WorldWideScience

Sample records for atypical scrapie phenotype

  1. Atypical scrapie in sheep from a UK research flock which is free from classical scrapie

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    Ortiz-Pelaez Angel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the wake of the epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy the British government established a flock of sheep from which scrapie-free animals are supplied to laboratories for research. Three breeds of sheep carrying a variety of different genotypes associated with scrapie susceptibility/resistance were imported in 1998 and 2001 from New Zealand, a country regarded as free from scrapie. They are kept in a purpose-built Sheep Unit under strict disease security and are monitored clinically and post mortem for evidence of scrapie. It is emphasised that atypical scrapie, as distinct from classical scrapie, has been recognised only relatively recently and differs from classical scrapie in its clinical, neuropathological and biochemical features. Most cases are detected in apparently healthy sheep by post mortem examination. Results The occurrence of atypical scrapie in three sheep in (or derived from the Sheep Unit is reported. Significant features of the affected sheep included their relatively high ages (6 y 1 mo, 7 y 9 mo, 9 y 7 mo respectively, their breed (all Cheviots and their similar PRNP genotypes (AFRQ/AFRQ, AFRQ/ALRQ, and AFRQ/AFRQ, respectively. Two of the three sheep showed no clinical signs prior to death but all were confirmed as having atypical scrapie by immunohistochemistry and Western immunoblotting. Results of epidemiological investigations are presented and possible aetiologies of the cases are discussed. Conclusion By process of exclusion, a likely explanation for the three cases of atypical scrapie is that they arose spontaneously and were not infected from an exterior source. If correct, this raises challenging issues for countries which are currently regarded as free from scrapie. It would mean that atypical scrapie is liable to occur in flocks worldwide, especially in older sheep of susceptible genotypes. To state confidently that both the classical and atypical forms of scrapie are absent from a

  2. Atypical/Nor98 Scrapie Infectivity in Sheep Peripheral Tissues

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    Andréoletti, Olivier; Orge, Leonor; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Beringue, Vincent; Litaise, Claire; Simon, Stéphanie; Le Dur, Annick; Laude, Hubert; Simmons, Hugh; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Costes, Pierrette; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Lacroux, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Atypical/Nor98 scrapie was first identified in 1998 in Norway. It is now considered as a worldwide disease of small ruminants and currently represents a significant part of the detected transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) cases in Europe. Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases were reported in ARR/ARR sheep, which are highly resistant to BSE and other small ruminants TSE agents. The biology and pathogenesis of the Atypical/Nor98 scrapie agent in its natural host is still poorly understood. However, based on the absence of detectable abnormal PrP in peripheral tissues of affected individuals, human and animal exposure risk to this specific TSE agent has been considered low. In this study we demonstrate that infectivity can accumulate, even if no abnormal PrP is detectable, in lymphoid tissues, nerves, and muscles from natural and/or experimental Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases. Evidence is provided that, in comparison to other TSE agents, samples containing Atypical/Nor98 scrapie infectivity could remain PrPSc negative. This feature will impact detection of Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases in the field, and highlights the need to review current evaluations of the disease prevalence and potential transmissibility. Finally, an estimate is made of the infectivity loads accumulating in peripheral tissues in both Atypical/Nor98 and classical scrapie cases that currently enter the food chain. The results obtained indicate that dietary exposure risk to small ruminants TSE agents may be higher than commonly believed. PMID:21347349

  3. Transmission of atypical scrapie to homozygous ARQ sheep.

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    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Two Cheviot ewes homozygous for the A136L141R154Q171 (AL141RQ) prion protein (PrP) genotype were exposed intracerebrally to brain pools prepared using four field cases of atypical scrapie from the United Kingdom. Animals were clinically normal until the end of the experiment, when they were culled 7 years post-inoculation. Limited accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrP(Sc)) was observed in the cerebellar molecular layer by immunohistochemistry, but not by western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, PrP(Sc) was partially localized in astrocytes and microglia, suggesting that these cells have a role in PrP(Sc) processing, degradation or both. Our results indicate that atypical scrapie is transmissible to AL141RQ sheep, but these animals act as clinically silent carriers with long incubation times.

  4. Immunological characterization of abnormal prion protein from atypical scrapie cases in sheep using a panel of monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gretzschel, A.; Buschmann, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Groschup, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    After the implementation of an active surveillance programme for scrapie in sheep in the EU, the number of diagnosed classical scrapie cases rose sharply and a novel kind of so-called atypical scrapie case was discovered. These atypical scrapie cases display unusual features concerning the

  5. Atypical scrapie prions from sheep and lack of disease in transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein.

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    Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Spiropoulos, John; Simmons, Marion M; Griffiths, Peter C; Groschup, Martin H; Hope, James; Brandner, Sebastian; Asante, Emmanuel A; Collinge, John

    2013-11-01

    Public and animal health controls to limit human exposure to animal prions are focused on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), but other prion strains in ruminants may also have zoonotic potential. One example is atypical/Nor98 scrapie, which evaded statutory diagnostic methods worldwide until the early 2000s. To investigate whether sheep infected with scrapie prions could be another source of infection, we inoculated transgenic mice that overexpressed human prion protein with brain tissue from sheep with natural field cases of classical and atypical scrapie, sheep with experimental BSE, and cattle with BSE. We found that these mice were susceptible to BSE prions, but disease did not develop after prolonged postinoculation periods when mice were inoculated with classical or atypical scrapie prions. These data are consistent with the conclusion that prion disease is less likely to develop in humans after exposure to naturally occurring prions of sheep than after exposure to epizootic BSE prions of ruminants.

  6. No temporal trends in the prevalence of atypical scrapie in British sheep, 2002–2006

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    del Rio Vilas Victor J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So-called atypical scrapie was first identified in Great Britain (GB in 2002 following the introduction of wide-scale scrapie surveillance. In particular, abattoir and fallen stock surveys have been carried out in GB since 2002, with a total of 147 atypical positives identified by the end of 2006. The results of these surveys provide data with which to assess temporal trends in the prevalence of atypical scrapie in sheep in Great Britain between 2002 and 2006. Results Using the results of abattoir and fallen stock surveys, the prevalence of atypical scrapie (percentage of samples positive was estimated. The prevalence in the abattoir and fallen stock surveys, for all years combined, was 0.09% (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.08%–0.11% and 0.07% (95% CI: 0.05%–0.11%, respectively. There were no significant temporal trends in either survey. Comparing the surveys' results, there were no significant differences in annual prevalence or the prevalence within PrP genotypes. For the abattoir survey, the PrP genotype with the highest prevalence was AHQ/AHQ, which was significantly higher than all other genotypes, except ARR/AHQ, AHQ/ARH and ARH/ARQ. Conclusion The estimated prevalence of atypical scrapie was similar in both the abattoir and fallen stock surveys. Our results indicate there was no significant temporal trend in prevalence, adding to evidence that this atypical form of scrapie may be a sporadic condition or, if it is infectious, that the force of infection is very low.

  7. Determining the relative susceptibility of four prion protein genotypes to atypical scrapie

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    Atypical scrapie is a sheep prion (PrPSc) disease whose epidemiology is consistent with a sporadic origin and is associated with specific polymorphisms of the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC). We describe a mass spectrometry-based method of detecting and quantifying the polymorphisms of sheep P...

  8. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of at...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification.......Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...

  9. The prevalence of atypical scrapie in sheep from positive flocks is not higher than in the general sheep population in 11 European countries

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    Liam Barry

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decade, active surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in small ruminants has been intensive in Europe. In many countries this has led to the detection of cases of atypical scrapie which, unlike classical scrapie, might not be contagious. EU legislation requires, that following detection of a scrapie case, control measures including further testing take place in affected flocks, including the culling of genotype susceptible to classical scrapie. This might result in the detection of additional cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of additional cases in flocks affected by atypical scrapie using surveillance data collected in Europe in order to ascertain whether atypical scrapie, is contagious. Results Questionnaires were used to collect, at national level, the results of active surveillance and testing associated with flock outbreaks in 12 European countries. The mean prevalence of atypical scrapie was 5.5 (5.0-6.0 cases per ten thousand in abattoir surveillance and 8.1 (7.3-9.0 cases per ten thousand in fallen stock. By using meta-analysis, on 11 out of the 12 countries, we found that the probability of detecting additional cases of atypical scrapie in positive flocks was similar to the probability observed in animals slaughtered for human consumption (odds ratio, OR = 1.07, CI95%: 0.70-1.63 or among fallen stock (OR = 0.78, CI95%: 0.51-1.2. In contrast, when comparing the two scrapie types, the probability of detecting additional cases in classical scrapie positive flocks was significantly higher than the probability of detecting additional cases in atypical scrapie positive flocks (OR = 32.4, CI95%: 20.7-50.7. Conclusions These results suggest that atypical scrapie is not contagious or has a very low transmissibility under natural conditions compared with classical scrapie. Furthermore this study stressed the importance of standardised data collection to make good

  10. Atypical PrPsc distribution in goats naturally affected with scrapie.

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    Sofianidis, G; Psychas, V; Billinis, C; Spyrou, V; Argyroudis, S; Vlemmas, I

    2008-01-01

    The brain and spinal cord of 48 goats from two Greek herds in which scrapie had been reported were examined. All animals were symptomless at the time of euthanasia. Notably, no lesions were observed either at the level of the obex or at other regions of the brain and spinal cord. Immunohistochemical examination revealed PrPsc labelling of the linear and fine punctuate types, mainly in the cerebral cortices, of 36 goats. Twenty-seven of them were negative by ELISA (designed to detect proteinase-resistant PrP) at the level of the obex but positive in a pooled brain sample, and the majority carried PrP genotypes associated with scrapie susceptibility. Surprisingly, in 16 of the 27 animals, PrPsc deposits were detected only in the rostral parts of the brain. In addition, nine animals which were ELISA-positive at the level of the obex exhibited positive immunoreactivity, but not in the dorsal vagal nucleus. The findings indicate that this unusual scrapie type may have been underdiagnosed previously and may be of importance in scrapie surveillance programmes.

  11. Different prion disease phenotypes result from inoculation of cattle with two temporally separated sources of sheep scrapie from Great Britain

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    Hawkins Steve AC

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the theoretical proposal that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE could have originated from sheep scrapie, this study investigated the pathogenicity for cattle, by intracerebral (i.c. inoculation, of two pools of scrapie agents sourced in Great Britain before and during the BSE epidemic. Two groups of ten cattle were each inoculated with pools of brain material from sheep scrapie cases collected prior to 1975 and after 1990. Control groups comprised five cattle inoculated with sheep brain free from scrapie, five cattle inoculated with saline, and for comparison with BSE, naturally infected cattle and cattle i.c. inoculated with BSE brainstem homogenate from a parallel study. Phenotypic characterisation of the disease forms transmitted to cattle was conducted by morphological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and biological methods. Results Disease occurred in 16 cattle, nine inoculated with the pre-1975 inoculum and seven inoculated with the post-1990 inoculum, with four cattle still alive at 83 months post challenge (as at June 2006. The different inocula produced predominantly two different disease phenotypes as determined by histopathological, immunohistochemical and Western immunoblotting methods and biological characterisation on transmission to mice, neither of which was identical to BSE. Whilst the disease presentation was uniform in all scrapie-affected cattle of the pre-1975 group, the post-1990 inoculum produced a more variable disease, with two animals sharing immunohistochemical and molecular profile characteristics with animals in the pre-1975 group. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that cattle inoculated with different pooled scrapie sources can develop different prion disease phenotypes, which were not consistent with the phenotype of BSE of cattle and whose isolates did not have the strain typing characteristics of the BSE agent on transmission to mice.

  12. Passage of scrapie to deer results in a new phenotype upon return passage to sheep

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    Aims: We previously demonstrated that scrapie has a 100% attack rate in white-tailed deer after either intracranial or oral inoculation. Samples from deer that developed scrapie had two different western blot patterns: samples derived from cerebrum had a banding pattern similar to the scrapie inocu...

  13. Codon 141 polymorphisms of the ovine prion protein gene affect the phenotype of classical scrapie transmitted from goats to sheep.

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    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J; Donnachie, Ben R; Chaplin, Melanie J; Cawthraw, Saira; González, Lorenzo

    2017-05-04

    A study to investigate transmission of classical scrapie via goat milk was carried out in sheep: firstly, lambs were challenged orally with goat scrapie brain homogenate to confirm transmission of scrapie from goats to sheep. In the second study phase, milk from scrapie-infected goats was fed to lambs. Lambs were selected according to their prion protein gene (PRNP) genotype, which was either VRQ/VRQ or ARQ/ARQ, with or without additional polymorphisms at codon 141 (FF141, LF141 or LL141) of the ovine PRNP. This report describes the clinical, pathological and molecular phenotype of goat scrapie in those sheep that progressed to clinical end-stage. Ten sheep (six VRQ/VRQ and four ARQ/ARQ, of which three FF141 and one LL141) challenged with one of two scrapie brain homogenates, and six pairs of sheep (ARQ, of which five LL141 and seven LF141) fed milk from six different goats, developed clinical disease, which was characterised by a pruritic (all VRQ/VRQ and LL141 sheep) or a non-pruritic form (all LF141 and FF141 sheep). Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed that the pattern of intra- and extracellular accumulation of disease-associated prion protein in the brain was also dependent on PRNP polymorphisms at codon 141, which was similar in VRQ and LL141 sheep but different from LF141 and FF141 sheep. The influence of codon 141 was also seen in discriminatory Western blot (WB), with LF141 and FF141 sheep showing a bovine spongiform encephalopathy-like profile (diminished reactivity with P4 antibody) on brain tissue. However, discriminatory WB in lymphoid tissues, and IHC pattern and profile both in lymphoid and brain tissue was consistent with classical scrapie in all sheep. This study provided further evidence that the clinical presentation and the pathological and molecular phenotypes of scrapie in sheep are influenced by PRNP polymorphisms, particularly at codon 141. Differences in the truncation of disease-associated prion protein between LL141 sheep and

  14. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

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    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans.

  15. Co-existence of scrapie prion protein types 1 and 2 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: its effect on the phenotype and prion-type characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cali, I.; Castellani, R.; Alshekhlee, A.; Cohen, Y.; Blevins, J.; Yuan, J.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Parchi, P.; Safar, J.G.; Zou, W.Q.; Gambetti, P.

    2009-01-01

    Five phenotypically distinct subtypes have been identified in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), based on the methionine/valine polymorphic genotype of codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene and the presence of either one of the two protease K-resistant scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) types

  16. An Atypical Rett Syndrome Phenotype Due to a Novel Missense Mutation in CACNA1A.

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    Epperson, Madison V; Haws, Michael E; Standridge, Shannon M; Gilbert, Donald L

    2018-03-01

    Some typical and atypical Rett syndrome patients lack known genetic mutations. Mutations in the P/Q type calcium channel CACNA1A have been implicated in epileptic encephalopathy, familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia 2, and spinocerebellar ataxia 6, but not Rett syndrome. Patient Description: The authors describe a female patient with developmental regression and a de novo, likely pathogenic mutation in CACNA1A who meets 3 of 4 main criteria (stereotypic hand movements, loss of purposeful hand movements, gait disturbance), and 6 of 11 supportive criteria (impaired sleep, abnormal tone, vasomotor disturbance, scoliosis, growth retardation, and screaming spells) for atypical Rett syndrome. Furthermore, she resembles the early seizure variant of Rett syndrome. Previously, 3 children with similar CACNA1A mutations have been reported, but a Rett syndrome phenotype has not been described. CACNA1A mutations should be considered in children presenting with an atypical Rett syndrome phenotype, specifically, the early seizure variant.

  17. Genotyping and surveillance for scrapie in Finnish sheep

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    Hautaniemi Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of scrapie is known to be influenced by the amino acid polymorphisms of the host prion protein (PrP gene. There is no breeding programme for TSE resistance in sheep in Finland, but a scrapie control programme has been in place since 1995. In this study we have analysed PrP genotypes of total of 928 purebred and crossbred sheep together with the data of scrapie survey carried out in Finland during 2002–2008 in order to gain knowledge of the genotype distribution and scrapie prevalence in Finnish sheep. Results The ARQ/ARQ genotype was the most common genotype in all breeds studied. ARR allele frequency was less than 12% in purebred Finnish sheep and in most genotypes heterozygous for ARR, the second allele was ARQ. The VRQ allele was not detected in the Grey race sheep of Kainuu or in the Aland sheep, and it was present in less than 6% of the Finnish Landrace sheep. Leucine was the most prominent amino acid found in codon 141. In addition, one novel prion dimorphisms of Q220L was detected. During the scrapie survey of over 15 000 sheep in 2002–2008, no classical scrapie cases and only five atypical scrapie cases were detected. Conclusions The results indicate that the Finnish sheep populations have genetically little resistance to classical scrapie, but no classical scrapie was detected during an extensive survey in 2002–2008. However, five atypical scrapie cases emerged; thus, the disease is present in the Finnish sheep population at a low level.

  18. Dual molecular diagnosis contributes to atypical Prader-Willi phenotype in monozygotic twins.

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    Jehee, Fernanda S; de Oliveira, Valdirene T; Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Pietra, Rafaella X; Rubatino, Fernando V M; Carobin, Natália V; Vianna, Gabrielle S; de Freitas, Mariana L; Fernandes, Karla S; Ribeiro, Beatriz S V; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Ali-Amin, Roza; White, Janson J; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Varela, Monica C; Koiffmann, Célia; Rosenberg, Carla; Carvalho, Cláudia M B

    2017-09-01

    We describe monozygotic twin girls with genetic variation at two separate loci resulting in a blended phenotype of Prader-Willi syndrome and Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. These girls were diagnosed in early infancy with Prader-Willi syndrome, but developed an atypical phenotype, with apparent intellectual deficiency and lack of obesity. Array-comparative genomic hybridization confirmed a de novo paternal deletion of the 15q11.2q13 region and exome sequencing identified a second mutational event in both girls, which was a novel variant c.145+1G>A affecting a TCF4 canonical splicing site inherited from the mosaic mother. RNA studies showed that the variant abolished the donor splicing site, which was accompanied by activation of an alternative non-canonical splicing-site which then predicts a premature stop codon in the following exon. Clinical re-evaluation of the twins indicated that both variants are likely contributing to the more severe phenotypic presentation. Our data show that atypical clinical presentations may actually be the expression of blended clinical phenotypes arising from independent pathogenic events at two loci. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Atypisk scrapie i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Peter; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Mølbak, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Testningen af ca. 35.000 danske får og geder for TSE i perioden 2006-2010 har medført fund af syv tilfælde hos får, som alle er karakteriseret som atypisk scrapie......Testningen af ca. 35.000 danske får og geder for TSE i perioden 2006-2010 har medført fund af syv tilfælde hos får, som alle er karakteriseret som atypisk scrapie...

  20. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Meat Markets

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    Luisa Zanolli Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua isolated from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Paixão, Renata; de Gobbi, Debora Dirani Sena; Raimundo, Daniele Cristine; Porfida Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana; Micke Moreno, Andrea; Hofer, Ernesto; dos Reis, Cristhiane Moura Falavina; Matté, Glavur Rogério; Matté, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  2. [Scrapie of sheep and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Iceland].

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    Georgsson, Gudmundur; Olafsson, Elías; Gudmundsson, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Scrapie of sheep and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) are both classified as prion diseases. The infectious agents of both diseases are closely related. The objectives of the study was to explore, whether sheep scrapie could be transmitted to humans and cause CJD. The occurrence of CJD was studied in a period of 40 years, 1960 to 2000. The first part of the study, which was started in 1980, was retrospective. Hospital records from the Department of Neurology of the National Hospital from the years 1960-1980 were scrutinised and paraffin blocks from the collection of the Department of Pathology from cases with the diagnosis CJD and some suspect cases were obtained and analysed. The latter part of the study was prospective, which gave the possibility to study codon 129 of PRNP gene and characterise the strain of the infectious agent. Information on the epidemiology of scrapie in Iceland and of the diet of Icelanders was collected. Four cases of CJD were detected in the 40 years studied, which corresponds to an incidence of 0.44 per million inhabitants, which is less than half the average incidence in 18 other European countries in the years 1997-2004. The low incidence of CJD in Iceland does not indicate that sheep scrapie can be transmitted to humans and cause CJD. If this were the case, we would have expected an higher incidence of CJD and possibly atypical cases, as the Icelandic population has been exposed to scrapie for 130 years.

  3. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Agrobacterium species from vineyards allows identification of typical Agrobacterium vitis and atypical biovar 1 strains.

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    Genov, N; Llop, P; López, M M; Bobev, S G; Álvarez, B

    2015-06-01

    To molecularly and phenotypically characterize a selection of Agrobacterium-like isolates from grapevine canes, crowns, soil and tumours in plants grown under cold conditions. Most of the strains were biovar 3 (Agrobacterium vitis), and the remaining were atypical biovar 1 (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). All of them were tumourigenic on grapevine plants but differences in other hosts were observed. Chromosomal and plasmid-borne traits were analysed by gene amplification with four primer sets. Detection of the pectin enzyme hydrolase gene clearly distinguished A. vitis from the atypical A. tumefaciens. Regarding the virulence sensor gene, limited host range tumour-inducing plasmids were found in the atypical isolates. About opine utilization, most A. vitis and some A. tumefaciens contained octopine/cucumopine plasmids, but the nopaline-type was only detected in one A. tumefaciens. The A. vitis strains were molecularly and phenotypically more homogeneous than those of A. tumefaciens, the latter displaying some typical A. vitis characteristics, suggesting an adaptation to life in grapevine. The findings of this work will help to improve detection procedures of the pathogen, and demonstrate the pathogen diversity in cold vineyards, laying the groundwork for epidemiological studies and development of control strategies of the crown and cane gall disease. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Scrapie resistance in ARQ sheep.

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    Laegreid, W W; Clawson, M L; Heaton, M P; Green, B T; O'Rourke, K I; Knowles, D P

    2008-10-01

    Variation in the ovine prion protein amino acid sequence influences scrapie progression, with sheep homozygous for A(136)R(154)Q(171) considered susceptible. This study examined the association of survival time of scrapie-exposed ARQ sheep with variation elsewhere in the ovine prion gene. Four single nucleotide polymorphism alleles were associated with prolonged survival. One nonsynonymous allele (T112) was associated with an additional 687 days of survival for scrapie-exposed sheep compared to M112 sheep (odds ratio, 42.5; P = 0.00014). The only two sheep homozygous for T112 (TARQ) did not develop scrapie, suggesting that the allelic effect may be additive. These results provide evidence that TARQ sheep are genetically resistant to development of classical scrapie.

  5. Scrapie Resistance in ARQ Sheep▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laegreid, W. W.; Clawson, M. L.; Heaton, M. P.; Green, B. T.; O'Rourke, K. I.; Knowles, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the ovine prion protein amino acid sequence influences scrapie progression, with sheep homozygous for A136R154Q171 considered susceptible. This study examined the association of survival time of scrapie-exposed ARQ sheep with variation elsewhere in the ovine prion gene. Four single nucleotide polymorphism alleles were associated with prolonged survival. One nonsynonymous allele (T112) was associated with an additional 687 days of survival for scrapie-exposed sheep compared to M112 sheep (odds ratio, 42.5; P = 0.00014). The only two sheep homozygous for T112 (TARQ) did not develop scrapie, suggesting that the allelic effect may be additive. These results provide evidence that TARQ sheep are genetically resistant to development of classical scrapie. PMID:18632863

  6. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    KAUST Repository

    Abd El Ghany, Moataz

    2016-05-25

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species.

  7. Epidemiological characteristics of classical scrapie outbreaks in 30 sheep flocks in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Marie McIntyre

    Full Text Available Most previous analyses of scrapie outbreaks have focused on flocks run by research institutes, which may not reflect the field situation. Within this study, we attempt to rectify this deficit by describing the epidemiological characteristics of 30 sheep flocks naturally-infected with classical scrapie, and by exploring possible underlying causes of variation in the characteristics between flocks, including flock-level prion protein (PrP genotype profile. In total, the study involved PrP genotype data for nearly 8600 animals and over 400 scrapie cases.We found that most scrapie cases were restricted to just two PrP genotypes (ARQ/VRQ and VRQ/VRQ, though two flocks had markedly different affected genotypes, despite having similar underlying genotype profiles to other flocks of the same breed; we identified differences amongst flocks in the age of cases of certain PrP genotypes; we found that the age-at-onset of clinical signs depended on peak incidence and flock type; we found evidence that purchasing infected animals is an important means of introducing scrapie to a flock; we found some evidence that flock-level PrP genotype profile and flock size account for variation in outbreak characteristics; identified seasonality in cases associated with lambing time in certain flocks; and we identified one case that was homozygous for phenylalanine at codon 141, a polymorphism associated with a very high risk of atypical scrapie, and 28 cases that were heterozygous at this codon.This paper presents the largest study to date on commercially-run sheep flocks naturally-infected with classical scrapie, involving 30 study flocks, more than 400 scrapie cases and over 8500 PrP genotypes. We show that some of the observed variation in epidemiological characteristics between farms is related to differences in their PrP genotype profile; although much remains unexplained and may instead be attributed to the stochastic nature of scrapie dynamics.

  8. Deconstructing "Atypical" Eating Disorders: an Overview of Emerging Eating Disorder Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stuart B; Anderson, Leslie K

    2015-11-01

    Recent changes to the diagnostic framework of eating disorders (ED's) in DSM-5 were introduced to reduce the large preponderance of cases falling within the residual and undifferentiated category. However, current reports continue to illustrate overrepresentation of cases in this residual category, suggesting that clinical reality comprises more diverse ED psychopathology than is accounted for in the current diagnostic spectrum. However, with emerging evidence preliminarily delineating several additional distinct phenotypes, we aim to provide a narrative overview of emerging ED phenotypes which (i) are not currently located as a specific diagnostic category in diagnostic criteria for ED's, (ii) centrally feature ED psychopathology, and (iii) have emerging empirical evidence suggesting the distinct nature of the syndrome. A greater awareness of these emerging phenotypes will likely facilitate accurate diagnostic practice and may also serve to facilitate further empirical efforts.

  9. Genetic and Pathological Follow-Up Study of Goats Experimentally and Naturally Exposed to a Sheep Scrapie Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrale, Caterina; Cancedda, Maria G.; Pintus, Davide; Masia, Mariangela; Nonno, Romolo; Ru, Giuseppe; Carta, Antonello; Demontis, Francesca; Santucciu, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thirty-seven goats carrying different prion protein genotypes (PRNP) were orally infected with a classical scrapie brain homogenate from wild-type (ARQ/ARQ) sheep and then mated to obtain 2 additional generations of offspring, which were kept in the same environment and allowed to be naturally exposed to scrapie. Occurrence of clinical or subclinical scrapie was observed in the experimentally infected goats (F0) and in only one (F1b) of the naturally exposed offspring groups. In both groups (F0 and F1b), goats carrying the R154H, H154H, R211Q, and P168Q-P240P dimorphisms died of scrapie after a longer incubation period than wild-type, G37V, Q168Q-P240P, and S240P goats. In contrast, D145D and Q222K goats were resistant to infection. The immunobiochemical signature of the scrapie isolate and its pathological aspects observed in the sheep donors were substantially maintained over 2 goat generations, i.e., after experimental and natural transmission. This demonstrates that the prion protein gene sequence, which is shared by sheep and goats, is more powerful than any possible but unknown species-related factors in determining scrapie phenotypes. With regard to genetics, our study confirms that the K222 mutation protects goats even against ovine scrapie isolates, and for the first time, a possible association of D145 mutation with scrapie resistance is shown. In addition, it is possible that the sole diverse frequencies of these genetic variants might, at least in part, shape the prevalence of scrapie among naturally exposed progenies in affected herds. IMPORTANCE This study was aimed at investigating the genetic and pathological features characterizing sheep-to-goat transmission of scrapie. We show that in goats with different prion protein gene mutations, the K222 genetic variant is associated with scrapie resistance after natural and experimental exposure to ovine prion infectivity. In addition, we observed for the first time a protective effect of the D145

  10. Sheep feed and scrapie, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Sandrine; Ducrot, Christian; Roy, Pascal; Remontet, Laurent; Jarrige, Nathalie; Calavas, Didier

    2005-08-01

    Scrapie is a small ruminant, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). Although in the past scrapie has not been considered a zoonosis, the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, transmissible to humans and experimentally to sheep, indicates that risk exists for small ruminant TSEs in humans. To identify the risk factors for introducing scrapie into sheep flocks, a case-control study was conducted in France from 1999 to 2000. Ninety-four case and 350 control flocks were matched by location and main breed. Three main hypotheses were tested: direct contact between flocks, indirect environmental contact, and foodborne risk. Statistical analysis was performed by using adjusted generalized linear models with the complementary log-log link function, considering flock size as an offset. A notable effect of using proprietary concentrates and milk replacers was observed. The risk was heterogeneous among feed factories. Contacts between flocks were not shown to be a risk factor.

  11. Atypical neuropathological sCJD-MM phenotype with abundant white matter Kuru-type plaques sparing the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ellen; Soler Insa, Josep Ma; Parchi, Piero; Saverioni, Daniela; Yagüe, Jordi; Nos, Carlos; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Ribalta, Teresa; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    We describe an atypical neuropatholgical phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 64-year-old man presenting with a 5-month history of rapidly progressive dementia, comprising behavioral disturbances, memory complaints, disorientation and language alterations. MRI showed diffuse atrophy and hyperintensities in parietal, occipital, temporal and frontal cortices and left caudate nucleus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. No typical EEG alterations were observed. Repeated 14-3-3 assay was positive after a first negative test. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes with small cortical foci of large confluent vacuoles and relatively well-preserved cerebellar cortex. The most striking feature was the presence of abundant Kuru-type plaques in both cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter. Sparse Kuru-type plaques were also seen in cerebellum, although only in white matter. Immunohistochemistry showed, in addition to unicentric plaques, diffuse synaptic and patchy perivacuolar, as well as plaque-like and periaxonal pathological prion protein deposits (PrP(res) ). Western blot studies demonstrated the co-occurrence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2 in frontal cortex and a relatively weak type 2 signal in cerebellum. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 and excluded mutations. This case shows a previously undescribed combination of histopathological features which preclude its classification according to the current phenotypic and molecular sCJD classification. The observation demonstrates that Kuru-type amyloid plaques mainly involving the cerebral white matter may also occur in sCJD cases with short clinical course and the co-existence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2. This case further highlights the complexity of the correlations between histopathological phenotype and PrP(res) isotype in prion diseases. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  12. An atypical strain of Pasteurella gallinarum: pathogenic, phenotypic, and genotypic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droual, R; Walker, R L; Shivaprasad, H L; Jeffrey, J S; Meteyer, C U; Chin, R P; Shapiro, D P

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenicity of a strain of Pasteurella gallinarum isolated in Fresno County, Calif., was compared with the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strain. Broiler chickens were inoculated intranasally with 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU) and intramuscularly with 10(5) CFU of each strain. The only notable lesions were in chickens inoculated intramuscularly with 10(5) CFU of the Fresno strain, which developed severe myositis at the inoculation site, pericarditis, perihepatitis, airsacculitis, and synovitis. P. gallinarum was reisolated from these lesions. Phenotypic characteristics of the two strains were identical except in reactions in ONPG broth and fermentation of xylose. Protein-banding patterns for the two strains were identical except for a single band difference in the 35-kilodalton region. Restriction endonuclease analysis confirmed that the Fresno strain was a distinct one. Plasmid analysis revealed that the ATCC strain had two plasmids and the Fresno strain had none.

  13. Atypical sporadic CJD-MM phenotype with white matter kuru plaques associated with intranuclear inclusion body and argyrophilic grain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Anna S; Trummert, Anita; Unterberger, Ursula; Ströbel, Thomas; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2015-08-01

    We describe an atypical neuropathological phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 76-year-old man. The clinical symptoms were characterized by progressive dementia, gait ataxia, rigidity and urinary incontinence. The disease duration was 6 weeks. MRI did not show prominent atrophy or hyperintensities in cortical areas, striatum or thalamus. Biomarker examination of the cerebrospinal fluid deviated from that seen in pure Alzheimer's disease. Triphasic waves in the EEG were detected only later in the disease course, while 14-3-3 assay was positive. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity (MM) at codon 129. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes corresponding to the MM type 1 cases. However, a striking feature was the presence of abundant kuru-type plaques in the white matter. This rare morphology was associated with neuropathological signs of intranuclear inclusion body disease and advanced stage of argyrophilic grain disease. These alterations did not show correlation with each other, thus seemed to develop independently. This case further highlights the complexity of neuropathological alterations in the ageing brain. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Identification of an atypical etiological head and neck squamous carcinoma subtype featuring the CpG island methylator phenotype

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    K. Brennan

    2017-03-01

    Further distinguishing features of this ‘CIMP-Atypical’ subtype include an antiviral gene expression profile associated with pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and CD8+ T cell infiltration, CASP8 mutations, and a well-differentiated state corresponding to normal SOX2 copy number and SOX2OT hypermethylation. We developed a gene expression classifier for the CIMP-Atypical subtype that could classify atypical disease features in two independent patient cohorts, demonstrating the reproducibility of this subtype. Taken together, these findings provide unprecedented evidence that atypical HNSCC is molecularly distinct, and postulates the CIMP-Atypical subtype as a distinct clinical entity that may be caused by chronic inflammation.

  15. Trends in genotype frequency resulting from breeding for resistance to classical scrapie in Belgium (2006~2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heyden, Sara; Roels, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In sheep, susceptibility to scrapie is mainly determined by codons 136, 154, and 171 of the PRNP gene. Five haplotypes are usually present (ARR, ARQ, ARH, AHQ, and VRQ). The ARR haplotype confers the greatest resistance to classical scrapie while VRQ renders animals most susceptible. In 2004, the European Union implemented a breeding program that promotes selection of the ARR haplotype while reducing the incidence of VRQ. From 2006 to 2011 in Belgium, frequency for the ARR/ARR genotypes increased from 38.3% to 63.8% (n = 6,437), the ARQ haplotype diminished from 21.1% to 12.9%, and the VRQ haplotype decreased from 2.0% to 1.7%. The status of codon 141, a determinant for atypical scrapie, was also evaluated. Out of 27 different breeds (n = 5,163), nine were abundant. The ARR/ARR frequency increased in eight of these nine major breeds. The selection program has had a major impact on the ARR haplotype frequency in Belgium. However, the occurrence of atypical scrapie represents a critical point for this program that warrants the continuous monitoring of scrapie. Additionally, genotype frequencies among the breeds varied greatly. Texel, a breed that is common in Belgium, can still be selected for due to its average ARR frequency. PMID:23388443

  16. Scrapie e seu diagnóstico diferencial em ovinos no Mato Grosso do Sul Scrapie and differential diagnosis in sheep in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Héllen M. Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie é uma doença infecciosa, neurodegenerativa fatal, causada pelo príon scrapie (PrPsc. Apresenta-se tanto na forma clássica em ovinos e caprinos geneticamente susceptíveis quanto na forma atípica em ovinos. A primeira notificação oficial do Brasil à Organização Mundial de Saúde Animal (OIE, um caso da forma clássica diagnosticado no Rio Grande do Sul ocorreu em 1985, mas a doença já havia sido diagnosticada no mesmo Estado em 1978. Este trabalho objetivou descrever dois surtos de Scrapie em ovinos em Mato Grosso do Sul (MS, Brasil e investigar, por meio de imuno-histoquímica (IHQ a presença de PrPsc no Sistema Nervoso Central (SNC de ovinos examinados entre 2003 e 2010. Na primeira parte observaram-se dois ovinos com sinais clínicos típicos de scrapie, detalhando-se os sinais neurológicos, dados epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e amostras teciduais em duplicata desses ovinos foram encaminhadas para realização de diagnóstico de Raiva e para diagnóstico IHQ para príon. Na segunda parte realizou-se levantamento de laudos de necropsia e diagnósticos histopatológicos de ovinos, no período de maio de 2003 a março de 2010. Amostras de sistema nervoso central de 51 casos foram selecionados, incluindo os dois já com diagnóstico de Scrapie mencionados acima; os tecido de todos esses ovinos foram submetidos à IHQ para detecção de proteína priônica. Os 49 ovinos avaliados apresentaram resultado negativo na IHQ para príon.Scrapie is a fatal neurodegenerative infectious disease, caused by the scrapie prion (PrPsc, that can both in the as the classic form in genetically susceptible sheep and goats and in the atypical form in sheep. The first official notification of scrapie from Brazil was made to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE in 1985, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, although the disease was first documented in this Brazilian state in 1978. The objective this paper was to describe two outbreaks

  17. Objects in contact with classical scrapie sheep act as a reservoir for scrapie transmission

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    Timm eKonold

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Classical scrapie is an environmentally transmissible prion disease of sheep and goats. Prions can persist and remain potentially infectious in the environment for many years and thus pose a risk of infecting animals after re-stocking. In vitro studies using serial Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (sPMCA have suggested that objects on a scrapie-affected sheep farm could contribute to disease transmission. This in vivo study aimed to determine the role of field furniture (water troughs, feeding troughs, fencing and other objects that sheep may rub against used by a scrapie-infected sheep flock as a vector for disease transmission to scrapie-free lambs with the prion protein genotype VRQ/VRQ, which is associated with high susceptibility to classical scrapie. When the field furniture was placed in clean accommodation sheep became infected when exposed to either a water trough (four out of five or to objects used for rubbing (four out of seven. This field furniture had been used by the scrapie-infected flock eight weeks earlier and had previously been shown to harbor scrapie prions by sPMCA. Sheep also became infected (20 out of 23 through exposure to contaminated field furniture placed within pasture not used by scrapie-infected sheep for 40 months, even though swabs from this furniture tested negative by PMCA. This infection rate decreased (1 out of 12 on the same paddock after replacement with clean field furniture. Twelve grazing sheep exposed to field furniture not in contact with scrapie-infected sheep for 18 months remained scrapie-free.The findings of this study highlight the role of field furniture used by scrapie-infected sheep to act as a reservoir for disease re-introduction although infectivity declines considerably if the field furniture has not been in contact with scrapie-infected sheep for several months. PMCA may not be as sensitive as VRQ/VRQ sheep to test for environmental contamination.

  18. Selective breeding for scrapie resistance in sheep

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    Cristina Santos Sotomaior

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is determined by the host’s prion protein gene (PRNP. PRNP polymorphisms at codons 136 (alanine, A/valine, V, 154 (histidine, H/arginine, R and 171 (glutamine, Q/histidine, H/arginine, R are the main determinants of sheep susceptibility/resistance to classical scrapie. There are four major variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programs have been developed in the European Union and the USA to increase the frequency of the resistant ARR allele while decreasing the frequency of the susceptible VRQ allele in sheep populations. In Brazil, little PRNP genotyping data are available for sheep, and thus far, no controlled breeding scheme for scrapie has been implemented. This review will focus on important epidemiological aspects of scrapie and the use of genetic resistance as a tool in breeding programs to control the disease.

  19. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atypical depression Overview Any type of depression can make you feel sad and keep you from enjoying life. However, atypical depression — also called depression with atypical features — means that ...

  20. Small mosaic deletion encompassing the snoRNAs and SNURF-SNRPN results in an atypical Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Lundin, Johanna; Malmgren, Helena; Lehtihet, Mikael; Nordgren, Ann

    2014-02-01

    Genetic analyses were performed in a male patient with suspected Prader-Willi syndrome who presented with hypogonadism, excessive eating, central obesity, small hands and feet and cognition within the low normal range. However, he had no neonatal hypotonia or feeding problems during infancy. Chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype. Further analysis with array-CGH identified a mosaic 847 kb deletion in 15q11-q13, including SNURF-SNRPN, the snoRNA gene clusters SNORD116 (HBII-85), SNORD115, (HBII-52), SNORD109 A and B (HBII-438A and B), SNORD64 (HBII-13), and NPAP1 (C15ORF2). MLPA confirmed the deletion and the results were compatible with a paternal origin. Metaphase-FISH verified the mosaicism with the deletion present in 58% of leukocytes analyzed. Three smaller deletions in this region have previously been reported in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype. All three deletions included SNORD116, but only two encompassed parts of SNURF-SNRPN, implicating SNORD116 as the major contributor to the Prader-Willi phenotype. Our case adds further information about genotype-phenotype correlation and supports the hypothesis that SNORD116 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of Prader-Willi syndrome. Furthermore, it examplifies diagnostic difficulties in atypical cases and illustrates the need for additional testing methods when Prader-Willi syndrome is suspected. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Selectie tegen gevoeligheid voor scrapie met behoud van genetische variatie = Selection against scrapie susceptibility while maintaining within breed genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windig, J.J.; Hoving, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    National legislation to breed for scrapie resistence was changed in 2007. The obligatory use of ARR/ARR rams was suspended in that year. Breeding for scrapie resistance is, however, still stimulated and not suspended. In this report a general advice on how to continue breeding for scrapie resistance

  2. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L that lead to atypical galactosemia

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    Benjamin Cocanougher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3–8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11–14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation.

  3. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-4 Alfa Mutation Associated with Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia and Atypical Renal Fanconi Syndrome: Expanding the Clinical Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improda, Nicola; Shah, Pratik; Güemes, Maria; Gilbert, Clare; Morgan, Kate; Sebire, Neil; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hussain, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The p.R63W mutation in the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 alpha (HNF4A) results in macrosomia and atypical Fanconi syndrome, in addition to hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HI). We describe 2 infants carrying this mutation, presenting with additional features. Cases Series: Patient 1, a male born with a birth weight of 1.7 SDS, was diagnosed with HI on day 2 of life. He responded to 3-10 mg/kg/day of diazoxide. Raised serum creatinine led to the investigation of renal tubular function, showing leaking of electrolytes and protein. The patient also had conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia with liver steatosis. Patient 2 was a male born with a weight of 0.36 SDS. His mother had renal Fanconi syndrome. He received parenteral nutrition and presented with HI at 1 month of age, while establishing enteral feeds. Biochemistry workup showed renal tubular leaking of calcium, sodium, and phosphate. A hypoglycaemia screen documented HI, and the patient was commenced on 2 mg/kg/day of diazoxide. Continuous glucose monitoring was performed in his mother, revealing overnight hypoglycaemia. Renal Fanconi syndrome represents the only HNF4A feature showing complete penetrance. Our cases suggest that the p.R63W HNF4A mutation must be considered in subjects with a normal birth weight and postulate the possibility of liver involvement as a part of this condition. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  5. Prion protein gene variability in Spanish goats. Inference through susceptibility to classical scrapie strains and pathogenic distribution of peripheral PrP(sc..

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    Cristina Acín

    Full Text Available Classical scrapie is a neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal, partially protease resistant prion protein (PrP(sc in the CNS and in some peripheral tissues in domestic small ruminants. Whereas the pathological changes and genetic susceptibility of ovine scrapie are well known, caprine scrapie has been less well studied. We report here a pathological study of 13 scrapie-affected goats diagnosed in Spain during the last 9 years. We used immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques to discriminate between classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. All the animals displayed PrP(sc distribution patterns and western blot characteristics compatible with classical scrapie. In addition, we determined the complete open reading frame sequence of the PRNP in these scrapie-affected animals. The polymorphisms observed were compared with those of the herd mates (n = 665 and with the frequencies of healthy herds (n = 581 of native Spanish goats (Retinta, Pirenaica and Moncaina and other worldwide breeds reared in Spain (Saanen, Alpine and crossbreed. In total, sixteen polymorphic sites were identified, including the known amino acid substitutions at codons G37V, G127S, M137I, I142M, H143R, R151H, R154H, R211Q, Q222K, G232W, and P240S, and new polymorphisms at codons G74D, M112T, R139S, L141F and Q215R. In addition, the known 42, 138 and 179 silent mutations were detected, and one new one is reported at codon 122. The genetic differences observed in the population studied have been attributed to breed and most of the novel polymorphic codons show frequencies lower than 5%. This work provides the first basis of polymorphic distribution of PRNP in native and worldwide goat breeds reared in Spain.

  6. Genome-wide association studies identify two novel BMP15 mutations responsible for an atypical hyperprolificacy phenotype in sheep.

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    Julie Demars

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS and ovulation rate (OR were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases and normal prolific ewes (controls from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E(-05 and 1E(-07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecX(Gr and FecX(O were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (p FecX (Gr = 5.98E(-06 and p FecX(O = 2.55E(-08. Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecX(Gr/FecX(Gr, LS = 2.50 ± 0.65 versus FecX(+/FecX(Gr, LS = 1.93 ± 0.42, p<1E(-03 and FecX(O/FecX(O, OR = 3.28 ± 0.85 versus FecX(+/FecX(O, OR = 2.02 ± 0.47, p<1E(-03. Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecX(Gr/FecX(Gr Grivette and homozygous FecX(O/FecX(O Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  7. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E−05 and 1E−07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr = 5.98E−06 and pFecXO = 2.55E−08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS = 2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS = 1.93±0.42, p<1E−03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR = 3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR = 2.02±0.47, p<1E−03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  8. Atypical Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Ertekin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypical depression is defined as a specifier of major depressive disorder. Columbia criteria for atypical depression are commonly used to make a diagnosis. Female sex, onset at early age, chronic course, and higher rate of comorbidity (especially anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder is noteworthy in atypical depression. Although, the atypical depression seems to support the familial genetic transition, there is not any specific study supporting these data. In the treatment of atypical depression, monoamine oxidase inhibitors are reported to be more effective than tricyclic antidepressants. In recent studies, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also proven to be efficient.

  9. Experimental infection of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) with sheep scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, CM; Schneider, Jay R.; Pedersen, Janice C.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are permissive to chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection, but their susceptibility to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is poorly characterized. In this initial study, we intracerebrally challenged 6 meadow voles with 2 isolates of sheep scrapie. Three meadow voles acquired a TSE after the scrapie challenge and an extended incubation period. The glycoform profile of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP(res)) in scrapie-sick voles remained similar to the sheep inocula, but differed from that of voles clinically affected by CWD. Vacuolization patterns and disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition were generally similar in all scrapie-affected voles, except in the hippocampus, where PrP(Sc) staining varied markedly among the animals. Our results demonstrate that meadow voles can acquire a TSE after intracerebral scrapie challenge and that this species could therefore prove useful for characterizing scrapie isolates.

  10. Caprine prion gene polymorphisms are associated with decreased incidence of classical scrapie in goat herds in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldmann Wilfred

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of genetic breeding programmes to eradicate transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in goats is an important aim for reasons of animal welfare as well as human food safety and food security. Based on the positive impact of Prnp genetics on sheep scrapie in Europe in the past decade, we have established caprine Prnp gene variation in more than 1100 goats from the United Kingdom and studied the association of Prnp alleles with disease phenotypes in 150 scrapie-positive goats. This investigation confirms the association of the Met142 encoding Prnp allele with increased resistance to preclinical and clinical scrapie. It reveals a novel association of the Ser127 encoding allele with a reduced probability to develop clinical signs of scrapie in goats that are already positive for the accumulation of disease-specific prion protein in brain or periphery. A United Kingdom survey of Prnp genotypes in eight common breeds revealed eleven alleles in over thirty genotypes. The Met142 encoding allele had a high overall mean allele frequency of 22.6%, whereas the Ser127 encoding allele frequency was considerably lower with 6.4%. In contrast, a well known resistance associated allele encoding Lys222 was found to be rare (0.9% in this survey. The analysis of Prnp genotypes in Mexican Criollas goats revealed nine alleles, including a novel Phe to Leu substitution in codon 201, confirming that high genetic variability of Prnp can be found in scrapie-free populations. Our study implies that it should be feasible to lower scrapie prevalence in goat herds in the United Kingdom by genetic selection.

  11. Phenotypic variability in developmental coordination disorder: Clustering of generalized joint hypermobility with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, atypical swallowing and narrative difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Mari, Giorgia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celli, Mauro; Castori, Marco; Camerota, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a recognized childhood disorder mostly characterized by motor coordination difficulties. Joint hypermobility syndrome, alternatively termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly featuring generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. Although these two conditions seem apparently unrelated, recent evidence highlights a high rate of motor and coordination findings in children with gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT. Here, we investigated the prevalence of gJHM in 41 Italian children with DCD in order to check for the existence of recognizable phenotypic subgroups of DCD in relation to the presence/absence of gJHM. All patients were screened for Beighton score and a set of neuropsychological tests for motor competences (Movement Assessment Battery for Children and Visual-Motor Integration tests), and language and learning difficulties (Linguistic Comprehension Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Boston Naming Test, Bus Story Test, and Memoria-Training tests). All patients were also screening for selected JHS/EDS-HT-associated features and swallowing problems. Nineteen (46%) children showed gJHM and 22 (54%) did not. Children with DCD and gJHM showed a significant excess of frequent falls (95 vs. 18%), easy bruising (74 vs. 0%), motor impersistence (89 vs. 23%), sore hands for writing (53 vs. 9%), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (89 vs. 36%), constipation (53 vs. 0%), arthralgias/myalgias (58 vs. 4%), narrative difficulties (74 vs. 32%), and atypical swallowing (74 vs. 18%). This study confirms the non-causal association between DCD and gJHM, which, in turn, seems to increase the risk for non-random additional features. The excess of language, learning, and swallowing difficulties in patients with DCD and gJHM suggests a wider effect of lax tissues in the development of the nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 9 CFR 54.10 - Tests for scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tests for scrapie. 54.10 Section 54.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... proteinase resistant protein associated with scrapie, and that animal tests positive to such a test, the...

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  14. Epidemiological analysis of data for scrapie in Great Britain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Donnelly, C.; Ferguson, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the control or eradication of scrapie and any other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) possibly circulating in the sheep population has become a priority in Britain and elsewhere in Europe. A better understanding of the epidemiology of scrapie would greatly aid the

  15. A Targeted Survey for Scrapie in Jos Plateau State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Nwankiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie, a disease of sheep and goats with a progressive course and fatal outcome, has not been identified in Nigeria. Anecdotal scrapie reports by livestock workers abound. Livestock diseases like scrapie form huddles in livestock economics of countries. For 8 months we surveyed for scrapie targeting emergency/casualty slaughter sheep and goats in Jos, Nigeria. We clinically examined 510 sheep and 608 goats of local breeds, aged from 12 months to 5 years. In total 31 (5.10% goats and no sheep were clinically suspicious for scrapie. Caudal brainstem tissues of suspect animals collected postmortem were analyzed for the disease specific form of the prion protein, PrPSc, using Bio-Rad’s TeSeE ELISA rapid test kit. No sample was positive for scrapie. Fluorescent antibody test for rabies and H&E staining on samples were carried out for differential diagnosis. These showed no pathological lesions indicative for neurological disease. While our findings do not exclude the presence of scrapie in Jos, we demonstrate that targeted sampling of small ruminants for neuroinfectious disease is feasible in developing countries, pointing to the possibility of implementing such a monitoring scheme in Nigeria to prevent economic losses in small ruminant livestock as scrapie caveats from endemic countries have shown.

  16. Design and Implementation of Distributed Crawler System Based on Scrapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhao

    2018-01-01

    At present, some large-scale search engines at home and abroad only provide users with non-custom search services, and a single-machine web crawler cannot sovle the difficult task. In this paper, Through the study and research of the original Scrapy framework, the original Scrapy framework is improved by combining Scrapy and Redis, a distributed crawler system based on Web information Scrapy framework is designed and implemented, and Bloom Filter algorithm is applied to dupefilter modul to reduce memory consumption. The movie information captured from douban is stored in MongoDB, so that the data can be processed and analyzed. The results show that distributed crawler system based on Scrapy framework is more efficient and stable than the single-machine web crawler system.

  17. Scrapie : in vitro- and in vivo-separation of infectivity and scrapie-associated fibrils (SAFs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braig, Henk Ronald

    1995-01-01

    The sheep and goat disease scrapie adapted to hamsters was studied as a model for unconventionals low virus diseases which are rare, fatal, spongiform encephalopathies of animals and man characterized by sometimes extreme long incubation periods, an apparent absence of any host immune reaction, and

  18. Atypical Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which is also used to treat insomnia Vortioxetine (Trintellix) Side effects may occur with antidepressants, including atypical ... traz_imtb_ins.pdf. Accessed May 23, 2016. Trintellix (prescribing information). Deerfield, Ill.: Takeda Pharmaceuticals; 2016. http:// ...

  19. Iron and iron/manganese ratio in forage from Icelandic sheep farms: relation to scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jóhannesson T

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was undertaken in order to examine whether any connection existed between the amounts of iron in forage and the sporadic occurrence of scrapie observed in certain parts of Iceland. As iron and manganese are considered antagonistic in plants, calculation of the Fe/Mn ratios was also included by using results from Mn determination earlier performed in the same samples. Forage samples (n = 170 from the summer harvests of 2001–2003, were collected from 47 farms for iron and manganese analysis. The farms were divided into four categories: 1. Scrapie-free farms in scrapie-free areas (n = 9; 2. Scrapie-free farms in scrapie-afflicted areas (n = 17; 3. Scrapie-prone farms (earlier scrapie-afflicted, restocked farms (n = 12; 4. Scrapie-afflicted farms (n = 9. Farms in categories 1 and 2 are collectively referred to as scrapie-free farms. The mean iron concentration in forage samples from scrapie-afflicted farms was significantly higher than in forage samples from farms in the other scrapie categories (P = 0.001. The mean Fe/Mn ratio in forage from scrapie-afflicted farms was significantly higher than in forage from scrapie-free and scrapie-prone farms (P

  20. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic evidence for susceptibility and resistance against scrapie in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-03-04

    ). The cause behind the disease is infec- tion by prion proteins (Prusiner 1982). The progression of scrapie is known to be influenced by the amino acid poly- morphism of the host prion protein (PRNP) gene (Belt et al. 1995).

  2. Evidence of scrapie transmission to sheep via goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Timm; Thorne, Leigh; Simmons, Hugh A; Hawkins, Steve A C; Simmons, Marion M; González, Lorenzo

    2016-09-17

    Previous studies confirmed that classical scrapie can be transmitted via milk in sheep. The current study aimed to investigate whether scrapie can also be transmitted via goat milk using in vivo (new-born lambs fed milk from scrapie-affected goats due to the unavailability of goat kids from guaranteed scrapie-free herds) and in vitro methods (serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification [sPMCA] on milk samples). In an initial pilot study, new-born lambs of two different prion protein gene (PRNP) genotypes (six VRQ/VRQ and five ARQ/ARQ) were orally challenged with 5 g brain homogenate from two scrapie-affected goats to determine susceptibility of sheep to goat scrapie. All sheep challenged with goat scrapie brain became infected based on the immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated PrP (PrP(sc)) in lymphoid tissue, with an ARQ/ARQ sheep being the first to succumb. Subsequent feeding of milk to eight pairs of new-born ARQ/ARQ lambs, with each pair receiving milk from a different scrapie-affected goat, resulted in scrapie in the six pairs that received the largest volume of milk (38-87 litres per lamb), whereas two pairs fed 8-9 litres per lamb, and an environmental control group raised on sheep milk from healthy ewes, did not show evidence of infection when culled at up to 1882 days of age. Infection in those 12 milk recipients occurred regardless of the clinical status, PrP(sc) distribution, caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus infection status and PRNP polymorphisms at codon 142 (II or IM) of the donor goats, but survival time was influenced by PRNP polymorphisms at codon 141. Serial PMCA applied to a total of 32 milk samples (four each from the eight donor goats collected throughout lactation) detected PrP(sc) in one sample each from two goats. The scrapie agent was present in the milk from infected goats and was able to transmit to susceptible species even at early preclinical stage of infection, when PrP(sc) was undetectable in the brain of the

  3. Atypical Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  4. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coping Other mental health disorders such as anxiety Suicide from feelings of depression Prevention There's no sure way to prevent depression. ... the association between oversleeping and overeating in atypical depression. Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2015;78:52. Koyuncu A, et al. Relationship ...

  5. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism arrays identified an atypical microdeletion of the Williams-Beuren syndrome interval in a patient presenting with a different phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shijun; Yang, Yifeng; Liu, Lin; Tan, Zhiping; Zhao, Tianli

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to identify the mutation causing an atypical syndrome. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays are considered to be a major detection method for submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements smaller than 5 Mb in size. Genomic DNA samples of the patient and his parents were converted to a final concentration of 50 ng/ml. The Illumina BeadScan genotyping system and the HumanOmni1‑Quad Chip were employed to obtain the signal intensities of SNP probes. The patient presented with congenital heart disease, autism, mental retardation, growth retardation, hypercalcemia, nephroliths and cleft palate. The karyotypes of the patient and his parents were normal. The present study employed high‑resolution SNP arrays to analyze the whole genome for copy number variations (CNVs). A total of 309 CNVs were discovered. A de novo 1.5 Mb gain of chromosome 7q11.23 (Chr7: 72,357,322‑73,856,472) was identified following exclusion of CNVs presented in the Database of Genomic Variants. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the current study describes the first case of a patient presenting with Williams‑Beuren syndrome alongside supravalvular aortic stenosis, autism and cleft palate, and identifies an atypical deletion at 7q11.23.

  6. Synthetic Scrapie Infectivity: Interaction between Recombinant PrP and Scrapie Brain-Derived RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Steve; Thomzig, Achim; Ruchoux, Marie-Madeleine; Vignier, Nicolas; Daus, Martin L; Poleggi, Anna; Lebon, Pierre; Freire, Sophie; Durand, Valerie; Graziano, Silvia; Galeno, Roberta; Cardone, Franco; Comoy, Emmanuel; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Beekes, Michael; Deslys, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Jean-Guy

    2015-01-01

    The key molecular event in human cerebral proteinopathies, which include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, is the structural conversion of a specific host protein into a β-sheet-rich conformer. With regards to this common mechanism, it appears difficult to explain the outstanding infectious properties attributed to PrPSc, the hallmark of another intriguing family of cerebral proteinopathies known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) or prion diseases. The infectious PrPSc or "prion" is thought to be composed solely of a misfolded form of the otherwise harmless cellular prion protein (PrPc). To gain insight into this unique situation, we used the 263K scrapie hamster model to search for a putative PrPSc-associated factor that contributes to the infectivity of PrPSc amyloid. In a rigorously controlled set of experiments that included several bioassays, we showed that originally innocuous recombinant prion protein (recPrP) equivalent to PrPc is capable of initiating prion disease in hamsters when it is converted to a prion-like conformation (β-sheet-rich) in the presence of RNA purified from scrapie-associated fibril (SAF) preparations. Analysis of the recPrP-RNA infectious mixture reveals the presence of 2 populations of small RNAs of approximately 27 and 55 nucleotides. These unprecedented findings are discussed in light of the distinct relationship that may exist between this RNA material and the 2 biological properties, infectivity and strain features, attributed to prion amyloid. PMID:25585171

  7. [Atypical odontalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, Jens Christoph

    2005-01-01

    In spite of its first description by the English surgeon JOHN HUNTER more than 200 years ago, atypical odontalgia (AO), or phantom tooth pain, is not universally known among dentists. AO is a persistent neuropathic pain which may be initiated after deafferentiation of trigeminal nerve fibers following root canal treatment, apicectomy, or tooth extraction. In the absence of pathological clinical or radiological findings, the diagnosis is made by exclusion. After a thorough patient education about the condition, pharmacological and psychological pain management is required. Invasive and irreversible treatment attempts are contraindicated.

  8. Genetic Resistance to Scrapie Infection in Experimentally Challenged Goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroux, Caroline; Perrin-Chauvineau, Cécile; Corbière, Fabien; Aron, Naima; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Torres, Juan Maria; Costes, Pierrette; Brémaud, Isabelle; Lugan, Séverine; Schelcher, François; Barillet, Francis

    2014-01-01

    In goats, several field studies have identified coding mutations of the gene encoding the prion protein (I/M142, N/D146, S/D146, R/Q211, and Q/K222) that are associated with a lower risk of developing classical scrapie. However, the data related to the levels of resistance to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of these different PRNP gene mutations are still considered insufficient for developing large-scale genetic selection against scrapie in this species. In this study, we inoculated wild-type (WT) PRNP (I142R154R211Q222) goats and homozygous and/or heterozygous I/M142, R/H154, R/Q211, and Q/K222 goats with a goat natural scrapie isolate by either the oral or the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Our results indicate that the I/M142 PRNP polymorphism does not provide substantial resistance to scrapie infection following intracerebral or oral inoculation. They also demonstrate that H154, Q211, and K222 PRNP allele carriers are all resistant to scrapie infection following oral exposure. However, in comparison to WT animals, the H154 and Q211 allele carriers displayed only moderate increases in the incubation period following i.c. challenge. After i.c. challenge, heterozygous K222 and a small proportion of homozygous K222 goats also developed the disease, but with incubation periods that were 4 to 5 times longer than those in WT animals. These results support the contention that the K222 goat prion protein variant provides a strong but not absolutely protective effect against classical scrapie. PMID:24284317

  9. Prevalence of overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome and atypical cardiometabolic phenotypes in the adult Romanian population: PREDATORR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, S; Moţa, M; Popa, A; Moţa, E; Serafinceanu, C; Guja, C; Catrinoiu, D; Hâncu, N; Lichiardopol, R; Bala, C; Popa, A; Roman, G; Radulian, G; Timar, R; Mihai, B

    2016-09-01

    The objectives were to assess the prevalence of overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS), and to evaluate the characteristics of the metabolically unhealthy lean (MUHL) and metabolically healthy overweight/obese (MHO) phenotypes in a Romanian population-based sample from the PREDATORR study. PREDATORR was an epidemiological study with a stratified, cross-sectional, cluster random sampling design. Participants were classified into four cardiometabolic phenotypes based on the BMI, the cut-off value being 25 kg/m(2), and the presence of MetS (defined according to the Harmonization definition 2009): MUHL, MHO, metabolically healthy lean (MHL) and metabolically unhealthy overweight/obese (MUHO). Overall, 2681 subjects aged 20-79 years were included in the analysis. The overall age and sex-adjusted prevalence of obesity was 31.90 %, overweight was 34.7 %, abdominal obesity was 73.90 % and MetS was 38.50 %. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of MHO phenotype was 31.60 %, while MUHL phenotype prevalence was 3.90 %. MUHL and MHO participants had a cardiometabolic profile, kidney function and CVD risk intermediary between MHL and MUHO. MUHL had higher odds of being associated with CVD risk (OR 5.8; p < 0.001), abdominal obesity, prediabetes, diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia than MHL, while MHO phenotype was associated with hypo-HDL cholesterolemia (OR 3.1; p = 0.002), prediabetes (OR 2.9; p < 0.001) and abdominal obesity. PREDATORR study showed a high prevalence of obesity/overweight, abdominal obesity and MetS in the adult Romanian population, and their association with kidney function and several cardiometabolic factors.

  10. Glutathione peroxidase (GPX activity in blood of ewes on farms in different scrapie categories in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiríksson Tryggvi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preliminary studies indicated decreased glutathione peroxidase (GPX activity in blood of ewes on scrapie-afflicted farms. Other studies have shown decreased GPX activity in brain of prion-infected mice and in prion-infected cells in vitro. The aim of this study was to examine the GPX activity in blood as well as the distribution of GPX-activity levels from ewes on farms in scrapie-afflicted areas in Iceland. Methods Blood samples were collected from 635 ewes (non-pregnant [n = 297] and pregnant [n = 338] on 40 farms in scrapie-afflicted areas during the years 2001–2005, for analysis of GPX activity. The farms were divided into three categories: 1. Scrapie-free farms (n = 14; 2. Scrapie-prone farms (earlier scrapie-afflicted, restocked farms (n = 12; 3. Scrapie-afflicted farms (n = 14. For comparison, 121 blood samples were also collected from non-pregnant ewes on one farm (farm A in a scrapie-free area (scrapie never registered. Chi-square test was used to test for normal distribution of GPX-results, and Kruskal-Wallis test to compare GPX-results between categories. Results The GPX-results appeared to be biphasically distributed in ewes in all three scrapie categories and on farm A. The presumptive breaking point was about 300 units g Hb-1. About 30–50% of the GPX-results from ewes in all three scrapie categories were below 300 units g Hb-1 but only about 13% of the GPX-results from ewes on farm A. The mean GPX activity was highest on farm A, and was significantly lower on scrapie-prone farms than on scrapie-free or scrapie-afflicted farms (non-pregnant and pregnant ewes: P Conclusions 1 the distribution of GPX-results in blood of Icelandic ewes apparently has a biphasic character; 2 the GPX-results were higher in ewes on one farm in a scrapie-free area than in ewes on farms in the scrapie-afflicted areas; 3 GPX-activity levels were significantly lowest on earlier scrapie-afflicted, restocked farms, which might have a

  11. Transcriptomic determinants of scrapie prion propagation in cultured ovine microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    While infection by scrapie prions is dependent on expression of cellular prion protein (PrP-C), other factors must play a role since not all cells that express equivalent levels of PrP-C are permissive to infection. The aim of this study was to determine the cellular factors associated with permissi...

  12. Histopathological studies of "CH1641-like" scrapie sources versus classical scrapie and BSE transmitted to ovine transgenic mice (TgOvPrP4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bencsik

    Full Text Available The possibility of the agent causing bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE infecting small ruminants is of serious concern for human health. Among scrapie cases, the CH1641 source in particular appears to have certain biochemical properties similar to the BSE strain. In France, several natural scrapie cases were identified as "CH1641-like" natural scrapie isolates in sheep and goats. The Tg(OvPrP4 mouse line expressing the ovine prion protein is a sensitive model for studying and identifying strains of agents responsible for scrapie and BSE. This model is also very useful when studying specific scrapie source CH1641, known to be not transmissible to wild-type mice despite the similarity of some of its biochemical properties to those of the BSE strain. As it is important to be able to fully distinguish CH1641 from BSE, we herein report the histopathological data from CH1641 scrapie transmission experiments compared to specific cases of "CH1641-like" natural scrapie isolates in sheep, murine scrapie strains and BSE. In addition to the conventional vacuolar lesion profile approach and PrP(d brain mappings, an innovative differential PET-blot analysis was introduced to classify the different strains of agent and revealed the first direct concordance between ways of grouping strains on the basis of PrP(d biochemical characteristics.

  13. Novel UBQLN2 mutations linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and atypical hereditary spastic paraplegia phenotype through defective HSP70-mediated proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssou, Elisa; Chartier, Laura; Amador, Maria-Del-Mar; Lam, Roselina; Lautrette, Géraldine; Nicol, Marie; Machat, Selma; Da Barroca, Sandra; Moigneu, Carine; Mairey, Mathilde; Larmonier, Thierry; Saker, Safaa; Dussert, Christelle; Forlani, Sylvie; Fontaine, Bertrand; Seilhean, Danielle; Bohl, Delphine; Boillée, Séverine; Meininger, Vincent; Couratier, Philippe; Salachas, François; Stevanin, Giovanni; Millecamps, Stéphanie

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in UBQLN2 have been associated with rare cases of X-linked juvenile and adult forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS linked to frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we report 1 known (c.1489C>T, p.Pro497Ser, P497S) and 3 novel (c.1481C>T, p.Pro494Leu, P494L; c.1498C>T, p.Pro500Ser, P500S; and c.1516C>G, p.Pro506Ala, P506A) missense mutations in the PXX domain of UBQLN2 in familial motor neuron diseases including ALS and spastic paraplegia (SP). A novel missense mutation (c.1462G>A, p.Ala488Thr, A488T) adjacent to this hotspot UBQLN2 domain was identified in a sporadic case of ALS. These mutations are conserved in mammals, are absent from ExAC and gnomAD browsers, and are predicted to be deleterious by SIFT in silico analysis. Patient lymphoblasts carrying a UBQLN2 mutation showed absence of ubiquilin-2 accumulation, disrupted binding with HSP70, and impaired autophagic pathway. Our results confirm the role of PXX repeat in ALS pathogenesis, show that UBQLN2-linked disease can manifest like a SP phenotype, evidence a highly reduced disease penetrance in females carrying UBQLN2 mutations, which is important information for genetic counseling, and underline the pivotal role of ubiquilin-2 in proteolysis regulation pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Infectivity of scrapie prions bound to a stainless steel surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Zobeley, E.; Flechsig, E.; Cozzio, A.; Enari, M; Weissmann, C

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The transmissible agent of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is not readily destroyed by conventional sterilization and transmissions by surgical instruments have been reported. Decontamination studies have been carried out thus far on solutions or suspensions of the agent and may not reflect the behavior of surface-bound infectivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As a model for contaminated surgical instruments, thin stainless-steel wire segments were exposed to scrapie agent, washed exha...

  15. Accumulation profiles of PrPSc in hemal nodes of naturally and experimentally scrapie-infected sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In classical scrapie, the disease-associated abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of normal prion protein accumulates principally in the nervous system and lymphoid tissues of small ruminants. Lymph nodes traffic leukocytes via lymphatic and blood vasculatures but hemal nodes lack lymphatic vessels and thus traffic leukocytes only via the blood. Although PrPSc accumulation profiles are well-characterized in ovine lymphoid tissues, there is limited information on such profiles in hemal nodes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the follicular accumulation of PrPSc within hemal nodes and lymph nodes by prion epitope mapping and western blot studies. Results Our studies found that PrPSc accumulation in 82% of animals’ abdominal hemal nodes when PrPSc is detected in both mesenteric and retropharyngeal lymph nodes collected from preclinical and clinical, naturally and experimentally (blood transfusion) scrapie-infected sheep representing all three major scrapie-susceptible Prnp genotypes. Abdominal hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes were then used to analyze immune cell phenotypes and PrPSc epitope mapping by immunohistochemistry and PrPSc banding patterns by western blot. Similar patterns of PrPSc accumulation were detected within the secondary follicles of hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes, where cellular labeling was mostly associated with macrophages and follicular dendritic cells. The pattern of PrPSc accumulation within hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes also did not differ with respect to epitope mapping with seven mAbs (N-terminus, n = 4; globular domain, n = 2; C-terminus, n = 1) in all three Prnp genotypes. Western blot analysis of hemal node and retropharyngeal lymph node homogenates revealed identical three banding patterns of proteinase K resistant PrPSc. Conclusion Despite the anatomical difference in leukocyte trafficking between lymph nodes and hemal nodes, the follicles of hemal nodes appear to

  16. Quantitating PrP polymorphisms present in prions from heterozygous scrapie-infected sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrapie is a prion (PrPSc) disease of sheep. The incubation period of sheep scrapie is strongly influenced by polymorphisms at positions 136, 154, and 171 of a sheep’s normal cellular prion protein (PrPC). Chymotrypsin was used to digest sheep recombinant PrP to identify a set of characteristic pept...

  17. Immunohistochemical distinction between preclinical bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie infection in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuring, C.M.A.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Sweeney, T.

    2005-01-01

    Sheep are susceptible experimentally to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the clinical signs being indistinguishable from those of scrapie. Because of the possibility of natural ovine BSE infection, laboratory tests are needed to distinguish between scrapie and BSE infection. The objectives of

  18. Prenatal transmission of scrapie in sheep and goats: A case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... or unwashed in vivo derived embryos are hazards for the transmission of scrapie. Evidence from causal reasoning, including experience from other prion diseases, shows that mechanisms exist for prenatal transmission and transmission by semen and embryos in both sheep and goats. Keywords: Goat, Prenatal, Scrapie, ...

  19. Selection for scrapie resistance decreased inbreeding rates in two rare sheep breeds in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windig, J.J.; Hoving-Bolink, A.H.; Hiemstra, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    An attempt to balance selection intensity and conservation of genetic diversity was made in the national program for breeding for scrapie resistance in the Netherlands. The ARR allele is associated with resistance to scrapie. In the Netherlands a breeding program was started on a voluntary basis in

  20. Scrapie prion liposomes and rods exhibit target sizes of 55,000 Da

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellinger-Kawahara, C.G.; Kempner, E.; Groth, D.; Gabizon, R.; Prusiner, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    Scrapie is a degenerative neurologic disease in sheep and goats which can be experimentally transmitted to laboratory rodents. Considerable evidence suggests that the scrapie agent is composed largely, if not entirely, of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Inactivation of scrapie prions by ionizing radiation exhibited single-hit kinetics and gave a target size of 55,000 +/- 9000 mol wt. The inactivation profile was independent of the form of the prion. Scrapie agent infectivity in brain homogenates, microsomal fractions, detergent-extracted microsomes, purified amyloid rods, and liposomes exhibited the same inactivation profile. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious particle causing scrapie contains approximately 2 PrPSc molecules.

  1. Substantiating atypical phenotypes of epidermolysis bullosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gostynska, Katarzyna Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In dit proefschrift worden studies beschreven die zich concentreren op de moleculaire diagnostiek van epidermolysis bullosa (EB). De studies zijn tot stand gekomen door de samenwerking van het Centrum voor Blaarziekten van de afdelingen Dermatologie en Genetica van het Universitair Medisch Centrum

  2. Prions in Milk from Ewes Incubating Natural Scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroux, Caroline; Simon, Stéphanie; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Maillet, Séverine; Mathey, Jacinthe; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Cassard, Hervé; Costes, Pierrette; Bergonier, Dominique; Weisbecker, Jean-Louis; Moldal, Torffin; Simmons, Hugh; Lantier, Frederic; Feraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Grassi, Jacques; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrPSc accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 µg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species. PMID:19079578

  3. Prions in milk from ewes incubating natural scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lacroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrP(Sc accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 microg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species.

  4. Pathological prion protein in the tongues of sheep infected with naturally occurring scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Crescio, Maria Ines; Martucci, Francesca; Mazza, Maria; Ru, Giuseppe; Bozzetta, Elena; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Caramelli, Maria

    2005-05-01

    Tongue involvement by prion spreading was shown to be a common outcome after oral or intracranial experimental challenge with scrapie and transmissible mink encephalopathy sources in rodent models. It is also known that bovine spongiform encephalopathy, which is pathogenic for humans, is experimentally transmissible to sheep and can lead to a disease indistinguishable from scrapie. A recent European Food Safety Authority opinion recommended research into PrPsc accumulation in the tongues of ruminants. We report on the detection of PrPsc in the tongues of seven scrapie-infected sheep by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting.

  5. [In vitro modification of the morphology and the growth of cells infected with scrapie (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, P; Dormont, D; Maunoury, R; Delamarche, C; Delpech, A; Dianoux, L; Latarjet, R

    1982-02-15

    Seven cell lines originated either in brains or in neuroblastomas of Mice, were infected with Scrapie. After 12 to 16 in vitro passages, 6 lines out of 7 showed changes of their morphology, and of their growth, resembling those occurring in the course of a malignant transformation. The Scrapie infected cells acquired the capacity to form 2 to 4 times more colonies in liquid medium than the controls, and to develop large tridimensional colonies in semisolid medium. The role of Scrapie in these changes is discussed.

  6. [Trials of in vitro propagation of the scrapie agent in mouse nerve cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, P; Dormont, D; Delpech, B; Court, L; Latarjet, R

    1981-11-02

    We attempted to propagate the Scrapie agent in vitro in glia and neuroblastoma cells of Mice. Four out of seven assays of infection were positive, i.e. after several passages in vitro yielding at most a 10(9) fold final dilution of the original material, the extracts of each of the four cultures, when injected intracerebrally into CD1 Mice, produced a deadly disease displaying the clinical and pathological signs characteristic of Scrapie.

  7. The Limits of Test-Based Scrapie Eradication Programs in Goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Fabien; Chauvineau-Perrin, Cécile; Lacroux, Caroline; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Thomas, Myriam; Brémaud, Isabelle; Chartier, Christophe; Barillet, Francis; Schelcher, François; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant post-mortem testing programs were initially designed for monitoring the prevalence of prion disease. They are now considered as a potential alternative to genetic selection for eradicating/controlling classical scrapie at population level. If such policy should be implemented, its success would be crucially dependent on the efficiency of the surveillance system used to identify infected flocks. In this study, we first determined the performance of post-mortem classical scrapie detection in eight naturally affected goat herds (total n = 1961 animals) according to the age at culling. These results provided us with necessary parameters to estimate, through a Monte Carlo simulation model, the performance of scrapie detection in a commercial population. According to this model, whatever the number of tests performed, post mortem surveillance will have limited success in identifying infected herds. These data support the contention that scrapie eradication programs relying solely on post mortem testing in goats will probably fail. Considering the epidemiological and pathological similarities of scrapie in sheep and goats, the efficiency of scrapie surveillance in both species is likely to be similar. PMID:23372789

  8. Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbian, Kent D.; Race, Brent; Favara, Cynthia; Gardner, Don; Taubner, Lara; Porcella, Stephen; Race, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood. To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)–resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles. Unique 263K molecular and biochemical profiles evolved in each of the infected hamster species. Characteristics of 263K in the new hamster species seemed to correlate best with host factors rather than agent strain. Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species. PMID:19193264

  9. Scrapie e seu diagnóstico diferencial em ovinos no Mato Grosso do Sul Scrapie and differential diagnosis in sheep in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Héllen M. Martins; Carvalho,Nilton M.; Nickolly L.K.S. Ribas; David Driemeier; Lemos,Ricardo A.A.; Eurípedes B. Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Scrapie é uma doença infecciosa, neurodegenerativa fatal, causada pelo príon scrapie (PrPsc). Apresenta-se tanto na forma clássica em ovinos e caprinos geneticamente susceptíveis quanto na forma atípica em ovinos. A primeira notificação oficial do Brasil à Organização Mundial de Saúde Animal (OIE), um caso da forma clássica diagnosticado no Rio Grande do Sul ocorreu em 1985, mas a doença já havia sido diagnosticada no mesmo Estado em 1978. Este trabalho objetivou descrever dois surtos de Scra...

  10. Cloning of a Gene Whose Expression is Increased in Scrapie and in Senile Plaques in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietgrefe, S.; Zupancic, M.; Haase, A.; Chesebro, B.; Race, R.; Frey, W.; Rustan, T.; Friedman, R. L.

    1985-12-01

    A complementary DNA library was constructed from messenger RNA's extracted from the brains of mice infected with the scrapie agent. The library was differentially screened with the objectives of finding clones that might be used as markers of infection and finding clones of genes whose increased expression might be correlated with the pathological changes common to scrapie and Alzheimer's disease. A gene was identified whose expression is increased in scrapie. The complementary DNA corresponding to this gene hybridized preferentially and focally to cells in the brains of scrapie-infected animals. The cloned DNA also hybridized to the neuritic plaques found with increased frequency in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Nasal potential difference measurements in patients with atypical cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschanski, M; Famini, H; Strauss-Liviatan, N; Rivlin, J; Blau, H; Bibi, H; Bentur, L; Yahav, Y; Springer, H; Kramer, M R; Klar, A; Ilani, A; Kerem, B; Kerem, E

    2001-06-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is based on characteristic clinical and laboratory findings. However, a subgroup of patients present with an atypical phenotype that comprises partial CF phenotype, borderline sweat tests and one or even no common cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of nasal potential difference (PD) measurements in the diagnosis of CF patients with an atypical presentation and in a population of patients suspected to have CF. Nasal PD was measured in 162 patients from four different groups: patients with classical CF (n = 31), atypical phenotype (n = 11), controls (n = 50), and patients with questionable CF (n = 70). The parameter, or combination of nasal PD parameters was calculated in order to best discriminate all CF patients (including atypical CF) from the non-CF group. The patients with atypical CF disease had intermediate values of PD measurements between the CF and non-CF groups. The best discriminate model that assigned all atypical CF patients as CF used: e(response to chloride-free and isoproterenol/response to amiloride) with a cut-off >0.70 to predict a CF diagnosis. When this model was applied to the group of 70 patients with questionable CF, 24 patients had abnormal PD similar to the atypical CF group. These patients had higher levels of sweat chloride concentration and increased rate of CFTR mutations. Nasal potential difference is useful in diagnosis of patients with atypical cystic fibrosis. Taking into account both the sodium and chloride transport elements of the potential difference allows for better differentiation between atypical cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis patients. This calculation may assist in the diagnostic work-up of patients whose diagnosis is questionable.

  12. Substitutions of PrP N-terminal histidine residues modulate scrapie disease pathogenesis and incubation time in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Eigenbrod

    Full Text Available Prion diseases have been linked to impaired copper homeostasis and copper induced-oxidative damage to the brain. Divalent metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Zn2+, bind to cellular prion protein (PrPC at octapeptide repeat (OR and non-OR sites within the N-terminal half of the protein but information on the impact of such binding on conversion to the misfolded isoform often derives from studies using either OR and non-OR peptides or bacterially-expressed recombinant PrP. Here we created new transgenic mouse lines expressing PrP with disrupted copper binding sites within all four histidine-containing OR's (sites 1-4, H60G, H68G, H76G, H84G, "TetraH>G" allele or at site 5 (composed of residues His-95 and His-110; "H95G" allele and monitored the formation of misfolded PrP in vivo. Novel transgenic mice expressing PrP(TetraH>G at levels comparable to wild-type (wt controls were susceptible to mouse-adapted scrapie strain RML but showed significantly prolonged incubation times. In contrast, amino acid replacement at residue 95 accelerated disease progression in corresponding PrP(H95G mice. Neuropathological lesions in terminally ill transgenic mice were similar to scrapie-infected wt controls, but less severe. The pattern of PrPSc deposition, however, was not synaptic as seen in wt animals, but instead dense globular plaque-like accumulations of PrPSc in TgPrP(TetraH>G mice and diffuse PrPSc deposition in (TgPrP(H95G mice, were observed throughout all brain sections. We conclude that OR and site 5 histidine substitutions have divergent phenotypic impacts and that cis interactions between the OR region and the site 5 region modulate pathogenic outcomes by affecting the PrP globular domain.

  13. Rapid and discriminatory diagnosis of scrapie and BSE in retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zijderveld Fred G

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis based on prion detection in lymph nodes of sheep and goats can improve active surveillance for scrapie and, if it were circulating, for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. With sizes that allow repetitive testing and a location that is easily accessible at slaughter, retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RLN are considered suitable organs for testing. Western blotting (WB of brain homogenates is, in principle, a technique well suited to both detect and discriminate between scrapie and BSE. In this report, WB is developed for rapid diagnosis in RLN and to study biochemical characteristics of PrPres. Results Optimal PrPres detection in RLN by WB was achieved by proper tissue processing, antibody choice and inclusion of a step for PrPresconcentration. The analyses were performed on three different sheep sources. Firstly, in a study with preclinical scrapie cases, WB of RLN from infected sheep of VRQ/VRQ genotype – VRQ represents, respectively, polymorphic PrP amino acids 136, 154, and 171 – allowed a diagnosis 14 mo earlier compared to WB of brain stem. Secondly, samples collected from sheep with confirmed scrapie in the course of passive and active surveillance programmes in the period 2002–2003 yielded positive results depending on genotype: all sheep with genotypes ARH/VRQ, VRQ/VRQ, and ARQ/VRQ scored positive for PrPres, but ARQ/ARQ and ARR/VRQ were not all positive. Thirdly, in an experimental BSE study, detection of PrPres in all 11 ARQ/ARQ sheep, including 7 preclinical cases, was possible. In all instances, WB and IHC were almost as sensitive. Moreover, BSE infection could be discriminated from scrapie infection by faster electrophoretic migration of the PrPres bands. Using dual antibody staining with selected monoclonal antibodies like 12B2 and L42, these differences in migration could be employed for an unequivocal differentiation between BSE and scrapie. With respect to glycosylation of PrPres, BSE cases

  14. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Arun; Rajan Jain; Vaibhav Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  15. The impact of the genotype on the prevalence of classical scrapie at population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz-Pelaez Angel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Total number and genotypes of animals in holdings selected for the genotype & cull option in the Compulsory Scrapie Flock Scheme (CSFS in Great Britain were extracted from the National Scrapie Plan data warehouse. The association between various genotype-related measures and scrapie prevalence infection was tested using zero-inflated negative binomial models with the counts of positive cases as dependent variable, and country, number of flocks in the scheme, flock size, surveillance source and the following genotype-related measurements: the centered-log ratios (clr oof the 15 genotypes, of the proportions of the 5 alleles at codons 136, 154 and 171, of the proportions of the 5 NSP types, and two flock-susceptibility risk indicators, as explanatory variables. A total of 319341 genotyped animals from 168 holdings were included in the analysis. An increased proportion of the ARR/ARR genotype corresponded to a decrease in the number of scrapie cases. ARR/AHQ, AHQ/VRQ, ARH/VRQ and ARQ/VRQ genotypes, NSP type V, ARH, ARQ, AHQ and VRQ alleles and the low and high-susceptibility risk indicators are all associated with an increase risk in the number of scrapie cases. Regardless the management practices; the increased susceptibility that the non-ARR alleles confer on an individual could be extrapolated at the population level. Increasing prevalence of ARR allele reduces the overall risk of scrapie at population level. At genotype level, the VRQ/VRQ genotype, present a very low frequency in the study population, seems to play a residual effect in the overall risk of scrapie in a flock.

  16. Within-holding prevalence of sheep classical scrapie in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Río Vilas Víctor J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data from the Compulsory Scrapie Flocks Scheme (CSFS, part of the compulsory eradication measures for the control of scrapie in the EU, have been used to estimate the within-holding prevalence of classical scrapie in Great Britain (GB. Specifically data from one of the testing routes within the CSFS have been used; the initial cull (IC, whereby two options can be applied: the whole flock cull option by which the entire flock is depopulated, and the genotyping and cull of certain genotypes. Results Between April 2005 and September 2007, 25,316 suitable samples, submitted from 411 flocks in 213 scrapie-affected holdings in Great Britain, were tested for scrapie. The predicted within-holding prevalence for the initial cull was 0.65% (95% CI: 0.55–0.75. For the whole cull option was 0.47% (95% CI: 0.32–0.68 and for the genotype and cull or mixed option (both options applied in different flocks of the same holding, the predicted within-holding prevalence was 0.7% (95% CI: 0.6–0.83. There were no significant differences in the within-flock prevalence between countries (England, Scotland and Wales or between CSFS holdings by the surveillance stream that detected the index case. The number of CSFS flocks on a holding did not affect the overall within-holding prevalence of classical scrapie. Conclusion These estimates are important in the discussion of the epidemiological implications of the current EU testing programme of scrapie-affected flocks and to inform epidemiological and mathematical models. Furthermore, these estimates may provide baseline data to assist the design of future surveillance activities and control policies with the aim to increase their efficiency.

  17. Quantitative detection and biological propagation of scrapie seeding activity in vitro facilitate use of prions as model pathogens for disinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pritzkow

    Full Text Available Prions are pathogens with an unusually high tolerance to inactivation and constitute a complex challenge to the re-processing of surgical instruments. On the other hand, however, they provide an informative paradigm which has been exploited successfully for the development of novel broad-range disinfectants simultaneously active also against bacteria, viruses and fungi. Here we report on the development of a methodological platform that further facilitates the use of scrapie prions as model pathogens for disinfection. We used specifically adapted serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA for the quantitative detection, on steel wires providing model carriers for decontamination, of 263K scrapie seeding activity converting normal protease-sensitive into abnormal protease-resistant prion protein. Reference steel wires carrying defined amounts of scrapie infectivity were used for assay calibration, while scrapie-contaminated test steel wires were subjected to fifteen different procedures for disinfection that yielded scrapie titre reductions of ≤10(1- to ≥10(5.5-fold. As confirmed by titration in hamsters the residual scrapie infectivity on test wires could be reliably deduced for all examined disinfection procedures, from our quantitative seeding activity assay. Furthermore, we found that scrapie seeding activity present in 263K hamster brain homogenate or multiplied by PMCA of scrapie-contaminated steel wires both triggered accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein and was further propagated in a novel cell assay for 263K scrapie prions, i.e., cerebral glial cell cultures from hamsters. The findings from our PMCA- and glial cell culture assays revealed scrapie seeding activity as a biochemically and biologically replicative principle in vitro, with the former being quantitatively linked to prion infectivity detected on steel wires in vivo. When combined, our in vitro assays provide an alternative to titrations of biological

  18. Detection of PrPSc in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue by Western Blot Differentiates Classical Scrapie, Nor98 Scrapie, and BSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with the presence of an infectious abnormal isoform of normal mammalian proteins called prions (PrP**Sc). Identification of PrP**Sc in the CNS is typicall...

  19. Immunohistochemical studies of scrapie archival material from Irish ARQ/ARQ sheep for evidence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-derived disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharpe, A.; McElroy, M.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Bassett, H.; O'Donoghue, A.M.; Sweeney, T.

    2005-01-01

    Since scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep are clinicopathologically indistinguishable, BSE in sheep may have been misdiagnosed as scrapie. Disease-specific prion protein (PrPd) patterns in archival tissues of 38 Irish ARQ/ARQ sheep diagnosed as scrapie-affected were compared

  20. Lack of relationship between Visna/maedi infection and scrapie resistance genetic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eider Salazar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between Visna/maedi virus (VMV antibody status and scrapie genetic resistance of 10,611 Rasa Aragonesa sheep from 17 flocks in Aragón (Spain was investigated. The fifteen most common PRNP gene haplotypes and genotypes were identified and the genotypes were classified into the corresponding scrapie risk groups (groups 1 to 5. ARQ (93.3% and ARR (31.8% were the most common haplotypes and ARQ/ARQ (56% and ARR/ARQ (25.6% were the most common genotypes. The frequencies of scrapie risk groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were 3.3%, 27.3%, 63.5%, 1.2% and 4.8%, respectively. Overall Visna/maedi seroprevalence was 53% and flock seroprevalence ranged between 21-86%. A random effects logistic regression model indicated that sheep VMV serological status (outcome variable was not associated with any particular scrapie risk group. Instead, VMV seropositivity progressively increased with age, was significantly greater in females compared to males and varied between flocks. The absence of a relationship between VMV infection and scrapie genotypes is important for VMV control and specifically for sheep participating in an ELISA-based Visna/maedi control program.

  1. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination.

  2. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will be approved by the Administrator when...

  3. Lack of prion accumulation in lymphoid tissues of PRNP ARQ/ARR sheep intracranially inoculated with the agent of scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted horizontally. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent and the tissue levels and distribution of PrPSc in affected sheep. The purpose of this study was to co...

  4. Lack of prion accumulation in lymphoid tissues of scrapie-affected sheep with AA136, QR171 polymorphism type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy which can be transmitted horizontally through the shedding of an infectious conformer (PrP**Sc) of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP**c). Genetics profoundly influence the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie. PrP**c amino-...

  5. Evaluation of two commercial, rapid, ELISA kits testing or scrapie in retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kittelberger, R.; McIntuyre, L.; Watts, S.; MacDiarmid, S.; Hannah, M.J.; Jenner, J.; Bueno, R.; Swainsbury, R.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Wemheuer, W.M.; Richt, J.A.; Sorenson, S.J.; Pigott, C.J.; O'Keefe, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the number of cases of scrapie that would occur in sheep of different prion protein (PrP) genotypes if scrapie was to become established in New Zealand, and to compare the performance of two commercially available, rapid ELISA kits using ovine retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes (RLN)

  6. Variability in disease phenotypes within a single PRNP genotype suggests the existence of multiple natural sheep scarpie strains within Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González, L.; Sisó, S.; Monleón, E.; Casalone, C.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Balkema-Buschmann, A.; Ortiz-Peláez, A.; Lulini, B.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Hoffmann, C.; Badiola, J.J.; Jeffrey, M.; Acín, C.

    2010-01-01

    Variability of pathological phenotypes within classical sheep scrapie cases has been reported for some time, but in many instances it has been attributed to differences in the PRNP genotype of the host. To address this issue we have examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB)

  7. Detection of prions in the faeces of sheep naturally infected with classical scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Linda A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Classical scrapie is a naturally transmitted prion disease of sheep and goats. Contaminated environments may contribute to the spread of disease and evidence from animal models has implicated urine, blood, saliva, placenta and faeces as possible sources of the infection. Here we sought to determine whether sheep naturally infected with classical scrapie shed prions in their faeces. We used serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA along with two extraction methods to examine faeces from sheep during both the clinical and preclinical phases of the disease and showed amplification of PrPSc in 7 of 15 and 14 of 14 sheep respectively. However PrPSc was not amplified from the faeces of 25 sheep not exposed to scrapie. These data represent the first demonstration of prion shedding in faeces from a naturally infected host and thus a likely source of prion contamination in the environment.

  8. Second passage of sheep scrapie and transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) agents in raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamir, A N; Kunkle, R A; Miller, J M; Richt, J A

    2005-11-01

    To determine the transmissibility and pathogenicity of sheep scrapie and transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) agents derived from raccoons (first passage), raccoon kits were inoculated intracerebrally with either TME (one source) or scrapie (two sources-each in separate groups of raccoons). Two uninoculated raccoon kits served as controls. All animals in the TME-inoculated group developed clinical signs of neurologic dysfunction and were euthanatized between postinoculation month (PIM) 6 and 8. Raccoons in the two scrapie-inoculated groups manifested similar clinical signs of disease, but such signs were observed much later and the animals were euthanized between PIM 12 and 18. Necropsy revealed no gross lesions in any of the raccoons. Spongiform encephalopathy was observed by use of light microscopy, and the presence of protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) was detected by use of immunohistochemical (IHC) and Western blot analytic techniques. Results of IHC analysis indicated a distinct pattern of anatomic distribution of PrPres in the TME- and scrapie-inoculated raccoons. These findings confirm that TME and sheep scrapie are experimentally transmissible to raccoons and that the incubation periods and IHC distribution for both agents are distinct. Therefore, it may be possible to use raccoons for differentiating unknown transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents. Further studies, with regard to the incubation period and the pattern of PrPres deposition by use of IHC analysis in bovine spongiform encephalopathy and for other isolates of scrapie, chronic wasting disease, and TME in raccoons are needed before the model can be further characterized for differentiation of TSE agents.

  9. Prenatal transmission of scrapie in sheep and goats: A case study for veterinary public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.B. Adams

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Unsettled knowledge as to whether scrapie transmits prenatally in sheep and goats and transmits by semen and preimplantation embryos has a potential to compromise measures for controlling, preventing and eliminating the disease. The remedy may be analysis according to a systematic review, allowing comprehensive and accessible treatment of evidence and reasoning, clarifying the issue and specifying the uncertainties. Systematic reviews have clearly formulated questions, can identify relevant studies and appraise their quality and can summarise evidence and reasoning with an explicit methodology. The present venture lays a foundation for a possible systematic review and applies three lines of evidence and reasoning to two questions. The first question is whether scrapie transmits prenatally in sheep and goats. It leads to the second question, which concerns the sanitary safety of artificial breeding technologies, and is whether scrapie transmits in sheep and goats by means of semen and washed or unwashed in vivo derived embryos. The three lines of evidence derive from epidemiological, field and clinical studies, experimentation, and causal reasoning, where inferences are made from the body of scientific knowledge and an understanding of animal structure and function. Evidence from epidemiological studies allow a conclusion that scrapie transmits prenatally and that semen and embryos are presumptive hazards for the transmission of scrapie. Evidence from experimentation confirms that semen and washed or unwashed in vivo derived embryos are hazards for the transmission of scrapie. Evidence from causal reasoning, including experience from other prion diseases, shows that mechanisms exist for prenatal transmission and transmission by semen and embryos in both sheep and goats.

  10. Clinical, electroretinographic and histomorphometric evaluation of the retina in sheep with natural scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toutain Pierre-Louis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retina is part of the diencephalon in a peripheral location and may be involved in prion diseases. Retinal function and structural changes were assessed in naturally scrapie-affected red face Manech ewes presenting the classical signs of the disease, and clinically healthy age-matched subjects for controls. Ophthalmic examination was done prior to electroretinography (ERG, which was carried out under conditions that allowed photopic and scotopic activities to be assessed. Histomorphometry of the inner and outer retinal layers was performed post-mortem, and retinas were also examined for evidence of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc accumulation and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP upregulation as a marker of gliosis. Scrapie status was determined by examination of brain tissue Results Ocular reflexes and ophthalmoscopy did not reveal any difference between scrapie affected and control animals. Although the light-and dark-adapted ERG responses of both rod-and cone-mediated functions had a similar waveform in scrapie-affected and control sheep, a significant reduction in the amplitude of the ERG a-and b-waves was observed in affected animals compared to controls. These functional alterations were correlated with a substantial loss of cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL, lengthening and disorganization in photoreceptor segments, and substantial reduction in cellularity and thickness of the inner nuclear layer (INL. The degenerative changes in the INL and ONL were most marked in the central and paracentral areas of the scrapie retinas, and were accompanied in all scrapie retinas by PrPSc deposition in the ganglion cell and synaptic layers. GFAP immunoreactivity was mainly increased in the ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers. Conclusions No appreciable fundoscopic changes were observed in the scrapie-affected ewes although reproducible changes in retinal function as measured by ERG were observed in these animals. The

  11. Scrapie e seu diagnóstico diferencial em ovinos no Mato Grosso do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    Héllen M. Martins; Carvalho,Nilton M.; Nickolly L.K.S. Ribas; David Driemeier; Lemos,Ricardo A.A.; Eurípedes B. Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Scrapie é uma doença infecciosa, neurodegenerativa fatal, causada pelo príon scrapie (PrPsc). Apresenta-se tanto na forma clássica em ovinos e caprinos geneticamente susceptíveis quanto na forma atípica em ovinos. A primeira notificação oficial do Brasil à Organização Mundial de Saúde Animal (OIE), um caso da forma clássica diagnosticado no Rio Grande do Sul ocorreu em 1985, mas a doença já havia sido diagnosticada no mesmo Estado em 1978. Este trabalho objetivou descrever dois surtos de Scra...

  12. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals. PMID:104301

  13. Atypical swallowing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, C; Prevedello, C; Giannini, L; Galbiati, G; Farronato, G

    2014-06-01

    Atypical swallowing is a myofunctional problem consisting of an altered tongue position during the act of swallowing. High incidence in population, multifactorial etiology and the recurring connection with the presence of malocclusions made it a topic of strong interest and discussion in science. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the current orientation on the topic of atypical swallowing, trying in particular to answer two questions: 1) what kind of connection is there between atypical swallowing and malocclusion; 2) what kind of therapy should be used to solve it. This review was conducted on the Medline database [www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed] searching for the keywords "atypical swallowing" and "tongue thrust". We examined all the documents from the year 1990 onwards, excluding the ones about syndromic cases of the central motor system. The causal relation between the two problems seems to be biunique: some authors affirm that this oral habit starts as a compensation mechanism for a preexisting malocclusion (especially in case of open-bite); other texts show that it has a tendency to exacerbate cases of malocclusion; it is also proven that a non-physiological tongue thrust can negatively influence the progress of an ongoing orthodontic therapy. Thereby, the best therapeutic approach seems to be a multidisciplinary one: beside orthodontics, which is necessary to correct the malocclusion, it is essential to set up a myofunctional rehabilitation procedure to correct the oral habit, therefore granting long time permanent results. There is also proof of a substantial difference between the results obtained from early (deciduous or primary mixed dentition) or later treatments. The biunique causal relation between atypical swallowing and malocclusion suggests a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach, orthodontic and myofunctional, to temporarily solve both problems. An early diagnosis and a prompt intervention have a significantly positive influence on the

  14. Identification of amino acid variation in the prion protein associated with classical scrapie in Canadian dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Mitchell, Gordon B; White, Bradley N

    2016-03-22

    A clear association of amino acid variation in the prion protein gene (PRNP) with susceptibility and resistance to classical scrapie exists in sheep, but not in goats. In this study we examined DNA sequence variation in the PRNP of 149 animals from two scrapie-infected herds of Saanen dairy goats, and identified 6 non-synonymous variants in the coding region. In the larger herd, all of the 54 scrapie-affected goats tested had at least one allele with the arginine (R) codon at position 211, with 52 being homozygous for that variant. No animal homozygous for the glutamine (Q) codon at 211 were affected and only two heterozygotes (R/Q) were affected. A weak association was found at position 146 and no significant associations were found with amino acid variation at the remaining four variant positions (142, 143, 222 and 240), however, the allelic variation was low. Similar patterns were observed in the second scrapie-affected herd. We also evaluated previous studies on goat herds affected with scrapie and this relationship of R susceptibility and Q resistance at 211 was present independent of the genotypes at the other positions including 222. The fact that glutamine at 211 provides a significant protective property to scrapie irrespective of the other positions could be important for breeding strategies aimed at improving herd resistance to scrapie, while maintaining important productivity traits.

  15. In vitro amplification of ovine prions from scrapie-infected sheep from Great Britain reveals distinct patterns of propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorne Leigh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA is a method that facilitates the detection of prions from many sources of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE. Sheep scrapie represents a unique diversity of prion disease agents in a range of susceptible PRNP genotypes. In this study PMCA was assessed on a range of Great Britain (GB sheep scrapie isolates to determine the applicability to veterinary diagnosis of ovine TSE. Results PrPSc amplification by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA was assessed as a diagnostic tool for field cases of scrapie. The technique was initially applied to thirty-seven isolates of scrapie from diverse geographical locations around GB, and involved sheep of various breeds and PRNP genotypes. All samples were amplified in either VRQ and/or ARQ PrPC substrate. For PrPSc from sheep with at least one VRQ allele, all samples amplified efficiently in VRQ PrPC but only PrPSc from ARH/VRQ sheep amplified in both substrates. PrPSc from ARQ/ARQ sheep displayed two amplification patterns, one that amplified in both substrates and one that only amplified in ARQ PrPC. These amplification patterns were consistent for a further 14/15 flock/farm mates of these sheep. Furthermore experimental scrapie strains SSBP1, Dawson, CH1641 and MRI were analysed. SSBP1 and Dawson (from VRQ/VRQ sheep amplified in VRQ but not ARQ substrate. MRI scrapie (from ARQ/ARQ sheep nor CH1641 did not amplify in ARQ or VRQ substrate; these strains required an enhanced PMCA method incorporating polyadenylic acid (poly(A to achieve amplification. Conclusions PrPsc from 52 classical scrapie GB field isolates amplified in VRQ or ARQ or both substrates and supports the use of PMCA as a rapid assay for the detection of a wide range of ovine classical scrapie infections involving multiple PRNP genotypes and scrapie strains.

  16. The distribution of four trace elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn in forage and the relation to scrapie in Iceland

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    Jóhannesson Torkell

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies indicated that the iron (Fe/manganese (Mn ratio in forage of sheep was significantly higher on scrapie-afflicted farms than on farms in other scrapie categories. This study was conducted to examine whether Fe and Mn in forage of sheep varied in general according to the scrapie status of different areas in the country. Copper (Cu and zinc (Zn were also included because of a possible relation to scrapie. Methods The country was subdivided into seven Areas (I-VII. Three Areas (I, IV, VII were designated scrapie-free (never diagnosed or eradicated and three as scrapie-endemic (II, III, VI; status of Area V was taken as unsettled. Of the harvest 2007 1552 samples were analysed from 344 farms all over the country, mostly grass silage from plastic bales (>90% and from the first cut (70% or more. Results were expressed as mg kg-1 dry matter. Results Fe varied enormously from less than 100 mg kg-1 to 5000 mg kg-1. Mn varied nearly thirtyfold (17-470 mg kg-1. Fe concentration was significantly lower in Area I than in Areas II, V and VI. Mn concentration was significantly higher in Areas I, IV and VII than in Areas II, III, V and VI. The Fe/Mn ratio was significantly less in Area I than in the other areas (except Area IV. Mean Cu concentration was 6.6-8.3 mg kg-1 and the mean Zn concentration was 24-29 mg kg-1. They differed significantly in some areas. Conclusions 1 Fe tended to be in lower amounts in sheep forage in scrapie-free than in endemic areas; 2 Mn was in higher amounts in forage in scrapie-free than endemic areas; 3 the Fe/Mn ratio was lower in scrapie-free than in endemic areas; 4 the Fe/Mn ratio may possibly be used as an indicator of scrapie status; 5 Cu and Zn in sheep forage were not related to scrapie; 6 further study on the role of Fe and Mn in the occurrence of scrapie in Iceland is needed.

  17. Rapid and discriminatory diagnosis of scrapie and BSE in retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes of sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, J.P.M.; Jacobs, J.G.; Erkens, J.H.F.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Keulen, van L.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Diagnosis based on prion detection in lymph nodes of sheep and goats can improve active surveillance for scrapie and, if it were circulating, for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). With sizes that allow repetitive testing and a location that is easily accessible at slaughter,

  18. Deletion of protease-activated receptor 2 prolongs survival of scrapie-inoculated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, R.; Olejár, Tomáš; Janoušková, O.; Holada, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 9 (2012), s. 2057-2061 ISSN 0022-1317 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : protease-activated receptor (PAR2) * scrapie * neurodegenerative disorders Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 3.127, year: 2012

  19. Semen from scrapie-infected rams does not transmit prion infection to transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarradin, Pierre; Melo, Sandrine; Barc, Céline; Lecomte, Céline; Andréoletti, Olivier; Lantier, Frédéric; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Gatti, Jean-Luc

    2008-03-01

    Scrapie is the most common transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) in livestock. Natural contamination in sheep flocks is presumed to occur by maternal transmission to offspring. However, horizontal prion transmission from animal to animal exists and may be significant in sustaining and spreading contagion in the field. Artificial insemination is widely used in modern farming, and as large amounts of prion protein have been found in sheep sperm membrane, epididymal fluid and seminal plasma, horizontal transmission by this route was hypothesized since no clear information has been obtained on possible sexual transmission of TSE. We therefore tested the contamination levels of semen from scrapie-infected rams at different stages of incubation, including the clinical phase of the disease. We report here that under our experimental conditions ram semen did not transmit infectivity to scrapie-susceptible transgenic mice overexpressing the V(136)R(154)Q(171) allele of the sheep prion (PRNP) gene. These results suggest that artificial insemination and natural mating have a very low or negligible potential for the transmission of scrapie in sheep flocks.

  20. Intraepithelial and interstitial deposition of pathological prion protein in kidneys of scrapie-affected sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciriaco Ligios

    Full Text Available Prions have been documented in extra-neuronal and extra-lymphatic tissues of humans and various ruminants affected by Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE. The presence of prion infectivity detected in cervid and ovine blood tempted us to reason that kidney, the organ filtrating blood derived proteins, may accumulate disease associated PrP(Sc. We collected and screened kidneys of experimentally, naturally scrapie-affected and control sheep for renal deposition of PrP(Sc from distinct, geographically separated flocks. By performing Western blot, PET blot analysis and immunohistochemistry we found intraepithelial (cortex, medulla and papilla and occasional interstitial (papilla deposition of PrP(Sc in kidneys of scrapie-affected sheep. Interestingly, glomerula lacked detectable signals indicative of PrP(Sc. PrP(Sc was also detected in kidneys of subclinical sheep, but to significantly lower degree. Depending on the stage of the disease the incidence of PrP(Sc in kidney varied from approximately 27% (subclinical to 73.6% (clinical in naturally scrapie-affected sheep. Kidneys from flocks without scrapie outbreak were devoid of PrP(Sc. Here we demonstrate unexpectedly frequent deposition of high levels of PrP(Sc in ovine kidneys of various flocks. Renal deposition of PrP(Sc is likely to be a pre-requisite enabling prionuria, a possible co-factor of horizontal prion-transmission in sheep.

  1. Dynamics of a scrapie outbreak in a flock of Romanov sheep-estimation of transmission parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Donelly, C.A.; Ferguson, N.M.; Anderson, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of epidemiological mechanisms and parameters underlying scrapie transmission in sheep flocks remains very limited at present. Here we introduce a method for fitting stochastic transmission models to outbreak data to estimate bounds on key transmission parameters. We apply this method to

  2. Atypical femoral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, Sandro; Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Luciani, Deianira; Mazzotti, Antonio; Donati, Davide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) represent the most widely used therapy for osteoporosis. Recently, a relationship between long-term treatment with BPs and a subset of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) from below the lesser trochanter to the sovracondilar line has been described. Many etiopathogenetic theories have been invoked to explain AFFs: reduced bone turnover and increased osteoblast bone apposition with accumulation of microdamage and decreased bone toughness with subsequent increased risk of mi...

  3. Biology of PrPsc accumulation in two natural scrapie-infected sheep flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, Patrick; O'Rourke, Katherine; Wolf, Cynthia; Shaw, Daniel; Baszler, Timothy V

    2004-11-01

    Sheep scrapie is a prion disease that requires interaction of exogenous prions with host prion protein (PrP) supporting prion formation. Disease is associated with deposition of a host-generated conformational variant of PrP, PrPsc, in a variety of tissues, including brain, resulting in fatal spongiform encephalopathy. Efficiency of PrPsc formation is determined by polymorphisms in the PrP-coding sequence. This article adds to previous data of natural sheep scrapie, concentrating on the effect of host genotype and age on PrPsc accumulation patterns during preclinical and clinical disease. Two entire scrapie-infected, predominantly Suffolk-cross, sheep flocks euthanized for regulatory purposes were genotyped and analyzed for PrPsc deposition in various tissues using single- and dual-label immunohistochemistry. Scrapie, as defined by PrPsc deposition, occurred in 13/80 sheep. Preclinical disease was evident in nearly 70% of infected sheep, ranging in age from 14 months to 7 years. PrPsc accumulated systemically in the nervous tissue, various lymphoid tissues, both alimentary tract related and non-alimentary tract related, and the placenta. Clinical neurological illness was always associated with spongiform encephalopathy and PrPsc deposition in the brain. Only 6 of 9 sheep with preclinical scrapie had PrPsc deposition in the brain but widespread PrPsc deposition in peripheral lymphoid tissue, supporting previous data showing peripheral PrPsc accumulation preceding deposition in the brain. PrPsc colocalized with a marker for follicular dendritic cells throughout the lymphoid system. PrPsc also accumulated in the peripheral nervous system, particularly the nervous supply of the gastrointestinal tract. Abundant PrPsc was evident in trophoblast cells of placentomes but not in the endometrium, myometrium, or associated nervous plexus. PrPsc deposits were not observed in the mammary parenchyma or bone marrow. Scrapie susceptibility was defined genetically by PrP codon 171

  4. Scrapie e seu diagnóstico diferencial em ovinos no Mato Grosso do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héllen M. Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie é uma doença infecciosa, neurodegenerativa fatal, causada pelo príon scrapie (PrPsc. Apresenta-se tanto na forma clássica em ovinos e caprinos geneticamente susceptíveis quanto na forma atípica em ovinos. A primeira notificação oficial do Brasil à Organização Mundial de Saúde Animal (OIE, um caso da forma clássica diagnosticado no Rio Grande do Sul ocorreu em 1985, mas a doença já havia sido diagnosticada no mesmo Estado em 1978. Este trabalho objetivou descrever dois surtos de Scrapie em ovinos em Mato Grosso do Sul (MS, Brasil e investigar, por meio de imuno-histoquímica (IHQ a presença de PrPsc no Sistema Nervoso Central (SNC de ovinos examinados entre 2003 e 2010. Na primeira parte observaram-se dois ovinos com sinais clínicos típicos de scrapie, detalhando-se os sinais neurológicos, dados epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e amostras teciduais em duplicata desses ovinos foram encaminhadas para realização de diagnóstico de Raiva e para diagnóstico IHQ para príon. Na segunda parte realizou-se levantamento de laudos de necropsia e diagnósticos histopatológicos de ovinos, no período de maio de 2003 a março de 2010. Amostras de sistema nervoso central de 51 casos foram selecionados, incluindo os dois já com diagnóstico de Scrapie mencionados acima; os tecido de todos esses ovinos foram submetidos à IHQ para detecção de proteína priônica. Os 49 ovinos avaliados apresentaram resultado negativo na IHQ para príon.

  5. Atypical presentations of neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system classically characterized by acute, severe episodes of optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. The identification of an autoantibody exclusively detected in NMO patients against aquaporin-4 (AQP-4 has allowed identification of cases beyond the classical phenotype. Brain lesions, once thought as infrequent, can be observed in NMO patients, but lesions have different characteristics from the ones seen in multiple sclerosis. Additionally, some AQP-4 antibody positive patients may present with a variety of symptoms not being restricted to optic neuritis and acute myelitis during the first attack or in a relapse. Examples are not limited to, but may include patients only with brain and/or brainstem lesions, narcolepsy with hypothalamic lesions or patients with intractable hiccups, nausea and vomiting. The prompt identification of NMO patients with atypical presentations may benefit these patients with institution of early treatment to reduce disability and prevent further attacks.

  6. Childhood Learning Disabilities and Atypical Dementia: A Retrospective Chart Review.

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    Alon Seifan

    Full Text Available To further our understanding of the association between self-reported childhood learning disabilities (LDs and atypical dementia phenotypes (Atypical Dementia, including logopenic primary progressive aphasia (L-PPA, Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA, and Dysexecutive-type Alzheimer's Disease (AD.This retrospective case series analysis of 678 comprehensive neuropsychological assessments compared rates of self-reported LD between dementia patients diagnosed with Typical AD and those diagnosed with Atypical Dementia. 105 cases with neuroimaging or CSF data available and at least one neurology follow-up were identified as having been diagnosed by the neuropsychologist with any form of neurodegenerative dementia. These cases were subject to a consensus diagnostic process among three dementia experts using validated clinical criteria for AD and PPA. LD was considered Probable if two or more statements consistent with prior LD were documented within the Social & Developmental History of the initial neuropsychological evaluation.85 subjects (Typical AD n=68, Atypical AD n=17 were included in the final analysis. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, handedness, education and symptom duration, patients with Probable LD, compared to patients without Probable LD, were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with Atypical Dementia vs. Typical AD (OR 13.1, 95% CI 1.3-128.4. All three of the L-PPA cases reporting a childhood LD endorsed childhood difficulty with language. By contrast, both PCA cases reporting Probable childhood LD endorsed difficulty with attention and/or math.In people who develop dementia, childhood LD may predispose to atypical phenotypes. Future studies are required to confirm whether atypical neurodevelopment predisposes to regional-specific neuropathology in AD and other dementias.

  7. Neurological manifestations of atypical celiac disease in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Çiğdem Genç; Aksoy, Erhan; Aksoy, Ayşe; Yüksel, Deniz; Özbay, Ferda

    2017-09-01

    Various typical and atypical neurological manifestations can be seen as the initial symptoms of celiac disease (CD). We suggest that gluten toxicity is the most suspicious triggering risk factor for probable pathophysiological pathways of neurological involvement in atypical CD. The medical charts of 117 patients diagnosed with atypical CD were retrieved from a tertiary center in Ankara, Turkey. Eight patients reported as having neurologic manifestations as initiating symptoms were evaluated in detail. The initial neurological manifestations of CD in our study included atypical absence, which was reported first in this study, generalized tonic-clonic seizures, complex partial seizures, severe axial hypotonia and down phenotype, multifocal leukoencephalopathy, mild optic neuritis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and short duration headaches. Seizures mostly emphasizing atypical absence could be the initial presentation manifestation of CD, first described in this literature. Gluten toxicity could be one of the most powerful triggering factors for developing epilepsy in CD. Learning disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, short duration headaches, mild optic neuritis, encephalopathy, and DS could also be the initial neurological manifestations of atypical CD. A gluten-restricted diet may improve neurological complaints, epileptic discharges, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. All we found may be a small part of the full range of neurological disorders of unknown origin related to CD. Clinical suspicion should be the rule for accurate diagnosis of the disease.

  8. Atypical odontalgia--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seena B; Boros, Audrey L; Kumar, Satish K S

    2012-09-01

    Atypical odontalgia is a commonly misdiagnosed condition that frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatments such as extraction and endodontic therapy. These treatments often worsen the pain. Despite greater recognition and understanding of this condition, proper diagnosis and treatment remains a challenge. It is believed that atypical odontalgia is a neuropathic condition. This article updates the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of atypical odontalgia, and provides appropriate diagnostic and management approaches for this condition.

  9. Scrapie diagnosis in a goat and four Santa Inês sheep from the same herd in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Leal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a fatal and progressive transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE of natural occurrence in sheep and goats. The suspicion of scrapie may be based on clinical signs; however, the detection of pathological features of the prionic protein (PrP in target tissues is necessary to diagnose the disease. The presence of an abnormal protein form (PrPSc in lymphoreticular and nervous tissues is an important characteristic in diagnosis. This paper reports a case of scrapie in a flock of 55 Suffolk crossbred sheep, 19 Santa Inês sheep and 21 goats in the Mato Grosso state, midwestern Brazil. The animals were euthanized after the confirmation of a scrapie case with clinical signs in a Suffolk sheep in the same farm. Samples of brainstem at the level of the obex and lymphoid issues like palatine tonsils, mesenteric lymph nodes, third eyelid fixed in formalin 10% were processed for histological examination. Histological examination with hematoxylin and eosin did not show any microscopic changes in samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC examination to detect anti-prion PrPSc was performed in lymphoid tissues. Scrapie diagnosis was confirmed based on IHC positive results for PrPSc in lymphoid tissues of a crossbreed goat and four Santa Inês sheep, without any clinical scrapie signs. IHC showed positive staining in at least three lymphoid germinal centers in goat mesenteric lymph node, palatine tonsil, and third eyelid samples. The mesenteric lymph node, and tonsil samples of all sheep showed positive immunostaining, and only one sheep showed positive staining in lymphoid follicles in the third eyelid. Scrapie diagnosis using IHC in fixed samples of lymphoreticular tissue is technically feasible to detect the disease in both goats and sheep, as a form of pre-clinical diagnosis. The results indicate that the herd was infected by a sheep coming from another herd where scrapie had been diagnosed before.

  10. Resistance to classical scrapie in experimentally challenged goats carrying mutation K222 of the prion protein gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acutis Pier Luigi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Susceptibility of sheep to scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of small ruminants, is strongly influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP. Breeding programs have been implemented to increase scrapie resistance in sheep populations; though desirable, a similar approach has not yet been applied in goats. European studies have now suggested that several polymorphisms can modulate scrapie susceptibility in goats: in particular, PRNP variant K222 has been associated with resistance in case-control studies in Italy, France and Greece. In this study we investigated the resistance conferred by this variant using a natural Italian goat scrapie isolate to intracerebrally challenge five goats carrying genotype Q/Q 222 (wild type and five goats carrying genotype Q/K 222. By the end of the study, all five Q/Q 222 goats had died of scrapie after a mean incubation period of 19 months; one of the five Q/K 222 goats died after 24 months, while the other four were alive and apparently healthy up to the end of the study at 4.5 years post-challenge. All five of these animals were found to be scrapie negative. Statistical analysis showed that the probability of survival of the Q/K 222 goats versus the Q/Q 222 goats was significantly higher (p = 0.002. Our study shows that PRNP gene mutation K222 is strongly associated with resistance to classical scrapie also in experimental conditions, making it a potentially positive target for selection in the frame of breeding programs for resistance to classical scrapie in goats.

  11. Short-term study of the uptake of PrPSc by the Peyer’s patches in hamsters after oral exposure to scrapie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Ann-Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2006-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) has been detected in the ileal Peyer's patches of lambs as early as one week after oral exposure to scrapie. In hamsters, the earliest reported time of PrPSc detection in the Peyer's patches after oral exposure to scrapie is 69 days post...... of the scrapie agent. PrPSc was demonstrated in the Peyer's patches only a few days after exposure, i.e., much earlier than previously reported. This study Supports the view that the Peyer's patches constitute at least one of the primary entry sites of PrPSc after oral exposure to scrapie....

  12. Mouse-adapted scrapie strains 139A and ME7 overcome species barrier to induce experimental scrapie in hamsters and changed their pathogenic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Gao, Chen; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Cao; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-03-09

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to be zoonotic diseases that can infect different kinds of animals. The transmissibility of TSE, like that of other infectious diseases, shows marked species barrier, either being unable to infect heterologous species or difficult to form transmission experimentally. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PrP among species is believed to be one of the elements in controlling the transmission TSE interspecies. Other factors, such as prion strains and host's microenvironment, may also participate in the process. Two mouse-adapted strains 139A and ME7 were cerebrally inoculated to Golden hamsters. Presences of scrapie associate fibril (SAF) and PrPSc in brains of the infected animals were tested by TEM assays and Western blots dynamically during the incubation periods. The pathogenic features of the novel prions in hamsters, including electrophoretic patterns, glycosylating profiles, immunoreactivities, proteinase K-resistances and conformational stabilities were comparatively evaluated. TSE-related neuropathological changes were assayed by histological examinations. After long incubation times, mouse-adapted agents 139A and ME7 induced experimental scrapie in hamsters, respectively, showing obvious spongiform degeneration and PrPSc deposits in brains, especially in cortex regions. SAF and PrPSc in brains were observed much earlier than the onset of clinical symptoms. The molecular characteristics of the newly-formed PrPSc in hamsters, 139A-ha and ME7-ha, were obviously distinct from the original mouse agents, however, greatly similar as that of a hamster-adapted scrapie strain 263 K. Although the incubation times and main disease signs of the hamsters of 139A-ha and ME7-ha were different, the pathogenic characteristics and neuropathological changes were highly similar. This finding concludes that mouse-adapted agents 139A and ME7 change their pathogenic characteristics during the transmission to

  13. INCREASING FOOD CHAIN SECURITY FOR SCRAPIE BY MARKER ASSISTED SELECTION IN SHEEP POPULATIONS

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    COŞIER VIORICA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Romania, by its genetic found made up of over 7.4 millions sheep and 1.8 millionsyoung sheep exported in EU countries, represents an important mark in bothEuropean and World sheep breeding sector, in last years marked by many ESSTcenters. The apparition of this disease and its high risk of danger for reared effectiveconstraint EEC countries to interfere by law regulations concerning scrapie controland stopping disease spreading. In our country, controls identified the presence ofscrapie in livestock. The international reference laboratories post mortem certifiedthe presence of disease. Immunohistochemical detection of PrPSc is a standarddiagnostic method for sheep scrapie. By immunohistochemistry (IHC, PrPSc isdetected in lymphoid tissues during preclinical and clinical disease. Aftergenotypization at PrnP locus, the marker assisted selection is compulsory, and flocksinclude only genotypes with high disease resistance.

  14. INCREASING FOOD CHAIN SECURITY FOR SCRAPIE BY MARKER ASSISTED SELECTION IN SHEEP POPULATIONS

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    VIORICA COŞIER

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Romania, by its genetic found made up of over 7.4 millions sheep and 1.8 millionsyoung sheep exported in EU countries, represents an important mark in bothEuropean and World sheep breeding sector, in last years marked by many ESSTcenters. The apparition of this disease and its high risk of danger for reared effectiveconstraint EEC countries to interfere by law regulations concerning scrapie controland stopping disease spreading. In our country, controls identified the presence ofscrapie in livestock. The international reference laboratories post mortem certifiedthe presence of disease. Immunohistochemical detection of PrPSc is a standarddiagnostic method for sheep scrapie. By immunohistochemistry (IHC, PrPSc isdetected in lymphoid tissues during preclinical and clinical disease. Aftergenotypization at PrnP locus, the marker assisted selection is compulsory, and flocksinclude only genotypes with high disease resistance.

  15. Distribution of Peripheral PrPSc in Sheep with Naturally Acquired Scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, María Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Marín, Belén; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system is the hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, in some of these diseases such as scrapie or chronic wasting disease, the PrPSc can also accumulate in other tissues, particularly in the lymphoreticular system. In recent years, PrPSc in organs other than nervous and lymphoid have been described, suggesting that distribution of this protein in affected individuals may be much larger than previously thought. In the present study, 11 non-nervous/non-lymphoid organs from 16 naturally scrapie infected sheep in advanced stages of the disease were examined for the presence of PrPSc. Fourteen infected sheep were of the ARQ/ARQ PRNP genotype and 2 of the VRQ/VRQ, where the letters A, R, Q, and V represent the codes for amino-acids alanine, arginine, glutamine and valine, respectively. Adrenal gland, pancreas, heart, skin, urinary bladder and mammary gland were positive for PrPSc by immunohistochemistry and IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test in at least one animal. Lung, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle exhibited PrPSc deposits by immunohistochemistry only. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the presence of PrPSc in the heart, pancreas and urinary bladder in naturally acquired scrapie infections. In some other organs examined, in which PrPSc had been previously detected, PrPSc immunolabeling was observed to be associated with new structures within those organs. The results of the present study illustrate a wide dissemination of PrPSc in both ARQ/ARQ and VRQ/VRQ infected sheep, even when the involvement of the lymphoreticular system is scarce or absent, thus highlighting the role of the peripheral nervous system in the spread of PrPSc. PMID:24828439

  16. Mouse-adapted ovine scrapie prion strains are characterized by different conformers of PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Alana M; Hopkins, Lee; Klein, Michael A; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2007-11-01

    The agent responsible for prion disease may exist in different forms, commonly referred to as strains, with each carrying the specific information that determines its own distinct biological properties, such as incubation period and lesion profile. Biological strain typing of ovine scrapie isolates by serial passage in conventional mice has shown some diversity in ovine prion strains. However, this biological diversity remains poorly supported by biochemical prion strain typing. The protein-only hypothesis predicts that variation between different prion strains in the same host is manifest in different conformations adopted by PrPSc. Here we have investigated the molecular properties of PrPSc associated with two principal Prnp(a) mouse-adapted ovine scrapie strains, namely, RML and ME7, in order to establish biochemical prion strain typing strategies that may subsequently be used to discriminate field cases of mouse-passaged ovine scrapie isolates. We used a conformation-dependent immunoassay and a conformational stability assay, together with Western blot analysis, to demonstrate that RML and ME7 PrPSc proteins show distinct biochemical and physicochemical properties. Although RML and ME7 PrPSc proteins showed similar resistance to proteolytic digestion, they differed in their glycoform profiles and levels of proteinase K (PK)-sensitive and PK-resistant isoforms. In addition, the PK-resistant core (PrP27-30) of ME7 was conformationally more stable following exposure to guanidine hydrochloride or Sarkosyl than was RML PrP27-30. Our data show that mouse-adapted ovine scrapie strains can be discriminated by their distinct conformers of PrPSc, which provides a basis to investigate their diversity at the molecular level.

  17. Atypical Presentation of Neurosyphilis

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    L C Anand

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Five cases of neurospyhilis with atypical manifestation have been reported. Of these four cases presented as acute neurological illness and showed variable recovery after antisyp′iiilitic therapy. One of these cases had parinaud sip which was unaffected by treatment One case presented as dementia and gave poor response to therapy. In only one of these five cases was reagin in CSF demonstrated. Lange′s colloidal gold test was negative in all. As such failure to demonstrate reagin in CSF does not rule out the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. In an antibiotic era patients may inadvertently receive some antibiotics prior to presentation to a clinician and therefore are unlikely to present with typical neurological and laboratory findings.

  18. [Atypical bipolar disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Christian

    2009-04-20

    Some epidemiologic data reveal how difficult detecting atypic bipolar disorders is: 9 years of progression before the diagnosis is properly established and a specific treatment is initiated, and intervention of 4 to 5 different specialists. Incomplete symptomatology, impulsive actions, periodic alcohol abuse, compulsive buying behaviors, acute delusional episodes, medicolegal actions and comorbidities can hide or modify bipolar symptomatology. Bipolarity should be systematically screened for in case of substance abuse (40 to 60 percent of bipolar disorders), anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders etc.) and feeding disorders. In these various situations, history taking and clinical examination will help to detect signs of bipolarity: reaction to antidepressants, inefficiency, paradoxical worsening, development of behavior disorders and mood changes. Besides screening for thymic disorders, the examination will be completed by history taking of thymic disorders, suicide, toxic abuse, anxiety disorders, personal history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in childhood, depression or postpartum psychosis in women, as well as premenstrual depressive manifestations.

  19. Atypical odontalgia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratkar, Harish; Pedersen, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Since persistent and chronic pain is more common in the head and neck region than in any other part of the body, dentists are more likely to encounter these rather complex cases in their practices. This article is a review and update on atypical odontalgia (AO). AO is a persistent neuropathic pain which may be initiated after deafferentiation of trigeminal nerve fibers following root canal treatment, apicectomy, or tooth extraction, or it may be of idiopathic origin. Details concerning its characteristics, pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, and treatment are made. The aim of this article is to help the clinician with the diagnosis and management of AO. The prognosis for AO is most often only fair, and the administration of tricyclic antidepressants often resolves symptoms. Invasive and irreversible treatment attempts are not recommended.

  20. ATYPICAL KAWASAKI DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristovski, Ljiljana; Milankov, Olgica; Vislavski, Melanija; Savić, Radojica; Bjelica, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute vasculitis which occurs primarily in children under the age of 5. The etiology of the disease is still unknown. Diagnostic criteria for Kawasaki disease are fever and at least four of the five additional clinical signs. Incomplete Kawasaki disease should be taken into consideration in case of all children with unexplained fever for more than 5 days, associated with 2 or 3 of the main clinical findings of Kawasaki disease. The diagnosis of incomplete Kawasaki disease is based on echocardiographic findings indicating the involvement of the coronary arteries. Cardiac complications, mostly coronary artery aneurysm, can occur in 20% to 25% of untreated patients and in 4% of treated patients. CASE REPORT. In this report we present a case of atypical Kawasaki disease in a 3.5-month-old infant. As soon as the diagnosis was made, the patient received high doses of intravenous immunoglobulin, with the initial introduction of ibuprofen, then aspirin with a good clinical response. Due to the presence of aneurysm of coronary arteries, further therapy involved aspirin and clopidogrel over the following 3 months, and then only aspirin for 2 years. There was a gradual regression of the changes in the coronary blood vessels to the normalization of the echocardiographic findings after 2 years. Kawasaki disease is the second most common vasculitis of childhood, so it should be included in the differential diagnosis for any child with a prolonged unexplained fever. Atypical Kawasaki disease should be taken into consideration in cases when not all clinical criteria are present but coronary abnormalities are documented.

  1. Atypical depression: current perspectives

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    Łojko D

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dorota Łojko,1 Janusz K Rybakowski1,2 1Department of Adult Psychiatry, 2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Abstract: The history and present status of the definition, prevalence, neurobiology, and treatment of atypical depression (AD is presented. The concept of AD has evolved through the years, and currently, in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM, Fifth Edition, the specifier of depressive episode with atypical feature is present for both diagnostic groups, that is, depressive disorders and bipolar and related disorders. This specifier includes mood reactivity, hyperphagia, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis, and interpersonal rejection sensitivity. Prevalence rates of AD are variable, depending on the criteria, methodology, and settings. The results of epidemiological studies using DSM criteria suggest that 15%–29% of depressed patients have AD, and the results of clinical studies point to a prevalence of 18%–36%. A relationship of AD with bipolar depression, seasonal depression, and obesity has also been postulated. Pathogenic research has been mostly focused on distinguishing AD from melancholic depression. The differences have been found in biochemical studies in the areas of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, inflammatory markers, and the leptin system, although the results obtained are frequently controversial. A number of findings concerning such differences have also been obtained using neuroimaging and neurophysiological and neuropsychological methods. An initial concept of AD as a preferentially monoamine oxidase inhibitor-responsive depression, although confirmed in some further studies, is of limited use nowadays. Currently, despite numerous drug trials, there are no comprehensive treatment guidelines for AD. We finalize the article by describing the future research perspectives for the definition, neurobiology, and treatment. A better

  2. Atypical depression: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łojko, Dorota; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2017-01-01

    The history and present status of the definition, prevalence, neurobiology, and treatment of atypical depression (AD) is presented. The concept of AD has evolved through the years, and currently, in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), Fifth Edition, the specifier of depressive episode with atypical feature is present for both diagnostic groups, that is, depressive disorders and bipolar and related disorders. This specifier includes mood reactivity, hyperphagia, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis, and interpersonal rejection sensitivity. Prevalence rates of AD are variable, depending on the criteria, methodology, and settings. The results of epidemiological studies using DSM criteria suggest that 15%–29% of depressed patients have AD, and the results of clinical studies point to a prevalence of 18%–36%. A relationship of AD with bipolar depression, seasonal depression, and obesity has also been postulated. Pathogenic research has been mostly focused on distinguishing AD from melancholic depression. The differences have been found in biochemical studies in the areas of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, inflammatory markers, and the leptin system, although the results obtained are frequently controversial. A number of findings concerning such differences have also been obtained using neuroimaging and neurophysiological and neuropsychological methods. An initial concept of AD as a preferentially monoamine oxidase inhibitor-responsive depression, although confirmed in some further studies, is of limited use nowadays. Currently, despite numerous drug trials, there are no comprehensive treatment guidelines for AD. We finalize the article by describing the future research perspectives for the definition, neurobiology, and treatment. A better specification of diagnostic criteria and description of clinical picture, a genome-wide association study of AD, and establishing updated treatment recommendations for this clinical phenomenon should be

  3. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

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    Anja M Oelschlegel

    Full Text Available Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice. We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  4. Gene expression alterations in brains of mice infected with three strains of scrapie

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    Race Richard E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders which occur in humans and various animal species. Examples include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD in deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep, and experimental mice. To gain insights into TSE pathogenesis, we made and used cDNA microarrays to identify disease-associated alterations in gene expression. Brain gene expression in scrapie-infected mice was compared to mock-infected mice at pre-symptomatic and symptomatic time points. Three strains of mouse scrapie that show striking differences in neuropathology were studied: ME7, 22L, and Chandler/RML. Results In symptomatic mice, over 400 significant gene expression alterations were identified. In contrast, only 22 genes showed significant alteration in the pre-symptomatic animals. We also identified genes that showed significant differences in alterations in gene expression between strains. Genes identified in this study encode proteins that are involved in many cellular processes including protein folding, endosome/lysosome function, immunity, synapse function, metal ion binding, calcium regulation and cytoskeletal function. Conclusion These studies shed light on the complex molecular events that occur during prion disease, and identify genes whose further study may yield new insights into strain specific neuropathogenesis and ante-mortem tests for TSEs.

  5. Classical sheep scrapie in Great Britain: spatial analysis and identification of environmental and farm-related risk factors

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    Del Río Vilas Victor J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies suggest that the spatial distribution of classical sheep scrapie in Great Britain is uneven and that certain flock characteristics may be associated with occurrence of the disease. However, the existence of areas of high and low disease-risk may also result from differences in the spatial distribution of environmental characteristics. In this study we explored the spatial pattern of classical scrapie in Great Britain between 2002 and 2005 and investigated the association between disease occurrence and various environmental and farm-related risk factors. Results Exploratory spatial analysis: South Wales was found to have a higher density of scrapie-positive farms than the rest of Great Britain. In addition, a small cluster of high-risk farms was identified in the center of this region in which clustering of scrapie-positive farms occurred up to a distance of approximately 40 km. Spatial modelling: A mixed-effects regression model identified flock-size and soil drainage to be significantly associated with the occurrence of scrapie in England and Wales (area under the curve (AUC 0.71 ± 0.01, 95% CI 0.68 - 0.74. The predictive risk map based on the estimated association between these factors and disease occurrence showed most of Wales to be at risk of being confirmed positive for scrapie with areas of highest risk in central and south Wales. In England, areas with the highest risk occurred mainly in the north and the midlands. Conclusion The observed distribution of scrapie in Great Britain exhibited a definite spatial pattern with south Wales identified as an area of high occurrence. In addition both flock (flock size and environmental variables (soil drainage were found to be significantly associated with the occurrence of the disease. However, the model's AUC indicated unexplained variation remaining in the model and the source of this variation may lie in farm-level characteristics rather than spatially

  6. Spatial distribution of the active surveillance of sheep scrapie in Great Britain: an exploratory analysis

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    Hyder Kieran

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper explores the spatial distribution of sampling within the active surveillance of sheep scrapie in Great Britain. We investigated the geographic distribution of the birth holdings of sheep sampled for scrapie during 2002 – 2005, including samples taken in abattoir surveys (c. 83,100 and from sheep that died in the field ("fallen stock", c. 14,600. We mapped the birth holdings by county and calculated the sampling rate, defined as the proportion of the holdings in each county sampled by the surveys. The Moran index was used to estimate the global spatial autocorrelation across Great Britain. The contributions of each county to the global Moran index were analysed by a local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA. Results The sampling rate differed among counties in both surveys, which affected the distribution of detected cases of scrapie. Within each survey, the county sampling rates in different years were positively correlated during 2002–2005, with the abattoir survey being more strongly autocorrelated through time than the fallen stock survey. In the abattoir survey, spatial indices indicated that sampling rates in neighbouring counties tended to be similar, with few significant contrasts. Sampling rates were strongly correlated with sheep density, being highest in Wales, Southwest England and Northern England. This relationship with sheep density accounted for over 80% of the variation in sampling rate among counties. In the fallen stock survey, sampling rates in neighbouring counties tended to be different, with more statistically significant contrasts. The fallen stock survey also included a larger proportion of holdings providing many samples. Conclusion Sampling will continue to be uneven unless action is taken to make it more uniform, if more uniform sampling becomes a target. Alternatively, analyses of scrapie occurrence in these datasets can take account of the distribution of sampling. Combining

  7. The evolution of the prevalence of classical scrapie in sheep in Great Britain using surveillance data between 2005 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mark; Ortiz-Pelaez, Angel

    2014-11-01

    After the decline of the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in Great Britain (GB), scrapie remains the most prevalent animal Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) present in GB. A number of control measures have been implemented for classical scrapie, and since 2005 there has been a large reduction in the number of observed cases. The objective of this study is to estimate two measures of disease frequency using up to date surveillance data collected during and after the implementation of different control measures established since 2004, and breeding for resistance schemes that ran from 2001 until 2009. This would enable an assessment of the effectiveness of both the breeding for resistance programme and the compulsory eradication measures in reducing the prevalence of scrapie in GB. Evaluation of the sensitivity of the rapid post-mortem test for scrapie indicated that it detected scrapie in the last 25% of the incubation period. A back-calculation model was developed to estimate the prevalence of infection at animal and flock-level. The results of the model indicated a mean drop of infection prevalence of 31% each year, leading to a 90% drop in infection prevalence between 2005, with an estimate of 5737 infected sheep in GB in 2012. The risks of classical scrapie infection in animals with genotypes of National Scrapie Plan Types I-IV (all other genotypes), relative to Type V (all genotypes containing V136 R154 Q171 and not A136 R154 R171), were estimated to be: 0, 0.0008, 0.07, and 0.21 respectively. The model estimated a very low rate of reporting of clinical suspects and a large decline from 2007 of the probability of a sheep being reported as a clinical suspect. The model also estimated that the expected number of sheep holdings with classical scrapie in 2012 was 215 (95% confidence interval: 33-437), out of a total of approximately 72,000 sheep holdings in GB. Model estimates indicate that the prevalence in 2012 has dropped to 10% of that

  8. Atypical mole syndrome and dysplastic nevi: identification of populations at risk for developing melanoma - review article

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    Juliana Hypólito Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical Mole Syndrome is the most important phenotypic risk factor for developing cutaneous melanoma, a malignancy that accounts for about 80% of deaths from skin cancer. Because the diagnosis of melanoma at an early stage is of great prognostic relevance, the identification of Atypical Mole Syndrome carriers is essential, as well as the creation of recommended preventative measures that must be taken by these patients.

  9. Lack of Prion Accumulation in Lymphoid Tissues of Scrapie-affected Sheep with the AA136, QR171 Prion Protein Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy which can be transmitted horizontally through the shedding of an infectious conformer (PrP**Sc) of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP**c). Genetics profoundly influence the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie. PrP**c amino-aci...

  10. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. 'INDOTEST' in atypical hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacci, F; Nuti, A; Cafforio, G; Lucetti, C; Logi, C; Cipriani, G; Orlandi, G; Bonuccelli, U

    2008-03-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is an indomethacin-responsive headache characterized by a chronic, strictly unilateral, side-locked without side-shifting, persistent headache. We report three cases of HC with atypical features in which an acute administration of indomethacin 50 mg IM (INDOTEST) was performed. In all three cases INDOTEST predicted chronic responsiveness to indomethacin. Thus, in cases of HC with atypical features, INDOTEST could help for a correct diagnosis and therapy.

  12. EU-approved rapid tests for bovine spongiform encephalopathy detect atypical forms: a study for their sensitivities.

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    Daniela Meloni

    Full Text Available Since 2004 it become clear that atypical bovine spongiform encephalopthies (BSEs exist in cattle. Whenever their detection has relied on active surveillance plans implemented in Europe since 2001 by rapid tests, the overall and inter-laboratory performance of these diagnostic systems in the detection of the atypical strains has not been studied thoroughly to date. To fill this gap, the present study reports on the analytical sensitivity of the EU-approved rapid tests for atypical L- and H-type and classical BSE in parallel. Each test was challenged with two dilution series, one created from a positive pool of the three BSE forms according to the EURL standard method of homogenate preparation (50% w/v and the other as per the test kit manufacturer's instructions. Multilevel logistic models and simple logistic models with the rapid test as the only covariate were fitted for each BSE form analyzed as directed by the test manufacturer's dilution protocol. The same schemes, but excluding the BSE type, were then applied to compare test performance under the manufacturer's versus the water protocol. The IDEXX HerdChek ® BSE-scrapie short protocol test showed the highest sensitivity for all BSE forms. The IDEXX® HerdChek BSE-scrapie ultra short protocol, the Prionics®--Check WESTERN and the AJ Roboscreen® BetaPrion tests showed similar sensitivities, followed by the Roche® PrionScreen, the Bio-Rad® TeSeE™ SAP and the Prionics®--Check PrioSTRIP in descending order of analytical sensitivity. Despite these differences, the limit of detection of all seven rapid tests against the different classes of material set within a 2 log(10 range of the best-performing test, thus meeting the European Food Safety Authority requirement for BSE surveillance purposes. These findings indicate that not many atypical cases would have been missed surveillance since 2001 which is important for further epidemiological interpretations of the sporadic character of

  13. Allelic variants at codon 146 in the PRNP gene show significant differences in the risk for natural scrapie in Cypriot goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Georgiadou, S; Simmons, M M; Windl, O; Dawson, M; Arnold, M E; Neocleous, P; Papasavva-Stylianou, P

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the association between the polymorphisms serine (S) or aspartic acid (D) at codon 146 of the PRNP gene and resistance to scrapie. All goats aged >12 months (a total of 1075 animals) from four herds with the highest prevalence of scrapie in the country were culled and tested, of which 234 (21·7%) were positive by either the rapid test or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for any of the tissues tested. The odds of scrapie infection occurring in NN146 goats was 101 [95% credible interval (CrI) 19-2938] times higher than for non-NN146 or unknown genotypes. IHC applied to lymphoreticular tissue produced the highest sensitivity (94%, 95% CrI 90-97). The presence of putatively resistant non-NN146 alleles in the Cypriot goat population, severely affected by scrapie, provides a potential tool to reduce/eradicate scrapie provided that coordinated nationwide breeding programmes are implemented and maintained over time.

  14. Lack of prion accumulation in lymphoid tissues of PRNP ARQ/ARR sheep intracranially inoculated with the agent of scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Justin J; Kunkle, Robert A; Richt, Jürgen A; Nicholson, Eric M; Hamir, Amir N

    2014-01-01

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted horizontally. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent and the tissue levels and distribution of PrPSc in affected sheep. The purpose of this study was to compare the survival time and PrPSc tissue distribution in sheep with highly resistant and highly susceptible PRNP genotypes after intracranial inoculation of the agent of scrapie. Five sheep each of genotype VRQ/VRQ, VRQ/ARR or ARQ/ARR were inoculated. Sheep were euthanized when clinical signs of scrapie became severe. Clinical signs, microscopic lesions, and western blot profiles were uniform across genotypes and consistent with manifestations of classical scrapie. Mean survival time differences were associated with the 171 polymorphic site with VRQ/VRQ sheep surviving 18 months, whereas VRQ/ARR and ARQ/ARR sheep survived 60 and 56 months, respectively. Labeling of PrPSc by immunohistochemistry revealed similar accumulations in central nervous system tissues regardless of host genotype. Immunoreactivity for PrPSc in lymphoid tissue was consistently abundant in VRQ/VRQ, present but confined to tonsil or retropharyngeal lymph node in 4/5 VRQ/ARR, and totally absent in ARQ/ARR sheep. The results of this study demonstrate the susceptibility of sheep with the ARQ/ARR genotype to scrapie by the intracranial inoculation route with PrPSc accumulation in CNS tissues, but prolonged incubation times and lack of PrPSc in lymphoid tissue.

  15. Scrapie Agent (Strain 263K) can transmit disease via the oral route after persistence in soil over years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bjoern; Thomzig, Achim; Buschmann, Anne; Groschup, Martin H; Peters, Rainer; Beekes, Michael; Terytze, Konstantin

    2007-05-09

    The persistence of infectious biomolecules in soil constitutes a substantial challenge. This holds particularly true with respect to prions, the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) such as scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or chronic wasting disease (CWD). Various studies have indicated that prions are able to persist in soil for years without losing their pathogenic activity. Dissemination of prions into the environment can occur from several sources, e.g., infectious placenta or amniotic fluid of sheep. Furthermore, environmental contamination by saliva, excrements or non-sterilized agricultural organic fertilizer is conceivable. Natural transmission of scrapie in the field seems to occur via the alimentary tract in the majority of cases, and scrapie-free sheep flocks can become infected on pastures where outbreaks of scrapie had been observed before. These findings point to a sustained contagion in the environment, and notably the soil. By using outdoor lysimeters, we simulated a contamination of standard soil with hamster-adapted 263K scrapie prions, and analyzed the presence and biological activity of the soil-associated PrP(Sc) and infectivity by Western blotting and hamster bioassay, respectively. Our results showed that 263K scrapie agent can persist in soil at least over 29 months. Strikingly, not only the contaminated soil itself retained high levels of infectivity, as evidenced by oral administration to Syrian hamsters, but also feeding of aqueous soil extracts was able to induce disease in the reporter animals. We could also demonstrate that PrP(Sc) in soil, extracted after 21 months, provides a catalytically active seed in the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) reaction. PMCA opens therefore a perspective for considerably improving the detectability of prions in soil samples from the field.

  16. Atypical early-onset Alzheimer's disease caused by the Iranian APP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Suzanne Granhøj; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Stokholm, Jette

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's disease are inherited autosomal dominantly, and to date, three causative genes have been found, the Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, the Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene and the Amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. We describe atypical phenotypic features in a fam......Approximately 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's disease are inherited autosomal dominantly, and to date, three causative genes have been found, the Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, the Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene and the Amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. We describe atypical phenotypic features...

  17. Heterogeneity of the Abnormal Prion Protein (PrPSc) of the Chandler Scrapie Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kazuo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-02-18

    The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, displays various sizes of aggregates. In this study, we investigated the conformation, aggregation stability and proteinase K (PK)-sensitivity of small and large PrPSc aggregates of mouse-adapted prion strains. We showed that small PrPSc aggregates, previously thought to be PK-sensitive, are resistant to PK digestion. Furthermore, we showed that small PrPSc aggregates of the Chandler scrapie strain have greater resistance to PK digestion and aggregation-denaturation than large PrPSc aggregates of this strain. We conclude that this strain consists of heterogeneous PrPSc.

  18. PrPSc in Salivary Glands of Scrapie-Affected Sheep▿

    OpenAIRE

    Vascellari, Marta; Nonno, Romolo; Mutinelli, Franco; Bigolaro, Michela; Di Bari, Michele Angelo; Melchiotti, Erica; Marcon, Stefano; D'Agostino, Claudia; Vaccari, Gabriele; Conte, Michela; De Grossi, Luigi; Rosone, Francesca; Giordani, Francesco; Agrimi, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    The salivary glands of scrapie-affected sheep and healthy controls were investigated for the presence of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). PrPSc was detected in major (parotid and mandibular) and minor (buccal, labial, and palatine) salivary glands of naturally and experimentally infected sheep. Using Western blotting, the PrPSc concentration in glands was estimated to be 0.02 to 0.005% of that in brain. Immunohistochemistry revealed intracellular depositions of PrPSc in ductal and acin...

  19. National atypical mycobacteria survey, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkort, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Infections with atypical mycobacteria in Australia during 2000 occurred at a rate of 1.8 cases per 100,000 population. The main sites of disease were the respiratory tract, soft tissue, and the lymphatics. The Mycobacterium avium complex was the most common group of mycobacteria isolated from respiratory, lymphatic sites, and blood. The rapidly growing mycobacteria, predominantly the M. fortuitum-M. abscessus-M. chelonae group were the most common soft tissue infections. Atypical mycobacteria were isolated from significant numbers of sputum 'smear positive' patients, requiring further tests to exclude M. tuberculosis. Geographical differences were observed for some Mycobacterium species, notably the isolation of M. haemophilum from Western Australia, and M. ulcerans from Victoria and Queensland. Newer molecular techniques, while improving precision and accuracy of identification, raise additional questions about the ecology of the atypical mycobacteria and their role in disease.

  20. A cross-sectional study of PRNP gene in two native Sicilian goat populations in Italy: a relation between prion gene polymorphisms and scrapie incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Sergio; Agnello, Stefano; D'Avola, Salvatore; Goldmann, Wilfred; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Vitale, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals, and scrapie in small ruminants is considered the archetype of TSEs. Derivata di Siria is a native dairy goat of Sicily (south Italy), which is related to Syrian goat breeds. Scrapie disease is considered endemic in Sicily since 1997, following the administration of an infected vaccine.Derivata di Siria goatswere involved in six of 66 scrapie-infected flocks in Sicily. Prion protein gene (PRNP) analysis revealed that none of the scrapie cases carried the p.Gln222Lys variant. Sequencing of PRNP in this goat population showed a high frequency (15%) of p.Gln222Lys variant confirming its association with scrapie resistance. PRNP polymorphisms were also analysed in the population of Pantelleria, a small Sicilian Island, where scrapie has never been reported. The native goat breed 'Pantesca' was maintained up to almost 80 years and the size of the sheep population on this island has historically been very low. Currently, a crossbreed goat population of 253 heads is present on the island. PRNP genotyping of Pantelleria goats showed genetic variation, with low presence of wild-type goats and the lack of protective alleles. These data reinforce the association between PRNP polymorphisms in small ruminants and scrapie incidence.

  1. White Blood Cell-Based Detection of Asymptomatic Scrapie Infection by Ex Vivo Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliez, Sophie; Jaumain, Emilie; Huor, Alvina; Douet, Jean-Yves; Lugan, Séverine; Cassard, Hervé; Lacroux, Caroline; Béringue, Vincent; Andréoletti, Olivier; Vilette, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods - in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays - to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages). However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease. PMID:25122456

  2. Perturbation of the Secondary Structure of the Scrapie Prion Protein Under Conditions that Alter Infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, Maria; Baldwin, Michael A.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) generates PrP 27-30, which polymerizes into amyloid. By attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, PrP 27-30 polymers contained 54% β-sheet, 25% α-helix, 10% turns, and 11% random coil; dispersion into detergent-lipid-protein-complexes preserved infectivity and secondary structure. Almost 60% of the β-sheet was low-frequency infrared-absorbing, reflecting intermolecular aggregation. Decreased low-frequency β-sheet and increased turn content were found after SDS/PAGE, which disassembled the amyloid polymers, denatured PrP 27-30, and diminished scrapie infectivity. Acid-induced transitions were reversible, whereas alkali produced an irreversible transition centered at pH 10 under conditions that diminished infectivity. Whether PrPSc synthesis involves a transition in the secondary structure of one or more domains of the cellular prion protein from α-helical, random coil, or turn into β-sheet remains to be established.

  3. Enzymatic formulation capable of degrading scrapie prion under mild digestion conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka A Okoroma

    Full Text Available The prion agent is notoriously resistant to common proteases and conventional sterilisation procedures. The current methods known to destroy prion infectivity such as incineration, alkaline and thermal hydrolysis are harsh, destructive, environmentally polluting and potentially hazardous, thus limit their applications for decontamination of delicate medical and laboratory devices, remediation of prion contaminated environment and for processing animal by-products including specified risk materials and carcases. Therefore, an environmentally friendly, non-destructive enzymatic degradation approach is highly desirable. A feather-degrading Bacillus licheniformis N22 keratinase has been isolated which degraded scrapie prion to undetectable level of PrP(Sc signals as determined by Western Blot analysis. Prion infectivity was verified by ex vivo cell-based assay. An enzymatic formulation combining N22 keratinase and biosurfactant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa degraded PrP(Sc at 65 °C in 10 min to undetectable level -. A time-course degradation analysis carried out at 50 °C over 2 h revealed the progressive attenuation of PrP(Sc intensity. Test of residual infectivity by standard cell culture assay confirmed that the enzymatic formulation reduced PrP(Sc infectivity to undetectable levels as compared to cells challenged with untreated standard scrapie sheep prion (SSBP/1 (p-value = 0.008 at 95% confidence interval. This novel enzymatic formulation has significant potential application for prion decontamination in various environmentally friendly systems under mild treatment conditions.

  4. Assessment of inbreeding resulting from selection for scrapie resistance: a model for rare sheep breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C; Orford, M; Tzamaloukas, O; Mavrogenis, A P; Miltiadou, D

    Inbreeding in a small population of Chios sheep undergoing intense selection for the PrP gene was assessed 10 years after the beginning of a scrapie resistance selection programme. Inbreeding in this stock, already under selection for production traits, was analysed by using pedigree records containing 10,492 animals from 1968 to 2008, and also by genotyping 192 individuals with a panel of 15 microsatellites. Genetic markers indicated a loss of heterozygosity (FIS over all loci was 0.059) and allelic diversity (mean effective number of alleles was 3.075±0.275). The annual rate of inbreeding increased significantly after the start of the scrapie resistance programme, ΔF=0.005 compared with ΔF=0.001 before 1999, and was subjected to several genetic bottlenecks, mainly due to the low initial frequency of resistant animals. However, the mean individual inbreeding coefficient estimated from the pedigree - in this closed stock resembling the case of a rare breed - stood at the level of 4.5 per cent, five generations after the implementation of selection for the PrP gene. The inbreeding coefficient estimated by genetic markers was 4.37 per cent, implying that such a marker panel could be a useful and cost-effective tool for estimating inbreeding in unrecorded populations. British Veterinary Association.

  5. Inoculation of Scrapie with the Self-Assembling RADA-Peptide Disrupts Prion Accumulation and Extends Hamster Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercerebral inoculation of 263K Scrapie brain homogenate (PrPsc) with a self-assembling RADA-peptide (RADA) significantly delayed disease onset and increased hamster survival. Time of survival was dependent on the dose of RADA and pre-incubation with PrPsc prior to inoculation. RADA treatment resu...

  6. Immunohistochemistry for PrPSc in natural scrapie reveals patterns which are associated with the PrP genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiropoulos, J; Casalone, C; Caramelli, M; Simmons, M M

    2007-08-01

    Immunohistochemistry for PrPSc is used widely in scrapie diagnosis. In natural scrapie cases the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) has revealed the existence of up to 12 different morphological types of immunostained deposits. The significance of this pattern variability in relation to genotype has not been studied extensively in natural disease. In this study we recorded in detail PrPSc patterns at the obex level of the medulla oblongata from 163 animals derived from 55 flocks which presented through passive surveillance in the UK and Italy. A strong association was seen between PrPSc patterns and PrP genotype, particularly in relation to codon 136. In a blind assessment of this association we were able to predict, with over 80% accuracy, the genotype of 151 scrapie cases which were presented through passive surveillance from 13 farms. The genotype of these cases was ARQ/ARQ or VRQ/VRQ. The association of PrPsc patterns with genotype was generally stronger in those farms where all the affected animals belonged to a single genotype compared with farms where both genotypes were identified, with the exception of one farm in which the genotype of all affected sheep was ARQ/ARQ and the PrPSc patterns were of the VRQ/VRQ type. Our observations support the hypothesis that the observed association between specific IHC patterns and genotypes may in fact be strain driven but in natural disease individual scrapie strains may demonstrate a genotypic tropism.

  7. Scrapie susceptibility-linked polymorphisms modulate the in vitro conversion of sheep prion protein to protease-resistant forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossers, A.; Belt, P.B.G.M.; Raymond, G.J.; Caughey, B.; Vries, de R.; Smits, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prion diseases are natural transmissible neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. They are characterized by the accumulation of a protease-resistant scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) mainly in the central nervous system.

  8. Transmission of the agent of sheep scrapie to deer results in PrPSc with two distinct molecular profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this work was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer (WTD) to the agent of sheep scrapie and to compare the resultant PrPSc to that of the original inoculum and chronic wasting disease (CWD). We inoculated WTD by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal (I...

  9. Relationships between PrPSc stability and incubation time for United States scrapie isolates in a natural host system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrentas, Catherine E; Greenlee, Justin J; Tatum, Trudy L; Nicholson, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep (Ovis aries), are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a â-rich conformer (PrP(Sc)) that accumulates into higher-order structures in the brain and other tissues. Distinct strains of TSEs exist, characterized by different pathologic profiles upon passage into rodents and representing distinct conformations of PrP(Sc). One biochemical method of distinguishing strains is the stability of PrP(Sc) as determined by unfolding in guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), which is tightly and positively correlated with the incubation time of disease upon passage into mice. Here, we utilize a rapid, protease-free version of the stability assay to characterize naturally occurring scrapie samples, including a fast-acting scrapie inoculum for which incubation time is highly dependent on the amino acid at codon 136 of the prion protein. We utilize the stability methodology to identify the presence of two distinct isolates in the inoculum, and compare isolate properties to those of a host-stabilized reference scrapie isolate (NADC 13-7) in order to assess the stability/incubation time correlation in a natural host system. We demonstrate the utility of the stability methodology in characterizing TSE isolates throughout serial passage in livestock, which is applicable to a range of natural host systems, including strains of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and chronic wasting disease.

  10. Relationships between PrPSc stability and incubation time for United States scrapie strains in a natural host system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep (Ovis aries), are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrP**C) into a beta-rich conformer (PrP**Sc) that accumulates into higher-order structures in the brain and other ti...

  11. Clinical and endocrine characteristics in atypical and classical growth hormone insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burren, C P; Woods, K A; Rose, S J; Tauber, M; Price, D A; Heinrich, U; Gilli, G; Razzaghy-Azar, M; Al-Ashwal, A; Crock, P A; Rochiccioli, P; Yordam, N; Ranke, M B; Chatelain, P G; Preece, M A; Rosenfeld, R G; Savage, M O

    2001-01-01

    Classical growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS) comprises a dysmorphic phenotype, extreme short stature (height SDS low IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Wide clinical variation is recognised with classical and atypical forms. We aimed to delineate features of the milder "atypical" GHIS phenotype, and to determine whether this correlates with milder auxological and biochemical features. Fifty-nine patients from a European series of 82 patients with GHIS, with strict diagnostic criteria of GHIS, were studied and assigned to classical or atypical GHIS groups according to facial phenotype, i.e. "classical" required 2 of 3 recognized GHIS features (frontal bossing, mid-facial hypoplasia and depressed nasal bridge), "atypical" required 0 or 1 of these facial features. Classical and atypical GHIS groups were compared in terms of (1) phenotypic features, including high-pitched voice, sparse hair, blue sclera, hypoglycaemia, microphallus, (2) birth length, height SDS, and (3) basal IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, GHBP and increase in IGF-I on IGF-I generation testing. Fifty patients [24 males, 26 females, aged 8.6 +/- 4.6 years (mean +/- SD)] had "classical GHIS", 9 patients (7 males, 2 females, aged 7.8 +/- 4.1 years) had "atypical GHIS", 7 with normal facies. Atypical GHIS patients had lesser height deficit (Ht SDS -4.0 +/- 1.4) compared to classical GHIS (-6.7 +/- 1.4), less reduction in IGFBP-3 SDS (atypical -5.5 +/- 3.3; classical -8.6 +/- 2.4), and more had normal GHBP (>10% binding). Other variables were also less frequent in atypical GHIS patients: high-pitched voice 11% (70% classical), sparse hair 11% (42% classical), blue sclera 0% (38% classical), hypoglycaemia 11% (42% classical), and microphallus 14% (1 of 7 males), compared to 79% of classical (19 of 24 males). Atypical GHIS patients, with relatively normal facial appearance, demonstrate less height defect and biochemical abnormalities compared to classical patients. GH insensitivity may be present in children with

  12. On the question of proportionality of the count of observed Scrapie cases and the size of holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Rio Vilas Victor J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper investigates the question of a suitable basic model for the number of scrapie cases in a holding and applications of this knowledge to the estimation of scrapie-affected holding population sizes and adequacy of control measures within holding. Is the number of scrapie cases proportional to the size of the holding in which case it should be incorporated into the parameter of the error distribution for the scrapie counts? Or, is there a different – potentially more complex – relationship between case count and holding size in which case the information about the size of the holding should be better incorporated as a covariate in the modeling? Methods We show that this question can be appropriately addressed via a simple zero-truncated Poisson model in which the hypothesis of proportionality enters as a special offset-model. Model comparisons can be achieved by means of likelihood ratio testing. The procedure is illustrated by means of surveillance data on classical scrapie in Great Britain. Furthermore, the model with the best fit is used to estimate the size of the scrapie-affected holding population in Great Britain by means of two capture-recapture estimators: the Poisson estimator and the generalized Zelterman estimator. Results No evidence could be found for the hypothesis of proportionality. In fact, there is some evidence that this relationship follows a curved line which increases for small holdings up to a maximum after which it declines again. Furthermore, it is pointed out how crucial the correct model choice is when applied to capture-recapture estimation on the basis of zero-truncated Poisson models as well as on the basis of the generalized Zelterman estimator. Estimators based on the proportionality model return very different and unreasonable estimates for the population sizes. Conclusion Our results stress the importance of an adequate modelling approach to the association between holding

  13. Atypical moles: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Allen; Duffy, R Lamar

    2015-06-01

    Atypical moles are benign pigmented lesions. Although they are benign, they exhibit some of the clinical and histologic features of malignant melanoma. They are more common in fair-skinned individuals and in those with high sun exposure. Atypical moles are characterized by size of 6 mm or more at the greatest dimension, color variegation, border irregularity, and pebbled texture. They are associated with an increased risk of melanoma, warranting enhanced surveillance, especially in patients with more than 50 moles and a family history of melanoma. Because an individual lesion is unlikely to display malignant transformation, biopsy of all atypical moles is neither clinically beneficial nor cost-effective. The ABCDE (asymmetry, border irregularity, color unevenness, diameter of 6 mm or more, evolution) mnemonic is a valuable tool for clinicians and patients to identify lesions that could be melanoma. Also, according to the "ugly duckling" concept, benign moles tend to have a similar appearance, whereas an outlier with a different appearance is more likely to be undergoing malignant change. Atypical moles with changes suggestive of malignant melanoma should be biopsied, using an excisional method, if possible.

  14. MANIFESTATIONS OF AGGRESSIVE ATYPICAL KAPOSI'S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has since the mid-1980's been known to distinguish atypical, aggressive Kaposi's sarcoma (AAKS) from the endemic type in Africa (1). In our series at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, we recorded 44 patients with AAKS, 35 of them male and 9 female, giving ...

  15. Atypical odontalgia: phantom tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, R E; Stewart, C M

    1991-10-01

    The findings in 30 cases diagnosed as atypical odontalgia are presented. The clinical characteristics of these cases are compared with other cases reported in the literature. Three cases are described in detail. Patient understanding and treatment with tricyclic antidepressants are discussed together with medication side effects and interactions. The importance of deferring invasive procedures is emphasized.

  16. In vitro amplification of PrPSc derived from the brain and blood of sheep infected with scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Leigh; Terry, Linda A

    2008-12-01

    Scrapie is a fatal, naturally transmissible, neurodegenerative prion disease that affects sheep and goats and is characterized by the accumulation of a misfolded protein, PrPSc, converted from host-encoded PrPc, in the central nervous system of affected animals. Highly efficient in vitro conversion of host PrPc to PrPSc has been achieved in models of scrapie and in natural prion diseases by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). Here, we demonstrate amplification, by serial PMCA, of PrPSc from individual sources of scrapie-infected sheep. Efficiency of amplification was affected by the pairing of the source of PrPSc with the control brain substrate of different genotypes of PrP. In line with previous studies, efficiency of amplification was greatly enhanced with the addition of a synthetic polyanion, polyadenylic acid (PolyA), facilitating rapid detection of low levels of PrPSc from body fluids such as blood. To this end PrPSc was amplified, in a 3 day PMCA assay, from blood leukocyte preparations from VRQ/VRQ scrapie-affected sheep at clinical end point. While PolyA-assisted PMCA resulted in spontaneous conversion of PrPc, we were able to distinguish blood samples from unaffected and affected sheep under controlled conditions. This study demonstrates that highly efficient amplification of PrPSc can be achieved for ovine scrapie from both brain and blood from naturally infected sheep and shows potential applications for improvements in current diagnostics and pre-mortem testing.

  17. Characterization of atypical Listeria innocua isolated from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Paixão, Renata; Gobbi, Debora Dirani; Raimundo, Daniele Cristine; Ferreira, Thais Porfida; Hofer, Ernesto; Matte, Maria Helena; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2012-05-01

    Atypical Listeria innocua strains presenting phenotypic characteristics similar to those of Listeria monocytogenes were recently isolated from food and the environment. These isolates also tested positive for virulence genes specific to L. monocytogenes. Here we report the isolation of atypical hemolytic L. innocua strains from the environment of pork processing plants in Brazil. The strains were positive for L. monocytogenes virulence genes hly, inlA and inlB by PCR and presented genotypic similarities with human isolates of L. monocytogenes via the AFLP technique using HindIII single enzyme protocol. Phenotypic and genotypic similarities suggest that these atypical L. innocua may be pathogenic strains. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic analysis of atypical progesterone profiles in Holstein-Friesian cows from experimental research herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyman, S.; Johansson, K.; Koning, de C.J.A.M.; Berry, D.P.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Wall, E.; Berglund, B.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the genetic variation in normal and atypical progesterone profiles and investigate if this information could be useful in an improved genetic evaluation for fertility for dairy cows. The phenotypes derived from normal profiles included cycle length traits,

  19. Clinical Heterogeneity of Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Koreans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyeok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA represents a group of inherited movement disorders characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Recent advances have included the identification of new causative genes and highlighted the wide phenotypic variation between and within the specific NBIA subtypes. This study aimed to investigate the current status of NBIA in Korea. Methods We collected genetically confirmed NBIA patients from twelve nationwide referral hospitals and from a review of the literature. We conducted a study to describe the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Korean adults with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN. Results Four subtypes of NBIA including PKAN (n = 30, PLA2G6-related neurodegeneration (n = 2, beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (n = 1, and aceruloplasminemia (n = 1 have been identified in the Korean population. The clinical features of fifteen adults with atypical PKAN included early focal limb dystonia, parkinsonism-predominant feature, oromandibular dystonia, and isolated freezing of gait (FOG. Patients with a higher age of onset tended to present with parkinsonism and FOG. The p.R440P and p.D378G mutations are two major mutations that represent approximately 50% of the mutated alleles. Although there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations, most patients carrying the p.D378G mutation had a late-onset, atypical form of PKAN. Conclusions We found considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in Korean adults with atypical PKAN. The age of onset may influence the presentation of extrapyramidal symptoms.

  20. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can...... and magnetic resonance imaging data and obtained follow-up (FU) information on 77 of these patients over a mean duration of 4 years. The AIIDLs presented as a single lesion in 72 (80 %) patients and exhibited an infiltrative (n = 35), megacystic (n = 16), Baló (n = 10) or ring-like (n = 16) lesion appearance...... in 77 (86 %) patients. Additional multiple sclerosis (MS)-typical lesions existed in 48 (53 %) patients. During FU, a further clinical attack occurred rarely (23-35 % of patients) except for patients with ring-like AIIDLs (62 %). Further attacks were also significantly more often in patients...

  1. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Koranne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  2. Biopsychosocial Aspects of Atypical Odontalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Ciaramella, A.; Paroli, M.; Lonia, L.; Bosco, M.; Poli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. A few studies have found somatosensory abnormalities in atypical odontalgia (AO) patients. The aim of the study is to explore the presence of specific abnormalities in facial pain patients that can be considered as psychophysical factors predisposing to AO. Materials and Methods. The AO subjects (n = 18) have been compared to pain-free (n = 14), trigeminal neuralgia (n = 16), migraine (n = 17), and temporomandibular disorder (n = 14). The neurometer current perception threshold (C...

  3. Atypical odontalgia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratkar, Harish; Koratkar, Sonal

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain is not uncommon; however, reaching a definitive diagnosis in these cases can be a complex challenge. Dentists are most likely to face this situation, because persistent and chronic pain is more common in the head and neck region than in any other part of the body. However, the complexities and diagnostic challenges mean that misdiagnosing neuropathic pain is common. This article presents a case of atypical odontalgia and illustrates the complexities involved when diagnosing the condition.

  4. Selective propagation of mouse-passaged scrapie prions with long incubation period from a mixed prion population using GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Ushiki-Kaku, Yuko; Matsuura, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated the propagation of mouse-passaged scrapie isolates with long incubation periods (L-type) derived from natural Japanese sheep scrapie cases in murine hypothalamic GT1-7 cells, along with disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) accumulation. We here analyzed the susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to scrapie prions by exposure to infected mouse brains at different passages, following interspecies transmission. Wild-type mice challenged with a natural sheep scrapie case (Kanagawa) exhibited heterogeneity of transmitted scrapie prions in early passages, and this mixed population converged upon one with a short incubation period (S-type) following subsequent passages. However, when GT1-7 cells were challenged with these heterologous samples, L-type prions became dominant. This study demonstrated that the susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to L-type prions was at least 105 times higher than that to S-type prions and that L-type prion-specific biological characteristics remained unchanged after serial passages in GT1-7 cells. This suggests that a GT1-7 cell culture model would be more useful for the economical and stable amplification of L-type prions at the laboratory level. Furthermore, this cell culture model might be used to selectively propagate L-type scrapie prions from a mixed prion population.

  5. Atypical Centrioles During Sexual Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer eAvidor-Reiss

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL. We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the zombie centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology.

  6. Explaining the heterogeneous scrapie surveillance figures across Europe: a meta-regression approach

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    Ru Giuseppe

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two annual surveys, the abattoir and the fallen stock, monitor the presence of scrapie across Europe. A simple comparison between the prevalence estimates in different countries reveals that, in 2003, the abattoir survey appears to detect more scrapie in some countries. This is contrary to evidence suggesting the greater ability of the fallen stock survey to detect the disease. We applied meta-analysis techniques to study this apparent heterogeneity in the behaviour of the surveys across Europe. Furthermore, we conducted a meta-regression analysis to assess the effect of country-specific characteristics on the variability. We have chosen the odds ratios between the two surveys to inform the underlying relationship between them and to allow comparisons between the countries under the meta-regression framework. Baseline risks, those of the slaughtered populations across Europe, and country-specific covariates, available from the European Commission Report, were inputted in the model to explain the heterogeneity. Results Our results show the presence of significant heterogeneity in the odds ratios between countries and no reduction in the variability after adjustment for the different risks in the baseline populations. Three countries contributed the most to the overall heterogeneity: Germany, Ireland and The Netherlands. The inclusion of country-specific covariates did not, in general, reduce the variability except for one variable: the proportion of the total adult sheep population sampled as fallen stock by each country. A large residual heterogeneity remained in the model indicating the presence of substantial effect variability between countries. Conclusion The meta-analysis approach was useful to assess the level of heterogeneity in the implementation of the surveys and to explore the reasons for the variation between countries.

  7. Scrapie infections initiated at varying doses: an analysis of 117 titration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A R; Bostock, C J

    2000-08-29

    An analysis of 117 titration experiments in the murine scrapie model is presented. The experiments encompass 30 years' work and a wide range of experimental conditions. To check that the experimental designs were reasonably consistent over time, comparisons were made of size, duration, source of inoculum, etc., in each experiment. These comparisons revealed no systematic trends that would render invalid comparisons across experiments. For 114 of the experiments it was possible to calculate the dose at which half of the challenged animals were infected (the ID50). These 114 experiments were then combined on the basis of relative dose (i.e. tenfold dilution relative to the ID50). This created a data set in which over 4000 animals were challenged with doses of scrapie ranging from four orders of magnitude below to five orders of magnitude above the ID50. Analysis of this data reveals that mean incubation periods rise linearly with logarithmic decreases in dose. A one unit increase in relative dose (i.e. a tenfold increase in actual dose) will, on average, decrease the incubation period by 25 days. At ID50 the average incubation period in this data set is 300 days. Within a single dose, in a single experimental model, incubation periods have a distribution close to normal. Variability in incubation period also rises linearly as dose decreases. There is no age or sex effect upon the probability of infection, but female mice have incubation periods that are, on average, nine days shorter than their male counterparts and young mice have incubation periods that are longer by seven days. Although many of these patterns are apparent in the results of single titration curves, they can be more rigorously investigated by considering the outcome for thousands of mice.

  8. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong-Seok [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Ho [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Il [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyeon-3-dong, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Carp, Richard I. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1050 Forest Hill Road, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Choi, Eun-Kyoung, E-mail: ekchoi@hallym.ac.kr [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Sun, E-mail: yskim@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  9. Membrane toxicity of abnormal prion protein in adrenal chromaffin cells of scrapie infected sheep.

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    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are associated with accumulations of disease specific PrP (PrP(d in the central nervous system (CNS and often the lymphoreticular system (LRS. Accumulations have additionally been recorded in other tissues including the peripheral nervous system and adrenal gland. Here we investigate the effect of sheep scrapie on the morphology and the accumulation of PrP(d in the adrenal medulla of scrapie affected sheep using light and electron microscopy. Using immunogold electron microscopy, non-fibrillar forms of PrP(d were shown to accumulate mainly in association with chromaffin cells, occasional nerve endings and macrophages. PrP(d accumulation was associated with distinctive membrane changes of chromaffin cells including increased electron density, abnormal linearity and invaginations. Internalisation of PrP(d from the chromaffin cell plasma membrane occurred in association with granule recycling following hormone exocytosis. PrP(d accumulation and internalisation from membranes is similarly associated with perturbations of membrane structure and trafficking in CNS neurons and tingible body macrophages of the LRS. These data suggest that a major toxic effect of PrP(d is at the level of plasma membranes. However, the precise nature of PrP(d-membrane toxicity is tissue and cell specific suggesting that the normal protein may act as a multi-functional scaffolding molecule. We further suggest that the co-localisation of PrP(d with exocytic granules of the hormone trafficking system may provide an additional source of infectivity in blood.

  10. Scrapie incidence and PRNP polymorphisms: rare small ruminant breeds of Sicily with TSE protecting genetic reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Maria; Migliore, Sergio; La Giglia, Maria; Alberti, Placido; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Langeveld, Jan P M

    2016-07-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases of several mammalian species, including humans. In Italy, the active surveillance through rapid tests on brain stem from small ruminants started in 2002 on randomly selected samples of healthy slaughtered animals. Sampling number was proportionally related to the regional small ruminant population. Of the twenty Italian regions, Sicily has the second largest population of small ruminants which is mainly constituted by crossbreed animals (>70 %). Sicily contains also three native sheep breeds Pinzirita, Comisana and Valle del Belice. Native goat breeds are Girgentana, Messinese, Argentata dell'Etna, Maltese and Rossa Mediterranea. The polymorphisms of prion protein gene (PRNP) may influence disease susceptibility and breeding programs for genetic TSE resistance are being applied in sheep. Protective alleles have been recently reported for goats also. These differ from those in sheep and may allow breeding programs in the near future. In this paper the data of active surveillance for scrapie control in general population of small ruminants in Sicily are reported together with the analysis on the polymorphism of PRNP in a number of Sicilian autochthonous breeds. The evaluation of the frequency of protective alleles is fundamental for the implementation of a TSE resistance breeding program. TSE surveillance in small ruminants in Sicily showed a of total fifty seven scrapie outbreaks from 1997 to 2014 involving mainly crossbreed animals. The PRNP polymorphism analysis in autochthonous breeds showed protective allele frequencies of 30-40 % ARR in sheep and 12-18 % K222 in three of the four goat breeds; these breeds are distributed over limited areas of the island. The study on PRNP polymorphisms in Sicilian small ruminant population showed higher frequency of the protective alleles compared to most other European breeds. Our results suggest that PRNP genetic variety in Sicilian sheep

  11. Phenotypic and genomic characterization of pneumococcus-like streptococci isolated from HIV-seropositive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegaard, T.M.; Bootsma, H.J.; Caugant, D.A.; Eleveld, M.J.; Mannsaker, T.; Froholm, L.O.; Gaustad, P.; Hoiby, E.A.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate differentiation between pneumococci and other viridans streptococci is essential given their differences in clinical significance. However, classical phenotypic tests are often inconclusive, and many examples of atypical reactions have been reported. In this study, we applied various

  12. Treatment options for atypical optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Optic neuritis (ON is defined as inflammation of the optic nerve and can have various etiologies. The most common presentation in the US is demyelinating, or "typical" ON, usually associated with multiple sclerosis. This is in contrast to "atypical" causes of ON, which differ in their clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. These atypical cases are characterized by lack of eye pain, exudates, and hemorrhages on exam, very severe, bilateral or progressive visual loss, or with failure to recover vision. Aims: The aim was to describe the clinical presentations of atypical ON and their treatments. Settings and Design: Review article. Materials and Methods: Literature review. Results: Types of atypical ON identified include neuromyelitis optica, autoimmune optic neuropathy, chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy, idiopathic recurrent neuroretinitis, and optic neuropathy associated with systemic diseases. Atypical ON usually requires corticosteroid treatment and often will require aggressive immunosuppression. Conclusions: Unlike demyelinating ON, atypical ON requires treatment to preserve vision.

  13. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  14. Subependymal plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains--why are they so different from compact kuru plaques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Beata; Liberski, Paweł P; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We report here routine thin-section and immunogold electron microscopic studies on diffuse plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains. These plaques were not discernible by routine HE staining. Ultrastructurally, plaques were recognized as areas of low electron density containing haphazardly-oriented fibrils, but not as stellate compact structures typical of mouse scrapie models; hence we labelled them "loose plaques". Following immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopy level, fibrils within plaques were heavily decorated with PrP-conjugated gold particles. Loose plaques were located beneath the basal border of the ependymal cells and around blood vessels in the adjacent subependymal neuropil. When dystrophic neurites containing electron-dense inclusion bodies, some of them autophagic vacuoles [59], were seen within the plaque perimeter, they always remained PrP-negative. Some microglial cells were observed in close contact with PrP-positive plaques, and secondary lysosomes within these cells were heavily decorated with gold particles.

  15. Comparative Susceptibility of Sheep of Different Origins, Breeds and PRNP Genotypes to Challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Fiona; Goldmann, Wilfred; Foster, James; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sheep are natural hosts of the prion disease, scrapie. They are also susceptible to experimental challenge with various scrapie strains and with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), which affects cattle and has been accidentally transmitted to a range of other species, including man. Incidence and incubation period of clinical disease in sheep following inoculation is controlled by the PRNP gene, which has different alleles defined on the basis of polymorphisms, particularly at codons 136, 154 and 171, although other codons are associated with survival time, and the exact responses of the sheep may be influenced by other breed-related differences. Here we report the results of a long term single study of experimental scrapie and BSE susceptibility of sheep of Cheviot, Poll Dorset and Suffolk breeds, originating from New Zealand and of a wide range of susceptible and resistant PRNP genotypes. Responses were compared with those of sheep from a closed Cheviot flock of UK origin (Roslin Cheviot flock). The unusually long observation period (6-8 years for most, but up to 12 years for others) allows us to draw robust conclusions about rates of survival of animals previously regarded as resistant to infection, particularly PRNP heterozygotes, and is the most comprehensive such study reported to date. BSE inoculation by an intracerebral route produced disease in all genotype groups with differing incubation periods, although M112T and L141F polymorphisms seemed to give some protection. Scrapie isolate SSBP/1, which has the shortest incubation period in sheep with at least one VRQ PRNP allele, also produced disease following sub-cutaneous inoculation in ARQ/ARQ animals of New Zealand origin, but ARQ/ARQ sheep from the Roslin flock survived the challenge. Our results demonstrate that the links between PRNP genotype and clinical prion disease in sheep are much less secure than previously thought, and may break down when, for example, a different breed of sheep is moved

  16. Comparative Susceptibility of Sheep of Different Origins, Breeds and PRNP Genotypes to Challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Houston

    Full Text Available Sheep are natural hosts of the prion disease, scrapie. They are also susceptible to experimental challenge with various scrapie strains and with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, which affects cattle and has been accidentally transmitted to a range of other species, including man. Incidence and incubation period of clinical disease in sheep following inoculation is controlled by the PRNP gene, which has different alleles defined on the basis of polymorphisms, particularly at codons 136, 154 and 171, although other codons are associated with survival time, and the exact responses of the sheep may be influenced by other breed-related differences. Here we report the results of a long term single study of experimental scrapie and BSE susceptibility of sheep of Cheviot, Poll Dorset and Suffolk breeds, originating from New Zealand and of a wide range of susceptible and resistant PRNP genotypes. Responses were compared with those of sheep from a closed Cheviot flock of UK origin (Roslin Cheviot flock. The unusually long observation period (6-8 years for most, but up to 12 years for others allows us to draw robust conclusions about rates of survival of animals previously regarded as resistant to infection, particularly PRNP heterozygotes, and is the most comprehensive such study reported to date. BSE inoculation by an intracerebral route produced disease in all genotype groups with differing incubation periods, although M112T and L141F polymorphisms seemed to give some protection. Scrapie isolate SSBP/1, which has the shortest incubation period in sheep with at least one VRQ PRNP allele, also produced disease following sub-cutaneous inoculation in ARQ/ARQ animals of New Zealand origin, but ARQ/ARQ sheep from the Roslin flock survived the challenge. Our results demonstrate that the links between PRNP genotype and clinical prion disease in sheep are much less secure than previously thought, and may break down when, for example, a different breed of

  17. Atypical temporomandibular joint pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Charles G; Wold, Courtney C; Stoll, Ethan M; Dolwick, M Franklin

    2014-12-01

    Atypical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain can consist of an unusual intensity, location or set of pain descriptors that do not match what is traditionally observed for TMJ capsular pain, disc displacements or arthritic conditions. Presented in this case report is an atypical pain report regarding a unilateral TMJ pain as the chief complaint. An overview of typical vs atypical TMJ pain is also reviewed to highlight unusual signs and symptoms so that the clinician can identify these atypical presentations and pursue further diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Is atypical odontalgia a psychological problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, S B; Solberg, W K

    1993-05-01

    Several authors have asserted that psychological factors are the underlying cause of atypical odontalgia. However, objective evidence is lacking to support this claim. In this study, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was used to assess psychological functioning of an atypical odontalgia population. Means of the standard scores for each Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scale were within normal ranges. Standard scores for atypical odontalgia profiles compared with standard scores for a chronic headache group (matched for age, sex, and chronicity) were similar and scales for both groups were within normal ranges. These findings fail to support psychological dysfunction as a primary condition associated with patients suffering from atypical odontalgia.

  19. Accumulation of pathological prion protein PrPSc in the skin of animals with experimental and natural scrapie.

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    Achim Thomzig

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion infectivity and its molecular marker, the pathological prion protein PrP(Sc, accumulate in the central nervous system and often also in lymphoid tissue of animals or humans affected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Recently, PrP(Sc was found in tissues previously considered not to be invaded by prions (e.g., skeletal muscles. Here, we address the question of whether prions target the skin and show widespread PrP(Sc deposition in this organ in hamsters perorally or parenterally challenged with scrapie. In hamsters fed with scrapie, PrP(Sc was detected before the onset of symptoms, but the bulk of skin-associated PrP(Sc accumulated in the clinical phase. PrP(Sc was localized in nerve fibres within the skin but not in keratinocytes, and the deposition of PrP(Sc in skin showed no dependence from the route of infection and lymphotropic dissemination. The data indicated a neurally mediated centrifugal spread of prions to the skin. Furthermore, in a follow-up study, we examined sheep naturally infected with scrapie and detected PrP(Sc by Western blotting in skin samples from two out of five animals. Our findings point to the skin as a potential reservoir of prions, which should be further investigated in relation to disease transmission.

  20. Rapid chemical decontamination of infectious CJD and scrapie particles parallels treatments known to disrupt microbes and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsios, Sotirios; Tittman, Sarah; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative human CJD and sheep scrapie are diseases caused by several different transmissible encephalopathy (TSE) agents. These infectious agents provoke innate immune responses in the brain, including late-onset abnormal prion protein (PrP-res) amyloid. Agent particles that lack detectable PrP sequences by deep proteomic analysis are highly infectious. Yet these agents, and their unusual resistance to denaturation, are often evaluated by PrP amyloid disruption. To reexamine the intrinsic resistance of TSE agents to denaturation, a paradigm for less resistant viruses and microbes, we developed a rapid and reproducible high yield agent isolation procedure from cultured cells that minimized PrP amyloid and other cellular proteins. Monotypic neuronal GT1 cells infected with the FU-CJD or 22L scrapie agents do not have complex brain changes that can camouflage infectious particles and prevent their disruption, and there are only 2 reports on infectious titers of any human CJD strain treated with chemical denaturants. Infectious titers of both CJD and scrapie were reduced by >4 logs with Thiourea-urea, a treatment not previously tested. A mere 5 min exposure to 4M GdnHCl at 22°C reduced infectivity by >5 logs. Infectious 22L particles were significantly more sensitive to denaturation than FU-CJD particles. A protocol using sonication with these chemical treatments may effectively decontaminate complicated instruments, such as duodenoscopes that harbor additional virulent microbes and biofilms associated with recent iatrogenic infections. PMID:26556670

  1. [Atypical courses of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, W

    1979-04-01

    For the investigation of the question of atypical forms of course selected findings of a multicentric electronic data processing investigation carried out on 1,000 patients with manifest rheumatoid arthritis were attracted. In these cases differences of the clinical symptomatology in the sexes were the result, at a different moment of the beginning and concerning serological findings. The latter was concerned clearly by the titres of rheumatoid factors, only suggestively cases with antinuclear factors. These differences, however, were not regarded as special forms in the sense of separated disease units. They rather represent only statistically provable deviations, the borderlines of which are by far transgressed by individual characteristics.

  2. Clinical and molecular review of atypical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

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    Taninee Sahakitrungruang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders. It comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by the mutations in the genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes that involved cortisol synthesis. More than 90% of cases are caused by a defect in the enzyme 21-hydroxylase. Four other enzyme deficiencies (cholesterol side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase [P450c17], 11β-hydroxylase [P450c11β], 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the steroid biosynthesis pathway, along with one cholesterol transport protein defect (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and one electrontransfer protein (P450 oxidoreductase account for the remaining cases. The clinical symptoms of the different forms of CAH result from the particular hormones that are deficient and those that are produced in excess. A characteristic feature of CAH is genital ambiguity or disordered sex development, and most variants are associated with glucocorticoid deficiency. However, in the rare forms of CAH other than 21-hydroxylase deficiency so-called "atypical CAH", the clinical and hormonal phenotypes can be more complicated, and are not well recognized. This review will focus on the atypical forms of CAH, including the genetic analyses, and phenotypic correlates.

  3. Clinical and molecular review of atypical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders. It comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by the mutations in the genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes that involved cortisol synthesis. More than 90% of cases are caused by a defect in the enzyme 21-hydroxylase. Four other enzyme deficiencies (cholesterol side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase [P450c17], 11β-hydroxylase [P450c11β], 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in the steroid biosynthesis pathway, along with one cholesterol transport protein defect (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein), and one electrontransfer protein (P450 oxidoreductase) account for the remaining cases. The clinical symptoms of the different forms of CAH result from the particular hormones that are deficient and those that are produced in excess. A characteristic feature of CAH is genital ambiguity or disordered sex development, and most variants are associated with glucocorticoid deficiency. However, in the rare forms of CAH other than 21-hydroxylase deficiency so-called "atypical CAH", the clinical and hormonal phenotypes can be more complicated, and are not well recognized. This review will focus on the atypical forms of CAH, including the genetic analyses, and phenotypic correlates. PMID:25883920

  4. Atypical Presentation of Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. T. Udaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor (ATRT is a rare malignant intracranial neoplasm more commonly diagnosed in young children. The authors report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a long standing history of slowly progressive weight loss, fatigue, and weakness over 1.5 years whose magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large heterogeneous enhancing dorsally exophytic lower brainstem mass. Examination revealed extreme cachexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, dysphagia, dysarthria, bilateral dysmetria, and global weakness without ambulation. The protracted history and neuroimaging features were most suggestive of a low grade glioma. However, pathology revealed a hypercellular tumor with large hyperchromatic nucleoli and loss of INI-1 staining on immunohistochemistry consistent with a diagnosis of an ATRT. The child died shortly after surgery due to complications from his brainstem infiltrative disease. This case illustrates the diverse presentation of ATRT in childhood that can clinically and radiographically mimic that of low grade glioma.

  5. Constrictive Pericarditis Associated with Atypical Antipsychotics

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    Kuan-chin Jean Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful surgical intervention in a case of constrictive pericarditis after long-term use of atypical antipsychotics. Pericarditis developed in our patient with a longstanding history of schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics. Pericardiectomy was undertaken, and the patient's presenting symptom of shortness of breath resolved subsequently with an uneventful postoperative course.

  6. Karyometry in atypical endometrial hyperplasia: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Peter H; Garcia, Francisco AR; Trimble, Cornelia L; Kauderer, James; Curtin, John; Lim, Peter C; Hess, Lisa M; Silverberg, Steven; Zaino, Richard J; Yozwiak, Michael; Bartels, Hubert G; Alberts, David S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment for atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) is based on pathologic diagnosis. About 40% of AEH is found to be carcinoma at surgery. This study's objective is to derive an objective characterization of nuclei from cases diagnosed as AEH or superficially invasive endometrial cancer (SIEC). Methods Cases from GOG study 167A were classified by a central pathology committee as AEH (n=39) or SIEC (n=39). High resolution digitized images of cell nuclei were recorded. Features of the nuclear chromatin pattern were computed. Classification rules were derived by discriminant analysis. Results Nuclei from cases of AEH and SIEC occupy the same range on a progression curve for endometrial lesions. Cases of AEH and SIEC both comprise nuclei of two phenotypes: hyperplastic characteristics and premalignant/neoplastic characteristics. The principal difference between AEH and SIEC is percentage of premalignant/neoplastic nuclei. When this percentage approaches 50-60% superficial invasion is likely. SIEC may develop already from lesions at the low end of the progression curve. Conclusions AEH comprises cases which may constitute a low risk group involving 40 % of nuclei of preneoplastic phenotype. Nuclei of the preneoplastic phenotype in AEH lesions are almost indistinguishable from nuclei in SIEC, where this percentage exceeds 60%. The percentage of nuclei of the preneoplastic phenotype in AEH lesions might serve as criterion for assessment of risk for the development of invasive disease. PMID:22155796

  7. Atypical Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Caused by Coxsackievirus A6 in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsten, Hans-Henrik; Kemp, Michael; Fischer, Thea K

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, outbreaks of atypical hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in children and adults have been reported worldwide. The majority of these outbreaks are caused by a new lineage of Coxsackie virus A6 (CV-A6) presenting a more severe clinical phenotype than the classical childhood HFMD caused...... by CV-A16. Between June 2014 and January 2016, 23 cases of atypical HFMD disease presented at a Dermatology Department at a regional University Hospital in Denmark. Patients were referred by general practitioners and dermatologists with a variety of clinical diagnoses, including eczema herpeticum...... caused by CV-A6 in the Region of Southern Denmark and that atypical HFMD can be difficult to diagnose clinically as it may mimic other severe skin diseases....

  8. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrPSc accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. Findings This study reports the failure to detect PrPSc in nervous or lymphoid tis...

  9. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrP(Sc) accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Hamir, Amir N

    2016-04-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. This study reports the failure to detect PrP(Sc) in nervous or lymphoid tissues of Suffolk sheep of the PRNP ARQ/ARR genotype after oral inoculation with a U.S. scrapie isolate. Lambs were inoculated within the first 24 h of birth with 1 ml of a 10% (wt./vol.) brain homogenate derived from a clinically affected ARQ/ARQ sheep. The inoculated sheep were observed daily throughout the experiment for clinical signs suggestive of scrapie until they were necropsied at 86 months post inoculation. Tissues were collected for examination by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay, but all failed to demonstrate evidence of scrapie infection. Neonatal sheep of the ARQ/ARQ genotype receiving the same inoculum developed scrapie within 24 months. Lambs of the ARQ/ARR genotype that received the same inoculum by intracranial inoculation develop scrapie with a prolonged incubation period and with abnormal prion present within the central nervous system, but not peripheral lymphoid tissues. Results of this study suggest that ARQ/ARR sheep are resistant to oral infection with the scrapie isolate used even during the neonatal period. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Atypical manifestations of tinea faciei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 58 paitents of tinea faciei was conducted. Twenty five (43.1% patients had history of photosensitivity. Twenty eight (48.2% patients were applying topical steroids, 2 (3.4% patients were on 10 mg of prednisolone daily. Associated tinea of other sites were observed in 14 (24.13%. 23 (39.6% patients had typical circinate, arcuate, annular plaques with raised margin showing vesiculo-pustules. Atypical manifestations were in the form of arcuate plaques on the pinna in 4 patients, erythematous plaques full of vesiculo-pustules without central clearing in 3. Thirty two (55.17% patients had plaques with broad edges and indistinct central clearing. In 2 patients lesions resembled discoid lupus erythematosus. Skin scrapings for fungus was positive in 36 (62.06% cases. All patients responded to systemic griseofulvin 10mg/kg with 1% clotrimazole topicaly in 4-8 weeks.

  11. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  12. Scrapie prions: a three-dimensional model of an infectious fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z; Prusiner, S B; Cohen, F E

    1996-01-01

    A conformational change seems to represent the major difference between the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) and its normal cellular isoform (PrPC). We recently proposed a set of four helix bundle models for the three-dimensional structure of PrPC that are consistent with a variety of spectroscopic and genetic data. We report a plausible model for the three-dimensional structure of a biologically important fragment of PrPSc. The model of residues 108-218 was constructed by an approach that combines computational techniques and experimental data. The proposed structures of this fragment of PrPSc display a four-stranded beta-sheet covered on one face by two alpha-helices. Residues implicated in the prion species barrier are found to cluster on the solvent-accessible surface of the beta-sheet of one of the models. This interface could provide a structural template that would assist the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc and hence direct prion propagation. Molecular models of the PrP isoforms should prove very useful in developing structural hypotheses about the process by which PrPC is transformed into PrPSc, the mechanisms by which PrP gene mutations give rise to the inherited human prion diseases, and the species barrier that seems to protect humans from animal prions. It seems likely that PrPC represents a kinetically trapped intermediate in PrP folding.

  13. Atypical activation during the Embedded Figures Task as a functional magnetic resonance imaging endophenotype of autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Rosemary J.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Calder, Andrew J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Atypical activation during the Embedded Figures Task has been demonstrated in autism, but has not been investigated in siblings or related to measures of clinical severity. We identified atypical activation during the Embedded Figures Task in participants with autism and unaffected siblings compared with control subjects in a number of temporal and frontal brain regions. Autism and sibling groups, however, did not differ in terms of activation during this task. This suggests that the pattern of atypical activation identified may represent a functional endophenotype of autism, related to familial risk for the condition shared between individuals with autism and their siblings. We also found that reduced activation in autism relative to control subjects in regions including associative visual and face processing areas was strongly correlated with the clinical severity of impairments in reciprocal social interaction. Behavioural performance was intact in autism and sibling groups. Results are discussed in terms of atypical information processing styles or of increased activation in temporal and frontal regions in autism and the broader phenotype. By separating the aspects of atypical activation as markers of familial risk for the condition from those that are autism-specific, our findings offer new insight into the factors that might cause the expression of autism in families, affecting some children but not others. PMID:23065480

  14. The N-terminal cleavage site of PrPSc from BSE differs from that of PrPSc from scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroko K; Yokoyama, Takashi; Takata, Masuhiro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Ushiki, Yuko K; Shinagawa, Morikazu

    2005-03-25

    Heterogeneity in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is thought to have derived from conformational variation in an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). To characterize PrPSc in bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and scrapie, we analyzed the newly generated N-terminus of PrPSc isoforms by digestion with proteinase K (PK). With a lower concentration of PK, the terminal amino acid of BSE PrPSc converged at N96. Under the same conditions, however, the terminal amino acid of scrapie PrPSc was G81 or G85. Furthermore, with an increase of PK concentration, the N-terminal amino acid was shifted and converged at G89. The results suggest that the PK cleavage site of BSE PrPSc is uniform and is different from the cleavage site of scrapie PrPSc.

  15. p.Asn176Lys and p.Met137Thr dimorphisms of the PRNP gene significantly decrease the susceptibility to classical scrapie in ARQ/ARQ sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrale, C; Carta, A; Attene, S; Galistu, A; Santucciu, C; Cancedda, M G; Saba, M; Sechi, S; Patta, C; Bandino, E; Ligios, C

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the susceptibility to scrapie of Sarda breed sheep carrying the genotype ARQ/ARQ with additional polymorphisms at the PRNP gene. To do this, we examined 256 scrapie-affected sheep and 320 flock-mate negative controls from 24 flocks. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that sheep carrying the ARQ/ARQ genotype with additional dimorphisms had lower risk of becoming scrapie affected when compared with those with ARQ/ARQ(wildtype) genotype. ARQ/ARQ genotypes that were detected with heterozygous or homozygous p.Asn176Lys and p.Met137Thr dimorphisms were associated with the lowest susceptibility to the disease. A significant lower risk was also associated with the p.Arg154His dimorphism, while p.Leu141Phe had a protective effect that was not statistically significant.

  16. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the risk of transmission of classical scrapie via in vivo derived embryo transfer in ovine animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    . Under natural exposure conditions, animals that are heterozygous or homozygous A136R154R171 display respectively a low or negligible risk of being infected. The genetic control of the susceptibility to classical scrapie is also likely to impact on the risk of transmitting the disease via embryo transfer......The risk of transmission of classical scrapie via the transfer of in vivo derived embryo in ovines was assessed, taking into account the scientific information made available since the last EFSA opinion on this topic (2010) (see http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/1429.htm). The potential...... impact of PrP genotype of the embryo and/or of the ram and donor ewe on this risk was also assessed. The new data made available over the last three years further reinforce the view that classical scrapie could be vertically transmitted in sheep. Since the possibility of such vertical transmission...

  17. Pseudoarthrosis in atypical femoral fracture: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, S; Bottai, V; Dell'Osso, G; De Paola, G; Ghilardi, M; Guido, G

    2013-11-01

    Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment; they have a high frequency of delayed healing. The authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy. Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment even if, in the literature, there is no clarity on the exact pathogenetic mechanism. The Task Force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research described the major and minor features to define atypical fractures and recommends that all the five major features must be present while minor features are not necessary. Another controversial aspect regarding the atypical femoral fractures is the higher frequency of the delayed healing that can be probably related to a suppressed bone turnover caused by a prolonged period of bisphosphonates treatment. This concept could be corroborated by the Spet Tc exam. In the case of a pseudoarthrosis, there is not a standardization of the treatment. In this report, the authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy; the patient was studied with clinical, bioumoral end SPECT-Tc exam of both femurs. Many studies show the relationship between bisphosphonates and the presence of atypical fractures. These fractures should be monitored more closely due to the risk of nonunion and they require considering an initial treatment with pharmacological augmentation to reduce the complications for the patient and the health care costs.

  18. Mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification corroborates the absence of PrP(Sc) accumulation in placenta from foetuses with the ARR/ARQ genotype in natural scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, María Carmen; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín; Acín, Cristina; Vargas, Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2017-05-01

    Ovine scrapie is a worldwide spread prion disease that is transmitted horizontally under field conditions. Placenta from scrapie-infected ewes is an important source of infection, since this tissue can accumulate high amounts of PrP(Sc) depending on the foetal genotype. Therefore, placentas carrying susceptible foetuses can accumulate PrP(Sc) but there is not PrP(Sc) accumulation in presence of foetuses with at least one ARR haplotype. In scrapie eradication programs, ARR/ARR males are used for breeding to increase the resistant progeny and reduce the horizontal transmission of the disease through the placenta. The development of highly sensitive techniques, that allow the detection of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc), has caused many secretions/excretions and tissues that had previously been deemed negative to be relabeled as positive for PrP(Sc). This has raised concerns about the possible presence of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc) in placentas from ARR foetuses that conventional techniques had indicated were negative. In the present study we examined 30 placentas from a total of 23 gestations; 15 gestations resulted from naturally ARQ/ARQ scrapie-infected ewes mated with ARR/ARR rams. The absence of PrP(Sc) in placentas carrying the foetal ARR haplotype (n=19) was determined by IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test, Prionics(®)-Check WESTERN and corroborated by the highly sensitive Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification technique (PMCA). By immunohistochemistry, several unspecific stainings that might mislead a diagnosis were observed. The results of the present study support that using ARR/ARR males in scrapie eradication programs efficiently decreases the spreading of the agent in the environment via shed placentas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Primary transmission of chronic wasting disease versus scrapie prions from small ruminants to transgenic mice expressing ovine or cervid prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Schneider, David A; Zhuang, Dongyue; Dassanayake, Rohana P; Balachandran, Aru; Mitchell, Gordon B; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2016-09-01

    Development of mice expressing either ovine (Tg338) or cervid (TgElk) prion protein (PrP) have aided in characterization of scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD), respectively. Experimental inoculation of sheep with CWD prions has demonstrated the potential for interspecies transmission but, infection with CWD versus classical scrapie prions may be difficult to differentiate using validated diagnostic platforms. In this study, mouse bioassay in Tg338 and TgElk was utilized to evaluate transmission of CWD versus scrapie prions from small ruminants. Mice (≥5 per homogenate) were inoculated with brain homogenates from clinically affected sheep or goats with naturally acquired classical scrapie, white-tailed deer with naturally acquired CWD (WTD-CWD) or sheep with experimentally acquired CWD derived from elk (sheep-passaged-CWD). Survival time (time to clinical disease) and attack rates (brain accumulation of protease resistant PrP, PrPres) were determined. Inoculation with classical scrapie prions resulted in clinical disease and 100 % attack rates in Tg338, but no clinical disease at endpoint (>300 days post-inoculation, p.i.) and low attack rates (6.8 %) in TgElk. Inoculation with WTD-CWD prions yielded no clinical disease or brain PrPres accumulation in Tg338 at endpoint (>500 days p.i.), but rapid onset of clinical disease (~121 days p.i.) and 100 % attack rate in TgElk. Sheep-passaged-CWD resulted in transmission to both mouse lines with 100 % attack rates at endpoint in Tg338 and an attack rate of ~73 % in TgElk with some culled due to clinical disease. These primary transmission observations demonstrate the potential of bioassay in Tg338 and TgElk to help differentiate possible infection with CWD versus classical scrapie prions in sheep and goats.

  1. Lymphomatoid papulosis with a natural killer-cell phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkenk, M. W.; Kluin, P. M.; Jansen, P. M.; Meijer, C. J.; Willemze, R.

    2001-01-01

    Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) is defined as a recurrent self-healing papulonodular eruption with the histological features of a (CD30+) cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The atypical cells usually have a CD3+/-, CD4+/-, CD8-, CD30+, CD56- T-cell phenotype. We report an unusual case of LyP, in which the

  2. Lymphomatoid papulosis with a natural killer-cell phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkenk, MW; Kluin, PM; Jansen, PM; Meijer, CJLM; Willemze, R

    Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) is defined as a recurrent self-healing papulonodular eruption with the histological features of a (CD30+) cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The atypical cells usually have a CD3+/-, CD4+/-, CD8-, CD30+, CD56- T-cell phenotype. We report an unusual case of LyP, in which the

  3. Flock-level risk factors for scrapie in Great Britain: analysis of a 2002 anonymous postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivam S Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In November 2002, an anonymous postal survey of sheep farmers in Great Britain (GB was conducted to identify factors associated with the flock-level occurrence of scrapie. This survey was undertaken to update an earlier postal survey in 1998, and was the first occasion in which a large-scale postal survey had been repeated. Results The results of the 2002 survey indicated that scrapie was more likely to occur in certain geographic regions; in purebred compared to commercial flocks; in larger flocks; in flocks which lambed in group pens compared to those which lambed in individual pens; in flocks which always lambed in the same location compared to those which did not; and in farms which kept certain breeds of sheep. In addition to these factors, the likelihood of the disease occurring in homebred animals was higher in flocks which bred a greater proportion of replacement animals or which bought-in lambs. Finally, within-flock transmission following exposure was more likely to occur in hill flocks compared to other farm types; in flocks which bred a greater proportion of replacement animals; and in farms which kept a certain crossbreed of ewe. Conclusion The risk factors identified from the 1998 and 2002 anonymous postal surveys in Great Britain were similar. However, differences between the surveys were identified in the influence of region and of purchasing behaviour on the risk of scrapie. These differences are most likely a consequence of changes in farmer awareness and the impact of the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease epidemic, respectively.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of CNS immediately before and after the detection of PrP(Sc) in SSBP/1 sheep scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Anton G; Hopkins, John

    2014-10-10

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), progressive and fatal neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) linked to the accumulation of misfolded prion protein, PrP(Sc). New Zealand Cheviot sheep, homozygous for the VRQ genotype of the PRNP gene are most susceptible with an incubation period of 193 days with SSBP/1 scrapie. However, the earliest time point that PrP(Sc) can be detected in the CNS is 125 days (D125). The aim of this study was to quantify changes to the transcriptome of the thalamus and obex (medulla) at times immediately before (D75) and after (D125) PrP(Sc) was detected. Affymetrix gene arrays were used to quantify gene expression in the thalamus and Illumina DGE-tag profiling for obex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to help describe the biological processes of scrapie pathology. Neurological disease and Cancer were common Bio Functions in each tissue at D75; inflammation and cell death were major processes at D125. Several neurological receptors were significantly increased at D75 (e.g. CHRNA6, GRM1, HCN2), which might be clues to the molecular basis of psychiatric changes associated with TSEs. No genes were significantly differentially expressed at both D75 and D125 and there was no progression of events from earlier to later time points. This implies that there is no simple linear progression of pathological or molecular events. There seems to be a step-change between D75 and D125, correlating with the detection of PrP(Sc), resulting in the involvement of different pathological processes in later TSE disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic testing in familial AD and FTD: mutation and phenotype spectrum in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S G; Schwartz, M; Batbayli, M

    2009-01-01

    on chromosome 17, the MAPT and the PGRN genes, are associated with autosomal dominant inherited FTD. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutation spectrum and describe genotype-phenotype correlations in families with inherited dementia. The identification of novel mutations and/or atypical genotype-phenotype...

  6. [Neurological manifestations in atypical Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Guzmán, Edgar; Gámez-González, Luisa Berenise; Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Sorcia-Ramírez, Giovanni; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. Atypical Kawasaki disease is defined as that where there are signs and symptoms not corresponding to the classical criteria for this nosological entity. Children with atypical Kawasaki disease may present with acute abdominal symptoms, meningeal irritation, pneumonia or renal failure. We describe 4 children with ages ranging from 2 to 12 years who had atypical Kawasaki disease, with neurological and gastrointestinal symptoms as part of the systemic presentation of the disease. Treatment consisted of immunoglobulin and corticosteroids with good evolution. KD is a systemic vasculitis that can involve many territories. Atypical manifestations can mislead the clinician and delay diagnosis. Pediatricians and sub-specialists should be aware of these neurological manifestations in order to provide adequate and opportune treatment.

  7. Atypical CT findings in bacterial meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, I.J.; Dillon, W.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Danziger, A.; Rechthand, E.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography has become a valuable imaging modality in the evaluation and management of most intracerebral infections. We report two cases of intracranial infections with atypical CT findings, and attempt to correlate these findings with the pathophysiology.

  8. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  9. Atypical odontalgia. Its aetiology and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, R I; Schnurr, R F

    1993-12-01

    Atypical odontalgia is a chronic pain disorder in which persistent pain develops in clinically normal teeth. Its possible aetiology and long-term prognosis are discussed. Suggested management regimes are reviewed.

  10. A macroprolactinoma becoming resistant to cabergoline and developing atypical pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Sbardella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenomas are a common intracranial neoplasm, usually demonstrating a benign phenotype. They can be classified according to pathological, radiological or clinical behaviour as typical, atypical or carcinomas, invasive or noninvasive, and aggressive or nonaggressive. Prolactinomas account for 40–60% of all pituitary adenomas, with dopamine agonists representing the first-line treatment and surgery/radiotherapy reserved for drug intolerance/resistance or in neuro-ophthalmological emergencies. We present the case of a 62-year-old man with an apparently indolent prolactin-secreting macroadenoma managed with partial resection and initially showing a biochemical response to cabergoline. Five years later, the tumour became resistant to cabergoline, despite a substantial increase in dosage, showing rapid growth and causing worsening of vision. The patient then underwent two further transsphenoidal operations and continued on high-dose cabergoline; despite these interventions, the tumour continued enlarging and prolactin increased to 107 269 U/L. Histology of the third surgical specimen demonstrated features of aggressive behaviour (atypical adenoma with a high cell proliferation index not present in the tumour removed at the first operation. Subsequently, he was referred for radiotherapy aiming to control tumour growth.

  11. Atypical Neurological Manifestations Of Hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    pal P K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A part from the well-established syndrome of motor paralysis, hypokalemia may present with atypical neurological manifestations, which are not well documented in literature. Methods: We treated 30 patients of hypokalemia whose neurological manifestations improved after corrections of hypokalemia. A retrospective chart review of the clinical profile was done with emphasis on the evolution of symptoms and occurrence of unusual manifestations. Results: Twenty-eight patients had subacute quadriparesis with duration of symptoms varying from 10hrs to 7 days and two had slowly progressive quadriparesis. Fifty percent of patients had more than one attack of paralysis. Early asymmetric weakness (11, stiffness and abnormal posture of hands (7, predominant bibrachial weakness (4, distal paresthesias (4, hemiparesthesia (1, hyperreflexia(4, early severe weakness of neck muscles (3, chorea (1, trismus (1,and, retention of urine (1 were the unusual features observed. The means level of serum potassium on admission was 2.1+0.6mEq/L.and the serum creatine kinase was elevated in 14 out of 17 patients. All patients except two had complete recovery.

  12. Biopsychosocial aspects of atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramella, A; Paroli, M; Lonia, L; Bosco, M; Poli, P

    2013-01-01

    Background. A few studies have found somatosensory abnormalities in atypical odontalgia (AO) patients. The aim of the study is to explore the presence of specific abnormalities in facial pain patients that can be considered as psychophysical factors predisposing to AO. Materials and Methods. The AO subjects (n = 18) have been compared to pain-free (n = 14), trigeminal neuralgia (n = 16), migraine (n = 17), and temporomandibular disorder (n = 14). The neurometer current perception threshold (CPT) was used to investigate somatosensory perception. Structured clinical interviews based on the DSM-IV axis I and DSM III-R axis II criteria for psychiatric disorders and self-assessment questionnaires were used to evaluate psychopathology and aggressive behavior among subjects. Results. Subjects with AO showed a lower A β , A δ , and C trigeminal fiber pain perception threshold when compared to a pain-free control group. Resentment was determined to be inversely related to A β (rho: 0.62, P < 0.05), A δ (rho: 0.53, P < 0.05) and C fibers (rho: 0.54, P < 0.05), and depression was inversely related with C fiber (rho: 0.52, P < 0.05) perception threshold only in AO subjects. Conclusion. High levels of depression and resentment can be considered predictive psychophysical factors for the development of AO after dental extraction.

  13. Transgenic Rabbits Expressing Ovine PrP Are Susceptible to Scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarradin, Pierre; Viglietta, Céline; Limouzin, Claude; Andréoletti, Olivier; Daniel-Carlier, Nathalie; Barc, Céline; Leroux-Coyau, Mathieu; Berthon, Patricia; Chapuis, Jérôme; Rossignol, Christelle; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Béringue, Vincent; Lantier, Frédéric; Laude, Hubert; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting a wide range of mammalian species. They are caused by prions, a proteinaceous pathogen essentially composed of PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the host encoded cellular prion protein PrPC. Constrained steric interactions between PrPSc and PrPC are thought to provide prions with species specificity, and to control cross-species transmission into other host populations, including humans. Transgenetic expression of foreign PrP genes has been successfully and widely used to overcome the recognized resistance of mouse to foreign TSE sources. Rabbit is one of the species that exhibit a pronounced resistance to TSEs. Most attempts to infect experimentally rabbit have failed, except after inoculation with cell-free generated rabbit prions. To gain insights on the molecular determinants of the relative resistance of rabbits to prions, we generated transgenic rabbits expressing the susceptible V136R154Q171 allele of the ovine PRNP gene on a rabbit wild type PRNP New Zealand background and assessed their experimental susceptibility to scrapie prions. All transgenic animals developed a typical TSE 6–8 months after intracerebral inoculation, whereas wild type rabbits remained healthy more than 700 days after inoculation. Despite the endogenous presence of rabbit PrPC, only ovine PrPSc was detectable in the brains of diseased animals. Collectively these data indicate that the low susceptibility of rabbits to prion infection is not enciphered within their non-PrP genetic background. PMID:26248157

  14. Replication and spread of CJD, kuru and scrapie agents in vivo and in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Emmerling, Kaitlin; Manuelidis, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents are defined by their virulence for particular species, their spread in the population, their incubation time to cause disease, and their neuropathological sequelae. Murine adapted human agents, including sporadic CJD (sCJD), New Guinea kuru, and Japanese CJD agents, display particularly distinct incubation times and maximal infectious brain titers. They also induce agent-specific patterns of neurodegeneration. When these TSE agents are transmitted to cultured hypothalamic GT1 cells they maintain their unique identities. Nevertheless, the human kuru (kCJD) and Japanese FU-CJD agents, as well as the sheep 22L and 263K scrapie agents display doubling times that are 8x to 33x faster in cells than in brain, indicating release from complex innate immune responses. These data are most consistent with a foreign viral structure, rather than an infectious form of host prion protein (PrP-res). Profound agent-specific inhibitory effects are also apparent in GT1 cells, and maximal titer plateau in kCJD and FU-CJD differed by 1,000-fold in a cell-based assay. Remarkably, the lower titer kCJD agent rapidly induced de novo PrP-res in GT1 cells, whereas the high titer FU-CJD agent replicated silently for multiple passages. Although PrP-res is often considered to be toxic, PrP-res instead may be part of a primal defense and/or clearance mechanism against TSE environmental agents. Limited spread of particular TSE agents through nanotubes and cell-to-cell contacts probably underlies the long peripheral phase of human CJD.

  15. [Clinical features of atypical refractory anemia (RA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, A; Jinnai, I; Kusumoto, S; Shiramatsu, F; Bessho, M; Saito, M; Hirashima, K

    1991-08-01

    Twenty-three patients with bicytopenia or pancytopenia were retrospectively studied. The patients with underlying disorders, blast count of more than 5% on bone marrow (BM) aspirate, blast count of more than 1% on peripheral blood or ringed sideroblast count of more than 15% on BM aspirate were excluded. According to Yoshida's criteria, 23 patients were classified into 6 subtypes [AA (aplastic anemia)1: typical AA, AA2: atypical AA, MDS (myelodysplastic syndrome)3: typical RA (refractory anemia, MDS4-6: atypical RA], and AA1 7 cases; AA2 2 cases; MDS3 5 cases; MDS4 1 case; MDS5 2 cases; MDS6 6 cases. To clarify the clinical features of atypical RA group (MDS4-6), we investigated ferrokinetics, RBC life span, karyotype, serum Epo (erythropoietin) concentration, response to therapy and prognosis. Results were as follows: 1) all three RA patients who were younger than 30 years old were included in atypical RA group, 2) in ferrokinetics study PID (plasma iron disappearance time) values of MDS4 and MDS6 patients ranged between those of AA1 and those of MDS3 patients (5 of 7 patients), 3) two cases who developed leukemia belonged to typical RA group, 4) patients with atypical RA showed response to therapy and their prognosis were better than those with typical RA. These observations suggest that atypical RA have different clinical features from typical RA.

  16. [Atypical agents of wound infection and targeted samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja

    2012-10-01

    All open wounds are primarily contaminated and subsequently colonized by microorganisms, predominantly bacteria. Only about 30% of chronic wounds are also infected. Factors which favor the development of infection are the following: large quantity of bacteria, presence of virulence factors, their quantity and number, predominantly the synergy of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and formation of biofilm. Common agents of infection of acute and chronic wounds are Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Streptococcus beta-haemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides spp., and Candida albicans. Difference between acute and chronic wound is in the predominance of individual agents, with an observation that Staphylococcus aureus is predominant in both cases. Atypical agents of chronic wound infection are rare, unusual, not found in the area in which we live, not proven by standard microbiological methods, but molecular methods are needed instead. They are predominantly opportunists, varying in the expression of virulence factors, or they have changed their phenotype characteristics and are not the agents of primary wound infections. They are the agents of secondary infections. Atypical agents of the chronic wound infection are diverse, from the anaerobe group, Peptoniphilus spp., Anaerococcus spp., Bacteroides ureolyticus, Finegoldia magma, the group of gram positive rods of the Corynebacterium genus, the group of bacteria from aquatic environment Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, and Vibrio alginolyticus. The targeted samples are biopsy sample as the "gold standard" and/or aspirate, when a significant quantity of exudate is present. Targeted samples are obligatory when there is a progression and decomposition of the base of the wound, increase in the size or depth of the wound, isolation of multiresistant microbes, or absence of clinical response to empirical antimicrobial therapy. In the diagnosis of opportunistic pathogens or atypical agents of chronic wound infection, it is

  17. Immune network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with atypical and classical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, M; Gottschalk, C G; Eddy, M L; Che, X; Ukaigwe, J E; Peterson, D L; Lipkin, W I

    2017-04-04

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a persistent and debilitating disorder marked by cognitive and sensory dysfunction and unexplained physical fatigue. Classically, cases present after a prodrome consistent with infection; however, some cases are atypical and have a different presentation and comorbidities that pose challenges for differential diagnosis. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 32 cases with classical ME/CFS and 27 cases with atypical ME/CFS using a 51-plex cytokine assay. Atypical subjects differed in cytokine profiles from classical subjects. In logistic regression models incorporating immune molecules that were identified as potential predictor variables through feature selection, we found strong associations between the atypical ME/CFS phenotype and lower CSF levels of the inflammatory mediators, interleukin 17A and CXCL9. Network analysis revealed an absence of inverse inter-cytokine relationships in CSF from atypical patients, and more sparse positive intercorrelations, than classical subjects. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist appeared to be a negative regulator in classical ME/CFS, with patterns suggestive of disturbances in interleukin 1 signaling and autoimmunity-type patterns of immune activation. Immune signatures in the central nervous system of ME/CFS patients with atypical features may be distinct from those with more typical clinical presentations.

  18. Inoculation of scrapie with the self-assembling RADA-peptide disrupts prion accumulation and extends hamster survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hnasko

    Full Text Available Intracerebral inoculation of 263K Scrapie brain homogenate (PrPsc with a self-assembling RADA-peptide (RADA significantly delayed disease onset and increased hamster survival. Time of survival was dependent on the dose of RADA and pre-incubation with PrPsc prior to inoculation. RADA treatment resulted in the absence of detectable PrPsc at 40 d followed by an increased rate of PrPsc accumulation at 75 d up to sacrifice. In all PrPsc inoculated animals, clinical symptoms were observed approximately 10 d prior to sacrifice and brains showed spongiform degeneration with Congo red positive plaques. A time-dependent increase in reactive gliosis was observed in both groups with more GFAP detected in RADA treated animals at all time points. The PrP protein showed dose-dependent binding to RADA and this binding was competitively inhibited by Congo Red. We conclude that RADA disrupts the efficacy of prion transmission by altering the rate of PrPsc accumulation. This is the first demonstration that a self-assembling biomolecular peptide can interact with PrPsc, disrupt the course of Scrapie disease process, and extend survival.

  19. The effects of selective breeding against scrapie susceptibility on the genetic variability of the Latxa Black-Faced sheep breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legarra Andrés

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breeding sheep populations for scrapie resistance could result in a loss of genetic variability. In this study, the effect on genetic variability of selection for increasing the ARR allele frequency was estimated in the Latxa breed. Two sources of information were used, pedigree and genetic polymorphisms (fifteen microsatellites. The results based on the genealogical information were conditioned by a low pedigree completeness level that revealed the interest of also using the information provided by the molecular markers. The overall results suggest that no great negative effect on genetic variability can be expected in the short time in the population analysed by selection of only ARR/ARR males. The estimated average relationship of ARR/ARR males with reproductive females was similar to that of all available males whatever its genotype: 0.010 vs. 0.012 for a genealogical relationship and 0.257 vs. 0.296 for molecular coancestry, respectively. However, selection of only ARR/ARR males implied important losses in founder animals (87 percent and low frequency alleles (30 percent in the ram population. The evaluation of mild selection strategies against scrapie susceptibility based on the use of some ARR heterozygous males was difficult because the genetic relationships estimated among animals differed when pedigree or molecular information was used, and the use of more molecular markers should be evaluated.

  20. The kuru infectious agent is a unique geographic isolate distinct from Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and scrapie agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuelidis, Laura; Chakrabarty, Trisha; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Nduom, Nana-Aba; Emmerling, Kaitlin

    2009-01-01

    Human sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (sCJD), endemic sheep scrapie, and epidemic bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are caused by a related group of infectious agents. The new U.K. BSE agent spread to many species, including humans, and clarifying the origin, specificity, virulence, and diversity of these agents is critical, particularly because infected humans do not develop disease for many years. As with viruses, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents can adapt to new species and become more virulent yet maintain fundamentally unique and stable identities. To make agent differences manifest, one must keep the host genotype constant. Many TSE agents have revealed their independent identities in normal mice. We transmitted primate kuru, a TSE once epidemic in New Guinea, to mice expressing normal and ≈8-fold higher levels of murine prion protein (PrP). High levels of murine PrP did not prevent infection but instead shortened incubation time, as would be expected for a viral receptor. Sporadic CJD and BSE agents and representative scrapie agents were clearly different from kuru in incubation time, brain neuropathology, and lymphoreticular involvement. Many TSE agents can infect monotypic cultured GT1 cells, and unlike sporadic CJD isolates, kuru rapidly and stably infected these cells. The geographic independence of the kuru agent provides additional reasons to explore causal environmental pathogens in these infectious neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19633190

  1. The kuru infectious agent is a unique geographic isolate distinct from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and scrapie agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuelidis, Laura; Chakrabarty, Trisha; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Nduom, Nana-Aba; Emmerling, Kaitlin

    2009-08-11

    Human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), endemic sheep scrapie, and epidemic bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are caused by a related group of infectious agents. The new U.K. BSE agent spread to many species, including humans, and clarifying the origin, specificity, virulence, and diversity of these agents is critical, particularly because infected humans do not develop disease for many years. As with viruses, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents can adapt to new species and become more virulent yet maintain fundamentally unique and stable identities. To make agent differences manifest, one must keep the host genotype constant. Many TSE agents have revealed their independent identities in normal mice. We transmitted primate kuru, a TSE once epidemic in New Guinea, to mice expressing normal and approximately 8-fold higher levels of murine prion protein (PrP). High levels of murine PrP did not prevent infection but instead shortened incubation time, as would be expected for a viral receptor. Sporadic CJD and BSE agents and representative scrapie agents were clearly different from kuru in incubation time, brain neuropathology, and lymphoreticular involvement. Many TSE agents can infect monotypic cultured GT1 cells, and unlike sporadic CJD isolates, kuru rapidly and stably infected these cells. The geographic independence of the kuru agent provides additional reasons to explore causal environmental pathogens in these infectious neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  3. Assessment of prion reduction filters in decreasing infectivity of ultracentrifuged 263K scrapie-infected brain homogenates in "spiked" human blood and red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Franco; Sowemimo-Coker, Samuel; Abdel-Haq, Hanin; Sbriccoli, Marco; Graziano, Silvia; Valanzano, Angelina; Berardi, Vito Angelo; Galeno, Roberta; Puopolo, Maria; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2014-04-01

    The safety of red blood cells (RBCs) is of concern because of the occurrence of four transfusion-transmitted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) cases in the United Kingdom. The absence of validated screening tests requires the use of procedures to remove prions from blood to minimize the risk of transmission. These procedures must be validated using infectious prions in a form that is as close as possible to one in blood. Units of human whole blood (WB) and RBCs were spiked with high-speed supernatants of 263K scrapie-infected hamster brain homogenates. Spiked samples were leukoreduced and then passed through prion-removing filters (Pall Corporation). In another experiment, RBCs from 263K scrapie-infected hamsters were treated as above, and residual infectivity was measured by bioassay. The overall removal of infectivity by the filters from prion-spiked WB and RBCs was approximately two orders of magnitude. No infectivity was detected in filtered hamster RBCs endogenously infected with scrapie. The use of prion-removing filters may help to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted vCJD. To avoid overestimation of prion removal efficiency in validation studies, it may be more appropriate to use supernates from ultracentrifugation of scrapie-infected hamster brain homogenate rather than the current standard brain homogenates. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  4. Primary transmission of chronic wasting disease versus scrapie prions from small ruminants to transgenic mice expressing ovine and cervid prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) reservoirs that could lead to disease re-emergence is imperative to U.S. scrapie eradication efforts. Transgenic mice expressing the cervid (TgElk) or ovine (Tg338) prion protein have aided characterization of chronic wasting disease (CWD) an...

  5. Relationship of PrPSc molecular properties with incubation time in a natural prion disease host: a characterization of three isolates of U.S. sheep scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of aspects of tertiary and quaternary structure of PrPSc associated with differences in disease presentation in the host is a key area of interest in the prion field. Previously, we determined that a U.S. scrapie isolate (136-VDEP) with a short incubation time upon passage in sheep als...

  6. Discovery of a novel, monocationic, small-molecule inhibitor of scrapie prion accumulation in cultured sheep microglia and rov cells PLoS one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prion diseases, including sheep scrapie are neurodegenerative diseases with the fundamental pathogenesis involving conversion of normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) to disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). An aromatic monocationic furamidine analogue (DB772), which has previously demonstrated a...

  7. Sheep scrapie susceptibility-linked polymorphisms do not modulate the initial binding of cellular to disease-associated prion protein prior to conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, A.; Bossers, A.

    2005-01-01

    Conversion of the host-encoded protease-sensitive cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the scrapie-associated protease-resistant isoform (PrPSc) of prion protein (PrP) is the central event in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. Differences in transmissibility and

  8. Scrapie transmits to white-tailed deer by the oral route and has a molecular profile similar to chronic wasting disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this work was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer (WTD) to the agent of sheep scrapie and to compare the resultant PrPSc to that of the original inoculum and chronic wasting disease (CWD). We inoculated WTD by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal (I...

  9. No evidence for involvement of plasma proteins or blood-borne cells in amyloid plaque formation in scrapie-affected mice. An immunohistoperoxidase study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Scott, J. R.; McBride, P. A.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Bruce, M. E.; Fraser, H.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate blood-brain permeability and the possible involvement of plasma proteins and blood-borne cells in amyloid plaque formation in scrapie-affected mice. No abnormal extravasation of intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was found and with

  10. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS USE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Potočnik-Dajčman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Classical antipsychotics – neuroleptics are one of the most frequently prescribed psychotropic drugs in child psychiatry. Atypical antipsychotics are used for the same indications – psychotic (schizophrenia as well as unpsychotic disorders (pervasive developmental disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders and tics disorders. It is surprising that the studies on their use with regard to this age group are rather rare. They are carried out on a small number of samples and only exceptionally double blind. This article summarizes published clinical experience with atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents. A short overview of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and side effects is given. Schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders are major indications for use of atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents, but they have also been successfully used for other disorders such as aggressive behaviour, tics and anorexia nervosa.Conclusions. With better side-effect profile, some of the atypical antipsychotics are expected to be doctrinally recognised as the first-line treatment for childhood schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders. However, more long-term studies carried out on a larger sample are needed. Atypical antipsychotics are already used in everyday practice as first-line treatment of childhood and adolescents schizophrenia.

  11. Atypical odontalgia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Marcello; Lobo, Silvia Lobo; Ceneviz, Caroline; Zawawi, Khalid; Al-Badawi, Emad; Maloney, George; Mehta, Noshir

    2003-01-01

    To review previous reports of cases of atypical odontalgia to examine its epidemiological and clinical characteristics and to explore the etiology and pathophysiology of the disease. Atypical odontalgia is one of many painful conditions that affect the oral cavity and is often overlooked in the differential diagnosis. A search of the literature was performed for all cases of atypical odontalgia reported from 1966 to the present. The typical clinical presentation of atypical odontalgia that has been reported involves pain in a tooth in the absence of any sign of pathology; the pain may spread to areas of the face, neck, and shoulder. The existing literature suggests that this condition occurs in 3% to 6% of the patients who undergo endodontic treatment, with high female preponderance and a concentration of cases in the fourth decade of life. Deafferentation seems to be the most likely mechanism to initiate the pain, but psychological factors, alteration of neural mechanisms, and even an idiopathic mechanism have been implicated. Not all reported cases were preceded by trauma to the teeth or gums. The treatment of choice is a tricyclic antidepressant, alone or in combination with a phenothiazine. The outcome is usually fair, with many patients obtaining complete relief from pain. Especially in the absence of overt pathology, particular attention should be paid to avoiding any unnecessary and potentially dangerous dental intervention on the teeth. Atypical odontalgia is surprisingly common, of uncertain origin, and potentially treatable.

  12. Heterozygous CAV1 frameshift mutations (MIM 601047) in patients with atypical partial lipodystrophy and hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Henian; Alston, Lindsay; Ruschman, Jennifer; Hegele, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Background Mice with a deleted Cav1 gene encoding caveolin-1 develop adipocyte abnormalities and insulin resistance. From genomic DNA of patients with atypical lipodystrophy and hypertriglyceridemia who had no mutations in any known lipodystrophy gene, we used DNA sequence analysis to screen the coding regions of human CAV1 (MIM 601047). Results We found a heterozygous frameshift mutation in CAV1, designated I134fsdelA-X137, in a female patient who had atypical partial lipodystrophy, with subcutaneous fat loss affecting the upper part of her body and face, but sparing her legs, gluteal region and visceral fat stores. She had severe type 5 hyperlipoproteinemia, with recurrent pancreatitis. In addition, she had some atypical features, including congenital cataracts and neurological findings. Her father was also heterozygous for this mutation, and had a similar pattern of fat redistribution, hypertriglyceridemia and congenital cataracts, with milder neurological involvement. An unrelated patient had a different heterozygous frameshift mutation in the CAV1 gene, designated -88delC. He also had a partial lipodystrophy phenotype, with subcutaneous fat loss affecting the arms, legs and gluteal region, but sparing his face, neck and visceral fat stores. He also had severe type 5 hyperlipoproteinemia, with recurrent pancreatitis; however he had no clinically apparent neurological manifestations. The mutations were absent from the genomes of 1063 healthy individuals. Conclusion Thus, very rare CAV1 frameshift mutations appear to be associated with atypical lipodystrophy and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:18237401

  13. Isolation-drug resistance profile and molecular characterization of indigenous typical and atypical mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanum, Tanveer; Rasool, Sheikh Ajaz; Ajaz, Munazza; Khan, Asif Iqbal

    2011-10-01

    One hundred and fifty mycobacterial isolates from different pathological Labs. of Karachi were collected and screened as acid fast. On the bases of phenotypic and biochemical results, it was found that, 58.66% isolates were typical mycobacteria while 41.33% belonged to atypical mycobacteria. The individual percentages of different mycobacterial species include: M. xenopi 35%, M. thermoresistible 19 %, M. terrae complex 6 %, M. marinum 6 %, M. fortuitum 6 %, M. kansasii 25 % and M. tuberculosis 58.66 %. The sensitivity of mycobacterial isolates was determined against 5 first line, 3 second line and 1 third line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The highest number of the isolates (typical and atypical mycobacteria) offered resistance against isoniazid and streptomycin. Clarithromycin was found to be the drug of choice as regards the drug sensitivity in case of atypical mycobacterial isolates. A total of 40 isolates were subjected to PCR based identification and differentiation of 16S rRNA gene(s). Accordingly, 37.5% isolates were identified as typical mycobacteria while 25% were identified as atypical mycobacteria. These findings carry significance because a detailed research based identification (PCR and Multiplex PCR based) regarding indigenous mycobacteria has been reported for the first time in Pakistan. However, both the approaches (conventional and molecular methods) have experimental importance while identifying these organisms.

  14. Weight change after an atypical antipsychotic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, L Douglas; Renner, Bernard T; Bengtson, Michael A; Wilcox, Brian M; Acholonu, Wilfred W

    2003-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotics successfully treat schizophrenia and other conditions, with a lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects than other agents used in treatment of these disorders. However, some atypical antipsychotics are associated with weight gain. To quantify the impact on weight and identify atypical antipsychotics causing the least amount of weight gain among patients switched from risperidone to olanzapine and olanzapine to risperidone. Patients included in the study (n = 86) were > or =18 years and had received > or =2 prescriptions for risperidone or olanzapine for > or =60 days, switched to the other atypical antipsychotic, and were dispensed > or =2 prescriptions for at least 60 days after the index date. Age, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were retrospectively abstracted from automated databases containing patient-specific prescription and vital sign information. At the time of their switch, the average patient age was 53.2 years (range 25-83). The average weight change in patients switched to olanzapine (n = 47) was +2.3 kg (p = 0.01) and the BMI change was +0.8 kg/m(2) (p = 0.02). The average percent body weight change was +2.8% and the BMI change was +3.0%. The average weight change after patients switched to risperidone (n = 39) was -0.45 kg (p = 0.69) and BMI change was -0.2 kg/m2 (p = 0.64). The average percentage weight change was -0.4% and BMI change was -0.5%. Practitioners' concern regarding weight changes after switching atypical antipsychotics seems warranted and patients should be provided consistent, ongoing weight monitoring. Further investigations should examine whether weight changes associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment further jeopardize this already at-risk population for severe comorbid conditions such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Atypical radiological findings in cerebral hydatid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzagmout, Mohammed; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohammed E

    2011-07-01

    Cerebral hydatid disease is very rare, representing only 2% of all cerebral space occupying lesions. The diagnosis is usually based on a pathognomonic CT pattern. Exceptionally, the image is atypical raising suspicion of many differential diagnoses such as intracerebral infectious, vascular lesions, or tumors. We report 2 atypical cases of cerebral hydatid cysts diagnosed in a 21, and a 24-year-old woman. The CT scan results suggest oligodendroglioma in the first case and brain abscess in the second. An MRI was helpful in the diagnosis of the 2 cases. Both patients underwent successful surgery with a good outcome. The hydatid nature of the cyst was confirmed by histology in both cases.

  16. Pediatric Melanoma and Atypical Melanocytic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeraman Kumar, Radhika; Messina, Jane L; Reed, Damon; Navid, Fariba; Sondak, Vernon K

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is uncommon in the pediatric age range, but is increasing in frequency and often presents with atypical features compared to the classic ABCDE criteria common to adult melanoma cases. Moreover, many melanocytic neoplasms in childhood pose diagnostic challenges to the pathologist, and sometimes cannot be unequivocally classified as benign nevi or melanoma. This chapter addresses the evaluation and management of pediatric patients with melanoma and atypical melanocytic neoplasms, including the roles of and unresolved questions surrounding sentinel lymph node biopsy, completion lymphadenectomy, adjuvant therapy, and treatment of advanced disease.

  17. Primary lateral sclerosis mimicking atypical parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlinah, Ibrahim M; Bhatia, Kailash P; Østergaard, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), the upper motor neurone variant of motor neurone disease, is characterized by progressive spinal or bulbar spasticity with minimal motor weakness. Rarely, PLS may present with clinical features resembling parkinsonism resulting in occasional misdiagnosis as one...... of the atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Here we describe five patients initially referred with a diagnosis of levodopa-unresponsive atypical parkinsonism (n = 4) or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (n = 1), but subsequently found to have features consistent with PLS instead. Onset age varied from 49 to 67...

  18. Atypical early-onset Alzheimer's disease caused by the Iranian APP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Nielsen, J.E.; Stokholm, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's disease are inherited autosomal dominantly, and to date, three causative genes have been found, the Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, the Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene and the Amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. We describe atypical phenotypic...... features in a family with a pathogenic APP gene mutation and discuss possible explanations for these atypical features. METHODS AND RESULTS: We report a family with a history of dementia compatible with autosomal dominant transmission. The disease course in the proband was not typical for Alzheimer......'s disease as the diagnosis was preceded by 8 years of an isolated amnesia. Further, the proband had epilepsy with complex partial seizures and central degenerative autonomic failure as determined by clinical physiology. Sequencing the three known causative Alzheimer genes revealed a pathogenic missense...

  19. Detection and localisation of PrP(Sc in the liver of sheep infected with scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally J Everest

    Full Text Available Prions are largely contained within the nervous and lymphoid tissue of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE infected animals. However, following advances in diagnostic sensitivity, PrP(Sc, a marker for prion disease, can now be located in a wide range of viscera and body fluids including muscle, saliva, blood, urine and milk, raising concerns that exposure to these materials could contribute to the spread of disease in humans and animals. Previously we demonstrated low levels of infectivity in the liver of sheep experimentally challenged with bovine spongiform encephalopathy. In this study we show that PrP(Sc accumulated in the liver of 89% of sheep naturally infected with scrapie and 100% of sheep challenged with BSE, at both clinical and preclinical stages of the disease. PrP(Sc was demonstrated in the absence of obvious inflammatory foci and was restricted to isolated resident cells, most likely Kupffer cells.

  20. Disentangling the Emerging Evidence around Atypical Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Clark, Emma M

    2012-01-01

    Atypical femur fractures are rare but a growing concern, as they are more common in patients who use bisphosphonates. The best radiology-based studies have had access to only short-term exposure data, while the studies using prescription databases with substantial long-term data did not have access...

  1. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  2. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  3. Atypical Neural Self-Representation in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Michael V.; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sadek, Susan A.; Pasco, Greg; Wheelwright, Sally J.; Suckling, John; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The "self" is a complex multidimensional construct deeply embedded and in many ways defined by our relations with the social world. Individuals with autism are impaired in both self-referential and other-referential social cognitive processing. Atypical neural representation of the self may be a key to understanding the nature of such impairments.…

  4. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  5. Atypical fractures on long term bisphosphonates therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussein, W

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates reduce fractures risk in patients with osteoporosis. A new pattern of fractures is now being noted in patients on prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. We report a case of an atypical femoral fracture with preceding pain and highlight the characteristics of these fractures.

  6. Atypical visuomotor performance in children with PDD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlooz, W.A.J.M.; Hulstijn, W.

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9–12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome),

  7. Lymph node dissection in atypical endometrial hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkın, Salih; Kan, Özgür; Dai, Ömer; Taşkın, Elif A; Koyuncu, Kazibe; Alkılıç, Ayşegül; Güngör, Mete; Ortaç, Fırat

    2017-09-01

    The rate of concomitant endometrial carcinoma in patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia is high. We aimed to investigate the role of lymphadenectomy in deciding adjuvant treatment in patients with concomitant atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma. Women with atypical endometrial hyperplasia were enrolled in this retrospective study. Lymph node dissection was performed in only some patients who gave informed consent if their surgeon elected to do so, or if the intraoperative findings necessitated. The final histopathologic evaluations of surgical specimens were compared with endometrial biopsy results. Eighty eligible patients were evaluated. Seventy-two (90%) patients had complex hyperplasia with atypia, and 8 (10%) patients had simple hyperplasia with atypia. Hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed to all patients; 37 also underwent lymph node dissection. Lymph node dissection was extended to the paraaortic region in 9 of 37 patients. The concomitant endometrial carcinoma rate was 50%. Two patients had lymph node metastasis. Among 40 cases of carcinoma, 17 had deep myometrial invasion and/or cervical or ovarian involvement or grade 2 tumors with superficial myometrial invasion on hysterectomy specimens; 27.5% of all carcinomas were stage Ib or higher. The concomitant endometrial carcinoma rate was high in patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia. Nearly half of these patients had risk factors for extrauterine spread. Lymph node dissection might be helpful to decide adjuvant treatment.

  8. Non-diabetic atypical necrobiosis lipoidica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One 8 year female child had asymptomatic, anaesthetic, hypohidrotic, atrophic, yellowish, waxy plaque on the front of left thigh since 2 months. No nerve thickening was observed clinically or histopathologically. Hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, epidermal atrophy, degeneration of collagen, mononuclear granulomas and perivascular mononuclear infiltrate confirmed the clinical diagnosis of atypical necrobiosis lipoidica.

  9. Th,e Diagnosis of Atypical Varicella*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion from generalized herpes simplex or variola virus infections. Atypical varicella may show widespread bullous or haemorrhagic cutaneous lesions and visceral involvement may occur with lesions in practically every tissue of the body. A feature of varicella is the affinity for epithelial tissues and the early involvement of the ...

  10. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how…

  11. latrogenic Pulpal Injury Masquerading as Atypical Odontalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Praveena Tantradi

    2011-01-01

    Several pain conditions may mimic atypical odontalgia (AO). Diagnosis of AO is made by ruling out other pain conditions. It is said that the most difficult diagnoses to rule out are pulpal pain condition. This report presents a case of iatrogenic pulpal injury mimicking AO.

  12. latrogenic Pulpal Injury Masquerading as Atypical Odontalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveena Tantradi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several pain conditions may mimic atypical odontalgia (AO. Diagnosis of AO is made by ruling out other pain conditions. It is said that the most difficult diagnoses to rule out are pulpal pain condition. This report presents a case of iatrogenic pulpal injury mimicking AO.

  13. Figurative language processing in atypical populations: the ASD perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulchanova, Mila; Saldaña, David; Chahboun, Sobh; Vulchanov, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of experimental and clinical research documenting problems in figurative language processing in atypical populations with a focus on the Autistic Spectrum. Research in the comprehension and processing of figurative language in autism invariably documents problems in this area. The greater paradox is that even at the higher end of the spectrum or in the cases of linguistically talented individuals with Asperger syndrome, where structural language competence is intact, problems with extended language persist. If we assume that figurative and extended uses of language essentially depend on the perception and processing of more concrete core concepts and phenomena, the commonly observed failure in atypical populations to understand figurative language remains a puzzle. Various accounts have been offered to explain this issue, ranging from linking potential failure directly to overall structural language competence (Norbury, 2005; Brock et al., 2008) to right-hemispheric involvement (Gold and Faust, 2010). We argue that the dissociation between structural language and figurative language competence in autism should be sought in more general cognitive mechanisms and traits in the autistic phenotype (e.g., in terms of weak central coherence, Vulchanova et al., 2012b), as well as failure at on-line semantic integration with increased complexity and diversity of the stimuli (Coulson and Van Petten, 2002). This perspective is even more compelling in light of similar problems in a number of conditions, including both acquired (e.g., Aphasia) and developmental disorders (Williams Syndrome). This dissociation argues against a simple continuity view of language interpretation. PMID:25741261

  14. Figurative language processing in atypical populations: The ASD perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila eVulchanova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of experimental and clinical research documenting problems in figurative language processing in atypical populations with a focus on the Autistic Spectrum. Research in the comprehension and processing of figurative language in autism invariably documents problems in this area. The greater paradox is that even at the higher end of the spectrum or in the cases of linguistically talented individuals with Asperger syndrome, where structural language competence is intact, problems with extended language persist. If we assume that figurative and extended uses of language essentially depend on the perception and processing of more concrete core concepts and phenomena, the commonly observed failure in atypical populations to understand figurative language remains a puzzle.Various accounts have been offered to explain this issue, ranging from linking potential failure directly to overall structural language competence (Brock et al., 2008; Norbury, 2005 to right-hemispheric involvement (Gold and Faust, 2010. We argue that the dissociation between structural language and figurative language competence in autism should be sought in more general cognitive mechanisms and traits in the autistic phenotype (e.g., in terms of weak central coherence, Vulchanova et al., 2012b, as well as failure at on-line semantic integration with increased complexity and diversity of the stimuli (Coulson and van Petten, 2002. This perspective is even more compelling in light of similar problems in a number of conditions, including both acquired (e.g., Aphasia and developmental disorders (Williams Syndrome. This dissociation argues against a simple continuity view of language interpretation.

  15. Figurative language processing in atypical populations: the ASD perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulchanova, Mila; Saldaña, David; Chahboun, Sobh; Vulchanov, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of experimental and clinical research documenting problems in figurative language processing in atypical populations with a focus on the Autistic Spectrum. Research in the comprehension and processing of figurative language in autism invariably documents problems in this area. The greater paradox is that even at the higher end of the spectrum or in the cases of linguistically talented individuals with Asperger syndrome, where structural language competence is intact, problems with extended language persist. If we assume that figurative and extended uses of language essentially depend on the perception and processing of more concrete core concepts and phenomena, the commonly observed failure in atypical populations to understand figurative language remains a puzzle. Various accounts have been offered to explain this issue, ranging from linking potential failure directly to overall structural language competence (Norbury, 2005; Brock et al., 2008) to right-hemispheric involvement (Gold and Faust, 2010). We argue that the dissociation between structural language and figurative language competence in autism should be sought in more general cognitive mechanisms and traits in the autistic phenotype (e.g., in terms of weak central coherence, Vulchanova et al., 2012b), as well as failure at on-line semantic integration with increased complexity and diversity of the stimuli (Coulson and Van Petten, 2002). This perspective is even more compelling in light of similar problems in a number of conditions, including both acquired (e.g., Aphasia) and developmental disorders (Williams Syndrome). This dissociation argues against a simple continuity view of language interpretation.

  16. Pathogenesis of scrapie in ARQ/ARQ sheep after subcutaneous infection: effect of lymphadenectomy and immune cell subset changes in relation to prion protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianini, F; Sisó, S; Ricci, E; Eaton, S L; Finlayson, J; Pang, Y; Hamilton, S; Steele, P; Reid, H W; Cantile, C; Sales, J; Jeffrey, M; Dagleish, M P; González, L

    2013-04-15

    It is well established that the infectious agent of scrapie can replicate in the lymphoreticular system (LRS). However, the effects of removal of LRS target tissues on the pathogenesis of the infection and the accumulation of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) in LRS tissues on specific immune cell subsets are poorly understood aspects. To address these questions 16 ARQ/ARQ sheep were subcutaneously inoculated in the drainage area of the prefemoral lymph node with brain homogenate derived from Suffolk sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Fourteen sheep were then subjected to either early (14-17 days post-inoculation [dpi]) or late (175-201 dpi) lymphadenectomy and culled at preclinical or clinical stages of infection. Neither late nor even early lymphadenectomy prevented infection or had any effect on the accumulation of PrP(d) in the LRS or CNS suggesting a rapid organic dissemination of the infectious agent after inoculation. Lymph nodes from eight scrapie inoculated sheep selected on the basis of the amount of PrP(d) in their LRS tissues (negative, low or high) were examined for six different immune cell markers. The PrP(d) negative lymph nodes from two sheep with no evidence of scrapie infection showed lower numbers of cluster of determination (CD) 21 positive cells than PrP(d) positive nodes, irrespective of their location (hind leg or head). However, quantitative differences in the expression of this marker were not detected when comparing lymph nodes with low and high levels of PrP(d) accumulation, suggesting that proliferation of CD21 positive cells is related to scrapie infection, but not directly linked to the magnitude of PrP(d) accumulation. An additional observation of the study was that sheep that were methionin-threonine at codon 112 of the prion protein gene showed lower attack rates than methionine homozygotes (67% and 100%, respectively) and also generally lower levels of PrP(d) accumulation in the LRS and brain and increased survival

  17. PrPSc accumulation in fetal cotyledons of scrapie-resistant lambs is influenced by fetus location in the uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Janet; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Baszler, Timothy V

    2006-04-01

    Placentae from scrapie-infected ewes have been shown to accumulate PrPSc when the genotype of the fetus is of a susceptible genotype (VRQ/VRQ, ARQ/VRQ or ARQ/ARQ). Cotyledons from fetuses of genotypes ARR/ARR, ARQ/ARR and ARQ/VRR have previously been shown to be resistant to PrPSc accumulation. By using ewes from a naturally infected scrapie flock, cotyledons from fetuses of multiple births of different genotypes were examined. PrPSc was detected in fetal cotyledons of genotype ARQ/ARQ, but not in cotyledons from their dizygotic twin of genotype ARQ/ARR. This confirms earlier reports of single fetuses of these genotypes, but is the first description of such a finding in twin fetuses, one of each genotype. It is also demonstrated that cotyledons from sibling fetuses of genotypes ARQ/VRQ and ARQ/ARQ have different patterns of PrPSc accumulation depending on whether the dam is of genotype ARQ/ARQ or ARQ/VRQ. Lastly, it is shown that cotyledons from fetuses with resistant genotypes are weakly positive for PrPSc when they have shared the same pregnant uterine horn with a fetus of a susceptible genotype with cotyledons positive for the detection of PrPSc. Additionally, a PCR product for the Sry gene, a product specific to males, was found in cotyledons from female fetuses that had shared a uterine horn with a male fetus. This indicates that some sharing of fetal blood occurs between placentomes and fetuses residing in the same uterine horn, which can result in PrPSc accumulation in cotyledons with resistant genotypes.

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of scrapie prion protein derived from ARQ and AHQ homozygote sheep by interspecies in vitro amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yoshioka, Miyako; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Prions, infectious agents causing TSEs, are composed primarily of the pathogenic form (PrP(Sc)) of the PrP(C). The susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is determined by polymorphisms in the coding region of the PRNP, mainly at codons 136, 154, and 171. The efficiency of in vitro amplification of sheep PrP(Sc) seems to be linked also to the PrP genotype. PrP(Sc) derived from sheep with V(136)R(154)Q(171)-associated genotypes can be amplified efficiently by PMCA in the presence of additional polyanion such as poly A, but there are no reports that cite ultrasensitive detection of PrP(Sc) derived from sheep of other PrP genotypes. We report here that sheep PrP(Sc) derived from ARQ and AHQ homozygotes was amplified efficiently by serial PMCA using mouse brain homogenate as PrP(C) substrate. ARQ/ARQ PrP(Sc) was detected in infected brain homogenates diluted up to 10(-10) after five rounds of amplification, and AHQ/AHQ PrP(Sc) was detected in samples diluted up to 10(-8) after four rounds of amplification. On the other hand, amplification of PrP(Sc) from VRQ/ARQ sheep seemed to be less efficient under the experimental conditions used. The interspecies PMCA developed in this study may be useful in the detailed analysis of PrP(Sc) distribution in classical scrapie-infected ARQ and AHQ homozygote sheep. © 2012 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Atypical Food Packaging Affects The Persuasive Impact of Product Claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, M.L.; Fransen, P.W.J.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Smit, E.G.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical food packaging draws attention in the retail environment, and therefore increases product salience. However, until now, no research has focused on how atypical packaging affects the persuasive impact of other food information. In the present study, we propose that atypical packaging

  20. Atypical food packaging affects the persuasive impact of product claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, I.; Fransen, M.L.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Smit, E.G.

    Atypical food packaging draws attention in the retail environment, and therefore increases product sal- ience. However, until now, no research has focused on how atypical packaging affects the persuasive impact of other food information. In the present study, we propose that atypical packaging

  1. Prevalence and correlates of atypical patterns of drug use progression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    None of the anxiety or mood disorders were associated with atypical patterns of use. Atypical patterns of drug use were not associated with increased risk for a lifetime substance use disorder. Conclusion: Atypical patterns of drug use initiation seem more prevalent in South Africa compared to other countries. The early use ...

  2. Sensory atypicalities in dyads of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glod, Magdalena; Riby, Deborah M; Honey, Emma; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2017-03-01

    Sensory atypicalities are a common feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To date, the relationship between sensory atypicalities in dyads of children with ASD and their parents has not been investigated. Exploring these relationships can contribute to an understanding of how phenotypic profiles may be inherited, and the extent to which familial factors might contribute towards children's sensory profiles and constitute an aspect of the broader autism phenotype (BAP). Parents of 44 children with ASD and 30 typically developing (TD) children, aged between 3 and 14 years, participated. Information about children's sensory experiences was collected through parent report using the Sensory Profile questionnaire. Information about parental sensory experiences was collected via self-report using the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile. Parents of children with ASD had significantly higher scores than parents of TD children in relation to low registration, over responsivity, and taste/smell sensory processing. Similar levels of agreement were obtained within ASD and TD parent-child dyads on a number of sensory atypicalities; nevertheless significant correlations were found between parents and children in ASD families but not TD dyads for sensation avoiding and auditory, visual, and vestibular sensory processing. The findings suggest that there are similarities in sensory processing profiles between parents and their children in both ASD and TD dyads. Familial sensory processing factors are likely to contribute towards the BAP. Further work is needed to explore genetic and environmental influences on the developmental pathways of the sensory atypicalities in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 531-538. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    These results provide quantitative formulation on canalization and genetic assimilation, in terms of fluctuations of gene expression levels. [Kaneko K 2009 Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations, robustness, and evolvability; Waddington's legacy revisited under the spirit of Einstein; J. Biosci.

  4. Primary human cytomegalovirus infection induces the expansion of virus-specific activated and atypical memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauby, Nicolas; Kummert, Caroline; Lecomte, Sandra; Liesnard, Corinne; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud

    2014-10-15

    Although neutralizing antibodies play a central role in the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) dissemination, little is known about the response of B lymphocytes to primary human CMV infection. The proportion, phenotype, specificity, and functionality of B-cell subsets were studied in a cohort of pregnant women with primary CMV infection. CMV-seronegative pregnant women, as well as CMV-seronegative and CMV-seropositive healthy adults, were included as controls. Primary CMV infection was associated with a sustained expansion of activated (CD27(+)CD20(+)CD21(low)) and atypical (CD27(-)CD20(+)CD21(low)) memory B cells (MBCs). Both subsets expressed an effector phenotype, and their proportions were correlated with viremia. Activated MBCs expressed high levels of activation markers and included high frequencies of tumor necrosis α (TNF-α)-producing cells, whereas atypical MBCs expressed high levels of inhibitory receptors and had low TNF-α responses. Fluorescent-labeled antigen experiments indicated that activated and atypical MBCs were enriched in CMV-specific cells. Primary CMV infection mobilizes a large pool of memory B cells that includes activated and atypical MBCs. The functional regulation of CMV-specific MBCs may limit the production of antibodies and the control of viral dissemination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A comparative study of Drosophila and human A-type lamins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra R Schulze

    Full Text Available Nuclear intermediate filament proteins, called lamins, form a meshwork that lines the inner surface of the nuclear envelope. Lamins contain three domains: an N-terminal head, a central rod and a C-terminal tail domain possessing an Ig-fold structural motif. Lamins are classified as either A- or B-type based on structure and expression pattern. The Drosophila genome possesses two genes encoding lamins, Lamin C and lamin Dm(0, which have been designated A- and B-type, respectively, based on their expression profile and structural features. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding A-type lamins are associated with a spectrum of predominantly tissue-specific diseases known as laminopathies. Linking the disease phenotypes to cellular functions of lamins has been a major challenge. Drosophila is being used as a model system to identify the roles of lamins in development. Towards this end, we performed a comparative study of Drosophila and human A-type lamins. Analysis of transgenic flies showed that human lamins localize predictably within the Drosophila nucleus. Consistent with this finding, yeast two-hybrid data demonstrated conservation of partner-protein interactions. Drosophila lacking A-type lamin show nuclear envelope defects similar to those observed with human laminopathies. Expression of mutant forms of the A-type Drosophila lamin modeled after human disease-causing amino acid substitutions revealed an essential role for the N-terminal head and the Ig-fold in larval muscle tissue. This tissue-restricted sensitivity suggests a conserved role for lamins in muscle biology. In conclusion, we show that (1 localization of A-type lamins and protein-partner interactions are conserved between Drosophila and humans, (2 loss of the Drosophila A-type lamin causes nuclear defects and (3 muscle tissue is sensitive to the expression of mutant forms of A-type lamin modeled after those causing disease in humans. These studies provide new insights on the

  6. Atypical Alstrom syndrome with novel ALMS1 mutations precluded by current diagnostic criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian

    2014-02-01

    We report on clinical and genetic studies in a non-consanguineous Irish sib-pair with infantile dilated cardiomyopathy and retinopathy. A diagnosis of Alström Syndrome (AS) was considered and diagnostic testing pursued. The Alströms gene (ALMS1) is very large (23 exons) and diagnostic testing of mutational hotspots (exon 6, 8 and 10) was negative. Furthermore the siblings were tall and did not have the typical phenotype of nystagmus, photophobia, obesity or hearing loss and so the AS diagnosis was removed. We then sought to identify the causative gene in this family using whole exome sequencing. Unexpectedly, the exome analysis identified novel compound heterozygous ALMS1 mutations in exon 5 (c.777delT:p.D260fs*26) and exon 20 (c.12145_12146insC:p.S4049fs*36) that segregated with the phenotype. Although the siblings show some clinical overlap with AS, their phenotype is not classical. It is plausible that their atypical presentation may be due to the location of the ALMS1 mutations outside the usual mutational hotspots. Our findings show how atypical cases of AS may be missed under the current diagnostic guidelines and support consideration of complete ALMS1 sequencing in children with two or more features, even if all of the core clinical features of AS are not present.

  7. Relationship between atypical depression and social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Ahmet; Ertekin, Erhan; Ertekin, Banu Aslantaş; Binbay, Zerrin; Yüksel, Cağrı; Deveci, Erdem; Tükel, Raşit

    2015-01-30

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of atypical and non-atypical depression comorbidity on the clinical characteristics and course of social anxiety disorder (SAD). A total of 247 patients with SAD were enrolled: 145 patients with a current depressive episode (unipolar or bipolar) with atypical features, 43 patients with a current depressive episode with non-atypical features and 25 patients without a lifetime history of depressive episodes were compared regarding sociodemographic and clinical features, comorbidity rates, and severity of SAD, depression and functional impairment. Thirty four patients with a past but not current history of major depressive episodes were excluded from the comparisons. 77.1% of current depressive episodes were associated with atypical features. Age at onset of SAD and age at initial major depressive episode were lower in the group with atypical depression than in the group with non-atypical depression. History of suicide attempts and bipolar disorder comorbidity was more common in the atypical depression group as well. Atypical depression group has higher SAD and depression severity and lower functionality than group with non-atypical depression. Our results indicate that the presence of atypical depression is associated with more severe symptoms and more impairment in functioning in patients with SAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at 15 codons of the prion protein gene from a scrapie-affected herd of Suffolk sheep in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Pinto de Andrade

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheeps and goats, associated with the deposition of a isoform of the prion protein (PrPsc. This isoform presents an altered conformation that leads to aggregation in the host's central nervous and lymphoreticular systems. Predisposition to the prion agent infection can be influenced by specific genotypes related to mutations in amino acids of the PrPsc gene. The most characterized mutations occur at codons 136, 154 and 171, with genotypes VRQ being the most susceptible and ARR the most resistant. In this study we have analyzed polymorphisms in 15 different codons of the PrPsc gene in sheeps from a Suffolk herd from Brazil affected by an outbreak of classical scrapie. Amplicons from the PrPsc gene, encompassing the most relevant altered codons in the protein, were sequenced in order to determine each animal's genotype. We have found polymorphisms at 3 of the 15 analyzed codons (136, 143 and 171. The most variable codon was 171, where all described alleles were identified. A rare polymorphism was found at the 143 codon in 4% of the samples analyzed, which has been described as increasing scrapie resistance in otherwise susceptible animals. No other polymorphisms were detected in the remaining 12 analyzed codons, all of them corresponding to the wild-type prion protein. Regarding the risk degree of developing scrapie, most of the animals (96% had genotypes corresponding to risk groups 1 to 3 (very low to moderate, with only 4% in the higher risks group. Our data is discussed in relation to preventive measures involving genotyping and positive selection to control the disease.

  9. Phosphorylated human tau associates with mouse prion protein amyloid in scrapie-infected mice but does not increase progression of clinical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Kraus, Allison; Chesebro, Bruce

    2016-07-03

    Tauopathies are a family of neurodegenerative diseases in which fibrils of human hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau) are believed to cause neuropathology. In Alzheimer disease, P-tau associates with A-beta amyloid and contributes to disease pathogenesis. In familial human prion diseases and variant CJD, P-tau often co-associates with prion protein amyloid, and might also accelerate disease progression. To test this latter possibility, here we compared progression of amyloid prion disease in vivo after scrapie infection of mice with and without expression of human tau. The mice used expressed both anchorless prion protein (PrP) and membrane-anchored PrP, that generate disease associated amyloid and non-amyloid PrP (PrPSc) after scrapie infection. Human P-tau induced by scrapie infection was only rarely associated with non-amyloid PrPSc, but abundant human P-tau was detected at extracellular, perivascular and axonal deposits associated with amyloid PrPSc. This pathology was quite similar to that seen in familial prion diseases. However, association of human and mouse P-tau with amyloid PrPSc did not diminish survival time following prion infection in these mice. By analogy, human P-tau may not affect prion disease progression in humans. Alternatively, these results might be due to other factors, including rapidity of disease, blocking effects by mouse tau, or low toxicity of human P-tau in this model.

  10. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  11. Typical and Atypical Manifestations of Intrathoracic Sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Jung, Jung Im; Chung, Myung Hee; Song, Sun Wha; Kim, Hyo Lim; Baik, Jun Hyun; Han, Dae Hee [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Jun [Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyo Young [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disorder of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas. The radiological findings associated with sarcoidosis have been well described. The findings include symmetric, bilateral hilar and paratracheal lymphadenopathy, with or without concomitant parenchymal abnormalities (multiple small nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution along with irregular thickening of the interstitium). However, in 25% to 30% of cases, the radiological findings are atypical and unfamiliar to most radiologists, which cause difficulty for making a correct diagnosis. Many atypical forms of intrathoracic sarcoidosis have been described sporadically. We have collected cases with unusual radiological findings associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis (unilateral or asymmetric lymphadenopathy, necrosis or cavitation, large opacity, ground glass opacity, an airway abnormality and pleural involvement) and describe the typical forms of the disorder as well. The understanding of a wide range of the radiological manifestations of sarcoidosis will be very helpful for making a proper diagnosis.

  12. Herpes zoster - typical and atypical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Roy Rafael; Peleg, Roni

    2017-08-01

    Varicella- zoster virus infection is an intriguing medical entity that involves many medical specialties including infectious diseases, immunology, dermatology, and neurology. It can affect patients from early childhood to old age. Its treatment requires expertise in pain management and psychological support. While varicella is caused by acute viremia, herpes zoster occurs after the dormant viral infection, involving the cranial nerve or sensory root ganglia, is re-activated and spreads orthodromically from the ganglion, via the sensory nerve root, to the innervated target tissue (skin, cornea, auditory canal, etc.). Typically, a single dermatome is involved, although two or three adjacent dermatomes may be affected. The lesions usually do not cross the midline. Herpes zoster can also present with unique or atypical clinical manifestations, such as glioma, zoster sine herpete and bilateral herpes zoster, which can be a challenging diagnosis even for experienced physicians. We discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of Herpes Zoster, typical and atypical presentations.

  13. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  14. Congenital left atrial appendage aneurysm: Atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bamous

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital left atrial appendage aneurysm is a rare condition caused by dysplasia of the atrial muscles. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy, with a 5-month history of cough and in sinus rhythm. Transthoracic echocardiography and computerized tomographic angiography confirmed the aneurysm of the left atrial appendage which was resected through median sternotomy on cardiopulmonary bypass. This case is presented not only for its rarity but also for its atypical clinical presentation.

  15. Recurrent atypical fibroxanthoma of the cheek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulas, I G; Price, M; Andrew, J E; Kountakis, S E

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) of the preauricular area that recurred after Mohs micrographic surgery. AFX is a benign cutaneous fibrohistiocytic tumor that is most commonly found in elderly patients. Although these tumors are benign, they may mimic spindle cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma on histologic examination. AFX tumors rarely recur or metastasize. Wide excision is recommended for the achievement of the best results.

  16. Atypical Localized Rheumatoid Nodule: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KORHAN BARIS BAYRAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid nodules can be seen in about 30% of patiens with rheumatoid arthritis. They are occasionally localized subcutaneous, but they can rarely seen in visceral organs. Their appearance can be confused with many clinical conditions when they have atypical localizations. To exclude the presence of a malignancy, these lesions should always be investigated. We aimed to discuss a patient with rheumatoid nodule localized in close neighborhood of hyoid bone, presumed as malignancy.

  17. An atypical case of segmental spinal dysgenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zana, Elodie; Chalard, Francois; Sebag, Guy [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France); Mazda, Keyvan [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Paris (France)

    2005-09-01

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a complex closed dysraphism. The diagnostic criteria are: lumbar or thoracolumbar vertebral dysgenesis causing kyphosis, focal spinal cord narrowing without exiting roots, deformity of the lower limbs and paraplegia or paraparesis. We present a newborn who showed atypical features of bifocal spinal cord narrowing, without any vertebral abnormality at the proximal level. This seems to be a variant of this rare entity, whose early diagnosis is important, as surgical stabilisation of the spine is required. (orig.)

  18. Atypical human infections by animal trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Truc

    Full Text Available The two classical forms of human trypanosomoses are sleeping sickness due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. brucei rhodesiense, and Chagas disease due to T. cruzi. However, a number of atypical human infections caused by other T. species (or sub-species have been reported, namely due to T. brucei brucei, T. vivax, T. congolense, T. evansi, T. lewisi, and T. lewisi-like. These cases are reviewed here. Some infections were transient in nature, while others required treatments that were successful in most cases, although two cases were fatal. A recent case of infection due to T. evansi was related to a lack of apolipoprotein L-I, but T. lewisi infections were not related to immunosuppression or specific human genetic profiles. Out of 19 patients, eight were confirmed between 1974 and 2010, thanks to improved molecular techniques. However, the number of cases of atypical human trypanosomoses might be underestimated. Thus, improvement, evaluation of new diagnostic tests, and field investigations are required for detection and confirmation of these atypical cases.

  19. Atypical pharmacologies at β-adrenoceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R J

    2008-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptors are one of the most widely studied groups of G-protein-coupled receptors but continue to provide surprises and insights that have general relevance to pharmacology. Atypical pharmacologies have been described for ligands formerly (and still) described as antagonists acting at β1-, β2- and β3-adrenoceptors that involve ligand-directed signalling and possibly allosteric interactions at the receptors. In the article by Ngala et al., in this issue of the Br J Pharmacol, another example of atypical interactions with β-adrenoceptors is described, this time for agonists. Some of the responses to BRL37344 and clenbuterol can be explained in terms of actions at β2-adrenoceptors, whereas others such as the increased glucose uptake and palmitate oxidation observed with pM concentrations of BRL37344 may involve interactions with other (possibly allosteric) sites. Atypical pharmacologies of ligands acting at β-adrenoceptors have already indicated new ways in which ligands can interact with G-protein-coupled receptors and these mechanisms are likely to have important consequences for future drug development. PMID:18641673

  20. Atypical caudate anatomy in children who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundas, Anne L; Mock, Jeffrey R; Cindass, Renford; Corey, Dave M

    2013-04-01

    A temporal motor defect in speech preparation and/or planning may contribute to the development of stuttering. This defect may be linked to a dysfunctional cortical-subcortical network at the level of the striatum. To determine whether structural differences exist and whether group differences are associated with stuttering severity or manual laterality, the caudate was measured in 14 children who stutter (CWS) and in a control group of right-handed boys, ages 8-13 years. There was a statistically significant hemisphere by group effect for caudate volume. CWS had reduced right caudate volume and atypical leftward asymmetry compared to controls. Nine of the 13 CWS with atypical caudate asymmetry had atypical manual laterality. These anomalies may represent a vulnerability that perturbs speech planning/preparation and contributes to inefficiencies in action-perception coupling that may be an indicator of stuttering susceptibility. These results suggest that right-handed boys who stutter may have a defect in the feedforward cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks.

  1. Transpupillary thermotherapy for atypical central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ryosuke Kawamura1,2, Hidenao Ideta1, Hideyuki Hori1, Kenya Yuki2, Tsuyoshi Uno1, Tatsurou Tanabe1, Kazuo Tsubota2, Tsutomu Kawasaki11Ideta Eye Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan; 2Keio University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC has been traditionally treated with laser photocoagulation. We thought that transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT utilizing a lower temperature than that of conventional laser photocoagulation might minimize permanent retinal and choroidal damage. Studies suggest that undesirable effects on vision due to TTT are minimal even if it is applied to foveal and/or parafoveal lesions when TTT requires a larger irradiation spot. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of TTT in the management of atypical CSC.Methods: We defined atypical CSC as bullous retinal detachment with diffuse or several leakages, severe leakage with fibrin formation under serous retinal detachment, or leakage within a pigment epithelium detachment. Eight consecutive patients with atypical CSC underwent visual acuity testing, ophthalmic examination, color photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography to evaluate the results of transpupillary thermotherapy. Retreatment of atypical CSC was based on ophthalmic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. TTT was performed on the leaking spots shown in fluorescein angiography, with a power of 50–250 mW, spot size of 500–1200 µm, and exposure time of 13–60 seconds to minimize retinal damage.Results: In five of eight affected eyes, serous detachments completely resolved within 1 month after the initial TTT. One eye had persistent subretinal fluid and required a second TTT treatment. Two eyes showed no resolution of CSC and were treated by conventional photocoagulation. Initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/600 to 20/20 (mean, 20/40; median, 20/30. Final BCVA

  2. Atypical depression and non-atypical depression: Is HPA axis function a biomarker? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juruena, Mario F; Bocharova, Mariia; Agustini, Bruno; Young, Allan H

    2017-10-06

    The link between the abnormalities of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and depression has been one of the most consistently reported findings in psychiatry. At the same time, multiple studies have demonstrated a stronger association between the increased activation of HPA-axis and melancholic, or endogenous depression subtype. This association has not been confirmed for the atypical subtype, and some researchers have suggested that as an antinomic depressive subtype, it may be associated with the opposite type, i.e. hypo-function, of the HPA-axis, similarly to PTSD. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarise existing studies addressing the abnormalities of the HPA-axis in melancholic and/or atypical depression. We conducted a systematic review in the literature by searching MEDLINE, PsycINFO, OvidSP and Embase databases until June 2017. The following search items were used: "hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal" OR "HPA" OR "cortisol" OR "corticotropin releasing hormone" OR "corticotropin releasing factor" OR "glucocorticoid*" OR "adrenocorticotropic hormone" OR "ACTH" AND "atypical depression" OR "non-atypical depression" OR "melancholic depression" OR "non-melancholic depression" OR "endogenous depression" OR "endogenomorphic depression" OR "non-endogenous depression". Search limits were set to include papers in English or German language published in peer-reviewed journals at any period. All studies were scrutinized to determine the main methodological characteristics, and particularly possible sources of bias influencing the results reported. We selected 48 relevant studies. Detailed analysis of the methodologies used in the studies revealed significant variability especially regarding the samples' definition comparing the HPA axis activity of melancholic patients to atypical depression, including healthy controls. The results were subdivided into 4 sections: (1) 27 studies which compared melancholic OR endogenous depression vs. non

  3. Mild phenotype in an adult male with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy – case report

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, Morten Andreas; Müller, Karin Brigitte; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jørum, Ellen; Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Tallaksen, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Source: doi: 10.1002/ccr3.434 Key Clinical Message:X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy may present with a deceptively mild phenotype, even in adult males. Tight collaboration between clinicians, geneticists, biochemists, and other specialists is increasingly required for clarification of diagnosis in cases with atypical presentation.

  4. Milde phenotype in an adult male With X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, Morten Andreas; Müller, Karin Brigitte; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jørum, Ellen; Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Tallaksen, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Source: doi: 10.1002/ccr3.434 Key Clinical Message:X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy may present with a deceptively mild phenotype, even in adult males. Tight collaboration between clinicians, geneticists, biochemists, and other specialists is increasingly required for clarification of diagnosis in cases with atypical presentation.

  5. Intracranial Tuberculoma Presenting as Atypical Eclampsia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arumugam, Sendhil Coumary; Murugesan, Sharmila; Pradeep, Sunitha; John, Lopamudra; Kolluru, Vasavi

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of eclampsia before 20 weeks of pregnancy and after 48 hours of delivery in the absence of typical signs of hypertension and or proteinuria is termed as atypical eclampsia. Atypical or non-classic eclampsia will have some symptoms of eclampsia but without the usual proteinuria or hypertension. All patients with atypical onset should undergo neurological evaluation to rule out neurologic causes of seizures. Cerebral tuberculosis is a rare and serious form of disease secondary to hae...

  6. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, Enver [Department of Paediatrics, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Yavuz, Cevdet [Department of Neurosurgery, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Ustundag, Nil [Department of Pathology, Abant Izzet Baysal University School of Medicine, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey)

    2003-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  7. Cost-effectiveness of an atypical conventional antipsychotic in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost-effectiveness of an atypical conventional antipsychotic in South Africa: An economic evaluation of quetiapine versus haloperidol in the treatment of patients partially responsive to previous antipsychotics.

  8. Immunolocalisation of PrPSc in scrapie-infected N2a mouse neuroblastoma cells by light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Nathalie M; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Bürkle, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) is PrPSc, an infectious, misfolded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). The localisation and trafficking of PrPSc and sites of conversion from PrPC to PrPSc are under debate, particularly since most published work did not discriminate between PrPC and PrPSc. Here we describe the localisation of PrPC and PrPSc in a scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cell line, ScN2a, by light and electron microscopic immunolocalisation. After eliminating PrPC with proteinase K, PrPSc was detected at the plasma membrane, endocytosed via clathrin-coated pits and delivered to early endosomes. Finally, PrPSc was detected in late endosomes/lysosomes. As we detected PrPSc at the cell surface, in early endosomes and in late endosomes/lysosomes, i.e. locations where PrPC is also present, our data imply that the conversion process could take place at the plasma membrane and/or along the endocytic pathway. Finally, we observed the release of PrPC/PrPSc via exocytotic pathways, i.e. via exosomes and as an opaque electron-dense mass which may represent a mechanism of intercellular spreading of infectious prions.

  9. Viral pneumonias: Typical and atypical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M.; Bleck, J.S.; Schirg, E.

    1987-10-01

    The clinical and radiological features of viral pneumonias are summarized and discussed. Although viral infections of the lung belong to atypical pneumonias they demonstrate not always the radiographic pattern of an interstitial pneumonia. Characteristic radiographic findings are quite rare. In most cases the microbial etiology cannot be predicted from chest radiographs. The appearance varies depending on the virulence of the organism and the resistence of the host. In this regard knowledge of epidemiological data as well as patients condition and underlying disease is of utmost importance. Differentiation between community- and hospital-acquired infection may be very helpful.

  10. Gorlin’s syndrome: Atypical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay N. Agrawal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. The condition appears to have complete penetrance and variable expressivity, which makes clinilcal presentation among families variable. All known BCNS carry mutations in PATCHED gene. A 65 years old male patient presented with complaints of characteristic skin lesions on his face, back, palms since early adulthood. The lesions were pigmented nodules with characteristic border. The histopathology showed characteristic features suggestive of Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC. This case was atypical due to appearance of lesions quite later in life.

  11. Wilson’s disease: Atypical imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a genetic movement disorder with characteristic clinical and imaging features. We report a 17- year-old boy who presented with sialorrhea, hypophonic speech, paraparesis with repeated falls and recurrent seizures along with cognitive decline. He had bilateral Kayser Flescher rings. Other than the typical features of Wilson’s disease in cranial MRI, there were extensive white matter signal abnormalities (T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities and gyriform contrast enhancement which are rare imaging features in Wilson's disease. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose Wilson’s disease when atypical imaging features are present.

  12. Bisphosphonates and Atypical Fractures of Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Yli-Kyyny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed medicines for the treatment of osteoporosis and have generally been regarded as well-tolerated and safe drugs. Since 2005, there have been numerous case reports about atypical fractures of the femur linked to long-term treatment of osteoporosis with bisphosphonates. Some attempts to characterize pathophysiology and epidemiology of these fractures have been published as well. However, as the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR concluded in their task force report, the subject warrants further studies.

  13. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  14. Atypical odontalgia--a diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, D N; Polonowita, A D

    2012-06-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a chronic orofacial pain condition of unclear pathophysiology, often presenting as toothache or pain at an extraction site. Idiopathic, psychogenic, vascular, and neuropathic causes have been proposed. In view of demonstrable somatosensory changes, and responses to management proposed for other forms of neuropathic pain, the best current evidence supports a neuropathic hypothesis. It is proposed that certain individuals with as-yet-undefined genetic vulnerability can develop AO when exposed to certain risk factors, including invasive dental treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of AO can be challenging, but can be aided by a multidisciplinary approach. Two cases of differing complexity are presented in this paper.

  15. [Persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Charly; Ettlin, Dominik; Pfau, Doreen B

    2013-01-01

    The terms 'persistent idiopathic facial pain' (PIFP) and 'atypical odontalgia' (AO) are currently used as exclusion diagnoses for chronic toothache and chronic facial pain. Knowledge about these pain conditions in medical and dental practices is of crucial importance for the prevention of iatrogenic tissue damage by not-indicated invasive interventions, such as endodontic treatment and tooth extraction. In the present paper, etiology and pathogenesis, differential diagnostic criteria, and diagnostic approaches will be explained and relevant therapeutic principles will be outlined. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Atypical Angelman syndrome due to a mosaic imprinting defect: Case reports and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fevre, Anna; Beygo, Jasmin; Silveira, Cheryl; Kamien, Benjamin; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Colley, Alison; Buiting, Karin; Dudding-Byth, Tracy

    2017-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability, limited, or absent speech and a generally happy demeanor. The four known etiological mechanisms; deletions, uniparental disomy, imprinting defects, and UBE3A mutation all affect expression of the UBE3A gene at 15q11-q13. An atypical phenotype is seen in individuals who are mosaic for a chromosome 15q11-q13 imprinting defect on the maternal allele. These patients present with a milder phenotype, often with hyperphagia and obesity or non-specific intellectual disability. Unlike typical AS syndrome, they can have a vocabulary up to 100 words and speak in sentences. Ataxia and seizures may not be present, and the majority of individuals do not have microcephaly. Here we review the current literature and present three individuals with atypical AS caused by a mosaic imprinting defect to demonstrate why DNA methylation analysis at the SNRPN locus needs to be considered in a broader clinical context. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Treatment of atypically-localized cavernous hemangioma in abdomen with atypical pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Cavernous hemangiomas of the liver rarely require treatment. Surgery is one of the options in selected cases and abdominal pain is one of the indications. In patients complaining from persistent abdominal pain, if intraabdominal atypical-localized mass was seen in examinations, hemangioma should be remembered in differential diagnosis.

  18. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain' most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of 'orofacial pain' are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of 'orofacial pain' remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of 'atypical odontalgia'. 'Atypical odontalgia' is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. 'Atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia' can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain.

  19. A novel approach for scrapie-associated prion (PrPSc) detection in blood using the competitive affinity of an aggregate-specific antibody and streptavidin to PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutyrine, Andrei; Huang, Hongsheng; Andrievskaia, Olga; Walther, Ines; Mitchell, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    Scrapie is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting sheep and goats, originating from exposure to disease-associated prions (PrP Sc ). An ante-mortem screening test that can detect native PrP Sc in body fluids remains unavailable due to insufficient sensitivity of current detection methods that involve proteinase or denaturation treatments. We adopted an approach to detect PrP Sc in whole blood using a simple proteinase- and denaturation-independent immunoassay, based on the competitive affinity of an aggregate-specific monoclonal antibody and streptavidin to PrP Sc . First, we demonstrated the ability of native PrP Sc to bind to streptavidin and the inhibition of this interaction by 15B3 antibody (P<0.05). This led to a new two-step assay that involved capturing native prions from infected blood on a solid-state matrix and detection of PrP Sc aggregates by evaluating the conformation-dependent conjugate catalytic activity ratio in samples against a pre-determined threshold. This test showed capacity for detecting scrapie prions in 500μl of sheep whole blood spiked with scrapie brain homogenate containing approximately 5ng of total brain protein, and estimated to have 500fg of PrP Sc . The test also discriminated between blood samples from scrapie-negative (6 sheep, 4 goats) and scrapie-infected animals (3 experimentally infected sheep, 7 naturally infected goats). Collectively, with the proposed high-throughput sample-processing platform, these initial studies provide insights into the development of a large-scale screening test for the routine diagnosis of scrapie. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  1. Neuromyelitis optica: atypical clinical and neuroradiological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Mariani, Silvia; Anselmi, Monica; Catalucci, Alessia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    The extreme variability of clinical and MRI findings in the suspicion of Devic's disease always requires the detection of specific antibodies (AQP4). MRI scans were performed with a high-field MRI scanner (1.5T General Electric Signa Horizon): the MRI protocol of the brain employed axial DP, T2, T1, FLAIR and DWI weighted images (wi) and coronal T2-wi. After intravenous administration of contrast medium axial and sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were repeated. The spine protocol employed after contrast medium included sagittal T2-wi, T2-wi with fat suppression and T1-wi. In May 2004, a 64-year-old healthy Caucasian woman began to suffer loss of motor and thermal sensitivity in the left lower limb. MRI showed non-specific areas of abnormal signal intensity on the deep left frontal and right frontoparietal white matter with no pathological enhancement after contrast medium and a small intramedullary area of altered signal at metameric level C2-C4 with a diagnosis of post-viral transverse myelitis. The patient had two similar episodes years later so the neurologist decided to search for circulating IgG AQP4 with the definitive diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. In this case, compared to a clinical presentation of atypical deficit neurological involvement, the neuroradiological results of a progressive diffuse involvement of the white matter were atypical. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. [Treatment with bisphosphonates and atypical fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivacow, Francisco R; Sarli, Marcelo; Buttazzoni, Mirena

    2009-01-01

    In the last twenty five years aminobisphosphonates have became the drugs of choice for the treatment of osteoporosis. They strongly inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption and reduce the incidence of new fractures in patients with established osteoporosis, but their long half-life and their chronic effects on bone physiology are a matter of concern. Theoretically a harmful consequence of a prolonged inhibition of bone remodeling could be the microdamage accumulation, and paradoxically the occurrence of new and atypical fractures. Until now, few cases of these unusual fractures have been reported in the international literature. All these patients shared some common characteristics, apart from the chronic use of bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis. The more frequent is the atypical location of the fractures. Since the majority happened in one or both femoral shafts, others bones such as sacrum, ischium, ribs and pubic rami could be affected. The fractures were atraumatic or caused by minimal trauma and, in some cases, it was preceded by a prodromal pain in the affected area. All cases had biochemical or histomorphometric evidence of low bone turnover. The aim of this paper is to report three new cases of patients that fulfill with the diagnostic criteria of this new entity, two of them with femoral shaft fractures and the remainder with a pelvis one.

  3. [Atypical odontalgia - a little known phantom pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, J C

    2001-02-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) was described in the dental literature more than 200 years ago, and it is included in most taxonomies and textbooks of pain. Nonetheless, it remains one of the most frequently misdiagnosed intraoral pain conditions. Due to similarities with phantom pain, AO is also referred to as "phantom tooth pain". AO is characterized by persistent throbbing pain in or around a former or present permanent tooth (preferably molars and premolars). Clinical and radiographic examination, however, does not reveal any organic cause of the pain. The complaints associated with AO usually begin after deafferentiation of primary afferent trigeminal nerve fibers, e. g., after pulp extirpation, apicectomy, or extraction of a tooth. AO is a diagnosis by exclusion. Patients and dentists must be aware of the fact that the therapeutic options are limited. AO is primarily managed with topically or systemically administered pharmacological agents. Unnecessary and harmful procedures around teeth and jaws must be avoided by all means. A concept was recently proposed which aims to unify a group of four types of orofacial pain under the term "idiopathic orofacial pain" (Woda & Pionchon 1999, 2000). These pain conditions - AO, atypical facial pain, burning mouth syndrome ("stomatodynia"), and subgroups of temporomandibular disorders ("idiopathic facial arthromyalgia") - are characterized by unknown etiology, but common clinical characteristics. It is to be hoped that the suggested classification will stimulate reflection on these enigmatic orofacial pain disorders.

  4. CASE REPORT CASE Atypical tuberculosis of the knee joint CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case report demonstrates the MRI findings of atypical tuberculosis. (TB) of the knee joint, caused by Mycobacterium kansasii. Osteoarticular. TB caused by atypical mycobacteria is rare; instead, it is predomi- nantly a synovial disease affecting the tendon sheaths rather than bone. Predisposing factors are ...

  5. 'Atypical' bacteria are a common cause of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To assess the proportion of cases of community· acquired pneumonia caused by 'atypical' bacteria, inclUding the recently discovered Chlamydia pneumoniae, and to compare the clinical, radiographic and laboratory features of patients with and without 'atypical' bacteria. Methods. A prospective serological ...

  6. Comparing the side effect profile of the Atypical Antipsychotics | Alao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post clozapine, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of four newer atypical antipsychotics; risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone for the treatment of schizophrenia. Because of their dual serotonin and dopamine receptor blocking abilities, atypical antipsychotics have greater efficacy ...

  7. An atypical presentation of myositis ossificans | Bultheel | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An atypical presentation of myositis ossificans. M Bultheel, JH Kirby, JT Viljoen, PL Viviers. Abstract. In the following case study an atypical presentation of myositis ossificans (MO) in the superior anterolateral thigh of a young soccer player is discussed. This case demonstrates that MO can present without obvious history of ...

  8. 'Atypical' bacteria are a common cause of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two most common organisms were C. pneumoniae (20,7%) and L. pneumophila (8,7%). There. were no differences in the clinical and radiographic features of patients with and without 'atypical' bacteria. Clinicians prescribed erythromycin or tetracyclines with equal frequency in the two groups. Conclusions. 'Atypical' ...

  9. CPD: Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with ...

  10. Insight into the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion from the structures of antibody-bound ovine prion scrapie-susceptibility variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Grosclaude, Jeanne; Lesceu, Stéphanie; Debey, Pascale; Doublet, Bénédicte; Tréguer, Eric; Rezaei, Human; Knossow, Marcel

    2004-07-13

    Prion diseases are associated with the conversion of the alpha-helix rich prion protein (PrPC) into a beta-structure-rich insoluble conformer (PrPSc) that is thought to be infectious. The mechanism for the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion and its relationship with the pathological effects of prion diseases are poorly understood, partly because of our limited knowledge of the structure of PrPSc. In particular, the way in which mutations in the PRNP gene yield variants that confer different susceptibilities to disease needs to be clarified. We report here the 2.5-A-resolution crystal structures of three scrapie-susceptibility ovine PrP variants complexed with an antibody that binds to PrPC and to PrPSc; they identify two important features of the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion. First, the epitope of the antibody mainly consists of the last two turns of ovine PrP second alpha-helix. We show that this is a structural invariant in the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion; taken together with biochemical data, this leads to a model of the conformational change in which the two PrPC C-terminal alpha-helices are conserved in PrPSc, whereas secondary structure changes are located in the N-terminal alpha-helix. Second, comparison of the structures of scrapie-sensitivity variants defines local changes in distant parts of the protein that account for the observed differences of PrPC stability, resistant variants being destabilized compared with sensitive ones. Additive contributions of these sensitivity-modulating mutations to resistance suggest a possible causal relationship between scrapie resistance and lowered stability of the PrP protein.

  11. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M; Baron, Gerald S; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc)) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc) propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C), by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen)) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(Res)). Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8) and 10(-13) were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res) levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C). Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res), RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res) strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res) levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc) immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  12. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vascellari

    Full Text Available Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc (PrP(Res. Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8 and 10(-13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  13. Effect of Polymorphisms at Codon 146 of the Goat PRNP Gene on Susceptibility to Challenge with Classical Scrapie by Different Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavva-Stylianou, Penelope; Simmons, Marion Mathieson; Ortiz-Pelaez, Angel; Windl, Otto; Spiropoulos, John; Georgiadou, Soteria

    2017-11-15

    This report presents the results of experimental challenges of goats with scrapie by both the intracerebral (i.c.) and oral routes, exploring the effects of polymorphisms at codon 146 of the goat PRNP gene on resistance to disease. The results of these studies illustrate that while goats of all genotypes can be infected by i.c. challenge, the survival distribution of the animals homozygous for asparagine at codon 146 was significantly shorter than those of animals of all other genotypes (chi-square value, 10.8; P = 0.001). In contrast, only those animals homozygous for asparagine at codon 146 (NN animals) succumbed to oral challenge. The results also indicate that any cases of infection in non-NN animals can be detected by the current confirmatory test (immunohistochemistry), although successful detection with the rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was more variable and dependent on the polymorphism. Together with data from previous studies of goats exposed to infection in the field, these data support the previously reported observations that polymorphisms at this codon have a profound effect on susceptibility to disease. It is concluded that only animals homozygous for asparagine at codon 146 succumb to scrapie under natural conditions. IMPORTANCE In goats, like in sheep, there are PRNP polymorphisms that are associated with susceptibility or resistance to scrapie. However, in contrast to the polymorphisms in sheep, they are more numerous in goats and may be restricted to certain breeds or geographical regions. Therefore, eradication programs must be specifically designed depending on the identification of suitable polymorphisms. An initial analysis of surveillance data suggested that such a polymorphism in Cypriot goats may lie in codon 146. In this study, we demonstrate experimentally that NN animals are highly susceptible after i.c. inoculation. The presence of a D or S residue prolonged incubation periods significantly, and prions were detected

  14. Na+/K+-ATPase is present in scrapie-associated fibrils, modulates PrP misfolding in vitro and links PrP function and dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Graham

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are characterised by widespread deposition of fibrillar and/or plaque-like forms of the prion protein. These aggregated forms are produced by misfolding of the normal prion protein, PrP(C, to the disease-associated form, PrP(Sc, through mechanisms that remain elusive but which require either direct or indirect interaction between PrP(C and PrP(Sc isoforms. A wealth of evidence implicates other non-PrP molecules as active participants in the misfolding process, to catalyse and direct the conformational conversion of PrP(C or to provide a scaffold ensuring correct alignment of PrP(C and PrP(Sc during conversion. Such molecules may be specific to different scrapie strains to facilitate differential prion protein misfolding. Since molecular cofactors may become integrated into the growing protein fibril during prion conversion, we have investigated the proteins contained in prion disease-specific deposits by shotgun proteomics of scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF from mice infected with 3 different strains of mouse-passaged scrapie. Concomitant use of negative control preparations allowed us to identify and discount proteins that are enriched non-specifically by the SAF isolation protocol. We found several proteins that co-purified specifically with SAF from infected brains but none of these were reproducibly and demonstrably specific for particular scrapie strains. The α-chain of Na(+/K(+-ATPase was common to SAF from all 3 strains and we tested the ability of this protein to modulate in vitro misfolding of recombinant PrP. Na(+/K(+-ATPase enhanced the efficiency of disease-specific conversion of recombinant PrP suggesting that it may act as a molecular cofactor. Consistent with previous results, the same protein inhibited fibrillisation kinetics of recombinant PrP. Since functional interactions between PrP(C and Na(+/K(+-ATPase have previously been reported in astrocytes, our data highlight this molecule as

  15. [Atypical cerebellar neurocytoma resembling a hemangioblastoma. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista Martínez, Olalla; Rivas López, Luis Alfredo; Pombo Otero, Jorge Francisco; Amaro Cendón, Santiago; Bravo García, Christian; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Through August 2013, 105 cases of intracranial extraventricular neurocytoma (EVN) had been described; 6% were located in cerebellum and 22% were atypical EVN. A rare morphologic form of neurocytoma, atypical EVN has had only 24 cases reported to date. Its prognosis is poorer than the typical central neurocytoma. This case report describes an atypical cerebellar EVN, a form that has not been reported yet, hence the interest of this article. We emphasise its cystic nature and mural nodule, in an infrequent presentation. EVN are low-incidence tumours that we need to take into consideration when making the differential diagnosis of cystic cerebellar lesions with mural nodule. Given that the prognosis of atypical EVNs depends on the atypical nature and on the grade of resection, medical follow up has to be more constant, due to the greater degree of recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Nardo, Davide [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A. [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gardner, Ann [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  17. Genetic heterogeneity in tuberous sclerosis: phenotypic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, I M; Connor, J M; Beighton, P H

    1990-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for genetic heterogeneity in tuberous sclerosis (TSC) on the basis of linkage analysis in affected kindreds. We have performed a detailed assessment of an affected South African family in which there is no evidence of linkage to chromosome 9 markers. The affected persons have atypical clinical features, namely prominent nuchal skin tags, a confetti pattern of hypopigmentation of the skin of the lower legs, and absence of ungual fibromata. Further investigation of these unusual phenotypic features is warranted in order to determine whether these lesions are consistently present in families in whom the gene for TSC is not on 9q34. We conclude that confetti depigmentation and nuchal skin tags may be clinical pointers to an alternative locus for TSC. Images PMID:2395158

  18. Discovery of a novel, monocationic, small-molecule inhibitor of scrapie prion accumulation in cultured sheep microglia and Rov cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, James B; Schneider, David A; Dinkel, Kelcey D; Balmer, Bethany F; Baszler, Timothy V; Mathison, Bruce A; Boykin, David W; Kumar, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, are neurodegenerative diseases with the fundamental pathogenesis involving conversion of normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Chemical inhibition of prion accumulation is widely investigated, often using rodent-adapted prion cell culture models. Using a PrP(Sc)-specific ELISA we discovered a monocationic phenyl-furan-benzimidazole (DB772), which has previously demonstrated anti-pestiviral activity and represents a chemical category previously untested for anti-prion activity, that inhibited PrP(Sc) accumulation and prion infectivity in primary sheep microglial cell cultures (PRNP 136VV/154RR/171QQ) and Rov9 cultures (VRQ-ovinized RK13 cells). We investigated potential mechanisms of this anti-prion activity by evaluating PrP(C) expression with quantitative RT-PCR and PrP ELISA, comparing the concentration-dependent anti-prion and anti-pestiviral effects of DB772, and determining the selectivity index. Results demonstrate at least an approximate two-log inhibition of PrP(Sc) accumulation in the two cell systems and confirmed that the inhibition of PrP(Sc) accumulation correlates with inhibition of prion infectivity. PRNP transcripts and total PrP protein concentrations within cell lysates were not decreased; thus, decreased PrP(C) expression is not the mechanism of PrP(Sc) inhibition. PrP(Sc) accumulation was multiple logs more resistant than pestivirus to DB772, suggesting that the anti-PrP(Sc) activity was independent of anti-pestivirus activity. The anti-PrP(Sc) selectivity index in cell culture was approximately 4.6 in microglia and 5.5 in Rov9 cells. The results describe a new chemical category that inhibits ovine PrP(Sc) accumulation in primary sheep microglia and Rov9 cells, and can be used for future studies into the treatment and mechanism of prion diseases.

  19. Infectious titres of sheep scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents cannot be accurately predicted from quantitative laboratory test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lorenzo; Thorne, Leigh; Jeffrey, Martin; Martin, Stuart; Spiropoulos, John; Beck, Katy E; Lockey, Richard W; Vickery, Christopher M; Holder, Thomas; Terry, Linda

    2012-11-01

    It is widely accepted that abnormal forms of the prion protein (PrP) are the best surrogate marker for the infectious agent of prion diseases and, in practice, the detection of such disease-associated (PrP(d)) and/or protease-resistant (PrP(res)) forms of PrP is the cornerstone of diagnosis and surveillance of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Nevertheless, some studies question the consistent association between infectivity and abnormal PrP detection. To address this discrepancy, 11 brain samples of sheep affected with natural scrapie or experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy were selected on the basis of the magnitude and predominant types of PrP(d) accumulation, as shown by immunohistochemical (IHC) examination; contra-lateral hemi-brain samples were inoculated at three different dilutions into transgenic mice overexpressing ovine PrP and were also subjected to quantitative analysis by three biochemical tests (BCTs). Six samples gave 'low' infectious titres (10⁶·⁵ to 10⁶·⁷ LD₅₀ g⁻¹) and five gave 'high titres' (10⁸·¹ to ≥ 10⁸·⁷ LD₅₀ g⁻¹) and, with the exception of the Western blot analysis, those two groups tended to correspond with samples with lower PrP(d)/PrP(res) results by IHC/BCTs. However, no statistical association could be confirmed due to high individual sample variability. It is concluded that although detection of abnormal forms of PrP by laboratory methods remains useful to confirm TSE infection, infectivity titres cannot be predicted from quantitative test results, at least for the TSE sources and host PRNP genotypes used in this study. Furthermore, the near inverse correlation between infectious titres and Western blot results (high protease pre-treatment) argues for a dissociation between infectivity and PrP(res).

  20. Extensive hypertrophic lupus erythematosus: Atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus (LE is a disease with a wide spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations. Clinical features of patients with LE show a great variation, and for this reason it is difficult to develop a unifying concept of this disease. Our objective is to present a case of hypertrophic LE with atypical morphology and extensive involvement, who responded favorably to isotretinoin. Diagnosis of hypertrophic lupus erythematosus (HLE was confirmed by characteristic histopathological findings. Combination therapy with isotretinoin and hydroxychloroquine resulted in flattening and repression of previously refractory skin lesions. Sometimes, HLE lesions may present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. In long standing lesions, squamous cell carcinoma may arise. Therefore, HLE requires adequate therapy with clinical and histopathological follow up.

  1. Brugada Syndrome with atypical characteristics: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Ari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada Syndrome (BrS is a heterogeneous genetic disease characterized by persistent or transient ST-segment elevation in the right precordial electrocardiography (ECG leads and a high incidence of sudden death and life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with structurally normal hearts. The syndrome generally manifests in men during adulthood. The ECG manifestations can be overt or concealed. We report a case of BrS whose type 1 ECG pattern during febrile state converted to type 2 ECG after alleviation of fever with atypical characteristics (78-year-old woman with monomorphic ventricular tachycardia on holter monitoring, a history of the sudden infant death of her child, and without inducible ventricular arrhythmia by programed ventricular stimulation [PVS].

  2. Atypical Bacteria and Macrolides in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xepapadaki Paraskevi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are common pathogens causing acute illness in both the upper and lower airways. Several observations are supportive of a possible causative role of these pathogens in asthma; however, more evidence is required before this becomes meaningful in clinical practice. Atypical bacteria can enhance airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, both of which have been associated with exacerbations in patients with preexisting asthma. It is less clear whether the above mechanisms might also be responsible for the development of asthma. Difficulties in accurately diagnosing these infections contribute to such uncertainty. In the present report, evidence of the involvement of Chlamydophila and Mycoplasma infection in the development and the progression of asthma are reviewed.

  3. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  4. Refractory Rheumatic Disorder: Atypical Postpregnancy Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Mourgues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a young patient with severe osteoporosis that was initially revealed when she presented with polyarthralgia during her second pregnancy. Postpartum, the pain increased and her X-ray did not show any abnormalities. A bone scintigraphy was performed. It indicated an inflammatory rheumatic disorder. Six months after partum, an investigation of right coxalgia revealed a spontaneous basicervical fracture. Given the persistent polyarthralgia, the patient underwent a new scintigraphy, which revealed areas of what looked to be old rib and L1 fractures. A subsequent full body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan revealed signal abnormalities that could indicate multiple lower limb bone fractures. Despite exhaustive biological, radiological, and histological testing, no secondary cause for the osteoporosis was found. The patient was started on teriparatide. We finally concluded that, despite the atypical presentation, the patient was suffering from postpregnancy osteoporosis. It is possible that the frequency of occurrence of this still poorly understood disease is underestimated.

  5. MANAGEMENT OF ATYPICAL CLUBFOOT BY PONSETI METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Blandinsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available From May 2006 to August 2009 analyzed 28 clinical observations (34 feet for children aged from 7 days to 1.5 years with severe atypical congenital clubfoot (Pirani 5,6 points, treated by the method of I. Ponseti. The average number of gypsum one foot to the full correction was - 6.3. It was written 38 achillotomy. Dates from the beginning of gypsum to achillotomy averaged - 34 days. All of the children undergoing treatment with us after the removal of plaster, dressed brace, fixing the foot fixed in position 45° abduction and 15° of flexion of the back and encouraged them to carry up to 3-4 years. All the children in this group achieved a complete correction of foot deformities without performing tenoligamentocapsulotomy. Results of treatment were evaluated according to the classification C. Pirani. Average score was 1.1 points. Follow-up was an average of 1 year 35 days.

  6. Atypical Celiac Disease Resistant to Thyroxine Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Aksu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in susceptible individuals upon ingestion of gluten containing diet, is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease and hypothyroidism ( especially due to Hashimoto disease cooccurence is frequently mentioned in the literature. The relationship between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease was first described three decades ago. Patients usually have the classical presentation of diarrhoea and steatorrhoea but hypothyroidism with weight loss and increased dose requirement of L Thyroxine are two well recognised presentations of celiac disease in hypothyroidism. It is known that these cases are resistant to thyroxine replacement. Herein we presented a 35 year old female patient with atypical celiac disease and needed an extremely high dose of thyroxine such as 1600 mcg/day for treatment.

  7. Atypical odontalgia - pathophysiology and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a chronic form of dental pain without signs of pathology. Several hypotheses have been put forward regarding the pathophysiology. AO has been proposed to be psychogenic, vascular, neuropathic or idiopathic. The scientific evidence supporting or rejecting these hypotheses are reviewed in this paper. At this time, the best supported hypothesis is that AO is a neuropathic pain condition. Relevant differential diagnoses, such as odontogenic pain, sinusitis, trigeminal neuralgia among others, are presented and the evidence regarding possible management strategies is reviewed. A treatment algorithm for AO is proposed based on the rather scarce scientific evidence available and inspired by a similar treatment algorithm for peripheral neuropathic pain. The proposed strategy involves an interdisciplinary approach including patient education, psychological counselling, topical and systemic medication and, importantly, avoidance of invasive treatments like surgery and endodontics. Two illustrative cases are presented.

  8. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Atypical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Noelle; Sullivan, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    When patients who are thin present with knee pain, it can be easy to overlook the possibility of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Although 80% of patients with a "slip" are obese, thin children are not immune to this problem. Endocrinopathies, especially hypothyroidism, can be associated with SCFE. This article describes guidelines for evaluating patients for a slip and highlights some important considerations for the atypical SCFE. Patients with open growth plates with thigh or knee pain should routinely have a hip examination as part of the evaluation. Plain radiographs, with an emphasis on obtaining a frog lateral image, are usually sufficient to make the diagnosis of SCFE. Patients diagnosed with SCFE should be immediately referred to an orthopedic surgeon because treatment for this condition is always surgical. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Atypical Neurotransmitters and the Neurobiology of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joca, Samia Regiane; Moreira, Fabricio Araujo; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report that the mechanism of action of antidepressants involves the facilitation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in the brain in the 1960s, the leading hypothesis about the neurobiology of depression has been the so called "monoaminergic hypothesis". However, a growing body of evidence from the last two decades also supports important involvement of non-monoaminergic mechanisms in the neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action. The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) and endocannabinoid signaling in the brain during the 1990s challenged the wellestablished criteria of classical neurotransmission. These transmitters are synthesized and released on demand by the postsynaptic neurons, and may act as a retrograde messenger on the presynaptic terminal, modulating neurotransmitter release. These unconventional signaling mechanisms and the important role as neural messengers have classified NO and endocannabinoids as atypical neurotransmitters. They are able to modulate neural signaling mediated by the main conventional neurotransmitters systems in the brain, including the monoaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling systems. This review aims at discussing the fundamental aspects of NO- and endocannabinoid-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to the neurobiology of depression. Both preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of these atypical neurotransmitters in the neurobiology of depression, and in the antidepressant effects are presented here. The evidence is discussed on basis of their ability to modulate different neurotransmitter systems in the brain, including monoaminergic and glutamatergic ones. A better comprehension of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms in the neurobiology depression could provide new avenues for the development of novel non-monoamine based antidepressants.

  10. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simona Spaccavento, Marina Del Prete, Angela Craca, Anna Loverre IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Cassano Murge, Bari, Italy Background: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS and aphasia. Aim: We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods: A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results: Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20, low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall, and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion: Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in

  11. [Atypical scurvy associated with anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, R; Gabrielli, A; Laffitte, E; Kherad, O

    2017-02-01

    Scurvy, or "Barlow's disease", is a widely described disease involving cutaneous and mucosal lesions resulting from vitamin C deficiency. Herein, we report a case of scurvy in a 48-year-old woman that was unusual in its atypical cutaneous-mucosal presentation as well as its association with anorexia nervosa. A 48-year-old woman treated for depression for several years was admitted to hospital for her impaired general state of health. Over the last year, she had presented palmoplantar rash and episodes of perimalleolar oedema. The clinical examination showed the patient to have wasting syndrome, with a BMI of 11.9kg/m2, lower-limb oedema, palmoplantar fissures, geographic tongue, telogen effluvium and purpuric petechiae on her right knee. However, no gingival bleeding was noted and there was no loss of tooth enamel. The remainder of the clinical examination was normal. Blood tests revealed extremely low vitamin C levels without any other associated deficiencies, as well as laboratory signs of cytolysis and anicteric cholestasis without inflammatory syndrome. The diagnosis of anorexia nervosa was made by psychiatrists, despite the unusual age of onset. Favorable clinical outcome was rapidly achieved via a one-month course of vitamin C supplements at a daily dose of 1g. The absence of classical buccal-dental symptoms and the presence of keratotic dermatosis with fissures and ulcers on the hands and feet are atypical in scurvy; however, this diagnosis was confirmed by the existence of purpura evoking capillary fragility, the patient's drastically low vitamin C level and the rapid subsidence of symptoms following treatment with oral vitamin C alone. Anorexia nervosa was doubtless the cause of deficiency. This situation is rare and a systematic review of the literature in Medline via PubMed showed that only three reports of scurvy associated with mental anorexia have been published since 1975. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Adrenoleukodystrophy - its diverse CT appearances and an evolutive or phenotypic variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubourg, P.; Diebler, C.

    1982-10-01

    The CT appearance of adrenoleukodystrophy is discussed on the basis of 16 personal observations and a review of the literature. CT appearance was typical in 10 of the 16 cases, atypical but suggestive of adrenoleukodystrophy in four cases, and misleading in two cases. Atypical CT presentations were most often observed at an early phase of the disease and included unilateral lesions or lesions without opacification at the periphery of the edemalike areas after contrast enhancement. In three cases, neurological signs, CT scans, and conjuctival and skin biopsies were highly suggestive of adrenoleukodystrophy, but there was no adrenal insufficiency. These cases may correspond to an evolutive or phenotypic variant of adrenoleukodystrophy.

  13. Association between paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia and atypical facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper, R P; Glynn, C J

    1999-12-01

    Paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia and atypical facial pain are both fairly common conditions that produce pain in the face of different character. Trigeminal neuralgia is sharp and shooting, brought on by facial movement, change of temperature and by touching the face at a specific point (the trigger point). Atypical facial pain is dull and unrelenting and its site is ill-defined. Trigeminal neuralgia is generally more common in older people, and affects women slightly more than men, and atypical facial pain generally affects younger people, with women predominating. The pains should never be confused. We have noticed that many patients with trigeminal neuralgia have additional symptoms of atypical facial pain and so we reviewed the records of the Pain Relief Unit retrospectively. Of the 83 patients identified with trigeminal neuralgia where records were adequate, 35 (42%) also had atypical facial pain. Five of these had developed it before the onset of trigeminal neuralgia and could be examples of pretrigeminal neuralgia. There were eight patients in the series with multiple sclerosis, of whom two also had atypical facial pain. There seemed to be no relationship between the development of atypical facial pain and the interventions used to treat trigeminal neuralgia. It is important that both conditions are identified and treated individually.

  14. Malignant atypical cell in urine cytology: a diagnostic dilemma

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    Kakkar Nandita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to find out the characteristic morphology of malignant atypical cells which were missed on routine cytology of urine. Materials and methods In this retrospective study, we examined detailed cytomorphology of 18 cases of atypical urinary cytology which were missed on routine examination and were further proved on histopathology as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of bladder. The cytological features of these cases were compared with 10 cases of benign urine samples. Results There were 11 cases of high grade TCC and 7 cases of low grade TCC on histopathology of the atypical urine samples. Necrosis in the background and necrosed papillae were mostly seen in malignant atypical cells. The comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei (single cells with deep black structure-less nuclei were only observed in malignant atypical cells. The most consistent features in malignant atypical cells were: i high nuclear and cytoplasmic (N/C ratio ii nuclear pleomorphism iii nuclear margin irregularity iv hyperchromasia and v chromatin abnormalities Conclusion The present study emphasizes that nuclear features such as high N/C ratio, hyperchromasia and chromatin abnormalities are particularly useful for assessing the malignant atypical cells. Other cytological features such as comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei are also helpful for diagnosis but have limited value because they are less frequently seen.

  15. Aggregates of scrapie-associated prion protein induce the cell-free conversion of protease-sensitive prion protein to the protease-resistant state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, B; Kocisko, D A; Raymond, G J; Lansbury, P T

    1995-12-01

    Scrapie infection instigates the in vivo conversion of normal, protease-sensitive prion protein (PrPC) into a protease-resistant form (PrPSc) by an unknown mechanism. In vitro studies have indicated that PrPSc can induce this conversion, consistent with proposals that PrPSc itself might be the infectious scrapie agent. Using this cell-free model of the PrPC to PrPSc conversion, we have studied the dependence of conversion on reactant concentration, and the properties of the PrPSc-derived species that has converting activity. The cell-free conversion of 35S PrPC to the proteinase K-resistant form was dependent on the reaction time and initial concentrations of PrPSc (above an apparent minimum threshold concentration) and 35S PrPC. Analysis of the physical size of the converting activity indicated that detectable converting activity was associated only with aggregates. Under mildly chaotropic conditions, which partially disaggregated PrPSc and enhanced the converting activity, the active species were heterogeneous in size, but larger than either effectively solubilized PrP or molecular weight standards of approximately 2000 kDa. The entity responsible for the converting activity was many times larger than a soluble PrP monomer and required a threshold concentration of PrPSc. These results are consistent with a nucleated polymerization mechanism of PrPSc formation and inconsistent with a heterodimer mechanism.

  16. An assessment of the efficiency of PrPsc detection in rectal mucosa and third-eyelid biopsies from animals infected with scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleón, Eva; Garza, Ma Carmen; Sarasa, Rocío; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Javier; Bolea, Rosa; Monzón, Marta; Vargas, M Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Acín, Cristina

    2011-01-27

    In classical scrapie, detection of PrPsc on lymphoreticular system is used for the in vivo and post mortem diagnosis of the disease. However, the sensitivity of this methodology is not well characterised because the magnitude and duration of lymphoid tissue involvement can vary considerably. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of detecting PrPsc in rectal mucosa and third-eyelid biopsies. A total of 474 genetically susceptible sheep and 24 goats from three scrapie infected flocks were included in this study. A sample from rectal mucosa and a sample from third-eyelid lymphoid tissue were collected from each animal. Biopsy samples were fixed in formaldehyde and processed for immunohistochemical examination. Animals with negative biopsy results were studied more closely through a post mortem examination of central nervous and lymphoreticular systems and if there was a positive result, additional biopsy sections were further tested. The sensitivity of rectal mucosa and third-eyelid assays were 36% and 40% respectively on initial examination but increased to 48% and 44% respectively after retesting. The results of this field study show a high percentage of infected animals that do not have detectable levels of PrPsc in the biopsied lymphoid tissue, due mainly to the relatively high number of animals with minimal or no involvement of lymphoid tissue in the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exposure of RML scrapie agent to a sodium percarbonate-based product and sodium dodecyl sulfate renders PrPSc protease sensitive but does not eliminate infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jodi D; Nicholson, Eric M; Foster, Gregory H; Greenlee, Justin J

    2013-01-11

    Prions, the causative agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are notoriously difficult to inactivate. Current decontamination recommendations by the World Health Organization include prolonged exposure to 1 N sodium hydroxide or > 20,000 ppm sodium hypochlorite, or autoclaving. For decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces and equipment as in abattoirs, for example, these methods are harsh or unsuitable. The current study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial product containing sodium percarbonate to inactivate prions. Samples of mouse brain infected with a mouse-adapted strain of the scrapie agent (RML) were exposed to a sodium percarbonate-based product (SPC-P). Treated samples were evaluated for abnormal prion protein (PrPSc)-immunoreactivity by western blot analysis, and residual infectivity by mouse bioassay. Exposure to a 21% solution of SPC-P or a solution containing either 2.1% or 21% SPC-P in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resulted in increased proteinase K sensitivity of PrPSc. Limited reductions in infectivity were observed depending on treatment condition. A marginal effect on infectivity was observed with SPC-P alone, but an approximate 2-3 log10 reduction was observed with the addition of SDS, though exposure to SDS alone resulted in an approximate 2 log10 reduction. This study demonstrates that exposure of a mouse-adapted scrapie strain to SPC-P does not eliminate infectivity, but does render PrPSc protease sensitive.

  18. Genotype to phenotype

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malcolm, Sue; Goodship, Timothy H. J

    2001-01-01

    ... Disorders Molecular Genetics of Hypertension Human Gene EvolutionAnalysis of Multifactorial Disease Transcription Factors Molecular Genetics of Cancer, Second edition Genotype to Phenotype, second e...

  19. Results of surgical treatment of atypical endometrial hyperplasia

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    O. A. Gornykh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of surgical treatment in 132 patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia have been studied. Post-operative diagnosis was: en- dometrial cancer – in 19 %, atypical hyperplasia – in 35 %, simple and complex hyperplasia – in 33 %, only atrophic endometrial changes – in 13 % of patients. The tumor was within the endometrium in 5 patients, the superficial invasion of the myometrium (1–2 mm were in 8 patients, invasion to half of the myometrium – in 9 patients, invasion of more than half of the myometrium – in 3 patients. The questions of tactics of treatment of atypical endometrial hyperplasia is under discussion.

  20. Intracranial Tuberculoma Presenting as Atypical Eclampsia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sendhil Coumary; Murugesan, Sharmila; Pradeep, Sunitha; John, Lopamudra; Kolluru, Vasavi

    2016-06-01

    Occurrence of eclampsia before 20 weeks of pregnancy and after 48 hours of delivery in the absence of typical signs of hypertension and or proteinuria is termed as atypical eclampsia. Atypical or non-classic eclampsia will have some symptoms of eclampsia but without the usual proteinuria or hypertension. All patients with atypical onset should undergo neurological evaluation to rule out neurologic causes of seizures. Cerebral tuberculosis is a rare and serious form of disease secondary to haematogenous spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we present a case of cerebral tuberculoma with seizures in late pregnancy mimicking eclampsia.

  1. Atypical real estate objects: legal regime and control system

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    Voskresenskaya Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The legal concept of immovable things raises controversy in legal practice. Determining and understanding the definition of real estate, the complexity and diversity of these objects, a growing appearance of so-called atypical properties (such as sport stadiums, roads, boreholes, analyzing legislation and judicial practice of this field – all these issues call for a deep study of this topic. There is a conflicting arbitration practice, the subject of which is the learning of the legal nature of atypical real estate (for instance, asphalt playgrounds, car parks, fences, wells. The object of the research is the learning of the legal status of atypical real estate.

  2. Direct observation of inclined a-type threading dislocation with a-type screw dislocation in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Tohoru; Sugimoto, Kohei; Goubara, Shin; Inomoto, Ryo; Okada, Narihito; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2017-05-01

    We investigated both the atomic arrangements in the core structure of threading dislocations (TDs) and their behaviors in unintentionally doped c-plane-GaN layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy and hydride vapor phase epitaxy using high angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The extra image contrast near the core was attributed to an extra displacement in a-type TDs in addition to the core structures revealed in previous reports; we used the notation "with displacement" to describe the new core structure. We found that TDs incline towards both the m- and a-directions from the c-direction. The transition of a-type TDs from the conventional core structure to the structure with displacement was deduced from its relationship to the TD inclination. We also found similarities between a-type screw dislocations and a-type TDs with displacement in the atomic-scale HAADF-STEM images. We concluded that a-type TDs could incline towards the a-direction via a-type screw dislocations, and that these inclined a-type TDs are observed as the core structure with displacement.

  3. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  4. The TGFBI A546D mutation causes an atypical type of lattice corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Gomez, Vicente; Villalvazo-Cordero, Leonardo; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2007-09-17

    To report the clinical, molecular, and histopathological features of a distinct transforming growth factor-beta-induced (TGFBI) gene-linked amyloidotic corneal dystrophy exhibiting an unusual lattice pattern. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed in 10 individuals of a Mexican family in which autosomal dominant transmission of the disease was observed. DNA was obtained from peripheral blood leukocytes of each participating subject. Genetic analyses included TGFBI polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and automated nucleotidic sequencing of exons 4, 11, 12, 13, and 14 from genomic DNA. Histological analysis of corneal tissue from an affected individual who underwent a penetrating keratoplasty was also performed. The corneal phenotype in this pedigree was characterized by multiple bilateral round opacities in the central part of the cornea combined with a conspicuous central and peripheral lattice pattern. TGFBI analysis revealed a heterozygous point mutation at exon 12 (1637 C>A) in all affected individuals, predicting an A546D missense change. The lattice phenotype resulting from the TGFBI A546D mutation in this family is distinct from that observed in a previously described pedigree carrying the A546D mutation and exhibiting a phenotype designated "polymorphic corneal amyloidosis". We propose this particular disorder to be classified as an atypical type of lattice stromal corneal dystrophy.

  5. Profile of hepatitis A infection with atypical manifestations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Tryambak; Das, Anjan Kumar; Ganguly, Sutapa

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the clinical course and biochemical profile of symptomatic children with viral hepatitis A who had atypical manifestations. Of 229 children with hepatitis A, atypical manifestations were found in 32 (14%) subjects. Prolonged cholestasis (n = 14), acute liver failure (9), relapse (9), ascites (8), and hematological problems (8) were the common presentations. Liver histology was suggestive of chronic liver disease in six children with protracted jaundice. Patients with atypical presentations were older (7.7 [1.6] years vs. 6.5 [2.6] years; p=0.012) and had higher total serum bilirubin (13.7 [8.1] mg/dL vs. 7.2 [4.0] mg/dL; p=children with acute hepatitis A infection have atypical presentation which is associated with increase in morbidity.

  6. Neural Correlates of Reward Processing in Typical and Atypical Development

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    Emma G. Duerden PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypically developing children including those born preterm or who have autism spectrum disorder can display difficulties with evaluating rewarding stimuli, which may result from impaired maturation of reward and cognitive control brain regions. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 58 typically and atypically developing children (6-12 years participated in a set-shifting task that included the presentation of monetary reward stimuli. In typically developing children, reward stimuli were associated with age-related increases in activation in cognitive control centers, with weaker changes in reward regions. In atypically developing children, no age-related changes were evident. Maturational disturbances in the frontostriatal regions during atypical development may underlie task-based differences in activation.

  7. The Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Psychotic Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Devi

    2007-01-01

    Convulsive therapy and its progeny, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), were originally used for the treatment of catatonic schizophrenia, and there is little doubt that ECT remains an effective intervention for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, current practice tends to favor the use of ECT in severe or treatment refractory affective disorders, and its use in schizophrenia and other nonaffective (atypical) psychotic disorders has become controversial. Case reports have suggested a role for ECT in two specific atypical psychotic disorders: Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. In this article, we review the atypical psychotic disorders and report a series of five case examples that signify the role of ECT in atypical psychotic presentations, particularly when the symptoms resemble those found in Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. PMID:20428309

  8. Atypical brain torque in boys with developmental stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Jeffrey Ryan; Zadina, Janet N; Corey, David M; Cohen, Jeremy D; Lemen, Lisa C; Foundas, Anne L

    2012-01-01

    The counterclockwise brain torque, defined as a larger right prefrontal and left parietal-occipital lobe, is a consistent brain asymmetry. Reduced or reversed lobar asymmetries are markers of atypical cerebral laterality and have been found in adults who stutter. It was hypothesized that atypical brain torque would be more common in children who stutter. Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphology measures were completed in boys who stutter (n = 14) and controls (n = 14), ages 8-13. The controls had the expected brain torque configurations whereas the boys who stutter were atypical. These results support the hypothesis that developmental stuttering is associated with atypical prefrontal and parietal-occipital lobe asymmetries.

  9. An atypical case of Noonan syndrome with mutation diagnosed by targeted exome sequencing

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    Jinsup Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is a genetic disorder caused by autosomal dominant inheritance and is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, short stature, chest deformity, and congenital heart disease. In individuals with NS, germline mutations have been identified in several genes involved in the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway. Because of its clinical and genetic heterogeneity, the conventional diagnostic protocol with Sanger sequencing requires a multistep approach. Therefore, molecular genetic diagnosis using targeted exome sequencing (TES is considered a less expensive and faster method, particularly for patients who do not fulfill the clinical diagnostic criteria of NS. In this case, the patient showed short stature, dysmorphic facial features suggestive of NS, feeding intolerance, cryptorchidism, and intellectual disability in early childhood. At the age of 16, the patient still showed extreme short stature with delayed puberty and characteristic facial features suggestive of NS. Although the patient had no cardiac problems or chest wall deformities, which are commonly present in NS and are major concerns for patients and clinicians, the patient showed several other characteristic clinical features of NS. Considering the possibility of a genetic disorder, including NS, a molecular genetic study with TES was performed. With TES analysis, we detected a pathogenic variant of c.458A > T in KRAS in this patient with atypical NS phenotype and provided appropriate clinical management and genetic counseling. The application of TES enables accurate molecular diagnosis of patients with nonspecific or atypical features in genetic diseases with several responsible genes, such as NS.

  10. The ability of haemolysins expressed by atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to bind to extracellular matrix components

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    Caroline A Magalhães

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical and atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC are considered important bacterial causes of diarrhoea. Considering the repertoire of virulence genes, atypical EPEC (aEPEC is a heterogeneous group, harbouring genes that are found in other diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes, such as those encoding haemolysins. Haemolysins are cytolytic toxins that lyse host cells disrupting the function of the plasma membrane. In addition, these cytolysins mediate a connection to vascular tissue and/or blood components, such as plasma and cellular fibronectin. Therefore, we investigated the haemolytic activity of 72 aEPEC isolates and determined the correlation of this phenotype with the presence of genes encoding enterohaemolysins (Ehly and cytolysin A (ClyA. In addition, the correlation between the expression of haemolysins and the ability of these secreted proteins to adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM components was also assessed in this study. Our findings demonstrate that a subset of aEPEC presents haemolytic activity due to the expression of Ehlys and/or ClyA and that this activity is closely related to the ability of these isolates to bind to ECM components.

  11. [Prevalence and determinants of atypical presentation of acute coronary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, David; Lunet, Nuno; Azevedo, Ana

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the characteristics of patients with atypical presentation of acute coronary syndromes may contribute to increased sensitivity in diagnosis in a given population. The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of atypical presentation, to identify its determinants, and to describe the presenting symptoms in cases of acute coronary syndrome at the emergency department of Hospital São João, Porto. Systematic sample of 288 emergency admissions with a confirmed diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in 2007. Atypical presentation was defined as absence of chest pain and/or syncope. The prevalence of atypical presentation was 20.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.0 to 25.5], with no important variation by gender. It increased with age and was more frequent in cases of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In multivariate analysis, atypical presentation was associated with age [>70 versus ≤ 50 years, odds ratio (OR)=3.45; 95%CI: 1.03-11.61] and it was about four times less likely in the presence of history of ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking. A history of heart failure was independently associated with a higher likelihood of acute coronary syndrome with atypical presentation (OR = 4.15, 95%CI 1.50-11.46). Among the 223 cases who had chest pain or discomfort, a growing, oppressive, prolonged (longer than 30 minutes), recurrent and episodic pain prevailed. Among other symptoms, dyspnea was the most frequently reported, either as the main symptom in cases of atypical presentation or concurrently with typical symptoms. Factors associated with atypical presentation are consistent with those described in other populations. Using routine clinical data allowed access to a large data base on a representative sample of patients admitted to the emergency department of a third-level hospital that serves a large part of the local urban population. In medical records, data are unstandardized and heterogeneous in validity

  12. Early Generation of New PrPSc on Blood Vessels after Brain Microinjection of Scrapie in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesebro, Bruce; Striebel, James; Rangel, Alejandra; Phillips, Katie; Hughson, Andrew; Caughey, Byron; Race, Brent

    2015-09-22

    Aggregation of misfolded host proteins in the central nervous system is believed to be important in the pathogenic process in several neurodegenerative diseases of humans, including prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. In these diseases, protein misfolding and aggregation appear to expand through a process of seeded polymerization. Prion diseases occur in both humans and animals and are experimentally transmissible orally or by injection, thus providing a controllable model of other neurodegenerative protein misfolding diseases. In rodents and ruminants, prion disease has a slow course, lasting months to years. Although prion infectivity has been detected in brain tissue at 3 to 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.), the details of early prion replication in the brain are not well understood. Here we studied the localization and quantitation of PrPSc generation in vivo starting at 30 min postmicroinjection of scrapie into the brain. In C57BL mice at 3 days p.i., generation of new PrPSc was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays, and at 7 days p.i., new generation was confirmed by real-time quaking-induced conversion assay. The main site of new PrPSc generation was near the outer basement membrane of small and medium blood vessels. The finding and localization of replication at this site so early after injection have not been reported previously. This predominantly perivascular location suggested that structural components of the blood vessel basement membrane or perivascular astrocytes might act as cofactors in the initial generation of PrPSc. The location of PrPSc replication at the basement membrane also implies a role for the brain interstitial fluid drainage in the early infection process. Neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and prion diseases, of humans are characterized by misfolding and aggregation of certain proteins, resulting in the destruction of brain tissue. In these diseases

  13. Discovery of a novel, monocationic, small-molecule inhibitor of scrapie prion accumulation in cultured sheep microglia and Rov cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Stanton

    Full Text Available Prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, are neurodegenerative diseases with the fundamental pathogenesis involving conversion of normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C to disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc. Chemical inhibition of prion accumulation is widely investigated, often using rodent-adapted prion cell culture models. Using a PrP(Sc-specific ELISA we discovered a monocationic phenyl-furan-benzimidazole (DB772, which has previously demonstrated anti-pestiviral activity and represents a chemical category previously untested for anti-prion activity, that inhibited PrP(Sc accumulation and prion infectivity in primary sheep microglial cell cultures (PRNP 136VV/154RR/171QQ and Rov9 cultures (VRQ-ovinized RK13 cells. We investigated potential mechanisms of this anti-prion activity by evaluating PrP(C expression with quantitative RT-PCR and PrP ELISA, comparing the concentration-dependent anti-prion and anti-pestiviral effects of DB772, and determining the selectivity index. Results demonstrate at least an approximate two-log inhibition of PrP(Sc accumulation in the two cell systems and confirmed that the inhibition of PrP(Sc accumulation correlates with inhibition of prion infectivity. PRNP transcripts and total PrP protein concentrations within cell lysates were not decreased; thus, decreased PrP(C expression is not the mechanism of PrP(Sc inhibition. PrP(Sc accumulation was multiple logs more resistant than pestivirus to DB772, suggesting that the anti-PrP(Sc activity was independent of anti-pestivirus activity. The anti-PrP(Sc selectivity index in cell culture was approximately 4.6 in microglia and 5.5 in Rov9 cells. The results describe a new chemical category that inhibits ovine PrP(Sc accumulation in primary sheep microglia and Rov9 cells, and can be used for future studies into the treatment and mechanism of prion diseases.

  14. Aberrant ERK 1/2 complex activation and localization in scrapie-infected GT1-1 cells

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    Didonna Alessandro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatal neurodegenerative disorders such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker diseases in humans, scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in animals, are characterized by the accumulation in the brain of a pathological form of the prion protein (PrP denominated PrPSc. The latter derives from the host cellular form, PrPC, through a process whereby portions of its α-helical and coil structures are refolded into β-sheet structures. Results In this work, the widely known in vitro model of prion replication, hypothalamic GT1-1 cell line, was used to investigate cellular and molecular responses to prion infection. The MAP kinase cascade was dissected to assess the phosphorylation levels of src, MEK 1/2 and ERK 1/2 signaling molecules, both before and after prion infection. Our findings suggest that prion replication leads to a hyper-activation of this pathway. Biochemical analysis was complemented with immunofluorescence studies to map the localization of the ERK complex within the different cellular compartments. We showed how the ERK complex relocates in the cytosol upon prion infection. We correlated these findings with an impairment of cell growth in prion-infected GT1-1 cells as probed by MTT assay. Furthermore, given the persistent urgency in finding compounds able to cure prion infected cells, we tested the effects on the ERK cascade of two molecules known to block prion replication in vitro, quinacrine and Fab D18. We were able to show that while these two compounds possess similar effects in curing prion infection, they affect the MAP kinase cascade differently. Conclusions Taken together, our results help shed light on the molecular events involved in neurodegeneration and neuronal loss in prion infection and replication. In particular, the combination of chronic activation and aberrant localization of the ERK complex may lead to a lack of essential neuroprotective and survival factors

  15. Polypeptide chain folding in the hydrophobic core of hamster scrapie prion: analysis by X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H; Kirschner, D A

    1998-01-01

    Conversion of the noninfectious, cellular form of the scrapie prion (PrPC) to the infectious form (PrPSc) is thought to be driven by an alpha-helical to beta-sheet conformational transition. The N-truncated polypeptide PrP27-30, which encompasses residues 90-231 of PrPSc and from which the truncated peptide is derived by limited proteolysis, assembles into amyloid rods that are rich in the beta-sheet conformation. The N-terminal half of PrP27-30, which includes residues 90-145 of PrP (SHa90-145) and contains the two putative alpha-helical domains H1 (PrP109-122) and H2 (PrP129-141), appears to be particularly crucial in the alpha --> beta conversion. To assess their role in this conformational transition, we have analyzed in detail X-ray diffraction patterns from the prion-related peptides A8A (PrP113-120), H1, and SHa90-145. We used iterative Fourier synthesis with beta-silk as an initial model for assigning phases. For H1, the lyophilized and acetonitrile-solubilized/dehydrated specimens gave two different electron density maps. The former showed that the beta-sheets were composed of small side chains as in A8A. The latter showed two types of beta-sheets having smaller and larger side chains, suggesting a turn. Such a turn was not observed in the lyophilized H1, indicating that the internal turn in H1 depends on the physical-chemical environment. In SHa90-145, the beta-chains are assembled in approximately 40 A-wide crystal domains (termed beta-crystallites), and the electron density maps of these crystallites showed evidence for turns within both the H1 and H2 domains. The molecular folding of H1-H2 is compared here with the recent NMR solution structure of recombinant hamster prion, and the effect of pH on the conformational change is discussed. The most compact structure based on the X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the N-terminal, smaller residues of H2 fold back and are hydrogen-bonded with the C-terminal, smaller residues of H1. Similar folding is

  16. Rapid detection of CWD PrP: comparison of tests designed for the detection of BSE or scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasche, T; Schenck, E V; Balachandran, A; Miller, M W; Langenberg, J; Frölich, K; Steinbach, F

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) mainly affecting cervids in North America. The accumulation of an abnormal form of host-encoded prion protein (PrP(CWD) ) in the CNS and lymphoid tissues is characteristic of the disease and known to be caused by pathogenic prion proteins (PrP(res) ), which are thought to be transmitted mainly by contact with body fluids, such like saliva. Species known to be naturally infected by CWD include Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). Recently, large-scale disease eradication or control programs have been attempted to curtail the spread of disease. But reports of diseased free-ranging and farmed cervids in many locations in the USA and Canada are still continuing. The goal of this study was to find sensitive rapid test systems that are reliably able to detect CWD-associated PrP(CWD) in cervids, thereby reviewing an important control tool in case the disease spreads further and reaches Europe. Seven tests, originally developed for the detection of other TSE diseases such as Scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy, including two Western blots, four enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and one lateral flow device, were included in this study. All seven tests evaluated were able to detect pathogenic prion proteins (PrP(CWD) ) in Northern American infected animals and distinguish physiologic prion protein (PrP(c) ) in brainstem (obex region) and lymph node samples from North American and European cervids, respectively. However, the specificity and sensitivity of the tests differed significantly. Highly sensitive tests for the detection of prion proteins are an important tool both for the design of effective disease surveillance and control strategies and the safety of the food chain. Thus, this study contributes to the emergency preparedness against CWD. © 2011 Crown Copyright. Reproduced with

  17. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  18. [Sturge-Weber syndrome with atypical calcifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, M L; de Juan, J; Antón, M; Roiz, C; Crespo, M

    1997-09-01

    The syndrome, or disease, or Sturge Weber (SSW) is a neuro-ectodermic disorder of unknown incidence, sporadic presentation and specific sex incidence. It is characterized by the presence of a flat, facial angioma which affects at least the first branch of the trigeminal nerve, association with ipsilateral leptomeningeal vascular anomalies, one or more symptoms (epilepsy, hemiparesia, hemiplegia or mental retardation) and ipsilateral vascular lesions of the choroid which lead to glaucoma. As a consequence of lepto-meningeal involvement, homolateral cerebral hemi-atrophy develops together with cortico-subcortical calcifications with a characteristic "railway line" appearance. We present the case of a six month old girl with a flat port wine angioma on the left half of her face, including three branches of the trigeminal nerve and the left half of her body. She had partial motor crises of the right leg. On the cranial CT there were left periventricular calcifications and calcifications of the choroid plexus. Gadolinium-MR showed signs of left cerebral hemi-atrophy, which was confirmed on the cerebral SPECT (left temporal hypoperfusion). This case is interesting on account of the presence of atypical calcifications, both with regard to the sites and age of presentation. We emphasize the need for cranial CT to rule out the presence of calcifications, (as in this case) not seen on Xray of the skull or on MR. We favour the use of cerebral SPECT as a complementary diagnostic technique.

  19. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  20. Persistent consequences of atypical early number concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle M. M. Mazzocco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available How does symbolic number knowledge performance help identify young children at risk for poor mathematics achievement outcomes? In research and practice, classification of mathematics learning disability (MLD, or dyscalculia is typically based on composite scores from broad measures of mathematics achievement. These scores do predict later math achievement levels, but do not specify the nature of math difficulties likely to emerge among students at greatest risk for long-term mathematics failure. Here we report that gaps in 2nd and 3rd graders’ number knowledge predict specific types of errors made on math assessments at Grade 8. Specifically, we show that early whole number misconceptions predict slower and less accurate performance, and atypical computational errors, on Grade 8 arithmetic tests. We demonstrate that basic number misconceptions can be detected by idiosyncratic responses to number knowledge items, and that when such misconceptions are evident during primary school they persist throughout the school age years, with variable manifestation throughout development. We conclude that including specific qualitative assessments of symbolic number knowledge in primary school may provide greater specificity of the types of difficulties likely to emerge among students at risk for poor mathematics outcomes.

  1. Atypical proliferating mucinous tumors of gigantic dimensions

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    Likić-Lađević Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (LMP are also known as atypically proliferating tumors. Ovarian tumors of LPM account for approximately 15% of all epithelial ovarian cancers. Mean age of occurrence is 40 years and they are 15-20 cm in diameter. Case report. A 32-year-old female patient was hospitalized as an urgent case with a large tumor mass that filled the entire abdomen. Cyst was 100 × 70 cm dimensions belonging to the right ovary and filled with 18 liters of content. Right adnexectomy, resection of the second ovary, as well as biopsy of the omentum were performed. Lymphadenectomy of the right iliac and obturator area was also performed. After receiving definitive histopathological results it was decided to perform a radical reoperation. On the 10th postoperative day relaparotomy, total hysterectomy and left adnexectomy were performed. The patient was released on the 6th postoperative day. She used to come to regular examinations up to date. Conclusion. This case is a proof that LMP tumors have low malignant potential, they grow slowly and can reach great proportions.

  2. Blink reflexes in patients with atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; List, Thomas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Leijon, Göran; Svensson, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To use the human blink reflex (BR) to explore possible neuropathic pain mechanisms in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO). In 13 AO patients, the BR was elicited using a concentric electrode and recorded bilaterally with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes on both orbicularis oculi muscles. Electrical stimuli were applied to the skin above branches of the V1, V2, and V3 nerves and to the V branch contralateral to the painful branch. Sensory and pain thresholds were determined. The BR examination of the painful V branch was repeated during a capsaicin pain-provocation test. The data were analyzed with nonparametric statistics. The BR responses (R2 and R3) evoked by stimulation of V3 were significantly smaller than the BR responses evoked by stimulation of V1 and V2 (P .569), and the BR (R2 and R3) was not significantly modulated by experimental pain (P > .080). The sensory thresholds were significantly lower on the painful side compared to the nonpainful side (P = .014). The pain thresholds were not different between sides (P > .910). No major differences between the V nociceptive pathways on the right and left sides were found in a relatively small group of AO patients. Future studies that compare BRs in AO patients and healthy volunteers are needed to provide further knowledge on the pain mechanisms in AO.

  3. Atypical resource allocation may contribute to many aspects of autism

    OpenAIRE

    Goldknopf, Emily J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature and on reports by people with autism, this paper suggests that atypical resource allocation is a factor that contributes to many aspects of autism spectrum conditions, including difficulties with language and social cognition, atypical sensory and attentional experiences, executive and motor challenges, and perceptual and conceptual strengths and weaknesses. Drawing upon resource theoretical approaches that suggest that perception, cognition, and action dra...

  4. Importance of the swallowing atypical in them malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Jiménez, Jonatan; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to determine the atypical swallowing malocclusions. When there are inadequate move-ments of the tongue and / or other structures during oral and pharyngolaryngeal phase of swallowing, talking about atypical swallowing, as a non-physiological habit. Its objectives may be multiple, simul-taneously acting alone or cumulatively. The size of a large tongue has been found as an impediment to correct such alternations, though this is a cause of causing malocclusion. the importance o...

  5. Generic penetration in the retail atypical antipsychotic market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderts, Susan; Kalali, Amir H; Buckley, Peter

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we explore the penetration of generic atypical antipsychotics in the United States market before and after the availability of generic risperidone in July 2008. Analysis suggests that, overall, generic penetration into the atypical antipsychotic market has grown from approximately three percent in January 2008 to more than 25 percent in December 2009. Similar trends are uncovered when branded and generic prescriptions are analyzed by specialty.

  6. An Atypical Case of Pityriasis Rosea Gigantea after Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papakostas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a common erythematosquamous eruption, typically presenting along the cleavage lines of the skin. A wide spectrum of atypical manifestations may challenge even the most experienced physician. Here we report a rare case of a suberythrodermic pityriasis rosea with gigantic plaques after an influenza vaccination, and we discuss the possible triggers of atypical manifestations of such a common dermatological disease in the setting of an altered immunity.

  7. Atypical presentation of macrophagic myofasciitis 10 years post vaccination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Aisling M

    2012-02-03

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of muscle believed to be due to persistence of vaccine-derived aluminium hydroxide at the site of injection. The condition is characterised by diffuse myalgias, arthralgia and fatigue. We describe a patient with histologically confirmed MMF whose presentation was atypical with left chest and upper limb pain beginning more than 10 years post vaccination. Treatment with steroids led to symptomatic improvement. Although rare, clinicians should consider MMF in cases of atypical myalgia.

  8. MR findings of atypical meningioma: comparison with benign meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Kim, Jung Hoon; Shin, Byung Suck; Lim, Soo Mee; Kim, Dae Hong; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    Atypical meningioma is an intermediate type, between benign and malignant meningiomas, and has a higher recurrence rate and poorer prognosis than the benign type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differential imaging findings between atypical and benign meningiomas. Over a five-year period, 11 acses of atypical meningioma (in ten patients) were pathologically proven, and 30 benign meningiomas were collected consecutively over 6 months. In retrospective analysis, the MR findings of atypical and benign meningiomas were compared with respect to tumor margin, lobulation, intra-/peritumoral hemorrhage, cystic change, heterogeneity, peritumoral edema, enhacement of adjacent meninges, invasion of adjacent venous sinus and adjacent bony change. Signigicant differential MR findings between the two groups were ill-defined tumor margin(atypical-27%;benign-0%), lobulation(82%;43%), heterogeneity(73%;30%), and peritumoral edema(100%;47%). With regard to moderate edema, there was no significant difference between the two groups (36%;23%), and with regard to intra-/peritumoral hemorrhage, cystic change, enhancement of adjacent meninges, invasion of adjacent venous sinus, and adjacent bony change, MR findings between the two groups were not significantly different. The MR findings of atypical meningioma are significantly different in several ways from those of benign meningioma, and these differences may help differentiate the two types.=20.

  9. Eculizumab in secondary atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero, Teresa; Rabasco, Cristina; López, Antía; Román, Elena; Ávila, Ana; Sevillano, Ángel; Huerta, Ana; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Fuentes, Carolina; Blasco, Miquel; Jarque, Ana; García, Alba; Mendizabal, Santiago; Gavela, Eva; Macía, Manuel; Quintana, Luis F.; María Romera, Ana; Borrego, Josefa; Arjona, Emi; Espinosa, Mario; Portolés, José; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; González-Parra, Emilio; Aljama, Pedro; Morales, Enrique; Cao, Mercedes; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Complement dysregulation occurs in thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) other than primary atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS). A few of these patients have been reported previously to be successfully treated with eculizumab. Methods. We identified 29 patients with so-called secondary aHUS who had received eculizumab at 11 Spanish nephrology centres. Primary outcome was TMA resolution, defined by a normalization of platelet count (>150 × 109/L) and haemoglobin, disappearance of all the markers of microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA), and improvement of renal function, with a ≥25% reduction of serum creatinine from the onset of eculizumab administration. Results. Twenty-nine patients with secondary aHUS (15 drug-induced, 8 associated with systemic diseases, 2 with postpartum, 2 with cancer-related, 1 associated with acute humoral rejection and 1 with intestinal lymphangiectasia) were included in this study. The reason to initiate eculizumab treatment was worsening of renal function and persistence of TMA despite treatment of the TMA cause and plasmapheresis. All patients showed severe MAHA and renal function impairment (14 requiring dialysis) prior to eculizumab treatment and 11 presented severe extrarenal manifestations. A rapid resolution of the TMA was observed in 20 patients (68%), 15 of them showing a ≥50% serum creatinine reduction at the last follow-up. Comprehensive genetic and molecular studies in 22 patients identified complement pathogenic variants in only 2 patients. With these two exceptions, eculizumab was discontinued, after a median of 8 weeks of treatment, without the occurrence of aHUS relapses. Conclusion. Short treatment with eculizumab can result in a rapid improvement of patients with secondary aHUS in whom TMA has persisted and renal function worsened despite treatment of the TMA-inducing condition. PMID:28339660

  10. Eculizumab in secondary atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero, Teresa; Rabasco, Cristina; López, Antía; Román, Elena; Ávila, Ana; Sevillano, Ángel; Huerta, Ana; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Fuentes, Carolina; Blasco, Miquel; Jarque, Ana; García, Alba; Mendizabal, Santiago; Gavela, Eva; Macía, Manuel; Quintana, Luis F; María Romera, Ana; Borrego, Josefa; Arjona, Emi; Espinosa, Mario; Portolés, José; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; González-Parra, Emilio; Aljama, Pedro; Morales, Enrique; Cao, Mercedes; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Praga, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Complement dysregulation occurs in thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) other than primary atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS). A few of these patients have been reported previously to be successfully treated with eculizumab. We identified 29 patients with so-called secondary aHUS who had received eculizumab at 11 Spanish nephrology centres. Primary outcome was TMA resolution, defined by a normalization of platelet count (>150 × 10 9 /L) and haemoglobin, disappearance of all the markers of microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA), and improvement of renal function, with a ≥25% reduction of serum creatinine from the onset of eculizumab administration. Twenty-nine patients with secondary aHUS (15 drug-induced, 8 associated with systemic diseases, 2 with postpartum, 2 with cancer-related, 1 associated with acute humoral rejection and 1 with intestinal lymphangiectasia) were included in this study. The reason to initiate eculizumab treatment was worsening of renal function and persistence of TMA despite treatment of the TMA cause and plasmapheresis. All patients showed severe MAHA and renal function impairment (14 requiring dialysis) prior to eculizumab treatment and 11 presented severe extrarenal manifestations. A rapid resolution of the TMA was observed in 20 patients (68%), 15 of them showing a ≥50% serum creatinine reduction at the last follow-up. Comprehensive genetic and molecular studies in 22 patients identified complement pathogenic variants in only 2 patients. With these two exceptions, eculizumab was discontinued, after a median of 8 weeks of treatment, without the occurrence of aHUS relapses. Short treatment with eculizumab can result in a rapid improvement of patients with secondary aHUS in whom TMA has persisted and renal function worsened despite treatment of the TMA-inducing condition.

  11. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with Atypical Odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Anna; Tu, Trang T H; Shinohara, Yukiko; Mikuzuki, Lou; Kawasaki, Kaoru; Sugawara, Shiori; Suga, Takayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Watanabe, Motoko; Umezaki, Yojiro; Yoshikawa, Tatsuya; Motomura, Haruhiko; Takenoshita, Miho; Maeda, Hidefumi; Toyofuku, Akira

    2018-01-01

    Atypical Odontalgia (AO) is a condition characterized by tooth pain with no apparent cause. Although psychiatric comorbidity seems to be very common, it has rarely been studied. To clarify the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the clinical features in patients with AO, we retrospectively evaluated their examination records. Clinical features and psychiatric diagnoses of 383 patients with AO were investigated by reviewing patients' medical records and referral letters. Psychiatric diagnoses were categorized according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). We also analyzed visual analogue scale (VAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) scores. Of the 383 patients with AO, 177 (46.2%) had comorbid psychiatric disorders. The most common were depressive disorders (15.4%) and anxiety disorders (10.1%). Serious psychotic disorders such as bipolar disorder (3.0%) and schizophrenia (1.8%) were rare. Dental trigger of AO was reported in 217 (56.7%) patients. There were no significant correlations between psychiatric comorbidities and most of the demographic features. Higher VAS and SDS scores, higher frequency of sleep disturbance, and higher ratings of "Fearful" and "Punishing-cruel" descriptors of the SF-MPQ were found in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. About half of AO patients had comorbid psychiatric disorders. Dental procedures are not necessarily causative factors of AO. In AO patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders, pain might have a larger emotional component than a sensory one. VAS, SDS, and SF-MPQ scores might aid in the noticing of underlying comorbid psychiatric disorders in AO patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clozapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic demonstrated to be superior in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia which causes fewer movement disorders. Clozapine, however, entails a significant risk of serious blood disorders such as agranulocytosis which could be potentially fatal. Currently there are a number of newer antipsychotics which have been developed with the purpose to find both a better tolerability profile and a superior effectiveness. Objectives To compare the clinical effects of clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics (such as amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine) in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Groups Register (June 2007) and reference lists of all included randomised controlled trials. We also manually searched appropriate journals and conference proceedings relating to clozapine combination strategies and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All relevant randomised, at least single-blind trials, comparing clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics, any dose and oral formulations, for people with schizophrenia or related disorders. Data collection and analysis We selected trials and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 27 blinded randomised controlled trials, which involved 3099 participants. Twelve randomised control trials compared clozapine with olanzapine, five with quetiapine, nine with risperidone, one with ziprasidone and two with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (overall 30.1%), leaving the interpretation

  13. Goats with aspartic acid or serine at codon 146 of the PRNP gene remain scrapie-negative after lifetime exposure in affected herds in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, S; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Simmons, M M; Windl, O; Dawson, M; Neocleous, P; Papasavva-Stylianou, P

    2017-01-01

    The results of the study reported here are part of an ongoing integrated research programme aimed at producing additional, robust, evidence on the genetic resistance to classical scrapie in goats, with particular reference to codon 146. The study targeted animals aged ⩾6 years, which were born and raised in infected herds and were being culled for management reasons. A total of 556 animals were tested, and all positive animals (n = 117) were of the susceptible NN genotype. A total of 246 goats heterozygous or homozygous for putatively resistant alleles (S146 and D146) were screened with no positive results. The outcome of this study supports the hypothesis that the D146 and S146 alleles could be used as the basis for a nationwide strategy for breeding for resistance in the Cypriot goat population.

  14. Selection Role on Configuration of Resistance / Susceptibility Degree to Scrapie and on Genetic Diversity at PrP Locus in the Botosani Karakul Sheep Breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Hrinca

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The molecular-genetic profiles from the determinant locus of scrapie have been described in the Botosani Karakul breed. Sheep belonged to two farm types: elite farm from Research and Development Station for Sheep and Goat Breeding, Popauti-Botosani and several production farms of some private farmers. The two farm types differ between them by selective specificities; in the farm elite the selection pressure is stronger and the selection criteria applied to sheep have been more accuracy than in the production farms. Sheep genotyping at the PrP locus was achieved by the Real-Time PCR method. By framing the individuals in risk classes concerning the prion disease, there were identified significant differences between the two farm types in terms of resistance / susceptibility to scrapie of sheep. The elite farm population is significantly advantaged as regards the molecular-genetic endowment at the PrP locus and low probability converting of the PrPc normal protein in the PrPSc pathogenic isomorph compared to the population of production farms. The reasons for the different associations of prion genotypes with morbid phenomenon intensity in the two farm types must be sought exclusively in the characteristics of selection systems applied to the animals in each farm type. From the standpoint of informational statistics, there is a high degree of genetic similarity at the PrP locus between the two populations. Contrary to expectations, the genetic diversity of prion structures is more developed in the elite farm than in the production farms. The knowing importance of prion profiles was revealed  in pursuit of genetic and veterinary prophylaxis of the sheep populations.

  15. Ichthyosiform mycosis fungoides with alopecia and atypical membranous nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a rare case of variant of mycosis fungoides (MF: ichthyosiform MF with alopecia and atypical membranous nephropathy. The diagnosis was made based on the following findings: generalized ichthyosis-like eruption, alopecia, enlarged superficial lymph nodes, proteinuria, and hematuria, the histological features of the skin biopsy from both ichthyotic and alopecic lesions with immunohistochemical staining, and the renal biopsy examination with immunofluorescence. The histological examination of ichthyotic and alopecic lesions displayed a predominant infiltration of atypical lymphocytes in the upper dermis with the characteristics of epidermotropism and folliculotropism. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that most infiltrated atypical lymphocytes were CD3, CD4, and CD45RO positive, whereas negative for CD5, CD7, CD20, CD30, and CD56. A renal biopsy examination revealed atypical membranous nephropathy with deposition of immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, IgA, C1q, and C3. In this case atypical membranous nephropathy was involved, which is very uncommon and has never been presented in the literature to date. Although ichthyosiform MF usually features a relatively favorable course, diffuse alopecia and the renal involvement in this case might indicate aggressive disease and poor prognosis.

  16. Atypical E2f functions are critical for pancreas polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matondo, Ramadhan B; Moreno, Eva; Toussaint, Mathilda J M; Tooten, Peter C J; van Essen, Saskia C; van Liere, Elsbeth A; Youssef, Sameh A; Bongiovanni, Laura; de Bruin, Alain

    2018-01-01

    The presence of polyploid cells in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas has been reported for four decades. In rodents, pancreatic polyploidization is initiated after weaning and the number of polyploid cells increases with age. Surprisingly the molecular regulators and biological functions of polyploidization in the pancreas are still unknown. We discovered that atypical E2f activity is essential for polyploidization in the pancreas, using an inducible Cre/LoxP approach in new-born mice to delete ubiquitously the atypical E2f transcription factors, E2f7 and E2f8. In contrast to its critical role in embryonic survival, conditional deletion of both of both atypical E2fs in newborn mice had no impact on postnatal survival and mice lived until old age. However, deficiency of E2f7 or E2f8 alone was sufficient to suppress polyploidization in the pancreas and associated with only a minor decrease in blood serum levels of glucose, insulin, amylase and lipase under 4 hours starvation condition compared to wildtype littermates. In mice with fewer pancreatic polyploid cells that were fed ad libitum, no major impact on hormones or enzymes levels was observed. In summary, we identified atypical E2fs to be essential for polyploidization in the pancreas and discovered that postnatal induced loss of both atypical E2fs in many organs is compatible with life until old age.

  17. A homozygous founder missense variant in arylsulfatase G abolishes its enzymatic activity causing atypical Usher syndrome in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateb, Samer; Kowalewski, Björn; Bedoni, Nicola; Damme, Markus; Pollack, Netta; Saada, Ann; Obolensky, Alexey; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Gross, Menachem; Dierks, Thomas; Banin, Eyal; Rivolta, Carlo; Sharon, Dror

    2018-01-04

    PurposeWe aimed to identify the cause of disease in patients suffering from a distinctive, atypical form of Usher syndrome.MethodsWhole-exome and genome sequencing were performed in five patients from three families of Yemenite Jewish origin, suffering from distinctive retinal degeneration phenotype and sensorineural hearing loss. Functional analysis of the wild-type and mutant proteins was performed in human fibrosarcoma cells.ResultsWe identified a homozygous founder missense variant, c.133G>T (p.D45Y) in arylsulfatase G (ARSG). All patients shared a distinctive retinal phenotype with ring-shaped atrophy along the arcades engirdling the fovea, resulting in ring scotoma. In addition, patients developed moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss. Both vision and hearing loss appeared around the age of 40 years. The identified variant affected a fully conserved amino acid that is part of the catalytic site of the enzyme. Functional analysis of the wild-type and mutant proteins showed no basal activity of p.D45Y.ConclusionHomozygosity for ARSG-p.D45Y in humans leads to protein dysfunction, causing an atypical combination of late-onset Usher syndrome. Although there is no evidence for generalized clinical manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases in this set of patients, we cannot rule out the possibility that mild and late-onset symptoms may appear.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 4 January 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.227.

  18. Germline Variation at CDKN2A and Associations with Nevus Phenotypes among Members of Melanoma Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Mitra, Nandita; Goldstein, Alisa M

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A are frequently identified among melanoma kindreds and are associated with increased atypical nevus counts. However, a clear relationship between pathogenic CDKN2A mutation carriage and other nevus phenotypes including counts of common acquired nevi has not yet been...... established. Using data from GenoMEL, we investigated the relationships between CDKN2A mutation carriage and 2-mm, 5-mm, and atypical nevus counts among blood-related members of melanoma families. Compared with individuals without a pathogenic mutation, those who carried one had an overall higher prevalence...

  19. Identification and epidemiological typing of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subspecies by phenotypic and genotypic methods and description of novel subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephan L.W.; Vandamme, P.

    1997-01-01

    of this taxon. Two novel, distinct groups of C. hyointestinalis-like bacteria, originally isolated from the cloacae of Canada geese and human diarrhoeic stools, were also identified by each of the methods used. This appears to be the first report confirming the presence of C. hyointestinalis-like strains from...... of the methods employed were able to differentiate isolates classified as C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii. However, two strains of the latter proved to be phenotypically atypical. These strains appeared to be closely related and may represent an atypical lineage...

  20. Olanzapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Duggan, Lorna; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of olanzapine compared to other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the reference of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised trials that used at least single-blind (rater-blind) design, comparing oral olanzapine with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random effects model. Main results The review currently includes 50 studies and 9476 participants which provided data for six comparisons (olanzapine compared to amisulpride, aripiprazole

  1. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with

  2. Presence of Phlebotomus perniciosus Atypical Form in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benallal, Kamel Eddine; Benikhlef, Razika; Garni, Rafik; Gassen, Brahim; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Harrat, Zoubir

    2017-03-01

    Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus longicuspis are two phlebotomine sand fly species morphologically similar and differing in males only by the shape of the copulatory valves which are bifurcated in P. perniciosus, tip long and tapered in P. longicuspis. A count of the median coxite setae was carried out on 208 specimens from the collections of Dedet and of Parrot, identified previously as P. longicuspis and on 38 P. perniciosus male sand flies captured during the year 2012-2013, in order to seek the presence of atypical P. perniciosus form. The analysis revealed the presence of 33/246 (13%) atypical P. perniciosus previously confused with P. longicuspis species and whose distribution is mainly located in the semi-arid and arid bioclimatic regions. This study proved for the first time the presence of atypical form of P. perniciosus in Algeria.

  3. Atypical Craniosynostosis with Torticollis and Neurological Symptoms: A Rhombencephalosynapsis Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virve Koljonen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We describe a case of 3-year-old girl with rhombencephalosynapsis, a rare cerebellar anomaly. Patient. A 3-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital due to congenital torticollis and asymmetry of face, skull and trunk. Craniosynostosis was suspected due to abnormal head shape. 3D-CT revealed closure of the sagittal suture without scaphocephalic skull. Due to atypical craniosynostosis with neurological symptoms, brain-MRI was performed revealing rhombencephalosynapsis. Results. Our patient presented with atypical craniosynostosis and balance problems, not typical for scaphocephaly. Operative treatment for craniosynotosis was not carried out because the cause of the problems was the cerebellum instead of the brain. Conclusions. Therefore, we conclude that patients with atypical craniosynostosis should be examined with brain-MRI to exclude the intracranial malformations, which 3D-CT does not reveal. Without brain-MRI, decision (not to perform surgery could have been different.

  4. Atypical presentation of HELLP syndrome: clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Tobar Parra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a case of HELLP syndrome with atypical presentation form. Background: HELLP syndrome is a complication of preeclampsia, characterized by: haemolysis, elevation of liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia; Can present atypical, without hypertension or proteinuria, 10-20% of the cases. Case report: 38 year old female patient, with a pregnancy of 38.5 weeks of gestation, treated at the Hospital Universitario San José de Popayán (Colombia. Atypical HELLP syndrome is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with thrombocytopenia, impaired liver enzymes, but no evidence of proteinuria or hypertension. Gestation is terminated by cesarean section and magnesium sulfate is given for 24 hours, with adequate post-surgical evolution, clinical improvement of the symptomatology presented, normalization of liver enzymes and platelet elevation. Conclusion: Knowledge of this syndrome, although of rare occurrence, allows a fast action, an effective diagnosis and treatment, to avoid morbidity and greater maternal fetal mortality.

  5. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with osteomyelofibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Dubravka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum generally appear on the upper extremities; most frequently they are associated with myeloproliferative disorders, including osteomyelofibrosis. A response to systemic steroids is more pronounced than in classical form. Sometimes it may be the first sign of an underlying malignancy. Case report. We reported a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum developed during the course of a myeloid malignancy - osteomyelofibrosis. The lesions occurred after a minor trauma. Painful blistering plaques, with an elevated, bluish-gray border were located on the dorsal aspect of hands. No skin malignancy was found. The lesions resolved rapidly to systemic steroids. Conclusion. Considering the unusual clinical presentation which makes the diagnosis difficult, as well as the fact that atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum can be the first sign of malignancies, especially myeloproliferative ones, recognizing this entity enables timely guiding future investigations toward their prompt detection.

  7. Presence of Phlebotomus perniciosus Atypical Form in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Eddine Benallal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus longicuspis are two phlebotomine sand fly species morphologically similar and differing in males only by the shape of the copulatory valves which are bifurcated in P. perniciosus, tip long and tapered in P. longicuspis.Methods: A count of the median coxite setae was carried out on 208 specimens from the collections of Dedet and of Parrot, identified previously as P. longicuspis and on 38 P. perniciosus male sand flies captured during the year 2012–2013, in order to seek the presence of atypical P. perniciosus form.Results: The analysis revealed the presence of 33/246 (13% atypical P. perniciosus previously confused with P. longicuspis species and whose distribution is mainly located in the semi-arid and arid bioclimatic regions.Conclusion: This study proved for the first time the presence of atypical form of P. perniciosus in Algeria.

  8. Presence of Phlebotomus perniciosus Atypical Form in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benallal, Kamel Eddine; Benikhlef, Razika; Garni, Rafik; Gassen, Brahim; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Harrat, Zoubir

    2017-01-01

    Background: Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus longicuspis are two phlebotomine sand fly species morphologically similar and differing in males only by the shape of the copulatory valves which are bifurcated in P. perniciosus, tip long and tapered in P. longicuspis. Methods: A count of the median coxite setae was carried out on 208 specimens from the collections of Dedet and of Parrot, identified previously as P. longicuspis and on 38 P. perniciosus male sand flies captured during the year 2012–2013, in order to seek the presence of atypical P. perniciosus form. Results: The analysis revealed the presence of 33/246 (13%) atypical P. perniciosus previously confused with P. longicuspis species and whose distribution is mainly located in the semi-arid and arid bioclimatic regions. Conclusion: This study proved for the first time the presence of atypical form of P. perniciosus in Algeria. PMID:29026861

  9. The Efficacy of Acute Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Mustafa M.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Rush, A. John; Knapp, Rebecca G.; Fink, Max; Rummans, Teresa A.; Rasmussen, Keith; Claassen, Cynthia; Petrides, Georgios; Biggs, Melanie M.; Mueller, Martina; Sampson, Shirlene; Bailine, Samuel H.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Kellner, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), with or without atypical features, who were treated with acute bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Method Analyses were conducted with 489 patients who met DSM-IV criteria for MDD. Subjects were identified as typical or atypical on the basis of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV obtained at baseline prior to ECT. Depression symptom severity was measured by the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D24) and the 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology–Self-Report (IDS-SR30). Remission was defined as at least a 60% decrease from baseline in HAM-D24 score and a total score of 10 or below on the last 2 consecutive HAM-D24 ratings. The randomized controlled trial was performed from 1997 to 2004. Results The typical (N = 453) and atypical (N = 36) groups differed in several sociodemographic and clinical variables including gender (p = .0071), age (p = .0005), treatment resistance (p = .0014), and age at first illness onset (p < .0001) and onset of current episode (p = .0008). Following an acute course of bilateral ECT, a considerable portion of both the typical (67.1%) and the atypical (80.6%) groups reached remission. The atypical group was 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1 to 6.2) times more likely to remit than the typical group after adjustment for age, psychosis, gender, clinical site, and depression severity based on the HAM-D24. Conclusion Acute ECT is an efficacious treatment for depressed patients with typical or atypical symptom features. PMID:18278988

  10. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT FOR ATYPICAL HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME IN A PUERPERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Ulitkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to show the problems of differential diagnosis and treatment of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome in a 23-year-old patient.Results. Eculizumab (Soliris, (Alexon Pharmaceuticals Inc., USA that is a glycosylated humanized monoclonal antibody to immunoglobulins (IgG2/4k is shown to be effective in treating this disease.Conclusion. Atypical hemolytical-uremic syndrome in pregnancy is a disease, whose treatment difficulties are largely associated with the problem of differential diagnosis with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and man-ifestations of multiple organ dysfunction. The treatment for this disease gives a key role to Eculizumab.

  11. Atypical Wernicke's encephalopathy showing involvement of substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidass, Bhagheerathi; Sunnathkal, Rajani; Rangashamanna, Dr Vital; Paraswani, Rajesh

    2012-04-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1) seen in alcoholics and even in nonalcoholic patients, classically presenting with a triad of ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and altered mental status. Typical findings in magnetic resonance imaging are represented by symmetric signal alterations in medial thalami, mamillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area and atypical findings involve lesions in cerebellum, midline vermis, red nuclei, dentate, caudate, cranial nerve nuclei, splenium and cerebral cortex. We report here a case of nonalcoholic starvation induced atypical WE showing symmetrical lesions in substantia nigra in addition to the classical neuroradiological findings. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. Atypical Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Use of Clozapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevedo-Florez Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is a medical emergency of infrequent presentation in the emergency department, which is associated with the use of psychiatric drugs, such as typical and atypical antipsychotics. Our case addresses a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia for 10 years, who had been receiving clozapine and clonazepam as part of their treatment. This patient presents the symptoms of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome without fever, which improves with treatment especially with the withdrawal of clozapine. In the absence of fever and clinical improvement, the patient is considered to have an atypical presentation of this disease.

  13. Atypical presentations of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Ansuya; Paruk, Hoosain; Bhagwan, Bhupendra; Moodley, Anand

    2017-02-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a monophasic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system associated with various viral infections including HIV infection. We present the findings of seven HIV-infected patients with mild to moderate immunosuppression presenting with atypical features. Four patients had a multiphasic course; three patients had tumefactive lesions, and two patients had corpus callosum lesions. Two patients with the multiphasic course also had tumefactive lesions. Their clinical and radiological findings are presented. Despite the few cases, we propose that the dysimmune process lying between marked immunosuppression (CD4  500 cells/μL) might be responsible for these atypical presentations.

  14. Atypical psychotic symptoms and Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Aislinn J; Wang, Zhenni; Taylor, Stephan F

    2016-10-01

    New-onset psychotic symptoms often respond well to antipsychotic treatment; however, symptoms may be difficult to treat when an underlying brain malformation is present. Here, we present a case of atypical psychotic symptoms in the context of a congenital cerebellar malformation (Dandy-Walker variant). The patient ultimately improved with paliperidone palmitate after multiple antipsychotic medication trials (both oral and one long-acting injectable) were ineffective. Neuroimaging may provide valuable diagnostic and prognostic information in cases of new-onset psychosis with atypical features and treatment resistance, even in the absence of neurologic signs and symptoms.

  15. Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis: Atypical and Resistant Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yeoungjee; Struijk, Dirk Gijsbert

    2017-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis remains to be one of the most frequent and serious complications of PD. In this study, existing literature has been reviewed on PD peritonitis caused by atypical organisms and antibiotic resistant organisms and their impact on patient outcomes. Although uncommon, delay in recognition of PD peritonitis caused by atypical organisms can lead to poor patient outcomes if there is a delay in diagnosis and implementation of appropriate treatment. There is also a large difference in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant infections across the world with variable impact on reported patient-level outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A child with myoclonus-dystonia (DYT11) misdiagnosed as atypical opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drivenes, Bergitte; Born, Alfred Peter; Ek, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: DYT11 is an autosomal dominant inherited movement disorder characterized by myoclonus and dystonia. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We present a case with atypical symptoms and with episodes of ataxia and myoclonus preceded by infections. Atypical presentation of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome...

  17. Down Syndrome: Cognitive Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most prevalent cause of intellectual impairment associated with a genetic anomaly, in this case, trisomy of chromosome 21. It affects both physical and cognitive development and produces a characteristic phenotype, although affected individuals vary considerably with respect to severity of specific impairments. Studies…

  18. The DFNA10 phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenheer, E. de; Huygen, P.L.M.; Wayne, S.; Smith, R.J.H.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the DFNA10 phenotype based on data from 25 hearing-impaired persons coming from a large American pedigree segregating for deafness at the DFNA10 locus (chromosome 6q22.3-23.2). Cross-sectional analysis of air conduction threshold-on-age data from all available

  19. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association...

  20. Evidence for Broadening Criteria for Atypical Depression Which May Define a Reactive Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Brett Silverstein; Jules Angst

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Arguing that additional symptoms should be added to the criteria for atypical depression. Method. Published research articles on atypical depression are reviewed. Results. (1) The original studies upon which the criteria for atypical depression were based cited fatigue, insomnia, pain, and loss of weight as characteristic symptoms. (2) Several studies of DSM depressive criteria found patients with atypical depression to exhibit high levels of insomnia, fatigue, and loss of appetit...

  1. Role of laboratory in rapid diagnosis of atypical mumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KE Vandana

    Full Text Available Fairly large number of mumps virus infections present atypically without parotitis leading to delay in diagnosis and increased morbidity. Awareness of such presentations and inclusion of serological test for detecting IgM-specific antibodies could help in solving diagnostic dilemma, especially in unvaccinated individuals from developing countries.

  2. Atypical Chikungunya during pregnancy: Report of the Venezuela final experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carvajal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging arbovirus in Latin America and the Caribbean. The virus was detected in the Caribbean territory, at the end of 2013 for the first time. It is known that 1 to 2 % of patients will show atypical symptoms. Methods Three cases of pregnant women with atypical Chikungunya virus are described taking into account epidemiological variables, clinical features, pregnancy progress and laboratory testing parameters. Results Three pregnant women with atypical CHIKV confirmed by RT‐PCR were included. All of them were included at the ICU because of a life‐ threatening disease, 2 of the pregnancies were resolved by caesarean, one at term with a newborn with typical CHIKV and the other one at the 25 week of pregnancy, this result in a stillborn and a neonatal death. Conclusion Chikungunya fever during pregnancy can show atypical and severe course, with adverse evolution of pregnancy and vertical transmission of the infection. We recommend to maximize the medical care in pregnant women with suspicion of CHIKV infection.

  3. Diagnosis and management of atypically presenting slowly-leaking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: An ectopic pregnancy is a common cause of morbidity and occasionally of mortality in women of reproductive age. Its diagnosis can be difficult with an atypical presentation as the classic symptoms of abdominal pain, amenorrhoea and vaginal bleeding are seen in 50% of women presenting with ectopic ...

  4. Heterogeneous photocatalysis for selected atypical antipsychotic removal from river waters

    OpenAIRE

    Regulska, El?bieta; Karpi?ska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis of selected atypical antipsychotic, namely olanzapine, was examined. Photocatalytic degradation of above mentioned pharmaceutic was investigated in deionized and river water solution in the presence of titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst. River water samples were collected from Narew and Marycha, which run in the east of Poland. Studied irradiation sources included ultraviolet radiation and simulated solar light. Photodegradation efficiency and the presen...

  5. Use of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareri P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Gareri,1 Cristina Segura-García,2 Valeria Graziella Laura Manfredi,1 Antonella Bruni,2 Paola Ciambrone,2 Gregorio Cerminara,2 Giovambattista De Sarro,2 Pasquale De Fazio2 1Elderly Health Care, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Department of Health Sciences, University “Magna Græcia” of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: The use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in the elderly has become wider and wider in recent years; in fact, these agents have novel receptor binding profiles, good efficacy with regard to negative symptoms, and reduced extrapyramidal symptoms. However, in recent years, the use of both conventional and atypical antipsychotics has been widely debated for concerns about their safety in elderly patients affected with dementia and the possible risks for stroke and sudden death. A MEDLINE search was made using the words elderly, atypical antipsychotics, use, schizophrenia, psychosis, mood disorders, dementia, behavioral disorders, and adverse events. Some personal studies were also considered. This paper reports the receptor binding profiles and the main mechanism of action of these drugs, together with their main use in psychiatry and the possible adverse events in elderly people. Keywords: atypical antipsychotics, dementia, elderly, psychosis, mood disorders, side effects

  6. [Atypical sites of metastatic renal carcinoma. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Fentes, D A; Blanco Parra, M; Toucedo Caamaño, V; Lema Grille, J; Cimadevila García, A; Villar Núñez, M

    2005-01-01

    To review in the literature atypical sites of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, its onset, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. To review, using Medline database, atypical sites of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the last five years Spanish literature. There have been published 15 spanish articles about atypical metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the last five years. Most patients were male with a mean age of 62,3 years and methacronous metastases. Imaging and pathological diagnosis. Main sites: ocular, renal graft, larynx, suprarenal, brain, penis, gastric and pancreatic. Surgical treatment if the surgeon is able to remove the lesion. Inmunotherapy and radiotherapy in the rest of cases. Renal cell carcinoma represents about 3% of all adult malignancy neoplasms. Its metastatic sites, in order of frequency, are lung, bone and liver, whether synchronic or methacronic. Its location, clinical features, onset, evolution and prognosis is very variable. Individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approach, according to prognostic factors. The knowledge of this atypical sites in patients with renal cell carcinoma in the past can lead us to an earlier diagnosis and treatment which could change the evolution of the illness.

  7. Strategies in an Arts Program for Adults with Atypical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Christina

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and implement strategies and adaptations in an arts program for adults with atypical communication due to developmental and intellectual disabilities. This study was conducted in the field using an action research approach with triangulated methods of data collection including semi-structured interviews,…

  8. Atypical vessels as an early sign of intracardiac myxoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dübel, Hans-Peter; Knebel, Fabian; Gliech, Volker; Konertz, Wolfgang; Rutsch, Wolfgang; Baumann, Gert; Borges, Adrian Constantin

    2004-01-01

    We report on a woman with previously unknown left atrial myxoma, who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. 45 months after the initial coronary angiography, echocardiography demonstrated a large atrial myxoma, which was not seen echocardiographically before. The retrospective analysis of the pre-intervention coronary angiography revealed atypical vessels in the atrial septum, which are interpreted as early signs of myxoma. PMID:15310408

  9. CASE REPORT CASE Atypical tuberculosis of the knee joint CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TB caused by atypical mycobacteria is rare; instead, it is predomi- nantly a synovial disease affecting the tendon sheaths rather than bone. Predisposing factors are immunocompromised individuals, including the elderly, alcoholics, those with HIV, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition and other chronic debilitating illnesses, and ...

  10. [HL-A W27 antigen and atypical rheumatic pelvispondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sany, J; Serre, H; Seignalet, J

    1976-02-01

    The authors report 26 cases of atypical inflammatory rheumatism in which the discovery of HL-A W27 antigen indicated the possibility of atypical ankylosing spondylarthritis. These patients included 17 men and 9 women with an average age of 35.6 years. The clinical symptoms included :--pelvic or vetebral signs alone in 8 cases,--pelvic or vertebral signs combined with peripheral inflammatory rheumatism, the latter being always cleaarly evident, in 9 cases,--extravertebral signs alone without any involvement of the vertebral column or of the sacroiliac joints in 9 cases (8 cases of peripheral inflammatory rheumatism, 1 case of talalgia). The vertebral radiograms were normal in 84 percent of cases. The sacroiliac joints were clear radiologically in 65 percent of cases. In the other cases the lesions, generally unilateral, were extremely discrete. In all the cases, the Waaler-Rose reaction was negative. The therapeutic test with non-hormonal anti inflammatory products were generally positive. The evolution of the condition confirmed the diagnosis of rheumatic pelvispondylitis in 2 cases. The patients have been under observation for insufficient time to be sure whether all the cases presented represent authentic cases of ankylosing spondylarthritis that were at first atypical. The authors emphasize the high percentage of female cases (38 percent) the high frequency of extra-vertebral manifestations. They also emphasize the value of looking for HL-A W27 antigen in patients with atypical inflammatory rheumatism.

  11. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus Resembling Clinical Absence with Atypical EEG Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channaiah Srikanth Mysore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We are reporting two cases: a patient with steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT and another patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS, both presenting with altered mental status (AMS and later diagnosed with nonconvulsive atypical absence status epilepticus (AS, with atypical EEG changes. Methods. A report of two cases. Results. A patient with history of SREAT and the other with SPMS had multiple admissions due to AMS. For both, EEG revealed the presence of a high voltage generalized sharply contoured theta activity. A diagnosis of NCSE with clinical features of AS was made based on both clinical and EEG features. There was significant clinical and electrographic improvement with administration of levetiracetam for both patients in addition to sodium valproate and Solumedrol for the SREAT patient. Both patients continued to be seizure free on follow-up few months later. Conclusions. This is a report of two cases of atypical AS, with atypical EEG, in patients with different neurological conditions. Prompt clinical and EEG recovery occurred following appropriate medical treatment. We think that this condition might be underreported and could significantly benefit from prompt treatment when appropriately diagnosed.

  12. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma in the foot: atypical MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuseghem, I. van; Pans, S.; Geusens, E.; Brys, P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Sciot, R. [Department of Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Wever, I. de [Department of Oncological Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium)

    2003-11-01

    Lipomatosis of a nerve is a well-known but uncommon entity mostly seen in the median nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to provide pathognomonic features, obviating the need for diagnostic biopsy. We present a case of lipomatosis of a branch of the medial plantar nerve with an atypical appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  13. Comparing the side effect profile of the Atypical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antipsychotics have greater efficacy (especially for negative symptoms) and fewer EPSE when compared to the typical antipsychotics. Given the lack of studies directly comparing these agents, we used the Physician Desk Reference (PDR) to calculate the treatment emergent placebo adjusted side effects for these atypical ...

  14. Early Freezing of Gait: Atypical versus Typical Parkinson Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Lieberman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 18 months, 850 patients were referred to Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center (MAPC. Among them, 810 patients had typical Parkinson disease (PD and 212 had PD for ≤5 years. Among the 212 patients with early PD, 27 (12.7% had freezing of gait (FOG. Forty of the 850 had atypical parkinsonism. Among these 40 patients, all of whom had symptoms for ≤5 years, 12 (30.0% had FOG. FOG improved with levodopa in 21/27 patients with typical PD but did not improve in the 12 patients with atypical parkinsonism. FOG was associated with falls in both groups of patients. We believe that FOG unresponsive to levodopa in typical PD resembles FOG in atypical parkinsonism. We thus compared the 6 typical PD patients with FOG unresponsive to levodopa plus the 12 patients with atypical parkinsonism with the 21 patients with typical PD responsive to levodopa. We compared them by tests of locomotion and postural stability. Among the patients with FOG unresponsive to levodopa, postural stability was more impaired than locomotion. This finding leads us to believe that, in these patients, postural stability, not locomotion, is the principal problem underlying FOG.

  15. Hereditary atypical retinitis pigmentosa: case report | Omoti | Annals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report presents four generations of hereditary atypical (pericentric) retinitis pigmentosa in an Itsekiri family of Warri, Delta state of Nigeria. The patients presented with nyctalopia, waxy disc pallor, arteriolar attenuation, pigment deposits around the optic nerve and visual field loss. The cases were typically mild with ...

  16. Stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas was made. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these two meningeal neoplasms. The difference was significant and it was moreover seen that there was no overlap between the two grou...

  17. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour in a supratentorial location

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cerebro spinal fluid seeding, as in our second patient,[4] which led to their death. e entire CNS must therefore be imaged at presentation to identify subarachnoid spread of the tumour. e differential diagnosis for atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour includes. PNET, medulloblastoma, high-grade glioma and teratoma.[1,3,6].

  18. Educational Needs and Causes of False Diagnosis of Atypical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The entity of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) in The Bethesda System 2001 for reporting cervical cytology is characterized by equivocal diagnosis, poor reproducibility and debatable management. This retrospective study was done to analyse the causes of false ASCUS if any and identify the ...

  19. Atypical presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus in a west ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, autoimmune multi-system disorder. About seventy to ninety percent of all cases of SLE occur in women. Although the disease is common in black young women residing in Europe and North America, it is reputed to be a very rare diagnosis in West Africa. A case of atypical ...

  20. Atypical tuberculosis of the knee joint | Albuquerque-Jonathan | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (TB) of the knee joint, caused by Mycobacterium kansasii. Osteoarticular TB caused by atypical mycobacteria is rare; instead, it is predominantly a synovial disease affecting the tendon sheaths rather than bone. Predisposing factors are immunocompromised individuals, including the elderly, alcoholics, those with HIV, ...

  1. Atypical Localizations of Hydatid Disease: Experience from a Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Departments of General Surgery, 1Radiodiagnosis and Imaging and 2Neurosurgery, Sheri Kashmir Institute of Medical. Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and ... development of hydatidosis at the primary sites. KEYWORDS: Atypical locations ..... Conflict of Interest: None declared. 24. Senyuz OF, Yesildag E, Celayir S.

  2. Grid Keratotomy for Treatment of Atypical Presenting Indolent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corneal ulcers are one of the highest causes of vision impairment in dogs. The Boxer breed is particularly predisposed to recurrent and refractory corneal ulcers (Whitley and Gigler, 1999). In this report we present an interesting case of indolent corneal ulcer in a Boxer with atypical clinical manifestation and features, and its ...

  3. Atypical basic movement kinematics in autism spectrum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Press, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum conditions have difficulties in understanding and responding appropriately to others. Additionally, they demonstrate impaired perception of biological motion and problems with motor control. Here we investigated whether individuals with autism move with an atypical kinematic profile, which might help to explain perceptual and motor impairments, and in principle may contribute to some of their higher level social problems. We recorded trajectory, velocity, acceleration and jerk while adult participants with autism and a matched control group conducted horizontal sinusoidal arm movements. Additionally, participants with autism took part in a biological motion perception task in which they classified observed movements as ‘natural’ or ‘unnatural’. Results show that individuals with autism moved with atypical kinematics; they did not minimize jerk to the same extent as the matched typical control group, and moved with greater acceleration and velocity. The degree to which kinematics were atypical was correlated with a bias towards perceiving biological motion as ‘unnatural’ and with the severity of autism symptoms as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. We suggest that fundamental differences in movement kinematics in autism might help to explain their problems with motor control. Additionally, developmental experience of their own atypical kinematic profiles may lead to disrupted perception of others’ actions. PMID:23983031

  4. Update on diffusion MRI in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Mahlknecht, P.; Seppi, K.; Goraj, B.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating Parkinson's disease (PD) from other types of neurodegenerative atypical parkinsonism (AP) can be challenging, especially in early disease stages. Routine brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show atrophy or signal changes in several parts of the brain with fairly high

  5. Phenotypic diversity in patients with lipodystrophy associated with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mory, Patricia B; Crispim, Felipe; Freire, Maria Beatriz S; Salles, João Eduardo N; Valério, Cynthia M; Godoy-Matos, Amelio F; Dib, Sérgio A; Moisés, Regina S

    2012-09-01

    Mutations in LMNA have been linked to diverse disorders called laminopathies, which display heterogeneous phenotypes and include diseases affecting muscles, axonal neurons, progeroid syndromes, and lipodystrophies. Among the lipodystrophies, LMNA mutations have been reported most frequently in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) of the Dunnigan variety; however, phenotypic heterogeneity in the pattern of body fat loss has been observed. In this study, we searched for LMNA mutations in patients with various forms of lipodystrophy. We studied 21 unrelated individuals with lipodystrophy. Subjects underwent a complete clinical evaluation and were classified as typical FPLD (n=12), atypical partial lipodystrophy (n=7), or generalized lipodystrophy (n=2). Molecular analysis of LMNA gene, analysis of body fat by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and biochemical measurements were performed. ALL PATIENTS WITH TYPICAL FPLD WERE FOUND TO CARRY LMNA MUTATIONS: seven patients harbored the heterozygous p.R482W (c.1444C>T), two patients harbored the p.R482Q (c.1445G>A), and two individuals harbored the novel heterozygous variant p.N466D (c.1396A>G), all in exon 8. Also, a homozygous p.R584H (c.1751 G>A) mutation in exon 11 was found. Among patients with atypical partial lipodystrophy, two of them were found to have LMNA mutations: a novel heterozygous p.R582C variation (c.1744 C>T) in exon 11 and a heterozygous substitution p.R349W (c.1045C>T) in exon 6. Among patients with generalized lipodystrophy, only one harbored LMNA mutation, a heterozygous p.T10I (c.29C>T) in exon 1. We have identified LMNA mutations in phenotypically diverse lipodystrophies. Also, our study broadens the spectrum of LMNA mutations in lipodystrophy.

  6. Clinical Profile of Atypical Manifestations of Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingam, Mahalakshmy

    2016-06-01

    To study the clinical profile and outcome of the atypical manifestations of dengue fever in children. All children (0-12 y of age) diagnosed and confirmed as dengue fever at a tertiary care hospital at Puducherry, between the 1st of August 2012 and January 31st 2015 were reviewed retrospectively from hospital case records as per the revised World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines 2011 for dengue fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen-based ELISA test or dengue serology for IgM and IgG antibodies and the data was analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. Out of 254 children admitted with dengue fever, non-severe dengue and severe dengue were seen in 62.6 % and 37.4 % respectively. Atypical manifestations were seen in 106 cases (41.7 %). Mean age of presentation was 6.9(3.3) y. M: F ratio was 1.2:1. The common manifestations of severe dengue infection were shock (37.4 %), bleeding (20.1 %) and multi-organ dysfunction (2.4 %). The most common atypical manifestations of dengue fever were lymphadenopathy (41.7 %), splenomegaly (21.2 %), biphasic fever (18.1 %), hepatitis (11.4 %), febrile diarrhea (6.3 %), refractory shock (2.4 %) and impaired consciousness (1.9 %). The other atypical manifestations present were portal hypertension, acalculous cholecystitis, appendicitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), myocarditis, pericardial effusion, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), myositis, acute kidney injury (AKI), hemophagocytic syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC). Platelet count did not always correlate well with the severity of bleeding. There were six deaths (2.4 %) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6 %). The common causes for poor outcome were multiorgan failure, encephalopathy and refractory shock. The atypical manifestations of dengue fever are no more a rare entity. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion and vigilance for atypical manifestations of

  7. Understanding A-type supergiants. I. Ultraviolet and visible spectral atlas of A-type supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Verdugo, E; Gómez de Castro, A I

    1999-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series whose aim is to perform a systematic study of A-type supergiant atmospheres and winds. Here we present a spectral atlas of 41 A-supergiants observed by us in high and medium resolution in the visible and ultraviolet. The atlas consists of profiles of the H alpha , H beta , H gamma , H delta , H epsilon , Ca II (H and K), Na I (D1 and D2), Mg II/sub 4481/, Mg II uv1 and Fe II uv1, uv2, uv3, uv62, uv63, uv161 lines for 41 stars with spectral types ranging from B9 to A9 and luminosity classes Ia, Iab and Ib, and provides the basic data for a thoughtful study of these stars. The overall characteristics of the sample as well as the data reduction procedures are described. We also present some examples of spectral variability. Figures 1-3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.com. (27 refs).

  8. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  9. Phenotypic integration: studying the ecology and evolution of complex phenotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pigliucci, Massimo; Preston, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    .... Studying the Plasticity of Phenotypic Integration in a Model Organism, 155 Massimo Pigliucci 8. Integrating Phenotypic Plasticity When Death Is on the Line: Insights from Predator-Prey Systems...

  10. From metabolome to phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Kannangara, Rubini Maya

    2017-01-01

    The development of crop varieties tolerant to growth temperature fluctuations and improved nutritional value is crucial due to climate change and global population growth. This study investigated the metabolite patterns of developing barley seed as a function of genotype and growth temperature fo...... their successful application to link genetic and environmental factors with the seed phenotype of unique and agro-economically important barley models for optimal vegetable protein and dietary fibre production....

  11. Clinical utilization of atypical antipsychotics in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    To analyze the available literature regarding the safety of atypical antipsychotics in pregnancy and lactation in order to recommend evidence-based strategies for pharmacologic management of psychosis in these conditions. We summarized the results from articles identified via MEDLINE/PubMed/TOXNET (1993-January 31, 2004), using the key terms pregnancy, lactation, breast-feeding, human milk, psychotropic drugs, atypical antipsychotics, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, clozapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole. Retrospective studies, clinical observations, and case reports regarding the 6 atypical antipsychotics mentioned above were selected and analyzed. Extensive manual review of pertinent journals and textbooks was also performed. Reviewed studies show that olanzapine and clozapine apparently do not increase the teratogenic risk if administered to pregnant women, while evidence on quetiapine, risperidone, aripiprazole, and ziprasidone is still limited. In contrast, available information is not able to exclude unwanted serious effects associated with the use of all atypical antipsychotics on mother-infant dyads. Furthermore, more than a few studies suggest increased hyperglycemic risk for pregnant women related to atypical antipsychotic therapy during gestation. Finally, published evidence about the effects on long-term infant neurodevelopment of drug exposure through both placenta and breast milk is represented only by sporadic case reports. It is well known that potential consequences of an untreated psychotic episode may be severe and may lead to the mother attempting suicide and/or infanticide. For these reasons, clinicians need to help mothers weigh both fetal and neonatal risks of exposure to drugs against the potential risk they and their infant may incur if the psychiatric illness is not treated. On the other hand, atypical antipsychotics in pregnancy and breast-feeding do not show evident advantages in safety when compared with typical neuroleptic

  12. Atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonov S.F.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature presents current data on cli¬nical picture and diagnostics of atypical depression. Rubric “atypical depression” includes a variety of depressive states characterized by reactively caused changes of mood, sensitivity to interpersonal contacts, inverted vegetative and somatic symptoms such as increased appetite and hypersomnia. The article considers the place of atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders. Positions of foreign authors that produce atypical depression as a clinical entity in the structure of Bipolar affective disorder II type are represented, the views of other authors on the structure of atypical depression are considered. The analysis of national concept of non-circular depression is carried out. Questions of atypical affective conditions acquire special significance due to preparation of International Classification of Diseases of the 11th revision, because inclusion in it of Bipolar affective disorder II type, a manifestation of which is considered to be atypical depressions, is under discussion.

  13. Prader-Willi syndrome and atypical submicroscopic 15q11-q13 deletions with or without imprinting defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Maaz; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-11-01

    We report a 20 year follow up on a Caucasian female, now 26 years of age, with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) harboring an atypical 15q11-q13 submicroscopic deletion of 100-200 kb in size first detected in 1996 involving the imprinting center, SNRPN gene and surrounding region. PWS is a rare complex disorder caused by the loss of paternally expressed genes in the 15q11-q13 region. With high resolution chromosomal microarray and methylation - specific MLPA analysis, we updated the genetic findings on our patient and found a 209,819bp deletion including the SNURF-SNRPN gene complex which includes the imprinting center and the SNORD116 region. We compared with four other similarly reported individuals in the literature with atypical submicroscopic deletions within this region but without imprinting center involvement to better characterize the specific genetic lesions causing PWS clinical findings. Clinically, our patient met the diagnostic criteria of PWS including infantile hypotonia, a poor suck with feeding difficulties, global developmental delays and later food foraging, childhood obesity, small hands and skin picking. Small atypical deletions of comparable sizes were seen in the 15q11-q13 region in all five cases and similar behavioral/physical characteristics were found despite an imprinting defect in our patient. These results further support an overlapping critical deletion region involving the non-coding snoRNA SNORD116 in common in the five individuals playing a key role in contributing to the PWS phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Pressure-assisted dissociation and degradation of "proteinase K-resistant" fibrils prepared by seeding with scrapie-infected hamster prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Maeno, Akihiro; Murayama, Taichi; Tachibana, Hideki; Fujita, Yuzo; Yamanaka, Hitoki; Nishida, Noriyuki; Atarashi, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    The crucial step for the fatal neurodegenerative prion diseases involves the conversion of a normal cellular protein, PrP(C), into a fibrous pathogenic form, PrP(Sc), which has an unusual stability against heat and resistance against proteinase K digestion. A successful challenge to reverse the reaction from PrP(Sc) into PrP(C) is considered valuable, as it would give a key to dissolving the complex molecular events into thermodynamic and kinetic analyses and may also provide a means to prevent the formation of PrP(Sc) from PrP(C) eventually in vivo. Here we show that, by applying pressures at kbar range, the "proteinase K-resistant" fibrils (rHaPrP(res)) prepared from hamster prion protein (rHaPrP [23-231]) by seeding with brain homogenate of scrapie-infected hamster, becomes easily digestible. The result is consistent with the notion that rHaPrP(res) fibrils are dissociated into rHaPrP monomers under pressure and that the formation of PrP(Sc) from PrP(C) is thermodynamically controlled. Moreover, the efficient degradation of prion fibrils under pressure provides a novel means of eliminating infectious PrP(Sc) from various systems of pathogenic concern.

  15. New insights into early sequential PrPsc accumulation in scrapie infected mouse brain evidenced by the use of streptomycin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencsik, Anna A; Leclere, Edwige; Perron, Hervé; Moussa, Aly

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the amplifying potentialities of streptomycin sulfate in the immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of the abnormal prion protein (PrPsc), we used a sequential brain sampling from C506M3 scrapie strain inoculated C57Bl/6 mice. The weekly removed brains, from 7 to 63 days post intra-cranial inoculation were analysed using PrPsc IHC. The introduction of streptomycin sulfate, a technique developed for accurate cellular and regional mapping of PrPsc deposition in several animal TSEs, revealed a substantial amplifying effect and a clear specific PrPsc detection as early as 28 days post inoculation. The location of the first detected PrPsc deposits suggests a possible involvement of the cerebrospinal fluid in the early dissemination of the infectious agent. The meaning of these newly accessible PrPsc deposits is discussed in relation to a possible nascent form of PrPsc molecules detected in situ for the first time. Altogether, these findings argue that this method can be highly useful to study the early stages after infection with prion agents.

  16. Atypical feminized male’s agonistic behavior relative to males and females of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Becerril-Morales

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early maturity during tilapia culture is a recurring problem. To avoid this, a series of techniques have been developed, including the production of YY-males. This technique involves the use of hormones to produce phenotypic females (XY genotype. However, incomplete transformations are frequently observed and the produced atypical feminized males (AFM could display an ambiguity in the phenotypic expression of behavioral patterns. The aim of this study was to measure the frequency and intensity of aggressive behavior as well as the role that initial residence plays when involving three phenotypes (males, females and AFM. The experiment consisted of three stages. Resident fish were AFM in the first stage, males in the second and females in the third. In each stage the resident fish confronted males, females and AFM acting as intruders. Aggressive behavior was exercised more frequently by resident fish. Intersexual confrontations showed higher levels of aggression compared to intrasexual confrontations. The frequency of confrontations was not significantly different in confrontations involving AFM, however, differences were observed in intensity of aggression. It is possible that an incomplete transformation at physiological level could be responsible for an inaccurate decoding of signal during confrontations.

  17. Atypical Antipsychotics and Inverse Agonism at 5-HT2 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Laura C.; Clarke, William P.; Berg, Kelly A.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well accepted that receptors can regulate cellular signaling pathways in the absence of a stimulating ligand, and inverse agonists can reduce this ligand-independent or “constitutive” receptor activity. Both the serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors have demonstrated constitutive receptor activity in vitro and in vivo. Each has been identified as a target for the treatment of schizophrenia. Further, most, if not all, atypical antipsychotic drugs have inverse agonist properties at both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. This paper describes our current knowledge of inverse agonism of atypical antipsychotics at 5-HT2A/2C receptor subtypes in vitro and in vivo. Exploiting inverse agonist properties of antipsychotic drugs may provide new avenues for drug development. PMID:26044975

  18. Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy with Atypical Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karagiannis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To report a case of acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR with atypical electrophysiology findings. Case Presentation. A 23-year-old-female presented with visual acuity deterioration in her right eye accompanied by photopsia bilaterally. Corrected distance visual acuity at presentation was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Fundus examination was unremarkable. Visual field (VF testing revealed a large scotoma. Pattern and full-field electroretinograms (PERG and ERG revealed macular involvement associated with generalized retinal dysfunction. Electrooculogram (EOG light rise and the Arden ratio were within normal limits bilaterally. The patient was diagnosed with AZOOR due to clinical findings, visual field defect, and ERG findings. Conclusion. This is a case of AZOOR with characteristic VF defects and clinical symptoms presenting with atypical EOG findings.

  19. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis with Atypical Clinical and MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse Rahime Hasırcı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a progressive inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system and a slow virus infection caused by aberrant measles virüs. Typical neurological manifestations include psychomotor impairment, progressive intellectual deterioration, myoclonic jerks and behavioral changes, with or without pyramidal symptoms. It usually affecting people aged 10 to 14 year. We report the case of an 17-year-old girl presenting with initial symptom of visual loss, seizures, a lack of SSPE specific EEG pattern, late onset and atypical fast progression of disease. The case highlights the importance of atypical clinical findings of SSPE at onset and also firstly disappearing, then appearing MRI findings at sequential images which can complicate the accurate diagnosis. High suspicion is needed because of its rareness.

  20. [Atypical fractures of the femur: apropos of 3 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanduloviciu, Maria; Stoll, Delphine; Lamy, Olivier; Krieg, Marc-Antoine; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère

    2014-08-06

    Osteoporosis is an increasing public health problem. The bisphophonates are the most useful treatment used through the world to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Their large prescription revealed an unpredictable side effect: the atypical fracture. These fractures appear in the subtrochanteric or diaphysal femoral proximal site, spontaneously or after a low trauma, and could be bilateral. X-rays shows a transversal or oblique fracture with a spur in the cortex and with a diffuse thickening of the cortical of the proximal femur. Expert's recommendations are current in progress to well understand and managed this problem. Here we report three cases of atypical femur fractures occurred in our Centre of bone diseases with some management and treatment propositions.

  1. Learning, plasticity, and atypical generalization in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Barbara A; Rice, Courtney L; Dovgopoly, Alexander; Lopata, Christopher J; Thomeer, Marcus L; Nelson, Andrew; Mercado, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show accelerated learning in some tasks, degraded learning in others, and distinct deficits when generalizing to novel situations. Recent simulations with connectionist models suggest that deficits in cortical plasticity mechanisms can account for atypical patterns of generalization shown by some children with ASD. We tested the surprising theoretical prediction, from past simulations, that the children with ASD who show atypical generalization in perceptual categorization tasks will benefit more from training with a single prototypical member of the category than from training with multiple examples, but children with ASD who generalize normally will be comparatively harmed. The experimental results confirmed this prediction, suggesting that plasticity deficits may well underlie the difficulties that some children with ASD have generalizing skills, and these deficits are not specific to the acquisition of social skills, but rather reflect a more general perceptual learning deficit that may impact many abilities.

  2. Idiopathic Atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome presenting with acute dystonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maduemem, Rizwan K E

    2017-09-01

    Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. The atypical HUS (aHUS) results from over activation of complement system with formation of micro thrombi and damage to endothelial cells resulting in renal impairment in 50 % and death in 25 %, commonly in untreated patients. We report an intriguing case of aHUS presenting with acute onset of movement disorder and fluctuating delirium.

  3. Atypical presentation is dominant and typical for coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami Nejad, Mohammad; Rostami, Kamran; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Habibi, Manijeh; Dabiri, Hossein; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-09-01

    Atypical presentation is the most prevalent form of coeliac disease (CD) and mostly clinically indistinguishable from other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. The first objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of CD in patients with GI symptoms and the second objective was to characterize the typical manifestations of the atypical forms of CD. This was a cross sectional study comprising 5,176 individuals by random sampling of self-referred people from the Tehran province, during the years 2006-2007 in a primary care setting. From 5,176 individuals, 670 with GI symptoms were selected for coeliac serology including total immunoglobulin A (IgA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies. Those with IgA deficiency were tested with IgG tTG. This study shows that 13% (670/5176) of self-referred patients to a general practice suffer from GI symptoms. Dyspepsia was the most common symptom in 25 seropositive cases similar to the rest of the study group. A positive anti-tTG test was found in 22 from 670 investigated subjects (17 women, 5 men) (95% CI: 1.70-4.30) and 8/670 were IgA deficient. A positive IgG tTG was detected in 3/8 IgA deficient individuals. The prevalence of CD antibodies in serologically screened samples excluding IgA-deficient was 3.3% and 3.7% when including those IgA-deficient with positive tTG-IgG. Non-specific GI symptoms seem to be the typical presentation of atypical CD. This study indicated that there is a high prevalence of CD antibodies among patients with GI symptoms (3.7%). More awareness regarding the atypical presentation of CD could be the key step in identifying asymptomatic patients.

  4. Atypical Histiocyte-Rich Sweet’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Chi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet’s Syndrome is a rare neutrophilic dermatosis thought to be a result of immune dysregulation occurring in the setting of drug exposure, recent infection, pregnancy, and underlying malignancy or idiopathic with specific and widely accepted diagnostic criteria established in the literature. Other organ systems can be involved with varying degrees of severity. An unusual case of Sweet’s Syndrome associated with myopericarditis, acral involvement, and atypical histological findings with predominance of histiocytes is described here.

  5. Use of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachnik, Joan M; Nunn-Thompson, Cheryl

    2007-04-01

    To review clinical trials and reports describing the efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole) in the treatment of autistic or other pervasive developmental disorders. English-language publications from the MEDLINE database (1966-February 2007) including clinical trials, case reports, and retrospective series were reviewed. Relevant data were extracted from studies of selected atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of autistic disorder in children, adolescents, and adults. Most literature found was in the form of case reports or case series; however, several open-label and double-blind trials were also identified. Autistic disorder is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder with limited treatment options. Nonpharmacologic approaches may be the most beneficial, but pharmacologic agents are needed for some patients with significant behavioral manifestations of the disorder. The atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole) have shown some efficacy in improving certain behavioral symptoms of autistic disorder--primarily aggressiveness, hyperactivity, and self-injurious behavior. Efficacy was based on observation or changes from baseline in behavioral rating scores. Data appear to be strongest for olanzapine compared with quetiapine, with several open-label trials suggesting its efficacy. Weight gain and sedation were frequently reported adverse events with both agents. Aripiprazole has demonstrated efficacy in limited case series, with minimal adverse effects reported. Atypical antipsychotics represent a treatment option for symptoms associated with autistic disorder. However, these drugs do not affect the core symptoms of autistic disorder and are associated with potentially significant adverse effects. In addition, there is a lack of randomized controlled trials to determine the true efficacy and long-term safety of these agents in the pediatric population.

  6. Recurrent Malignancy-Associated Atypical Neutrophilic Dermatosis With Noninfectious Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Kathryn Nicole; Panach, Kamaldeep; Dominguez, Arturo Ricardo

    2017-12-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis presents with the sudden onset of fever, leukocytosis and tender, erythematous, edematous, well-demarcated papules and plaques that histopathologically demonstrate a dense neutrophilic infiltrate. A total of 20% of patients with SS have malignancy-associated disease that can present with bullous or atypical skin lesions that mimic pyoderma gangrenosum, another neutrophilic dermatosis. Both entities exist on a spectrum, and in the context of underlying malignancy, these neutrophilic diseases become less clinically distinct. The literature also describes life-threatening cases of neutrophilic dermatoses that mimic severe sepsis. We present a fatal case of a patient with chronic eosinophilic leukemia with recurrent episodes of malignancy-associated atypical neutrophilic dermatosis characterized by necrotic skin lesions, pulmonary infiltrates and noninfectious shock and we also summarize the clinical presentations of an additional 10 patients reported in the literature. We conducted a PubMed search of articles published up to and in 2015, focusing on the English and Spanish literature with SS cross-referenced with the following search terms: neutrophilic dermatosis, pyoderma gangrenosum, shock, multiorgan failure and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The articles were reviewed and the patients׳ clinical and laboratory findings were summarized. Cases of atypical neutrophilic dermatosis presenting with noninfectious shock syndrome are likely underrecognized clinically and underreported in the literature. Patients with malignancy-associated atypical neutrophilic dermatoses associated with noninfectious shock syndrome typically have multisystem disease characterized by recurrent episodes and typically have poor prognoses. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary atypical carcinoid of the parietal pleura expressing KIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The author reports an extremely rare case of atypical carcinoid of the pleura expressing KIT. An 81-year-old Japanese man with emphysema was found to have a mass (3×3×2 cm) in the left parietal pleura by various imaging modalities. Video-assisted tumorectomy was performed, but could not excise it completely. Histologically, the tumor was composed of atypical cells arranged in trabecular, ribbon-like, and rosette patterns. Mitotic figures and necrosis were present. The tumor cells were argyrophil. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for pancytokeratins, cytokeratin (CK) 18, chromogranin (focal), p53, KIT, and Ki67 (labeling=17%). In contrast, the tumor cells were negative for CK5/6, CK7, CK19, CK20, CK34βE12, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, S100-protein, α-smooth muscle actin, desmin, CEA, TTF-1, CDX-2, AFP, HepPar-1, synaptophysin, CD56, CA19-9, CD15, neuron specific enolase, serotonin, CD34, platelet-derived growth factor-α, calretinin, thrombomodulin, WT-1, B72.3, and D2-40. The pathologic diagnosis was atypical carcinoid of the pleura. The patient was examined by whole body computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, but there were no tumors other than the pleural tumor. Endoscopic examinations including upper and lower gastrointestinal tract revealed no tumors. Therefore, the pleural tumor was thought to be primary. Ten months later, the patient developed metastatic lesions in the vertebular and femoral bones, and died of respiratory failure. Autopsy was not performed. To the best of the author's knowledge, there are no cases of primary carcinoid in the pleura in the English literature. This case is also interesting in that the atypical carcinoid expressed KIT.

  8. Acute neck pain, an atypical presentation of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Julian; Blakeley, Chris; Sakar, Ramy; Aktar, Khalida; Hashemi, Kambiz

    2007-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage can be a massively debilitating condition with long‐term repercussions. The “classic” presentation of sudden‐onset severe headache normally raises suspicions. However, if the presentation is atypical, the diagnosis may be missed. We report on a 52‐year‐old man who presented with a 1‐day history of progressively worsening right‐sided neck pain spreading to the chest with associated symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. After initial stabilisation, the patient's Glasgow Co...

  9. Atypical Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in Thai Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarurin Pitanupong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence, and associated factors of atypical eating attitudes and behaviors in Thai medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey examined the eating abnormalities in Thai medical students, conducted in 2014. Research assistants collected data by using; self-reported questionnaires using The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 Thai Version. The statistical analysis used R-program for qualitative variables and logistic regression was applied to determine the correlation and P-value. Results: 141 Thai, medical students (15.9% were reported to have atypical attitudes towards eating, and displayed abnormal eating behaviors. There was no statistically significant correlation of attitude towards eating, and their current eating behaviors according to the medical students’ gender, year of studying and Grade Point Average. However, their eating attitudes and behaviors were, associated with Body Mass index. Normal weight (BMI 18.5- 23.49 and overweight (BMI 23.5-39.9 groups could increase by 2.2 (95% CI =1.2, 4.3 and 2.3 (95% CI=1.1, 4.8 times risk depending on atypical eating attitudes and abnormal eating behaviors respectively, when compared with the underweight group (BMI<18.5. Conclusion: There was no correlated difference in concerns to the Thai medical student’s abnormal eating habits, with gender, years of their study and Grade Point Average. Only normal to over-weight BMI were associated. Overweight male, medical students significantly represented more atypical attitudes towards eating and behaviors than other groups in this population. These results may reveal the changing trends of eating attitudes and behaviors due to the current ideal body image of being more muscular. However, prospective studies are still needed.

  10. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Doggett; James Brazil; Marketa Limova; Leah Press; Sidney Smith; Jeremy Peck

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX), an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California). All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up...

  11. Atypical Pelvic Crescent Fracture Caused by Vertical Shear Force

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sang-Eun; Lee, Se-Won; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Park, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The crescent fracture consists of a posterior iliac wing fracture with extension into the sacroiliac joint and a dislocation of the sacroiliac joint. This fracture represents a subset of lateral compression injury. The strong posterior ligaments of sacroiliac joint remain intact and a fracture fragment (crescent shape) involving the posterior superior iliac spines remains firmly attached to the sacrum. We report a patient with atypical pelvic crescent fracture that is mainly influenced by ver...

  12. Childhood atypical meningioma with perineural spread: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Feng-Yu.; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Wong, Ho-Fai; Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan); Wu, Chieh-Tsai [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan); Lin, Kuang-Lin [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Meningiomas are uncommon in children. When they occur, they are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. Childhood meningiomas are generally large and commonly associated with cyst formation and an unusual location. Perineural tumor spread, occasionally associated with head and neck malignancies, is very rare in meningiomas. We present the MR findings of an atypical meningioma with perineural spread in a 4.5-year-old girl. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative methods for somatosensory evaluation in atypical odontalgia

    OpenAIRE

    PORPORATTI,André Luís; COSTA,Yuri Martins; STUGINSKI-BARBOSA,Juliana; BONJARDIM,Leonardo Rigoldi; CONTI,Paulo César Rodrigues; SVENSSON,Peter

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify reliable somatosensory evaluation methods for atypical odontalgia (AO) patients. The computerized search included the main databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library). The studies included used the following quantitative sensory testing (QST) methods: mechanical detection threshold (MDT), mechanical pain threshold (MPT) (pinprick), pressure pain threshold (PPT), dynamic mechanical allodynia with a cotton swab (DMA1) or a brush (DMA2), warm d...

  14. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) A...

  15. Extracutaneous atypical syphilis in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Paula; Imaz, Arkaitz; Calatayud, Laura; García, Olga; Saumoy, María; Podzamczer, Daniel

    2017-12-07

    We describe a series of cases of syphilis with atypical extracutaneous clinical presentation diagnosed in HIV-infected patients. Retrospective observational study. All cases of syphilis diagnosed in HIV-infected patients during the period between June 2013 and June 2016 in a tertiary hospital of the Barcelona metropolitan area were analysed. A total of 71 cases of syphilis were diagnosed, 32 of them presenting with clinical signs or symptoms. Seven of these cases (9.8% of the total and 21.8% of the symptomatic cases) had atypical presentations with extracutaneous involvement: ocular (4), gastric (1), multiple hepatic abscesses (1) and generalised adenopathies (1). Patients were treated with intramuscular or intravenous penicillin and the clinical and serological evolution was good in all of them. Extracutaneous atypical clinical presentations were observed in 21.8% of symptomatic cases of syphilis in HIV+ patients with ocular involvement being the most freqent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Atypical resource allocation may contribute to many aspects of autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Goldknopf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a review of the literature and on reports by people with autism, this paper suggests that atypical resource allocation is a factor that contributes to many aspects of autism spectrum conditions, including difficulties with language and social cognition, atypical sensory and attentional experiences, executive and motor challenges, and perceptual and conceptual strengths and weaknesses. Drawing upon resource theoretical approaches that suggest that perception, cognition, and action draw upon multiple pools of resources, the approach states that compared with resources in typical cognition, resources in autism are narrowed or reduced, especially in people with strong sensory symptoms. In narrowed attention, resources are restricted to smaller areas and to fewer modalities, stages of processing, and cognitive processes than in typical cognition; resources may be more intense than in typical cognition. In reduced attentional capacity, overall resources are reduced; resources may be restricted to fewer modalities, stages of processing, and cognitive processes than in typical cognition, or the amount of resources allocated to each area or process may be reduced. Possible neural bases of the hypothesized atypical resource allocation, relations to other approaches, limitations, and tests of the hypotheses are discussed.

  17. Atypical Rocky Mountain spotted fever with polyarticular arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Muhammad A; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2013-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an acute, serious tick borne illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsi. Frequently, RMSF is manifested by headache, a typical rash and fever but atypical disease is common, making diagnosis difficult. Inflammatory arthritis as a manifestation is rare. The purpose of this study is to describe a patient with serologically proven RMSF who presented in an atypical manner with inflammatory arthritis of the small joints of the hands and to review the previously reported patients with rickettsial infection and inflammatory arthritis. An 18-year-old woman presented with a rash that began on the distal extremities and spread centrally, along with hand pain and swelling. She had tenderness and swelling of the metacarpophlangeal joints on examination in addition to an erythematosus macular rash and occasional fever. Acute and convalescent serology demonstrated R rickettsi infection. She was successfully treated with doxycycline. Inflammatory arthritis is a rare manifestation of RMSF or other rickettsial infection with 8 previously reported patients, only 1 of whom had RMSF. Physician must have a high index of suspicion for RMSF because of atypical presentations.

  18. Research advance on diagnosis and treatment for atypical optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yan Zeng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuritis(ONis one of the most common causes of vision loss by neural eye diseases in youth and middle-aged. In the past, the diagnosis simply according to the risk position, which did not distinguish from the pathogenesis and clinical characteristics, can not meet the current clinical diagnosis and treatment needs. Combining with the etiology, clinical characteristics and prognosis, the latest classification of the current international diagnosis of ON are typical and atypical ON. Typical ON relates to multiple sclerosis(MSor demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, it has a relatively good therapeutic effect and prognosis. Rather than, atypical ON has complex etiology, clinical manifestation, and the treatment and prognosis are also different. At present there are many international ON treatment guidelines with level I evidence-based medical evidence, but with different genetic background, geographical environment and ethnic groups, they are not been determined. China lacks of such a multicenter large sample, a wide range of research evidence. In this paper, we will summarize the progress of the diagnosis and treatment about ON, especially about the atypical ON, in order to provide some suggestions to further improve the standardization and individualization for clinical diagnosis and treatment on ON.

  19. Splice mutations preserve myophosphorylase activity that ameliorates the phenotype in McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Duno, Morten; Schwartz, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Over 100 mutations in the myophosphorylase gene, which cause McArdle disease, are known. All these mutations have resulted in a complete block of muscle glycogenolysis, and accordingly, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been identified in this condition. We evaluated physiologic and genetic...... with atypical McArdle disease compared to typical McArdle patients. Oxygen uptake, relative to cardiac output, was severely impaired in the 47 patients with typical McArdle disease, and partially normalized in the milder affected McArdle patients. These findings identify the first distinct genotype-phenotype...... relationship in McArdle disease, and indicate that minimal myophosphorylase activity ameliorates the typical McArdle disease phenotype by augmenting muscle oxidative capacity. The milder form of McArdle disease provides important clues to the level of functional myophosphorylase needed to support muscle...

  20. Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome in an adult Indian male-case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika C G Raj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMMS is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by multiple melanocytic nevi, usually more than 50, and a family history of melanoma. It is known to be associated with carcinoma of pancreas and other malignancies involving gastrointestinal tract, breast, lung, larynx, and skin in the kindred. There is no published report of FAMMMS in dark-skinned individuals. We report a case of FAMMMS in a dark-skinned adult Indian male, who had multiple extensive nevi all over the body and oral mucosa; associated with malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (Marjolin′s ulcer, and carcinoma of pancreas. His father had died of carcinoma of lung and his sister had a partial phenotypic expression. The clinical presentation of the case is discussed with review of literature.

  1. Quantification of Microbial Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Verónica S.; Krömer, Jens O.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolite profiling technologies have improved to generate close to quantitative metabolomics data, which can be employed to quantitatively describe the metabolic phenotype of an organism. Here, we review the current technologies available for quantitative metabolomics, present their advantages and drawbacks, and the current challenges to generate fully quantitative metabolomics data. Metabolomics data can be integrated into metabolic networks using thermodynamic principles to constrain the directionality of reactions. Here we explain how to estimate Gibbs energy under physiological conditions, including examples of the estimations, and the different methods for thermodynamics-based network analysis. The fundamentals of the methods and how to perform the analyses are described. Finally, an example applying quantitative metabolomics to a yeast model by 13C fluxomics and thermodynamics-based network analysis is presented. The example shows that (1) these two methods are complementary to each other; and (2) there is a need to take into account Gibbs energy errors. Better estimations of metabolic phenotypes will be obtained when further constraints are included in the analysis. PMID:27941694

  2. Evidence for Broadening Criteria for Atypical Depression Which May Define a Reactive Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Brett; Angst, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Arguing that additional symptoms should be added to the criteria for atypical depression. Method. Published research articles on atypical depression are reviewed. Results. (1) The original studies upon which the criteria for atypical depression were based cited fatigue, insomnia, pain, and loss of weight as characteristic symptoms. (2) Several studies of DSM depressive criteria found patients with atypical depression to exhibit high levels of insomnia, fatigue, and loss of appetite/weight. (3) Several studies have found atypical depression to be comorbid with headaches, bulimia, and body image issues. (4) Most probands who report atypical depression meet criteria for "somatic depression," defined as depression associated with several of disordered eating, poor body image, headaches, fatigue, and insomnia. The gender difference in prevalence of atypical depression results from its overlap with somatic depression. Somatic depression is associated with psychosocial measures related to gender, linking it with the descriptions of atypical depression as "reactive" appearing in the studies upon which the original criteria for atypical depression were based. Conclusion. Insomnia, disordered eating, poor body image, and aches/pains should be added as criteria for atypical depression matching criteria for somatic depression defining a reactive depressive disorder possibly distinct from endogenous melancholic depression.

  3. Evidence for Broadening Criteria for Atypical Depression Which May Define a Reactive Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Silverstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Arguing that additional symptoms should be added to the criteria for atypical depression. Method. Published research articles on atypical depression are reviewed. Results. (1 The original studies upon which the criteria for atypical depression were based cited fatigue, insomnia, pain, and loss of weight as characteristic symptoms. (2 Several studies of DSM depressive criteria found patients with atypical depression to exhibit high levels of insomnia, fatigue, and loss of appetite/weight. (3 Several studies have found atypical depression to be comorbid with headaches, bulimia, and body image issues. (4 Most probands who report atypical depression meet criteria for “somatic depression,” defined as depression associated with several of disordered eating, poor body image, headaches, fatigue, and insomnia. The gender difference in prevalence of atypical depression results from its overlap with somatic depression. Somatic depression is associated with psychosocial measures related to gender, linking it with the descriptions of atypical depression as “reactive” appearing in the studies upon which the original criteria for atypical depression were based. Conclusion. Insomnia, disordered eating, poor body image, and aches/pains should be added as criteria for atypical depression matching criteria for somatic depression defining a reactive depressive disorder possibly distinct from endogenous melancholic depression.

  4. Evidence for Broadening Criteria for Atypical Depression Which May Define a Reactive Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Brett; Angst, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Arguing that additional symptoms should be added to the criteria for atypical depression. Method. Published research articles on atypical depression are reviewed. Results. (1) The original studies upon which the criteria for atypical depression were based cited fatigue, insomnia, pain, and loss of weight as characteristic symptoms. (2) Several studies of DSM depressive criteria found patients with atypical depression to exhibit high levels of insomnia, fatigue, and loss of appetite/weight. (3) Several studies have found atypical depression to be comorbid with headaches, bulimia, and body image issues. (4) Most probands who report atypical depression meet criteria for “somatic depression,” defined as depression associated with several of disordered eating, poor body image, headaches, fatigue, and insomnia. The gender difference in prevalence of atypical depression results from its overlap with somatic depression. Somatic depression is associated with psychosocial measures related to gender, linking it with the descriptions of atypical depression as “reactive” appearing in the studies upon which the original criteria for atypical depression were based. Conclusion. Insomnia, disordered eating, poor body image, and aches/pains should be added as criteria for atypical depression matching criteria for somatic depression defining a reactive depressive disorder possibly distinct from endogenous melancholic depression. PMID:26258131

  5. [Genetic analysis of a case with atypical neonatal Cri-du-chat syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenfeng; Chen, He; Mu, Haiyan; Li, Jie

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical features and genetic mutations in a neonate with atypical Cri-du-chat syndrome, whom only featured with weak cry but had no dysmorphic facial features and congenital heart disease. METHODS G-banding karyotyping was performed on the child and her parents. The result was validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosome microarray (CMA) was used to further delineate the mutation. RESULTS G-banding analysis suggested that the child had a karyotype of 46,XX,del(5)(p14p15), while both of his parents had a normal karyotype. FISH confirmed the absence of D5S23 and D5S721 at 5p15.2. A 25.7 Mb deletion was detected in the 5p15.33p14.1 region by CMA. CONCLUSION The phenotype of Cri-du-chat syndrome can vary significantly among patients, particularly in neonates, and can be easily mis-diagnosed. Combined cytogenetic and molecular analysis can identify the missing fragments with greater precision.

  6. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  7. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  8. DNA Damage Accumulation and TRF2 Degradation in Atypical Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidisha eSaha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome (AWS, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT, did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, -H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  9. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: what is it, how is it diagnosed, and how is it treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nester, Carla M; Thomas, Christie P

    2012-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare syndrome of hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal insufficiency. Genetic mutations in the alternate pathway of complement are well recognized as the cause in more than 60% of patients affected by this thrombotic microangiopathy. The identification of aHUS as a disease of the alternate pathway of complement enables directed therapeutic intervention both in the acute and chronic setting and may include one or all of the following: plasma therapy, complement blockade, and liver transplantation. Because aHUS shares many of the presenting characteristics of the other thrombotic microangiopathies, and confirmatory genetic results are not available at the time of presentation, the diagnosis relies heavily on the recognition of a clinical syndrome consistent with the diagnosis in the absence of signs of an alternate cause of thrombotic microangiopathy. Limited understanding of the epidemiology, genetics, and clinical features of aHUS has the potential to delay diagnosis and treatment. To advance our understanding, a more complete characterization of the unique phenotypical features of aHUS is needed. Further studies to identify additional genetic loci for aHUS and more robust biomarkers of both active and quiescent disease are required. Advances in these areas will undoubtedly improve the care of patients with aHUS.

  10. Characterising atypical Candida albicans clinical isolates from six third-level hospitals in Bogotá, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Leguizamón, Giovanni; Fiori, Alessandro; López, Luisa F; Gómez, Beatriz L; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Gómez-López, Arley; Suárez, Carlos F; Ceballos, Andrés; Van Dijck, Patrick; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2015-10-05

    Candida species are the most frequently found fungal pathogens causing nosocomial disease in a hospital setting. Such species must be correctly identified to ensure that appropriate control measures are taken and that suitable treatment is given for each species. Candida albicans is causing most fungal disease burden worldwide; the challenge lies in differentiating it from emerging atypical, minor and related species such as Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana. The purpose of this study was to compare identification based on MALDI-TOF MS to standard identification systems using a set of nosocomial isolates. Eleven nosocomial samples were collected from 6 third-level hospitals in Bogotá, Colombia. All the samples were identified by combining MALDI-TOF MS with morphological characters, carbohydrate assimilation and molecular markers (D1/D2 and HWP1). The present work describes the first collection of atypical Colombian Candida clinical isolates; these were identified as Candida albicans/Candida africana by their MALDI-TOF MS profile. Phenotypical characteristics showed that they were unable to produce chlamydospores, assimilate trehalose, glucosamine, N- acetyl-glucosamine and barely grew at 42 °C, as would be expected for Candida africana. The molecular identification of the D1/D2 region of large subunit ribosomal RNA and HWP1 hyphal cell wall protein 1 sequences from these isolates was consistent with those for Candida albicans. The mass spectra obtained by MALDI-TOF MS were analysed by multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and cluster analysis, differences being revealed between Candida albicans, Candida africana, Candida dubliniensis reference spectra and two clinical isolate groups which clustered according to the clinical setting, one of them being clearly related to C. albicans. This study highlights the importance of using MALDI-TOF MS in combination with morphology, substrate assimilation and molecular markers for characterising Candida albicans

  11. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease a case report, with special attention to the electroencephalogram in this disorder and to its possible relationships to kuru, scrapie and «mad cow disease»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Chapman

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 58-year-old Brazillian cattle rancher and businessman is presented. The EEG was normal, which is consistent with the fact that it was made during the first half of his illness; in a later stage suppression of normal rhythms by slow moderate voltage waves would be expected. The resemblances of kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease» to C-J disease are discussed. In each of these 4 illnesses the patient or affected animal (scrapie and «mad cow disease" (a has a widespread spongiform encephalopathy and consequent dementia, myoclonic epilepsy and cerebellar and corticospinal symptoms, (b Each illness is caused by a virus (or virus-like organism called a PrP or prion which is unusually resistant to heat and entirely resistant to ultraviolet light and x-rays, (c This causative agent can be transmitted to other mammals by intracerebral injection or, in the proved cases of 3 of them, by the oral route. Unresolved questions about C-J disease include the following: Are C-J disease, kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease" essentially similar illnesses caused by the same virus or by subtle variants of it? What is the incubation period of C-J disease, and does its virus exist for long periods of time in some asymptomatic persons, some of whom may never become neurologically ill? How does this virus enter the bodies of most persons with C-J disease, and why does the clinical disease characteristically occur only in middle age?

  12. Molecular definition of deletions of different segments of distal 5p that result in distinct phenotypic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, D.M.; Bengtsson, U.; Wasmuth, J.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine (United States); Niebuhr, E. [Univ. of Copenhagen, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CDC) is a segmental aneusomy associated with deletions of chromosome 5p15. In an effort to define regions that produce the phenotypes associated with CDC, we have analyzed deletions from 17 patients. The majority of these patients had atypical CDC features or were asymptomatic. Using these patients, we have mapped several phenotypes associated with deletions of 5p, including speech delay, catlike cry, newborn facial dysmorphism, and adult facial dysmorphism. This phenotypic map should provide a framework with which to begin identification of genes associated with various phenotypic features associated with deletions of distal 5p. We have also analyzed the parental origin of the de novo deletions, to determine if genomic imprinting could be occurring in this region. In addition, we have isolated cosmids that could be useful for both prenatal and postnatal assessments of del5(p) individuals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Relationships among Sensory Responsiveness, Anxiety, and Ritual Behaviors in Children with and without Atypical Sensory Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Shalita, Tami; Mansour, Hanin; Dar, Reuven

    2017-08-01

    To explore relationships between sensory responsiveness, anxiety, and ritual behaviors in boys with typical and atypical sensory responsiveness. Forty-eight boys, ages 5-9 participated in the study (28 boys with atypical sensory responsiveness and 20 controls). Atypical sensory responsiveness was defined as a score of ≤154 on the Short Sensory Profile. Parents completed the Sensory Profile, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, and the Childhood Routines Inventory. Children with atypical sensory responsiveness had significantly higher levels of anxiety and a higher frequency of ritual behaviors than controls. Atypical sensory responsiveness was significantly related to both anxiety and ritual behaviors, with anxiety mediating the relationship between sensory modulation and ritual behaviors. The findings elucidate the potential consequences of atypical sensory responsiveness and could support the notion that ritual behaviors develop as a coping mechanism in response to anxiety stemming from primary difficulty in modulating sensory input.

  14. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

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    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing Proteinase K Resistance of Fish Prion Proteins in a Scrapie-Infected Mouse Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Salta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The key event in prion pathogenesis is the structural conversion of the normal cellular protein, PrPC, into an aberrant and partially proteinase K resistant isoform, PrPSc. Since the minimum requirement for a prion disease phenotype is the expression of endogenous PrP in the host, species carrying orthologue prion genes, such as fish, could in theory support prion pathogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the development of abnormal protein deposition in sea bream brain, following oral challenge of the fish with natural prion infectious material. In this study, we used a prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma cell line for the expression of three different mature fish PrP proteins and the evaluation of the resistance of the exogenously expressed proteins to proteinase K treatment (PK, as an indicator of a possible prion conversion. No evidence of resistance to PK was detected for any of the studied recombinant proteins. Although not indicative of an absolute inability of the fish PrPs to structurally convert to pathogenic isoforms, the absence of PK-resistance may be due to supramolecular and conformational differences between the mammalian and piscine PrPs.

  16. Drug information update. Atypical antipsychotics and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: nuances and pragmatics of the association.

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    Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse event associated with the use of antipsychotics. Although atypical antipsychotics were initially considered to carry no risk of NMS, reports have accumulated over time implicating them in NMS causation. Almost all atypical antipsychotics have been reported to be associated with NMS. The clinical profile of NMS caused by certain atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has been reported to be considerably different from the NMS produced by typical antipsychotics, with diaphoresis encountered more commonly, and rigidity and tremor encountered less frequently. This article briefly discusses the evidence relating to the occurrence, presentation and management of NMS induced by atypical antipsychotics.

  17. Atypical lymphocytes in malaria mimicking dengue infection in Thailand

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    Polrat Wilairatana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polrat Wilairatana1, Noppadon Tangpukdee1, Sant Muangnoicharoen1, Srivicha Krudsood2, Shigeyuki Kano31Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Tropical Medicine and Malaria, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Patients with uncomplicated falciparum or vivax malaria usually present with acute febrile illness and thrombocytopenia similar to dengue infection. We retrospectively studied atypical lymphocytes (AL and atypical lymphocytosis (ALO, defined as AL > 5% of total white blood cells in 1310 uncomplicated malaria patients. In 718 falciparum malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 53.2% and 5.7% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–10%, whereas in 592 vivax malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 55.4% and 9.5% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–14%. After antimalarial treatment, AL and ALO declined in both falciparum and vivax malaria. However, AL and ALO remained in falciparum malaria on days 7, 14, and 21, whereas AL and ALO remained in vivax malaria on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. In both falciparum and vivax malaria patients, there was a positive correlation between AL and total lymphocytes, but a negative correlation between AL and highest fever on admission, white blood cells, and neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets (P < 0.05. In conclusion, AL or ALO may be found in uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria mimicking dengue infection. In tropical countries where both dengue and malaria are endemic, presence of AL or ALO in any acute febrile patients with thrombocytopenia (similar to the findings in dengue malaria could not be excluded. Particularly if the patients have risk of malaria infection, confirmative microscopic examination for malaria should be carried out

  18. Reassessing risk models for atypical hyperplasia: age may not matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Emanuele; Coopey, Suzanne B; Griffin, Molly; Polubriaginof, Fernanda; Buckley, Julliette M; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Garber, Judy E; Smith, Barbara L; Gadd, Michele A; Specht, Michelle C; Guidi, Anthony; Hughes, Kevin S

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of age at diagnosis of atypical hyperplasia ("atypia", ductal [ADH], lobular [ALH], or severe ADH) on the risk of developing subsequent invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Using standard survival analysis methods, we retrospectively analyzed 1353 women not treated with chemoprevention among a cohort of 2370 women diagnosed with atypical hyperplasia to determine the risk relationship between age at diagnosis and subsequent breast cancer. For all atypia diagnoses combined, our cohort showed a 5-, 10-, and 15-year risk of invasive breast cancer or DCIS of 0.56, 1.25, and 1.30, respectively, with no significant difference in the (65,75] year age group. For women aged (35,75] years, we observed no significant difference in the 15-year risk of invasive breast cancer or DCIS after atypical hyperplasia, although the baseline risk for a 40-year-old woman is approximately 1/8 the risk of a 70-year-old woman. The risks associated with invasive breast cancer or DCIS for women in our cohort diagnosed with ADH, severe ADH, or ALH, regardless of age, were 7.6% (95% CI 5.9-9.3%) at 5 years, 25.1% (20.7-29.2%) at 10 years, and 40.1% (32.8-46.6%) at 15 years. In contrast to current risk prediction models (e.g., Gail, Tyrer-Cuzick) which assume that the risk of developing breast cancer increases in relation to age at diagnosis of atypia, we found the 15-year cancer risk in our cohort was not significantly different for women between the ages of 35 (excluded) and 75. This implies that the "hits" received by the breast tissue along the "high-risk pathway" to cancer might possibly supersede other factors such as age.

  19. THE ROLE OF ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC DECREASING AGGRESIVENESS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvita Novia Anggraini Maria

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatry disorder accompanying by alteration of mind-set, perception,  thought, and behavior. Symptom of schizophrenia can be positive symptom and negative symptom. The positive symptom often became a fear for the others, that is aggresiveness as violance, suicide, ang homicide. Aggresiveness divided in five category, that is impulsivity, affective instability, anxiety/hyperarousal, cognitive disorganization, predatory/planned aggression. Pharmacology theraphy is a choice in decreasing aggresiveness in schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotic theraphy indicate higher effectivity and fewer side effect than conventional antipsychotic.

  20. Unusual imaging presentation of infantile atypical Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nishith; Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Sinha, Mukul; Gupta, Arpita; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic medium vessel vasculitis of unknown etiology affecting children under 5 years of age. There are no specific diagnostic tests, and thus, the diagnosis of the disease is primarily made on the basis of clinical criteria. Unusual presentations of Kawasaki disease have been variably reported from different parts of the world. However, presentation of the disease in the form of peripheral thromboembolism and florid non-coronary aneurysms has rarely been described This report describes the imaging findings in infantile atypical Kawasaki disease with aneurysms of multiple medium-sized arteries, including coronary arteries, emphasizing the detection of clinically silent aneurysms in the disease.