed Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. Yersinia phage phiYe-F10 is highly specific for serotype O : 3 Yersinia enterocolitic at 25 degrees C, which showed a typical narrow lysis spectrum. Phage phiYe-F10 can lysed much more pathogenic Y. enterocolitica than nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica.

  6. The genus Yersinia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prpic, J.K.; Davey, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the Fourth International symposium on Yersinia. The topics covered include: Cloning and use of Vwa plasmid DNA as gene probes for virulent Yersiniae; Studies on the role of virulence determinants of Yersinia enterocolitica in gnotobiotic piglets; and significance of specific IgA antibodies in infections due to Yersinia enterocolitica and their complications.

  7. Reconstruction, Prokaryotic Expression, Purification of Recombinant F1-V Mutant from Yersinia pestis%鼠疫耶尔森菌F1-V融合蛋白改构体的构建、原核表达及纯化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房婷; 尹可欣; 任军; 张晓鹏; 于蕊; 宋小红; 杨秀旭; 于长明

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clone, express and purify F1mut-V fusion protein from Yersinia pestis by structure-based immunogen design. Methods: In order to transplant the NH2-terminal first fourteen amino acid residues of F1 to the COOH-terminus, the F1mut gene was amplified by three-step PCR and fused to the NH2-terminal of V antigen. Then the F1mut-V gene was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a and transformed into E.co⁃li BL21(DE3). The soluble rF1mut-V was purified with ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatogra⁃phy, hydrophobic chromatography and gel filter chromatography and characterrized by SDS-PAGE and Western blot⁃ting. Results: The recombinant F1mut-V expressed in soluble form in E.coli and the target protein expressed ac⁃counts for 25% of the total protein of the bacteria. After sequential four purification steps, the purity of rF1mut-V fusion protein achieved 95% and could specifically react with the antibody against F1 and V by Western blotting. Conclusion: The rF1mut-V would be the alternative active pharmaceutical ingredient of the next plague vaccine.%目的:通过基于结构的基因突变获得鼠疫耶尔森菌F1抗原突变体(F1mut),克隆、表达并纯化F1mut-V融合蛋白。方法:通过3轮PCR,将编码F1抗原分子N端1~14位氨基酸的基因序列移到3'端,测序无误后将F1mut基因与V基因的5'端连接,构建改构的融合基因F1mut-V,将其克隆到原核表达载体pET-32a后转化大肠杆菌BL21(DE3),经IPTG诱导后,目的蛋白为可溶性表达,通过硫酸铵分级沉淀、阴离子交换层析、疏水相互作用层析和凝胶过滤层析纯化,用SDS-PAGE和Western印迹分析纯化产物。结果:重组F1mut-V在大肠杆菌中为可溶性表达,表达量占全菌蛋白的25%以上,纯化后目的蛋白的纯度达95%,经Western印迹检测,与抗V、F1抗体均有特异性结合。结论:重组F1mut-V有望成为新一代亚单位疫苗的有效成分。

  8. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Vagima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF. In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the

  9. Yersinia type Ⅲ effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khavong Pha; Lorena Navarro

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type Ⅲ secretion system(T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp.(Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gramnegative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3 SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins(YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia effector

  10. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRakin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a prerequisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B. Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High Pathogenicity Island (HPI that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis / Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch and yersiniachelin (Ych. Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and / or supplemented by alternative iron scavenging systems.

  11. [A personal view of the history of the genus Yersinia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaret, H H

    1987-01-01

    The first recorded experience Australia had of the genus Yersinia was the arrival in 1889 of a French expedition led by Pasteur's nephew, Dr. Adrien Loir. At that time Australia was in the grips of an epidemic of rabbits, and Loir's purpose was to eradicate the rabbits by means of fowl plague (Pasteurella multocida). Sadly, bureaucratic and political obstacles prevailed, and Loir was never granted permission to release his biological control agent. Alexander Yersin had been tempted to join Loir's expedition, but elected in the end to travel to Hong Kong, where he discovered the plague bacillus. Had he gone to Australia, we might not now be speaking of the genus Yersinia... Historically, Yersinia pestis has affected not only world history but literature as well. In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, the tragic denouement can be attributed directly to the consequences of the Great Plague. In times of plague, cities closed their gates to travellers, and houses their doors and windows. Thus Laurence's explanatory letter was prevented from reaching Romeo, who returned to take his life beside the drugged (but living) body of his beloved. Not only was the contemporary literature from which Shakespeare drew inspiration full of references to the plague, but he himself had experienced the social effects of the plague at first hand. The recent rejection of the name Y. pseudotuberculosis var. pestis in favour of Y. pestis is fitting, not simply on the grounds of preventing confusion - after all, Y. pseudotuberculosis can be an equally lethal pathogen. However, a review of the epidemiology for Y. pestis since the First Pandemic in the 6th Century AD lends support to Devignat's hypothesis that Y. pseudotuberculosis evolved from Y. pestis, rather than vice versa. This probably occurred in Europe shortly before the Second Pandemic, and the new mutant spread slowly through the European rodent population, immunising the carriers against plague. In other parts of the world which

  12. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-08

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct.

  13. Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master Regulator LcrF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh; Dersch, Petra; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2015-12-07

    Many Gram-negative pathogens express a type III secretion (T3SS) system to enable growth and survival within a host. The three human-pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, encode the Ysc T3SS, whose expression is controlled by an AraC-like master regulator called LcrF. In this review, we discuss LcrF structure and function as well as the environmental cues and pathways known to regulate LcrF expression. Similarities and differences in binding motifs and modes of action between LcrF and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog ExsA are summarized. In addition, we present a new bioinformatics analysis that identifies putative LcrF binding sites within Yersinia target gene promoters.

  14. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Atypical depression By Mayo Clinic Staff Any type of depression can make you feel sad and keep you from enjoying life. However, atypical depression — also called depression with atypical features — means that ...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Yersinis pestis Strains Antiqua and Nepa1516: Evidence of Gene Reduction in an Emerging Pathogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Patrick S [ORNL; Hu, Ping [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Radnedge, Lyndsay [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Vergez, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Worsham, Patricia [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases; Chu, May C [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Anderson, Gary L [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2006-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plagues, has undergone detailed study at the molecular level. To further investigate the genomic diversity among this group and to help characterize lineages of the plague organism that have no sequenced members, we present here the genomes of two isolates of the ''classical'' antiqua biovar, strains Antiqua and Nepal516. The genomes of Antiqua and Nepal516 are 4.7 Mb and 4.5 Mb and encode 4,138 and 3,956 open reading frames, respectively. Though both strains belong to one of the three classical biovars, they represent separate lineages defined by recent phylogenetic studies. We compare all five currently sequenced Y. pestis genomes and the corresponding features in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. There are strain-specific rearrangements, insertions, deletions, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a unique distribution of insertion sequences. We found 453 single nucleotide polymorphisms in protein-coding regions, which were used to assess the evolutionary relationships of these Y. pestis strains. Gene reduction analysis revealed that the gene deletion processes are under selective pressure, and many of the inactivations are probably related to the organism's interaction with its host environment. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the differences between the two biovar antiqua lineages and support the notion that grouping Y. pestis strains based strictly on the classical definition of biovars (predicated upon two biochemical assays) does not accurately reflect the phylogenetic relationships within this species. A comparison of four virulent Y. pestis strains with the human-avirulent strain 91001 provides further insight into the genetic basis of virulence to humans.

  16. An encapsulated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a highly efficient vaccine against pneumonic plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derbise

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plague is still a public health problem in the world and is re-emerging, but no efficient vaccine is available. We previously reported that oral inoculation of a live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the recent ancestor of Yersinia pestis, provided protection against bubonic plague. However, the strain poorly protected against pneumonic plague, the most deadly and contagious form of the disease, and was not genetically defined. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The sequenced Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 has been irreversibly attenuated by deletion of genes encoding three essential virulence factors. An encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis was generated by cloning the Y. pestis F1-encoding caf operon and expressing it in the attenuated strain. The new V674pF1 strain produced the F1 capsule in vitro and in vivo. Oral inoculation of V674pF1 allowed the colonization of the gut without lesions to Peyer's patches and the spleen. Vaccination induced both humoral and cellular components of immunity, at the systemic (IgG and Th1 cells and the mucosal levels (IgA and Th17 cells. A single oral dose conferred 100% protection against a lethal pneumonic plague challenge (33×LD(50 of the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain and 94% against a high challenge dose (3,300×LD(50. Both F1 and other Yersinia antigens were recognized and V674pF1 efficiently protected against a F1-negative Y. pestis. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis V674pF1 is an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague, and could be developed for mass vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control pneumonic plague transmission and mortality.

  17. Yersinia enterocolitica Monographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Germs from Yersinia genus have a vast ecologic niche, being met at different domestic and wild animal species, but also in food, water and soil. The majority of yersinis live in the digestive tract of human and numerous animal species, especially rodents, but also in soil, plant debris, waters etc. Numerous species of Yersinia genus could produce characteristic infections in human, the main source of infections is represented by rodents and hematophagous insects or, more frequently, by water ...

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica Monographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Tirziu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Germs from Yersinia genus have a vast ecologic niche, being met at different domestic and wild animal species, but also in food, water and soil. The majority of yersinis live in the digestive tract of human and numerous animal species, especially rodents, but also in soil, plant debris, waters etc. Numerous species of Yersinia genus could produce characteristic infections in human, the main source of infections is represented by rodents and hematophagous insects or, more frequently, by water or contaminated food. In a 1999 study, Mead and coauthors established that the Yersinia enterocolitica prevalence in food, in USA, is around 90%. Foods of animal origin more frequently contaminated with Yersinia enterocolitica are: pork, poultry, beef and lamb meat, milk, ice-cream, sea fruits etc., among them pork meat and milk represents the sources of the most numerous toxi-infection outbreaks in human, in different world regions. Bacteria determine infections which interest the digestive tract in numerous animal species and human, with diarrhea, lymphadenitis, pneumonia and abortion are the most important symptoms. Yersinia enterocolitica enter the human body regularly by oral ingestion, and localize itself with predilection in the distal portion of the ileum and at the ileocaecal appendix and proximal colon level, were determine a terminal ileitis with lymphadenitis, acute enterocolitis, and secondary accompanied with nodosum erythema, poliartritis that could be complicated with septicemia, sometimes leading to death.

  19. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  20. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six 'effector' proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen.

  1. YopP-expressing variant of Y. pestis activates a potent innate immune response affording cross-protection against yersiniosis and tularemia [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Zauberman

    Full Text Available Plague, initiated by Yersinia pestis infection, is a rapidly progressing disease with a high mortality rate if not quickly treated. The existence of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains emphasizes the need for the development of novel countermeasures against plague. We previously reported the generation of a recombinant Y. pestis strain (Kim53ΔJ+P that over-expresses Y. enterocolitica YopP. When this strain was administered subcutaneously to mice, it elicited a fast and effective protective immune response in models of bubonic, pneumonic and septicemic plague. In the present study, we further characterized the immune response induced by the Kim53ΔJ+P recombinant strain. Using a panel of mouse strains defective in specific immune functions, we observed the induction of a prompt protective innate immune response that was interferon-γ dependent. Moreover, inoculation of mice with Y. pestis Kim53ΔJ+P elicited a rapid protective response against secondary infection by other bacterial pathogens, including the enteropathogen Y. enterocolitica and the respiratory pathogen Francisella tularensis. Thus, the development of new therapies to enhance the innate immune response may provide an initial critical delay in disease progression following the exposure to highly virulent bacterial pathogens, extending the time window for successful treatment.

  2. Atypical Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  3. Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kathrin eHeroven

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the principles how pathogenic bacteria adapt their metabolism to a specific host microenvironment is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis. The enteric pathogenic Yersinia species Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica and the causative agent of plague, Y. pestis, are able to survive in a large variety of environmental reservoirs (e.g. soil, plants, insects as well as warm-blooded animals (e.g. rodents, pigs, humans with a particular preference for lymphatic tissues. In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and inter-bacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly. In addition, nutrient availability has an impact on expression of virulence genes in response to C-sources, demonstrating a tight link between the pathogenicity of yersiniae and utilization of nutrients. Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp and the carbon storage regulator (Csr system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability. Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets.

  4. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Atkinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen.

  5. The exoribonuclease Polynucleotide Phosphorylase influences the virulence and stress responses of yersiniae and many other pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Rosenzweig

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are incessantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stressors threatening their existence. Therefore, bacterial pathogens must possess mechanisms to successfully subvert host immune defenses as well as overcome the stress associated with host-cell encounters. To achieve this, bacterial pathogens typically experience a genetic re-programming whereby anti-host/stress factors become expressed and eventually translated into effector proteins. In that vein, the bacterial host-cell induced stress-response is similar to any other abiotic stress to which bacteria respond by up-regulating specific stress-responsive genes. Following the stress encounter, bacteria must degrade unnecessary stress responsive transcripts through RNA decay mechanisms. The 3 pathogenic yersiniae (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudo-tuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica are all psychrotropic bacteria capable of growth at 4˚C; however, cold growth is dependent on the presence of an exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase. PNPase has also been implicated as a virulence factor in several notable pathogens including the salmonellae, Helicobacter pylori, and the yersiniae (where it typically influences the type three secretion system. Further, PNPase has been shown to associate with ribonuclease E (endoribonuclease, RhlB (RNA helicase, and enolase (glycolytic enzyme in several Gram-negative bacteria forming a large, multi-protein complex known as the RNA degradosome. This review will highlight studies demonstrating the influence of PNPase on the virulence potentials and stress responses of various bacterial pathogens as well as focusing on the degradosome- dependent and -independent roles played by PNPase in yersiniae stress responses.

  6. Papel das Yops secretadas por Yersinia sobre a resposta imune do hospedeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M.M. MEDEIROS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    O gênero Yersinia compreende três espécies patogênicas para humanos: Y. pestis , Y. enterocolitica e Y. pseudotuberculosis . A patogenicidade de Yersinia está ligada à presença do plasmideo de 70-kb (pYV que é comum às três espécies e codifica um sistema de secreção do tipo III e um conjunto de proteínas de virulência, incluindo aquelas conhecidas como Yops (Yersinia outer proteins, que são exportadas por este sistema quando as células do hospedeiro são infectadas pela bactéria. Duas Yops translocadoras (YopB e YopD se inserem na membrana plasmática e funcionam no transporte de seis efetoras (YopO, YopH, YopM, YopJ e YopT para o citosol da célula do hospedeiro. As Yops efetoras funcionam interferindo em múltiplas vias de sinalização da célula infectada. Como conseqüência, a resposta imune inata e adaptativa do hospedeiro fica afetada. Este trabalho enfoca o papel das Yops na modulação da resposta imune do hospedeiro. Palavras-chave: Yersinia ; Yops, fagocitose, citocinas, anticorpos.

  7. Identification of Yersinia enterocolitica in minced meat: a comparative analysis of API 20E, Yersinia identification kit and a 16S rRNA-based PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T; Neubauer, H; Nikolaou, K; Roesler, U; Hensel, A

    2004-02-01

    The isolation and identification of Yersinia enterocolitica from minced meat on CIN agar medium is still one of the major problems in food microbiology because of the low selectivity of cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin (CIN) agar. A total of 198 minced meat samples were collected from commercial establishments (butcher shops and supermarkets) in seven German cities in order to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three identification techniques suitable for the differentiation of Y. enterocolitica within the rich background flora on CIN agar plates. As expected isolation of Y. enterocolitica from minced meat on CIN agar medium after 72 h enrichment in peptone, sorbitol and bile salts (PSB) broth was difficult because all plates were abundantly covered with numerous 'typical'Yersinia-like colonies of bull's eye appearance as well as with atypical colonies. Based on the phenotype of the colonies it was possible to detect colonies showing Yersinia-like growth on CIN agar in 52 samples (26%). For identification of Y. enterocolitica the API 20E system (bioMerieux, Nürtingen, Germany), the Yersinia identification kit (Merlin, Bornheim-Hersel, Germany) and a 16S rRNA based PCR assay were compared. Only in one sample (0.5%) a Y. enterocolitica strain was detected by all methods. Of the three identification systems tested for routine laboratory diagnostics the API 20E system was found to be the most suitable tool to identify Y. enterocolitica colonies within the rich background flora from minced meat samples on CIN agar plates.

  8. Yersinia enterocolitica: Gıda Kaynaklı bir Patojen

    OpenAIRE

    Özbaş, Z. Yeşim; Aytaç, S. Aykut

    1994-01-01

    In this review, a foodborn pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica was investigated. In addition to taxonomical and ecological characteristics of the bacterium, foods involved in Yersinia infections, pathogenicity and factors affecting the growth and survival of Yersinia in food were also discussed.

  9. The natural history and incidence of Yersinia pestis and prospects for vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, E D; Oyston, P C F

    2012-07-01

    Plague is an ancient, serious, infectious disease which is still endemic in regions of the modern world and is a potential biothreat agent. This paper discusses the natural history of the bacterium and its evolution into a flea-vectored bacterium able to transmit bubonic plague. It reviews the incidence of plague in the modern world and charts the history of vaccines which have been used to protect against the flea-vectored disease, which erupts as bubonic plague. Current approaches to vaccine development to protect against pneumonic, as well as bubonic, plague are also reviewed. The considerable challenges in achieving a vaccine which is licensed for human use and which will comprehensively protect against this serious human pathogen are assessed.

  10. In Vitro Intracellular Trafficking of Virulence Antigen during Infection by Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-17

    Core. Author Contributions Conceived and designed the experiments: TLD GR HBH WJR SW. Performed the experiments: TLD GR EEB CEC. Analyzed the data...TLD GR EEB CEC SW. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: TLD HBH WJR BSP SW. Wrote the paper: TLD SW. References 1. Butler T (1983) Plague and

  11. Discrimination of Pathogenic Versus Non-Pathogenic Yersinia Pestis and Escherichia Coli Using Proteomics Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    constructed in a FASTA format using the annotated bacterial proteome sequences derived from fully sequenced chromosomes of 881 bacteria, including their...outer membrane protein X putative cystine -binding periplasmic pro putative lipoprotein putative lipoprotein elongation factor Ts putative lipoprotein

  12. Complete genome sequence of Yersinia pestis strain 91001, an isolate avirulent to humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yajun; Tong, Zongzhong; Wang, Jin;

    2004-01-01

    -Microtus brandti. The genome of strain 91001 consists of one chromosome and four plasmids (pPCP1, pCD1, pMT1 and pCRY). The 9609-bp pPCP1 plasmid of strain 91001 is almost identical to the counterparts from reference strains (CO92 and KIM). There are 98 genes in the 70,159-bp range of plasmid pCD1. The 106,642-bp...

  13. Recombinant expression and functional analysis of proteases from Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus anthracis, and Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieper Rembert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncharacterized proteases naturally expressed by bacterial pathogens represents important topic in infectious disease research, because these enzymes may have critical roles in pathogenicity and cell physiology. It has been observed that cloning, expression and purification of proteases often fail due to their catalytic functions which, in turn, cause toxicity in the E. coli heterologous host. Results In order to address this problem systematically, a modified pipeline of our high-throughput protein expression and purification platform was developed. This included the use of a specific E. coli strain, BL21(DE3 pLysS to tightly control the expression of recombinant proteins and various expression vectors encoding fusion proteins to enhance recombinant protein solubility. Proteases fused to large fusion protein domains, maltosebinding protein (MBP, SP-MBP which contains signal peptide at the N-terminus of MBP, disulfide oxidoreductase (DsbA and Glutathione S-transferase (GST improved expression and solubility of proteases. Overall, 86.1% of selected protease genes including hypothetical proteins were expressed and purified using a combination of five different expression vectors. To detect novel proteolytic activities, zymography and fluorescence-based assays were performed and the protease activities of more than 46% of purified proteases and 40% of hypothetical proteins that were predicted to be proteases were confirmed. Conclusions Multiple expression vectors, employing distinct fusion tags in a high throughput pipeline increased overall success rates in expression, solubility and purification of proteases. The combinatorial functional analysis of the purified proteases using fluorescence assays and zymography confirmed their function.

  14. Detection and Identification of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Yersinia pestis Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes lineage group classification by MAMA -PCR of the listeriolysin gene. Curr. Microbiol. 43:129–133. 17. Klein, B., G. Weirich...and H. Brauch. 2001. DHPLC-based germline muta- tion screening in the analysis of the VHL tumor suppressor gene: usefulness and limitations. Hum. Genet...108:376–384. 18. Kleymenova, E., and C. L. Walker. 2001. Determination of loss of heterozy- gosity in frozen and paraffin embedded tumors by

  15. Identification and characterisation of a novel adhesin Ifp in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Champion Olivia L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to identify new virulence determinants in Y. pseudotuberculosis a comparison between its genome and that of Yersinia pestis was undertaken. This reveals dozens of pseudogenes in Y. pestis, which are still putatively functional in Y. pseudotuberculosis and may be important in the enteric lifestyle. One such gene, YPTB1572 in the Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 genome sequence, encodes a protein with similarity to invasin, a classic adhesion/invasion protein, and to intimin, the attaching and effacing protein from enteropathogenic (EPEC and enterohaemorraghic (EHEC Escherichia coli. Results We termed YPTB1572 Ifp (Intimin family protein and show that it is able to bind directly to human HEp-2 epithelial cells. Cysteine and tryptophan residues in the C-terminal region of intimin that are essential for function in EPEC and EHEC are conserved in Ifp. Protein binding occurred at distinct foci on the HEp-2 cell surface and can be disrupted by mutation of a single cysteine residue at the C-terminus of the protein. Temporal expression analysis using lux reporter constructs revealed that ifp is expressed at late log phase at 37°C in contrast to invasin, suggesting that Ifp is a late stage adhesin. An ifp defined mutant showed a reduction in adhesion to HEp-2 cells and was attenuated in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Conclusion A new Y. pseudotuberculosis adhesin has been identified and characterised. This Ifp is a new member in the family of invasin/intimin outer membrane adhesins.

  16. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  17. Yersinia enterocolitica infection and tcaA-dependent killing of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Britta; Starke, Mandy; Higel, Fabian; Scherer, Siegfried; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2010-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a validated model to study bacterial pathogenicity. We report that Yersinia enterocolitica strains W22703 (biovar 2, serovar O:9) and WA314 (biovar 1B, serovar O:8) kill C. elegans when feeding on the pathogens for at least 15 min before transfer to the feeding strain Escherichia coli OP50. The killing by Yersinia enterocolitica requires viable bacteria and, in contrast to that by Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains, is biofilm independent. The deletion of tcaA encoding an insecticidal toxin resulted in an OP50-like life span of C. elegans, indicating an essential role of TcaA in the nematocidal activity of Y. enterocolitica. TcaA alone is not sufficient for nematocidal activity because E. coli DH5alpha overexpressing TcaA did not result in a reduced C. elegans life span. Spatial-temporal analysis of C. elegans infected with green fluorescent protein-labeled Y. enterocolitica strains showed that Y. enterocolitica colonizes the nematode intestine, leading to an extreme expansion of the intestinal lumen. By low-dose infection with W22703 or DH5alpha followed by transfer to E. coli OP50, proliferation of Y. enterocolitica, but not E. coli, in the intestinal lumen of the nematode was observed. The titer of W22703 cells within the worm increased to over 10(6) per worm 4 days after infection while a significantly lower number of a tcaA knockout mutant was recovered. A strong expression of tcaA was observed during the first 5 days of infection. Y. enterocolitica WA314 (biovar 1B, serovar O:8) mutant strains lacking the yadA, inv, yopE, and irp1 genes known to be important for virulence in mammals were not attenuated or only slightly attenuated in their toxicity toward the nematode, suggesting that these factors do not play a significant role in the colonization and persistence of this pathogen in nematodes. In summary, this study supports the hypothesis that C. elegans is a natural host and nutrient source of Y. enterocolitica.

  18. Immunosuppressive Yersinia Effector YopM Binds DEAD Box Helicase DDX3 to Control Ribosomal S6 Kinase in the Nucleus of Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Laura; Schnapp, Marie; Rumm, Andreas; Trasak, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Alawi, Malik; Grundhoff, Adam; Kikhney, Alexey G; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Buck, Friedrich; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Svergun, Dmitri I; Hentschke, Moritz; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Yersinia outer protein M (YopM) is a crucial immunosuppressive effector of the plaque agent Yersinia pestis and other pathogenic Yersinia species. YopM enters the nucleus of host cells but neither the mechanisms governing its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling nor its intranuclear activities are known. Here we identify the DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3) as a novel interaction partner of Y. enterocolitica YopM and present the three-dimensional structure of a YopM:DDX3 complex. Knockdown of DDX3 or inhibition of the exportin chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) increased the nuclear level of YopM suggesting that YopM exploits DDX3 to exit the nucleus via the CRM1 export pathway. Increased nuclear YopM levels caused enhanced phosphorylation of Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (RSK1) in the nucleus. In Y. enterocolitica infected primary human macrophages YopM increased the level of Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and this effect required interaction of YopM with RSK and was enhanced by blocking YopM's nuclear export. We propose that the DDX3/CRM1 mediated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of YopM determines the extent of phosphorylation of RSK in the nucleus to control transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines.

  19. Immunosuppressive Yersinia Effector YopM Binds DEAD Box Helicase DDX3 to Control Ribosomal S6 Kinase in the Nucleus of Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Berneking

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia outer protein M (YopM is a crucial immunosuppressive effector of the plaque agent Yersinia pestis and other pathogenic Yersinia species. YopM enters the nucleus of host cells but neither the mechanisms governing its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling nor its intranuclear activities are known. Here we identify the DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3 as a novel interaction partner of Y. enterocolitica YopM and present the three-dimensional structure of a YopM:DDX3 complex. Knockdown of DDX3 or inhibition of the exportin chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1 increased the nuclear level of YopM suggesting that YopM exploits DDX3 to exit the nucleus via the CRM1 export pathway. Increased nuclear YopM levels caused enhanced phosphorylation of Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (RSK1 in the nucleus. In Y. enterocolitica infected primary human macrophages YopM increased the level of Interleukin-10 (IL-10 mRNA and this effect required interaction of YopM with RSK and was enhanced by blocking YopM's nuclear export. We propose that the DDX3/CRM1 mediated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of YopM determines the extent of phosphorylation of RSK in the nucleus to control transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines.

  20. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  1. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  2. Complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of a new special Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Gu, Wenpeng; Xiao, Yuchun; Zhang, Zhewen; Qiu, Haiyan; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiaohe; Ling, Yunchao; Song, Lai; Chen, Meili; Zhao, Yongbing; Wu, Jiayan; Jing, Huaiqi; Xiao, Jingfa; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is the most diverse species among the Yersinia genera and shows more polymorphism, especially for the non-pathogenic strains. Individual non-pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains are wrongly identified because of atypical phenotypes. In this study, we isolated an unusual Y. enterocolitica strain LC20 from Rattus norvegicus. The strain did not utilize urea and could not be classified as the biotype. API 20E identified Escherichia coli; however, it grew well at 25 °C, but E. coli grew well at 37 °C. We analyzed the genome of LC20 and found the whole chromosome of LC20 was collinear with Y. enterocolitica 8081, and the urease gene did not exist on the genome which is consistent with the result of API 20E. Also, the 16 S and 23 SrRNA gene of LC20 lay on a branch of Y. enterocolitica. Furthermore, the core-based and pan-based phylogenetic trees showed that LC20 was classified into the Y. enterocolitica cluster. Two plasmids (80 and 50 k) from LC20 shared low genetic homology with pYV from the Yersinia genus, one was an ancestral Yersinia plasmid and the other was novel encoding a number of transposases. Some pathogenic and non-pathogenic Y. enterocolitica-specific genes coexisted in LC20. Thus, although it could not be classified into any Y. enterocolitica biotype due to its special biochemical metabolism, we concluded the LC20 was a Y. enterocolitica strain because its genome was similar to other Y. enterocolitica and it might be a strain with many mutations and combinations emerging in the processes of its evolution.

  3. Generation of a CRISPR database for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis complex and role of CRISPR-based immunity in conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Katja A; Mattinen, Laura; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Vergnaud, Gilles; Gorgé, Olivier; Nikkari, Simo; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat - CRISPR-associated genes (CRISPR-Cas) system is used by bacteria and archaea against invading conjugative plasmids or bacteriophages. Central to this immunity system are genomic CRISPR loci that contain fragments of invading DNA. These are maintained as spacers in the CRISPR loci between direct repeats and the spacer composition in any bacterium reflects its evolutionary history. We analysed the CRISPR locus sequences of 335 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis complex strains. Altogether 1902 different spacer sequences were identified and these were used to generate a database for the spacer sequences. Only ∼10% of the spacer sequences found matching sequences. In addition, surprisingly few spacers were shared by Yersinia pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains. Interestingly, 32 different protospacers were present in the conjugative plasmid pYptb32953. The corresponding spacers were identified from 35 different Y. pseudotuberculosis strains indicating that these strains had encountered pYptb32953 earlier. In conjugation experiments, pYptb32953-specific spacers generally prevented conjugation with spacer-positive and spacer-free strains. However, some strains with one to four spacers were invaded by pYptb32953 and some spacer-free strains were fully resistant. Also some spacer-positive strains were intermediate resistant to conjugation. This suggests that one or more other defence systems are determining conjugation efficiency independent of the CRISPR-Cas system.

  4. Yersinia infection tools – characterization of structure and function of adhesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelia Malgorzata Mikula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the seventeen species of the Gram-negative genus Yersinia, three have been shown to be virulent and pathogenic to humans and animals - Y. enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. pestis. In order to be so, they are armoured with various factors that help them adhere to tissues and organelles, cross the cellular barrier and escape the immune system during host invasion. The group of proteins that mediate pathogen-host interactions constitute adhesins. Invasin, Ail, YadA, YadB, YadC, Pla and pH 6 antigen belong to the most prominent and best-known Yersinia adhesins. They act at different times and stages of infection complementing each other by their ability to bind a variety of host molecules such as collagen, fibronectin, laminin, β1 integrins, and complement regulators. All the proteins are anchored in the bacterial outer membrane, often forming rod-like or fimbrial-like structures that protrude to the extracellular milieu. Structural studies have shown that the anchor region forms a β-barrel composed of 8, 10 or 12 antiparallel β strands. Depending on the protein, the extracellular part can be composed of several domains belonging to the immunoglobulin fold superfamily, or form a coiled-coil structure with globular head domain at the end, or just constitute several loops connecting individual β stands in the β-barrel. Those extracellular regions define the activity of each adhesin. This review focuses on the structure and function of these important molecules, and their role in pathogenesis.

  5. The complete genome sequence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758, the causative agent of Far East scarlet-like fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The first reported Far East scarlet-like fever (FESLF epidemic swept the Pacific coastal region of Russia in the late 1950s. Symptoms of the severe infection included erythematous skin rash and desquamation, exanthema, hyperhemic tongue, and a toxic shock syndrome. The term FESLF was coined for the infection because it shares clinical presentations with scarlet fever caused by group A streptococci. The causative agent was later identified as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, although the range of morbidities was vastly different from classical pseudotuberculosis symptoms. To understand the origin and emergence of the peculiar clinical features of FESLF, we have sequenced the genome of the FESLF-causing strain Y. pseudotuberculosis IP31758 and compared it with that of another Y. pseudotuberculosis strain, IP32953, which causes classical gastrointestinal symptoms. The unique gene pool of Y pseudotuberculosis IP31758 accounts for more than 260 strain-specific genes and introduces individual physiological capabilities and virulence determinants, with a significant proportion horizontally acquired that likely originated from Enterobacteriaceae and other soil-dwelling bacteria that persist in the same ecological niche. The mobile genome pool includes two novel plasmids phylogenetically unrelated to all currently reported Yersinia plasmids. An icm/dot type IVB secretion system, shared only with the intracellular persisting pathogens of the order Legionellales, was found on the larger plasmid and could contribute to scarlatinoid fever symptoms in patients due to the introduction of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive capabilities. We determined the common and unique traits resulting from genome evolution and speciation within the genus Yersinia and drew a more accurate species border between Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis. In contrast to the lack of genetic diversity observed in the evolutionary young descending Y. pestis lineage, the population

  6. Protection against lethal subcutaneous challenge of virulent Y. pestis strain 141 using an F1-V subunit vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we designed and engineered a two-component recombinant fusion protein antigen as a vaccine candidate against the possible biological threat of Yersinia pestis. The recombinant F1-V protein was formulated with Alhydrogel. A four-time injection with a dosage of 10, 20 and 50 μg/mouse in about two months was adopted for vaccination. Serum antibodies and subclass of T helper cells were measured and analyzed. After the final vaccination, the mice were challenged by 141 strain with 25―600 LD50. In conclusion, the recombinant vaccine was capable of inducing protective immunity against subcutaneous challenge. The level of serum IgG was supposed to be a main factor that affected the final protection of challenge. 20 μg recombinant protein could induce an endpoint titre of serum IgG as high as 51200, which was enough to afford 100% protection against 400 LD50 virulent 141 challenge. The antibody isotype analysis showed that the vaccine induced predominantly an IgG1 rather than IgG2a response. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that Alhydrogel significantly helped induce a stronger humoral immunity instead of CTL cellular response. These findings suggested that the plague F1-V subunit vaccine is promising for the next plague vaccine.

  7. The Yersinia enterocolitica type three secretion chaperone SycO is integrated into the Yop regulatory network and binds to the Yop secretion protein YscM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heesemann Jürgen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenic yersiniae (Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica share a virulence plasmid encoding a type three secretion system (T3SS. This T3SS comprises more than 40 constituents. Among these are the transport substrates called Yops (Yersinia outer proteins, the specific Yop chaperones (Sycs, and the Ysc (Yop secretion proteins which form the transport machinery. The effectors YopO and YopP are encoded on an operon together with SycO, the chaperone of YopO. The characterization of SycO is the focus of this study. Results We have established the large-scale production of recombinant SycO in its outright form. We confirm that Y. enterocolitica SycO forms homodimers which is typical for Syc chaperones. SycO overproduction in Y. enterocolitica decreases secretion of Yops into the culture supernatant suggesting a regulatory role of SycO in type III secretion. We demonstrate that in vitro SycO interacts with YscM1, a negative regulator of Yop expression in Y. enterocolitica. However, the SycO overproduction phenotype was not mediated by YscM1, YscM2, YopO or YopP as revealed by analysis of isogenic deletion mutants. Conclusion We present evidence that SycO is integrated into the regulatory network of the Yersinia T3SS. Our picture of the Yersinia T3SS interactome is supplemented by identification of the SycO/YscM1 interaction. Further, our results suggest that at least one additional interaction partner of SycO has to be identified.

  8. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Priti; Jain, Rajan; Tripathi, Vaibhav

    2013-10-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  9. NOVEL ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Vinay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotics are a group of drugs commonly but not exclusively used to treat psychosis. Antipsychotic agents are grouped in two categories: Typical and Atypical antipsychotics. The first antipsychotic was chlorpromazine, which was developed as a surgical anesthetic. The first atypical anti-psychotic medication, clozapine, was discovered in the 1950s, and introduced in clinical practice in the 1970s. Both typical and atypical antipsychotics are effective in reducing positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Blockade of D2 receptor in mesolimbic pathway is responsible for antipsychotic action. Typical antipsychotics are not particularly selective and also block Dopamine receptors in the mesocortical pathway, tuberoinfundibular pathway, and the nigrostriatal pathway. Blocking D2 receptors in these other pathways is thought to produce some of the unwanted side effects. Atypical antipsychotics differ from typical psychotics in their "limbic-specific" dopamine type 2 (D2-receptor binding and high ratio of serotonin type 2 (5-HT2-receptor binding to D2. Atypical antipsychotics are associated with a decreased capacity to cause EPSs, TD, narcoleptic malignant syndrome, and hyperprolactinemia. Atypical antipsychotic agents were developed in response to problems with typical agents, including lack of efficacy in some patients, lack of improvement in negative symptoms, and troublesome adverse effects, especially extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs and tardive dyskinesia (TD.

  10. YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA: AN IMPORTANT HUMAN FOODBORNE PATHOGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a Gram-negative microbe of public health importance and is under national FoodNet surveillance in the United States. The majority of human yersiniosis cases are foodborne. Consumption of dairy products (milk, ice cream), water, vegetables (tofu), and pork have been linke...

  11. Medium for presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    OpenAIRE

    Weagant, S D

    1983-01-01

    A medium, lysine-arginine-iron agar, was developed for the presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica isolates. This medium was a modification of lysine-iron agar and allowed for the testing of five biochemical characteristics in a single tube medium. The reactions of Y. enterocolitica on this medium were reliable and distinctive. The medium significantly simplified the identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates.

  12. Medium for presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weagant, S D

    1983-02-01

    A medium, lysine-arginine-iron agar, was developed for the presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica isolates. This medium was a modification of lysine-iron agar and allowed for the testing of five biochemical characteristics in a single tube medium. The reactions of Y. enterocolitica on this medium were reliable and distinctive. The medium significantly simplified the identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates.

  13. 噬菌体phiYe-F10的裂解谱的测定以及裂解能力与宿主毒力基因间关系分析%Detection of Yersinia Enterocolitica Bacteriophage PhiYe-F10 Lysis Spectrum and Analysis of the Relationship between Lysis Ability and Virulence Gene of Yersinia Enterocolitica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查涛; 梁俊容; 肖玉春; 景怀琦

    2016-01-01

    pseudotuberculosis and 1 of Yersinia pestis.The virulence genes of these Yersinia enterocolitica (attachment invasion locus (ail) and enterotoxin (ystA、ystB) and yersinia adhesin A (yadA),virulence factor (virF),specific gene for lipopolysaccharide O-side chain of serotype O ∶ 3 (rfbc) were all detected.Among the 213 Yersinia enterocolitica,84 strains were O ∶ 3 serotype (78 strains with rfbcgene),10 were serotype O ∶ 5,13 were serotype O ∶ 8,34 were serotype O.∶ 9 and 72 were other serotypes.Of these,77 were typical pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica harboring with virulence plasmid (ail+,ystA+,ystB-,yadA+,virF+),and 15were pathogenic bacterial strains deficiency virulence plasmid (ail+,ystA+,ystB-,yadA-,virF-) and the rest 121 were non pathogenic genotype strains.PhiYe-F10 lysed the 71 serotype O ∶ 3 Yersinia enterocolitica strains which were all carried with rfbc+,including 52 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica,19 nonpathogenic Y.enterocolitica.The phiYe-F10 can not lysed serotype O ∶ 5,O ∶ 9 and other serotype Y.enterocolitica,the lysis rate of serotype O ∶ 3 was as high as 84.5 %.The phiYe-F10 can not lysed Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis.Yersinia phage phiYe-F10 is highly specific for serotype O ∶ 3 Yersinia enterocolitic at 25℃,which showed a typical narrow lysis spectrum.Phage phiYe-F10 can lysed much more pathogenic Y.enterocolitica than nonpathogenic Y.enterocolitica.

  14. 78 FR 23207 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a Yersinia Pestis Vaccine, Live...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... field test data support the conclusions of the environmental assessment and the issuance of a finding of... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing... Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment concerning authorization...

  15. Protection Conferred by recombinant Yersinia pestis Antigens Produced by a Rapid and Highly Scalable Plant Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-24

    signal; CT, synthetic chloroplast targeting sequence; PhiC31, integrase; 6% HIS, histidine tag; MP, movement protein. Fig. 2. Coomassie-stained gels...The level of F1 targeted to chloroplasts was lower, but still detectable on a Coomassie-stained gel (Fig. 2A). We con- Fig. 1. Constructs used in the...apoplastic targeting (lanes 5), chloroplast -targeted antigens (lanes 6), cytosolic-targeted translational fusions with GFP (lanes 7), cytosolic- targeted

  16. Atypical Optic Neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Eric D; Boudreault, Katherine; Rizzo, Joseph F; Falardeau, Julie; Cestari, Dean M

    2015-12-01

    Classic demyelinative optic neuritis is associated with multiple sclerosis and typically carries a good prognosis for visual recovery. This disorder is well characterized with respect to its presentation and clinical features by baseline data obtained through the optic neuritis treatment trial and numerous other studies. Atypical optic neuritis entails clinical manifestations that deviate from this classic pattern of features. Clinical signs and symptoms that deviate from the typical presentation should prompt consideration of less common etiologies. Atypical features to consider include lack of pain, simultaneous or near-simultaneous onset, lack of response to or relapse upon tapering from corticosteroids, or optic nerve head or peripapillary hemorrhages. The most important alternative etiologies to consider and the steps towards their respective diagnostic evaluations are suggested for these atypical features.

  17. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  18. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo;

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  19. Yersinia enterocolitica: Epidemiological Studies and Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiqur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica is the most common bacteriological cause of gastrointestinal disease in many developed and developing countries. Although contaminated food is the main source of human infection due to Y. enterocolitica, animal reservoir and contaminated environment are also considered as other possible infection sources for human in epidemiological studies. Molecular based epidemiological studies are found to be more efficient in investigating the occurrence of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in natural samples, in addition to conventional culture based studies.

  20. Pilot Study on the Use of DNA Priming Immunization to Enhance Y. pestis LcrV-Specific B Cell Responses Elicited by a Recombinant LcrV Protein Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that DNA immunization is powerful in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses in both animal and human studies. However, there is limited information on the mechanism of this effect. In particular, it is not known whether DNA immunization can also enhance the development of antigen-specific B cell development. In this report, a pilot study was conducted using plague LcrV immunogen as a model system to determine whether DNA immunization is able to enhance LcrV-specific B cell development in mice. Plague is an acute and often fatal infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis. Humoral immune responses provide critical protective immunity against plague. Previously, we demonstrated that a DNA vaccine expressing LcrV antigen can protect mice from lethal mucosal challenge. In the current study, we further evaluated whether the use of a DNA priming immunization is able to enhance the immunogenicity of a recombinant LcrV protein vaccine, and in particular, the development of LcrV-specific B cells. Our data indicate that DNA immunization was able to elicit high-level LcrV antibody responses when used alone or as part of a prime-boost immunization approach. Most significantly, DNA immunization was also able to increase the levels of LcrV-specific B cell development. The finding that DNA immunization can enhance antigen-specific B cell responses is highly significant and will help guide similar studies in other model antigen systems.

  1. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Arun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  2. Estudio bacteriológico de la Pasteurella pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Colichón

    1942-10-01

    Full Text Available Un considerable número de cepas de P. pestis aisladas en el Perú han sido estudiadas bacteriológicamente y los resultados obtenidos pueden ser resumidos en la forma siguiente: 2 cepas entre 148 estudiadas en caldo produjeron franco enturbiamiento del medio. La liquefación de la gelatina, la producción de indol y acetil metilcarbinol fueron negativos para todas las cepas estudiadas. En las condiciones ordinarias puede haber débil producción de SH2 por muy pocas cepas; en cambio, en el agar-Martín-infusión-extracto hepático la producción de SH2 ocurre en el mayor número de cepas, y en un considerable número de ellas en forma notablemente intensa. La temperatura de incubación es decisiva en la producción de hidrógeno sulfurado. Salvo una excepción la reducción del azul de metileno fue negativa para las cepas estudiadas, en esta misma forma la reducción de nitratos a nitritos, la producción de ácido nitroso y reacción del rojo de metilo fueron positivas para las cepas de P. pestis probadas. Todas las cepas estudiadas dieron reacción de catalasas positiva y no desarrollaron en ácido úrico, ni en medio de Koser. La acción de la P. pestis sobre los carbohidratos fue dividida en los siguientes grupos: Carbohidratos atacados constantemente con producción de ácido, no gas; ellos son: glucosa, maltosa, manita, xilosa, salicina y leche tornasolada. Carbohidratos constantemente no atacados, como son: sacarosa, rafinosa, dulcita, inosita, glicerina y dextrina. Carbohidratos, inconstantemente atacados y son: rhamnosa, trehalosa, lactosa, sorbita y arabinosa. En condiciones adecuadas de cultivo, muchas cepas pueden desarrollar en papa, entre las que desarrollaron se observaron algunas que producen pigmentación amarillo-cepia o amarillo dorado. Las pruebas, del ácido nitroso, de la reducción del azul de metileno y de la rahmnosa tienen valor relativo para el Diagnóstico de la Peste, en cambio la glicerina, el indol, la sacarosa

  3. Experimental Yersinia enterocolitica enteritis in rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, C H; Mors, V; Seemayer, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Young rabbits weighing 500 to 800 g were inoculated orogastrically with clinical isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica (serotype O:3; enterotoxigenic; HeLa cell invasive) at a dose of 1.4 X 10(10) bacteria suspended in 10% sodium bicarbonate solution. Diarrhea developed in 41 (87%) of 47 rabbits, with a mean +/- standard deviation onset at 5.4 +/- 2.4 days. The attack rate and onset of diarrhea were correlated with inoculum size. The 50% infectious dose was 2.9 X 10(8) bacteria. Bacterial colon...

  4. [Atypical presentation of preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditisheim, A; Boulvain, M; Irion, O; Pechère-Bertschi, A

    2015-09-09

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome, which still represents one of the major causes of maternal-fetal mortality and morbidity. Diagnosis can be made difficult due to the complexity of the disorder and its wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. In order to provide an efficient diagnostic tool to the clinician, medical societies regularly rethink the definition criteria. However, there are still clinical presentations of preeclampsia that escape the frame of the definition. The present review will address atypical forms of preeclampsia, such as preeclampsia without proteinuria, normotensive preeclampsia, preeclampsia before 20 weeks of gestation and post-partum preeclampsia.

  5. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is resistant to killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas R; Davey, Martin S; Green, Christopher; Cooper, Ian A M; Titball, Richard W; Lukaszewski, Roman A

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between human neutrophils and the Gram negative gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was investigated in vitro. Despite the wealth of data describing how Yersinia can affect the function of neutrophils, there are no published studies describing if neutrophil cells can affect the viability of Y. pseudotuberculosis. The wild-type IP32953 strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis was found to be resistant to killing by human neutrophils. Confocal examination and flow-cytometric analysis of this interaction revealed that bacteria were taken up.

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0564 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0564 ref|NP_407377.1| hypothetical protein YPO3936 [Yersinia pestis CO...92] ref|NP_671186.1| hypothetical protein y3892 [Yersinia pestis KIM] ref|NP_994586.1| hypothetical protein YP_3298 [Yersinia... pestis biovar Microtus str. 91001] ref|YP_653672.1| hypothetical protein YPA_3765 [Yersinia... pestis Antiqua] ref|YP_649511.1| hypothetical protein YPN_3584 [Yersinia pestis... Nepal516] ref|ZP_01917834.1| putative membrane protein [Yersinia pestis CA88-4125] gb|AAM87437.1|AE013994_2 hypothetical [Yersinia

  7. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis.

  8. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is ...

  9. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  10. Atypical Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Steenwyk, Steven D; Molnar, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    We have identified some two-hundred new variable stars in a systematic study of a data archive obtained with the Calvin-Rehoboth observatory. Of these, we present five close binaries showing behaviors presumably due to star spots or other magnetic activity. For context, we first present two new RS CVn systems whose behavior can be readily attribute to star spots. Then we present three new close binary systems that are rather atypical, with light curves that are changing over time in ways not easily understood in terms of star spot activity generally associated with magnetically active binary systems called RS CVn systems. Two of these three are contact binaries that exhibit gradual changes in average brightness without noticeable changes in light curve shape. A third system has shown such large changes in light curve morphology that we speculate this may be a rare instance of a system that transitions back and forth between contact and noncontact configurations, perhaps driven by magnetic cycles in at least o...

  11. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmü Sena Sarı; Figen Kaptan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was ...

  12. LcrV delivered via type III secretion system of live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enhances immunogenicity against pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Sanapala, Shilpa; Henderson, Jeremy C; Sam, Shandiin; Olinzock, Joseph; Trent, M Stephen; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mutant strain with arabinose-dependent regulated and delayed shutoff of crp expression (araC P(BAD) crp) and replacement of the msbB gene with the Escherichia coli msbB gene to attenuate it. Then, we inserted the asd mutation into this construction to form χ10057 [Δasd-206 ΔmsbB868::P(msbB) msbB(EC) ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD) crp] for use with a balanced-lethal Asd-positive (Asd(+)) plasmid to facilitate antigen synthesis. A hybrid protein composed of YopE (amino acids [aa]1 to 138) fused with full-length LcrV (YopE(Nt138)-LcrV) was synthesized in χ10057 harboring an Asd(+) plasmid (pYA5199, yopE(Nt138)-lcrV) and could be secreted through a type III secretion system (T3SS) in vitro and in vivo. Animal studies indicated that mice orally immunized with χ10057(pYA5199) developed titers of IgG response to whole-cell lysates of Y. pestis (YpL) and subunit LcrV similar to those seen with χ10057(pYA3332) (χ10057 plus an empty plasmid). However, only immunization of mice with χ10057(pYA5199) resulted in a significant secretory IgA response to LcrV. χ10057(pYA5199) induced a higher level of protection (80% survival) against intranasal (i.n.) challenge with ~240 median lethal doses (LD50) (2.4 × 10(4) CFU) of Y. pestis KIM6+(pCD1Ap) than χ10057(pYA3332) (40% survival). Splenocytes from mice vaccinated with χ10057(pYA5199) produced significant levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-17 (IL-17) after restimulation with LcrV and YpL antigens. Our results suggest that it is possible to use an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain delivering the LcrV antigen via the T3SS as a potential vaccine candidate against pneumonic plague.

  13. Genotyping of human and porcine Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia intertmedia, and Yersinia bercovieri strains from Switzerland by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; On, Stephen L.W.; Kokotovic, Branko

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 231 strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, 25 strains of Y. intermedia, and 10 strains of Y. bercovieri from human and porcine sources (including reference strains) were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), a whole-genome fingerprinting method for subtyping ba...

  14. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Identifies Genetic Traits to Elucidate Their Different Ecologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Kaisa; Somervuo, Panu; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are both etiological agents for intestinal infection known as yersiniosis, but their epidemiology and ecology bear many differences. Swine are the only known reservoir for Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains, which are the most common cause of human disease, while Y. pseudotuberculosis has been isolated from a variety of sources, including vegetables and wild animals. Infections caused by Y. enterocolitica mainly originate from swine, but fresh produce has been the source for widespread Y. pseudotuberculosis outbreaks within recent decades. A comparative genomic hybridization analysis with a DNA microarray based on three Yersinia enterocolitica and four Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genomes was conducted to shed light on the genomic differences between enteropathogenic Yersinia. The hybridization results identified Y. pseudotuberculosis strains to carry operons linked with the uptake and utilization of substances not found in living animal tissues but present in soil, plants, and rotting flesh. Y. pseudotuberculosis also harbors a selection of type VI secretion systems targeting other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These genetic traits are not found in Y. enterocolitica, and it appears that while Y. pseudotuberculosis has many tools beneficial for survival in varied environments, the Y. enterocolitica genome is more streamlined and adapted to their preferred animal reservoir.

  15. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Identifies Genetic Traits to Elucidate Their Different Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Jaakkola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are both etiological agents for intestinal infection known as yersiniosis, but their epidemiology and ecology bear many differences. Swine are the only known reservoir for Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains, which are the most common cause of human disease, while Y. pseudotuberculosis has been isolated from a variety of sources, including vegetables and wild animals. Infections caused by Y. enterocolitica mainly originate from swine, but fresh produce has been the source for widespread Y. pseudotuberculosis outbreaks within recent decades. A comparative genomic hybridization analysis with a DNA microarray based on three Yersinia enterocolitica and four Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genomes was conducted to shed light on the genomic differences between enteropathogenic Yersinia. The hybridization results identified Y. pseudotuberculosis strains to carry operons linked with the uptake and utilization of substances not found in living animal tissues but present in soil, plants, and rotting flesh. Y. pseudotuberculosis also harbors a selection of type VI secretion systems targeting other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These genetic traits are not found in Y. enterocolitica, and it appears that while Y. pseudotuberculosis has many tools beneficial for survival in varied environments, the Y. enterocolitica genome is more streamlined and adapted to their preferred animal reservoir.

  16. Resistant Yersinia Enterocolitica Peritonitis in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ÖZDEN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Peritonitis is an important problem of peritoneal dialysis patients. Although Gram (+ bacteria are more frequent, Gram (- bacteria can rarely be the cause of peritonitis. Yersinia enterocolitica is a Gram (- enteric bacteria that especially causes gastrointestinal infections via contaminated food intake in immunosuppressive situations such as haemochromatosis, desferroxamine therapy or chronic hepatitis. We report a 51-year-old man who had been undergoing SAPD because of chronic renal failure for 2 years. We evaluated his peritoneal fl uid because of symptoms of peritonitis. His peritoneal cellular composition was consistent with peritonitis and after the microbiological culture of the fl uid we determined Yersinia enterocolitica as the pathogenic agent. The peritonitis persisted despite the administration of long term combined antibiotherapy and we removed the peritoneal catheter. In conclusion, Yersinia enterocolitica peritonitis is resistant to conventional antibiotic therapy and an indication for catheter removal.

  17. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are crucial in Bifidobacterium adolescentis-mediated inhibition of Yersinia enterocolitica infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    In industrialized countries bacterial intestinal infections are commonly caused by enteropathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. The interaction of the microbiota with the host immune system determines the adequacy of an appropriate response against pathogens. In this study we addressed whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium adolescentis is protective during intestinal Yersinia enterocolitica infection. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed with B. adolescentis, infected with Yersinia enterocolitica, or B. adolescentis fed and subsequently infected with Yersinia enterocolitica. B. adolescentis fed and Yersinia infected mice were protected from Yersinia infection as indicated by a significantly reduced weight loss and splenic Yersinia load when compared to Yersinia infected mice. Moreover, protection from infection was associated with increased intestinal plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell function was investigated using depletion experiments by injecting B. adolescentis fed, Yersinia infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-mouse PDCA-1 antibody, to deplete plasmacytoid dendritic cells, or respective isotype control. The B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia dissemination to the spleen was abrogated after plasmacytoid dendritic cell depletion indicating a crucial function for pDC in control of intestinal Yersinia infection. We suggest that feeding of B. adolescentis modulates the intestinal immune system in terms of increased plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies, which might account for the B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia enterocolitica infection.

  18. Regulation of Yersina pestis Virulence by AI-2 Mediated Quorum Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segelke, B; Hok, S; Lao, V; Corzett, M; Garcia, E

    2010-03-29

    The proposed research was motivated by an interest in understanding Y. pestis virulence mechanisms and bacteria cell-cell communication. It is expected that a greater understanding of virulence mechanisms will ultimately lead to biothreat countermeasures and novel therapeutics. Y. pestis is the etiological agent of plague, the most devastating disease in human history. Y. pestis infection has a high mortality rate and a short incubation before mortality. There is no widely available and effective vaccine for Y. pestis and multi-drug resistant strains are emerging. Y. pestis is a recognized biothreat agent based on the wide distribution of the bacteria in research laboratories around the world and on the knowledge that methods exist to produce and aerosolize large amounts of bacteria. We hypothesized that cell-cell communication via signaling molecules, or quorum sensing, by Y. pestis is important for the regulation of virulence factor gene expression during host invasion, though a causative link had never been established. Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication which enables orchestration of gene expression for many bacteria as a function of population density and available evidence suggests there may be a link between quorum sensing and regulation of Y. pesits virulence. Several pathogenic bacteria have been shown to regulate expression of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding type III secretion, via quorum sensing. The Y. pestis genome encodes several cell-cell signaling pathways and the interaction of at least three of these are thought to be involved in one or more modes of host invasion. Furthermore, Y. pestis gene expression array studies carried out at LLNL have established a correlation between expression of known virulence factors and genes involved in processing of the AI-2 quorum sensing signal. This was a basic research project that was intended to provide new insights into bacterial intercellular communication and how it is

  19. Control of Yersinia enterocolitica in pigs at herd level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjerve, Eystein; Lium, Bjørn; Nielsen, Bent

    1998-01-01

    A higher herd prevalence of antibodies (ELISA) to Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 was found in conventional slaughter production (86.0% seropositive herds) than in conventional farrow-to-finish herds (53.1% seropositive herds). The herd prevalence of antibodies to Y. enterocolitica in multiplying herds.......41) and using straw bedding for slaughter pigs (OR = 2.25) were other factors that increased the risk. In conclusion, the epidemiological data suggest that it is possible to reduce the herd prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 by minimising contact between infected herds and non-infected herds. Further...

  20. Prevalence, characterization, and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia species and Yersinia enterocolitica isolated from raw milk in farm bulk tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Radmehr, Behrad; Ismail, Salmah

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and to characterize and determine the antibiotic resistance of Yersinia spp. isolates from raw milk. From September 2008 to August 2010, 446 raw milk samples were obtained from farm bulk milk tanks in Varamin, Iran. Yersinia spp. were detected in 29 (6.5%) samples, out of which 23 (79.3%), 5 (17.2%), and 1 (3.4%) were isolated from cow, sheep, and goat raw milk, respectively. The most common species isolated was Yersinia enterocolitica (65.5%), followed by Yersinia frederiksenii (31%), and Yersinia kristensenii (3.4%). Of the 19 Y. enterocolitica isolates, 14 (73.7%) were grouped into bioserotype 1A/O:9, 4 (21.1%) belonged to bioserotype 1B:O8, 1 (5.3%) belonged to bioserotype 4/O:3, and 1 isolate (biotype 1A) was not typable. All the isolates of biotypes 1B and 4harbored both the ystA and ail genes. However, all the isolates of biotype 1A were only positive for the ystB gene. The tested Yersinia spp. showed the highest percentages of resistance to tetracycline (48.3%), followed by ciprofloxacin and cephalothin (each 17.2%), ampicillin (13.8%), streptomycin (6.9%), and amoxicillin and nalidixic acid (each 3.4%). All of the tested isolates demonstrated significant sensitivity to gentamicin and chloramphenicol. Recovery of potentially pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from raw milk indicates high risks of yersiniosis associated with consumption of raw milk.

  1. [Therapy for atypical facial pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroko

    2009-09-01

    Atypical facial pain is a pain in the head, neck and the face, without organic causes. It is treated at departments of physical medicine, such as dental, oral and maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, cerebral surgery, or head and neck surgery. In primary care, it is considered to be a medically unexplained symptom (MUS), or a somatoform disorder, such as somatization caused by a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) by psychiatrists. Usually, patients consult departments of physical medicine complaining of physical pain. Therefore physicians in these departments should examine the patients from the holistic perspective, and identify organic diseases. As atypical facial pain becomes chronic, other complications, including psychiatric complaints other than physical pain, such as depression may develop. Moreover, physical, psychological, and social factors affect the symptoms by interacting with one another. Therefore, in examining atypical facial pain, doctors specializing in dental, oral and maxillofacial medicine are required to provide psychosomatic treatment that is based on integrated knowledge.

  2. Radiation resistance and injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Rowley, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25/sup 0/C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and -30/sup 0/C, the D value of strain IP107 and 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at -20/sup 0/C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at -20/sup 0/C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at -20/sup 0/C, nor did storage at -20/sup 0/C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25/sup 0/C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36/sup 0/C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36/sup 0/C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5/sup 0/C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36/sup 0/C for 1 day than at 5/sup 0/C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation.

  3. Green fluorescent protein labeling of food pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensberger, Eva Theres; Kostić, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Labeling of bacteria with marker genes, such as green fluorescent protein, is a useful and practicable tool for tracking and enumerating bacterial cells in a complex environment e.g. discrimination from the indigenous background population. In this study, novel TurboGFP prokaryotic expression vector was utilized for labeling of Yersinia species. Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A, biovar 2, biovar 4 and Y. pseudotuberculosis were successfully transformed with the vector and expressed bright green fluorescence that was even detectable visually by eye. No adverse effects were observed in growth behavior of the labeled strains compared to wild type (parental) strains and vector maintenance for longer time periods could be achieved for Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A, Y. enterocolitica biovar 2 and Y. pseudotuberculosis.

  4. Molecular cloning of cecropin B responsive endonucleases in Yersinia ruckeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously demonstrated that Yersinia ruckeri resists cecropin B in an inducible manner. In this study, we sought to identify the molecular changes responsible for the inducible cecropin B resistance of Y. ruckeri. Differences in gene expression associated with the inducible resistance were ...

  5. Yersinia enterocolitica : Genes involved in cold-adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverde, R.L.J.

    1999-01-01

    It is known from the literature that: -The application of chilling as a means of food preservation has frequently resulted in food borne infections with psychrotrophic micro-organisms, such as Yersinia enterocolitica, Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila; - The injurious effect on huma

  6. Mechanisms of Yersinia YopO kinase substrate specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Lin; Singaravelu, Pavithra; Wee, Sheena; Xue, Bo; Ang, Khay Chun; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Robinson, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Yersinia bacteria cause a range of human diseases, including yersiniosis, Far East scarlet-like fever and the plague. Yersiniae modulate and evade host immune defences through injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One of the Yops, YopO (also known as YpkA) obstructs phagocytosis through disrupting actin filament regulation processes - inhibiting polymerization-promoting signaling through sequestration of Rac/Rho family GTPases and by using monomeric actin as bait to recruit and phosphorylate host actin-regulating proteins. Here we set out to identify mechanisms of specificity in protein phosphorylation by YopO that would clarify its effects on cytoskeleton disruption. We report the MgADP structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals its active site architecture. Using a proteome-wide kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS) method, we identified that YopO phosphorylates a wide range of actin-modulating proteins and located their phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry. Using artificial substrates we clarified YopO’s substrate length requirements and its phosphorylation consensus sequence. These findings provide fresh insight into the mechanism of the YopO kinase and demonstrate that YopO executes a specific strategy targeting actin-modulating proteins, across multiple functionalities, to compete for control of their native phospho-signaling, thus hampering the cytoskeletal processes required for macrophage phagocytosis. PMID:28051168

  7. Atypical moles: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Allen; Duffy, R Lamar

    2015-06-01

    Atypical moles are benign pigmented lesions. Although they are benign, they exhibit some of the clinical and histologic features of malignant melanoma. They are more common in fair-skinned individuals and in those with high sun exposure. Atypical moles are characterized by size of 6 mm or more at the greatest dimension, color variegation, border irregularity, and pebbled texture. They are associated with an increased risk of melanoma, warranting enhanced surveillance, especially in patients with more than 50 moles and a family history of melanoma. Because an individual lesion is unlikely to display malignant transformation, biopsy of all atypical moles is neither clinically beneficial nor cost-effective. The ABCDE (asymmetry, border irregularity, color unevenness, diameter of 6 mm or more, evolution) mnemonic is a valuable tool for clinicians and patients to identify lesions that could be melanoma. Also, according to the "ugly duckling" concept, benign moles tend to have a similar appearance, whereas an outlier with a different appearance is more likely to be undergoing malignant change. Atypical moles with changes suggestive of malignant melanoma should be biopsied, using an excisional method, if possible.

  8. Integrated Semiconductor-based Diagnostics System for Multiplexed Genomic Amplification and Electrochemical Detection of Biothreat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    contains all of the reagents and a microarray to test for Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Brucella suis, Vibrio cholera, and Yersinia enterocolitica .

  9. Atypical Steatocystoma Multiplex with Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Hasibur; Islam, Muhammad Saiful; Ansari, Nazma Parvin

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old male reported to us with an atypical case of giant steatocystoma multiplex in the scrotum with calcification. There was no family history of similar lesions. Yellowish, creamy material was expressed from a nodule during punch biopsy. The diagnosis was based on clinical as well as histological findings. Successful surgical excision was done to cure the case without any complications. PMID:22363850

  10. Atypical Centrioles During Sexual Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer eAvidor-Reiss

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL. We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the zombie centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology.

  11. Atypical Imaging Appearances of Meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Soltani shirazi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Meningiomas are the commonest primary non-glial intracranial tumors. The diagnosis is usually correctly established on characteristic imaging appearances. Atypical meningiomas may be difficult to diagnose because of their similarity to other brain tumors. This paper presents one case of atypical meningioma, misdiagnosed primarily as glioblastoma multiforms (GBM by radiological techniques. "nCase report: A 15-year-old girl presented with a severe intermittent generalized headache that on occasion localized to retro-orbital and vertex. Other manifestations were blurred vision, photophobia, diplopia, weakness and clumsiness of the right hand. The result of systemic and neurological examinations was normal, except for a positive right hand drift test. MRI showed a large lobulated mass with peripheral edema, central necrosis and a heterogenous enhancement at the central part of the parietal lobe inducing to subfalcian herniation. Glioblastoma multiforms (GBM was misdiagnosed for the patient on the basis of MRI appearance. Pathology evaluation was compatible with meningioma (WHO grade I to II. The patient was operated and discharged with minimal right hand weakness. Physiotherapy was recommended to improve the remaining problems. "nConclusion: Atypical meningiomas may mimic other intracranical brain lesions and may cause misdiagnosis. It is important to be aware of these features in order to avoid misdiagnosis. "n"n  

  12. Período de infectividade de animais inoculados experimentalmente com Yersinia sp Period of infectivity of animals challenged by Yersinia sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Maria Machado de Medeiros

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Lotes de camundongos suiços convencionais foram inoculados tanto por via intragástrica (IG quanto por via intravenosa (IV com Yersinia enterocolitica dos sorotipos 0:3, 0:8 e 0:9 e com amostras de yersinias atípicas. Foi mantido um lote de animais não inoculados como controle. Verificou-se qual o período de permanência dessas bactérias no intestino dos animais inoculados. Yersinia enterocolitica dos sorotipos 0:3, 0:8 e 0:9, considerados adaptados ao homem, permaneceram no intestino dos animais inoculados por um período muito maior do que as amostras de Yersinia não adaptadas, quer inoculadas por via intragástrica, quer por via intravenosa.Conventional swiss mice were innoculated intragastrically (IG and intravenously (IV with Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes 0:3, 0:8 and 0:9 and with Yersinia enterocolitica like strains. A control animal group was not innoculated. The period that strains remained in the cecal content after the IG and IV challenge was determined. After IG and IV innoculation, Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes 0:3, 0:8 and 0:9, considered adapted to man, were isolated from the cecal content for a longer period than those considered nonadapted.

  13. Sepsis and siderosis, Yersinia enterocolitica and hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Phoebe A; Woods, Marion L

    2017-01-04

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with sepsis, relative bradycardia, CT evidence of numerous small liver abscesses and 'skin bronzing' consistent with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 infection was confirmed by serology specimens taken 10 days apart. Iron overload was detected, and homozygous C282Y gene mutation confirmed HH. Liver biopsy revealed grade IV siderosis with micronodular cirrhosis. Haemochromatosis is a common, inherited disorder leading to iron overload that can produce end-organ damage from excess iron deposition. Haemochromatosis diagnosis allowed aggressive medical management with phlebotomy achieving normalisation of iron stores. Screening for complications of cirrhosis was started that included hepatoma surveillance. Iron overload states are known to increase patient susceptibility to infections caused by lower virulence bacteria lacking sophisticated iron metabolism pathways, for example, Yersinia enterocolitica Although these serious disseminated infections are rare, they may serve as markers for occult iron overload and should prompt haemochromatosis screening.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of herbs against Yersinia enterocolitica and mixed microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa SHARMA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at developing herbal medicine against food borne pathogens, therefore the antimicrobial activity of four herbs viz. Arjuna (bark, Ashwagandha (roots, Puthkanda (leaves and Shalampanja (roots was checked. Aqueous, ethanolic and petroleum ether extracts of each herb were extracted and their antimicrobial activity against mixed microflora and against Yersinia enterocolitica was determined. Tetracycline and gentamicin were used as reference antibiotics. Arjuna extracts showed the highest antimicrobial potential against mixed population and Yersinia enterocolitica in comparison to Ashwagandha, Puthkanda and Shalampanja extracts. The antimicrobial activity of Arjuna aqueous extract was lower compared to gentamicin, but comparable to tetracycline. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of aqueous extract of Arjuna showed the lowest values indicating that it is more effective in lower concentration of use. The antimicrobial activity of herbs showed the following trend Arjuna > Puthkanda > Shalampanja > Ashwagandha.

  15. THE FIRST REPORT OF YERSINIA ISOLATION OF VEGETABLE IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Soltan-Dallal

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Yersiniosis is a common infection in human and animals. Yersinia enterocolitica infection has been associated with a variety of clinical manifestations. This bacterium has been isolated from water, meat, milk environment, animals and so on. Our studies have been accomplished about isolation of Y. enterocolitica from vegetables such as lettuce, carrot, celery, parsley, tomato, cabbage, radish, mushroom and leek. Four methods for isolating were: enrichment with ITC broth, enrichment with PSB broth, enrichment with PSB medium with KOH 0.25% and cold enrichment for 14 d at 4 C and used from PSB medium with KOH0.25%. Two cases of Yersinia were isolated from 110 samples of raw vegetables. One case of Y. enterocolotica enterocolitica was isolated from lettuce and the other case was Y.fredriksenli from parsley. Biochemical and virulent tests demonstrated environmental strains but not pathogenic.

  16. ENTEROTOXIN PRODUCTION BY YERSINIA SPECIES AT 4 AND 25 C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Soltandallal

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia cntcrocolitica is new included in the classification of both the invasive bacteria (e.g. Shigella and the toxicogenic bacteria (e.g. Escherichia coli. three human strains and 43 environmental strains were used to produce Y. enteroclitica enterotoxin at 4 C , 25'C and 37 C using infant mouse assay. At 25 C enterotoxin was produced by 10 environmental strains and by all of the 3 human strains. Enterotoxin was produced by only 3 environmental strains (yersinia intermedia at 4 C. At 37"C, none of the strains protluced enterotoxin. This enterotoxin was stable for 2 months at 4"C andjor 6 months at 60°C. At 100°C for 10 to 60 minutes and 121 C (autoclave for 20 minutes this enterotoxin did not loss its activity. the results indicate that Y. intermedia may cause food intoxication after food storage at 4 C temperature.

  17. Using Comparative Genomics for Inquiry-Based Learning to Dissect Virulence of "Escherichia coli" O157:H7 and "Yersinia pestis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumler, David J.; Banta, Lois M.; Hung, Kai F.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Cabot, Eric L.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.

    2012-01-01

    Genomics and bioinformatics are topics of increasing interest in undergraduate biological science curricula. Many existing exercises focus on gene annotation and analysis of a single genome. In this paper, we present two educational modules designed to enable students to learn and apply fundamental concepts in comparative genomics using examples…

  18. Identification of Ciprofloxacin Resistance by SimpleProbe (trademark), High Resolution Melt and Pyrosequencing (trademark) Nucleic Acid Analysis in Biothreat Agents: Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and gyrase are clustered at the DNA breakage site. J Biol Chem 2005;280:14252e63. [6] Wolfson JS, Hooper DC...Ambler J, Mehtar S, Fisher LM. Involvement of topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase as ciprofloxacin targets in Streptococcus pneumoniae . Antimicrob Agents...agents addressed here and further research into this possibility would provide valuable insight into fluoroquinolone resistance in these important

  19. Performance of a Handheld PCR Instrument in the Detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis: Sensitivity, Specificity, and Effect of Interferents on Assay Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    A Bordetella pertussis 105 0/3 N/A Campylobacter jejuni 105 0/3 N/A Clostridium perfringens 105 1/5 50 Clostridium tetani ...ATCC 9797 105 0/3 N/A Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33560 105 0/3 N/A Clostridium perfringens 105 0/3 N/A Escherichia coli ATCC

  20. Yersinia hepatic abscesses subsequent to long-term iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, P M; MacSween, H M

    1987-02-20

    A 71-year-old woman who had been receiving iron injections for at least ten years was admitted to the Dr Everett Chalmers Hospital, Fredericton, New Brunswick. The initial diagnosis was metastatic tumors in the liver, but after further evaluation, the initial diagnosis was corrected to multiple hepatic abscesses due to Yersinia enterocolitica. The liver biopsy showed abundant iron deposition. With the appropriate antibiotic treatment, the patient recovered.

  1. Recent Findings about the Yersinia enterocolitica Phage Shock Protein Response

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAGUCHI, Saori; Andrew J. Darwin

    2012-01-01

    The phage shock protein (Psp) system is a conserved extracytoplasmic stress response in bacteria that is essential for virulence of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. This article summarizes some recent findings about Y. enterocolitica Psp system function. Increased psp gene expression requires the transcription factor PspF, but under non-inducing conditions PspF is inhibited by an interaction with another protein, PspA, in the cytoplasm. A Psp-inducing stimulus causes PspA to reloca...

  2. Yersinia enterocolitica-mediated degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möllerherm, Helene; Neumann, Ariane; Schilcher, Katrin; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Dersch, Petra; Lüthje, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is described as a tool of the innate host defence to fight against invading pathogens. Fibre-like DNA structures associated with proteins such as histones, cell-specific enzymes and antimicrobial peptides are released, thereby entrapping invading pathogens. It has been reported that several bacteria are able to degrade NETs by nucleases and thus evade the NET-mediated entrapment. Here we studied the ability of three different Yersinia serotypes to induce and degrade NETs. We found that the common Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8 and O:9 were able to induce NETs in human blood-derived neutrophils during the first hour of co-incubation. At later time points, the NET amount was reduced, suggesting that degradation of NETs has occurred. This was confirmed by NET degradation assays with phorbol-myristate-acetate-pre-stimulated neutrophils. In addition, we found that the Yersinia supernatants were able to degrade purified plasmid DNA. The absence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions, but not that of a protease inhibitor cocktail, completely abolished NET degradation. We therefore postulate that Y. enterocolitica produces Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-dependent NET-degrading nucleases as shown for some Gram-positive pathogens.

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  4. Real-Time PCR Diagnostics for Detecting and Identifying Potential Bioweapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-18

    var niger Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacillus anthracis BA0068 Bacillus bronchiseptica Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacillus anthracis Clostridium...botulinium Staphylococcus Aureus Bacillus anthracis Comamonas acidivarns Streptococcus pyogenes Bacillus anthracis N.H. Corynebacterium sp. Streptococcus...flexneri Yersinia pestis Bacillus macerans Shigella sonnei Yersinia pestis Bacillus megaterium Staphylococcus aureus Yersinia pestis Bacillus popilliae

  5. Treatment options for atypical optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Optic neuritis (ON is defined as inflammation of the optic nerve and can have various etiologies. The most common presentation in the US is demyelinating, or "typical" ON, usually associated with multiple sclerosis. This is in contrast to "atypical" causes of ON, which differ in their clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. These atypical cases are characterized by lack of eye pain, exudates, and hemorrhages on exam, very severe, bilateral or progressive visual loss, or with failure to recover vision. Aims: The aim was to describe the clinical presentations of atypical ON and their treatments. Settings and Design: Review article. Materials and Methods: Literature review. Results: Types of atypical ON identified include neuromyelitis optica, autoimmune optic neuropathy, chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy, idiopathic recurrent neuroretinitis, and optic neuropathy associated with systemic diseases. Atypical ON usually requires corticosteroid treatment and often will require aggressive immunosuppression. Conclusions: Unlike demyelinating ON, atypical ON requires treatment to preserve vision.

  6. Bacteriemia y absceso hepático causado por Yersinia enterocolitica Bacteremia and hepatic abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Navascués

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica es un cocobacilo gram negativo de amplia distribución mundial cuyo reservorio natural se encuentra en una gran variedad de animales. La transmisión a los humanos se realiza principalmente a través de la vía fecal-oral aunque también se han descrito casos de transmisión a través de transfusiones sanguíneas. Su aislamiento se realiza habitualmente dentro de un cuadro gastrointestinal y rara vez produce trastornos extraintestinales como bacteriemia, abscesos, manifestaciones cutáneas, etc. Éstos se han asociado a diferentes enfermedades de base como alteraciones del metabolismo del hierro, diabetes mellitus, alcoholismo, malnutrición, tumores, terapia inmunosupresora y cirrosis. Presentamos el caso de un paciente diabético que desarrolló bacteriemia asociada a abscesso hepático por Yersinia enterocolitica.Yersinia enterocolitica is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that is distributed world-wide and whose natural reservoire is found in a great variety of animals. Transmission to humans mainly occurs through the faecal-oral path although cases have been described of transmission through blood transfusions. It is isolated within a gastro-intestinal clinical picture and it rarely produces extra-intestinal disorders such as bacteraemia, abscesses, cutaneous signs, etc. The latter have been associated with different underlying diseases such as alterations of the iron metabolism, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, malnutrition, tumours, immunosuppressant therapy and cirrhosis. We present the case of a diabetic patient who developed bacteraemia associated with hepatic abscess due to Yersinia enterocolitica.

  7. Strategies used by Yersinia enterocolitica to evade killing by the host: thinking beyond Yops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Mahesh Shanker; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2014-02-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an important gastrointestinal pathogen. Its pathogenicity has been attributed primarily to the plasmid encoded Yersinia outer proteins or Yops that are known to subvert the immune system. This review, however, highlights the role of Yop-independent mechanisms that help Y. enterocolitica evade immune system and contribute significantly to its survival in the host.

  8. Yersinia ruckeri infection of rainbow trout: entrance portals and spread in the host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, S.; Khimmakthong, U.; Chettri, J. K.;

    2013-01-01

    The portal of entrance of either formalin inactivated or live Yersinia ruckeri organism in rainbow trout fish was studied by applying immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. The sequential study involved a specific monoclonal antibody and a specific oligonucleotide probe binding to Yersinia...

  9. Sample collection of virulent and non-virulent B. anthracis and Y. pestis for bioforensics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Yolanda E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shou, Yulin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marrone, Babetta L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dunbar, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Validated sample collection methods are needed for recovery of microbial evidence in the event of accidental or intentional release of biological agents into the environment. To address this need, we evaluated the sample recovery efficiencies of two collection methods -- swabs and wipes -- for both non-virulent and virulent strains of B. anthracis and Y. pestis from four types of non-porous surfaces: two hydrophilic surfaces, stainless steel and glass, and two hydrophobic surfaces, vinyl and plastic. Sample recovery was quantified using Real-time qPCR to assay for intact DNA signatures. We found no consistent difference in collection efficiency between swabs or wipes. Furthermore, collection efficiency was more surface-dependent for virulent strains than non-virulent strains. For the two non-virulent strains, B. anthracis Sterne and Y. pestis A1122, collection efficiency was approximately 100% and 1 %, respectively, from all four surfaces. In contrast, recovery of B. anthracis Ames spores and Y. pestis C092 from vinyl and plastic was generally lower compared to collection from glass or stainless steel, suggesting that surface hydrophobicity may playa role in the strength of pathogen adhesion. The surface-dependent collection efficiencies observed with the virulent strains may arise from strain-specific expression of capsular material or other cell surface receptors that alter cell adhesion to specific surfaces. These findings contribute to validation of standard bioforensics procedures and emphasize the importance of specific strain and surface interactions in pathogen detection.

  10. THE SURVIVAL OF PASTEURELLA PESTIS IN MATERIALS PRESERVED BY SOLID CARBON DIOXIDE (DRY-ICE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOLDENBERG, M I; QUAN, S F; PRINCE, F M

    1964-01-01

    In the investigation of outbreaks of plague it is frequently more satisfactory to send specimens of suspected material collected in the field to a central laboratory, where usually better facilities for their more detailed examination are available. In the present study the authors have investigated the suitability of solid CO(2) (dry-ice) for the preservation of such material during transit. Three types of preparation were tested: broth suspensions of Pasteurella pestis, the livers and spleens of guinea-pigs dying after being infected with two different strains of P. pestis, and whole carcasses of mice and ground-squirrels infected with the organism. An additional test to ascertain the rate at which animal specimens became frozen and thawed was also carried out.These studies showed that (1) organisms in the various tissues frozen in dry-ice were not adversely affected by such treatment; (2) the survival of P. pestis cells did not depend on the number of organisms present in broth cultures or tissue suspensions, small numbers surviving equally well as large; and (3) plague bacilli contained in whole carcasses, even when present in small numbers, were also successfully preserved. It is concluded from these results, and also from the authors' practical use of the method over several years, that for the transport of plague-suspect materials from the field to the laboratory freezing with dry-ice can be confidently recommended.

  11. Prevalence and genetic diversity of enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. in pigs at farms and slaughter in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Šernienė, Loreta; Malakauskas, Alvydas; Laukkanen-Ninios, Riikka; Korkeala, Hannu; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2013-04-01

    The prevalence of enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. in pigs at farms and slaughter in relation to potential farming risk factors in Lithuania was examined. Pig faeces and carcase swab samples from 11 farms were studied at slaughterhouses. Nine of the 11 farms were visited again 3-5 months later, and pooled feacal samples and environmental samples were collected. Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica was found in 64% and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in 45% of the sampled pig farms. All obtained isolates belonged to bioserotypes 4/O:3 and 2/O:3, respectively. Low biosecurity level was associated with a high prevalence of Y. enterocolitica on farms. Characterization with PFGE of 64 Y. enterocolitica and 27 Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates revealed seven and two different genotypes, respectively. Dominant enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. genotypes were obtained in both pig feacal and carcase samples. The high contamination of pig carcases (25%) with enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. may be an important factor contributing to the high incidence of human yersiniosis in Lithuania.

  12. Advance in molecular mechanism of host-microbe: invasion and survival of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in host cells%假结核耶尔森氏菌与宿主之间相互作用的分子机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄睿; 马艳庆; 赵晋; 宋雷

    2016-01-01

    耶尔森氏菌属中有3个种对人和动物具有致病性,包括鼠疫杆菌(Yersinia pestis)、小肠结肠炎耶尔森氏菌(Yersinia enterocolitica)和假结核耶尔森氏菌(Yersinia pseudotuberculosis).研究发现,假结核耶尔森氏菌能通过小鼠小肠派氏淋巴结的M细胞(Microfold cell)进T跨细胞转运.这种转运方式首先是细菌利用其表面蛋白侵袭素Invasin或黏附素YadA蛋白识别并结合宿主细胞表面的整合素Integrin受体家族成员的β1链,然后细胞膜上的分泌通道打开,细菌利用Ⅲ型分泌系统把效应蛋白注入宿主细胞内,破坏宿主细胞免疫系统进行感染的过程.过去三十年内关于假结核耶尔森氏菌有大量的文献报道,本文综述该菌与宿主细胞之间相互作用分子机制的研究进展,并讨论目前关于假结核耶尔森氏菌的研究方向及热点.

  13. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  14. Atypical Presentation of Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. T. Udaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor (ATRT is a rare malignant intracranial neoplasm more commonly diagnosed in young children. The authors report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a long standing history of slowly progressive weight loss, fatigue, and weakness over 1.5 years whose magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large heterogeneous enhancing dorsally exophytic lower brainstem mass. Examination revealed extreme cachexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, dysphagia, dysarthria, bilateral dysmetria, and global weakness without ambulation. The protracted history and neuroimaging features were most suggestive of a low grade glioma. However, pathology revealed a hypercellular tumor with large hyperchromatic nucleoli and loss of INI-1 staining on immunohistochemistry consistent with a diagnosis of an ATRT. The child died shortly after surgery due to complications from his brainstem infiltrative disease. This case illustrates the diverse presentation of ATRT in childhood that can clinically and radiographically mimic that of low grade glioma.

  15. Thigh Abscess Caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an Immunocompetent Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purva Gumaste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica is primarily a gastrointestinal tract pathogen known to cause gastroenteritis, although it may produce extra-intestinal infections like sepsis and its sequelae. However, primary cutaneous infections are extremely rare. We present a case of Y. enterocolitica thigh abscess in an immunocompetent adult. The portal of entry is unclear in this case. He did many outdoor activities that involved skin injuries and exposure to soil and contaminated water. Hence, direct inoculation as a result of exposure to contaminated water is postulated in the absence of evidence for a gastrointestinal route of infection.

  16. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  17. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  18. CDP-Alcohol Hydrolase, a Very Efficient Activity of the 5′-Nucleotidase/UDP-Sugar Hydrolase Encoded by the ushA Gene of Yersinia intermedia and Escherichia coli▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pereira, Isabel; Canales, José; Cabezas, Alicia; Martín Cordero, Paloma; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside 5′-diphosphate-X hydrolases are interesting enzymes to study due to their varied activities and structure-function relationships and the roles they play in the disposal, assimilation, and modulation of the effects of their substrates. Few of these enzymes with a preference for CDP-alcohols are known. In Yersinia intermedia suspensions prepared from cultures on Columbia agar with 5% sheep blood, we found a CDP-alcohol hydrolase liberated to Triton X-100-containing medium. Growth at 25°C was deemed optimum in terms of the enzyme-activity yield. The purified enzyme also displayed 5′-nucleotidase, UDP-sugar hydrolase, and dinucleoside-polyphosphate hydrolase activities. It was identified as the protein product (UshAYi) of the Y. intermedia ushA gene (ushAYi) by its peptide mass fingerprint and by PCR cloning and expression to yield active enzyme. All those activities, except CDP-alcohol hydrolase, have been shown to be the properties of UshA of Escherichia coli (UshAEc). Therefore, UshAEc was expressed from an appropriate plasmid and tested for CDP-alcohol hydrolase activity. UshAEc and UshAYi behaved similarly. Besides being the first study of a UshA enzyme in the genus Yersinia, this work adds CDP-alcohol hydrolase to the spectrum of UshA activities and offers a novel perspective on these proteins, which are viewed here for the first time as highly efficient enzymes with kcat/Km ratios near the theoretical maximum level of catalytic activities. The results are discussed in the light of the known structures of UshAEc conformers and the respective homology models constructed for UshAYi, and also in relation to possible biological functions. Interestingly, every Yersinia species with a sequenced genome contains an intact ushA gene, except Y. pestis, which in all its sequenced biovars contains a ushA gene inactivated by frameshift mutations. PMID:18641143

  19. The ail gene is present in some Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Leila M; Hallanvuo, Saija; Haukka, Kaisa; Skurnik, Mikael; Siitonen, Anja

    2011-03-01

    One chromosomal virulence marker of Yersinia is the gene ail, which encodes Ail, an outer membrane protein that promotes attachment and invasion. A high correlation has been found between the ail gene and the virulence of Yersinia. Here, we report two Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains that are usually nonpathogenic and carry the ail gene. The ail gene sequences of biotype 1A strains displayed similarity to the bioserotype 1B/O:8 strain 8081. The finding suggests that ail-based detection methods for Y. enterocolitica alone are insufficient to detect real pathogenic strains.

  20. Pseudoarthrosis in atypical femoral fracture: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, S; Bottai, V; Dell'Osso, G; De Paola, G; Ghilardi, M; Guido, G

    2013-11-01

    Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment; they have a high frequency of delayed healing. The authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy. Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment even if, in the literature, there is no clarity on the exact pathogenetic mechanism. The Task Force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research described the major and minor features to define atypical fractures and recommends that all the five major features must be present while minor features are not necessary. Another controversial aspect regarding the atypical femoral fractures is the higher frequency of the delayed healing that can be probably related to a suppressed bone turnover caused by a prolonged period of bisphosphonates treatment. This concept could be corroborated by the Spet Tc exam. In the case of a pseudoarthrosis, there is not a standardization of the treatment. In this report, the authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy; the patient was studied with clinical, bioumoral end SPECT-Tc exam of both femurs. Many studies show the relationship between bisphosphonates and the presence of atypical fractures. These fractures should be monitored more closely due to the risk of nonunion and they require considering an initial treatment with pharmacological augmentation to reduce the complications for the patient and the health care costs.

  1. Directional gene flow and ecological separation in Yersinia enterocolitica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Sandra; Corander, Jukka; de Been, Mark; Harris, Simon; Cheng, Lu; Hall, Miquette; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide. Recent work defining the phylogeny of the genus Yersinia subdivided Y. enterocolitica into six distinct phylogroups. Here, we provide detailed analyses of the evolutionary processes leading to the emergence of these phylogroups. The dominant phylogroups isolated from human infections, PG3–5, show very little diversity at the sequence level, but do present marked patterns of gain and loss of functions, including those involved in pathogenicity and metabolism, including the acquisition of phylogroup-specific O-antigen loci. We tracked gene flow across the species in the core and accessory genome, and show that the non-pathogenic PG1 strains act as a reservoir for diversity, frequently acting as donors in recombination events. Analysis of the core and accessory genome also suggested that the different Y. enterocolitica phylogroups may be ecologically separated, in contrast to the long-held belief of common shared ecological niches across the Y. enterocolitica species.

  2. High prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in pig cheeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen-Ninios, Riikka; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Maijala, Riitta; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-10-01

    Samples from pork cuts for minced meat and cheeks from processing plants and a slaughterhouse, and modified atmosphere (MA) packaged pork from retail were studied to estimate the prevalence of pathogenic, i.e. virulence plasmid bearing, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in pork, as well as to quantify pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in pork cuts. Pathogenic (virF-positive) Y. enterocolitica was isolated from 17 pig cheeks (23%) but not from any of the MA-packaged 54 retail pork samples and only from one of the 155 pork cut (0.6%). Most (16/17) of the cheek samples were contaminated with pathogenic Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 and one with bioserotype 2/O:9. No Y. pseudotuberculosis was isolated. The prevalence of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica was clearly higher (39%) in 155 pork cuts when studied with nested PCR targeting yadA on the virulence plasmid pYV although the contamination level was low varying between 0.1 and 1.6 MPN/g. Raw pork cuts and especially pig cheeks may serve as possible sources for yersiniosis caused by pathogenic Y. enterocolitica.

  3. Bisphosphonate-associated atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Ely A; Banks, Kevin P; Vroman, Penny J

    2015-03-01

    Bisphosphonates help prevent progressive bone mineralization loss and subsequent osteoporotic fractures. However, long-term bisphosphonate therapy paradoxically increases the risk of a unique injury called an atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture. Despite this, the benefits of bisphosphonates outweigh the risks, because far more pathologic fractures are prevented than induced. The early identification of atypical subtrochanteric femur fractures is important as there is high associated morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of a 76-y-old woman with a completed bisphosphonate-associated atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture.

  4. Unique activity spectrum of colicin FY: all 110 characterized Yersinia enterocolitica isolates were colicin FY susceptible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosák, Juraj; Micenková, Lenka; Vrba, Martin; Ševčíková, Alena; Dědičová, Daniela; Garzetti, Debora; Šmajs, David

    2013-01-01

    Colicin FY is a plasmid encoded toxin that recognizes a yersinia-specific outer membrane protein (YiuR) as a receptor molecule. We have previously shown that the activity spectrum of colicin FY comprises strains of the genus Yersinia. In this study, we analyzed the activity of colicin FY against 110 Yersinia enterocolitica isolates differing in geographical origin and source. All isolates were characterized through analysis of 16S rRNA genes, serotyping, biotyping, restriction profiling of genomic DNA, detection of virulence markers and susceptibility to antibiotics. This confirmed the broad variability of the collection, in which all 110 Y. enterocolitica isolates, representing 77 various strains, were inhibited by colicin FY. Although isolates showed variable levels of susceptibility to colicin FY, it was not associated with any strain characteristic. The universal susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica strains to colicin FY together with the absence of activity towards strains outside the Yersinia genus suggests potential therapeutic applications for colicin FY.

  5. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  6. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...

  7. Atypical presentations of Wolframs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary or sporadic neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD. The classically described presentation is of insulin-dependent diabetes, followed by optic atrophy, central diabetes insipidus, and sensory neural deafness. Also included are less well-described presentations of Wolframs syndrome. We here present three cases of atypical presentation of this syndrome. Case 1: A 15-year-old boy with insulin-dependent diabetes was presented for evaluation of depressive symptoms associated with suicidal tendency. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are described with Wolframs syndrome, and wolframin gene, in recessive inheritance, is associated with psychiatric illnesses without other manifestations of Wolframs syndrome. Case 2: A 17-year-old diabetic boy on insulin with good control of blood sugar presented for evaluation of delayed puberty. Central hypogonadism and other anterior pituitary hormone dysfunctions are the less publicized hormone dysfunctions in Wolframs syndrome. Case 3: A 23-year-old female who was on insulin for diabetes for the past 14 years, got admitted for evaluation of sudden loss of vision. This patient had developed a vitreous hemorrhage and, on evaluation, was found to have optic atrophy, sensory neural hearing loss, and diabetes insipidus, and presented differently from the gradual loss of vision described in Wolframs syndrome. Conclusion: Wolframs syndrome being a multisystem degenerative disorder can have myriad other manifestations than the classically described features. Neuropsychiatric manifestations, depression with suicidal risk, central hypogonadism, and secondary adrenal insufficiency are among the less well-described manifestations of this syndrome.

  8. Atypical presentations of neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system classically characterized by acute, severe episodes of optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. The identification of an autoantibody exclusively detected in NMO patients against aquaporin-4 (AQP-4 has allowed identification of cases beyond the classical phenotype. Brain lesions, once thought as infrequent, can be observed in NMO patients, but lesions have different characteristics from the ones seen in multiple sclerosis. Additionally, some AQP-4 antibody positive patients may present with a variety of symptoms not being restricted to optic neuritis and acute myelitis during the first attack or in a relapse. Examples are not limited to, but may include patients only with brain and/or brainstem lesions, narcolepsy with hypothalamic lesions or patients with intractable hiccups, nausea and vomiting. The prompt identification of NMO patients with atypical presentations may benefit these patients with institution of early treatment to reduce disability and prevent further attacks.

  9. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS FROM SCRATCH TO THE PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chauhan*, Amit Mittal, Pradeep Kumar Arora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental illness constitutes the second-largest disease burden in the United States. Psychosis is one of the most common and severe mental illnesses. It is an extremely devastating condition characterised by delusions, hallucinations, distortion of thoughts and deteriorating social functioning experiences. Psychosis in all human societies has approximately same incidence of occurrence as in accordance to “anthropo-parity principle.” It has large economic impact on various aspects of cognition, health, and quality of life which has devastated effects on its sufferers and facing them large economic burden. Psychosis (Schizophrenia is associated with an imbalance of the dopaminergic system, entailing hyper-stimulation of dopamine function in the brain, particularly in the mesolimbic pathway. Consequences of antipsychotic treatment are far reaching and expensive. Detrimental extrapyramidal side effects associated with conventional antipsychotics and non-compliance among patients limits long term treatment with conventional antipsychotics. It gives rise to a new class, atypical antipsychotics owning low propensity to cause EPS, efficacy against refractory cases and better control over negative symptoms, better tolerance and compliance along with lower relapse rate and safer adverse effect profile. Atypical antipsychotics have revolutionized the treatment of psychosis, now being the treatment of choice for patients with psychosis. The positive therapeutic experience with the atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of psychosis and their favourable effects outweighs their unfavourable adverse effects. Though atypical antipsychotics are widely prescribed in the treatment of schizophrenia, however not a single atypical antipsychotic drug having any exceptional efficacy and safety profile. Thus, there is still a lot of research needed to be carried out in the development of novel atypical antipsychotics. This review is comprehensive appraisal about

  10. Ileitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica - X-ray differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Hering, L.; Tanneberger, D.

    1981-12-01

    The article gives a brief description of the characteristic features of the clinical and roentgenological course and the various stages of enteritis caused by Yersinia. Basing on three cases of ileitis caused by Yersinia, the far-reaching similarity with the early changes and even the advanced stages of Crohn's diseases are demonstrated. Attention is drawn to the possibilities of differentiating between the two disease patterns.

  11. Enzymatic degradation of polygalacturonic acid by Yersinia and Klebsiella species in relation to clinical laboratory procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, M P; Chatterjee, A K; Starr, P B; Buchanan, G E

    1977-10-01

    As scored by several specified plating procedures, clinical and environmental strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae "Oxytocum" showed detectable, albeit generally weak, ability to digest polygalacturonic (pectic) acid. None of these bacterial strains had the vigorous and rapid pectolytic activity on these polygalacturonic acid-containing media that is typical of soft-rot Erwinia species, although some of the Oxytocum strains came fairly close. Analyses of the pectolytic enzyme contents of the cells and culture supernatants of the Yersinia and Klebsiella species revealed that readily detectable quantities of cell-bound polygalacturonic acid trans-eliminase and hydrolytic polygalacturonase were formed by the Yersinia and Klebsiella species; however, the total units of enzyme activity produced by these bacteria were, in general, lower than were produced by soft-rot Erwinia species. Furthermore, unlike the situation in soft-rot Erwinia cultures, these pectolytic enzymes of Yersinia and Klebsiella species were not excreted rapidly and massively into the growth medium. Cultures of other enterobacteria (Citrobacter species, Enterobacter species, Erwinia amylovora, Erwinia herbicola, Escherichia coli, Proteus species, Salmonella typhimurium, and Serratia marcescens) showed no pectolytic ability whatsoever by any of the plating procedures used and (to the extent they were so examined) produced no pectolytic enzymes detectable either in their cells or culture supernatants. This slow or weak release of pectolytic enzymes by Yersinia and Klebsiella species has a bearing on clinical laboratory procedures suitable for detecting their pectolytic activity; methods adequate for this purpose are detailed.

  12. Differentiation of Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A from pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica biotypes by detection of β-glucosidase activity: comparison of two chromogenic culture media and Vitek2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhukorpi, Jari; Päivänurmi, Marjut

    2014-01-01

    Aesculin hydrolysis (ESC) is one of the key reactions in differentiating pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica biotypes 1B, 2, 3, 4 and 5 from the less-pathogenic biotype 1A. Because the ESC reaction is caused by β-glucosidase (βGLU) activity of the bacteria, we studied whether two commonly used methods (BBL CHROMagar Orientation and Vitek2 Gram-negative identification card) could be used in assessing βGLU activity of 74 Yersinia strains. Both methods were sensitive (100 % and 97 %) and specific (100 % and 100 %) in differentiating βGLU-positive YE BT1A from βGLU-negative Y. enterocolitica biotypes. For a subset of strains (n = 69), a new selective CHROMagar Yersinia showed excellent agreement with the strains' βGLU activity. Thus all the methods evaluated in this study may be used to differentiate between YE BT1A and other Y. enterocolitica biotypes.

  13. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jakobovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 14-year-old girl, who was 13 y after liver transplantation for biliary atresia with an unremarkable postoperative course. She presented with fever of up to 40°C, extreme fatigue, malaise, anorexia, and occasional vomiting. On physical examination the only finding was splenomegaly. Lab results showed hyperglobulinemia and an elevated sedimentation rate. Liver function tests were normal except for mild elevation of γGTP. Abdominal U/S and CT demonstrated an enlarged spleen with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes enlargement. An exhaustive evaluation for infectious causes, autoimmune conditions, and malignancy was negative. A full recovery after 5 months prompted testing for self-limited infectious etiologies. Yersinia enterocolitica infection was diagnosed.

  14. Nod2 mediates susceptibility to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Meinzer

    Full Text Available Nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (NOD2 is a component of the innate immunity known to be involved in the homeostasis of Peyer patches (PPs in mice. However, little is known about its role during gut infection in vivo. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis, adenolymphitis and septicaemia which is able to invade its host through PPs. We investigated the role of Nod2 during Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Death was delayed in Nod2 deleted and Crohn's disease associated Nod2 mutated mice orogastrically inoculated with Y. pseudotuberculosis. In PPs, the local immune response was characterized by a higher KC level and a more intense infiltration by neutrophils and macrophages. The apoptotic and bacterial cell counts were decreased. Finally, Nod2 deleted mice had a lower systemic bacterial dissemination and less damage of the haematopoeitic organs. This resistance phenotype was lost in case of intraperitoneal infection. We concluded that Nod2 contributes to the susceptibility to Y. pseudotuberculosis in mice.

  15. Susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica to UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, R.C.; Lund, V.; Carlson, D.A.

    1987-02-01

    Two enteric pathogens, Campylobacter jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica serogroup O:3, together with Escherichia coli, were investigated for susceptibility to UV radiation at 254 nm. The UV dose required for a 3-log reduction (99.9% inactivation) of C. jejuni, Y. enterocolitica, and E. coli was 1.8, 2.7, and 5.0 mWs/cm2, respectively. Using E. coli as the basis for comparison, it appears that C. jejuni and Y. enterocolitica serogroup O:3 are more sensitive to UV than many of the pathogens associated with waterborne disease outbreaks and can be easily inactivated in most commercially available UV reactors. No association was found between the sensitivity of Y. enterocolitica to UV and the presence of a 40- to 50-megadalton virulence plasmid.

  16. Presence of Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in wild boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannö, A; Aspán, A; Hestvik, G; Jacobson, M

    2014-12-01

    The European wild boar populations are growing and spreading to new areas, which might constitute a threat to public health, since wild boar can harbour pathogens with the potential to cause serious illness in humans. Tonsils, ileocaecal lymph nodes and faecal samples were collected from 88 Swedish wild boars and analysed for the presence of the zoonotic pathogens Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). A combination of cultivation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used and overall, 20% of sampled individuals tested positive for Y. enterocolitica, 20% for Y. pseudotuberculosis and 10% for Salmonella spp. A total of 41% of sampled individuals tested positive for one or more of these three pathogens. No EHEC were detected. Samples PCR-positive for Salmonella spp. were cultivated further and six isolates were obtained, belonging to Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica and subspecies diarizone. The pathogens were most commonly detected in tonsil samples.

  17. Clinical Presentation of Atypical Genital Herpes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 梁沛杨; 罗北京

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To make a clinical analysis on the basis of 36cases of atypical genital herpes (GH) patients. Methods: Thirty-six cases of atypical GH were diagnosedclinically, and their case histories, symptoms and signs wererecorded in detail and followed up. Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was adopted for testing HSV2-DNA with cotton-tippedswabs. Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) forserum anti-HSV2-IgM was done to establish a definfiivediagnosis. Other diagnoses were excluded at the same time bytesting for related pathogens including fungi, Chlamydia,Mycoplasma, Treponema pallidum, gonococci, Trichomonas,etc. Results: The main clinical manifestations of atypical GHwere: (1) small genital ulcers; (2) inflammation of urethralmeatus; (3) nonspecific genital erythema; (4) papuloid noduleson the glands; (5) nonspecific vaginitis. Twenty-three cases(64%) tested by PCR were HSV2-DNA sera-positive, and 36cases (100 %) anti-HSV2-IgM sera-positive by ELISA. Conclusion: atypical HSV is difficult to be diagnosed. Butthe combination of PCR and ELIAS will be helpful to thediagnosis of atypical HSV.

  18. Atypical aging in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Warren B

    2013-01-01

    divided into two sections. The first section will review typical and atypical aging patterns in somatic issues in elder adults with DS; the second section will review the multifaceted relationship between AD and DS.

  19. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, Debra K

    2003-01-01

    A review of the English literature confirms that neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) occurs with both traditional and atypical antipsychotic medications. Published reports of NMS induced by the traditional antipsychotics have given the practitioner valuable information on the prevention and treatment of this adverse effect. Case reports have also been published concerning NMS and clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. By evaluating the case reports of atypical antipsychotic-induced NMS, valuable information may be obtained concerning similarities or differences from that induced by the traditional antipsychotics. The case reports of NMS with atypical antipsychotics were evaluated for diagnosis, age/sex of patient, risk factors, antipsychotic doses and duration of use, symptoms of NMS, and clinical course.

  20. [Atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Beata R; Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Marmurowska-Michałowska, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Introduction of a new group of antipsychotic drugs, called atypical because of the proprieties differing them from classical neuroleptics, gave hope for the beginning of a new era in treatment of psychoses, including schizophrenia. Different mechanisms of action not only resulted in a broader spectrum of action and high efficacy but also in a relative lack of extrapiramidal symptoms. However, atypical neuroleptics are not totally free from adverse effects. Symptoms such as sedation, metabolic changes and weight gain, often very quick and severe - present also in the case of classical drugs, but put to the background by extrapiramidal symptoms--have become prominent. Weight gain is important both from the clinical and subjective point of view--as associated with serious somatic consequences and as a source of enormous mental distress. These problems are addressed in this review, with the focus on weight gain associated with the use of specific atypical neuroleptics.

  1. Atypical RNAs in the coelacanth transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Anne; Doose, Gero; Tafer, Hakim; Robinson, Mark; Saha, Nil Ratan; Gerdol, Marco; Canapa, Adriana; Hoffmann, Steve; Amemiya, Chris T; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-09-01

    Circular and apparently trans-spliced RNAs have recently been reported as abundant types of transcripts in mammalian transcriptome data. Both types of non-colinear RNAs are also abundant in RNA-seq of different tissue from both the African and the Indonesian coelacanth. We observe more than 8,000 lincRNAs with normal gene structure and several thousands of circularized and trans-spliced products, showing that such atypical RNAs form a substantial contribution to the transcriptome. Surprisingly, the majority of the circularizing and trans-connecting splice junctions are unique to atypical forms, that is, are not used in normal isoforms.

  2. Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Yersinia Species Isolated From Chicken and Beef Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamohammad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Foodborne diseases are widespread and growing public health problem in developed and developing countries. There are many microorganisms act as etiological agents for foodborne diseases such as Campylobacter spp., Listeria, Staphylococcos, Salmonella, Bacillus, Yersinia spp. High prevalence of gastrointestinal illness, including fatal cases attributable to yersiniosis, is also observed in many developing countries. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica and other Yersinia species in meat and chicken samples in various seasons and to determine their antibiotic resistance profile. Materials and Methods To investigate the prevalence of Yersinia spp., a total of 450 samples, including chicken (n = 226 and beef meat (n = 224 were collected from supermarkets in Tehran. All samples were transported on ice to the laboratory and microbiological analysis was carried out within 2 hours after the collection. Susceptibility testing of bacterial strains was according to CLSI guideline at 28˚C by the disk diffusion assay. Results From a total of 450 samples, (226 chickens and 224 beef meats, 70 (15.5% samples were positive for Yersinia spp. Of these isolates, (80% 56 species were identified as Y. enterocolitica, 8 (11% as Y. frederiksenii, 5 (7% as Y. intermedia and 1 (1.4% as Y. kristensenii. The highest rate of resistance was seen against cephalotin (98%, and ampicillin (52%. However, gentamicin and chloramphenicol were the most active antibiotics against the target cultures. Considering the season of isolation, Yersinia spp. were frequently isolated in autumn (52%, followed by spring (29%. Conclusions Y. enterocolitica was the most spp. distributed among other species. Many factors, such as isolation assay, season, and geographical location play critical role in reports of increase or decrease in the prevalence of the Yersinia spp. all over the world. Our findings demonstrate that the

  3. Cold Shock Proteins: a Minireview with Special Emphasis on Csp-family of Enteropathogenic Yersinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Keto-Timonen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms for coping with stress and adapting to changing environmental conditions. Many bacteria produce small cold shock proteins (Csp as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock. During cold shock, the cell membrane fluidity and enzyme activity decrease, and the efficiency of transcription and translation is reduced due to stabilization of nucleic acid secondary structures. Moreover, protein folding is inefficient and ribosome function is hampered. Csps are thought to counteract these harmful effects by serving as nucleic acid chaperons that may prevent the formation of secondary structures in mRNA at low temperature and thus facilitate the initiation of translation. However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal growth and stress adaptation responses. Csps have been shown to contribute to osmotic, oxidative, starvation, pH and ethanol stress tolerance as well as to host cell invasion. Therefore, Csps seem to have a wider role in stress tolerance of bacteria than previously assumed. Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are enteropathogens that can spread through foodstuffs and cause an enteric infection called yersiniosis. Enteropathogenic Yersinia are psychrotrophs that are able to grow at temperatures close to 0ºC and thus they set great challenges for the modern food industry. To be able to efficiently control psychrotrophic Yersinia during food production and storage, it is essential to understand the functions and roles of Csps in stress response of enteropathogenic Yersinia.

  4. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of Yersinia infection in the north of the Volga-Vyatka region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Bondarenkо

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective: to describe clinical and epidemiological picture of Yersinia infection in the Kirov region.Materials and methods: the study included 40 patients, ranging in age from 17 to 69 years: 36 patients with a diagnosis of yersiniosis, 4 – pseudotuberculosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by the method of indirect hemagglutination Yersinia and pseudotuberculosis diagnosis.Results of research: Yersinia infection in the Kirov region in all cases was accompanied by intoxication. Catarrhal syndrome and rash was detected in 2/3 of patients. Generalized form of the disease was characterized by liver disease in most patients. Almost half of the patients had lesions of the musculoskeletal system and the effects of gastroenteritis were recorded in 35% of cases. Factor for the development of chronic Yersinia infection is burdened premorbid background.Conclusion: For the prevention of adverse outcomes Yersinia infection requires a comprehensive approach to the treatment of patients with severe premorbid background. Such patients should be allocated to risk group. Subsequent clinical supervision must be exercised within a period of 1 year with doctors of other specialties.

  5. Behavior of Yersinia enterocolitica in the presence of the bacterivorous Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, E; Baré, J; Van Damme, I; Bert, W; Sabbe, K; Houf, K

    2013-10-01

    Free-living protozoa play an important role in the ecology and epidemiology of human-pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the interaction between Yersinia enterocolitica, an important food-borne pathogen, and the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was studied. Several cocultivation assays were set up to assess the resistance of Y. enterocolitica to A. castellanii predation and the impact of environmental factors and bacterial strain-specific characteristics. Results showed that all Y. enterocolitica strains persist in association with A. castellanii for at least 14 days, and associations with A. castellanii enhanced survival of Yersinia under nutrient-rich conditions at 25°C and under nutrient-poor conditions at 37°C. Amoebae cultivated in the supernatant of one Yersinia strain showed temperature- and time-dependent permeabilization. Intraprotozoan survival of Y. enterocolitica depended on nutrient availability and temperature, with up to 2.8 log CFU/ml bacteria displaying intracellular survival at 7°C for at least 4 days in nutrient-rich medium. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to locate the Yersinia cells inside the amoebae. As Yersinia and Acanthamoeba share similar ecological niches, this interaction identifies a role of free-living protozoa in the ecology and epidemiology of Y. enterocolitica.

  6. Detection of Yersinia spp and Salmonella spp. in apparently healthy cats and dogs in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shabnam hashemi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Companion animals, such as cat and dog, are potential sources of transmissible diseases to humans, especially children. They harbor zoonotic agents in gastrointestinal tracts as carriers which are capable of infecting their owners. Salmonella and Yersinia bacteria are considered as frequent causes of illness in children. This study was aimed at finding out the prevalence rate of infection in apparently healthy dogs and cats in Tehran, Iran. Materials and methods: A total of 100 rectal swabs from dogs and cats were analyzed by a multiplex PCR method with specific primers for detection of Yersinia and Salmonella species. Results: Fifteen samples (4 cats and 11 dogs were positive for Yersinia and 20 samples (9 cats and 11 dogs were positive for Salmonella. So the prevalence rate of Yersinia was 8% in cats and 22% in dogs and the prevalence rates of Salmonella were 18 and 22% in cats and dogs respectively. Discussion and conclusion: According to the results, Yersinia and Salmonella were detected in 8- 22% of pet animals without any clinical signs. The contaminated animal foods may be the main source of infection. These results may be useful in planning control and preventive programs. 

  7. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria, Salmonella, and Yersinia species isolates in ducks and geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Radmehr, Behrad; Ismail, Salmah

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria, Salmonella, and Yersinia spp. isolated from duck and goose intestinal contents. A total of 471 samples, including 291 duck and 180 goose intestinal contents, were purchased from wet markets between November 2008 and July 2010. Listeria, Salmonella, and Yersinia spp. were isolated from 58 (12.3%), 107 (22.7%), and 80 (17%) of the samples, respectively. It was concluded that Listeria ivanovii, Salmonella Thompson, and Yersinia enterocolitica were the predominant serovars among Listeria, Salmonella, and Yersinia spp., respectively. Moreover, resistance to tetracycline was common in Listeria (48.3%) and Salmonella spp. (63.6%), whereas 51.3% of the Yersinia spp. isolates were resistant to cephalothin. Therefore, continued surveillance of the prevalence of the pathogens and also of emerging antibiotic resistance is needed to render possible the recognition of foods that may represent risks and also ensure the effective treatment of listeriosis, salmonellosis, and yersiniosis.

  8. Biochemical and molecular studies of atypical nevi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwpoort, Arno Frans van

    2011-01-01

    The results obtained in this thesis suggest that the most explicit differences between normal and atypical melanocytes are subtle changes in pigment biosynthesis and the functioning of the antioxidant system. Impairment of the antioxidant system and increased levels of pheomelanin result in increase

  9. Non-diabetic atypical necrobiosis lipoidica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One 8 year female child had asymptomatic, anaesthetic, hypohidrotic, atrophic, yellowish, waxy plaque on the front of left thigh since 2 months. No nerve thickening was observed clinically or histopathologically. Hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, epidermal atrophy, degeneration of collagen, mononuclear granulomas and perivascular mononuclear infiltrate confirmed the clinical diagnosis of atypical necrobiosis lipoidica.

  10. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  11. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  12. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  13. Atypical fractures on long term bisphosphonates therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussein, W

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates reduce fractures risk in patients with osteoporosis. A new pattern of fractures is now being noted in patients on prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. We report a case of an atypical femoral fracture with preceding pain and highlight the characteristics of these fractures.

  14. Atypical visuomotor performance in children with PDD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlooz, W.A.J.M.; Hulstijn, W.

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9–12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome), a

  15. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  16. Susceptibilité de Rattus norvegicus et Rattus rattus frugivurus de la ville de Recife à la Pasteurella pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva A. de Mello

    1968-06-01

    Full Text Available L'auíeur a vérifié la susceptibilité de deux espèces de rongeurs domestiques de la ville de Recife. Etat du Pernambuco, R. norvegicus et Rattus rattus frugivurus, les comparant aux souris albinos de la souche "Swiss" avec deux souches de P. pestis dont une était isolée au municipe d'Exu, Etat du Pernambuco âenommée PEXU 19 et Vautre provenante du Venezuela dite RANGEL. Les deux espèces de rongeurs ont montré une resistence modérée par rapport aux deux souches de P. pestis tandis que les souris ont révélé d'être hautement susceptibles.

  17. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  18. Autologous /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled granulocytes in Yersinia infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Boerner, W.; Fischbach, W.

    1985-04-01

    Autologous /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled granulocytes have proved to be valuable for the localization of inflammatory bowel diseases, especially Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Other rare inflammatory bowel diseases also yield positive /sup 111/In scans. One case of Yersinia infection of the terminal ileum (Yersinia enterocolitica) showing an accumulation of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled granulocytes 0.5, 4, and 24 h after the reinjection of the labeled cells is described. The 4-day fecal excretion of /sup 111/In-oxine granulocytes showed a slight inflammatory activity of the terminal ileum. One negative scan is reported in a cotrimoxazole-treated patient with Yersinia infection.

  19. Diet type and challenge by Yersinia Ruckeri influence the intestinal microbiota in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Dalsgaard, Inger; Jørgensen, L. von Gersdorff

    In warm-blooded animals such as humans and pigs the intestinal microbial composition is dependent on the type of ingested diet. It is known that it also influences the immune system and prevent colonization of pathogenic bacteria. The question is if the gut microbiota has the same impact in lower....... These ‘high Yersinia level’ fish had a significantly lower amount of reads from the order Burkholderiales relative to the ‘low Yersinia level’ fish and non-infected control fish. Further, the ‘high Yersinia level’ fish further clustered separately when analyzing the bacterial community on a PCA plot...... indicate that the gut microbiota in rainbow trout, like in warm-blooded animals, is highly plastic according to the type of diet and does also seem to be involved in the immunological response in connection to pathogenic challenge....

  20. First report: Yersinia enterocolitica recovered from canine tonsils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brenda P; Drummond, Niall; Ringwood, Tamara; O'Sullivan, Edmund; Buckley, James F; Whyte, Paul; Prentice, Mike B; Fanning, Séamus

    2010-12-15

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is a known zoonotic pathogen and is often found in pig tonsils as the primary site of colonisation. In this study we investigated whether or not Y. enterocolitica could be recovered from canine tonsils. During a study on the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in animal populations in Ireland, 144 canine tonsils and 72 canine rectal swabs were procured over a ten-month period and subjected to microbiological examination for the presence of this human pathogen. Molecular methods were used to determine virulence and all strains were negative for the chromosomally mediated virulence factor (ail) and plasmid-encoded adhesion molecule (pYad). Y. enterocolitica was recovered from 25 of 216 (12%) samples. Twenty-four strains were from tonsils along with one from a rectal swab. All were biotype 1A. Antimicrobial resistance profiling showed two of 25 (8%) were resistant to cephalothin and the remaining strains were resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin with six of these additionally resistant to streptomycin. Our evidence that a human pathogen may be harboured in the oral cavity of dogs' adds a new dimension to the epidemiology of this organism, identifying a potential public health risk following exposure to dogs.

  1. Prevalence of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in Finnish Slaughter Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahikainen Ibañez, T; Laukkanen-Ninios, R; Hakkinen, M; Johansson, T; Vilar, M; Korkeala, H

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica was determined in tonsil and intestinal content samples from 388 healthy fattening pigs at the four biggest Finnish slaughterhouses. These slaughterhouses process 73% of pigs in Finland. Tonsil samples were tested by PCR targeted for yadA, and intestinal samples were cultured. All pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates represented bioserotype 4/O:3. The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsil samples was 60% (95% confidence limit, 55.4 to 65.1%), and its prevalence in intestinal samples was 26% (95% confidence limit, 22.1 to 31.2%). The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsil and intestinal samples varied between the four slaughterhouses. The tonsil prevalence of Y. enterocolitica was higher in slaughterhouse B, and the prevalence in intestinal content was higher in slaughterhouse C. There were more positive results in both tonsil and intestinal samples in pigs coming from fattening farms than in pigs coming from farrowing-and-fattening farms. A seasonal variation was observed in the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in intestinal samples, with the highest prevalence during July and August, but no seasonal variation was detected in tonsil samples.

  2. Acute encephalopathy and tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, Hiroshi; Kamei, Koichi; Ogura, Masao; Kikuchi, Eriko; Hoshino, Hideki; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Abe, Jun; Ito, Shuichi

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a 28-month-old boy with encephalopathy and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis possibly associated with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yp) infection. He was transferred to our center because of impairment of renal function and altered consciousness. He had fever for 5 days after recurrent vomiting and diarrhea. Computed tomography scan was normal, but electroencephalogram (EEG) analyses showed generalized slow wave patterns. Continuous hemodialysis was undergone and then his renal function was improved, but altered consciousness persisted. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) revealed abnormally low signals at entire field, which suggested that he was suffered from encephalopathy. Phenobarbital administration and post-encephalopathy rehabilitation were started, and he recovered in fully premorbid state with normal EEG and SPECT findings on the 33rd hospital day. Various bacterial cultures were negative, but both Yp antibody and Yp-derived mitogen (YPM) antibody, the antibody of a specific Yp exotoxin, had an extremely high titer. This is the first report of encephalopathy potentially caused by Yp, indicated by the presence of a high Yp and YPM antibody titer.

  3. Isolation and Pathogenicity Analyses onYersinia enterocoliticafrom Pelteobagrus vachelli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jing; Wang Li

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia enterocoliticais an important zoonotic pathogen that can induce disease outbreaks in a wide host range. Strain YER6022 was isolated fromPelteobagrus vachelli and identified using bacterial morphology and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Five virulence factors were detected, then artificial infection experiment and histopathological method were carried out. These results showed that strain YER6022 was one ofY. enterocolitica family members. In addition,ail,ystb,virF,yadA andHPIintwere dectected. In artificial infection experiment, with 80% mortality and 100% morbidity, injectedPelteobagrus vachellisshowed red swollen of the anus, abdomen swelling and fim bleeding. There existed serious hyperaemia and edema in kidney, spleen, intestine and liver at the light microscope. Ultrastructural observation indicated that mitochondria of the liver, kidney, spleen and intestine swelled and mitochondrial cristae broke. The data had further shed light on its pathogenicity inPelteobagrus vachelli. It would benefit for further studies on pathogenesis ofPelteobagrus vachelli infected withY. enterocolitica.

  4. The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Yersinia enterocolitica strain 8081.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Thomson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The human enteropathogen, Yersinia enterocolitica, is a significant link in the range of Yersinia pathologies extending from mild gastroenteritis to bubonic plague. Comparison at the genomic level is a key step in our understanding of the genetic basis for this pathogenicity spectrum. Here we report the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (serotype 0:8; biotype 1B and extensive microarray data relating to the genetic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica species. Our analysis reveals that the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 is a patchwork of horizontally acquired genetic loci, including a plasticity zone of 199 kb containing an extraordinarily high density of virulence genes. Microarray analysis has provided insights into species-specific Y. enterocolitica gene functions and the intraspecies differences between the high, low, and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotypes. Through comparative genome sequence analysis we provide new information on the evolution of the Yersinia. We identify numerous loci that represent ancestral clusters of genes potentially important in enteric survival and pathogenesis, which have been lost or are in the process of being lost, in the other sequenced Yersinia lineages. Our analysis also highlights large metabolic operons in Y. enterocolitica that are absent in the related enteropathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, indicating major differences in niche and nutrients used within the mammalian gut. These include clusters directing, the production of hydrogenases, tetrathionate respiration, cobalamin synthesis, and propanediol utilisation. Along with ancestral gene clusters, the genome of Y. enterocolitica has revealed species-specific and enteropathogen-specific loci. This has provided important insights into the pathology of this bacterium and, more broadly, into the evolution of the genus. Moreover, wider investigations looking at the patterns of gene loss and gain in the Yersinia have highlighted common

  5. Multiple hepatic abscesses due to Yersinia enterocolitica infection secondary to primary haemochromatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, T K; Vinding, K; Hey, H

    2001-01-01

    A case of hepatic abscesses due to Yersinia enterocolitica in an immunocompetent male is presented. Re-examination after 3 months showed that the patient had primary haemochromatosis. Treatment with repeated phlebotomies was instituted. Two years after the patient was first admitted to hospital. 17...... showed that prior to this case only 45 cases of hepatic abscess secondary to Yersinia enterocolitica have been registered. Of the 45 reported cases, 64% had underlying haemochromatosis and 29% had diabetes mellitus. The overall mortality was 31%. Mortality before 1987 was 60% (n = 20) and since 1987...

  6. Early manifestation of Yersinia colitis demonstrated by the double-contrast barium enema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspestrand, F.

    1986-11-01

    A 19-year old female with a bloody, diarrheal illness of acute onset where Crohn's disease primarly was suspected is presented. The double-contrast barium enema revealed multiple, diffusely scattered aphthous erosions of the colonic mucosa: the rectum was scarcely affected. Biopsies taken by endoscopy demonstrated nonspecific inflammatory changes of the mucous membrane. However, routinely taken stool cultures revealed an infectious colitis due to Yersinia enterocolitica. Our case demonstrates the necessity to consider Yersinia enterocolitis in the radiographic differential diagnosis when the diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis seems obvious.

  7. Bacterial resistance to complement killing mediated by the Ail protein of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    OpenAIRE

    Bliska, J B; Falkow, S

    1992-01-01

    Ail is a 17-kDa outer membrane Yersinia protein that mediates bacterial attachment to, and invasion of, cultured epithelial cells. We report here an alternative role for Ail in the pathogenesis of Yersinia infection. We found that Escherichia coli HB101 harboring the 4-kilobase recombinant ail clone pVM102 were highly resistant to killing in up to 50% normal human serum. A 674-base-pair fragment of DNA from pVM102, which encodes the ail gene, was inserted into pUC18 and shown to promote full ...

  8. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Deepti; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Bhat, M Ramesh; Srinath, M K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  9. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti D′Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  10. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  11. A Precise Temperature-Responsive Bistable Switch Controlling Yersinia Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes; Bücker, René; Herbst, Katharina; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Pisano, Fabio; Wittmann, Christoph; Münch, Richard; Müller, Johannes; Jahn, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Different biomolecules have been identified in bacterial pathogens that sense changes in temperature and trigger expression of virulence programs upon host entry. However, the dynamics and quantitative outcome of this response in individual cells of a population, and how this influences pathogenicity are unknown. Here, we address these questions using a thermosensing virulence regulator of an intestinal pathogen (RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis) as a model. We reveal that this regulator is part of a novel thermoresponsive bistable switch, which leads to high- and low-invasive subpopulations within a narrow temperature range. The temperature range in which bistability is observed is defined by the degradation and synthesis rate of the regulator, and is further adjustable via a nutrient-responsive regulator. The thermoresponsive switch is also characterized by a hysteretic behavior in which activation and deactivation occurred on vastly different time scales. Mathematical modeling accurately mirrored the experimental behavior and predicted that the thermoresponsiveness of this sophisticated bistable switch is mainly determined by the thermo-triggered increase of RovA proteolysis. We further observed RovA ON and OFF subpopulations of Y. pseudotuberculosis in the Peyer’s patches and caecum of infected mice, and that changes in the RovA ON/OFF cell ratio reduce tissue colonization and overall virulence. This points to a bet-hedging strategy in which the thermoresponsive bistable switch plays a key role in adapting the bacteria to the fluctuating conditions encountered as they pass through the host’s intestinal epithelium and suggests novel strategies for the development of antimicrobial therapies. PMID:28006011

  12. Recent findings about the Yersinia enterocolitica phage shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Saori; Darwin, Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    The phage shock protein (Psp) system is a conserved extracytoplasmic stress response in bacteria that is essential for virulence of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. This article summarizes some recent findings about Y. enterocolitica Psp system function. Increased psp gene expression requires the transcription factor PspF, but under non-inducing conditions PspF is inhibited by an interaction with another protein, PspA, in the cytoplasm. A Psp-inducing stimulus causes PspA to relocate to the cytoplasmic membrane, freeing PspF to induce psp gene expression. This PspA relocation requires the integral cytoplasmic membrane proteins, PspB and PspC, which might sense an inducing trigger and sequester PspA by direct interaction. The subsequent induction of psp gene expression increases the PspA concentration, which also allows it to contact the membrane directly, perhaps for its physiological function. Mutational analysis of the PspB and PspC proteins has revealed that they both positively and negatively regulate psp gene expression and has also identified PspC domains associated with each function. We also compare the contrasting physiological roles of the Psp system in the virulence of Y. enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). In S. Typhimurium, PspA maintains the proton motive force, which provides the energy needed to drive ion importers required for survival within macrophages. In contrast, in the extracellular pathogen Y. enterocolitica, PspB and PspC, but not PspA, are the Psp components needed for virulence. PspBC protect Y. enterocolitica from damage caused by the secretin component of its type 3 secretion system, an essential virulence factor.

  13. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy in patient with Yersinia enterocolitica infection. A differential diagnosis to abdominal lymphoma; Mesenteriale Lymphadenopathie bei Infektion mit Yersinia enterocolitica. Eine Differentialdiagnose zum abdominalen Lymphom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trommer, G.; Koesling, S. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Bewer, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Thorax- und onkologische Chirurgie

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of previously undiagnosed Yersinia enterocolitica infection in a 46-year old woman. She consulted her physician because of continual weight loss and physical lassitude. A leucocytosis was found. Sonography revealed an excessive enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes. A malignant lymphoma was suspected and the patient underwent a staging by CT. There the disease was limited on mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Bone marrow biopsy and CT-guided lymph node biopsy did not confirm a systemic lymphatic disease. The patient did not undergo a special therapy. After six months, CT showed a clear regression of enlarged lymph nodes. Finally, a previous Yersinia enterocolitica infection of immunotype 03 could be proved serologically. At this time, the patient had no complaints. Diagnostic and differential diagnosis of benign abdominal lymph node enlargement are discussed based on literature. (orig.) [Deutsch] Berichtet wird der Fall einer klinisch inapperenten Yersinia-enterocolitica-Infektion bei einer 46jaehrigen Patientin, die aufgrund stetigen Gewichtsverlustes und koerperlicher Abgeschlagenheit den Hausarzt konsultierte. Dieser diagnostizierte eine Leukozytose. Die daraufhin durchgefuehrte Sonographie ergab eine massive abdominale Lymphknotenvergroesserung. Unter dem Verdacht eines malignen Lymphoms erfolgte eine computertomographische Ausbreitungsdiagnostik, die die Erkrankung auf mesenteriale und retroperitoneale Lymphknoten beschraenkt zeigte. Knochenmarkbiopsie und CT-gestuetzte Lymphknotenpunktion ergaben keinen Hinweis auf eine lymphatische Systemerkrankung. Ohne Therapie zeigte eine CT-Kontrolle nach 6 Monaten eine deutliche Regredienz der Lymphknotenschwellung. Bei der Erregersuche konnte serologisch eine zurueckliegende Infektion mit Yersinia enterocolitica, Serotyp 03, nachgewiesen werden. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war die Patientin beschwerdefrei. Anhand der Literatur werden Diagnostik und Differentialdiagnose benigner abdominaler

  14. Atypical reactive histiocytosis. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Barleta del Castillo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the case of a 50 year old chronic alcoholic and heavy smoker female that was assisted at the provincial university hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ in Cienfuegos city due to a severe adenic syndrome and who was diagnosed as a case of atypical reactive histiocytosis , problem which disappeared with the abstinence of toxic habits, improving her health.

  15. Bisphosphonate-induced atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The use of bisphosphonates (BPs) is universally accepted in the management of osteoporosis. However, a small percentage of patients have been recognised to develop atypical subtrochanteric fractures of the femur with the prolonged use of BPs. We report a rare case of bilateral insufficiency lesions in the proximal femora, where a major subtrochanteric fracture developed with a minor fall. This was successfully treated with internal fixation using proximal femoral nail.

  16. An atypical case of segmental spinal dysgenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zana, Elodie; Chalard, Francois; Sebag, Guy [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France); Mazda, Keyvan [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Paris (France)

    2005-09-01

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a complex closed dysraphism. The diagnostic criteria are: lumbar or thoracolumbar vertebral dysgenesis causing kyphosis, focal spinal cord narrowing without exiting roots, deformity of the lower limbs and paraplegia or paraparesis. We present a newborn who showed atypical features of bifocal spinal cord narrowing, without any vertebral abnormality at the proximal level. This seems to be a variant of this rare entity, whose early diagnosis is important, as surgical stabilisation of the spine is required. (orig.)

  17. Atypical presentations of methemoglobinemia from benzocaine spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantisattamo, Ekamol; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Vierra, Joseph R; Evans, Samuel J

    2011-06-01

    Widely used for local anesthesia, especially prior to endoscopic procedures, benzocaine spray is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic methemoglobinemia. The authors report an atypical case of methemoglobinemia in a woman presenting with pale skin and severe hypoxemia, after a delayed repeat exposure to benzocaine spray. Early recognition and prompt management of methemoglobinemia is needed in order to lessen morbidity and mortality from this entity.

  18. An atypical mycobacterial infection of the shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium malmoense is an acid-fast non-tuberculous organism that most commonly causes pulmonary infection. Extrapulmonary infection has also been reported. With an increased emphasis being placed on the clinical importance of this organism, especially within Europe, we report the first case of septic arthritis of the shoulder caused by this organism. We also highlight the importance of considering atypical mycobacterium infection in the differential diagnosis of shoulder infection and issues surrounding the management of this entity.

  19. Atypical manifestations of multiple myeloma: Radiological appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Thomas [Department of Radiology, St-Vincenz Hospital, Auf dem Schafsberg, D-65549 Limburg (Germany)]. E-mail: t.hess@st-vincenz.de; Egerer, Gerlinde [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kasper, Bernd [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasul, Kakil Ibrahim [Hamad Medical Center, Moha (Qatar); Goldschmidt, Hartmut [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauffmann, G.W. [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic procedures performed on patients with multiple myeloma typically reveal lytic bone lesions, osteopenia or osteoporosis, bone marrow infiltration by plasma cells as well as overproduction of immunoglobulin or light chains in the serum or urine. Skeletal manifestations are extremely variable and the unusual forms have been described extensively. Extramedullary plasma-cell tumours (plasmocytoma) are found in about 5% of newly diagnosed patients with multiple myelomas. In this paper we present eight patients with atypical forms of multiple myeloma.

  20. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  1. Pathogenesis of post-irradiation infection. 2. Role of neutrophils in the defence of irradiated rats against Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazin, H.; Platteau, B.; Bakour, R.; Janssens, M.; Wauters, G. (Universite de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium))

    1982-07-01

    Wistar R inbred rats showed a substantial mortality when they were given Yersinia enterocolitica eight days after a 6.5 Gy total body irradiation. The possibility to abolish the high susceptibility of these irradiated rats to Yersinia enterocolitica by intravenous injections of isogenic neutrophils is presented: irradiated rats injected with 7 to 10.10/sup 7/ isogenic neutrophils, by the intravenous route, just before or after the administration of Yersinia enterocolitica, were not susceptible. On the contrary, control irradiated rats, not transfused, were killed by the same bacterial challenge.

  2. Prophylactic Nailing of Incomplete Atypical Femoral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wug Oh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent reports have described the occurrence of low-energy subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures associated with long-term bisphosphonate use. Although information regarding the surgical treatment of these atypical femoral fractures is increasing, it is unclear if the preventive operation is useful in incomplete fractures. This study examined the results of preventive intramedullary nailing for incomplete atypical femoral fractures. Material and Methods. A retrospective search was conducted for patients older than 50 years receiving bisphosphonate therapy, with incomplete, nondisplaced fractures in either the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal area of the femur. Seventeen patients with a total of 20 incomplete, non-displaced lesions were included. The mean duration of bisphosphonate use was 50.5 months. Eleven of the 17 (64.7% patients had complete or incomplete fractures on the contralateral femur. All were treated with prophylactic fixation of an intramedullary (IM nail. The minimum followup was 12 months. Results. All cases healed with a mean period of 14.3 weeks. Nineteen of the 20 cases healed with the dissolution of incomplete fractures of the lateral aspect. A complete fracture developed at the time of nailing in one patient, but it healed with callus bridging. Conclusion. IM nailing appears to be a reliable way of preventing the progress of incomplete atypical femoral fractures.

  3. Combined detection and strain typing of Yersinia enterocolitica directly from pork and poultry enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Yersinia enterocolitica is responsible for an estimated 98,000 cases of foodborne illness per year in the U.S. causing both intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. Its prevalence in retail pork and poultry, believed to the primary sources of these infections, ranges widely from 0 to 6...

  4. Too early to dismiss Yersinia enterocolitica infection in the aetiology of Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas H; Hansen, Pia S; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) infection has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease (GD). The association between YE and GD could, however, also be due to common genetic or environmental factors affecting the development of both YE infection and GD. This potential...

  5. Clonality and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Yersinia enterocolitica Isolated From U.S. Market Weight Hogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigs are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica pathogenic to humans. In this study 106 ail-positive pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates, previously recovered from 2,793 swine fecal samples (3.8%) collected during National Animal Health Monitoring System’s Swine 2000 study, wer...

  6. Yersinia enterocolitica outbreak associated with ready-to-eat salad mix, Norway, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Emily; Heier, Berit Tafjord; Nygård, Karin; Stalheim, Torunn; Cudjoe, Kofitsyo S; Skjerdal, Taran; Wester, Astrid Louise; Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne; Stavnes, Trine-Lise; Vold, Line

    2012-09-01

    In 2011, an outbreak of illness caused by Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 in Norway was linked to ready-to-eat salad mix, an unusual vehicle for this pathogen. The outbreak illustrates the need to characterize isolates of this organism, and reinforces the need for international traceback mechanisms for fresh produce.

  7. Prevalence, serotype, virulence characteristics, clonality and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from swine feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Swine are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), a human pathogen. Since YE is a fecal organism of swine, the primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, serotype, virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated characteristics, clonality, and antibiotic su...

  8. Agglutination of pYV+ Yersinia enterocolitica strains by agglutinin from Mangifera indica.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Agglutination of 271 strains of Yersinia enterocolitica and related species grown at 37 degrees C by a 0.01% dilution of the agglutinin from Mangifera indica was correlated with the presence of the virulence plasmid. The study of YadA mutants suggested that the YadA protein is the target of the plant agglutinin.

  9. 76 FR 69034 - Microbiology Devices; Classification of In Vitro Diagnostic Device for Yersinia Species Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Microbiology Devices...] Microbiology Devices; Classification of In Vitro Diagnostic Device for Yersinia Species Detection AGENCY: Food... II (special controls), in accordance with the recommendation of the Microbiology Devices...

  10. Intestinal obstruction complicating Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:21 infection in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufti, Areej; Al Kaabi, Nawal A; Rubin, Steven Z; Suh, Kathryn N

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal obstruction is an uncommon complication of Yersinia enterocolitica infection. We report a case of enterocolitis in an 11-month-old infant, complicated by intestinal obstruction. Y. entercolitica serotype O:21, previously reported to cause severe disease, was isolated from the patient's stool. Unusual or complicated presentations of yersiniosis may be associated with more pathogenic strains of Y. enterocolitica.

  11. Yersinia virulence factor YopM induces sustained RSK activation by interfering with dephosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Hentschke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogenic yersiniae inject several effector proteins (Yops into host cells, which subverts immune functions and enables the bacteria to survive within the host organism. YopM, whose deletion in enteropathogenic yersiniae results in a dramatic loss of virulence, has previously been shown to form a complex with and activate the multifunctional kinases PKN2 and RSK1 in transfected cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a near physiological approach with double-affinity-tagged YopM being translocated into the macrophage cell line J774A.1 via the natural type three secretion system of Yersinia we verified the interaction of YopM with PKN2 and RSK1 and detected association with additional PKN and RSK isoforms. In transfected and infected cells YopM induced sustained phosphorylation of RSK at its activation sites serine-380 and serine-221 even in the absence of signalling from its upstream kinase ERK1/2, suggesting inhibition of dephosphorylation. ATP-depletion and in vitro assays using purified components directly confirmed that YopM shields RSK isoforms from phosphatase activity towards serines 380 and 221. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that during Yersinia infection YopM induces sustained activation of RSK by blocking dephosphorylation of its activatory phosphorylation sites. This may represent a novel mode of action of a bacterial virulence factor.

  12. Evaluation of a modified Cefsulodin-Irgasan-Novobiocin agar for isolation of Yersinia spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Kuan Tan

    Full Text Available Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are important food borne pathogens. However, the presence of competitive microbiota makes the isolation of Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis from naturally contaminated foods difficult. We attempted to evaluate the performance of a modified Cefsulodin-Irgasan-Novobiocin (CIN agar in the differentiation of Y. enterocolitica from non-Yersinia species, particularly the natural intestinal microbiota. The modified CIN enabled the growth of Y. enterocolitica colonies with the same efficiency as CIN and Luria-Bertani agar. The detection limits of the modified CIN for Y. enterocolitica in culture medium (10 cfu/ml and in artificially contaminated pork (10(4 cfu/ml were also comparable to those of CIN. However, the modified CIN provided a better discrimination of Yersinia colonies from other bacteria exhibiting Yersinia-like colonies on CIN (H2S-producing Citrobacter freundii, C. braakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Aeromonas hydrophila, Providencia rettgeri, and Morganella morganii. The modified CIN exhibited a higher recovery rate of Y. enterocolitica from artificially prepared bacterial cultures and naturally contaminated samples compared with CIN. Our results thus demonstrated that the use of modified CIN may be a valuable means to increase the recovery rate of food borne Yersinia from natural samples, which are usually contaminated by multiple types of bacteria.

  13. [The bacteriophages Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: the detection in strains of different O-serovars and their identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonova, L D; Kudriakova, T A; Kachkina, G V; Gaevskaia, N E

    2013-08-01

    The sample included five indicator pseudotuberculosis strains. The application of these strains permitted to isolate out of 161 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis 9 bacteriophages identical by their morphologic and serologic characteristics but having individual particularities in their lytic activity. The test on sensitivity to bacteriophages can be used in laboratory diagnostic to differentiate the strains of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ST19 Isolates and One Isolate Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, Mikhail E; Blouin, Yann; Evseeva, Vera V; Afanas'ev, Maxim V; Pourcel, Christine; Balakhonov, Sergey V; Vergnaud, Gilles; Anisimov, Andrey P

    2013-04-11

    We report the first draft genome sequences of five Yersinia pseudotuberculosis isolates of sequence type (ST) 19 and of a variant from one of the five isolates. The total length of assemblies ranged from 4,226,485 bp to 4,274,148 bp, including between 3,808 and 3,843 predicted coding sequences.

  15. Immune response of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae to Yersinia ruckeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Kania, Per Walter; Raida, Martin Kristian

    of naive larvae were bath exposed for 1 h with different concentrations of ß-glucan from Euglena gracilis. Two days post infection, larvae showed typical signs of Yersinia infection with haemorrhages in mouth region and inflammation on the dorsal side of the body. However, no mortality was observed during...

  16. Independent Emergence of Yersinia ruckeri Biotype 2 in the United States and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Timothy J.; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2011-01-01

    Biotype 2 (BT2) variants of the bacterium Yersinia ruckeri are an increasing disease problem in U.S. and European aquaculture and have been characterized as serovar 1 isolates that lack both peritrichous flagella and secreted phospholipase activity. The emergence of this biotype has been associat...

  17. Transpupillary thermotherapy for atypical central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ryosuke Kawamura1,2, Hidenao Ideta1, Hideyuki Hori1, Kenya Yuki2, Tsuyoshi Uno1, Tatsurou Tanabe1, Kazuo Tsubota2, Tsutomu Kawasaki11Ideta Eye Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan; 2Keio University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC has been traditionally treated with laser photocoagulation. We thought that transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT utilizing a lower temperature than that of conventional laser photocoagulation might minimize permanent retinal and choroidal damage. Studies suggest that undesirable effects on vision due to TTT are minimal even if it is applied to foveal and/or parafoveal lesions when TTT requires a larger irradiation spot. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of TTT in the management of atypical CSC.Methods: We defined atypical CSC as bullous retinal detachment with diffuse or several leakages, severe leakage with fibrin formation under serous retinal detachment, or leakage within a pigment epithelium detachment. Eight consecutive patients with atypical CSC underwent visual acuity testing, ophthalmic examination, color photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography to evaluate the results of transpupillary thermotherapy. Retreatment of atypical CSC was based on ophthalmic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. TTT was performed on the leaking spots shown in fluorescein angiography, with a power of 50–250 mW, spot size of 500–1200 µm, and exposure time of 13–60 seconds to minimize retinal damage.Results: In five of eight affected eyes, serous detachments completely resolved within 1 month after the initial TTT. One eye had persistent subretinal fluid and required a second TTT treatment. Two eyes showed no resolution of CSC and were treated by conventional photocoagulation. Initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/600 to 20/20 (mean, 20/40; median, 20/30. Final BCVA

  18. Detection, seroprevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in pig tonsils in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonardi, S; Bruini, I; D'Incau, M; Van Damme, I; Carniel, E; Brémont, S; Cavallini, P; Tagliabue, S; Brindani, F

    2016-10-17

    Yersiniosis is the third most common reported zoonoses in Europe, with Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis responsible for 98.66% and 0.94% of the confirmed human cases in 2013. From June 2013 to October 2014, 201 pigs at slaughter belonging to 67 batches were tested for Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis in tonsils. Diaphragm muscle samples were tested for antibodies against Yersinia by a commercially available ELISA test. Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 was detected in 55/201 pig tonsils (27.4%; 95% CI 23.1-37.1). The positive pigs came from 38/67 batches (56.7%) and were reared in 36/61 farms (59.0%). There was no statistical difference between farrow-to-finish and finishing farms. The mean count of Y. enterocolitica was 3.56±0.85log10CFU/g with a minimum of 2.0log10CFU/g and a maximum of 4.78log10CFU/g. Y. pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 4/201 pig tonsils (2.0%; 95% CI 0.0-4.5). Three isolates belonged to serotype O:3 and one to serotype O:1. The positive pigs belonged to 4/67 batches (6.0%) and came from finishing farms only. Y. pseudotuberculosis could be enumerated in one sample only (4.27log10CFU/g). The ELISA test demonstrated that 56.1% of the meat juice samples were positive for Yersinia antibodies. Serological positivity was found in 67.9% (36/53) of the Y. enterocolitica- and 75.0% (3/4) of the Y. pseudotuberculosis positive pigs. A significant association was found between serological results and the presence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsils (OR=1.97, p=0.044). All the Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, gentamicin, ceftazidime, ertapenem and meropenem, 94.5% to cefotaxime, 89.1% to kanamycin and 78.2% to tetracycline. The highest resistance rates were observed for ampicillin (100%), sulphonamides (98.2%) and streptomycin (78.2%). Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were sensitive to all the antimicrobials tested, i.e. amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, azithromycin, cephalothin, cefoxitin

  19. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. Methodology/Principal findings From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments. PMID

  20. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalyan, Z. A.; Ter-Pogossyan, Z. R.; Abroyan, L. O.; Hakobyan, L. H.; Avetisyan, A. S.; Karalyan, N. Yu; Karalova, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection. PMID:27536044

  1. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Karalyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection.

  2. Application of fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism for comparison of human and animal isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fearnley, C.; On, S.L.W.; Kokotovic, Branko

    2005-01-01

    An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method, developed to genotype Yersinia enterocolitica, has been used to investigate 70 representative strains isolated from humans, pigs, sheep, and cattle in the United Kingdom. AFLP primarily distinguished Y enterocolitica strains according...

  3. Literatuuronderzoek naar gegevens betreffende de betekenis van een aantal verwekkers van zoonosen in verband met de vleesconsumptie. VI: Yersinia enterocolitica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos; J.M.; Engel; H.W.B.; Groothuis; D.G.; Knapen; F.van; Oosterom; J.; Weiss; J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica kan bij de mens aanleiding geven tot verschillende ziektebeelden. Het meest wordt de acute enterocolitis beschreven, vooral bij zeer jonge kinderen, maar daarnaast zijn ook de acute mesenteriale lymfadenitis en terminale ileitis (pseudoappendicitis) bekend. Dragerschap zo

  4. Deciphering the acylation pattern of Yersinia enterocolitica lipid A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Reinés

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria may modify their surface to evade the host innate immune response. Yersinia enterocolitica modulates its lipopolysaccharide (LPS lipid A structure, and the key regulatory signal is temperature. At 21°C, lipid A is hexa-acylated and may be modified with aminoarabinose or palmitate. At 37°C, Y. enterocolitica expresses a tetra-acylated lipid A consistent with the 3'-O-deacylation of the molecule. In this work, by combining genetic and mass spectrometric analysis, we establish that Y. enterocolitica encodes a lipid A deacylase, LpxR, responsible for the lipid A structure observed at 37°C. Western blot analyses indicate that LpxR exhibits latency at 21°C, deacylation of lipid A is not observed despite the expression of LpxR in the membrane. Aminoarabinose-modified lipid A is involved in the latency. 3-D modelling, docking and site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that LpxR D31 reduces the active site cavity volume so that aminoarabinose containing Kdo(2-lipid A cannot be accommodated and, therefore, not deacylated. Our data revealed that the expression of lpxR is negatively controlled by RovA and PhoPQ which are necessary for the lipid A modification with aminoarabinose. Next, we investigated the role of lipid A structural plasticity conferred by LpxR on the expression/function of Y. enterocolitica virulence factors. We present evidence that motility and invasion of eukaryotic cells were reduced in the lpxR mutant grown at 21°C. Mechanistically, our data revealed that the expressions of flhDC and rovA, regulators controlling the flagellar regulon and invasin respectively, were down-regulated in the mutant. In contrast, the levels of the virulence plasmid (pYV-encoded virulence factors Yops and YadA were not affected in the lpxR mutant. Finally, we establish that the low inflammatory response associated to Y. enterocolitica infections is the sum of the anti-inflammatory action exerted by pYV-encoded YopP and the

  5. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, Enver [Department of Paediatrics, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Yavuz, Cevdet [Department of Neurosurgery, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Ustundag, Nil [Department of Pathology, Abant Izzet Baysal University School of Medicine, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey)

    2003-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  6. A rare case of enteric and systemic Yersinia enterocolitica infection in a chronic, not iron-overloaded dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Intra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present herein a case of bacterial gastroenteritis due to Yersinia enterocolitica, occurred in a young woman undergoing haemodialysis with a previous history positive for prolonged (20 years immunosuppressive therapy for glomerulonephritis before and for kidney transplant later. The patient’s outcome was favourable after a third-generation cephalosporin treatment without complications. The possible pathophysiological association between patient clinical condition and Yersinia bacteraemia is discussed, along with the review of literature.

  7. Prevalence of Aeromonas Hydrophila and Yersinia Enterocolitica in Children with Acute Diarrhea Attending Health Centers in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diarrhea is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially children, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. Various studies have been reported regarding the relationship between the children acute diarrhea and Aeromonashydrophila and Yersinia enterocolitica. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of the bacteria and their sensitivity to common antibiotics and the prevalence of virulence genes in the bacteria in Hamadan, Iran. Materials & Methods: In this study, 120 stool samples collected from children less than 10 years of age with acute diarrhea were examined for Aeromonashydrophila and Yersinia enterocolitica. Identification of the bacteria was performed by biochemical reactions and PCR using 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, the prevalence of virulence genes earA and hyl of Aeromonashydrophila and ail and ystB genes of Yersinia enterocolitica were investigated using PCR. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria was performed by disk diffusion method. Results: Out of 120 stool samples, 2 (1.7 % Aeromonashydrophila and 3 (2.5% Yersinia enterocolitica were isolated. All isolates of Aeromonashydrophila were sensitive to the chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole, gentamicin, meropenem, amikacin and 50% of isolates were sensitive to the ceftriaxone and azithromycin. All Aeromonashydrophila isolates were resistant to erythromycin. All isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica were sensitive to the chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole and meropenem. The 33.3% of the isolates were sensitive to gentamicin and amikacin and 66.6% of them were susceptible to ceftriaxone. However, all of Yersinia enterocolitica isolates were resistant to erythromycin and azithromycin. The prevalence aerA and hyl genes in Aeromonashydrophila were reported 100% and 50%, respectively. The prevalence of ail and ystB genes in Yersinia enterocolitica was reported as 66.6%. Conclusions: Identification and analysis of

  8. Hematological Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Erdogan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics cause less frequently extrapyramidal system symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and hyperprolactinemia than typical antipsychotics. However hematological side effects such as leukopenia and neutropenia could occur during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. These side effects could lead to life threatening situations and the mortality rate due to drug related agranulocytosis is about 5-10%. There are several hypothesis describing the mechanisms underlying drug induced leukopenia and/or neutropenia such as direct toxic effects of these drugs upon the bone marrow or myeloid precursors, immunologic destruction of the granulocytes or supression of the granulopoiesis. Clozapine is the antipsychotic agent which has been most commonly associated with agranulocytosis. A nitrenium ion which is formed by the bioactivation of clozapine is thought to have an important role in the pathophysiogy of this adverse effect. Aside from clozapine, there are several case reports reporting an association between olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and leukopenia. We did not find any study or case report presenting amisulpride or sulpride related hematological side effects in our literature search. Patients who had hematological side effects during their previous antipsychotic drug treatments and who had lower baseline blood leukocyte counts, have higher risk to develop leukopenia or neutropenia during their current antipsychotic treatment. Once leukopenia and neutropenia develops, drugs thought to be responsible for this side effect should be discontinued or dosages should be lowered. In some cases iniatition of lithium or G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy may be helpful in normalizing blood cell counts. Clinicans should avoid any combination of drugs known to cause hematological side effects. Besides during antipsychotic treatment, infection symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat or

  9. Atypical And Severe Enlargement Of Right Atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Carmine; Rossetti, Pietro; Rocci, Anna; Rubino, Pasquale; Basaglia, Manuela; Gaibazzi, Nicola; Quintavalla, Roberto

    2016-09-13

    A 76 year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department for recent-onset dyspnea and cough. The electrocardiogram was considered inconclusive. A thoracic X-ray showed global cardiac profile enlargement. Computed tomography, acutely performed in the clinical suspicion of atypical pneumonia/myocarditis or pericardial effusion, showed cardiac enlargement especially of the right chambers. In order to investigate Ebstein's anomaly, pericardial cysts, tumors or other conditions of the right heart a simple trans-thoracic echocardiogram was performed. Four chambers view showed a giant right atrium aneurysm with moderate tricuspid regurgitation without stenosis or typical Ebstein's echocardiographic pattern.

  10. Wilson’s disease: Atypical imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a genetic movement disorder with characteristic clinical and imaging features. We report a 17- year-old boy who presented with sialorrhea, hypophonic speech, paraparesis with repeated falls and recurrent seizures along with cognitive decline. He had bilateral Kayser Flescher rings. Other than the typical features of Wilson’s disease in cranial MRI, there were extensive white matter signal abnormalities (T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities and gyriform contrast enhancement which are rare imaging features in Wilson's disease. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose Wilson’s disease when atypical imaging features are present.

  11. Atypical outcome in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Freidson, S

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the course of psychiatric illness in two boys. Both presented with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in midchildhood; after puberty, one boy developed a schizophrenic illness while the other boy developed a major affective illness. Although the major ADHD outcome studies have found no link between the childhood occurrence of ADHD and psychosis in adulthood, occasionally such a link may exist. The theoretical and practical implications of this finding are discussed. It should be noted, however, that such outcome is highly atypical and very rare.

  12. Atypical Log D profile of rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariappan T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution coefficient (log D values of rifampicin, an essential first-line antitubercular drug, at gastrointestinal pH conditions are not reported in literature. Hence determinations were made using n-octanol and buffers ranging between pH 1-7. Also, log D values were predicted using Prolog D. Both the determinations showed opposite behaviour. The atypical experimental log D profile of rifampicin could be attributed to its surface-active properties, which also explained the reported permeability behaviour of the drug in various gastrointestinal tract segments.

  13. Atypical giant chondroblastoma mimicking a chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, Sunita; Menon, Santosh; Gulia, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign tumor derived from chondroblasts, commonly presenting in the second decade of life. It is usually found in the epiphysis or apophysis of long bones; however, it may rarely affect flat bones like scapula. Occasionally a histologically typical chondroblastoma may exhibit an aggressive behavior that is not normally associated with benign tumors such as a large size, pulmonary metastases, joint and soft-tissue infiltration and local recurrence. We present a case report of a patient with chondroblastoma showing atypical radiological presentation and non-concordance with age.

  14. Bisphosphonates and Atypical Fractures of Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Yli-Kyyny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed medicines for the treatment of osteoporosis and have generally been regarded as well-tolerated and safe drugs. Since 2005, there have been numerous case reports about atypical fractures of the femur linked to long-term treatment of osteoporosis with bisphosphonates. Some attempts to characterize pathophysiology and epidemiology of these fractures have been published as well. However, as the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR concluded in their task force report, the subject warrants further studies.

  15. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  16. Gorlin’s syndrome: Atypical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay N. Agrawal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. The condition appears to have complete penetrance and variable expressivity, which makes clinilcal presentation among families variable. All known BCNS carry mutations in PATCHED gene. A 65 years old male patient presented with complaints of characteristic skin lesions on his face, back, palms since early adulthood. The lesions were pigmented nodules with characteristic border. The histopathology showed characteristic features suggestive of Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC. This case was atypical due to appearance of lesions quite later in life.

  17. Atypical presentation of childhood obsessive compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyakam Mohapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. The phenomenology of OCD in children and adolescent is strikingly similar to that of adults. But at times, the presentation of OCD may be so atypical or unusual in children and adolescents that may lead to misdiagnosis or delay in diagnosis. We report a case of 10-year-old child who was initially misdiagnosed with schizophrenia, and treated with antipsychotic for 2 months. But once the core symptoms were recognized as obsessions and compulsions and appropriately treated in the line of OCD, the symptoms resolved significantly.

  18. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  19. Insecticidal genes of Yersinia spp.: taxonomical distribution, contribution to toxicity towards Manduca sexta and Galleria mellonella, and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachtner Joachim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxin complex (Tc proteins termed TcaABC, TcdAB, and TccABC with insecticidal activity are present in a variety of bacteria including the yersiniae. Results The tc gene sequences of thirteen Yersinia strains were compared, revealing a high degree of gene order conservation, but also remarkable differences with respect to pseudogenes, sequence variability and gene duplications. Outside the tc pathogenicity island (tc-PAIYe of Y. enterocolitica strain W22703, a pseudogene (tccC2'/3' encoding proteins with homology to TccC and similarity to tyrosine phosphatases at its C-terminus was identified. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the tc-PAIYe and of tccC2'/3'-homologues in all biotype 2–5 strains tested, and their absence in most representatives of biotypes 1A and 1B. Phylogenetic analysis of 39 TccC sequences indicates the presence of the tc-PAIYe in an ancestor of Yersinia. Oral uptake experiments with Manduca sexta revealed a higher larvae lethality of Yersinia strains harbouring the tc-PAIYe in comparison to strains lacking this island. Following subcutaneous infection of Galleria mellonella larvae with five non-human pathogenic Yersinia spp. and four Y. enterocolitica strains, we observed a remarkable variability of their insecticidal activity ranging from 20% (Y. kristensenii to 90% (Y. enterocolitica strain 2594 dead larvae after five days. Strain W22703 and its tcaA deletion mutant did not exhibit a significantly different toxicity towards G. mellonella. These data confirm a role of TcaA upon oral uptake only, and suggest the presence of further insecticidal determinants in Yersinia strains formerly unknown to kill insects. Conclusion This study investigated the tc gene distribution among yersiniae and the phylogenetic relationship between TccC proteins, thus contributing novel aspects to the current discussion about the evolution of insecticidal toxins in the genus Yersinia. The toxic potential of several Yersinia

  20. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, K.H.; Florquin, S.; Groothoff, J.W.; Verlaak, R.; Strain, L.; Goodship, T.H.; Weening, J.J.; Davin, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of imme

  1. Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 isolated from a hunted wild alpine ibex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutsen, S; Sarno, E; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M; Cernela, N; Stephan, R

    2013-03-01

    Occurrence of Yersinia spp. in wild ruminants was studied and the strains were characterized to get more information on the epidemiology of enteropathogenic Yersinia in the wildlife. In total, faecal samples of 77 red deer, 60 chamois, 55 roe deer and 27 alpine ibex were collected during 3 months of the hunting season in 2011. The most frequently identified species was Y. enterocolitica found in 13%, 10%, 4% and 2% of roe deer, red deer, alpine ibex and chamois, respectively. Interestingly, one Y. enterocolitica O:3 strain, isolated from an alpine ibex, carried the important virulence genes located on the virulence plasmid (yadA and virF) and in the chromosome (ail, hreP, myfA and ystA). Most of the Y. enterocolitica strains belonged to biotype 1A of which 14 were ystB positive. Further studies are needed to clarify the importance of alpine ibex as a reservoir of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica.

  2. Translational regulation of Yersinia enterocolitica mRNA encoding a type III secretion substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaskie, Karyl S; Ligtenberg, Katherine Given; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-12-06

    Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion machines transport YopQ and other Yop effectors into host immune cells. YopD and its chaperone LcrH are essential components of the Yersinia type III pathway, enabling effector translocation into host cells. YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 also regulate yop expression post-transcriptionally in response to environmental signals; however, the molecular mechanisms for this regulation and Yop secretion are unknown. We show here that YopD associates with 30 S ribosomal particles in a manner requiring LcrH. When added to ribosomes, YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 block the translation of yopQ mRNA. We propose a model whereby LcrH-dependent association of YopD with 30 S ribosomal particles enables YscM1 to block yopQ translation unless type III machines are induced to secrete the effector.

  3. Role of the beta1-integrin cytoplasmic tail in mediating invasin-promoted internalization of Yersinia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Anna; Armulik, Annika; Brakebusch, Cord

    2002-01-01

    Invasin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis binds to beta1-integrins on host cells and triggers internalization of the bacterium. To elucidate the mechanism behind the beta1-integrin-mediated internalization of Yersinia, a beta1-integrin-deficient cell line, GD25, transfected with wild-type beta1A, beta......1B or different mutants of the beta1A subunit was used. Both beta1A and beta1B bound to invasin-expressing bacteria, but only beta1A was able to mediate internalization of the bacteria. The cytoplasmic region of beta1A, differing from beta1B, contains two NPXY motifs surrounding a double threonine...... site. Exchanging the tyrosines of the two NPXYs to phenylalanines did not inhibit the uptake, whereas a marked reduction was seen when the first tyrosine (Y783) was exchanged to alanine. A similar reduction was seen when the two nearby threonines (TT788-9) were exchanged with alanines. It was also...

  4. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-10-13

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain.

  5. A novel high-resolution melting analysis-based method for Yersinia enterocolitica genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Roberto A; Falcão, Juliana P

    2014-11-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains are associated with biotypes 1B, 2-5, while environmental strains with biotype 1A. In this work a method for Y. enterocolitica genotyping based on HRMA to determine SNPs was developed and the genetic diversity of 50 strains was determined. The strains were clustered into three groups consistent with the pathogenic profile of each biotype. The results provided a better understanding of the Y. enterocolitica genetic variability.

  6. The source of Yersinia spp. in pasteurized milk: an investigation at a dairy.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, M. H.; Hooper, W. L.; Rodhouse, J C

    1990-01-01

    Pasteurized bottled milk supplied by a single dairy was frequently found to be contaminated with Yersinia spp. Investigations were carried out at the dairy in an effort to pinpoint the source of these organisms. Viable counts obtained from milk bottle rinses indicated that bottle washing was often unsatisfactory, and on one occasion Y. frederiksenii was isolated from the pooled rinse water of six bottles. Samples of milk were taken on arrival at the dairy and at various stages following paste...

  7. Rapid biochemical screening for Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, and Aeromonas isolates from stool specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    De Ryck, R; Struelens, M. J.; Serruys, E

    1994-01-01

    Four screens for the rapid (4 to 6 h) biochemical detection of pathogens from enteric isolation media are described. The Salmonella screen consisted of Kligler iron agar (KIA), motility-indole-urea-tryptophan-deamination semisolid medium (MIU-TDA), and the o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) test; the Shigella screen consisted of KIA, MIU-TDA, the ONPG test, and the lysine decarboxylation-indole test; the Yersinia screen consisted of a rhamnose broth; the Aeromonas screen consisted ...

  8. Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin NadA Targets β1 Integrins: FUNCTIONAL SIMILARITY TO YERSINIA INVASIN*

    OpenAIRE

    Nägele, Virginie; Heesemann, Jürgen; Schielke, Stephanie; Jiménez-Soto, Luisa F.; Kurzai, Oliver; Ackermann, Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    Meningococci are facultative-pathogenic bacteria endowed with a set of adhesins allowing colonization of the human upper respiratory tract, leading to fulminant meningitis and septicemia. The Neisseria adhesin NadA was identified in about 50% of N. meningitidis isolates and is closely related to the Yersinia adhesin YadA, the prototype of the oligomeric coiled-coil adhesin (Oca) family. NadA is known to be involved in cell adhesion, invasion, and induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Becaus...

  9. Characterization of Oral Yersinia enterocolitica Infection in Three Different Strains of Inbred Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted differences in the resistances of various mouse strains to intravenous (i.v.) infection with Yersinia enterocolitica. In particular, differences in resistance and immunological response between BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse strains have been determined. Following i.v infection, C57BL/6 mice are more resistant to Y. enterocolitica than are BALB/c mice. However, because Y. enterocolitica is typically a food-borne pathogen, the oral route of infection more accurately ...

  10. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Nardo, Davide [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A. [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gardner, Ann [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  11. [Phenotypic characterization and distribution of Yersinia in human and environmental samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Castillo, F; Larraz, V; Asunción Lafarga, M; Navarro, M; Gómez-Lus, R

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of species and phenotypes of Yersinia isolated from environmental samples over an eight year period are compared to that of stool cultures obtained from patients of the same geographical location (Zaragoza, Spain). The number of samples and the percentage contamination were as follows: wastewater 362, 67.4%, freshwater 523, 13.4%, raw food 607, 24.5% and cooked food 1134, 7.9%. Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated significantly more frequently than other species in wastewater, while Yersinia intermedia was the most significant species found in freshwater. Significant differences between the percentage isolates of identified species in raw and cooked foods were not found. Fifteen different serogroups were identified from faeces, thirteen of which were also isolated from environmental samples. Three serogroups of Y. enterocolitica associated with human disease were isolated from the patients faeces as follows: O:3, 145 cases; O:8, 3 cases and O:5,27, 1 case. A low proportion were isolated from food: O:3, 3 strains; O:8, 2 strains and O:5,27, 5 strains. Only one isolate from serogroup O:3 was obtained from freshwater.

  12. The risk on contact people with different serotypes of sticks the Yersinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimfa Maria Stojek

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Experts are anxious because “American serotype” Yersinia entorocolitica O:8 unexpectedly appeared in Europe in the years 2000 because of its high pathogenicity. The aim of the investigations was to determine people risk contact with different serotypes of Yersinia, based on serological investigations in the years 1997–99 in relation to current epidemiological situation. The study covered 573 sera, from 300 healthy persons and 157 suspicious of yersiniosis, and 116 suspicious of other zoonosis. Tests were performed by passive hemaglutination reaction with antigens viewed as pathogenic to humans Y. enterocolitica O:3, O:5, O:6, O:8, O:9 and Y. pseudotuberculosis group I and III. The most frequently detected antibodies were anti-Y.e. O:5 (41,2% and then anti-Y.e. O:8 (36,6%, anti-Y.e. O;3 (20,1%, anti-Y.e. O;6 (9,2%, anti-Y.e. O:9 (4,6% and anti-Y. pseudotuberculosis I i III (11,8% and 10,3%. The results of investigations show, that already in the years 1997–1999 over 30% of population had contact with Yersinia sticks, including serotypes thought as pathogenic: Y. enterocolitica O:3 (20,1 %, Y. enterocolitica O:9 (4,6 % and particularly with Y. enterocolitica O:8 (36,6 %.

  13. Yersinia Virulence Depends on Mimicry of Host Rho-Family Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prehna,G.; Ivanov, M.; Blisha, J.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Yersinia spp. cause gastroenteritis and the plague, representing historically devastating pathogens that are currently an important biodefense and antibiotic resistance concern. A critical virulence determinant is the Yersinia protein kinase A, or YpkA, a multidomain protein that disrupts the eukaryotic actin cytoskeleton. Here we solve the crystal structure of a YpkA-Rac1 complex and find that YpkA possesses a Rac1 binding domain that mimics host guanidine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) of the Rho GTPases. YpkA inhibits nucleotide exchange in Rac1 and RhoA, and mutations that disrupt the YpkA-GTPase interface abolish this activity in vitro and impair in vivo YpkA-induced cytoskeletal disruption. In cell culture experiments, the kinase and the GDI domains of YpkA act synergistically to promote cytoskeletal disruption, and a Y. pseudotuberculosis mutant lacking YpkA GDI activity shows attenuated virulence in a mouse infection assay. We conclude that virulence in Yersinia depends strongly upon mimicry of host GDI proteins by YpkA.

  14. Detection of Yersinia spp. in meat products by enrichment culture, immunomagnetic separation and nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Cecilia S M Lucero; Velázquez, Lidia Del Carmen; Favier, Gabriela Isabel; Genaro, María Silvia Di; Escudero, María Esther

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica in meat products was assessed by four methods: cold enrichment in trypticase soy broth (A), enrichment in modified Rappaport broth at 25 °C (B), concentration by immunomagnetic separation (C) and yadA nested PCR (D). Furthermore, the pathogenic potentials of the isolates were established by phenotypic and genotypic tests, and their genomic relationships were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A total of 238 samples were collected at retail level in the city of San Luis, Argentina, during the period 2007-2008. The highest Yersinia prevalence in meat products was observed by method D (92 positive samples), followed by methods A (13 positive samples) and C (5 positive samples); however, no isolation was obtained by method B. Fourteen Y. enterocolitica and 4 Yersinia intermedia strains were recovered by culture. All Y. enterocolitica 2/O:9 strains gave results related to virulence by phenotypic tests and exhibited the genotype virF(+)myfA(+)ail(+)ystA(+). Two biotype 1A strains showed a genotype virF(-)myfA(-)ail(+)ystA(+)ystB(+). The 14 Y. enterocolitica strains isolated during this work plus one reference strain were separated into 11 genomic types by PFGE. This genomic heterogeneity of the isolates shows the diversity of Y. enterocolitica strains in our region. It is the first time that IMS was used to search Y. enterocolitica strains from naturally contaminated meat products.

  15. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 survives and replicates in trophozoites and persists in cysts of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Montañez, Jennifer; Benavides-Montaño, Javier A; Hinz, Angela K; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a foodborne enteric pathogen that causes a mild self-limiting diarrhea in humans. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to persist in soil and water and in association with fresh produce, but the mechanism by which it persists is unknown. It has been shown that Y. pseudotuberculosis co-occurs with protozoans in these environments; therefore, this study investigates if bacterivorous free-living amoeba (FLA) are able to support persistence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Coculture studies of Y. pseudotuberculosis and the prototype FLA, Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that bacteria had an enhanced capacity to survive in association with amoeba and in the absence of any cytotoxic effects. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to survive and replicate in trophozoites specifically localized within vacuoles, and persists within cysts over a period of at least a week. These data present the first evidence that Y. pseudotuberculosis is able to resist the bacterivorous nature of FLA and instead exhibits an enhanced ability to replicate and persist in coculture with amoeba. This study sheds light on the potential role of FLA in the ecology of Y. pseudotuberculosis which may have implications for food safety.

  16. Clinical grand rounds: atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkins, Kavita S; Bobrowski, Amy E; Lane, Jerome C; Langman, Craig B

    2012-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, lifethreatening, chronic, genetic disease of uncontrolled alternative pathway complement activation. The understanding of the pathophysiology and genetics of this disease has expanded over recent decades and promising new developments in the management of aHUS have emerged. Regardless of the cause of aHUS, with or without a demonstrated mutation or autoantibody, blockade of terminal complement activation through C5 is of high interest as a mechanism to ameliorate the disease. Eculizumab, an existing monoclonal antibody directed against C5 with high affinity, prevents the perpetuation of the downstream activation of the complement cascade and the damage caused by generation of the anaphylotoxin C5a and the membrane attack complex C5b-9, by blocking C5 cleavage. We report the successful use of eculizumab in a patient after kidney transplantation and discuss the disease aHUS.

  17. Atypical Cogan's syndrome associated with coronary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivanovic Branislava; Tadic Marijana; Damjanov Nemanja; Simic Dragan; Zlatanovic Maja

    2011-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome (CS) is a rare inflammatory disorder characterized by interstitial keratitis and vestibuloauditory abnormalities often associated with various systemic manifestations. Involvement of cardiovascular system resembling systemic vasculitis may lead to severe complications and death. The present report describes a case of a female patient with atypical Cogan's syndrome presented with systemic manifestations and severe coronary and femoral artery stenosis.Despite the clinical improvement after glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, the patient required double aortocoronal bypass grafting one year letter. During three years follow-up, she was in stable condition, without stenocardial symptoms and claudication and her inflammatory parameters remain normal. This case highlights the rare involvement of coronary arteries without associated large-vessel vasculitis of the aortic arch in CS.

  18. Brugada Syndrome with atypical characteristics: Case report

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    Hatem Ari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada Syndrome (BrS is a heterogeneous genetic disease characterized by persistent or transient ST-segment elevation in the right precordial electrocardiography (ECG leads and a high incidence of sudden death and life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with structurally normal hearts. The syndrome generally manifests in men during adulthood. The ECG manifestations can be overt or concealed. We report a case of BrS whose type 1 ECG pattern during febrile state converted to type 2 ECG after alleviation of fever with atypical characteristics (78-year-old woman with monomorphic ventricular tachycardia on holter monitoring, a history of the sudden infant death of her child, and without inducible ventricular arrhythmia by programed ventricular stimulation [PVS].

  19. Pulmonary Atypical Adenomatous Hyperplasia And Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeilinXu; XiaYang; ZhiyaoZhang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relationship between atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC). METHODS Morphometric, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 4 patients with low grade AAH, 5 with high grade AAH and 7 with BAC. RESULTS The mean nuclear areas of high grade AAH and BAC were greater than those of low grade AAH (P<0.05); p53 protein expression was negative in 4 cases of low grade AAH,while the positive rates in high grade AAH and BAC were 40% (2/5) and 57% (4/7), respectively. CONCLUSION The development of BAC is stepwise. AAH appears to be a lesion closely related with BAC, probably as its genuine precursor.

  20. Indications of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Andrew; Monasterio, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAP) have become some of the most commonly prescribed medications in primary and specialist care settings. Off-label prescribing accounts for much of the expanded use of AAPs. This has become common in the elderly. Marketing by pharmaceutical companies appears to have contributed to the off-label use of AAPs, in situations where their safety and efficacy is far from established. Although evidence provides varying degrees of support for their use for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, augmentation of antidepressants in depression, anxiety, insomnia and in the management of psychosis in Parkinson's Disease, there are a number of potential problems with their expanded use in the elderly. These include weight gain, type two diabetes mellitus, sudden cardiac death and increased mortality rates in the elderly with dementia. It is recommended that whenever AAPs are used off-label, a review date is identified, informed consent is obtained and treatment and side-effects are closely monitored.

  1. Atypical parakeratosis: a marker of dysplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, T M; Kannan, V; Kline, T S

    1996-11-01

    The Bethesda System categorizes atypical parakeratosis (APK) as "ASCUS or SIL depending on the degree of cellular abnormalities." APK, however, is not well-defined. We retrospectively reviewed 68 cervicovaginal specimens with follow-up material to identify specific criteria and clinical significance of APK. APK cells were small cells, 2-3 times the diameter of neutrophil, with dense, orangeophilic cytoplasm, high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, dense, often uneven chromatin, and irregular nuclear contour. Of 62 cases with APK, 37 had accompanying dysplastic cells. Of 25 cases with APK alone, follow-up revealed 12 with squamous intraepithelial lesion (5 HSIL and 7 LSIL) and 13 with benign changes. A major diagnostic pitfall of APK was inflammation with degeneration. Abundant APK cells, minimal inflammation and degeneration, and previous history of dysplasia frequently were associated with follow-up SIL. The findings of this study identify APK as an important marker for dysplasia that warrants careful evaluation and follow-up.

  2. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

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    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  3. Emphysematous Cystitis: Report of an Atypical Case

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    Karen De Baets

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the atypical case of a nondiabetic 66-year old male with severe abdominal pain and vomiting who was found to have emphysematous cystitis. Of all gas-forming infections of the urinary tract emphysematous cystitis is the most common and the least severe. The major risk factors are diabetes mellitus and urinary tract obstruction. Most frequent causative pathogens are Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The clinical presentation is nonspecific and ranges from asymptomatic urinary tract infection to urosepsis and septic shock. The diagnosis is made by abdominal imaging. Treatment consists of broad-spectrum antibiotics, bladder drainage, and management of the risk factors. Surgery is reserved for severe cases. Overall mortality rate of emphysematous cystitis is 7%. Immediate diagnosis and treatment is necessary because of the rapid progression to bladder necrosis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, urosepsis, and possibly fatal evolution.

  4. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simona Spaccavento, Marina Del Prete, Angela Craca, Anna Loverre IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Cassano Murge, Bari, Italy Background: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS and aphasia. Aim: We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods: A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results: Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20, low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall, and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion: Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in

  5. Integrated genomic analyses of de novo pathways underlying atypical meningiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Youngblood, Mark W.; Clark, Victoria E.; Coşkun, Süleyman; Henegariu, Octavian; Duran, Daniel; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Kaulen, Leon D.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Abraham, Brian J.; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Timmer, Marco; Goldbrunner, Roland; Omay, S. Bülent; Baranoski, Jacob; Baran, Burçin; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Bai, Hanwen; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Schramm, Johannes; Moliterno, Jennifer; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A.; Günel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign brain tumours, with a potential for becoming atypical or malignant. On the basis of comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses, we compared benign meningiomas to atypical ones. Here, we show that the majority of primary (de novo) atypical meningiomas display loss of NF2, which co-occurs either with genomic instability or recurrent SMARCB1 mutations. These tumours harbour increased H3K27me3 signal and a hypermethylated phenotype, mainly occupying the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding sites in human embryonic stem cells, thereby phenocopying a more primitive cellular state. Consistent with this observation, atypical meningiomas exhibit upregulation of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of the PRC2 complex, as well as the E2F2 and FOXM1 transcriptional networks. Importantly, these primary atypical meningiomas do not harbour TERT promoter mutations, which have been reported in atypical tumours that progressed from benign ones. Our results establish the genomic landscape of primary atypical meningiomas and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28195122

  6. Malignant atypical cell in urine cytology: a diagnostic dilemma

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    Kakkar Nandita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to find out the characteristic morphology of malignant atypical cells which were missed on routine cytology of urine. Materials and methods In this retrospective study, we examined detailed cytomorphology of 18 cases of atypical urinary cytology which were missed on routine examination and were further proved on histopathology as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of bladder. The cytological features of these cases were compared with 10 cases of benign urine samples. Results There were 11 cases of high grade TCC and 7 cases of low grade TCC on histopathology of the atypical urine samples. Necrosis in the background and necrosed papillae were mostly seen in malignant atypical cells. The comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei (single cells with deep black structure-less nuclei were only observed in malignant atypical cells. The most consistent features in malignant atypical cells were: i high nuclear and cytoplasmic (N/C ratio ii nuclear pleomorphism iii nuclear margin irregularity iv hyperchromasia and v chromatin abnormalities Conclusion The present study emphasizes that nuclear features such as high N/C ratio, hyperchromasia and chromatin abnormalities are particularly useful for assessing the malignant atypical cells. Other cytological features such as comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei are also helpful for diagnosis but have limited value because they are less frequently seen.

  7. Atypical antipsychotics in first admission schizophrenia: medication continuation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtabai, Ramin; Lavelle, Janet; Gibson, P Joseph; Bromet, Evelyn J

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic medications on treatment continuation and outcomes in a first admission sample of patients with schizophrenia treated in usual practice settings. In a sample of 189 participants with a research diagnosis of DSM-IV schizophrenia drawn from the Suffolk County Mental Health Project, we compared the effects of atypical and conventional agents on change of medication, medication gaps, and rehospitalization. For these analyses we used the method of survival analysis for recurrent events, in which the episodes of treatment rather than individual subjects are the units of analysis. In addition, we compared improvement in positive and negative symptoms from intake to 24- or 48-month followups for subjects who stayed on one type of medication or changed to atypicals from conventional antipsychotics. Atypical agents were associated with lower risk of medication change, medication gaps, and rehospitalization. Both conventional and atypical agents were associated with improvement of positive symptoms at followup, but only subjects on atypical agents at followup experienced a significant improvement in negative symptoms. We conclude that in usual practice settings, as in randomized clinical trials, atypical agents are associated with improved treatment continuation and outcomes.

  8. 建立快速检测鼠疫耶尔森菌的胶体金免疫层析法%The Establishment of Gold-immunochromatography for Fast Detection of Yersinia Pestis of Bubonic Plague

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡孔新; 李伟; 姚李四; 陈维娜; 王静; 闫中强; 周蕾

    2004-01-01

    [目的]建立检测鼠疫耶尔森菌(鼠疫杆菌)的胶体金标记免疫层析方法.[方法]采用柠檬酸三钠还原法制备胶体金颗粒,并标记鼠疫杆菌的抗体,制成免疫层析检测试纸条,进行特异性和敏感性评价,并对面粉、土壤、奶粉、淀粉等不同材料进行模拟添加鼠疫菌检测.[结果]用多种不同的常见细菌或近缘细菌进行测试,未出现非特异性反应,检测鼠疫杆菌的灵敏度为1×105cfu/ml,对水、土壤、奶粉、面粉、淀粉、酵母粉等不同材料中鼠疫杆菌进行检测也取得同样结果,10~15min即可得到结果.[结论]建立了1种可以用于现场快速检测鼠疫杆菌的胶体金免疫层析方法,为进一步大规模应用奠定了基础.

  9. Results of surgical treatment of atypical endometrial hyperplasia

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    O. A. Gornykh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of surgical treatment in 132 patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia have been studied. Post-operative diagnosis was: en- dometrial cancer – in 19 %, atypical hyperplasia – in 35 %, simple and complex hyperplasia – in 33 %, only atrophic endometrial changes – in 13 % of patients. The tumor was within the endometrium in 5 patients, the superficial invasion of the myometrium (1–2 mm were in 8 patients, invasion to half of the myometrium – in 9 patients, invasion of more than half of the myometrium – in 3 patients. The questions of tactics of treatment of atypical endometrial hyperplasia is under discussion.

  10. Intracranial Tuberculoma Presenting as Atypical Eclampsia: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Sharmila; Pradeep, Sunitha; John, Lopamudra; Kolluru, Vasavi

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of eclampsia before 20 weeks of pregnancy and after 48 hours of delivery in the absence of typical signs of hypertension and or proteinuria is termed as atypical eclampsia. Atypical or non-classic eclampsia will have some symptoms of eclampsia but without the usual proteinuria or hypertension. All patients with atypical onset should undergo neurological evaluation to rule out neurologic causes of seizures. Cerebral tuberculosis is a rare and serious form of disease secondary to haematogenous spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we present a case of cerebral tuberculoma with seizures in late pregnancy mimicking eclampsia. PMID:27504359

  11. Identificación y tipificación de biotipos y serotipos de Yersinia enterocolitica Identification and typing of Yersinia enterocolitica biotypes and serotypes isolated

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    Paulino Elizalde Castañeda

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Conocer la existencia de Yersinia enterocolitica en suínos visiblemente sanos y sacrificados para el consumo humano. MÉTODOS: Fueron estudiadas 100 muestras de tejido linfático obtenidas en el momento del sacrifício, en un matadero del Estado de México. Fueron realizados muestreos pilotos de 20 casos, de los cuales 20% fueron positivos, permitiendo obtener una muestra estudiada (n=100. Las muestras colectadas de tejido linfático fueron acondicionadas para el aislamiento de Yersinia enterocolitica en caldo de Rappaport y en medio de cultivo de Salmonella-Shigella y MacConkey. Las identificaciones fueron efectuadas por medio de pruebas bioquímicas y serológicas, utilizándose en el caso los antisueros O:3, O:8 y O:9 para la biotipificación correspondiente. RESULTADOS: Fueron obtenidos 22 aislamientos tipificándose 8 serotipos pertenecientes al O:3 y 8 al O:9 correspondientes al biotipo 1; y, en 6 muestras no fue posible la serotipificación. No se encontró en el total de los aislados el serotipo O:8. CONCLUSIONES: En base en la metodología, se registró la presencia de Y. enterocolitica y sus serogrupos en tejido linfático de porcinos por la primera vez en México; esto es importante porque el patógeno y sus serotipos aislados están comprometidos con mayor frecuencia con problemas de salud pública.OBJECTIVE: To assess the presence of Yersinia enterocolitica in otherwise healthy pigs slaughtered for human consumption. METHODS: One hundred pharyngeal tonsils were sampled in a slaughterhouse in the state of Mexico. The minimum sample size (n=100 was calculated based on a preliminary sample of 20 cases, which had 20% positive cases. The collected tonsil samples were inoculated in Rappaport broth, and Salmonella-Shigella and McConkey media. The biotyping identification process was based on biochemical and serological tests using O:3, O:8 and O:9 antisera. RESULTS: Twenty-two isolates were obtained. Most were biotype 1 (8 cases

  12. Teaching strategies for atypical presentation of illness in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Aselage, Melissa; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-07-01

    Atypical presentation of illness is a phenomenon where "seeing is believing." Expert geriatric nurses and clinicians know all too well the early signs and symptoms of this phenomenon, which frequently masquerades bacterial infections, pain, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or other serious medical ailments in older adults. Students, however, as novices to clinical practice, require interactive learning approaches to reflect on the patient's illness presentations, help with developing the necessary skills to analyze and synthesize clinically relevant data, and witness resolution of an atypical presentation when found and treated. Use of a case study as an educational tool can facilitate critical thinking about a clinical problem, such as atypical presentation of illness, for students within a problem-based learning format. Furthermore, we highlight strategies for teaching students atypical presentation of illness with consideration of student learning preferences, which include visual, auditory, reading, and kinesthetic modes of learning.

  13. Atypical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Eric T

    2016-09-01

    A 14 year old patient with short stature, type I diabetes, and cataracts was referred for evaluation of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Radiography was suggestive of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with decreased bone mineral density for age. Targeted molecular and biochemical testing were normal in this patient. Whole exome sequencing was performed and showed compound heterozygosity for previously reported pathogenic GALNS variants which were diagnostic of mucopolysaccharidosis, type IVA (Morquio A). While this case describes neither a novel condition nor a new mutation, it does illustrate three important points in the diagnosis of patients with atypical forms of MPS IVA. First, that in many instances urine glycosaminoglycan analysis is not sufficient to rule out MPS IVA as a potential diagnosis. Patients in whom biochemical screening is advised should have measurement of leukocyte enzymatic activity. Second, that in patients with radiographic evidence of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with additional features or with normal targeted testing, MPS IVA should remain in the differential diagnosis. Third, that whole exome sequencing represents a viable diagnostic platform for evaluation of patients with unknown skeletal or metabolic disease.

  14. Atypical clinical response patterns to ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Blanca; Binder, Sandra; Hamid, Omid

    2011-08-01

    Patients with advanced melanoma have few treatment options, and survival is poor. However, improved understanding of how the immune system interacts with cancer has led to the development of novel therapies. Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), a key negative regulator of host T-cell responses. This article presents cases of patients receiving ipilimumab in clinical trials along with a discussion of their significance and relevance to nursing practice. The patients showed different response patterns to ipilimumab and also had various typical immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which were managed successfully. The atypical response patterns produced by ipilimumab likely reflect its mechanism of action, which requires time for the immune system to mount an effective antitumor response. Meanwhile, lesions may appear to enlarge as a consequence of enhanced T-cell infiltration, although this may not necessarily be true disease progression. Patients receiving ipilimumab may respond very differently compared to how they might react to chemotherapy. Responses can take weeks or months to develop; therefore, clinicians should not terminate treatment prematurely, providing the patient's condition allows for continuation. Early recognition of irAEs combined with prompt management will ensure that events are more likely to resolve without serious consequences.

  15. Atypical Takotsubo syndrome during anagrelide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Riccardo; Rognoni, Andrea; Ardizzone, Fabio; Maccio, Sergio; Santagostino, Alberto; Rognoni, Giorgio

    2009-07-01

    Anagrelide is a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor utilized in the treatment of essential thrombocythemia. Anagrelide can be responsible for positive inotropic and chonotropic activity of the cardiovascular system. Moreover, it can induce vasospam directly on the epicardial coronary arteries. In the literature, it is well reported that this inhibitor can determine serious cardiovascular side effects, including congestive heart failure, arrhythmia and acute coronary syndrome. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed a mid-ventricular Takotsubo syndrome while on anagrelide therapy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as left ventricular ballooning syndrome, is characterized by a reversible ventricular contractile dysfunction with akinesis and expansion of apical segments and hyperkinesis of the basal segments. Recently, atypical cases with akinesia and dilation of mid-ventricular segment and hypercontraction of the apical segments, also called mid-ventricular and inverted Takotsubo syndrome, have been described. Even though the pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome is poorly understood, several mechanisms have been proposed, including catecholamine-induced myocardial stunning, and ischemia-mediated stunning due to multivessel epicardial or microvascular spasm. We think that in our case, the adverse response of anagrelide therapy was determined, by accumulated dosage of the drug, through an intensive inotropic stimulation and a sympathetic hyperactivation in a vulnerable myocardium. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of an association between anagrelide therapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  16. Atypical focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Rizwan Khan; Taimur Saleem; Tanveer Ul Haq; Kanwal Aftab

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Focal nodular hyperplasia, a benign hepatic tumor, is usually asymptomatic. However, rarely the entity can cause symptoms, mandating intervention. METHOD: We present a case of focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver, which caused a considerable diagnostic dilemma due to its atypical presentation. RESULTS: A 29-year-old woman presented with a 15-year history of a progressively increasing mass in the right upper quadrant which was associated with pain and emesis. Examination showed a firm, mobile mass palpable below the right subcostal margin. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed an exophytic mass arising from hepatic segments III and IVb. Trucut biopsy of the hepatic mass was equivocal. Angiography showed a vascular tumor that was supplied by a tortuous branch of the proper hepatic artery. Surgical intervention for removal of the mass was undertaken. Intra-operatively, two large discrete tumors were found and completely resected. Histopathological examination showed features consistent with focal nodular hyperplasia. CONCLUSION: This description of an unusual case of focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver highlights the point that the diagnosis of otherwise benign hepatic tumors may be difficult despite extensive work-up in some cases.

  17. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

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    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  18. Nocturnal manifestations of atypical parkinsonian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Colosimo, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Although nocturnal disturbances are increasingly recognized as an integral part of the continuum of daytime manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD), there is still little evidence in the medical literature to support the occurrence of these complex phenomena in patients with atypical parkinsonian disorders (APDs). Based on the anatomical substrates in APDs, which are considered to be more extensive outside the basal ganglia than in PD, we might expect that patients with APDs encounter the whole range of nocturnal disturbances, including motor, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and neuropsychiatric manifestations at a similar, or even greater, frequency than in PD. This article is a review of the current literature on the problems at nighttime of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. MEDLINE, life science journals and online books were searched by querying appropriate key words. Reports were included if the studies were related to nocturnal manifestations in APDs. Forty articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Differences between these symptoms in APDs and PD are highlighted, given the evidence available about each manifestation. This analysis of nocturnal manifestations of APDs suggests the need for future studies to address these issues to improve the quality of life not only of patients with APDs but the caregivers who encounter the challenges of supporting these patients on a daily basis.

  19. Persistent consequences of atypical early number concepts

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    Michèle M. M. Mazzocco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available How does symbolic number knowledge performance help identify young children at risk for poor mathematics achievement outcomes? In research and practice, classification of mathematics learning disability (MLD, or dyscalculia is typically based on composite scores from broad measures of mathematics achievement. These scores do predict later math achievement levels, but do not specify the nature of math difficulties likely to emerge among students at greatest risk for long-term mathematics failure. Here we report that gaps in 2nd and 3rd graders’ number knowledge predict specific types of errors made on math assessments at Grade 8. Specifically, we show that early whole number misconceptions predict slower and less accurate performance, and atypical computational errors, on Grade 8 arithmetic tests. We demonstrate that basic number misconceptions can be detected by idiosyncratic responses to number knowledge items, and that when such misconceptions are evident during primary school they persist throughout the school age years, with variable manifestation throughout development. We conclude that including specific qualitative assessments of symbolic number knowledge in primary school may provide greater specificity of the types of difficulties likely to emerge among students at risk for poor mathematics outcomes.

  20. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.