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Sample records for atypical scrapie phenotype

  1. The natural atypical scrapie phenotype is preserved on experimental transmission and sub-passage in PRNP homologous sheep

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    Bellworthy Susan J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical scrapie was first identified in Norwegian sheep in 1998 and has subsequently been identified in many countries. Retrospective studies have identified cases predating the initial identification of this form of scrapie, and epidemiological studies have indicated that it does not conform to the behaviour of an infectious disease, giving rise to the hypothesis that it represents spontaneous disease. However, atypical scrapie isolates have been shown to be infectious experimentally, through intracerebral inoculation in transgenic mice and sheep. The first successful challenge of a sheep with 'field' atypical scrapie from an homologous donor sheep was reported in 2007. Results This study demonstrates that atypical scrapie has distinct clinical, pathological and biochemical characteristics which are maintained on transmission and sub-passage, and which are distinct from other strains of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in the same host genotype. Conclusions Atypical scrapie is consistently transmissible within AHQ homozygous sheep, and the disease phenotype is preserved on sub-passage.

  2. Atypical scrapie in sheep from a UK research flock which is free from classical scrapie

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    Ortiz-Pelaez Angel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the wake of the epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy the British government established a flock of sheep from which scrapie-free animals are supplied to laboratories for research. Three breeds of sheep carrying a variety of different genotypes associated with scrapie susceptibility/resistance were imported in 1998 and 2001 from New Zealand, a country regarded as free from scrapie. They are kept in a purpose-built Sheep Unit under strict disease security and are monitored clinically and post mortem for evidence of scrapie. It is emphasised that atypical scrapie, as distinct from classical scrapie, has been recognised only relatively recently and differs from classical scrapie in its clinical, neuropathological and biochemical features. Most cases are detected in apparently healthy sheep by post mortem examination. Results The occurrence of atypical scrapie in three sheep in (or derived from the Sheep Unit is reported. Significant features of the affected sheep included their relatively high ages (6 y 1 mo, 7 y 9 mo, 9 y 7 mo respectively, their breed (all Cheviots and their similar PRNP genotypes (AFRQ/AFRQ, AFRQ/ALRQ, and AFRQ/AFRQ, respectively. Two of the three sheep showed no clinical signs prior to death but all were confirmed as having atypical scrapie by immunohistochemistry and Western immunoblotting. Results of epidemiological investigations are presented and possible aetiologies of the cases are discussed. Conclusion By process of exclusion, a likely explanation for the three cases of atypical scrapie is that they arose spontaneously and were not infected from an exterior source. If correct, this raises challenging issues for countries which are currently regarded as free from scrapie. It would mean that atypical scrapie is liable to occur in flocks worldwide, especially in older sheep of susceptible genotypes. To state confidently that both the classical and atypical forms of scrapie are absent from a

  3. Atypical Scrapie Prions from Sheep and Lack of Disease in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human Prion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Wadsworth, Jonathan D. F.; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Spiropoulos, John; Simmons, Marion M; Griffiths, Peter C; Martin H Groschup; Hope, James; Brandner, Sebastian; Asante, Emmanuel A.; Collinge, John

    2013-01-01

    Public and animal health controls to limit human exposure to animal prions are focused on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), but other prion strains in ruminants may also have zoonotic potential. One example is atypical/Nor98 scrapie, which evaded statutory diagnostic methods worldwide until the early 2000s. To investigate whether sheep infected with scrapie prions could be another source of infection, we inoculated transgenic mice that overexpressed human prion protein with brain tissue...

  4. Epidemiological investigations on the potential transmissibility of a rare disease: the case of atypical scrapie in Great Britain.

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    Ortiz-Peláez, A; Arnold, M E; Vidal-Diez, A

    2016-07-01

    Multiple cases of atypical scrapie in the same holding and co-existence with classical scrapie have been reported in Great Britain. A two-stage simulation tool was developed by combining a sampling algorithm and a hierarchical Bayesian model to simulate the number of positive cases of atypical scrapie from: (i) random sampling and (ii) using the actual sampled population in Great Britain, being the output probability of detection of flocks with one and more cases. Cluster analysis was conducted to assess the level of geographical over- and under-sampling over the years. The probability of detecting at least two cases of atypical scrapie in the same holding is much lower in simulated random data than in simulated actual data for all scenarios. Sampling bias in the selection of sheep for testing led to multiple sampling from fewer but larger holdings, Scotland, and areas of Wales were under-sampled and the South-West and East of England oversampled. The pattern of atypical scrapie cases observed is unlikely to be explained by a multi-case event epidemiologically linked. The co-existence of classical and atypical scrapie is a rare event with 19 holdings detected in GB and does not suggest an epidemiological link between the two types of disease. PMID:26976340

  5. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Sladek, Malgorzata; Murphy, M Stephen; Escher, Johanna C; Pærregaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of...... atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  6. The prevalence of atypical scrapie in sheep from positive flocks is not higher than in the general sheep population in 11 European countries

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    Liam Barry

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decade, active surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in small ruminants has been intensive in Europe. In many countries this has led to the detection of cases of atypical scrapie which, unlike classical scrapie, might not be contagious. EU legislation requires, that following detection of a scrapie case, control measures including further testing take place in affected flocks, including the culling of genotype susceptible to classical scrapie. This might result in the detection of additional cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of additional cases in flocks affected by atypical scrapie using surveillance data collected in Europe in order to ascertain whether atypical scrapie, is contagious. Results Questionnaires were used to collect, at national level, the results of active surveillance and testing associated with flock outbreaks in 12 European countries. The mean prevalence of atypical scrapie was 5.5 (5.0-6.0 cases per ten thousand in abattoir surveillance and 8.1 (7.3-9.0 cases per ten thousand in fallen stock. By using meta-analysis, on 11 out of the 12 countries, we found that the probability of detecting additional cases of atypical scrapie in positive flocks was similar to the probability observed in animals slaughtered for human consumption (odds ratio, OR = 1.07, CI95%: 0.70-1.63 or among fallen stock (OR = 0.78, CI95%: 0.51-1.2. In contrast, when comparing the two scrapie types, the probability of detecting additional cases in classical scrapie positive flocks was significantly higher than the probability of detecting additional cases in atypical scrapie positive flocks (OR = 32.4, CI95%: 20.7-50.7. Conclusions These results suggest that atypical scrapie is not contagious or has a very low transmissibility under natural conditions compared with classical scrapie. Furthermore this study stressed the importance of standardised data collection to make good

  7. Different prion disease phenotypes result from inoculation of cattle with two temporally separated sources of sheep scrapie from Great Britain

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    Hawkins Steve AC

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the theoretical proposal that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE could have originated from sheep scrapie, this study investigated the pathogenicity for cattle, by intracerebral (i.c. inoculation, of two pools of scrapie agents sourced in Great Britain before and during the BSE epidemic. Two groups of ten cattle were each inoculated with pools of brain material from sheep scrapie cases collected prior to 1975 and after 1990. Control groups comprised five cattle inoculated with sheep brain free from scrapie, five cattle inoculated with saline, and for comparison with BSE, naturally infected cattle and cattle i.c. inoculated with BSE brainstem homogenate from a parallel study. Phenotypic characterisation of the disease forms transmitted to cattle was conducted by morphological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and biological methods. Results Disease occurred in 16 cattle, nine inoculated with the pre-1975 inoculum and seven inoculated with the post-1990 inoculum, with four cattle still alive at 83 months post challenge (as at June 2006. The different inocula produced predominantly two different disease phenotypes as determined by histopathological, immunohistochemical and Western immunoblotting methods and biological characterisation on transmission to mice, neither of which was identical to BSE. Whilst the disease presentation was uniform in all scrapie-affected cattle of the pre-1975 group, the post-1990 inoculum produced a more variable disease, with two animals sharing immunohistochemical and molecular profile characteristics with animals in the pre-1975 group. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that cattle inoculated with different pooled scrapie sources can develop different prion disease phenotypes, which were not consistent with the phenotype of BSE of cattle and whose isolates did not have the strain typing characteristics of the BSE agent on transmission to mice.

  8. Uremic parkinsonism with atypical phenotypes and radiologic features.

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    Yoon, Jee-Eun; Kim, Ji Sun; Park, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Roh, Hakjae; Park, Sung Tae; Cho, Jin Whan; Ahn, Moo-Young

    2016-04-01

    Uremic encephalopathy with bilateral basal ganglia lesions has been reported as an acute neurometabolic disease which shows reversible clinical course and brain imaging features. The exact nature and pathophysiology have not been well established. We encountered two patients who showed a relapsing and aggravating course and an atypical phenotype including parkinsonism with paroxysmal dystonic head tremor and acute onset monoparesis of the lower extremity. They also showed unusual radiological findings which revealed combined lesions in the basal ganglia and cortex, persistent hemorrhagic transformation, and focal ischemic lesion in the internal capsule. Herein, we present the unusual phenomenology with atypical radiologic findings and suggest the possible multifactorial pathogenesis of uremic encephalopathy. PMID:26631408

  9. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans. PMID:22495232

  10. Genotyping and surveillance for scrapie in Finnish sheep

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    Hautaniemi Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of scrapie is known to be influenced by the amino acid polymorphisms of the host prion protein (PrP gene. There is no breeding programme for TSE resistance in sheep in Finland, but a scrapie control programme has been in place since 1995. In this study we have analysed PrP genotypes of total of 928 purebred and crossbred sheep together with the data of scrapie survey carried out in Finland during 2002–2008 in order to gain knowledge of the genotype distribution and scrapie prevalence in Finnish sheep. Results The ARQ/ARQ genotype was the most common genotype in all breeds studied. ARR allele frequency was less than 12% in purebred Finnish sheep and in most genotypes heterozygous for ARR, the second allele was ARQ. The VRQ allele was not detected in the Grey race sheep of Kainuu or in the Aland sheep, and it was present in less than 6% of the Finnish Landrace sheep. Leucine was the most prominent amino acid found in codon 141. In addition, one novel prion dimorphisms of Q220L was detected. During the scrapie survey of over 15 000 sheep in 2002–2008, no classical scrapie cases and only five atypical scrapie cases were detected. Conclusions The results indicate that the Finnish sheep populations have genetically little resistance to classical scrapie, but no classical scrapie was detected during an extensive survey in 2002–2008. However, five atypical scrapie cases emerged; thus, the disease is present in the Finnish sheep population at a low level.

  11. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

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    Verhoeven WMA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Willem MA Verhoeven1,2, Jos IM Egger1,3,4, Marjolein H Willemsen5, Gert JM de Leijer6, Tjitske Kleefstra51Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Centre of Excellence for Neuropsychiatry, Venray, 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Rotterdam, 3Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, 4Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, 5Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, 6Dichterbij, Institutes for Intellectual Disabilities, Gennep, The NetherlandsAbstract: The 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturbances, communication deficits, and motor perseverations. Data on psychological dysfunctions are so far not available. Previous studies have suggested that the loss of one copy of the gene SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3 is related to the neurobehavioral phenotype. Additional genes proximal to SHANK3 are also likely to play a role in the phenotype of patients with larger deletions. The present paper describes two adult brothers with an identical 2.15 Mb 22qter (22q13.32q13.33 deletion, of whom the youngest was referred for evaluation of recurrent mood changes. In both patients, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed hypoplasia of the vermis cerebelli. Extensive clinical examinations led to a final diagnosis of atypical bipolar disorder, of which symptoms fully remitted during treatment with a mood stabilizer. In the older brother, a similar psychopathological picture appeared to be present, although less severe and with a later onset. It is concluded that the behavioral phenotype of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome comprises absent or delayed speech and perseverations

  12. Atypical Down syndrome phenotype in a girl with 21;21 translocation trisomy.

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    Tuysuz, B; Yavuz, A; Ozdil, M; Caferler, J; Ozon, H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a girl with microcephaly, short stature, coarse face, severe growth and developmental delay, seizures, hypertonia, bilateral flexion contractures of the knees, and a de novo 21;21 translocation trisomy 21 in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed the trisomy 21 translocation using whole chromosome painting probe 21 (WCP21). Chromosome analysis which was also performed on skin fibroblasts and revealed mosaicism for a translocation trisomy 21 cell line (22.3%) as well as a second cell line consisting of one normal chromosome 21 and a small ring chromosome 21 derived from the translocation 21q21q (61%) and a third line consisting of monosomy 21 (16.7%). FISH analyses by LS121 probe for the critical (21q22.2-22.3) region of Down syndrome (DS) on interphase blood cells resulted with 30% two signals and 70% three signals, skin fibroblasts showed 84% single signal, 9% two signals and 7% three signals. The size of ring chromosome 21 in skin fibroblasts was very small and probably there was a large, more proximally located deletion including chromosome 21q22 band. We consider that the atypical DS phenotype of the patient originated from the small ring chromosome 21 and the monosomy 21 in the skin fibroblasts and other tissues not available for analysis. Therefore, the clinical findings of the patient were most similar to monosomy 21 mosaicism syndrome. PMID:20420031

  13. Atypical phenotypes associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants and a proposal for broadening CHARGE syndrome clinical diagnostic criteria.

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    Hale, Caitlin L; Niederriter, Adrienne N; Green, Glenn E; Martin, Donna M

    2016-02-01

    CHARGE syndrome (Coloboma of the eye, Heart defects, Atresia of the choanae, Retardation of growth and/or development, Genital and/or urinary anomalies, and Ear malformations, including deafness and vestibular disorders) is a genetic condition characterized by a specific and recognizable pattern of features. Heterozygous pathogenic variants in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) are the major cause of CHARGE syndrome, and have been identified in 70-90% of individuals fulfilling clinical diagnostic criteria. Since 2004, when CHD7 was discovered as the causative gene for CHARGE syndrome, the phenotypic spectrum associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants has expanded. Predicted pathogenic CHD7 variants have been identified in individuals with isolated features of CHARGE including autism and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we present genotype and phenotype data from a cohort of 28 patients who were considered for a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, including one patient with atypical presentations and a pathogenic CHD7 variant. We also summarize published literature on pathogenic CHD7 variant positive individuals who have atypical clinical presentations. Lastly, we propose a revision to current clinical diagnostic criteria, including broadening of the major features associated with CHARGE syndrome and addition of pathogenic CHD7 variant status as a major criterion. PMID:26590800

  14. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    KAUST Repository

    Abd El Ghany, Moataz

    2016-05-25

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species.

  15. Epidemiological characteristics of classical scrapie outbreaks in 30 sheep flocks in the United Kingdom.

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    K Marie McIntyre

    Full Text Available Most previous analyses of scrapie outbreaks have focused on flocks run by research institutes, which may not reflect the field situation. Within this study, we attempt to rectify this deficit by describing the epidemiological characteristics of 30 sheep flocks naturally-infected with classical scrapie, and by exploring possible underlying causes of variation in the characteristics between flocks, including flock-level prion protein (PrP genotype profile. In total, the study involved PrP genotype data for nearly 8600 animals and over 400 scrapie cases.We found that most scrapie cases were restricted to just two PrP genotypes (ARQ/VRQ and VRQ/VRQ, though two flocks had markedly different affected genotypes, despite having similar underlying genotype profiles to other flocks of the same breed; we identified differences amongst flocks in the age of cases of certain PrP genotypes; we found that the age-at-onset of clinical signs depended on peak incidence and flock type; we found evidence that purchasing infected animals is an important means of introducing scrapie to a flock; we found some evidence that flock-level PrP genotype profile and flock size account for variation in outbreak characteristics; identified seasonality in cases associated with lambing time in certain flocks; and we identified one case that was homozygous for phenylalanine at codon 141, a polymorphism associated with a very high risk of atypical scrapie, and 28 cases that were heterozygous at this codon.This paper presents the largest study to date on commercially-run sheep flocks naturally-infected with classical scrapie, involving 30 study flocks, more than 400 scrapie cases and over 8500 PrP genotypes. We show that some of the observed variation in epidemiological characteristics between farms is related to differences in their PrP genotype profile; although much remains unexplained and may instead be attributed to the stochastic nature of scrapie dynamics.

  16. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: Atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); M.H. Willemsen; G.J.M. de Leijer (Gert); T. Kleefstra (Tjitske)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturban

  17. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.; Egger, J.I.; Willemsen, M.H.; Leijer, G.J. de; Kleefstra, T.

    2012-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturbances, communi

  18. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

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    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases. PMID:27187038

  19. Different mutations at V363 MAPT codon are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes and show unusual structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Bastone, Antonio; Piccoli, Elena; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Beeg, Marten; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Motta, Simona; Salsano, Ettore; Pareyson, Davide; Erbetta, Alessandra; Elia, Antonio Emanuele; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Silani, Vincenzo; Morelli, Claudia; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2014-02-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is one of the major genes linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a group of neurodegenerative diseases clinically, pathologically, and genetically heterogeneous. In particular, MAPT mutations give rise to the subgroup of tauopathies. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the MAPT mutations so far described are the decreased ability of tau protein to promote microtubule polymerization (missense mutations) or the altered ratio of tau isoforms (splicing mutations), both leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated filamentous tau protein. Following a genetic screening of patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration, we identified 2 MAPT mutations, V363I and V363A, leading to atypical clinical phenotypes, such as posterior cortical atrophy. We investigated in vitro features of the recombinant mutated tau isoforms and revealed unusual functional and structural characteristics such as an increased ability to promote microtubule polymerization and a tendency to form oligomeric instead of filamentous aggregates. Thus, we disclosed a greater than expected complexity of abnormal features of mutated tau isoforms. Overall our findings suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. PMID:24018212

  20. Role of Plasminogen in Propagation of Scrapie

    OpenAIRE

    Salmona, Mario; Capobianco, Raffaella; Colombo, Laura; De Luigi, Ada; Rossi, Giacomina; Mangieri, Michela; Giaccone, Giorgio; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether plasminogen may feature in scrapie infection, we inoculated plasminogen-deficient (Plg−/−), heterozygous plasminogen-deficient (Plg+/−), and wild-type (Plg+/+) mice by the intracerebral or intraperitoneal (i.p.) route with the RML scrapie strain and monitored the onset of neurological signs of disease, survival time, brain, and accumulation of scrapie disease-associated forms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Only after i.p. inoculation, a slight, although significant, diff...

  1. An atypical phenotype of hypokalemic periodic paralysis caused by a mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN4A

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yang Hee; Kim, June Bum

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an autosomal-dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic muscle weakness with hypokalemia. The respiratory and cardiac muscles typically remain unaffected, but we report an atypical case of a family with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which the affected members presented with frequent respiratory insufficiency during severe attacks. Molecular analysis revealed a heterozygous c.664 C>T transition in the sodium channel gene SCN4A, leading to an...

  2. Scrapie e seu diagnóstico diferencial em ovinos no Mato Grosso do Sul Scrapie and differential diagnosis in sheep in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Héllen M. Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie é uma doença infecciosa, neurodegenerativa fatal, causada pelo príon scrapie (PrPsc. Apresenta-se tanto na forma clássica em ovinos e caprinos geneticamente susceptíveis quanto na forma atípica em ovinos. A primeira notificação oficial do Brasil à Organização Mundial de Saúde Animal (OIE, um caso da forma clássica diagnosticado no Rio Grande do Sul ocorreu em 1985, mas a doença já havia sido diagnosticada no mesmo Estado em 1978. Este trabalho objetivou descrever dois surtos de Scrapie em ovinos em Mato Grosso do Sul (MS, Brasil e investigar, por meio de imuno-histoquímica (IHQ a presença de PrPsc no Sistema Nervoso Central (SNC de ovinos examinados entre 2003 e 2010. Na primeira parte observaram-se dois ovinos com sinais clínicos típicos de scrapie, detalhando-se os sinais neurológicos, dados epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e amostras teciduais em duplicata desses ovinos foram encaminhadas para realização de diagnóstico de Raiva e para diagnóstico IHQ para príon. Na segunda parte realizou-se levantamento de laudos de necropsia e diagnósticos histopatológicos de ovinos, no período de maio de 2003 a março de 2010. Amostras de sistema nervoso central de 51 casos foram selecionados, incluindo os dois já com diagnóstico de Scrapie mencionados acima; os tecido de todos esses ovinos foram submetidos à IHQ para detecção de proteína priônica. Os 49 ovinos avaliados apresentaram resultado negativo na IHQ para príon.Scrapie is a fatal neurodegenerative infectious disease, caused by the scrapie prion (PrPsc, that can both in the as the classic form in genetically susceptible sheep and goats and in the atypical form in sheep. The first official notification of scrapie from Brazil was made to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE in 1985, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, although the disease was first documented in this Brazilian state in 1978. The objective this paper was to describe two outbreaks

  3. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes

    OpenAIRE

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2012-01-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a ve...

  4. Role of plasminogen in propagation of scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmona, Mario; Capobianco, Raffaella; Colombo, Laura; De Luigi, Ada; Rossi, Giacomina; Mangieri, Michela; Giaccone, Giorgio; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2005-09-01

    To investigate whether plasminogen may feature in scrapie infection, we inoculated plasminogen-deficient (Plg(-/-)), heterozygous plasminogen-deficient (Plg(+/-)), and wild-type (Plg(+/+)) mice by the intracerebral or intraperitoneal (i.p.) route with the RML scrapie strain and monitored the onset of neurological signs of disease, survival time, brain, and accumulation of scrapie disease-associated forms of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Only after i.p. inoculation, a slight, although significant, difference in survival (P follicular dendritic or lymphoid cells in Plg(-/-) mice. Once the disease progressed and mice began to die of infection, differences were no longer apparent in either brains or spleens. In conclusion, our data indicate that plasminogen has no major effect on the survival of scrapie agent-infected mice. PMID:16103174

  5. Selective breeding for scrapie resistance in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Santos Sotomaior

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is determined by the host’s prion protein gene (PRNP. PRNP polymorphisms at codons 136 (alanine, A/valine, V, 154 (histidine, H/arginine, R and 171 (glutamine, Q/histidine, H/arginine, R are the main determinants of sheep susceptibility/resistance to classical scrapie. There are four major variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programs have been developed in the European Union and the USA to increase the frequency of the resistant ARR allele while decreasing the frequency of the susceptible VRQ allele in sheep populations. In Brazil, little PRNP genotyping data are available for sheep, and thus far, no controlled breeding scheme for scrapie has been implemented. This review will focus on important epidemiological aspects of scrapie and the use of genetic resistance as a tool in breeding programs to control the disease.

  6. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L that lead to atypical galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cocanougher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3–8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11–14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation.

  7. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L) that lead to atypical galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocanougher, Benjamin; Aypar, Umut; McDonald, Amber; Hasadsri, Linda; Bennett, Michael J; Edward Highsmith, W; D׳Aco, Kristin

    2015-06-01

    Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3-8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11-14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation. PMID:26217714

  8. Delineation of a recognizable phenotype for the recurrent LCR22-C to D/E atypical 22q11.2 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoa-Alonso, Amaya; Artigas-López, Mercè; Moreno-Igoa, María; Cattalli, Claudio; Hernández-Charro, Blanca; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria Antonia

    2016-06-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is typically caused by haploinsufficiency of a 3 Mb region that extends from LCR22-A until LCR22-D, while the recurrent recombination between any of the LCR22-D to H causes the 22q11.2 distal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe three patients with a de novo atypical ∼1.4 Mb 22q11.2 deletion that involves LCR22-C to a region beyond D (LCR22-C to D/E), encompassing the distal portion of the typical deleted region and the proximal portion of the distal deletion. We also review six previous published patients with the same rearrangement and compare their features with those found in patients with overlapping deletions. Patients with LCR22-C to D/E deletion present a recognizable phenotype characterized by facial dysmorphic features, high frequency of cardiac defects, including conotruncal defects, prematurity, growth restriction, microcephaly, and mild developmental delay. Genotype-phenotype analysis of the patients indicates that CRKL and MAPK1 genes play an important role as causative factors for the main clinical features of the syndrome. In particular, CRKL gene seems to be involved in the occurrence of conotruncal cardiac anomalies, mainly tetralogy of Fallot. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991864

  9. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a very unusual phenotype (dysmorphic features, ocular abnormalities, growth delay, rickets, mild mental retardation) in which a digenic inheritance was discovered. Two different, novel disease-causing mutations were detected, both inherited from the patient's healthy mother, that is a truncating mutation in the CLCN5 gene (A249fs*20) and a donor splice-site alteration in the OCRL gene (c.388+3A>G). The mRNA analysis of the patient's leukocytes revealed an aberrantly spliced OCRL mRNA caused by in-frame exon 6 skipping, leading to a shorter protein, but keeping intact the central inositol 5-phosphatase domain and the C-terminal side of the ASH-RhoGAP domain. Only wild-type mRNA was observed in the mother's leukocytes due to a completely skewed X inactivation. Our results are the first to reveal the effect of an epistatic second modifier in Dent's disease too, which can modulate its expressivity. We surmise that the severe Dent disease 2 phenotype of our patient might be due to an addictive interaction of the mutations at two different genes. PMID:23047739

  10. Surveillance and simulation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie in small ruminants in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurbriggen Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged in European cattle livestock in 1986 a fundamental question was whether the agent established also in the small ruminants' population. In Switzerland transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs in small ruminants have been monitored since 1990. While in the most recent TSE cases a BSE infection could be excluded, for historical cases techniques to discriminate scrapie from BSE had not been available at the time of diagnosis and thus their status remained unclear. We herein applied state-of-the-art techniques to retrospectively classify these animals and to re-analyze the affected flocks for secondary cases. These results were the basis for models, simulating the course of TSEs over a period of 70 years. The aim was to come to a statistically based overall assessment of the TSE situation in the domestic small ruminant population in Switzerland. Results In sum 16 TSE cases were identified in small ruminants in Switzerland since 1981, of which eight were atypical and six were classical scrapie. In two animals retrospective analysis did not allow any further classification due to the lack of appropriate tissue samples. We found no evidence for an infection with the BSE agent in the cases under investigation. In none of the affected flocks, secondary cases were identified. A Bayesian prevalence calculation resulted in most likely estimates of one case of BSE, five cases of classical scrapie and 21 cases of atypical scrapie per 100'000 small ruminants. According to our models none of the TSEs is considered to cause a broader epidemic in Switzerland. In a closed population, they are rather expected to fade out in the next decades or, in case of a sporadic origin, may remain at a very low level. Conclusions In summary, these data indicate that despite a significant epidemic of BSE in cattle, there is no evidence that BSE established in the small ruminant population in

  11. Selective breeding for scrapie resistance in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Santos Sotomaior; Fernanda Trentini Lopes Ribeiro; Rüdiger Daniel Ollhoff

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is determined by the host’s prion protein gene (PRNP). PRNP polymorphisms at codons 136 (alanine, A/valine, V), 154 (histidine, H/arginine, R) and 171 (glutamine, Q/histidine, H/arginine, R) are the main determinants of sheep susceptibility/resistance to classical scrapie. There are four major variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programs have been developed in the European Union and the USA to incre...

  12. Atypical Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Ertekin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypical depression is defined as a specifier of major depressive disorder. Columbia criteria for atypical depression are commonly used to make a diagnosis. Female sex, onset at early age, chronic course, and higher rate of comorbidity (especially anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder is noteworthy in atypical depression. Although, the atypical depression seems to support the familial genetic transition, there is not any specific study supporting these data. In the treatment of atypical depression, monoamine oxidase inhibitors are reported to be more effective than tricyclic antidepressants. In recent studies, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also proven to be efficient.

  13. Phenotypic variability in developmental coordination disorder: Clustering of generalized joint hypermobility with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, atypical swallowing and narrative difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Mari, Giorgia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celli, Mauro; Castori, Marco; Camerota, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a recognized childhood disorder mostly characterized by motor coordination difficulties. Joint hypermobility syndrome, alternatively termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly featuring generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. Although these two conditions seem apparently unrelated, recent evidence highlights a high rate of motor and coordination findings in children with gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT. Here, we investigated the prevalence of gJHM in 41 Italian children with DCD in order to check for the existence of recognizable phenotypic subgroups of DCD in relation to the presence/absence of gJHM. All patients were screened for Beighton score and a set of neuropsychological tests for motor competences (Movement Assessment Battery for Children and Visual-Motor Integration tests), and language and learning difficulties (Linguistic Comprehension Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Boston Naming Test, Bus Story Test, and Memoria-Training tests). All patients were also screening for selected JHS/EDS-HT-associated features and swallowing problems. Nineteen (46%) children showed gJHM and 22 (54%) did not. Children with DCD and gJHM showed a significant excess of frequent falls (95 vs. 18%), easy bruising (74 vs. 0%), motor impersistence (89 vs. 23%), sore hands for writing (53 vs. 9%), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (89 vs. 36%), constipation (53 vs. 0%), arthralgias/myalgias (58 vs. 4%), narrative difficulties (74 vs. 32%), and atypical swallowing (74 vs. 18%). This study confirms the non-causal association between DCD and gJHM, which, in turn, seems to increase the risk for non-random additional features. The excess of language, learning, and swallowing difficulties in patients with DCD and gJHM suggests a wider effect of lax tissues in the development of the nervous system. PMID:25821095

  14. Architecture of secondary lymphoid tissue in sheep experimentally challenged with scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Marie L; Hopkins, Lee J; Halliday, Sue; Houston, Fiona; Hunter, Nora; McConnell, Ian

    2004-02-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in which there is an accumulation of the abnormal form of the prion protein, PrPsc, in the lymphoreticular system and nervous system. There is a particular accumulation of PrPsc on follicular dendritic cells within the germinal centre of B-cell follicles. Because accumulation of PrPsc in the nervous system leads to neuronal cell loss we have examined PrPsc accumulation in the prescapular and mesenteric lymph nodes in relation to lymph node architecture of scrapie-challenged sheep. We demonstrate that an accumulation of PrPsc in the lymph node fails to result in gross defects in the microanatomy and phenotype of T- and B-cell areas in the lymph nodes. PMID:15027909

  15. An economic evaluation of preclinical testing strategies compared to the compulsory scrapie flock scheme in the control of classical scrapie.

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Boden; Ian Handel; Neil Hawkins; Fiona Houston; Helen Fryer; Rowland Kao

    2012-01-01

    Cost-benefit is rarely combined with nonlinear dynamic models when evaluating control options for infectious diseases. The current strategy for scrapie in Great Britain requires that all genetically susceptible livestock in affected flocks be culled (Compulsory Scrapie Flock Scheme or CSFS). However, this results in the removal of many healthy sheep, and a recently developed pre-clinical test for scrapie now offers a strategy based on disease detection. We explore the flock level cost-effecti...

  16. Impaired spleen structure and chemokine expression in ME7 scrapie-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soochan; Han, Sinsuk; Lee, Hyung Soo; Kim, Yong-Sun; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that prion protein-deficient (Prnp(0/0)) Zürich I mice display impaired T zone structure resulting from decreased splenic expression of the T cell homing chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21. Prions are transported to, and colonise in, the secondary lymphoid tissues. Therefore, in order to investigate how scrapie infection affects the splenic white pulp structure, we infected C57BL/6 mice with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain ME7 and analysed end-stage prion disease. We found that the white pulp regions of ME7-infected spleens were smaller, and contained markedly diminished T zones, as compared to control spleens. Although lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not affected, the expression of both CCL19 and CCL21 was decreased. In addition, the networks of follicular dendritic cells, which are known to express high levels of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and to accumulate PrP(Sc) following scrapie infection, were larger in ME7-infected spleens. Further, they were associated with increased numbers of B cells expressing high levels of IgM. These data indicate that ME7-infected spleens display phenotype characteristics different from those reported for Prnp(0/0) spleens mainly due to the gain of PrP(Sc) function and suggest that the PrP(C) is required, not only to form the splenic white pulp structure, but also to maintain the intact T zone structure. PMID:27021907

  17. Extended scrapie incubation time in goats singly heterozygous for PRNP S146 or K222

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrapie is the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of sheep and goats, and scrapie eradication in sheep is based in part on strong genetic resistance to classical scrapie. Goats may serve as a scrapie reservoir, and to date there has been no experimental inoculation confirming strong genet...

  18. 78 FR 25943 - Changes to Scrapie Flock Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Changes to Scrapie Flock Certification Program AGENCY: Animal... giving notice of changes to the Scrapie Flock Certification Program (SFCP), a voluntary program for sheep and goat flock owners who wish to reduce and/or eliminate the risk of introducing classical...

  19. Epidemiological analysis of data for scrapie in Great Britain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Donnelly, C.; Ferguson, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the control or eradication of scrapie and any other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) possibly circulating in the sheep population has become a priority in Britain and elsewhere in Europe. A better understanding of the epidemiology of scrapie would greatly aid the dev

  20. Strain typing of classical scrapie by transgenic mouse bioassay using protein misfolding cyclic amplification to replace primary passage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy E Beck

    Full Text Available According to traditional murine bioassay methodology, prions must be serially passaged within a new host before a stable phenotype, and therefore a strain, can be assigned. Prions often transmit with difficulty from one species to another; a property termed the transmission barrier. Transgenic mouse lines that over express prion protein (PrP genes of different species can circumvent the transmission barrier but serial passages may still be required, particularly if unknown strains are encountered. Here we sought to investigate whether protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA, an in-vitro method of PrP(Sc replication, could be used to replace serial passage of VRQ/VRQ classical scrapie isolates undergoing strain typing in ovine transgenic tg338 mice. Two classical scrapie field isolates that do not readily transmit to wild-type mice underwent bioassay in tg338 mice pre- and post- PMCA and the phenotype of disease in inoculated mice was compared. For one of the sources investigated, the PMCA product gave rise to the same disease phenotypes in tg338 mice as traditional bioassay, as indicated by lesion profile, IHC analysis and Western blot, whilst the second source produced phenotypic characteristics which were not identical with those that arose through traditional bioassay. These data show that differences in the efficiency of PMCA as a strain-typing tool may vary between ovine classical scrapie isolates and therefore suggest that the ability of PMCA to replace serial passage of classical scrapie in tg338 mice may depend on the strain present in the initial source.

  1. Spinal but not cortical microglia acquire an atypical phenotype with high VEGF, galectin-3 and osteopontin, and blunted inflammatory responses in ALS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemova, Maria; Small, Alissa L; Smith, Stephanie M C; Mitchell, Gordon S; Watters, Jyoti J

    2014-09-01

    Activation of microglia, CNS resident immune cells, is a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. Despite evidence that microglia contribute to disease progression, the exact role of these cells in ALS pathology remains unknown. We immunomagnetically isolated microglia from different CNS regions of SOD1(G93A) rats at three different points in disease progression: presymptomatic, symptom onset and end-stage. We observed no differences in microglial number or phenotype in presymptomatic rats compared to wild-type controls. Although after disease onset there was no macrophage infiltration, there were significant increases in microglial numbers in the spinal cord, but not cortex. At disease end-stage, microglia were characterized by high expression of galectin-3, osteopontin and VEGF, and concomitant downregulated expression of TNFα, IL-6, BDNF and arginase-1. Flow cytometry revealed the presence of at least two phenotypically distinct microglial populations in the spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry showed that galectin-3/osteopontin positive microglia were restricted to the ventral horns of the spinal cord, regions with severe motor neuron degeneration. End-stage SOD1(G93A) microglia from the cortex, a less affected region, displayed similar gene expression profiles to microglia from wild-type rats, and displayed normal responses to systemic inflammation induced by LPS. On the other hand, end-stage SOD1(G93A) spinal microglia had blunted responses to systemic LPS suggesting that in addition to their phenotypic changes, they may also be functionally impaired. Thus, after disease onset, microglia acquired unique characteristics that do not conform to typical M1 (inflammatory) or M2 (anti-inflammatory) phenotypes. This transformation was observed only in the most affected CNS regions, suggesting that overexpression of mutated hSOD1 is not sufficient to trigger these changes in microglia. These

  2. Retrovirus antigens in brains of mice with scrapie- and murine leukemia virus-induced spongiform encephalopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, P M; Pitts, O M; Rohwer, R. G.; Gajdusek, D C; Ruscetti, S K

    1982-01-01

    Wild mouse ecotropic virus-induced spongiform encephalomyelopathy pathologically similar to scrapie was associated with the expression of retrovirus antigens in mouse brains. However, scrapie-infected mice with spongiform encephalopathy showed no increased expression of retrovirus antigens in brain. Thus, the pathogenesis of the scrapie spongiform lesion does not appear to involve activation of endogenous retrovirus.

  3. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L) that lead to atypical galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Cocanougher; Umut Aypar; Amber McDonald; Linda Hasadsri; Bennett, Michael J; Edward Highsmith, W.; Kristin D׳Aco

    2015-01-01

    Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3–8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut so...

  4. Transmissibility of caprine scrapie in ovine transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Rourke Katherine I

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The United States control program for classical ovine scrapie is based in part on the finding that infection is typically spread through exposure to shed placentas from infected ewes. Transmission from goats to sheep is less well described. A suitable rodent model for examining the effect of caprine scrapie isolates in the ovine host will be useful in the ovine scrapie eradication effort. In this study, we describe the incubation time, brain lesion profile, glycoform pattern and PrPSc distribution patterns in a well characterized transgenic mouse line (Tg338 expressing the ovine VRQ prion allele, following inoculation with brain from scrapie infected goats. Results First passage incubation times of caprine tissue in Tg338 ovinized mice varied widely but second passage intervals were shorter and consistent. Vacuolation profiles, glycoform patterns and paraffin-embedded tissue blots from terminally ill second passage mice derived from sheep or goat inocula were similar. Proteinase K digestion products of murine tissue were slightly smaller than the original ruminant inocula, a finding consistent with passage of several ovine strains in previous reports. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that Tg338 mice propagate prions of caprine origin and provide a suitable baseline for examination of samples identified in the expanded US caprine scrapie surveillance program.

  5. Atypical parkinsonism: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2015-02-01

    Atypical parkinsonism comprises typically progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and mutilple system atrophy, which are distinct pathologic entities; despite ongoing research, their cause and pathophysiology are still unknown, and there are no biomarkers or effective treatments available. The expanding phenotypic spectrum of these disorders as well as the expanding pathologic spectrum of their classic phenotypes makes the early differential diagnosis challenging for the clinician. Here, clinical features and investigations that may help to diagnose these conditions and the existing limited treatment options are discussed. PMID:25432722

  6. Norwegian farmers' vigilance in reporting sheep showing scrapie-associated signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarp Jorun

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrapie is a chronic neurodegenerative disease affecting small ruminants and belongs to the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Scrapie is considered a serious animal disease and it has been notifiable in Norway since 1965. The clinical signs of scrapie might be vague and the farmers, if familiar with the signs of scrapie, are often in the best position for detecting scrapie suspects. In 2002, an anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted in order to assess Norwegian sheep farmers' vigilance of scrapie. Results Although the potential detection of a scrapie-positive animal would lead to the destruction of the sheep flock concerned, almost all the farmers (97 % expressed their willingness to report scrapie suspects. This was most certainly dependent on the Government taking the economic responsibility for the control programme as nearly all the farmers responded that this was an important condition. Listeriosis is relatively common disease in Norwegian sheep and a differential diagnosis for scrapie. In a multinomial logistic regression the reporting behaviour for non-recovering listeriosis cases, used as a measurement of willingness to report scrapie, was examined. The reporting of non-recovering listeriosis cases increased as the knowledge of scrapie-associated signs increased, and the reporting behaviour was dependent on both economic and non-economic values. Conclusion The results indicate that in 2002 almost all sheep farmers showed willingness to report any scrapie suspects. Nevertheless there is an underreporting of scrapie suspects and the farmers' awareness and hence their vigilance of scrapie could be improved. Furthermore, the results suggest that to ensure the farmers' compliance to control programmes for serious infectious diseases, the farmers' concerns of non-economic as well as economic values should be considered.

  7. Eradication of scrapie with selective breeding: are we nearly there?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidse Aart

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following EU decision 2003/100/EC Member States have recently implemented sheep breeding programmes to reduce the prevalence of sheep with TSE susceptible prion genotypes. The present paper investigates the progress of the breeding programme in the Netherlands. The PrP genotype frequencies were monitored through time using two sets of random samples: one set covers the years 2005 to 2008 and is taken from national surveillance programme; the other is taken from 168 random sheep farms in 2007. The data reveal that although the level of compliance to the breeding programme has been high, the frequency of susceptible genotypes varies substantially between farms. The 168 sheep farms are a subset of 689 farms participating in a postal survey inquiring about management and breeding strategies. This survey aimed to identify how much these strategies varied between farms, in order to inform assessment of the expected future progress towards eradication of classical scrapie. Results On the one hand, we found that compliance to the national breeding program has been high, and the frequency of resistant genotypes is expected to increase further in the next few years. On the other hand, we observed a large variation in prevalence of the scrapie resistant PrP genotype ARR between farms, implicating a large variation of genetic resistance between farms. Substantial between-flock differences in management and breeding strategies were found in the postal survey, suggesting considerable variation in risk of scrapie transmission between farms. Conclusions Our results show that although there has been a good progress in the breeding for scrapie resistance and the average farm-level scrapie susceptibility in the Netherlands has been significantly reduced, still a considerable proportion of farms contain high frequencies of susceptible genotypes in their sheep population. Since 2007 the breeding for genetic resistance is voluntarily again, and

  8. Scrapie-specific pathology of sheep lymphoid tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases often result in accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrP(d in the lymphoreticular system (LRS, specifically in association with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs and tingible body macrophages (TBMs of secondary follicles. We studied the effects of sheep scrapie on lymphoid tissue in tonsils and lymph nodes by light and electron microscopy. FDCs of sheep were grouped according to morphology as immature, mature or regressing. Scrapie was associated with FDC dendrite hypertrophy and electron dense deposit or vesicles. PrP(d was located using immunogold labelling at the plasmalemma of FDC dendrites and, infrequently, mature B cells. Abnormal electron dense deposits surrounding FDC dendrites were identified as immunoglobulins suggesting that excess immune complexes are retained and are indicative of an FDC dysfunction. Within scrapie-affected lymph nodes, macrophages outside the follicle and a proportion of germinal centre TBMs accumulated PrP(d within endosomes and lysosomes. In addition, TBMs showed PrP(d in association with the cell membrane, non-coated pits and vesicles, and also with discrete, large and random endoplasmic reticulum networks, which co-localised with ubiquitin. These observations suggest that PrP(d is internalised via the caveolin-mediated pathway, and causes an abnormal disease-related alteration in endoplasmic reticulum structure. In contrast to current dogma, this study shows that sheep scrapie is associated with cytopathology of germinal centres, which we attribute to abnormal antigen complex trapping by FDCs and abnormal endocytic events in TBMs. The nature of the sub-cellular changes in FDCs and TBMs differs from those of scrapie infected neurones and glial cells suggesting that different PrP(d/cell membrane interactions occur in different cell types.

  9. Scrapie-specific pathology of sheep lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases often result in accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrP(d)) in the lymphoreticular system (LRS), specifically in association with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and tingible body macrophages (TBMs) of secondary follicles. We studied the effects of sheep scrapie on lymphoid tissue in tonsils and lymph nodes by light and electron microscopy. FDCs of sheep were grouped according to morphology as immature, mature or regressing. Scrapie was associated with FDC dendrite hypertrophy and electron dense deposit or vesicles. PrP(d) was located using immunogold labelling at the plasmalemma of FDC dendrites and, infrequently, mature B cells. Abnormal electron dense deposits surrounding FDC dendrites were identified as immunoglobulins suggesting that excess immune complexes are retained and are indicative of an FDC dysfunction. Within scrapie-affected lymph nodes, macrophages outside the follicle and a proportion of germinal centre TBMs accumulated PrP(d) within endosomes and lysosomes. In addition, TBMs showed PrP(d) in association with the cell membrane, non-coated pits and vesicles, and also with discrete, large and random endoplasmic reticulum networks, which co-localised with ubiquitin. These observations suggest that PrP(d) is internalised via the caveolin-mediated pathway, and causes an abnormal disease-related alteration in endoplasmic reticulum structure. In contrast to current dogma, this study shows that sheep scrapie is associated with cytopathology of germinal centres, which we attribute to abnormal antigen complex trapping by FDCs and abnormal endocytic events in TBMs. The nature of the sub-cellular changes in FDCs and TBMs differs from those of scrapie infected neurones and glial cells suggesting that different PrP(d)/cell membrane interactions occur in different cell types. PMID:18074028

  10. Accumulation of Cholesterol Esters in ex vivo Lymphocytes from Scrapie-susceptible Sheep and in Scrapie-infected Mouse Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Our studies on the role of cholesterol homeostasis in the pathogenesis of scrapie in sheep, revealed abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in brains and in ex vivo skin fibroblasts from genetically scrapie-susceptible, as compared to sheep with resistant genotype. We now report that PBMCs isolated from scrapie-susceptible sheep, as well as mouse neuroblastoma cell lines persistently infected with two different mouse-adapted strains of scrapie, showed similar alterations with up to 3-fold higher cholesterol ester levels than their resistant or uninfected counterparts. Treatments with drugs that interfere with intracellular cholesterol metabolism strongly reduced accumulation of cholesterol esters in scrapie-infected cell lines, whereas had significantly lower, or no effect, in uninfected cell line. These data add support to our hypothesis that accumulation of cholesterol esters may represent a biological marker of susceptibility to prion infection and a potential molecular target for prion inhibitors.

  11. Resistance of Neonatal Mice to Scrapie Is Associated with Inefficient Infection of the Immature Spleen

    OpenAIRE

    Ierna, Michelle; Farquhar, Christine F.; Outram, George W.; Bruce, Moira E.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that neonatal mice up to about a week old are less susceptible than adult mice to infection by intraperitoneal inoculation with mouse-passaged scrapie. In peripherally inoculated adult mice, scrapie replicates in lymphoid tissues such as the spleen before invading the central nervous system. Here, we investigated scrapie susceptibility in neonatal mice in more detail, concentrating on spleen involvement. First, we demonstrated that neonatal mice are about 10 time...

  12. Scrapie-Specific Pathology of Sheep Lymphoid Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Gillian McGovern; Martin Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases often result in accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrP(d)) in the lymphoreticular system (LRS), specifically in association with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and tingible body macrophages (TBMs) of secondary follicles. We studied the effects of sheep scrapie on lymphoid tissue in tonsils and lymph nodes by light and electron microscopy. FDCs of sheep were grouped according to morphology as immature, mature or regress...

  13. Electrophoretic properties of the scrapie agent in agarose gels.

    OpenAIRE

    Prusiner, S B; Groth, D F; Bildstein, C; Masiarz, F R; McKinley, M P; Cochran, S P

    1980-01-01

    The molecular properties of the scrapie agent were investigated by subjecting partially purified preparations to electrophoresis on agarose gels. When electrophoresis was performed at room temperature in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (NaDodSO4), most of the recoverable agent was found at the top of the gel, consistent with previous studies indicating aggregation of the agent upon exposure to elevated temperatures. In addition, less than 5% of the agent applied to the gel was found af...

  14. Scrapie prevalence in sheep of susceptible genotype is declining in a population subject to breeding for resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Engel Bas; Davidse Aart; Bossers Alex; Melchior Marielle B; Hagenaars Thomas J; van Zijderveld Fred G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Susceptibility of sheep to scrapie infection is known to be modulated by the PrP genotype of the animal. In the Netherlands an ambitious scrapie control programme was started in 1998, based on genetic selection of animals for breeding. From 2002 onwards EU regulations required intensive active scrapie surveillance as well as certain control measures in affected flocks. Here we analyze the data on genotype frequencies and scrapie prevalence in the Dutch sheep population obt...

  15. A transfectant RK13 cell line permissive to classical caprine scrapie prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Zhuang, Dongyue; Truscott, Thomas C; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Schneider, David A

    2016-03-01

    To assess scrapie infectivity associated with caprine-origin tissues, bioassay can be performed using kids, lambs or transgenic mice expressing caprine or ovine prion (PRNP) alleles, but the incubation periods are fairly long. Although several classical ovine scrapie prion permissive cell lines with the ability to detect brain-derived scrapie prion have been available, no classical caprine scrapie permissive cell line is currently available. Therefore, the aims of this study were to generate a rabbit kidney epithelial cell line (RK13) stably expressing caprine wild-type PRNP (cpRK13) and then to assess permissiveness of cpRK13 cells to classical caprine scrapie prion propagation. The cpRK13 and plasmid control RK13 (pcRK13) cells were incubated with brain-derived classical caprine scrapie inocula prepared from goats or ovinized transgenic mice (Tg338, express ovine VRQ allele) infected with caprine scrapie. Significant PrP(Sc) accumulation, which is indicative of scrapie prion propagation, was detected by TSE ELISA and immunohistochemistry in cpRK13 cells inoculated with classical caprine scrapie inocula. Western blot analysis revealed the typical proteinase K-resistant 3 PrP(res) isoforms in the caprine scrapie prion inoculated cpRK13 cell lysate. Importantly, PrP(Sc) accumulation was not detected in similarly inoculated pcRK13 cells, whether by TSE ELISA, immunohistochemistry, or western blot. These findings suggest that caprine scrapie prions can be propagated in cpRK13 cells, thus this cell line may be a useful tool for the assessment of classical caprine prions in the brain tissues of goats. PMID:27216989

  16. An economic evaluation of preclinical testing strategies compared to the compulsory scrapie flock scheme in the control of classical scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Boden

    Full Text Available Cost-benefit is rarely combined with nonlinear dynamic models when evaluating control options for infectious diseases. The current strategy for scrapie in Great Britain requires that all genetically susceptible livestock in affected flocks be culled (Compulsory Scrapie Flock Scheme or CSFS. However, this results in the removal of many healthy sheep, and a recently developed pre-clinical test for scrapie now offers a strategy based on disease detection. We explore the flock level cost-effectiveness of scrapie control using a deterministic transmission model and industry estimates of costs associated with genotype testing, pre-clinical tests and the value of a sheep culled. Benefit was measured in terms of the reduction in the number of infected sheep sold on, compared to a baseline strategy of doing nothing, using Incremental Cost Effectiveness analysis to compare across strategies. As market data was not available for pre-clinical testing, a threshold analysis was used to set a unit-cost giving equal costs for CSFS and multiple pre-clinical testing (MT, one test each year for three consecutive years. Assuming a 40% within-flock proportion of susceptible genotypes and a test sensitivity of 90%, a single test (ST was cheaper but less effective than either the CSFS or MT strategies (30 infected-sales-averted over the lifetime of the average epidemic. The MT strategy was slightly less effective than the CSFS and would be a dominated strategy unless preclinical testing was cheaper than the threshold price of £6.28, but may be appropriate for flocks with particularly valuable livestock. Though the ST is not currently recommended, the proportion of susceptible genotypes in the national flock is likely to continue to decrease; this may eventually make it a cost-effective alternative to the MT or CSFS.

  17. Cholesterol Metabolism in Brain and Skin Fibroblasts from Sarda Breed Sheep With Scrapie-resistant and Scrapie-susceptible Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a fatal spongiform encephalopathy of sheep, a transmissible form of prion disease caused by neuronal accumulation of the aberrantly conformed prion protein (PrPsc. Currently, no ante-mortem diagnostic tests are available to detect this untreatable disease in the pre-clinical stage, thus making difficult to control its spread. Recent evidence suggests that the production of PrPsc can be modulated by the levels of membrane cholesterol in neuronal cells. Since cholesterol levels in cell membranes are dependent on cholesterol homeostasis in the whole organism, we studied cholesterol metabolism in brain tissues, plasma and skin fibroblasts of Sarda breed sheep with scrapie-resistant (ARR/ARR and scrapie-susceptible (ARQ/ARQ prion protein genotypes, both not infected (ARQ/ARQ- and infected (ARQ/ARQ+ with scrapie. We found that, the levels of cytoplasmic cholesterol esters (CE in brains and skin fibroblasts from sheep with the ARQ/ARQ genotype were consistently higher than those from sheep with the ARR/ARR genotype. Conversely, the levels of free cholesterol (FC were lower in ARQ/ARQ, as compared to ARR/ARR sheep, thus resulting in a sharp reduction of the FC/CE ratio. Moreover, both uninfected and infected ARQ/ARQ sheep showed abnormally low levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C in their plasma, as compared to ARR/ARR sheep. These data other than adding new strength to the notion that altered levels of intracellular cholesterol may indicate the presence of a lipid metabolic state that predisposes to infection with, and accumulation of, PrPsc in the brain, discriminate for the first time between two distinct but related cellular pools of cholesterol, namely membrane FC on one hand and cytoplasmic CE on the other.

  18. Investigation of a simple model for within-flock transmission of scrapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.J.; Windig, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic control programs for scrapie in sheep build on solid knowledge of how susceptibility to scrapie is modulated by the prion protein genotype at the level of an individual sheep. In order to satisfactorily analyze the effectivity of control programs at the population level, insight is needed at

  19. Scrapie prion liposomes and rods exhibit target sizes of 55,000 Da

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrapie is a degenerative neurologic disease in sheep and goats which can be experimentally transmitted to laboratory rodents. Considerable evidence suggests that the scrapie agent is composed largely, if not entirely, of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Inactivation of scrapie prions by ionizing radiation exhibited single-hit kinetics and gave a target size of 55,000 +/- 9000 mol wt. The inactivation profile was independent of the form of the prion. Scrapie agent infectivity in brain homogenates, microsomal fractions, detergent-extracted microsomes, purified amyloid rods, and liposomes exhibited the same inactivation profile. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious particle causing scrapie contains approximately 2 PrPSc molecules

  20. Prions in milk from ewes incubating natural scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lacroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrP(Sc accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 microg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species.

  1. Sparse PrPSc accumulation in the placentas of goats with naturally acquired scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huijan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domestic goats (Capra hircus are a natural and experimental host of scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE of sheep and cattle. Goats are also susceptible to experimental infection with the agents of TSEs of deer and elk (chronic wasting disease and humans (Creutzfeldt Jakob disease. Distribution of PrPSc, the abnormal prion protein, is similar in the tissues of scrapie-infected sheep and goats but no data are available on the potential shedding of the agent through the placenta, the presumed route of transmission of ovine scrapie. We describe the sparse accumulation of PrPSc in the placentas of goats with naturally acquired classical scrapie in comparison to field cases of classical ovine scrapie. Results PrPSc was detected in the shed placentas from a sample of U.S. goats with naturally occurring scrapie, diagnosed by antemortem lymphoid tissue biopsy or identified as high risk progeny of infected dams. PrPSc accumulation patterns in the intact placentome and western blot banding was similar in the caprine and ovine samples. However, levels of PrPSc estimated from ELISA and immunohistochemistry assays were generally lower in goats than in sheep, although wide variation was noted in both species. Conclusions PrPSc accumulates in the shed placentas of goats with naturally acquired scrapie. Although these levels were low in most caprine samples, the caprine placenta may contribute to prion contamination of kidding facilities and transmission to co-housed sheep or goats.

  2. Age, scrapie status, PrP genotype and follicular dendritic cells in ovine ileal Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marruchella, Giuseppe; Ligios, Ciriaco; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) residing within ileal Peyer's patches (PPs) are of crucial relevance for sheep scrapie early pathogenesis and subsequent scrapie prion neuroinvasion. In this study, ileal PP follicles were significantly more numerous in lambs than in adult Sarda breed sheep, with significant differences being also found in lymphoid follicle area, perimeter and FDC density. Furthermore, PrPd deposition within ileal PPs and host's PrP genotype did not significantly influence these parameters. We conclude that age significantly affects FDC density in ileal PPs from Sarda breed ovines, independently from host's scrapie status and PrP genotype. PMID:21962485

  3. Osteogenesis imperfecta: an atypical association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Mallakmir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI also known as and lsquo;brittle bone disease', is a clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder with defect in type I collagen. The more prevalent autosomal dominant forms of OI are caused by primary defects in type I collagen, while autosomal recessive forms are caused by deficiency of proteins which interact with type I procollagen for post-translational modification and/or folding. Few cases of OI associated with atypical features have been reported. We report a case of 54 days male child of OI associated with pyloric stenosis. The case probably is a form of autosomal recessive OI with severe phenotype. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 783-785

  4. Resistance of neonatal mice to scrapie is associated with inefficient infection of the immature spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierna, Michelle; Farquhar, Christine F; Outram, George W; Bruce, Moira E

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that neonatal mice up to about a week old are less susceptible than adult mice to infection by intraperitoneal inoculation with mouse-passaged scrapie. In peripherally inoculated adult mice, scrapie replicates in lymphoid tissues such as the spleen before invading the central nervous system. Here, we investigated scrapie susceptibility in neonatal mice in more detail, concentrating on spleen involvement. First, we demonstrated that neonatal mice are about 10 times less susceptible than adults to intraperitoneal scrapie inoculation. Then we injected mice intraperitoneally with a scrapie dose that produced disease in all mice inoculated at 10 days or older but in only about a third of neonatally inoculated mice. In this experiment, spleens collected 70 days after scrapie injection of mice 10 days old or older almost all contained pathological prion protein, PrPSc, and those that were bioassayed all contained high infectivity levels. In contrast, at this early stage, only two of six spleens from neonatally inoculated mice had detectable, low infectivity levels; no PrPSc was detected, even in the two spleens. Therefore, neonatal mice have an impaired ability to replicate scrapie in their spleens, suggesting that replication sites are absent or sparse at birth but mature within 10 days. The increase in susceptibility with age correlated with the first immunocytochemical detection of the normal cellular form of prion protein, PrPc, on maturing follicular dendritic cell networks. As lymphoid tissues are more mature at birth in sheep, cattle, and humans than in mice, our results suggest that in utero infection with scrapie-like agents is theoretically possible in these species. PMID:16352571

  5. Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel E Comoy; Mikol, Jacqueline; Luccantoni-Freire, Sophie; Correia, Evelyne; Lescoutra-Etchegaray, Nathalie; Durand, Valérie; Dehen, Capucine; Andreoletti, Olivier; Casalone, Cristina; Richt, Juergen A.; Greenlee, Justin J.; Baron, Thierry; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Brown, Paul; Deslys, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is the only animal prion disease reputed to be zoonotic, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans and having guided protective measures for animal and human health against animal prion diseases. Recently, partial transmissions to humanized mice showed that the zoonotic potential of scrapie might be similar to c-BSE. We here report the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to cynomolgus macaque, a highly ...

  6. Immunohistochemical detection and distribution of prion protein in a goat with natural scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Reginald A; Rock, Matthew J; Anderson, Anne K; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2003-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from a 3-year-old female Angora goat suffering from clinical scrapie were immunostained after hydrated autoclaving using a monoclonal antibody (mAb, F99/97.6.1; IgG1) specific for a conserved epitope on the prion protein. Widespread and prominent deposition of the scrapie isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) was observed in the brain, brainstem, spinal cord, retina, postganglionic neurons associated with parasympathetic ganglia of myenteric and submucosal plexuses, Peyer's patches, peripheral lymph nodes, and pharyngeal and palatine tonsils. The goat was homozygous for PrP alleles encoding 5 octapeptide repeat sequences in the N-terminal region of the prion protein and isoleucine at codon 142, a genotype associated with high susceptibility and short incubation times in goats. The results of this study indicate that mAb F99/97.6.1 is useful for detection of PrPSc deposition, and this is a specific and reliable immunohistochemical adjunct to histopathology for diagnosis of natural caprine scrapie, although precise determination of the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the assay as a diagnostic test for scrapie in goats will require examination of a sufficiently large sample size. As with ovine scrapie, prion protein is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, gastrointestinal tract, and lymphoid tissues in natural caprine scrapie. PMID:12661726

  7. Cloning of a Gene Whose Expression is Increased in Scrapie and in Senile Plaques in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietgrefe, S.; Zupancic, M.; Haase, A.; Chesebro, B.; Race, R.; Frey, W.; Rustan, T.; Friedman, R. L.

    1985-12-01

    A complementary DNA library was constructed from messenger RNA's extracted from the brains of mice infected with the scrapie agent. The library was differentially screened with the objectives of finding clones that might be used as markers of infection and finding clones of genes whose increased expression might be correlated with the pathological changes common to scrapie and Alzheimer's disease. A gene was identified whose expression is increased in scrapie. The complementary DNA corresponding to this gene hybridized preferentially and focally to cells in the brains of scrapie-infected animals. The cloned DNA also hybridized to the neuritic plaques found with increased frequency in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Rapid and discriminatory diagnosis of scrapie and BSE in retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zijderveld Fred G

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis based on prion detection in lymph nodes of sheep and goats can improve active surveillance for scrapie and, if it were circulating, for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. With sizes that allow repetitive testing and a location that is easily accessible at slaughter, retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RLN are considered suitable organs for testing. Western blotting (WB of brain homogenates is, in principle, a technique well suited to both detect and discriminate between scrapie and BSE. In this report, WB is developed for rapid diagnosis in RLN and to study biochemical characteristics of PrPres. Results Optimal PrPres detection in RLN by WB was achieved by proper tissue processing, antibody choice and inclusion of a step for PrPresconcentration. The analyses were performed on three different sheep sources. Firstly, in a study with preclinical scrapie cases, WB of RLN from infected sheep of VRQ/VRQ genotype – VRQ represents, respectively, polymorphic PrP amino acids 136, 154, and 171 – allowed a diagnosis 14 mo earlier compared to WB of brain stem. Secondly, samples collected from sheep with confirmed scrapie in the course of passive and active surveillance programmes in the period 2002–2003 yielded positive results depending on genotype: all sheep with genotypes ARH/VRQ, VRQ/VRQ, and ARQ/VRQ scored positive for PrPres, but ARQ/ARQ and ARR/VRQ were not all positive. Thirdly, in an experimental BSE study, detection of PrPres in all 11 ARQ/ARQ sheep, including 7 preclinical cases, was possible. In all instances, WB and IHC were almost as sensitive. Moreover, BSE infection could be discriminated from scrapie infection by faster electrophoretic migration of the PrPres bands. Using dual antibody staining with selected monoclonal antibodies like 12B2 and L42, these differences in migration could be employed for an unequivocal differentiation between BSE and scrapie. With respect to glycosylation of PrPres, BSE cases

  9. Scrapie pathogenesis: the role of complement C1q in scrapie agent uptake by conventional dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Sebti, Yasmine; Mitchell, Daniel A; Sim, Robert B; MacPherson, Gordon G

    2009-02-01

    Mice lacking complement components show delayed development of prion disease following peripheral inoculation. The delay could relate to reduced scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulation on follicular dendritic cells (DCs). However conventional DCs (cDCs) play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of prion diseases and complement deficiency could result in decreased PrP(Sc) uptake by cDCs in the periphery. To explore this possibility, we cultured murine splenic or gut-associated lymph node cDCs with scrapie-infected whole brain homogenate in the presence or absence of complement. Uptake decreased significantly if the serum in the cultures was heat-inactivated. Because heat inactivation primarily denatures C1q, we used serum from C1q(-/-) mice and showed that PrP(Sc) uptake was markedly decreased. PrP(Sc) internalization was saturable and temperature-dependent, suggesting receptor-mediated uptake. Furthermore, uptake characteristics differed from fluid-phase endocytosis. Immunofluorescence showed colocalization of C1q and PrP(Sc), suggesting interaction between these molecules. We evaluated the expression of several complement receptors on cDCs and confirmed that cDCs that take up PrP(Sc) express one of the C1q receptors, calreticulin. Our results show that C1q participates in PrP(Sc) uptake by cDCs, revealing a critical role for cDCs in initial prion capture, an event that takes place before the PrP(Sc) accumulation within the follicular DC network. PMID:19155476

  10. Atypical early-onset Alzheimer's disease caused by the Iranian APP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Suzanne Granhøj; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Stokholm, Jette; Schwartz, Marianne; Batbayli, Mustafa; Ballegaard, Martin; Erdal, Jesper; Krabbe, Katja; Waldemar, Gunhild

    Approximately 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's disease are inherited autosomal dominantly, and to date, three causative genes have been found, the Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, the Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene and the Amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. We describe atypical phenotypic features in a...... family with a pathogenic APP gene mutation and discuss possible explanations for these atypical features....

  11. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo; Rocca, Mara A; Miller, Andrew David; Schmierer, Klaus; Frederiksen, Jette; Gass, Achim; Gama, Hugo; Tilbery, Charles P; Rocha, Antonio J; Flores, José; Barkhof, Frederik; Seewann, Alexandra; Palace, Jacqueline; Yousry, Tarek; Montalban, Xavier; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  12. Characterization of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida by different methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, B.; Austin, D.A.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Gudmundsdottir, B.K.; Høie, S.; Thornton, J.M.; Larsen, J.L.; O'Hici, B.; Powell, R.

    1998-01-01

    Fifty two isolates of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida, recovered from a wide range of hosts and geographical locations, were heterogeneous in terms of molecular and phenotypic characteristics, and represented taxa which could not be accommodated by the current classification of four subspecies. Ge...

  13. Characterization of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida by different methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, B.; Austin, D.A.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Gudmundsdottir, B.K.; Høie, S.; Thornton, J.M.; Larsen, J.L.; O'Hici, B.; Powell, R.

    1998-01-01

    Fifty two isolates of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida, recovered from a wide range of hosts and geographical locations, were heterogeneous in terms of molecular and phenotypic characteristics, and represented taxa which could not be accommodated by the current classification of four subspecies...

  14. Atypical sporadic bovine leukosis in a beef feedlot heifer

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrick, Steven H.

    2002-01-01

    This case is considered atypical because the clinical signs are exemplary of both the systemic and localized forms of the disease. Although diseases are commonly described and differentiated as either multisystemic or localized, as demonstrated here, disease expression can be a continuum between 2 distinct phenotypes.

  15. Classical scrapie prions are associated with peripheral blood monocytes and T-lymphocytes from naturally infected sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects sheep and goats. As detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay, previous studies suggested scrapie prions in the blood of sheep might be associated with B lymphocytes but not with monocytes or T lymphocytes. The association of sc...

  16. Lack of prion accumulation in lymphoid tissues of scrapie-affected sheep with AA136, QR171 polymorphism type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy which can be transmitted horizontally through the shedding of an infectious conformer (PrP**Sc) of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP**c). Genetics profoundly influence the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie. PrP**c amino-...

  17. 76 FR 43649 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Scrapie in Sheep and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... Collection; Scrapie in Sheep and Goats; Interstate Movement Restrictions and Indemnity Program AGENCY: Animal... information collection associated with regulations for the interstate movement of sheep and goats and an...' Information Collection Coordinator, at (301) 851-2908. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Scrapie in Sheep...

  18. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination. PMID:16259408

  19. Interlaboratory trial on TSE rapid tests for the control of the Italian scrapie surveillance network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, R; Ingravalle, F; Di Vietro, D; Ru, G; Bozzetta, E

    2009-10-20

    Scrapie, a neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats and one of several transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) has been subject to mandatory active surveillance in EU through rapid testing since 2002. Regulation EC/999/2001 on TSE surveillance requires that each Member State's National Reference Laboratory for TSE periodically verifies diagnostic standards and methods by comparative testing. In 2007 the Italian Reference Centre carried out the first ring trial for classical scrapie on a set of 21 negative and 9 positive homogenated brainstems, the latter consisting of three replicates of an ARQ/ARQ scrapie positive sample diluted 1:10, 1:20 and 1:50. The purpose of the study was to verify the interlaboratory agreement in term of Cohen's kappa (k) of the rapid systems currently used by the 25 national rapid test laboratories (RTLs) [laboratories: Biorad TeSeE (17 laboratories), Enfer TSE version 2.0 (4 laboratories), Idexx Herd chek BSE-scrapie antigen kit (3 laboratories) and Prionics check LIA SR (1 laboratory)]. Our results show that the agreement among the laboratories using the same rapid test varied between 0.84 and 1, while the estimated overall agreement among the 25 laboratories was very good (k-combined=0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.89). Nevertheless, as regards differences in analytical sensitivity among the rapid tests in use, under-recognition of pre-clinical scrapie cases by lower performing systems must be expected. PMID:19457624

  20. Detection of prions in the faeces of sheep naturally infected with classical scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Linda A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Classical scrapie is a naturally transmitted prion disease of sheep and goats. Contaminated environments may contribute to the spread of disease and evidence from animal models has implicated urine, blood, saliva, placenta and faeces as possible sources of the infection. Here we sought to determine whether sheep naturally infected with classical scrapie shed prions in their faeces. We used serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA along with two extraction methods to examine faeces from sheep during both the clinical and preclinical phases of the disease and showed amplification of PrPSc in 7 of 15 and 14 of 14 sheep respectively. However PrPSc was not amplified from the faeces of 25 sheep not exposed to scrapie. These data represent the first demonstration of prion shedding in faeces from a naturally infected host and thus a likely source of prion contamination in the environment.

  1. Intracerebral administration of Interleukin-12 (IL-12 and IL-18 modifies the course of mouse scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartoni Claudia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion diseases are characterised by a neurodegenerative pattern in which the function of immune system remains still elusive. In the present study, we evaluate if an exogenous treatment with Interleukin-12 (IL-12 and IL-18, able to activate microglia, is able to affect scrapie pathogenesis. Results Cytokines injected intracranially, induced a strong inflammatory response characterised by TNF-�� production and microglia activation. Two groups of mice were injected intracerebrally with high dose of ME7 strain of scrapie containing IL-12 and IL-18 or sterile saline. Cytokines-treated mice showed a more pronounced accumulation of PrPSc in brain tissues at 90 days post-inoculation and a shorter mean survival times than untreated mice. Conclusion We can conclude that intracerebral administration of IL-12 and IL-18 can modulate scrapie pathogenesis possibly through a microglia-mediated pattern.

  2. Dengue fever: atypical manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataraj Gangasiddaiah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is affecting millions of population globally. For the past one decade, we have seen several outbreaks and even causing significant mortality of affected population. We witnessed numerous pattern and multisystem presentation of dengue in this period. The CNS manifestation like encephalitis, polyneuropathy (GB like syndrome and paresthesias were uncommonly reported priorly. Pancreatitis, polyserositis, carditis of varying severity and hepatic failure are the, some of atypical manifestations observed in recent out breaks. So dengue illness can presents with multi system involvement and can account to significant mortality. Here an attempt was done to present varying, uncommon and atypical manifestation of dengue illness. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1804-1806

  3. Endocervical Atypical Polypoid Adenomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapas, Athanasios; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Athanasiou, Stavros; Loutradis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Atypical polypoid adenomyomas (APAMs) are rare uterine tumors that occur predominantly in premenopausal women, with less than 250 cases reported so far, worldwide. They may recur after treatment, and they may coexist with, or precede development of an endometrial adenocarcinoma. For this reason cases managed with conservative surgery or medical therapies require long-term follow-up. We report the case of a 41 years old nulliparous patient who during a diagnostic hysteroscopy was found with an endocervical atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APAM). The patient was desirous of a pregnancy, reported menometrorrhagia, and had a coexistent 5 cm, grade 2, submucous myoma, 3 endometrial polyps, and diffuse adenomyosis. She was treated with hysteroscopic resection of the APAM and polyps, plus laparoscopic myomectomy and wedge resection of adenomyosis. She is on an IVF list and after 4 months she is symptoms-free. PMID:26304721

  4. Atypical femoral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, Sandro; Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Luciani, Deianira; Mazzotti, Antonio; Donati, Davide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) represent the most widely used therapy for osteoporosis. Recently, a relationship between long-term treatment with BPs and a subset of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) from below the lesser trochanter to the sovracondilar line has been described. Many etiopathogenetic theories have been invoked to explain AFFs: reduced bone turnover and increased osteoblast bone apposition with accumulation of microdamage and decreased bone toughness with subsequent increased risk of mi...

  5. Conns' syndrome - atypical presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary hyperaldosteronism (Conns' syndrome) commonly presents with a combination of clinical features of hypokalemia and hypertension. Atypical presentations like normotension, normokalemia and neurological ailments are described in few cases. We encountered two such cases, the first presenting with acute neurological complaint and second case having insignificant hypertension. Both the patients had a characteristic biochemical and imaging profile consistent with primary hyperaldosteronism and responded to surgical resection of adrenal adenoma. (author)

  6. Atypical presentations of neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system classically characterized by acute, severe episodes of optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. The identification of an autoantibody exclusively detected in NMO patients against aquaporin-4 (AQP-4 has allowed identification of cases beyond the classical phenotype. Brain lesions, once thought as infrequent, can be observed in NMO patients, but lesions have different characteristics from the ones seen in multiple sclerosis. Additionally, some AQP-4 antibody positive patients may present with a variety of symptoms not being restricted to optic neuritis and acute myelitis during the first attack or in a relapse. Examples are not limited to, but may include patients only with brain and/or brainstem lesions, narcolepsy with hypothalamic lesions or patients with intractable hiccups, nausea and vomiting. The prompt identification of NMO patients with atypical presentations may benefit these patients with institution of early treatment to reduce disability and prevent further attacks.

  7. Diagnóstico Preclínico de Scrapie mediante inmunohistoquímica

    OpenAIRE

    Farias Roldán, Gustavo Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    El scrapie clásico producido por priones, es una enfermedad neurodegenerativa fatal que afecta a ovinos y caprinos, caracterizada por presentar un largo periodo de incubación, posterior a lo cual es posible el diagnóstico con la aparición gradual de los signos clínicos y las alteraciones neurológicas. La principal vía de transmisión entre los animales es la oral. En Chile el scrapie no ha sido descrito, por tanto, al tratarse de una región con baja probabilidad de encontrar ...

  8. In vitro amplification of ovine prions from scrapie-infected sheep from Great Britain reveals distinct patterns of propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorne Leigh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA is a method that facilitates the detection of prions from many sources of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE. Sheep scrapie represents a unique diversity of prion disease agents in a range of susceptible PRNP genotypes. In this study PMCA was assessed on a range of Great Britain (GB sheep scrapie isolates to determine the applicability to veterinary diagnosis of ovine TSE. Results PrPSc amplification by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA was assessed as a diagnostic tool for field cases of scrapie. The technique was initially applied to thirty-seven isolates of scrapie from diverse geographical locations around GB, and involved sheep of various breeds and PRNP genotypes. All samples were amplified in either VRQ and/or ARQ PrPC substrate. For PrPSc from sheep with at least one VRQ allele, all samples amplified efficiently in VRQ PrPC but only PrPSc from ARH/VRQ sheep amplified in both substrates. PrPSc from ARQ/ARQ sheep displayed two amplification patterns, one that amplified in both substrates and one that only amplified in ARQ PrPC. These amplification patterns were consistent for a further 14/15 flock/farm mates of these sheep. Furthermore experimental scrapie strains SSBP1, Dawson, CH1641 and MRI were analysed. SSBP1 and Dawson (from VRQ/VRQ sheep amplified in VRQ but not ARQ substrate. MRI scrapie (from ARQ/ARQ sheep nor CH1641 did not amplify in ARQ or VRQ substrate; these strains required an enhanced PMCA method incorporating polyadenylic acid (poly(A to achieve amplification. Conclusions PrPsc from 52 classical scrapie GB field isolates amplified in VRQ or ARQ or both substrates and supports the use of PMCA as a rapid assay for the detection of a wide range of ovine classical scrapie infections involving multiple PRNP genotypes and scrapie strains.

  9. Cytokine antibody array analysis in brain and periphery of scrapie-infected Tg338 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) that affects sheep and goats. While a change in prion protein conformation has been established as an important aspect of disease, other aspects of TSE pathogenesis are not fully understood. The preset study used protei...

  10. Intraepithelial and interstitial deposition of pathological prion protein in kidneys of scrapie-affected sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciriaco Ligios

    Full Text Available Prions have been documented in extra-neuronal and extra-lymphatic tissues of humans and various ruminants affected by Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE. The presence of prion infectivity detected in cervid and ovine blood tempted us to reason that kidney, the organ filtrating blood derived proteins, may accumulate disease associated PrP(Sc. We collected and screened kidneys of experimentally, naturally scrapie-affected and control sheep for renal deposition of PrP(Sc from distinct, geographically separated flocks. By performing Western blot, PET blot analysis and immunohistochemistry we found intraepithelial (cortex, medulla and papilla and occasional interstitial (papilla deposition of PrP(Sc in kidneys of scrapie-affected sheep. Interestingly, glomerula lacked detectable signals indicative of PrP(Sc. PrP(Sc was also detected in kidneys of subclinical sheep, but to significantly lower degree. Depending on the stage of the disease the incidence of PrP(Sc in kidney varied from approximately 27% (subclinical to 73.6% (clinical in naturally scrapie-affected sheep. Kidneys from flocks without scrapie outbreak were devoid of PrP(Sc. Here we demonstrate unexpectedly frequent deposition of high levels of PrP(Sc in ovine kidneys of various flocks. Renal deposition of PrP(Sc is likely to be a pre-requisite enabling prionuria, a possible co-factor of horizontal prion-transmission in sheep.

  11. Detection of PrPres in genetically susceptible fetuses from sheep with natural scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carmen Garza

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy with a wide PrPres dissemination in many non-neural tissues and with high levels of transmissibility within susceptible populations. Mechanisms of transmission are incompletely understood. It is generally assumed that it is horizontally transmitted by direct contact between animals or indirectly through the environment, where scrapie can remain infectious for years. In contrast, in utero vertical transmission has never been demonstrated and has rarely been studied. Recently, the use of the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique (PMCA has allowed prion detection in various tissues and excretions in which PrPres levels have been undetectable by traditional assays. The main goal of this study was to detect PrPres in fetal tissues and the amniotic fluid from natural scrapie infected ewes using the PMCA technique. Six fetuses from three infected pregnant ewes in an advanced clinical stage of the disease were included in the study. From each fetus, amniotic fluid, brain, spleen, ileo-cecal valve and retropharyngeal lymph node samples were collected and analyzed using Western blotting and PMCA. Although all samples were negative using Western blotting, PrPres was detected after in vitro amplification. Our results represent the first time the biochemical detection of prions in fetal tissues, suggesting that the in utero transmission of scrapie in natural infected sheep might be possible.

  12. Experimental transmission of U.S. scrapie agent to neonatal sheep by oral route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), is a naturally occurring fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. This study documents incubation periods, pathological findings and distribution of abnormal prion proteins (PrP**Sc) by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in tiss...

  13. Manipulation of PrPres production in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bate, C.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Williams, A.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study the accumulation of protease resistant prion protein (PrPres) in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells (ScN2a cells) was shown to be dependent on culture conditions. The highest levels of PrPres were found in slow growing cells. Further increases in PrPres accumulation were obser

  14. Scrapie in France: some possible predisposing factors in the naturally-acquired disease of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, J; Delasnerie-Laupretre, N; Cathala, F; Brown, P

    1983-10-01

    A nationwide survey of the occurrence of scrapie in France during the 12-year period 1968-1979 has shown the disease to be more widespread than previously thought. The data suggest that certain sheep raising practices, such as transhumance (nomadic grazing), pen and pasture alternations, and use of animals for milk production, may play a possible role in disease prevalence. PMID:6685940

  15. Deletion of protease-activated receptor 2 prolongs survival of scrapie-inoculated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, R.; Olejár, Tomáš; Janoušková, O.; Holada, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 9 (2012), s. 2057-2061. ISSN 0022-1317 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : protease-activated receptor (PAR2) * scrapie * neurodegenerative disorders Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Disease s ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 3.127, year: 2012

  16. Oral scrapie infection modifies the homeostasis of Peyer's patches' dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorban, Gauthier; Defaweux, Valérie; Levavasseur, Etienne; Demonceau, Caroline; Thellin, Olivier; Flandroy, Sylvain; Piret, Joëlle; Falisse, Nandini; Heinen, Ernst; Antoine, Nadine

    2007-09-01

    In transmitted prion diseases the immune system supports the replication and the propagation of the pathogenic agent (PrPSc). DCs, which are mobile cells present in large numbers within lymph organs, are suspected to carry prions through the lymphoid system and to transfer them towards the peripheral nervous system. In this study, C57Bl/6 mice were orally inoculated with PrPSc (scrapie strain 139A) and sacrificed at the preclinical stages of the disease. Immunolabelled cryosections of Peyer's patches were analysed by confocal microscopy. Membrane prion protein expression was studied by flow cytometry. In Peyer's patches (PP), dissected at day one and day 105 after oral exposure to scrapie, we observed an increased population of DCs localised in the follicular-associated epithelium. On day 105, PrPSc was found in the follicles inside the PP of prion-infected mice. A subset of Peyer's patches DCs, which did not express cellular prion protein on their surface in non-infected mice conditions, was prion-positive in scrapie conditions. Within Peyer's patches oral scrapie exposure thus induced modifications of the homeostasis of DCs at the preclinical stages of the disease. These results give new arguments in favour of the implication of DCs in prion diseases. PMID:17622551

  17. Murine scrapie infection causes an abnormal germinal centre reaction in the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, G; Brown, K L; Bruce, M E; Jeffrey, M

    2004-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) of the lymphoreticular system play a role in the peripheral replication of prion proteins in some transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including experimental murine scrapie models. Disease-specific PrP (PrPd) accumulation occurs in association with the plasmalemma and extracellular space around FDC dendrites, but no specific immunological response has yet been reported in animals affected by TSEs. In the present study, morphology (light microscopical and ultrastructural) of secondary lymphoid follicles of the spleen were examined in mice infected with the ME7 strain of scrapie and in uninfected control mice, with or without immunological stimulation with sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), at 70 days post-inoculation or at the terminal stage of disease (268 days). Scrapie infection was associated with hypertrophy of FDC dendrites, increased retention of electron-dense material at the FDC plasma membrane, and increased maturation and numbers of B lymphocytes within secondary follicles. FDC hypertrophy was particularly conspicuous in immune-stimulated ME7-infected mice. The electron-dense material was associated with PrP Napoli accumulation, as determined by immunogold labelling. We hypothesize that immune system changes are associated with increased immune complex trapping by hypertrophic FDCs expressing PrP Napoli molecules at the plasmalemma of dendrites, and that this process is exaggerated by immune system stimulation. Contrary to previous dogma, these results show that a pathological response within the immune system follows scrapie infection. PMID:15003476

  18. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  19. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  20. Biology of PrPsc accumulation in two natural scrapie-infected sheep flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, Patrick; O'Rourke, Katherine; Wolf, Cynthia; Shaw, Daniel; Baszler, Timothy V

    2004-11-01

    Sheep scrapie is a prion disease that requires interaction of exogenous prions with host prion protein (PrP) supporting prion formation. Disease is associated with deposition of a host-generated conformational variant of PrP, PrPsc, in a variety of tissues, including brain, resulting in fatal spongiform encephalopathy. Efficiency of PrPsc formation is determined by polymorphisms in the PrP-coding sequence. This article adds to previous data of natural sheep scrapie, concentrating on the effect of host genotype and age on PrPsc accumulation patterns during preclinical and clinical disease. Two entire scrapie-infected, predominantly Suffolk-cross, sheep flocks euthanized for regulatory purposes were genotyped and analyzed for PrPsc deposition in various tissues using single- and dual-label immunohistochemistry. Scrapie, as defined by PrPsc deposition, occurred in 13/80 sheep. Preclinical disease was evident in nearly 70% of infected sheep, ranging in age from 14 months to 7 years. PrPsc accumulated systemically in the nervous tissue, various lymphoid tissues, both alimentary tract related and non-alimentary tract related, and the placenta. Clinical neurological illness was always associated with spongiform encephalopathy and PrPsc deposition in the brain. Only 6 of 9 sheep with preclinical scrapie had PrPsc deposition in the brain but widespread PrPsc deposition in peripheral lymphoid tissue, supporting previous data showing peripheral PrPsc accumulation preceding deposition in the brain. PrPsc colocalized with a marker for follicular dendritic cells throughout the lymphoid system. PrPsc also accumulated in the peripheral nervous system, particularly the nervous supply of the gastrointestinal tract. Abundant PrPsc was evident in trophoblast cells of placentomes but not in the endometrium, myometrium, or associated nervous plexus. PrPsc deposits were not observed in the mammary parenchyma or bone marrow. Scrapie susceptibility was defined genetically by PrP codon 171

  1. Scrapie e seu diagnóstico diferencial em ovinos no Mato Grosso do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héllen M. Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie é uma doença infecciosa, neurodegenerativa fatal, causada pelo príon scrapie (PrPsc. Apresenta-se tanto na forma clássica em ovinos e caprinos geneticamente susceptíveis quanto na forma atípica em ovinos. A primeira notificação oficial do Brasil à Organização Mundial de Saúde Animal (OIE, um caso da forma clássica diagnosticado no Rio Grande do Sul ocorreu em 1985, mas a doença já havia sido diagnosticada no mesmo Estado em 1978. Este trabalho objetivou descrever dois surtos de Scrapie em ovinos em Mato Grosso do Sul (MS, Brasil e investigar, por meio de imuno-histoquímica (IHQ a presença de PrPsc no Sistema Nervoso Central (SNC de ovinos examinados entre 2003 e 2010. Na primeira parte observaram-se dois ovinos com sinais clínicos típicos de scrapie, detalhando-se os sinais neurológicos, dados epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e amostras teciduais em duplicata desses ovinos foram encaminhadas para realização de diagnóstico de Raiva e para diagnóstico IHQ para príon. Na segunda parte realizou-se levantamento de laudos de necropsia e diagnósticos histopatológicos de ovinos, no período de maio de 2003 a março de 2010. Amostras de sistema nervoso central de 51 casos foram selecionados, incluindo os dois já com diagnóstico de Scrapie mencionados acima; os tecido de todos esses ovinos foram submetidos à IHQ para detecção de proteína priônica. Os 49 ovinos avaliados apresentaram resultado negativo na IHQ para príon.

  2. Classical scrapie prions in ovine blood are associated with B lymphocytes and platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dassanayake Rohana P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats characterized by cellular accumulation of abnormal isoforms of prion protein (PrPSc in the central nervous system and the follicles of peripheral lymphoid tissues. Previous studies have shown that the whole blood and buffy coat blood fraction of scrapie infected sheep harbor prion infectivity. Although PrPSc has been detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, plasma, and more recently within a subpopulation of B lymphocytes, the infectivity status of these cells and plasma in sheep remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether circulating PBMCs, B lymphocytes and platelets from classical scrapie infected sheep harbor prion infectivity using a sheep bioassay. Results Serial rectal mucosal biopsy and immunohistochemistry were used to detect preclinical infection in lambs transfused with whole blood or blood cell fractions from preclinical or clinical scrapie infected sheep. PrPSc immunolabeling was detected in antemortem rectal and postmortem lymphoid tissues from recipient lambs receiving PBMCs (15/15, CD72+ B lymphocytes (3/3, CD21+ B lymphocytes (3/3 or platelet-rich plasma (2/3 fractions. As expected, whole blood (11/13 and buffy coat (5/5 recipients showed positive PrPSc labeling in lymphoid follicles. However, at 549 days post-transfusion, PrPSc was not detected in rectal or other lymphoid tissues in three sheep receiving platelet-poor plasma fraction. Conclusions Prion infectivity was detected in circulating PBMCs, CD72+ pan B lymphocytes, the CD21+ subpopulation of B lymphocytes and platelet-rich plasma of classical scrapie infected sheep using a sheep bioassay. Combining platelets with B lymphocytes might enhance PrPSc detection levels in blood samples.

  3. Dermatofibroma: Atypical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Roy Bandyopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma.

  4. Dermatofibroma: Atypical Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Mousumi Roy; Besra, Mrinal; Dutta, Somasree; Sarkar, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma. PMID:26955137

  5. Active Surveillance for Scrapie by Third Eyelid Biopsy and Genetic Susceptibility Testing of Flocks of Sheep in Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rourke, Katherine I.; Duncan, John V.; Logan, James R.; Anderson, Anne K.; Norden, Dianne K.; Williams, Elizabeth S.; Combs, Bret A.; Stobart, Robert H.; Moss, Gary E.; Sutton, Diane L

    2002-01-01

    Control of scrapie, an ovine transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disorder, has been hampered by the lack of conventional antemortem diagnostic tests. Currently, scrapie is diagnosed by postmortem examination of the brain and lymphoid tissues for PrPSc, the protein marker for this group of disorders. For live, asymptomatic sheep, diagnosis using tonsil or third-eyelid lymphoid tissue biopsy and PrPSc assay has been described. To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of third-eyeli...

  6. Insights into the role of “prion-like” genes and proteins on scrapie susceptibility and ram fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Pimenta, Jorge Manuel Botelho Garcia Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Tese de Douoramento em Ciências Veterinárias. Especialidade de Produção Animal The established association between polymorphisms of prnp prion gene and susceptibility to scrapie disease in sheep prompted the development of breeding programmes aimed at increasing the natural resistance to scrapie in the European Union. In order to study the possible undesirable consequences from the widespread selection for the prnp genotype on ovine genetic diversity and reproduction, we primarily focused ...

  7. In vitro Expression in Eukaryotic Cells of a Prion Protein Gene Cloned from Scrapie-Infected Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, Byron; Race, Richard E.; Vogel, Mari; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1988-07-01

    It has been proposed that the causative agent of scrapie represents a class of infectious particle that is devoid of nucleic acid and that an altered form of the endogenous prion protein (PrP) is the agent. However, it has been difficult to exclude the possibility that PrP purified from scrapie tissues might be contaminated with a more conventional viral agent. To obtain PrP uncontaminated by scrapie-infected tissues, PrP cDNA cloned from a scrapie-infected mouse brain was expressed in mouse C127 cells in vitro. mRNA and protein encoded by the cloned PrP gene were identified. The expressed PrP polypeptides appeared to be glycosylated and were released from the cell surface into the medium. Homogenates of the cells expressing the cloned PrP gene were inoculated into susceptible mice but failed to induce clinical signs of scrapie. Thus, either PrP is not the transmissible agent of scrapie or the expressed PrP requires additional modification to be infectious.

  8. Features of follicular dendritic cells in ovine pharyngeal tonsil: An in vivo and in vitro study in the context of scrapie pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Toppets, Vinciane; Defaweux, Valérie; Piret, Joëlle; Kirschvinkc, Nathalie; Grobet, Luc; Antoine, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    Although the alimentary tract has been suggested as the most likely portal of entry in natural scrapie, a growing amount of data indicates that the respiratory system and more specifically the pharyngeal tonsils serve as a natural portal of entry for scrapie. This study describes for the first time the broad cell populations in the lymphoid compartment of pharyngeal tonsils and more specifically inside the lymphoid follicles where the scrapie agent accumulates during the period...

  9. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümmü Sena Sarı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was first reported in the 1970s in mostly kids should be considered for differential diagnosis in adult cases presenting with high fever, atypical rash and pneumonia even if patients have a history of immunization

  10. Comparison of strategies for substantiating freedom from scrapie in a sheep flock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducrot Christian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The public health threat represented by a potential circulation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent in sheep population has led European animal health authorities to launch large screening and genetic selection programmes. If demonstrated, such a circulation would have dramatic economic consequences for sheep breeding sector. In this context, it is important to evaluate the feasibility of qualification procedures that would allow sheep breeders demonstrating their flock is free from scrapie. Classical approaches, based on surveys designed to detect disease presence, do not account for scrapie specificities: the genetic variations of susceptibility and the absence of live diagnostic test routinely available. Adapting these approaches leads to a paradoxical situation in which a greater amount of testing is needed to substantiate disease freedom in genetically resistant flocks than in susceptible flocks, whereas probability of disease freedom is a priori higher in the former than in the latter. The goal of this study was to propose, evaluate and compare several qualification strategies for demonstrating a flock is free from scrapie. Results A probabilistic framework was defined that accounts for scrapie specificities and allows solving the preceding paradox. Six qualification strategies were defined that combine genotyping data, diagnostic tests results and flock pedigree. These were compared in two types of simulated flocks: resistant and susceptible flocks. Two strategies allowed demonstrating disease freedom in several years, for the majority of simulated flocks: a strategy in which all the flock animals are genotyped, and a strategy in which only founders animals are genotyped, the flock pedigree being known. In both cases, diagnostic tests are performed on culled animals. The less costly strategy varied according to the genetic context (resistant or susceptible and to the relative costs of a genotyping exam and of a

  11. Short-term study of the uptake of PrPSc by the Peyer’s patches in hamsters after oral exposure to scrapie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Ann-Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2006-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) has been detected in the ileal Peyer's patches of lambs as early as one week after oral exposure to scrapie. In hamsters, the earliest reported time of PrPSc detection in the Peyer's patches after oral exposure to scrapie is 69 days post-infection. To...... scrapie agent. PrPSc was demonstrated in the Peyer's patches only a few days after exposure, i.e., much earlier than previously reported. This study Supports the view that the Peyer's patches constitute at least one of the primary entry sites of PrPSc after oral exposure to scrapie....

  12. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmü Sena Sarı; Figen Kaptan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was ...

  13. Scrapie affects the maturation cycle and immune complex trapping by follicular dendritic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Gillian; Mabbott, Neil; Jeffrey, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS). Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrP(d) accumulations within the LRS are associated with morphological changes to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and tingible body macrophages (TBMs). Here we examined FDCs and TBMs in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of scrapie-affected mice by light and electron microscopy. In MLNs from uninfected mice, FDCs could be morphologically categorised into immature, mature and regressing forms. However, in scrapie-affected MLNs this maturation cycle was adversely affected. FDCs characteristically trap and retain immune complexes on their surfaces, which they display to B-lymphocytes. In scrapie-affected MLNs, some FDCs were found where areas of normal and abnormal immune complex retention occurred side by side. The latter co-localised with PrP(d) plasmalemmal accumulations. Our data suggest this previously unrecognised morphology represents the initial stage of an abnormal FDC maturation cycle. Alterations to the FDCs included PrP(d) accumulation, abnormal cell membrane ubiquitin and excess immunoglobulin accumulation. Regressing FDCs, in contrast, appeared to lose their membrane-attached PrP(d). Together, these data suggest that TSE infection adversely affects the maturation and regression cycle of FDCs, and that PrP(d) accumulation is causally linked to the abnormal pathology observed. We therefore support the hypothesis that TSEs cause an abnormality in immune function. PMID:19997557

  14. Scrapie affects the maturation cycle and immune complex trapping by follicular dendritic cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS. Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrP(d accumulations within the LRS are associated with morphological changes to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs and tingible body macrophages (TBMs. Here we examined FDCs and TBMs in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs of scrapie-affected mice by light and electron microscopy. In MLNs from uninfected mice, FDCs could be morphologically categorised into immature, mature and regressing forms. However, in scrapie-affected MLNs this maturation cycle was adversely affected. FDCs characteristically trap and retain immune complexes on their surfaces, which they display to B-lymphocytes. In scrapie-affected MLNs, some FDCs were found where areas of normal and abnormal immune complex retention occurred side by side. The latter co-localised with PrP(d plasmalemmal accumulations. Our data suggest this previously unrecognised morphology represents the initial stage of an abnormal FDC maturation cycle. Alterations to the FDCs included PrP(d accumulation, abnormal cell membrane ubiquitin and excess immunoglobulin accumulation. Regressing FDCs, in contrast, appeared to lose their membrane-attached PrP(d. Together, these data suggest that TSE infection adversely affects the maturation and regression cycle of FDCs, and that PrP(d accumulation is causally linked to the abnormal pathology observed. We therefore support the hypothesis that TSEs cause an abnormality in immune function.

  15. Scrapie Affects the Maturation Cycle and Immune Complex Trapping by Follicular Dendritic Cells in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gillian McGovern; Neil Mabbott; Martin Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS). Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrP(d) accumulations within the LRS are associated with...

  16. Accumulation and dissemination of prion protein in experimental sheep scrapie in the natural host

    OpenAIRE

    Warner Richard; Heasman Lindsay; Dexter Glenda E; Ryder Stephen J; Moore S Jo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In order to study the sites of uptake and mechanisms of dissemination of scrapie prions in the natural host under controlled conditions, lambs aged 14 days and homozygous for the VRQ allele of the PrP gene were infected by the oral route. Infection occurred in all lambs with a remarkably short and highly consistent incubation period of approximately 6 months. Challenge of lambs at approximately eight months of age resulted in disease in all animals, but with more variable ...

  17. Distribution of Peripheral PrP Sc in Sheep with Naturally Acquired Scrapie

    OpenAIRE

    Garza, María Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Marín, Belén; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system is the hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, in some of these diseases such as scrapie or chronic wasting disease, the PrPSc can also accumulate in other tissues, particularly in the lymphoreticular system. In recent years, PrPSc in organs other than nervous and lymphoid have been described, suggesting that distribution of this protein in affected individuals may be much larger than previously though...

  18. Interlaboratory trial on TSE rapid tests for the control of the Italian scrapie surveillance network

    OpenAIRE

    Nappi, R.; Ingravalle, F; Di Vietro, D.; G.Ru,; Bozzetta, E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Scrapie, a neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats and one of several transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and monitored in EU through has been subject to mandatory active surveillance since 2002. Regulation EC/999/2001 on TSE surveillance requires that each Member State's National Reference Laboratory for TSE periodically verifies diagnostic standards and methods by comparative testing. In 2007 the Italian Reference Centre carried out the first ring trial...

  19. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja M Oelschlegel

    Full Text Available Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice. We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  20. Detection and clinical evolution of scrapie in sheep by 3rd eyelid biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco; Luján, Lluís; Bolea, Rosa; Monleón, Eva; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Fernández, Antonio; De Blas, Ignacio; Badiola, Juan José

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this article was to characterize the clinical evolution of scrapie in naturally affected sheep. Eighteen sheep with scrapie diagnosed by examination of 3rd eyelid biopsy and 12 control ewes were studied throughout the duration of their disease. Diagnosis was confirmed postmortem by histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analysis of nervous tissue. Complete clinical examinations were performed every 2 weeks for each animal, of which 3 clinical examinations per animal are reported. Those clinical signs that showed a significant frequency within the corresponding clinical examination were considered representative of each stage of the disease (ie, early, middle, and late). The representative clinical signs for the early stage were hypoesthesia in the limbs, alteration of mental status, and a body condition score gait abnormalities, and teeth grinding. On the basis of these results, we propose the calculation of an objective clinical index that allows the differentiation among clinical stages and that could be useful for further studies. The usefulness of 3rd eyelid lymphoid tissue biopsies for sequential clinical studies in naturally scrapie-affected sheep is demonstrated. PMID:16496940

  1. Gene expression alterations in brains of mice infected with three strains of scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Race Richard E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders which occur in humans and various animal species. Examples include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD in deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep, and experimental mice. To gain insights into TSE pathogenesis, we made and used cDNA microarrays to identify disease-associated alterations in gene expression. Brain gene expression in scrapie-infected mice was compared to mock-infected mice at pre-symptomatic and symptomatic time points. Three strains of mouse scrapie that show striking differences in neuropathology were studied: ME7, 22L, and Chandler/RML. Results In symptomatic mice, over 400 significant gene expression alterations were identified. In contrast, only 22 genes showed significant alteration in the pre-symptomatic animals. We also identified genes that showed significant differences in alterations in gene expression between strains. Genes identified in this study encode proteins that are involved in many cellular processes including protein folding, endosome/lysosome function, immunity, synapse function, metal ion binding, calcium regulation and cytoskeletal function. Conclusion These studies shed light on the complex molecular events that occur during prion disease, and identify genes whose further study may yield new insights into strain specific neuropathogenesis and ante-mortem tests for TSEs.

  2. Differentiation of ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy isolate types, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and CH1641 scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J G; Sauer, M; van Keulen, L J M; Tang, Y; Bossers, A; Langeveld, J P M

    2011-01-01

    With increased awareness of the diversity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains in the ruminant population, comes an appreciation of the need for improved methods of differential diagnosis. Exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been associated with the human TSE, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, emphasizing the necessity in distinguishing low-risk TSE types from BSE. TSE type discrimination in ruminants such as cattle, sheep, goats and deer, requires the application of several prion protein (PrP)-specific antibodies in parallel immunochemical tests on brain homogenates or tissue sections from infected animals. This study uses in a single incubation step, three PrP-specific antibodies and fluorescent Alexa dye-labelled anti-mouse Fabs on a Western blot. The usual amount of brain tissue needed is 0.5 mg. This multiplex application of antibodies directed towards three different PrP epitopes enabled differential diagnosis of all established main features of classical scrapie, BSE and Nor98-like scrapie in sheep and goats, as well as the currently known BSE types C, H and L in cattle. Moreover, due to an antibody-dependent dual PrP-banding pattern, for the first time CH1641 scrapie of sheep can be reliably discriminated from the other TSE isolate types in sheep. PMID:20943889

  3. Disease-associated PrP in the enteric nervous system of scrapie-affected Suffolk sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggebø, Ragna; González, Lorenzo; Press, Charles McL; Gunnes, Gjermund; Espenes, Arild; Jeffrey, Martin

    2003-05-01

    Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of 20- to 24-month-old Suffolk sheep in the late subclinical and early clinical phase of scrapie was studied. Sites in the alimentary tract extending from the forestomachs and abomasum to the colon from scrapie-affected sheep (PrP(ARQ/ARQ)) and scrapie-resistant sheep (PrP(ARR/ARQ) and PrP(ARR/ARR)) were examined. PrP(d) was found only in scrapie-affected sheep and was most prominent in the ENS when abundant deposits of PrP(d) were also present in adjacent lymphoid nodules. Immunolabelling with the nerve fibre markers PgP 9.5 and neuron-specific enolase and the satellite cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein revealed the extensive ganglionated networks of the myenteric and submucosal plexi. Fewer nerve fibres were present in the lamina propria, T-cell dominated interfollicular areas and dome regions of Peyer's patches. A substantial network of nerve fibres was detected in many lymphoid nodules of both the scrapie-affected and scrapie-resistant sheep. Nerve fibres were also detected within the capsule of lymphoid nodules. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of nerves in the lymphoid nodules, showing a close association with follicular dendritic cells, lymphocytes and tingible body macrophages. In demonstrating that lymphoid nodules in the Peyer's patches of scrapie-affected sheep possess a substantial network of nerve fibres, the present study shows that nodules provide close contact between nerve fibres and cell populations known to contain abundant PrP(d), including follicular dendritic cells and tingible body macrophages, and that gut-associated lymphoid nodules in sheep may represent an important site for neuroinvasion. PMID:12692300

  4. Scrapie infectivity is quickly cleared in tissues of orally-infected farmed fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faoro Franco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE belongs to the group of animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE. BSE epidemic in the UK and elsewhere in Europe has been linked to the use of bovine meat and bone meals (MBM in the feeding of cattle. There is concern that pigs, poultry and fish bred for human consumption and fed with infected MBM would eventually develop BSE or carry residual infectivity without disease. Although there has been no evidence of infection in these species, experimental data on the susceptibility to the BSE agent of farm animals other than sheep and cow are limited only to pigs and domestic chicken. In the framework of a EU-granted project we have challenged two species of fish largely used in human food consumption, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, with a mouse-adapted TSE strain (scrapie 139A, to assess the risk related to oral consumption of TSE contaminated food. In trout, we also checked the "in vitro" ability of the pathological isoform of the mouse prion protein (PrPSc to cross the intestinal epithelium when added to the mucosal side of everted intestine. Results Fish challenged with a large amount of scrapie mouse brain homogenate by either oral or parenteral routes, showed the ability to clear the majority of infectivity load. None of the fish tissues taken at different time points after oral or parenteral inoculation was able to provoke scrapie disease after intracerebral inoculation in recipient mice. However, a few recipient mice were positive for PrPSc and spongiform lesions in the brain. We also showed a specific binding of PrPSc to the mucosal side of fish intestine in the absence of an active uptake of the prion protein through the intestinal wall. Conclusion These results indicate that scrapie 139A, and possibly BSE, is quickly removed from fish tissues despite evidence of a prion like protein in fish and of a specific binding of Pr

  5. Lack of Prion Accumulation in Lymphoid Tissues of Scrapie-affected Sheep with the AA136, QR171 Prion Protein Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy which can be transmitted horizontally through the shedding of an infectious conformer (PrP**Sc) of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP**c). Genetics profoundly influence the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie. PrP**c amino-aci...

  6. Mouse-adapted scrapie strains 139A and ME7 overcome species barrier to induce experimental scrapie in hamsters and changed their pathogenic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Qi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE diseases are known to be zoonotic diseases that can infect different kinds of animals. The transmissibility of TSE, like that of other infectious diseases, shows marked species barrier, either being unable to infect heterologous species or difficult to form transmission experimentally. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PrP among species is believed to be one of the elements in controlling the transmission TSE interspecies. Other factors, such as prion strains and host's microenvironment, may also participate in the process. Methods Two mouse-adapted strains 139A and ME7 were cerebrally inoculated to Golden hamsters. Presences of scrapie associate fibril (SAF and PrPSc in brains of the infected animals were tested by TEM assays and Western blots dynamically during the incubation periods. The pathogenic features of the novel prions in hamsters, including electrophoretic patterns, glycosylating profiles, immunoreactivities, proteinase K-resistances and conformational stabilities were comparatively evaluated. TSE-related neuropathological changes were assayed by histological examinations. Results After long incubation times, mouse-adapted agents 139A and ME7 induced experimental scrapie in hamsters, respectively, showing obvious spongiform degeneration and PrPSc deposits in brains, especially in cortex regions. SAF and PrPSc in brains were observed much earlier than the onset of clinical symptoms. The molecular characteristics of the newly-formed PrPSc in hamsters, 139A-ha and ME7-ha, were obviously distinct from the original mouse agents, however, greatly similar as that of a hamster-adapted scrapie strain 263 K. Although the incubation times and main disease signs of the hamsters of 139A-ha and ME7-ha were different, the pathogenic characteristics and neuropathological changes were highly similar. Conclusions This finding concludes that mouse-adapted agents 139A and ME7

  7. Identification of the structural mutation responsible for the dibucaine-resistant (atypical) variant form of human serum cholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A point mutation in the gene for human serum cholinesterase was identified that changes Asp-70 to Gly in the atypical form of serum cholinesterase. The mutation in nucleotide 209, which changes codon 70 from GAT to GGT, was found by sequencing a genomic clone and sequencing selected regions of DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The entire coding sequences for usual and atypical cholinesterases were compared, and no other consistent base differences were found. The nucleotide-209 mutation was detected in all five atypical cholinesterase families examined. There was complete concordance between this mutation and serum cholinesterase phenotypes for all 14 heterozygous and 6 homozygous atypical subjects tested. The mutation causes the loss of a Sau3A1 restriction site; the resulting DNA fragment length polymorphism was verified by electrophoresis of 32P-labeled DNA restriction fragments from usual and atypical subjects. Dot-blot hybridization analysis with a 19-mer allele-specific probe to the DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction distinguished between the usual and atypical genotypes. The authors conclude that the Asp-70 → Gly mutation accounts for reduced affinity of atypical cholinesterase for choline esters and that Asp-70 must be an important component of the anionic site. Heterogeneity in atypical alleles may exist, but the Asp-70 point mutation may represent an appreciable portion of the atypical gene pool

  8. The Oral Secretion of Infectious Scrapie Prions Occurs in Preclinical Sheep with a Range of PRNP Genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Gough, Kevin C; Baker, Claire A; Rees, Helen C.; Terry, Linda A; Spiropoulos, John; Thorne, Leigh; Maddison, Ben C

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical sheep with the highly scrapie-susceptible VRQ/VRQ PRNP genotype secrete prions from the oral cavity. In order to further understand the significance of orally available prions, buccal swabs were taken from sheep with a range of PRNP genotypes and analyzed by serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). Prions were detected in buccal swabs from scrapie-exposed sheep of genotypes linked to high (VRQ/VRQ and ARQ/VRQ) and low (ARR/VRQ and AHQ/VRQ) lymphoreticular system inv...

  9. Familial benign pemphigus atypical localization

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Maria Veronica; Halac, Sabina; Mainardi, Claudio; Kurpis, Maria; Ruiz Lascano, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We present an atypical case of familial benign pemphigus (Hailey-Hailey disease), which presented as crusted, annular plaques limited to the back without intertriginous involvement. We could not find in the literature another patient with plaques located solely on the back without a prior history of classical disease.

  10. Atypical early-onset Alzheimer's disease caused by the Iranian APP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Nielsen, J.E.; Stokholm, J.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's disease are inherited autosomal dominantly, and to date, three causative genes have been found, the Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, the Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene and the Amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. We describe atypical phenotypic...... features in a family with a pathogenic APP gene mutation and discuss possible explanations for these atypical features. METHODS AND RESULTS: We report a family with a history of dementia compatible with autosomal dominant transmission. The disease course in the proband was not typical for Alzheimer...... mutation, APP Thr714Ala (the Iranian mutation). CONCLUSIONS: The atypical clinical phenotype with long prodromal phase, autonomic failure and seizures in this new proband with the APP Thr714Ala mutation illustrates the clinical heterogeneity in families with identical pathogenic mutations Udgivelsesdato...

  11. Recognition and diagnosis of atypical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The term atypical depression dates to the first wave of reports describing differential response to monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). In contrast to more TCA-responsive depressions, patients with so-called atypical symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia, interpersonal sensitivity, leaden paralysis, increased appetite and/or weight, and phobic anxiety) were observed to be more responsive to MAOIs. After several decades of controversy and debate, the phrase "with atypical features" was added as an episode specifier in the DSM-IV in 1994. The 1-year prevalence of the defined atypical depression subtype is approximately 1% to 4%; around 15% to 29% of patients with major depressive disorder have atypical depression. Hardly "atypical" in contemporary contexts, atypical depression also is common in dysthymic bipolar II disorders and is notable for its early age at onset, more chronic course, and high rates of comorbidity with social phobia and panic disorder with agoraphobia. The requirement of preserved mood reactivity is arguably the most controversial of the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression. When compared with melancholia, the neurobiological profiles of patients with atypical depression are relatively normal. The utility of the atypical depression subtype for differential therapeutics diminished substantially when the TCAs were supplanted as first-line antidepressants by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Although introduction of safer MAOIs has fostered renewed interest in atypical depression, the validity and importance of the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression for the nosology of affective illness remains an open question. PMID:17640153

  12. Unsuspected early neuronal loss in scrapie-infected mice revealed by morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J R; Jeffrey, M; Halliday, W G

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine to what extent neuronal loss is a feature of scrapie pathology, using an experimental model in which infectivity and subsequent vacuolar lesions are well characterized but in which neuronal loss has not been previously identified. Intraocular infection with ME7 scrapie directs infection through the major projections of the optic nerve, which include the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) on the contralateral side to the infected eye. Infectivity can be detected in the dLGN at 77 days post-infection and vacuolar lesions are first seen around halfway through the incubation period of 240 days. Morphometric assessment of neuron number in the dLGN was made on gallocyanin stained semi-serial sections from 5 infected and 5 normal brain-injected controls at 4 fifty-day intervals during the incubation period, and on clinically terminal mice. The number of neurons in the dLGN of the infected mice decreased steadily from around 20,000 at 50 days post-infection to under 2,000 in the terminal group. The loss was delayed in the ipsilateral dLGN, although terminal counts were the same for both sides. The onset of neuronal loss was coincident with initial vacuolar changes, and neuronal numbers were inversely proportional to the severity of vacuolation. It is concluded that scrapie infection causes a progressive neuronal loss that can be identified some 30-80 days after infectivity can be detected in the dLGN, long before the onset of clinical disease. PMID:8030955

  13. Clinical Heterogeneity of Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Koreans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyeok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA represents a group of inherited movement disorders characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Recent advances have included the identification of new causative genes and highlighted the wide phenotypic variation between and within the specific NBIA subtypes. This study aimed to investigate the current status of NBIA in Korea. Methods We collected genetically confirmed NBIA patients from twelve nationwide referral hospitals and from a review of the literature. We conducted a study to describe the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Korean adults with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN. Results Four subtypes of NBIA including PKAN (n = 30, PLA2G6-related neurodegeneration (n = 2, beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (n = 1, and aceruloplasminemia (n = 1 have been identified in the Korean population. The clinical features of fifteen adults with atypical PKAN included early focal limb dystonia, parkinsonism-predominant feature, oromandibular dystonia, and isolated freezing of gait (FOG. Patients with a higher age of onset tended to present with parkinsonism and FOG. The p.R440P and p.D378G mutations are two major mutations that represent approximately 50% of the mutated alleles. Although there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations, most patients carrying the p.D378G mutation had a late-onset, atypical form of PKAN. Conclusions We found considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in Korean adults with atypical PKAN. The age of onset may influence the presentation of extrapyramidal symptoms.

  14. Alkaline hydrolysis of mouse-adapted scrapie for inactivation and disposal of prion-positive material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R G L; Scanga, J A; Powers, B E; Pilon, J L; Vercauteren, K C; Nash, P B; Smith, G C; Belk, K E

    2009-05-01

    Prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, chronic wasting disease, and scrapie pose serious risks to human and animal health due to a host of disease-specific factors, including the resistance of infectious prions (PrP(Sc)) to natural degradation and to most commercial inactivation procedures. In an attempt to address this concern, a mouse model was used to compare the efficacy of an alkaline hydrolysis process with a simulated continuous-flow rendering treatment for disposal of PrP(Sc)-infected biological material. Female C57/BL6 mice (N = 120) were randomly divided into 4 treatment groups (n = 30), and each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with their designated treatment inoculum. Treatment groups 1 and 2 served as the positive and negative controls, respectively. Group 3 was inoculated with rendered scrapie-positive mouse brain material to investigate the effectiveness of simulated continuous-flow rendering practices to reduce or eliminate PrP(Sc). Group 4 was inoculated with hydrolyzed scrapie-positive mouse brain material to determine the sterilizing effect of alkaline hydrolysis on PrP(Sc). Mice were monitored for overt signs of disease, and those showing clinical signs were killed to prevent undue suffering. Brains were obtained from all mice that died (or were killed) and analyzed with an ELISA for the presence of PrP(Sc). Results indicated that the simulated continuous-flow rendering treatment used for preparing the rendering treatment group inoculum failed to completely eliminate PrP(Sc). Rendering delayed, but did not stop, clinical mouse-adapted scrapie transmission. Compared with positive controls, the rendering treatment group experienced an approximate 45-d average delay in days to death (250 vs. 205 d for positive controls; P loss of 73.9% (P = 0.0094). Positive controls suffered 100% death loss. The results validated the efficacy of the alkaline hydrolysis treatment to inactivate all PrP(Sc) because no alkaline hydrolysis

  15. Atypical fractures, a biased perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    When stress fractures started to show up in the femurs of elderly ladies, it was soon evident that bisphosphonate use lay behind, and the absolute risk increase due to bisphosphonate use was reasonably well estimated already in 2008. Thereafter followed a period of confusion: the term atypical fracture was introduced, with a definition so vague that the true stress fractures tended to disappear in a cloud of ambiguity. This cast doubt on the association with bisphosphonates. The association was then re-established by large epidemiological studies based on radiographic adjudication. Atypical fractures are largely caused by bisphosphonates. With a correct indication, bisphosphonates prevent many more fractures than they cause, at least during the first years of use. With an incorrect indication they are likely to cause more harm than good. PMID:26768286

  16. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koranne R

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  17. Experimental transmission of U.S. scrapie agent by nasal, peritoneal and conjunctival routes to genetically susceptible sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. This study documents incubation periods, pathological findings and distribution of abnormal prion proteins (PrP**Sc) by immunohistochemistry in tissues of genetically susceptible sheep inoculated with U.S. sheep scr...

  18. White blood cell-based detection of asymptomatic scrapie infection by ex vivo assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Halliez

    Full Text Available Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods--in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays--to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages. However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease.

  19. Enzymatic formulation capable of degrading scrapie prion under mild digestion conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka A Okoroma

    Full Text Available The prion agent is notoriously resistant to common proteases and conventional sterilisation procedures. The current methods known to destroy prion infectivity such as incineration, alkaline and thermal hydrolysis are harsh, destructive, environmentally polluting and potentially hazardous, thus limit their applications for decontamination of delicate medical and laboratory devices, remediation of prion contaminated environment and for processing animal by-products including specified risk materials and carcases. Therefore, an environmentally friendly, non-destructive enzymatic degradation approach is highly desirable. A feather-degrading Bacillus licheniformis N22 keratinase has been isolated which degraded scrapie prion to undetectable level of PrP(Sc signals as determined by Western Blot analysis. Prion infectivity was verified by ex vivo cell-based assay. An enzymatic formulation combining N22 keratinase and biosurfactant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa degraded PrP(Sc at 65 °C in 10 min to undetectable level -. A time-course degradation analysis carried out at 50 °C over 2 h revealed the progressive attenuation of PrP(Sc intensity. Test of residual infectivity by standard cell culture assay confirmed that the enzymatic formulation reduced PrP(Sc infectivity to undetectable levels as compared to cells challenged with untreated standard scrapie sheep prion (SSBP/1 (p-value = 0.008 at 95% confidence interval. This novel enzymatic formulation has significant potential application for prion decontamination in various environmentally friendly systems under mild treatment conditions.

  20. The evaluation of exposure risks for natural transmission of scrapie within an infected flock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the epidemiology of scrapie has been broadly understood for many years, attempts to introduce voluntary or compulsory controls to eradicate the disease have frequently failed. Lack of precision in defining the risk factors on farm has been one of the challenges to designing control strategies. This study attempted to define which parts of the annual flock management cycle represented the greatest risk of infection to naive lambs exposed to the farm environment at different times. Results In VRQ/VRQ lambs exposed to infected sheep at pasture or during lambing, and exposed to the buildings in which lambing took place, the attack rate was high and survival times were short. Where exposure was to pasture alone the number of sheep affected in each experimental group was reduced, and survival times were longer and related to length of exposure. Conclusion At the flock level, eradication and control strategies for scrapie must take into account the need to decontaminate buildings used for lambing, and to reduce (or prevent the exposure of lambs to infected sheep, especially in the later stages of incubation, and at lambing. The potential for environmental contamination from pasture should also be considered. Genotype selection may still prove to be the only viable tool to prevent infection from contaminated pasture, reduce environmental contamination and limit direct transmission from sheep to sheep.

  1. Atypical eating disorders: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Frederico

    2011-01-01

    Frederico Duarte Garcia1, Héloïse Délavenne2, Pierre Déchelotte11Nutrition and Digestive System Research Group (EA 4311) and Nutrition Unit, Rouen Institute of Medical Research and Innovation, Federative Institute for Peptide Research (IFRMP 23), Rouen University and University Hospital, Rouen, France; 2Department of Addictology of the Rouen University Hospital, Rouen University, Rouen, FranceIntroduction: Atypical eating disorders (AEDs), also known ...

  2. On the question of proportionality of the count of observed Scrapie cases and the size of holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Rio Vilas Victor J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper investigates the question of a suitable basic model for the number of scrapie cases in a holding and applications of this knowledge to the estimation of scrapie-affected holding population sizes and adequacy of control measures within holding. Is the number of scrapie cases proportional to the size of the holding in which case it should be incorporated into the parameter of the error distribution for the scrapie counts? Or, is there a different – potentially more complex – relationship between case count and holding size in which case the information about the size of the holding should be better incorporated as a covariate in the modeling? Methods We show that this question can be appropriately addressed via a simple zero-truncated Poisson model in which the hypothesis of proportionality enters as a special offset-model. Model comparisons can be achieved by means of likelihood ratio testing. The procedure is illustrated by means of surveillance data on classical scrapie in Great Britain. Furthermore, the model with the best fit is used to estimate the size of the scrapie-affected holding population in Great Britain by means of two capture-recapture estimators: the Poisson estimator and the generalized Zelterman estimator. Results No evidence could be found for the hypothesis of proportionality. In fact, there is some evidence that this relationship follows a curved line which increases for small holdings up to a maximum after which it declines again. Furthermore, it is pointed out how crucial the correct model choice is when applied to capture-recapture estimation on the basis of zero-truncated Poisson models as well as on the basis of the generalized Zelterman estimator. Estimators based on the proportionality model return very different and unreasonable estimates for the population sizes. Conclusion Our results stress the importance of an adequate modelling approach to the association between holding

  3. Follicular dendritic cell dedifferentiation by treatment with an inhibitor of the lymphotoxin pathway dramatically reduces scrapie susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabbott, Neil A; Young, Janice; McConnell, Irene; Bruce, Moira E

    2003-06-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) may be acquired peripherally, in which case infectivity usually accumulates in lymphoid tissues before dissemination to the nervous system. Studies of mouse scrapie models have shown that mature follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), expressing the host prion protein (PrP(c)), are critical for replication of infection in lymphoid tissues and subsequent neuroinvasion. Since FDCs require lymphotoxin signals from B lymphocytes to maintain their differentiated state, blockade of this stimulation with a lymphotoxin beta receptor-immunoglobulin fusion protein (LT beta R-Ig) leads to their temporary dedifferentiation. Here, a single treatment with LT beta R-Ig before intraperitoneal scrapie inoculation blocked the early accumulation of infectivity and disease-specific PrP (PrP(Sc)) within the spleen and substantially reduced disease susceptibility. These effects coincided with an absence of FDCs in the spleen for ca. 28 days after treatment. Although the period of FDC dedifferentiation was extended to at least 49 days by consecutive LT beta R-Ig treatments, this had little added protective benefit after injection with a moderate dose of scrapie. We also demonstrate that mature FDCs are critical for the transmission of scrapie from the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment with LT beta R-Ig before oral scrapie inoculation blocked PrP(Sc) accumulation in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes and prevented neuroinvasion. However, treatment 14 days after oral inoculation did not affect survival time or susceptibility, suggesting that infectivity may have already spread to the peripheral nervous system. Although manipulation of FDCs may offer a potential approach for early intervention in peripherally acquired TSEs, these data suggest that the duration of the treatment window may vary widely depending on the route of exposure. PMID:12768004

  4. Evolving A-Type Artificial Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Orr, Ewan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate Turing's notion of an A-type artificial neural network. We study a refinement of Turing's original idea, motivated by work of Teuscher, Bull, Preen and Copeland. Our A-types can process binary data by accepting and outputting sequences of binary vectors; hence we can associate a function to an A-type, and we say the A-type {\\em represents} the function. There are two modes of data processing: clamped and sequential. We describe an evolutionary algorithm, involving graph-theoretic manipulations of A-types, which searches for A-types representing a given function. The algorithm uses both mutation and crossover operators. We implemented the algorithm and applied it to three benchmark tasks. We found that the algorithm performed much better than a random search. For two out of the three tasks, the algorithm with crossover performed better than a mutation-only version.

  5. Five Cases of Atypical Rickettsial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Salva, I; Gouveia, C.; De Sousa, R.; Brito, MJ

    2011-01-01

    Background: Rickettsia conorii is the most frequent species of RickettsiaI causing disease in Portugal. In general the disease manifests itself by fever, exanthema, headaches and the presence of an eschar. However atypical forms can be present and physicians should be aware. Aims: Analyse the atypical presentation of rickettsiosis. Material and Methods: Children admitted at the CHLC Hospital from 2000 to 2010 with atypical presentation of rickettsiosis. Clinical diagnosis wa...

  6. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  7. Atypical extragonadal germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak Deb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review the experience with the diagnosis and management of extragonadal germ cell tumors (GCT with a subset analysis of those with atypical features. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients of extragonadal germ cell tumors between 2000 and 2010 was carried out. Results: Fifteen children aged 7 days to 15 years (median, 1.5 years were included. Three had an antenatal diagnosis (one sacrococcygeal, one retrobulbar, one retroperitoneal tumor and were operated in the neonatal period. The locations were distributed between the retrobulbar area (1, anterior neck-thyroid gland (1, mediastinum (4, abdominothoracic extending through the esophageal hiatus (1, retroperitoneal (4 and sacrococcygeal (4. On histological examination, five harbored immature elements while two were malignant; the latter children received postexcision adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no mortality. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years (6 months to 8 years, 14/15 have had an event-free survival. One immature mediastinal teratoma that recurred locally 7.5 years after the initial operation was excised and adjuvant chemotherapy instituted. Conclusions: Extragonadal GCTs in children are uncommon and occasionally present with atypical clinical, radiological and histological features resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas.

  8. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  9. CJD and Scrapie Require Agent-Associated Nucleic Acids for Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsios, Sotirios; Manuelidis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Unlike Alzheimer's and most other neurodegenerative diseases, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) are all caused by actively replicating infectious particles of viral size and density. Different strain-specific TSE agents cause CJD, kuru, scrapie and BSE, and all behave as latent viruses that evade adaptive immune responses and can persist for years in lymphoreticular tissues. A foreign viral structure with a nucleic acid genome best explains these TSE strains and their endemic and epidemic spread in susceptible species. Nevertheless, it is widely believed that host prion protein (PrP), without any genetic material, encodes all these strains. We developed rapid infectivity assays that allowed us to reproducibly isolate infectious particles where >85% of the starting titer separated from the majority of host components, including PrP. Remarkably, digestion of all forms of PrP did not reduce brain particle titers. To ask if TSE agents, as other viruses, require nucleic acids, we exposed high titer FU-CJD and 22L scrapie particles to potent nucleases. Both agent-strains were propagated in GT1 neuronal cells to avoid interference by complex degenerative brain changes that can impede nuclease digestions. After exposure to nucleases that are active in sarkosyl, infectivity of both agents was reproducibly reduced by ≥99%. No gold-stained host proteins or any form of PrP were visibly altered by these nucleases. In contrast, co-purifying protected mitochondrial DNA and circular SPHINX DNAs were destroyed. These findings demonstrate that TSE agents require protected genetic material to infect their hosts, and should reopen investigation of essential agent nucleic acids. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1947-1958, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773845

  10. Membrane toxicity of abnormal prion protein in adrenal chromaffin cells of scrapie infected sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are associated with accumulations of disease specific PrP (PrP(d in the central nervous system (CNS and often the lymphoreticular system (LRS. Accumulations have additionally been recorded in other tissues including the peripheral nervous system and adrenal gland. Here we investigate the effect of sheep scrapie on the morphology and the accumulation of PrP(d in the adrenal medulla of scrapie affected sheep using light and electron microscopy. Using immunogold electron microscopy, non-fibrillar forms of PrP(d were shown to accumulate mainly in association with chromaffin cells, occasional nerve endings and macrophages. PrP(d accumulation was associated with distinctive membrane changes of chromaffin cells including increased electron density, abnormal linearity and invaginations. Internalisation of PrP(d from the chromaffin cell plasma membrane occurred in association with granule recycling following hormone exocytosis. PrP(d accumulation and internalisation from membranes is similarly associated with perturbations of membrane structure and trafficking in CNS neurons and tingible body macrophages of the LRS. These data suggest that a major toxic effect of PrP(d is at the level of plasma membranes. However, the precise nature of PrP(d-membrane toxicity is tissue and cell specific suggesting that the normal protein may act as a multi-functional scaffolding molecule. We further suggest that the co-localisation of PrP(d with exocytic granules of the hormone trafficking system may provide an additional source of infectivity in blood.

  11. Accumulation and dissemination of prion protein in experimental sheep scrapie in the natural host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warner Richard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the sites of uptake and mechanisms of dissemination of scrapie prions in the natural host under controlled conditions, lambs aged 14 days and homozygous for the VRQ allele of the PrP gene were infected by the oral route. Infection occurred in all lambs with a remarkably short and highly consistent incubation period of approximately 6 months. Challenge of lambs at approximately eight months of age resulted in disease in all animals, but with more variable incubation periods averaging significantly longer than those challenged at 14 days. This model provides an excellent system in which to study the disease in the natural host by virtue of the relatively short incubation period and close resemblance to natural infection. Results Multiple sites of prion uptake were identified, of which the most important was the Peyer's patch of the distal ileum. Neuroinvasion was detected initially in the enteric nervous system prior to infection of the central nervous system. At end stage disease prion accumulation was widespread throughout the entire neuraxis, but vacuolar pathology was absent in most animals that developed disease at 6–7 months of age. Conclusion Initial spread of detectable PrP was consistent with drainage in afferent lymph to dependent lymph nodes. Subsequent accumulation of prions in lymphoid tissue not associated with the gut is consistent with haematogenous spread. In addition to macrophages and follicular dendritic cells, prion containing cells consistent with afferent lymph dendritic cells were identified and are suggested as a likely vehicle for carriage of prions from initial site of uptake to the lymphoreticular system, and as potential carriers of prion protein in blood. It is apparent that spongiform change, the characteristic lesion of scrapie and other prion diseases, is not responsible for the clinical signs in sheep, but may develop in an age dependent manner.

  12. Explaining the heterogeneous scrapie surveillance figures across Europe: a meta-regression approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Giuseppe

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two annual surveys, the abattoir and the fallen stock, monitor the presence of scrapie across Europe. A simple comparison between the prevalence estimates in different countries reveals that, in 2003, the abattoir survey appears to detect more scrapie in some countries. This is contrary to evidence suggesting the greater ability of the fallen stock survey to detect the disease. We applied meta-analysis techniques to study this apparent heterogeneity in the behaviour of the surveys across Europe. Furthermore, we conducted a meta-regression analysis to assess the effect of country-specific characteristics on the variability. We have chosen the odds ratios between the two surveys to inform the underlying relationship between them and to allow comparisons between the countries under the meta-regression framework. Baseline risks, those of the slaughtered populations across Europe, and country-specific covariates, available from the European Commission Report, were inputted in the model to explain the heterogeneity. Results Our results show the presence of significant heterogeneity in the odds ratios between countries and no reduction in the variability after adjustment for the different risks in the baseline populations. Three countries contributed the most to the overall heterogeneity: Germany, Ireland and The Netherlands. The inclusion of country-specific covariates did not, in general, reduce the variability except for one variable: the proportion of the total adult sheep population sampled as fallen stock by each country. A large residual heterogeneity remained in the model indicating the presence of substantial effect variability between countries. Conclusion The meta-analysis approach was useful to assess the level of heterogeneity in the implementation of the surveys and to explore the reasons for the variation between countries.

  13. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong-Seok [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Ho [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Il [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyeon-3-dong, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Carp, Richard I. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1050 Forest Hill Road, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Choi, Eun-Kyoung, E-mail: ekchoi@hallym.ac.kr [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Sun, E-mail: yskim@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  14. [From the Scrapie syndrome of sheep and goat to the mad cow disease - the history of the discovery of prion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Weng, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Since the discovery of Scrapie Syndrome in sheep and goats in 1730, there emerged a series of diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. In the research of kuru disease, the American scientist D. Carlteton Gajdusek found a new virus without the characteristic of DNA and RNA, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1976. Since then another American scientist, Stanley B. Prusiner, found a new virus-prion, taking protein as the genetic medium, which was awarded the Nobel prize in physiology and medicine in 1997. The discovery of prion is a great landmark in the research of life science, which laid a theoretical foundation for people to conquer a series of diseases such as Scrapie syndrome in sheep and goats, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. PMID:19930927

  15. The effects of selective breeding against scrapie susceptibility on the genetic variability of the Latxa Black-Faced sheep breed

    OpenAIRE

    Legarra Andrés; Parada Analia; Alfonso Leopoldo; Ugarte Eva; Arana Ana

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Breeding sheep populations for scrapie resistance could result in a loss of genetic variability. In this study, the effect on genetic variability of selection for increasing the ARR allele frequency was estimated in the Latxa breed. Two sources of information were used, pedigree and genetic polymorphisms (fifteen microsatellites). The results based on the genealogical information were conditioned by a low pedigree completeness level that revealed the interest of also using the inform...

  16. Follicular Dendritic Cell Dedifferentiation by Treatment with an Inhibitor of the Lymphotoxin Pathway Dramatically Reduces Scrapie Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mabbott, Neil; Young, J.; McConnell, I.; Bruce, Moira

    2003-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) may be acquired peripherally, in which case infectivity usually accumulates in lymphoid tissues before dissemination to the nervous system. Studies of mouse scrapie models have shown that mature follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), expressing the host prion protein (PrP(c)), are critical for replication of infection in lymphoid tissues and subsequent neuroinvasion. Since FDCs require lymphotoxin signals from B lymphocytes to maintain their differ...

  17. Accumulation profiles of PrPSc in hemal nodes of naturally and experimentally scrapie-infected sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Truscott, Thomas C; Özyiğit, M Özgür; Zhuang, Dongyue; Schneider, David A; O’Rourke, Katherine I.

    2013-01-01

    Background In classical scrapie, the disease-associated abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of normal prion protein accumulates principally in the nervous system and lymphoid tissues of small ruminants. Lymph nodes traffic leukocytes via lymphatic and blood vasculatures but hemal nodes lack lymphatic vessels and thus traffic leukocytes only via the blood. Although PrPSc accumulation profiles are well-characterized in ovine lymphoid tissues, there is limited information on such profiles in hemal nodes. T...

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Deficient, but Not Interleukin-6-Deficient, Mice Resist Peripheral Infection with Scrapie

    OpenAIRE

    Mabbott, Neil; Williams, Alun; Farquhar, Christine; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kollias, Giorgos; Bruce, Moira

    2000-01-01

    In most peripheral infections of rodents and sheep with scrapie, infectivity is found first in lymphoid tissues and later in the central nervous system (CNS). Cells within the germinal centers (GCs) of the spleen and lymph nodes are important sites of extraneural replication, from which infection is likely to spread to the CNS along peripheral nerves. Here, using immunodeficient mice, we investigate the identity of the cells in the spleen that are important for disease propagation. Despite po...

  19. Temporary blockade of the tumor necrosis factor receptor signaling pathway impedes the spread of scrapie to the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Mabbott, Neil; McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin; Bruce, Moira

    2002-01-01

    Although the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative diseases, their agents usually replicate and accumulate in lymphoid tissues long before infection spreads to the central nervous system (CNS). Studies of a mouse scrapie model have shown that mature follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which express the host prion protein (PrP(c)), are critical for replication of infection in lymphoid tissues. In the absence of mature FDCs, the spread of infection to the CNS is ...

  20. Unusual cerebral vascular prion protein amyloid distribution in scrapie-infected transgenic mice expressing anchorless prion protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Alejandra; Race, Brent; Klingeborn, Mikael; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Background In some prion diseases, misfolded aggregated protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) is found in brain as amyloid, which can cause cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Small diffusible precursors of PrPres amyloid might flow with brain interstitial fluid (ISF), possibly accounting for the perivascular and intravascular distribution of PrPres amyloid. We previously reported that PrPres amyloid in scrapie-infected transgenic mice appeared to delay clearance of microinjected brain ISF trace...

  1. Pathogenesis of natural goat scrapie: modulation by host PRNP genotype and effect of co-existent conditions

    OpenAIRE

    González, Lorenzo; Martin, Stuart; Hawkins, Stephen A.C.; Goldmann, Wilfred; Jeffrey, Martin; Sisó, Sílvia

    2010-01-01

    After detection of a high prevalence of scrapie in a large dairy goat herd, 72 infected animals were examined by immunohistochemistry with prion protein (PrP) antibody Bar224 to study the pathogenesis of the infection. Tissues examined included the brain and thoracic spinal cord (TSC), a wide selection of lymphoreticular system (LRS) tissues, the distal ileum and its enteric nervous system (ENS), and other organs, including the mammary gland. The whole open reading frame of the PRNP gene was ...

  2. Typical and atypical AIS. Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, M; Pinchuk, D

    2012-01-01

    AIS hypothesis has the right to recognition, if it explains the transition of "healthy" vertebra column into status of "scoliotic" one. AIS is the most investigated disease in the history of orthopedics, but up the present time there is no clear explanation of some its phenomena: vertebra column mono-form deformation along with its poly etiology character, interrelation of its origin and development and child's growth process etc. The key for authors' view at AIS was scoliosis with non-standard (concave side) rotation. On the bases of its' multifunctional instrumental investigation results (Rtg, EMG, EEG, optical topography, hormonal and neuropeptides trials, thermo-vision methods and other) in comparison with typical AIS was worked out the new hypothesis, part of it is suggested for discussion. In the work under observation is the sequence of appearance of typical and atypical scoliosis symptomatology beginning from the preclinical stage. PMID:22744477

  3. Accumulation of pathological prion protein PrPSc in the skin of animals with experimental and natural scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Thomzig

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion infectivity and its molecular marker, the pathological prion protein PrP(Sc, accumulate in the central nervous system and often also in lymphoid tissue of animals or humans affected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Recently, PrP(Sc was found in tissues previously considered not to be invaded by prions (e.g., skeletal muscles. Here, we address the question of whether prions target the skin and show widespread PrP(Sc deposition in this organ in hamsters perorally or parenterally challenged with scrapie. In hamsters fed with scrapie, PrP(Sc was detected before the onset of symptoms, but the bulk of skin-associated PrP(Sc accumulated in the clinical phase. PrP(Sc was localized in nerve fibres within the skin but not in keratinocytes, and the deposition of PrP(Sc in skin showed no dependence from the route of infection and lymphotropic dissemination. The data indicated a neurally mediated centrifugal spread of prions to the skin. Furthermore, in a follow-up study, we examined sheep naturally infected with scrapie and detected PrP(Sc by Western blotting in skin samples from two out of five animals. Our findings point to the skin as a potential reservoir of prions, which should be further investigated in relation to disease transmission.

  4. Sensitive and specific detection of classical scrapie prions in the brains of goats by real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Orrú, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; Caughey, Byron; Graça, Telmo; Zhuang, Dongyue; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Knowles, Donald P; Schneider, David A

    2016-03-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a rapid, specific and highly sensitive prion seeding activity detection assay that uses recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) to detect subinfectious levels of the abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Although RT-QuIC has been successfully used to detect PrPSc in various tissues from humans and animals, including sheep, tissues from goats infected with classical scrapie have not yet been tested. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to (1) evaluate whether prion seeding activity could be detected in the brain tissues of goats with scrapie using RT-QuIC, (2) optimize reaction conditions to improve scrapie detection in goats, and (3) compare the performance of RT-QuIC for the detection of PrPSc with the more commonly used ELISA and Western blot assays. We further optimized RT-QuIC conditions for sensitive and specific detection of goat scrapie seeding activity in brain tissue from clinical animals. When used with 200  mM sodium chloride, both full-length sheep rPrPSen substrates (PrP genotypes A136R154Q171 and V136R154Q171) provided good discrimination between scrapie-infected and normal goat brain samples at 10(- )3 dilution within 15  h. Our findings indicate that RT-QuIC was at least 10,000-fold more sensitive than ELISA and Western blot assays for the detection of scrapie seeding activity in goat brain samples. In addition to PRNP WT samples, positive RT-QuIC reactions were also observed with three PRNP polymorphic goat brain samples (G/S127, I/M142 and H/R143) tested. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RT-QuIC sensitively detects prion seeding activity in classical scrapie-infected goat brain samples. PMID:26653410

  5. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  6. Atypical Williams syndrome in an infant with complete atrioventricular canal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C; Reichert, Sara L; Zackai, Elaine H; Kaplan, Paige B

    2015-12-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is a well-described microdeletion syndrome characterized by specific dysmorphic facial features, peripheral pulmonic stenosis, supravalvular aortic stenosis, hypercalcemia, feeding difficulties, gastroesophageal reflux, short stature, and specific intellectual disabilities (such as visual spatial problems). WBS is caused by 7q11.23 deletions that contain multiple genes known to contribute to the above phenotype. We report a neonate with a complete atrioventricular canal (CAVC) defect, an atypical cardiac lesion for WBS, and few typical phenotypic features of WBS, diagnosed at 20 days of life. PMID:26271350

  7. Establishment of the Method of Immunohistochemistry Assay for the Detection of Scrapie in Chinese Short-Tailed Han Sheep by Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The method of immunohistochemistry assay for the detection of scrapie in Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep was established using monoclonal antibody. Genomic DNA was isolated from Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep blood. Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, PrP27-30 gene sequence was amplified from Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep genomic DNA. By recombinant DNA technology, the recombinant protein of Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep PrP27-30 was obtained. Then, using standard methodology of myeloma cell fusion, a panel of monoclonal antibodies was generated. With mAbs, scrapie in Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep was detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The recombinant protein of Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep PrP27-30 was obtained and a panel of six hybridoma cell lines secreting specific antibodies to Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep PrP27-30 related to scrapie was obtained with one fusion between myeloma Sp2/0 and spleen cells from mice immunized with the purified recombinant protein. Four hybridoma cell lines can be used in immunohistochemistry assay for the detection of scrapie in Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep. So that the special monoclonal antibody developed in author's institute can be used to detect PrPsc of scrapie in Chinese Short-tailed Han sheep by immunohistochemistry in China.

  8. Novel CLN1 mutation with atypical juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We detected a novel CLN1 gene mutation (p.Arg151X, heterogenous in a 12-year-old boy. Low level of palmitoyl protein thioesterase and granular inclusion pattern in lymphocytes were also consistent with infantile Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL. However, the clinical phenotype was that of atypical juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL and consisted of progressive visual loss from the age of 8 years. His visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes at first presentation, 6/36 one month later, then 6/6 (right eye, and 6/60 (left eye 6 months later. However, after 4 months, visual acuity dropped to 6/60 in both eyes and at last follow-up, it was 6/60 (right eye and 3/60 (left eye. Visual hallucinations were also reported. Persistent normal fundi findings, normal electroretinogram (ERG, and delayed visual evoked potentials (VEP were suggestive of non-retinal adolescence form/atypical JNCL. Visual loss in JNCL is secondary to retinal dystrophy. Our observations suggest that JNCL should be considered in any children presenting with bilateral progressive visual loss even with normal fundi and/or delayed VEP. Electron microscopy of buffy coat and palmitoyl protein thioesterase enzyme study are useful tools in diagnosis. Pertinent issues regarding clinical symptomatology, ophthalmologic findings, and laboratory results are discussed.

  9. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  10. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS FROM SCRATCH TO THE PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chauhan*, Amit Mittal, Pradeep Kumar Arora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental illness constitutes the second-largest disease burden in the United States. Psychosis is one of the most common and severe mental illnesses. It is an extremely devastating condition characterised by delusions, hallucinations, distortion of thoughts and deteriorating social functioning experiences. Psychosis in all human societies has approximately same incidence of occurrence as in accordance to “anthropo-parity principle.” It has large economic impact on various aspects of cognition, health, and quality of life which has devastated effects on its sufferers and facing them large economic burden. Psychosis (Schizophrenia is associated with an imbalance of the dopaminergic system, entailing hyper-stimulation of dopamine function in the brain, particularly in the mesolimbic pathway. Consequences of antipsychotic treatment are far reaching and expensive. Detrimental extrapyramidal side effects associated with conventional antipsychotics and non-compliance among patients limits long term treatment with conventional antipsychotics. It gives rise to a new class, atypical antipsychotics owning low propensity to cause EPS, efficacy against refractory cases and better control over negative symptoms, better tolerance and compliance along with lower relapse rate and safer adverse effect profile. Atypical antipsychotics have revolutionized the treatment of psychosis, now being the treatment of choice for patients with psychosis. The positive therapeutic experience with the atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of psychosis and their favourable effects outweighs their unfavourable adverse effects. Though atypical antipsychotics are widely prescribed in the treatment of schizophrenia, however not a single atypical antipsychotic drug having any exceptional efficacy and safety profile. Thus, there is still a lot of research needed to be carried out in the development of novel atypical antipsychotics. This review is comprehensive appraisal about

  11. Surgical Options for Atypical Facial Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Shervin; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-07-01

    Atypical neuropathic facial pain is a syndrome of intractable and unremitting facial pain that is secondary to nociceptive signaling in the trigeminal system. These syndromes are often recalcitrant to pharmacotherapy and other common interventions, including microvascular decompression and percutaneous procedures. Herein, the authors present two other viable approaches (nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone lesioning and motor cortex stimulation), their indications, and finally a possible treatment algorithm to consider when assessing patients with atypical facial pain. PMID:27325003

  12. Interventional trials in atypical parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschlböck, S; Krismer, F; Wenning, G K

    2016-01-01

    Atypical parkinson disorders (APD) are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases with a variable clinical presentation that may even mimic Parkinson's disease. Multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are commonly summarized under this umbrella term. Significant developments in research have expanded knowledge and have broadened available symptomatic treatments, particularly for the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Nonetheless, symptomatic support still remains limited in all of these disorders. Currently, there exists no effective treatment to delay disease progression and disease-modifying trials have failed to provide coherent and convincing results. Recent trials of rasagiline (in MSA), rifampicin (in MSA), tideglusib (in PSP) and davunetide (in PSP) reported negative results. Nevertheless, large cohorts of patients were recruited for interventional studies in the last few years which improved our understanding of trial methodology in APDs immensely. In addition, remarkable progress in basic research has been reported recently and will provide a solid foundation for future therapeutic trials. In this review, we will summarize published randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in APDs. Additionally, the design of ongoing and unpublished interventions will be presented. PMID:26421389

  13. Prion replication in the hematopoietic compartment is not required for neuroinvasion in scrapie mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeuillet, Corinne; Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Naquet, Philippe; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Gagnon, Jean; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Fatal neurodegenerative prion diseases are caused by the transmissible PrP(Sc) prion agent whose initial replication after peripheral inoculation takes place in follicular dendritic cells present in germinal centers of lymphoid organs. However, prion replication also occurs in lymphoid cells. To assess the role of the hematopoietic compartment in neuroinvasion and prion replication, we generated chimeric mice, on a uniform congenic C57/BL6J background, by bone marrow replacement with hematopoietic cells expressing different levels of PrP protein. Nine different types of chimeric mice were inoculated intraperitoneally either with the lymphotropic Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain or the non lymphotropic ME-7 scrapie strain, at different doses. Here, we clearly demonstrate that overexpression of PrP by the hematopoietic system, or the lack of PrP expression by the bone marrow derived cells, does not change the incubation time period of the disease, even when the mice are infected at limiting doses. We conclude that the hematopoietic compartment is more or less permissive to prion replication, both for RML and ME-7, but does not play a role in neuroinvasion. PMID:20957200

  14. Interaction between dendritic cells and nerve fibres in lymphoid organs after oral scrapie exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorban, Gauthier; Defaweux, Valérie; Demonceau, Caroline; Flandroy, Sylvain; Van Lerberghe, Pierre-Bernard; Falisse-Poirrier, Nandini; Piret, Joëlle; Heinen, Ernst; Antoine, Nadine

    2007-12-01

    In transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the infectious agent, called PrPsc, an abnormal isoform of the cellular prion protein, accumulates and replicates in lymphoid organs before affecting the nervous system. To clarify the cellular requirements for the neuroinvasion of the scrapie agent from the lymphoid organs to the central nervous system, we have studied, by confocal microscopy, the innervations within Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes and the spleen of mice in physiological conditions and after oral exposure to prion. Contacts between nerve fibres and PrPsc-associated cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), were evaluated in preclinical prion-infected mice. Using a double immunolabelling strategy, we demonstrated the lack of innervation of PrPsc-accumulating cells (FDCs). Contacts between nerve fibers and PrPsc-propagating cells (DCs) were detected in T-cell zones and cell-trafficking areas. This supports, for the first time, the possible implication of dendritic cells in the prion neuroinvasion process. PMID:17823814

  15. Role of gut macrophages in mice orally contaminated with scrapie or BSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignien, Thomas; Shakweh, Monjed; Calvo, Pilar; Marcé, Dominique; Salès, Nicole; Fattal, Elias; Deslys, Jean-Philippe; Couvreur, Patrick; Lasmezas, Corinne Ida

    2005-07-25

    While there is a growing consensus on the understanding of the propagation pathways after oral infection of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents and even if the central role of follicular dendritic cells is identified, little is known about the key players in the first steps of the infection and about the site of the disease development. We investigated the role of gut macrophages, which are capable of capturing aggregates of the prion protein. PLGA particles containing clodronate were designed in order to be orally administered and to target Peyer's patches for inducing gut-associated macrophages suicide in mice. Mice were subsequently infected with scrapie or BSE by the oral route. It was found that the efficacy of macrophage suppression in the Peyer's patches correlated well with an earlier appearance of PrPres in these formations and with a higher amount of PrPres at a later stage of the infection. Thus, the capture of infectious particles that have crossed the epithelial gut barrier and their elimination by macrophages seems to be a key event to restrict the amount of agent initiating the infection. PMID:15964722

  16. Prion replication in the hematopoietic compartment is not required for neuroinvasion in scrapie mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Loeuillet

    Full Text Available Fatal neurodegenerative prion diseases are caused by the transmissible PrP(Sc prion agent whose initial replication after peripheral inoculation takes place in follicular dendritic cells present in germinal centers of lymphoid organs. However, prion replication also occurs in lymphoid cells. To assess the role of the hematopoietic compartment in neuroinvasion and prion replication, we generated chimeric mice, on a uniform congenic C57/BL6J background, by bone marrow replacement with hematopoietic cells expressing different levels of PrP protein. Nine different types of chimeric mice were inoculated intraperitoneally either with the lymphotropic Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML strain or the non lymphotropic ME-7 scrapie strain, at different doses. Here, we clearly demonstrate that overexpression of PrP by the hematopoietic system, or the lack of PrP expression by the bone marrow derived cells, does not change the incubation time period of the disease, even when the mice are infected at limiting doses. We conclude that the hematopoietic compartment is more or less permissive to prion replication, both for RML and ME-7, but does not play a role in neuroinvasion.

  17. Protective effect of the AT137RQ and ARQK176 PrP alleles against classical scrapie in Sarda breed sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Gabriele; Scavia, Gaia; Sala, Marcello; Cosseddu, Gianmario; Chiappini, Barbara; Conte, Michela; Esposito, Elena; Lorenzetti, Raniero; Perfetti, Gabriella; Marconi, Paola; Scholl, Francesco; Barbaro, Katia; Bella, Antonino; Nonno, Romolo; Agrimi, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    The susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is under the control of the host’s prion protein (PrP) gene and is also influenced by the strain of the agent. PrP polymorphisms at codons 136 (A/V), 154 (R/H) and 171 (Q/R/H) are the main determinants of susceptibility/resistance of sheep to classical scrapie. They are combined in four main variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programmes have been undertaken on this basis in the European Union and the USA to increase the frequency of the resistant ARR allele in sheep populations. Herein, we report the results of a multi-flock study showing the protective effect of polymorphisms other than those at codons 136, 154 and 171 in Sarda breed sheep. All ARQ/ARQ affected sheep (n = 154) and 378 negative ARQ/ARQ controls from four scrapie outbreaks were submitted to sequencing of the PrP gene. The distribution of variations other than those at the standard three codons, between scrapie cases and negative controls, was statistically different in all flocks. In particular, the AT137RQ and ARQK176 alleles showed a clear protective effect. This is the first study demonstrating a protective influence of alleles other than ARR under field conditions. If further investigations in other sheep breeds and with other scrapie sources confirm these findings, the availability of various protective alleles in breeding programmes of sheep for scrapie resistance could be useful in breeds with a low frequency of the ARR allele and would allow maintaining a wider variability of the PrP gene. PMID:19171116

  18. Strain specific resistance to murine scrapie associated with a naturally occurring human prion protein polymorphism at residue 171.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Striebel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE or prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders associated with conversion of normal host prion protein (PrP to a misfolded, protease-resistant form (PrPres. Genetic variations of prion protein in humans and animals can alter susceptibility to both familial and infectious prion diseases. The N171S PrP polymorphism is found mainly in humans of African descent, but its low incidence has precluded study of its possible influence on prion disease. Similar to previous experiments of others, for laboratory studies we created a transgenic model expressing the mouse PrP homolog, PrP-170S, of human PrP-171S. Since PrP polymorphisms can vary in their effects on different TSE diseases, we tested these mice with four different strains of mouse-adapted scrapie. Whereas 22L and ME7 scrapie strains induced typical clinical disease, neuropathology and accumulation of PrPres in all transgenic mice at 99-128 average days post-inoculation, strains RML and 79A produced clinical disease and PrPres formation in only a small subset of mice at very late times. When mice expressing both PrP-170S and PrP-170N were inoculated with RML scrapie, dominant-negative inhibition of disease did not occur, possibly because interaction of strain RML with PrP-170S was minimal. Surprisingly, in vitro PrP conversion using protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA, did not reproduce the in vivo findings, suggesting that the resistance noted in live mice might be due to factors or conditions not present in vitro. These findings suggest that in vivo conversion of PrP-170S by RML and 79A scrapie strains was slow and inefficient. PrP-170S mice may be an example of the conformational selection model where the structure of some prion strains does not favor interactions with PrP molecules expressing certain polymorphisms.

  19. Clinical Presentation of Atypical Genital Herpes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 梁沛杨; 罗北京

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To make a clinical analysis on the basis of 36cases of atypical genital herpes (GH) patients. Methods: Thirty-six cases of atypical GH were diagnosedclinically, and their case histories, symptoms and signs wererecorded in detail and followed up. Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was adopted for testing HSV2-DNA with cotton-tippedswabs. Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) forserum anti-HSV2-IgM was done to establish a definfiivediagnosis. Other diagnoses were excluded at the same time bytesting for related pathogens including fungi, Chlamydia,Mycoplasma, Treponema pallidum, gonococci, Trichomonas,etc. Results: The main clinical manifestations of atypical GHwere: (1) small genital ulcers; (2) inflammation of urethralmeatus; (3) nonspecific genital erythema; (4) papuloid noduleson the glands; (5) nonspecific vaginitis. Twenty-three cases(64%) tested by PCR were HSV2-DNA sera-positive, and 36cases (100 %) anti-HSV2-IgM sera-positive by ELISA. Conclusion: atypical HSV is difficult to be diagnosed. Butthe combination of PCR and ELIAS will be helpful to thediagnosis of atypical HSV.

  20. Scrapie transmits to white-tailed deer by the oral route and has a molecular profile similar to chronic wasting disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this work was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer (WTD) to the agent of sheep scrapie and to compare the resultant PrPSc to that of the original inoculum and chronic wasting disease (CWD). We inoculated WTD by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal (I...

  1. A lympho-follicular microenvironment is required for pathological prion protein deposition in chronically inflamed tissues from scrapie-affected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrale, Caterina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Masia, Mariangela; Sechi, Stefania; Macciocu, Simonetta; Santucciu, Cinzia; Petruzzi, Mara; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    In sheep scrapie, pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition occurs in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. We investigated PrP(Sc) distribution in scrapie-affected sheep showing simultaneous evidence of chronic lymphofollicular, lymphoproliferative/non-lymphofollicular, and/or granulomatous inflammations in their mammary gland, lung, and ileum. To do this, PrP(Sc) detection was carried out via immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting techniques, as well as through inflammatory cell immunophenotyping. Expression studies of gene coding for biological factors modulating the host's inflammatory response were also carried out. We demonstrated that ectopic PrP(Sc) deposition occurs exclusively in the context of lymphofollicular inflammatory sites, inside newly formed and well-organized lymphoid follicles harboring follicular dendritic cells. On the contrary, no PrP(Sc) deposition was detected in granulomas, even when they were closely located to newly formed lymphoid follicles. A significantly more consistent expression of lymphotoxin α and β mRNA was detected in lymphofollicular inflammation compared to the other two types, with lymphotoxin α and β signaling new lymphoid follicles' formation and, likely, the occurrence of ectopic PrP(Sc) deposition inside them. Our findings suggest that, in sheep co-affected by scrapie and chronic inflammatory conditions, only newly formed lymphoid follicles provide a suitable micro-environment that supports the scrapie agent's replication in inflammatory sites, with an increased risk of prion shedding through body secretions/excretions. PMID:23658779

  2. A lympho-follicular microenvironment is required for pathological prion protein deposition in chronically inflamed tissues from scrapie-affected sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Maestrale

    Full Text Available In sheep scrapie, pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc deposition occurs in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. We investigated PrP(Sc distribution in scrapie-affected sheep showing simultaneous evidence of chronic lymphofollicular, lymphoproliferative/non-lymphofollicular, and/or granulomatous inflammations in their mammary gland, lung, and ileum. To do this, PrP(Sc detection was carried out via immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting techniques, as well as through inflammatory cell immunophenotyping. Expression studies of gene coding for biological factors modulating the host's inflammatory response were also carried out. We demonstrated that ectopic PrP(Sc deposition occurs exclusively in the context of lymphofollicular inflammatory sites, inside newly formed and well-organized lymphoid follicles harboring follicular dendritic cells. On the contrary, no PrP(Sc deposition was detected in granulomas, even when they were closely located to newly formed lymphoid follicles. A significantly more consistent expression of lymphotoxin α and β mRNA was detected in lymphofollicular inflammation compared to the other two types, with lymphotoxin α and β signaling new lymphoid follicles' formation and, likely, the occurrence of ectopic PrP(Sc deposition inside them. Our findings suggest that, in sheep co-affected by scrapie and chronic inflammatory conditions, only newly formed lymphoid follicles provide a suitable micro-environment that supports the scrapie agent's replication in inflammatory sites, with an increased risk of prion shedding through body secretions/excretions.

  3. Features of follicular dendritic cells in ovine pharyngeal tonsil: an in vivo and in vitro study in the context of scrapie pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppets, Vinciane; Defaweux, Valerie; Piret, Joelle; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Grobet, Luc; Antoine, Nadine

    2011-05-15

    Although the alimentary tract has been suggested as the most likely portal of entry in natural scrapie, a growing amount of data indicates that the respiratory system and more specifically the pharyngeal tonsils serve as a natural portal of entry for scrapie. This study describes for the first time the broad cell populations in the lymphoid compartment of pharyngeal tonsils and more specifically inside the lymphoid follicles where the scrapie agent accumulates during the period of latency. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), stromal cells located in the light zone of the germinal centre of lymphoid follicles, seem to be the principal causal factor in the accumulation of the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Knowing that efficient lymphoreticular prion propagation requires PrPc expression, we analysed the expression of PrPc with the mouse monoclonal antibody Pri 909 both in situ and on FDC-cluster-enriched cell suspensions. In situ, a positive staining was observed in the germinal centre of pharyngeal lymph follicles. The germinal centre labelling was due to the presence of a follicular dendritic network as revealed after immunogold staining of isolated FDC clusters. Our results suggest that the pharyngeal lymphoreticular system and more specifically PrPc expressing follicular dendritic cells could serve as a prion "reservoir" during the latency phase, thus playing a key role during the scrapie lymphoinvasion. PMID:21353313

  4. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the risk of transmission of classical scrapie via in vivo derived embryo transfer in ovine animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    . Under natural exposure conditions, animals that are heterozygous or homozygous A136R154R171 display respectively a low or negligible risk of being infected. The genetic control of the susceptibility to classical scrapie is also likely to impact on the risk of transmitting the disease via embryo transfer...

  5. Myenteric neurons of the ileum that express somatostatin are a target of prion neuroinvasion in an alimentary model of sheep scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrapie disease is an orally transmissible spongiform encephalopathy disease of sheep in which the causative agent, the prion, can disseminate to the brain via nerves innervating the gut. Nerve cells intrinsic to the ileum (enteric neurons) are the first part of the peripheral nervous system invaded...

  6. The effects of selective breeding against scrapie susceptibility on the genetic variability of the Latxa Black-Faced sheep breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legarra Andrés

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breeding sheep populations for scrapie resistance could result in a loss of genetic variability. In this study, the effect on genetic variability of selection for increasing the ARR allele frequency was estimated in the Latxa breed. Two sources of information were used, pedigree and genetic polymorphisms (fifteen microsatellites. The results based on the genealogical information were conditioned by a low pedigree completeness level that revealed the interest of also using the information provided by the molecular markers. The overall results suggest that no great negative effect on genetic variability can be expected in the short time in the population analysed by selection of only ARR/ARR males. The estimated average relationship of ARR/ARR males with reproductive females was similar to that of all available males whatever its genotype: 0.010 vs. 0.012 for a genealogical relationship and 0.257 vs. 0.296 for molecular coancestry, respectively. However, selection of only ARR/ARR males implied important losses in founder animals (87 percent and low frequency alleles (30 percent in the ram population. The evaluation of mild selection strategies against scrapie susceptibility based on the use of some ARR heterozygous males was difficult because the genetic relationships estimated among animals differed when pedigree or molecular information was used, and the use of more molecular markers should be evaluated.

  7. IMPY, a potential β-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of Aβ plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [125I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [125I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [125I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with 123I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging

  8. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome C3 CD46 CFB CFH CFHR5 CFI THBD Related Information ... Manual Consumer Version: Thrombocytopenia Merck Manual Professional Version: Complement System Orphanet: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Patient Support ...

  10. Figurative language processing in atypical populations: the ASD perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulchanova, Mila; Saldaña, David; Chahboun, Sobh; Vulchanov, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of experimental and clinical research documenting problems in figurative language processing in atypical populations with a focus on the Autistic Spectrum. Research in the comprehension and processing of figurative language in autism invariably documents problems in this area. The greater paradox is that even at the higher end of the spectrum or in the cases of linguistically talented individuals with Asperger syndrome, where structural language competence is intact, problems with extended language persist. If we assume that figurative and extended uses of language essentially depend on the perception and processing of more concrete core concepts and phenomena, the commonly observed failure in atypical populations to understand figurative language remains a puzzle. Various accounts have been offered to explain this issue, ranging from linking potential failure directly to overall structural language competence (Norbury, 2005; Brock et al., 2008) to right-hemispheric involvement (Gold and Faust, 2010). We argue that the dissociation between structural language and figurative language competence in autism should be sought in more general cognitive mechanisms and traits in the autistic phenotype (e.g., in terms of weak central coherence, Vulchanova et al., 2012b), as well as failure at on-line semantic integration with increased complexity and diversity of the stimuli (Coulson and Van Petten, 2002). This perspective is even more compelling in light of similar problems in a number of conditions, including both acquired (e.g., Aphasia) and developmental disorders (Williams Syndrome). This dissociation argues against a simple continuity view of language interpretation. PMID:25741261

  11. Figurative language processing in atypical populations: The ASD perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila eVulchanova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of experimental and clinical research documenting problems in figurative language processing in atypical populations with a focus on the Autistic Spectrum. Research in the comprehension and processing of figurative language in autism invariably documents problems in this area. The greater paradox is that even at the higher end of the spectrum or in the cases of linguistically talented individuals with Asperger syndrome, where structural language competence is intact, problems with extended language persist. If we assume that figurative and extended uses of language essentially depend on the perception and processing of more concrete core concepts and phenomena, the commonly observed failure in atypical populations to understand figurative language remains a puzzle.Various accounts have been offered to explain this issue, ranging from linking potential failure directly to overall structural language competence (Brock et al., 2008; Norbury, 2005 to right-hemispheric involvement (Gold and Faust, 2010. We argue that the dissociation between structural language and figurative language competence in autism should be sought in more general cognitive mechanisms and traits in the autistic phenotype (e.g., in terms of weak central coherence, Vulchanova et al., 2012b, as well as failure at on-line semantic integration with increased complexity and diversity of the stimuli (Coulson and van Petten, 2002. This perspective is even more compelling in light of similar problems in a number of conditions, including both acquired (e.g., Aphasia and developmental disorders (Williams Syndrome. This dissociation argues against a simple continuity view of language interpretation.

  12. Atypical MRI appearance of desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the atypical MRI features and histopathological findings of a desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma in an 8-year-old girl. The mass was predominantly solid with a large, solid, non-enhancing exophytic component. The adjacent brain showed cortical necrosis and white-matter gliosis, suggesting earlier hypoxia. (orig.)

  13. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  14. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  15. Disentangling the Emerging Evidence around Atypical Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Clark, Emma M

    2012-01-01

    Atypical femur fractures are rare but a growing concern, as they are more common in patients who use bisphosphonates. The best radiology-based studies have had access to only short-term exposure data, while the studies using prescription databases with substantial long-term data did not have access...

  16. Atypical manifestation of dural arteriovenous fistula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary dural arteriovenous fistula presenting as infantile stroke, in a fifteen month old boy, is reported. The initial impression on CT scan in this case was misleading, due to the atypical appearance of the pathological periventricular blood vessels, interpreted as periventricular calcification.

  17. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, William V.; Dickson, Chata A.; Balsamo, Lyn M.; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y.; Farren, Kevin M.; Wheeler, Emily E.; McIlvane, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded…

  18. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how…

  19. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    OpenAIRE

    Derek To; Aaron Wong; Valentina Montessori

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  20. Atypical fractures on long term bisphosphonates therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussein, W

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates reduce fractures risk in patients with osteoporosis. A new pattern of fractures is now being noted in patients on prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. We report a case of an atypical femoral fracture with preceding pain and highlight the characteristics of these fractures.

  1. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  2. Non-diabetic atypical necrobiosis lipoidica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One 8 year female child had asymptomatic, anaesthetic, hypohidrotic, atrophic, yellowish, waxy plaque on the front of left thigh since 2 months. No nerve thickening was observed clinically or histopathologically. Hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, epidermal atrophy, degeneration of collagen, mononuclear granulomas and perivascular mononuclear infiltrate confirmed the clinical diagnosis of atypical necrobiosis lipoidica.

  3. PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN): Further expansion of the clinical, radiological and mutation spectrum associated with infantile and atypical childhood-onset disease

    OpenAIRE

    Illingworth, M.A.; Carr, L J; Kurian, M.A.; Meyer, E.; Chong, W.K.; Manzur, A.Y.; Younis, R.; Hardy, C; McDonald, F.; Childs, A. M.; Stewart, B.; Warren, D.; KNEEN, R; King, M.D.; Hayflick, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) is a major phenotype of autosomal recessive Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA). We describe the clinical phenotypes, neuroimaging features and PLA2G6 mutations in 5 children, of whom 4 presented with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). One other patient was diagnosed with the onset of PLAN in childhood, and our report highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with this atypical PLAN subtype. In this series, the ...

  4. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  5. Atypical Alstrom syndrome with novel ALMS1 mutations precluded by current diagnostic criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian

    2014-02-01

    We report on clinical and genetic studies in a non-consanguineous Irish sib-pair with infantile dilated cardiomyopathy and retinopathy. A diagnosis of Alström Syndrome (AS) was considered and diagnostic testing pursued. The Alströms gene (ALMS1) is very large (23 exons) and diagnostic testing of mutational hotspots (exon 6, 8 and 10) was negative. Furthermore the siblings were tall and did not have the typical phenotype of nystagmus, photophobia, obesity or hearing loss and so the AS diagnosis was removed. We then sought to identify the causative gene in this family using whole exome sequencing. Unexpectedly, the exome analysis identified novel compound heterozygous ALMS1 mutations in exon 5 (c.777delT:p.D260fs*26) and exon 20 (c.12145_12146insC:p.S4049fs*36) that segregated with the phenotype. Although the siblings show some clinical overlap with AS, their phenotype is not classical. It is plausible that their atypical presentation may be due to the location of the ALMS1 mutations outside the usual mutational hotspots. Our findings show how atypical cases of AS may be missed under the current diagnostic guidelines and support consideration of complete ALMS1 sequencing in children with two or more features, even if all of the core clinical features of AS are not present.

  6. A New, Atypical Case of Cobalamin F Disorder Diagnosed by Whole Exome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Panayiotis; D'Alessandro, Mariella; Lochhead, Paul; Samant, Shalaka; Bisset, W Michael; Hauptfleisch, Catherine; Dean, John

    2016-02-01

    Cobalamin F (cblF) disorder, caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the LMBRD1 gene, is a recognised cause of developmental delay, pancytopaenia and failure to thrive which may present in the neonatal period. A handful of cases have been reported in the medical literature. We report a new case, diagnosed at the age of 6 years through whole exome sequencing, with atypical features including prominent metopic suture, cleft palate, unilateral renal agenesis and liver abnormalities, which broaden the phenotypic spectrum. PMID:26997947

  7. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti D′Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  8. Primary lateral sclerosis mimicking atypical parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlinah, Ibrahim M; Bhatia, Kailash P; Østergaard, Karen;

    2007-01-01

    the atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Here we describe five patients initially referred with a diagnosis of levodopa-unresponsive atypical parkinsonism (n = 4) or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (n = 1), but subsequently found to have features consistent with PLS instead. Onset age varied from......Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), the upper motor neurone variant of motor neurone disease, is characterized by progressive spinal or bulbar spasticity with minimal motor weakness. Rarely, PLS may present with clinical features resembling parkinsonism resulting in occasional misdiagnosis as one of...... eventually seen in all patients. Anterior horn cell involvement developed in three cases. Early gait disturbances resulting in falls were seen in all patients and none of them responded to dopaminergic medications. Two patients underwent dopamine transporter (DaT) SPECT scanning with normal results. Other...

  9. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  10. Atypical burkitt's lymphoma transforming from follicular lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chung Lap P; Loong Florence; Hwang Yu Y; Chim Chor S

    2011-01-01

    Amongst follicular lymphoma that transforms into a high-grade lymphoma, majority are diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Here we reported a rare atypical Burkitt's lymphoma transformation from an asymptomatic follicular lymphoma. Lymph node biopsy showed a composite lymphoma with infiltration of the inter-follicular areas by high grade small non-cleaved lymphoma cells amongst neoplastic follicles. Moreover, FISH and molecular genetic study confirmed concomitant MYC translocations and t(14;18) in t...

  11. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    OpenAIRE

    Troxell, Megan L.; Donald C Houghton

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease classically presents with aggressive necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, often with pulmonary hemorrhage. The pathologic hallmark is linear staining of GBMs for deposited immunoglobulin G (IgG), usually accompanied by serum autoantibodies to the collagen IV alpha-3 constituents of GBMs. Methods Renal pathology files were searched for cases with linear anti-GBM to identify cases with atypical or indolent course. Histopa...

  12. Transpupillary thermotherapy for atypical central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ryosuke Kawamura1,2, Hidenao Ideta1, Hideyuki Hori1, Kenya Yuki2, Tsuyoshi Uno1, Tatsurou Tanabe1, Kazuo Tsubota2, Tsutomu Kawasaki11Ideta Eye Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan; 2Keio University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC has been traditionally treated with laser photocoagulation. We thought that transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT utilizing a lower temperature than that of conventional laser photocoagulation might minimize permanent retinal and choroidal damage. Studies suggest that undesirable effects on vision due to TTT are minimal even if it is applied to foveal and/or parafoveal lesions when TTT requires a larger irradiation spot. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of TTT in the management of atypical CSC.Methods: We defined atypical CSC as bullous retinal detachment with diffuse or several leakages, severe leakage with fibrin formation under serous retinal detachment, or leakage within a pigment epithelium detachment. Eight consecutive patients with atypical CSC underwent visual acuity testing, ophthalmic examination, color photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography to evaluate the results of transpupillary thermotherapy. Retreatment of atypical CSC was based on ophthalmic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. TTT was performed on the leaking spots shown in fluorescein angiography, with a power of 50–250 mW, spot size of 500–1200 µm, and exposure time of 13–60 seconds to minimize retinal damage.Results: In five of eight affected eyes, serous detachments completely resolved within 1 month after the initial TTT. One eye had persistent subretinal fluid and required a second TTT treatment. Two eyes showed no resolution of CSC and were treated by conventional photocoagulation. Initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/600 to 20/20 (mean, 20/40; median, 20/30. Final BCVA

  13. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF

  14. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalyan, Z. A.; Ter-Pogossyan, Z. R.; Abroyan, L. O.; Hakobyan, L. H.; Avetisyan, A. S.; Yu, Karalyan N.; Karalova, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection. PMID:27536044

  15. Analysis of Protein Levels of 24 Cytokines in Scrapie Agent-Infected Brain and Glial Cell Cultures from Mice Differing in Prion Protein Expression Levels ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Striebel, James F; Peterson, Karin E.; Chesebro, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Activation of microglia and astroglia is seen in many neurodegenerative diseases including prion diseases. Activated glial cells produce cytokines as a protective response against certain pathogens and as part of the host inflammatory response to brain damage. In addition, cytokines might also exacerbate tissue damage initiated by other processes. In the present work using multiplex assays to analyze protein levels of 24 cytokines in scrapie agent-infected C57BL/10 mouse brains, we observed e...

  16. Treatment of Scrapie Pathogen 263K With Tetracycline Partially Abolishes Protease-resistant Activity in vitro and Reduces Infectivity in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN-JUN GUO; DE-XIN WANG; XIAO-PING DONG; JUN HAN; HAI-LAN YAO; BAO-YUN ZHANG; JIAN-MEI GAO; JIN ZHANG; XIN-LI XIAO; XIAO-FAN WANG; WEI-QIN ZHAO

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the possible effect of tetracycline on protease-resistant activity in vitro and infectivity in vivo of a scrapie strain 263K.Methods Scrapie pathogens were incubated with tetracycline at different concentrations for various periods of time and protease-resistant PrP signals were evaluated with proteinase K-treatment and Western blots.The preparations treated with tetracycline were intracerebrally inoculated into golden hamsters and typical TSE manifestations were noted.PrPSc in brain tissues of the infected animals was detected by PrP specific Western blot assays. Results Protease-resistant PrP was significantly reduced in or removed from the preparations treated with tetracycline in a dose-dependant manner.Compared with the control group after incubated for 53.75±0.50 days,the preparations treated with 5 mmol/L and 20 mmol/L tetracycline prolonged the incubation time of 61.5±1.73 and 59.5±0.58 days (P<0.05). Conclusion Treatment of scrapie pathogen 263K with tetracycline reduces or removes its protease-resistant activity in vitro.

  17. Management of Typical and Atypical Hangman's Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Beagrie, Christopher; Woolley, Ele; Zakaria, Rasheed; Radon, Mark; Clark, Simon; Pillay, Robin; Wilby, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study of a prospectively maintained database. Objective Our aim was to retrospectively review management and outcomes of patients with low-grade hangman's fractures, specifically looking at differences in outcomes between collars and halo immobilization. We also studied fracture patterns and their treatment outcomes. Methods Forty-one patients with hangman's fractures were identified from 105 patients with axis fractures between 2007 and 2013. Typical hangman's fractures were defined as traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis causing a bilateral pars interarticularis fracture. Fractures involving the posterior cortex of C2 on one or both sides or an asymmetrical pattern were defined as atypical. Results There were 41 patients with a mean age of 59 years, with 13 (31.7%) typical and 28 (68.2%) atypical fractures. There were 22 (53.6%) type 1 fractures, 7 (41.4%) type 2 fractures, and 2 (4.9%) type 2a fractures in this series. Cervical collars were used to manage 11 patients (27% of all patients with hangman's fractures) and halo orthosis was used in 27 (65.8%). Three (7.3%) patients underwent surgical fixation of the fracture. Bony union was achieved in all patients on radiologic follow-up. Permanent neurologic deficit occurred in one patient due to associated injuries. Neck pain and stiffness were reported more commonly in the atypical group, but this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusions The majority of hangman type fractures can be treated nonoperatively. We found no difference in outcomes between a rigid collar or halo immobilization for treatment of low-grade fractures. Radiologic follow-up is essential to identify cases of nonunion. PMID:27099816

  18. Hematological Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Erdogan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics cause less frequently extrapyramidal system symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and hyperprolactinemia than typical antipsychotics. However hematological side effects such as leukopenia and neutropenia could occur during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. These side effects could lead to life threatening situations and the mortality rate due to drug related agranulocytosis is about 5-10%. There are several hypothesis describing the mechanisms underlying drug induced leukopenia and/or neutropenia such as direct toxic effects of these drugs upon the bone marrow or myeloid precursors, immunologic destruction of the granulocytes or supression of the granulopoiesis. Clozapine is the antipsychotic agent which has been most commonly associated with agranulocytosis. A nitrenium ion which is formed by the bioactivation of clozapine is thought to have an important role in the pathophysiogy of this adverse effect. Aside from clozapine, there are several case reports reporting an association between olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and leukopenia. We did not find any study or case report presenting amisulpride or sulpride related hematological side effects in our literature search. Patients who had hematological side effects during their previous antipsychotic drug treatments and who had lower baseline blood leukocyte counts, have higher risk to develop leukopenia or neutropenia during their current antipsychotic treatment. Once leukopenia and neutropenia develops, drugs thought to be responsible for this side effect should be discontinued or dosages should be lowered. In some cases iniatition of lithium or G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy may be helpful in normalizing blood cell counts. Clinicans should avoid any combination of drugs known to cause hematological side effects. Besides during antipsychotic treatment, infection symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat or

  19. Trisomy 18 with unilateral atypical ectrodactyly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.C. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Becerra et al. recently reported on an infant with multiple congenital anomalies who had trisomy 18. This preterm infant presented with bilateral ectrodactyly of feet, small cleft palate, esophageal atresia with associated tracheoesophageal fistula, congenital heart disease and other anomalies. The authors referenced article by Castle and Bernstein, in which they reported a male with trisomy 18 and cleft foot as well as a review of the literature which showed 2 other infants with trisomy 18 and ectrodactyly of the feet. An additional case of trisomy 18 associated with multiple congenital anomalies, including unilaterial, atypical ectrodactyly of the left foot.

  20. Gorlin’s syndrome: Atypical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay N. Agrawal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. The condition appears to have complete penetrance and variable expressivity, which makes clinilcal presentation among families variable. All known BCNS carry mutations in PATCHED gene. A 65 years old male patient presented with complaints of characteristic skin lesions on his face, back, palms since early adulthood. The lesions were pigmented nodules with characteristic border. The histopathology showed characteristic features suggestive of Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC. This case was atypical due to appearance of lesions quite later in life.

  1. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Premeshwar Niwant; Mukta Motwani; Sushil Naik

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic res...

  2. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  3. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  4. Atypical Teratoid/Rrhabdoid Tumour of Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Sidhu,P.Sakhuja,V.Malhotra,R.Gondal S.Kumar

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET / medulloblastoma (MB are the most commonmalignantcentral nervous tumors of the first decade of life. Atypical teratoid / rhabdoid tumor (ATT / RT isa tumor of infancy and childhood although occasional cases have also been described in adults.ATT/RT has a characteristic histopathological, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural features.ATT /RT is a rare tumor, incidence of which remains to be defined with only hundred publishedcases. The present report docurilents the clinical features, histological and immunohistochemicalfindings of a case ofATT / RT.

  5. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain' most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of 'orofacial pain' are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of 'orofacial pain' remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of 'atypical odontalgia'. 'Atypical odontalgia' is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. 'Atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia' can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain. PMID:26464604

  6. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  7. Keloidal Atypical Fibroxanthoma: Case and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongdee, Emily; Touloei, Khasha; Shitabata, Paul K.; Shareef, Shahjahan; Maranda, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Keloidal atypical fibroxanthoma (KAF) has recently been categorized as a variant of atypical fibroxanthoma. This paper will emphasize the importance of including KAF in both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions which exhibit keloidal collagen and will also review the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis, histology, immunochemistry and treatments. PMID:27462224

  8. [Atypical cerebellar neurocytoma resembling a hemangioblastoma. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista Martínez, Olalla; Rivas López, Luis Alfredo; Pombo Otero, Jorge Francisco; Amaro Cendón, Santiago; Bravo García, Christian; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Through August 2013, 105 cases of intracranial extraventricular neurocytoma (EVN) had been described; 6% were located in cerebellum and 22% were atypical EVN. A rare morphologic form of neurocytoma, atypical EVN has had only 24 cases reported to date. Its prognosis is poorer than the typical central neurocytoma. This case report describes an atypical cerebellar EVN, a form that has not been reported yet, hence the interest of this article. We emphasise its cystic nature and mural nodule, in an infrequent presentation. EVN are low-incidence tumours that we need to take into consideration when making the differential diagnosis of cystic cerebellar lesions with mural nodule. Given that the prognosis of atypical EVNs depends on the atypical nature and on the grade of resection, medical follow up has to be more constant, due to the greater degree of recurrence. PMID:24837842

  9. Copy number variants in association with type 1 collagenopathy: Atypical osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Cartwright, Ashley; Smith, Kath; Arundel, Paul; Bishop, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    We report a sibling-pair and a 4-year old child from two families with an atypical presentation in Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). In the sib-pair, the older sibling initially came to medical attention due to a fracture history (Patient 1) and she was shown to have a COL1A2 mutation. In addition, she also had developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, and a history of frequent infections which led to a search for an alternate diagnosis. ArrayCGH revealed a 4.3 Mb duplication on chromosome 19q13.42q13.43, which was confirmed by FISH analysis. On further familial analysis, the younger sibling who had no previous fracture history was also found to have the COL1A2 mutation and tested positive for the 19q13.42q13.43 duplication (Patient 2). The 19q13 duplication appears to be the cause of intellectual disability in these siblings but given that this is a chromosomal duplication, it is still possible that there is an as yet unidentified cause that may account for the combined phenotype in this family. Patient 3 was a 4-year old child presenting with a femoral fracture, blue sclerae, developmental delay, and joint hypermobility. Genetic analyses confirmed a COL1A2 mutation but also revealed an 8.8 Mb deletion of 11q24.2q25, confirmed by G-band chromosome analysis. We discuss the differing phenotypes in patients presenting with atypical OI and stress the need to consider ancillary investigations in individuals presenting with heterogeneous phenotypic symptoms, not entirely attributable to OI. PMID:26471105

  10. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Nardo, Davide [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A. [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gardner, Ann [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  11. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in 99mTc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  12. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  13. [Atypical early posttraumatic syndromes (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, G E

    1974-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 1,925 head injuries, 283 patients (14.7%), could not be classified, neither in the group of simple head injuries without cerebral symptoms, nor in the group of typical concussions characterized by immediate amnesia or observed coma. We have prefered the rather neutral term of atypical early posttraumatic syndromes. In this group, apart from neurovegetative manifestations, partial disturbances of consciousness and perception, we have also classified delayed disturbances of consciousness. Special attention has been given to migraineous phenomena and to a syndrome, characteristic for children, described by Mealey. This is an intermediate group important from a medico-legal point of view because certain transient cerebral manifestations risk to be mistaken for psychological reactions. On the other hand symptoms probably of psychic origin were discussed. PMID:4469864

  14. Pedal edema associated with atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Munshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a patient diagnosed as a case of bipolar affective disorder complaining of bothersome incidence of pedal edema 1 month after the initiation of atypical antipsychotic regimen with risperidone and quetiapine. All hematological and biochemical profiles were found to be normal. On discontinuation of risperidone, the condition remained unresolved even after 2 weeks, and the edema progressed reaching her calves. On tapering the dose of quetiapine, she started showing gradual improvement in edematous condition. Quetiapine was slowly discontinued. No further recurrence of edema occurred, and hence, no further medication changes were implemented. Pedal edema was found to be resolved within weeks of dechallenge of the regimen. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale gave a score of 7 which denotes "probable" adverse drug reaction with quetiapine.

  15. [Treatment of atypical and neurotic depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, P; Umann, E; Kulawik, H

    1986-10-01

    Hitherto it has not been usual to talk in the German language about the therapy-oriented concept of two forms of the progress of atypical depression (Type A and Type V). The characteristic symptom of Type A is angst, together with phobias, physical complaints, etc. In Type V there are vegetative symptoms, often towards evening (Hypersomnia, difficulty in getting to sleep, increased appetite, increased weight, increased libido), accompanied by hysterical extrovert personality traits, and of intermittent occurrence. These clinical pictures are amenable to psychopharmalogical therapy. In conformity with the assumption of "somatic accommodation" treatment with antidepressives is recommended in the case neurotic depression, too, at least in the initial stages of treatment. PMID:3809300

  16. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Abrahamsen, Bo;

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) and denosumab reduce the risk of spine and nonspine fractures. Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) located in the subtrochanteric region and diaphysis of the femur have been reported in patients taking BPs and in patients on denosumab, but they also occur in patients with no...... exposure to these drugs. In this report, we review studies on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and medical management of AFFs, published since 2010. This newer evidence suggests that AFFs are stress or insufficiency fractures. The original case definition was revised to highlight radiographic features that...... distinguish AFFs from ordinary osteoporotic femoral diaphyseal fractures and to provide guidance on the importance of their transverse orientation. The requirement that fractures be noncomminuted was relaxed to include minimal comminution. The periosteal stress reaction at the fracture site was changed from a...

  17. Case Report: Atypical Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Vito; Rubbino, Gabriella; Leanza, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) (also called Bushy Syndrome or Amsterdam dwarfism), is a genetic disorder that can lead to several alterations. This disease affects both physical and neuropsychiatric development. The various abnormalities include facial dysmorphia (arched eyebrows, synophrys, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, down-turned angles of the mouth), upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, and gastrointestinal alterations. The prevalence of this syndrome is approximately one per 15,000. Ultrasound is not the perfect means to diagnose CdLS, however, many abnormalities can be detected prenatally by scrupulous image observation. We report an atypical CdLS case characterized by increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester, normal karyotype, saddle nose, micrognathia with receding jaw, low set ears, facies senilis, arthrogryposis of the hands, absence of the Aranzio ductus venous, dilatation of gallbladder and bowel, a unique umbilical artery, increased volume of amniotic fluid, and intrauterine growth retardation ending with the interruption of pregnancy. PMID:26834972

  18. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2 cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  19. Close interactions between sympathetic neural fibres and follicular dendritic cells network are not altered in Peyer's patches and spleen of C57BL/6 mice during the preclinical stage of 139A scrapie infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demonceau, Caroline; Piret, Joelle; Zorzi, Danièle; Thellin, Olivier; Heinen, Ernst

    2014-07-15

    During preclinical stage of prion diseases, secondary lymphoid organs seem to play an important role in prion amplification prior the invasion of the associated peripheral nervous system. In mice, it was shown that the relative positioning of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) affects the velocity of neuroinvasion following scrapie inoculation. In this study, we checked if scrapie infection, by oral or intraperitoneal route, could influence this neuroimmune interface between FDC and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive neural fibres within Peyer's patches (PP) and spleen of the C57BL/6 mouse strain. We concluded that, in vivo, scrapie 139A and ME7 strains do not modify FDC-SNS neuroimmune interface. However, age seems to alter this neuroimmune interface and thus could influence the neuroinvasion in prion pathogenesis. PMID:24841625

  20. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simona Spaccavento, Marina Del Prete, Angela Craca, Anna Loverre IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Cassano Murge, Bari, Italy Background: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS and aphasia. Aim: We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods: A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results: Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20, low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall, and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion: Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in

  1. Patterns and predictors of atypical language representation in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Krijn Kristian; Ferrier, Cyrille Henri

    2013-04-01

    In the majority of the normal population, the left hemisphere is dominant for language. In epilepsy, a higher proportion of 'atypical' language representation is encountered. This can follow one of three patterns: (1) altered interhemispheric representation, where the spectrum of lateralisation is shifted to the right; (2) interhemispheric dissociation of linguistic subfunctions; or (3) intrahemispheric changes in representation. Knowledge of these patterns is essential for avoiding postoperative language deficits in epilepsy patients undergoing surgery. Several predictors of atypical language representation exist. It is more prevalent in left-handed individuals. Lesions in rough proximity to classical language areas are more associated with atypical language, although in some cases, remote lesions, such as in the hippocampus, can also lead to altered language representation. The more disruptive the lesion, the more likely atypical language is to be found. Widespread and frequent interictal epileptiform discharges are also associated with atypical language. Atypical language representation is more likely to be present when injury or epilepsy onset occurred at a young age. Thus, a subgroup of patients can be defined in whom atypical language representation is more likely to be found. PMID:22942215

  2. Malignant atypical cell in urine cytology: a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakkar Nandita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to find out the characteristic morphology of malignant atypical cells which were missed on routine cytology of urine. Materials and methods In this retrospective study, we examined detailed cytomorphology of 18 cases of atypical urinary cytology which were missed on routine examination and were further proved on histopathology as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of bladder. The cytological features of these cases were compared with 10 cases of benign urine samples. Results There were 11 cases of high grade TCC and 7 cases of low grade TCC on histopathology of the atypical urine samples. Necrosis in the background and necrosed papillae were mostly seen in malignant atypical cells. The comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei (single cells with deep black structure-less nuclei were only observed in malignant atypical cells. The most consistent features in malignant atypical cells were: i high nuclear and cytoplasmic (N/C ratio ii nuclear pleomorphism iii nuclear margin irregularity iv hyperchromasia and v chromatin abnormalities Conclusion The present study emphasizes that nuclear features such as high N/C ratio, hyperchromasia and chromatin abnormalities are particularly useful for assessing the malignant atypical cells. Other cytological features such as comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei are also helpful for diagnosis but have limited value because they are less frequently seen.

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease a case report, with special attention to the electroencephalogram in this disorder and to its possible relationships to kuru, scrapie and «mad cow disease»

    OpenAIRE

    A.H. Chapman; Djalma Vieira e Silva

    1993-01-01

    A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 58-year-old Brazillian cattle rancher and businessman is presented. The EEG was normal, which is consistent with the fact that it was made during the first half of his illness; in a later stage suppression of normal rhythms by slow moderate voltage waves would be expected. The resemblances of kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease» to C-J disease are discussed. In each of these 4 illnesses the patient or affected animal (scrapie and «mad cow disease") (a) ...

  4. Accumulation and aberrant composition of cholesteryl esters in Scrapie-infected N2a cells and C57BL/6 mouse brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bari Michele A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Cholesterol changes have been described in prion-cell models and in experimental rodent scrapie; yet, the pattern of this association is still controversial. Methods To shed light on the matter, we analysed and compared cholesterol variations in ScN2a cells and in brains of Scrapie-infected C57Bl/6 mice, using two different methods: a fluorimetric-enzymatic cholesterol assay, and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS. Results Compared to uninfected controls, similar cholesterol metabolism anomalies were observed in infected cells and brains by both methods; however, only HPLC-MS revealed statistically significant cholesterol variations, particularly in the cholesteryl esters (CE fraction. HPLC-MS analyses also revealed different fatty acid composition of the CE fraction in cells and brains. In N2a cells, their profile reflected that of serum, while in normal brains cholesteryl-linoleate only was found at detectable levels. Following prion infection, most CE species were increased in the CE pool of ScN2a cells, whereas a conspicuous amount of cholesteryl-arachidonate only was found to contribute to the cerebral increase of CE. Of interest, oral pravastatin administration to Scrapie-infected mice, was associated with a significant reduction of cerebral free cholesterol (FC along with a concomitant further increase of the CE pool, which included increased amounts of both cholesteryl-linoleate and cholesteryl-arachidonate. Conclusion Although mechanistic studies are needed to establish the pathophysiological relevance of changes in cerebral CE concentrations, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report to provide evidence of increased cholesterol esterification in brains of prion-infected mice, untreated and treated with pravastatin.

  5. [The modern concept of atypical depression: four definitions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    This report describes and compares four current concepts and definitions of atypical depression. Since its emergence, atypical depression has been considered a depressive state that can be relieved by MAO inhibitors. Davidson classified the symptomatic features of atypical depression into type A, which is predominated by anxiety symptoms, and type V, which is represented by atypical vegetative symptoms, such as hyperphagia, weight gain, oversleeping, and increased sexual drive. Features that are shared by both subtypes include: early onset, female predominance, outpatient predominance, mildness, few suicide attempts, nonbipolarity, nonendogeneity, and few psychomotor changes. Based on these features, bipolar depression can also be defined as atypical depression type V. Herein, we examine and classify four concepts of atypical depression according to the endogenous-nonendogenous (melancholic-nonmelancholic) and unipolar-bipolar dichotomies. The Columbia University group (see Quitkin, Stewart, McGrath, Klein et al.) and the New South Wales University group (see Parker) consider atypical depression to be chronic, mild, nonendogenous (nonmelancholic), unipolar depression. The former group postulates that mood reactivity is necessary, while the latter asserts the structural priority of anxiety symptoms over mood symptoms and the significance of interpersonal rejection sensitivity. For the Columbia group, the significance of mood reactivity reflects the theory that mood nonreactivity is the essential symptom of "endogenomorphic depression", which was proposed by Klein as typical depression. Thus, mood reactivity is not related to overreactivity or hyperactivity, which are often observed in atypical depressives. However, Parker postulates that psychomotor symptoms are the essential features of melancholia, which he recognizes as typical depression; therefore, the New South Wales group does not recognize the significance of mood reactivity. The New South Wales group

  6. Emergence of a novel bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion from an atypical H-type BSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The H-type of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) was serially passaged in bovinized transgenic (TgBoPrP) mice. At the fourth passage, most challenged mice showed a typical H-BSE phenotype with incubation periods of 223 ± 7.8 days. However, a different phenotype of BSE prion with shorter incubation periods of 109 ± 4 days emerged in a minor subset of the inoculated mice. The latter showed distinct clinical signs, brain pathology, and abnormal prion protein profiles as compared to H-BSE and other known BSE strains in mice. This novel prion was transmitted intracerebrally to cattle, with incubation periods of 14.8 ± 1.5 months, with phenotypes that differed from those of other bovine prion strains. These data suggest that intraspecies transmission of H-BSE in cattle allows the emergence of a novel BSE strain. Therefore, the continuation of feed ban programs may be necessary to exclude the recycling of H-BSE prions, which appear to arise spontaneously, in livestock. Such measures should help to reduce the risks from both novel and known strains of BSE. PMID:26948374

  7. Emergence of a novel bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion from an atypical H-type BSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The H-type of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) was serially passaged in bovinized transgenic (TgBoPrP) mice. At the fourth passage, most challenged mice showed a typical H-BSE phenotype with incubation periods of 223 ± 7.8 days. However, a different phenotype of BSE prion with shorter incubation periods of 109 ± 4 days emerged in a minor subset of the inoculated mice. The latter showed distinct clinical signs, brain pathology, and abnormal prion protein profiles as compared to H-BSE and other known BSE strains in mice. This novel prion was transmitted intracerebrally to cattle, with incubation periods of 14.8 ± 1.5 months, with phenotypes that differed from those of other bovine prion strains. These data suggest that intraspecies transmission of H-BSE in cattle allows the emergence of a novel BSE strain. Therefore, the continuation of feed ban programs may be necessary to exclude the recycling of H-BSE prions, which appear to arise spontaneously, in livestock. Such measures should help to reduce the risks from both novel and known strains of BSE. PMID:26948374

  8. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vascellari

    Full Text Available Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc (PrP(Res. Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8 and 10(-13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  9. CD21-Positive Follicular Dendritic Cells: A Possible Source of PrPSc in Lymph Node Macrophages of Scrapie-Infected Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Lynn M.; Cheevers, William P.; Davis, William C.; Knowles, Donald P.; O’Rourke, Katherine I.

    2003-01-01

    Natural sheep scrapie is a prion disease characterized by the accumulation of PrPSc in brain and lymphoid tissues. Previous studies suggested that lymph node macrophages and follicular dendritic cells (FDC) accumulate PrPSc. In this study, lymph nodes were analyzed for the presence of PrPSc and macrophage or FDC markers using dual immunohistochemistry. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the C-terminus of PrP reacted with CD172a+ macrophages and CD21+ FDC processes in secondary follicles. However,...

  10. [Apropos of atypical melancholia with Sustiva (efavirenz)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J P; Halleguen, O; Picard, A; Lang, J M; Danion, J M

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has changed dramatically in recent years as a result of the development of new drugs which allows a variety of multitherapy combinations more adapted to patients' needs and thereby improving compliance. Efavirenz is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In addition to a potent antiretroviral activity, efavirenz is an easy-to-take drug with once-daily dosing and is usually well tolerated. Efavirenz, however, may induce psychic alterations which are variable and atypical in both their clinical presentation and severity. As early as the first days of treatment, efavirenz may provoke surprising phenomena such as nightmares, vivid dreams, hallucinations or illusions, and twilight states. Depersonalization and derealization episodes, personality alterations, stream of thought troubles and unusual thought contents, atypical depression and cognitive disorders have also been observed. These phenomena may occur either early or later on treatment. The prevalence of severe psychic disorders is less than 5%, but they are often responsible for harmful treatment discontinuations. Psychiatric side effects are heterogeneous and probably not related to pre-existing psychologic weakness. We do not have enough data to evaluate these side effects and their etiopathogeny. The drug could act directly on the central nervous system since it crosses the blood-brain barrier, on the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems. Some authors have compared efavirenz-induced psychic effects to those associated with LSD and found structural similarities between the two molecules. However, the heterogeneity and low prevalence of the psychiatric side effects of efavirenz suggest and individual sensitivity. In order to improve patient care, a better clinical approach, neuropsychological evaluation, and functional brain imagery should be used to progress in the analysis and comprehension of these disorders. We discuss in this paper the case of Mister H. This HIV

  11. Acute rhabdomyolysis associated with atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, A. J.; Duncan, R; Henderson, L.; Jamal, G A; Kennedy, P G

    1991-01-01

    We report a patient with atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with acute rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis may be the cause of elevation of creatine kinase sometimes seen in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  12. Quantitative methods for somatosensory evaluation in atypical odontalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Costa, Yuri Martins; Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana;

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify reliable somatosensory evaluation methods for atypical odontalgia (AO) patients. The computerized search included the main databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library). The studies included used the following quantitative sensory testing (QST...

  13. Teaching strategies for atypical presentation of illness in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Aselage, Melissa; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-07-01

    Atypical presentation of illness is a phenomenon where "seeing is believing." Expert geriatric nurses and clinicians know all too well the early signs and symptoms of this phenomenon, which frequently masquerades bacterial infections, pain, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or other serious medical ailments in older adults. Students, however, as novices to clinical practice, require interactive learning approaches to reflect on the patient's illness presentations, help with developing the necessary skills to analyze and synthesize clinically relevant data, and witness resolution of an atypical presentation when found and treated. Use of a case study as an educational tool can facilitate critical thinking about a clinical problem, such as atypical presentation of illness, for students within a problem-based learning format. Furthermore, we highlight strategies for teaching students atypical presentation of illness with consideration of student learning preferences, which include visual, auditory, reading, and kinesthetic modes of learning. PMID:20608591

  14. Atypical Toxoplasma gondii genotype in feral cats from the Fernando de Noronha Island, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, R P B; Almeida, J C; Lima, D C V; Pedrosa, C M; Magalhães, F J R; Alcântara, A M; Barros, L D; Vieira, R F C; Garcia, J L; Mota, R A

    2016-07-15

    Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Brazil have a different phenotypic and genotypic pattern, with predominance of virulent isolates and recombinant genotypes, compared to the North Hemisphere. Considering that a new T. gondii genotype, non-pathogenic to mice, was previously identified from free-range chickens from the Fernando de Noronha Island, Brazil, this study aimed to identify genotypes of this parasite in tissue samples of feral cats (Felis catus) from this Brazilian Island. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were detected in 18/31 (58%) feral cats. Two non-virulent T. gondii isolates were obtained by mouse bioassay. Genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP using 10 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, PK1, L358 and Apico) and an atypical strain of T. gondii (ToxoDB #146) was identified. This is the first report of this genotype in feral cats. PMID:27270396

  15. Atypical fibroxanthoma: An unusual skin neoplasm in xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Bandyopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive disorder related to defective deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA repair. Various cutaneous manifestations related to ultraviolet (UV damage characterize the clinical course. Primary malignant cutaneous neoplasms like squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma have been reported. Atypical fibroxanthoma is a rare dermal neoplasm occurring in UV-damaged skin. We report an unusual case of atypical fibroxanthoma in a 20-year-old male with XP.

  16. Atypical Fibroxanthoma: An Unusual Skin Neoplasm in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjana Bandyopadhyay; Dipanwita Nag; Sanjay Bandyopadhyay; Swapan Kumar Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder related to defective deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair. Various cutaneous manifestations related to ultraviolet (UV) damage characterize the clinical course. Primary malignant cutaneous neoplasms like squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma have been reported. Atypical fibroxanthoma is a rare dermal neoplasm occurring in UV-damaged skin. We report an unusual case of atypical fibroxanthoma in a 20-y...

  17. Atypical presentation of macrophagic myofasciitis 10 years post vaccination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Aisling M

    2012-02-03

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of muscle believed to be due to persistence of vaccine-derived aluminium hydroxide at the site of injection. The condition is characterised by diffuse myalgias, arthralgia and fatigue. We describe a patient with histologically confirmed MMF whose presentation was atypical with left chest and upper limb pain beginning more than 10 years post vaccination. Treatment with steroids led to symptomatic improvement. Although rare, clinicians should consider MMF in cases of atypical myalgia.

  18. An Atypical Case of Pityriasis Rosea Gigantea after Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papakostas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a common erythematosquamous eruption, typically presenting along the cleavage lines of the skin. A wide spectrum of atypical manifestations may challenge even the most experienced physician. Here we report a rare case of a suberythrodermic pityriasis rosea with gigantic plaques after an influenza vaccination, and we discuss the possible triggers of atypical manifestations of such a common dermatological disease in the setting of an altered immunity.

  19. Orthostatic Hypotension in Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Atypical Parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad; Johan Lökk

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is one of the commonly occurring nonmotor symptoms in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) and atypical parkinsonism (AP). We aimed to review current evidences on epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of OH in patients with IPD and AP. Major electronic medical databases were assessed including PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase up to February 2013. English-written original or review articles with keywords such as “Parkinson’s disease,” “atypical p...

  20. Persistent consequences of atypical early number concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichèleM. M.Mazzocco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available How does symbolic number knowledge performance help identify young children at risk for poor mathematics achievement outcomes? In research and practice, classification of mathematics learning disability (MLD, or dyscalculia is typically based on composite scores from broad measures of mathematics achievement. These scores do predict later math achievement levels, but do not specify the nature of math difficulties likely to emerge among students at greatest risk for long-term mathematics failure. Here we report that gaps in 2nd and 3rd graders’ number knowledge predict specific types of errors made on math assessments at Grade 8. Specifically, we show that early whole number misconceptions predict slower and less accurate performance, and atypical computational errors, on Grade 8 arithmetic tests. We demonstrate that basic number misconceptions can be detected by idiosyncratic responses to number knowledge items, and that when such misconceptions are evident during primary school they persist throughout the school age years, with variable manifestation throughout development. We conclude that including specific qualitative assessments of symbolic number knowledge in primary school may provide greater specificity of the types of difficulties likely to emerge among students at risk for poor mathematics outcomes.

  1. DENGUE WITH ATYPICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND WHO CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Mahadeorao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arboviral diseases. Dengue virus belongs to family Flaviviridae , has four serotypes that spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes . Dengue epidemics can have a significant economic and health t oll. Worldwide, an estimated 3.6 billion people are at risk of infection with about 50 - 100 million new cases each year Illness produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes varies from mild asymptomatic illness to severe fatal dengue haemorrhagic fe ver/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS. During the early febrile stage clinicians cannot predict which patients will progress to severe disease. Atypical manifestations were reported are associated with high risk of mortality. The existing WHO dengue classific ation scheme and case definitions have some drawbacks. A global strategy to reduce the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently un der development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future

  2. Atypical proliferating mucinous tumors of gigantic dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likić-Lađević Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (LMP are also known as atypically proliferating tumors. Ovarian tumors of LPM account for approximately 15% of all epithelial ovarian cancers. Mean age of occurrence is 40 years and they are 15-20 cm in diameter. Case report. A 32-year-old female patient was hospitalized as an urgent case with a large tumor mass that filled the entire abdomen. Cyst was 100 × 70 cm dimensions belonging to the right ovary and filled with 18 liters of content. Right adnexectomy, resection of the second ovary, as well as biopsy of the omentum were performed. Lymphadenectomy of the right iliac and obturator area was also performed. After receiving definitive histopathological results it was decided to perform a radical reoperation. On the 10th postoperative day relaparotomy, total hysterectomy and left adnexectomy were performed. The patient was released on the 6th postoperative day. She used to come to regular examinations up to date. Conclusion. This case is a proof that LMP tumors have low malignant potential, they grow slowly and can reach great proportions.

  3. Atypical focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Rizwan Khan; Taimur Saleem; Tanveer Ul Haq; Kanwal Aftab

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Focal nodular hyperplasia, a benign hepatic tumor, is usually asymptomatic. However, rarely the entity can cause symptoms, mandating intervention. METHOD: We present a case of focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver, which caused a considerable diagnostic dilemma due to its atypical presentation. RESULTS: A 29-year-old woman presented with a 15-year history of a progressively increasing mass in the right upper quadrant which was associated with pain and emesis. Examination showed a firm, mobile mass palpable below the right subcostal margin. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed an exophytic mass arising from hepatic segments III and IVb. Trucut biopsy of the hepatic mass was equivocal. Angiography showed a vascular tumor that was supplied by a tortuous branch of the proper hepatic artery. Surgical intervention for removal of the mass was undertaken. Intra-operatively, two large discrete tumors were found and completely resected. Histopathological examination showed features consistent with focal nodular hyperplasia. CONCLUSION: This description of an unusual case of focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver highlights the point that the diagnosis of otherwise benign hepatic tumors may be difficult despite extensive work-up in some cases.

  4. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable. PMID:26501689

  5. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  6. Atypical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Eric T

    2016-09-01

    A 14 year old patient with short stature, type I diabetes, and cataracts was referred for evaluation of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Radiography was suggestive of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with decreased bone mineral density for age. Targeted molecular and biochemical testing were normal in this patient. Whole exome sequencing was performed and showed compound heterozygosity for previously reported pathogenic GALNS variants which were diagnostic of mucopolysaccharidosis, type IVA (Morquio A). While this case describes neither a novel condition nor a new mutation, it does illustrate three important points in the diagnosis of patients with atypical forms of MPS IVA. First, that in many instances urine glycosaminoglycan analysis is not sufficient to rule out MPS IVA as a potential diagnosis. Patients in whom biochemical screening is advised should have measurement of leukocyte enzymatic activity. Second, that in patients with radiographic evidence of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with additional features or with normal targeted testing, MPS IVA should remain in the differential diagnosis. Third, that whole exome sequencing represents a viable diagnostic platform for evaluation of patients with unknown skeletal or metabolic disease. PMID:27331011

  7. Atypical sonographic patterns of fibroadenoma of the breast : pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To correlate the atypical sonographic patterns of fibroadenoma of the breast with the pathologic findings. Among 203 surgically proven 43 which were sonographically atypical fibroadenomas, were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic criteria for atypical variety, as seen on sonography, were an ill-defined margin, microlobulated or irregular shape, heterogeneous internal echo-pattern, posterior shadowing, microcalcification, and clefts. The atypical sonographic patterns of these 43 fibroadenomas were analysed and compared with the pathologic findings. Among 43 lesions, ill-defined margins or irregular shapes were seen in 15 cases, heterogeneous internal echo-patterns in 27, posterior attenuation in nine, and clefts in seven. Thirty-seven (86%) of the 43 were predominantly ductal or had a mixed ductal and stromal component. Eleven (73.3%) of fifteen ill-defined margin or irregular shaped lesions were caused by interdigitation of surrounding normal breast parenchyma and mass. Twenty two (81.5%) of 27 heterogeneous internal echo-pat-terns were related to dilated ducts, phyllodes features, collagen bundles, adenosis, microcalcification, or fat vacuoles. Eight (88.9%) of nine posterior attenuations were caused by collagen bundles, microcalcification, ductal proliferation or dilatation. All seven cases showing clefts revealed phyllodes features and dilated ducts. Most atypical fibroadenomas had a predominantly ductal or mixed component. Ill-defined margin or irregular shape was mainly due to interdigitation of normal surrounding parenchyma. Variable histologic features were related to the heterogeneous internal echo-pattern, posterior shadowing, and the clefts revealed by atypical sonographic findings

  8. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Ritter, David M; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na(+) channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  9. Investigating emotional impairments in adults with autism spectrum disorders and the broader autism phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Berthoz, Sylvie; Lalanne, Christophe; Crane, Laura; Hill, Elisabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the socio-affective atypicalities observed in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of this study was to further explore emotional responsiveness in adults with ASD using well-validated self-reports of alexithymia and extend these with consideration of anhedonia, and to determine whether these features are part of a broader autism phenotype. Thirty-eight adults with ASD, 87 parents of ASD individuals and 47 typical controls completed the Autism...

  10. Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Karla; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Volein, Agnes; Tucker, Leslie A; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Bolton, Patrick; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H

    2010-12-01

    Atypical attention has been proposed as a marker of the broader autism phenotype. In the present study we investigated this and the related process of inhibitory control at the youngest possible age through the study of infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder (Sibs-ASD). Both attention and inhibition have been related to the frontal cortex of the brain. Nine- to ten-month-old Sibs-ASD and low-risk control infants completed the Freeze-Frame task, in which infants are encouraged to inhibit looks to peripherally presented distractors whilst looking at a central animation. The attractiveness of the central stimulus is varied in order to investigate the selectivity of infants' responses. In line with previous studies, it was found that a subset of Sibs-ASD infants had difficulty disengaging attention from a central stimulus in order to orient to a peripheral stimulus. The Sibs-ASD group also showed less Selective Inhibition than controls. However, Sibs-ASD infants did demonstrate Selective Inhibitory Learning. These results provide preliminary evidence for atypical frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype. PMID:20609478

  11. Detection of water-soluble disease-associated PrP species in blood and brain of scrapie-infected hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Haq, Hanin

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed supernatant (S(HS)) of scrapie-infected hamster brain homogenate contains a soluble infectivity similar to that of the plasma that escapes leukodepletion and can transmit prion infection. This recent finding highlights the fact that soluble prion infectivity could be relevant for prion disease propagation and progression. PrP(Sc) is essential in prion disease pathogenesis, but little to nothing is known about the PrP(Sc) species that may be associated with this form of prion infectivity. Scrapie-infected hamster plasma and S(HS) were subjected to biochemical analysis, and the results demonstrate for the first time that soluble infectivity is associated with a water-soluble PrP(Sc) species with substantially different properties from classical PrP(Sc), the concentration of which seems to correlate with the magnitude and efficiency of the soluble infectivity. Such characteristics suggest that this species might represent the soluble prion agent itself or its vehicle, highlighting the need to adequately revise the strategies involved in prion removal, diagnosis, and therapy. PMID:26105967

  12. In-situ spectroscopic investigation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: application of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to a scrapie-hamster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2002-03-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), such as BSE in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in man are a group of fatal infectious diseases of the central nervous system that are far from being fully understood. Presuming the pathological changes to originate from small disease-specific compositional and structural modifications at the molecular level, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to achieve insight into biochemical parameters underlying pathogenesis. We have developed an FTIR microspectroscopy-based strategy which, as a combination of image reconstruction and multivariate pattern recognition methods, permitted the comparison of identical substructures in the cerebellum of healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamsters in the terminal stage of the disease. Here we present FTIR data about the pathological changes of scrapie-infected and normal tissue of the gray matter structures stratum granulosum and stratum moleculare. IR spectroscopy was also applied to tissue pieces of the medulla oblongata of infected and control Syrian hamsters. Mapping data were analyzed with cluster analysis and imaging methods. We found variations in the spectra of the infected tissue, which are due to changes in carbohydrates, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and proteins.

  13. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  14. Phenotypic heterogeneity in hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa): classification is an essential step toward personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, John R; Piguet, Vincent

    2013-06-01

    Awareness is increasing that there is phenotypic heterogeneity within the hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) disease spectrum. However, the few randomized HS trials that are available have not distinguished between the subtypes of the disease. In this issue, Canoui-Poitrine et al. used latent class (LC) analysis of the largest HS cohort described to date to generate three phenotypic subtypes. LC 1 correlates with "typical" European HS, mainly involving the axilla, groin, and, in women, the inframammary region. "Atypical" HS, which may be linked to γ-secretase gene mutations, was subdivided further into LC2 and LC3 subtypes. PMID:23673498

  15. Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayer, Ali; Asif, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare life-threatening disorder characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and ischemic injury to organs, especially the kidneys. Microvascular injury and thrombosis are the dominant histologic findings. Complement activation through the alternative pathway plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atypical HUS. Genetic abnormalities involving complement regulatory proteins and complement components form the molecular basis for complement activation. Endothelial cell dysfunction, probably because of the effects of complement activation, is an intermediate stage in the pathophysiologic cascade. Atypical HUS has a grave prognosis. Although mortality approaches 25% during the acute phase, end-stage renal disease develops in nearly half of patients within a year. Atypical HUS has a high recurrence rate after renal transplantation, and recurrent disease often leads to graft loss. Plasma therapy in the form of plasma exchange or infusion has remained the standard treatment for atypical HUS. However, many patients do not respond to plasma therapy and some require prolonged treatment. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the treatment of atypical HUS, eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks cleavage of complement C5 into biologically active mediators of inflammation and cytolysis. Although case reports have shown the efficacy of eculizumab, randomized clinical trials are lacking. Therapeutic strategies targeting endothelial cells have demonstrated promising results in experimental settings. Therefore, inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme, HMG-CoA reductase, and xanthine oxidase as well as antioxidants, such as ascorbic acid, may have salutary effects in patients with atypical HUS. PMID:24681522

  16. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  17. Ichthyosiform mycosis fungoides with alopecia and atypical membranous nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a rare case of variant of mycosis fungoides (MF: ichthyosiform MF with alopecia and atypical membranous nephropathy. The diagnosis was made based on the following findings: generalized ichthyosis-like eruption, alopecia, enlarged superficial lymph nodes, proteinuria, and hematuria, the histological features of the skin biopsy from both ichthyotic and alopecic lesions with immunohistochemical staining, and the renal biopsy examination with immunofluorescence. The histological examination of ichthyotic and alopecic lesions displayed a predominant infiltration of atypical lymphocytes in the upper dermis with the characteristics of epidermotropism and folliculotropism. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that most infiltrated atypical lymphocytes were CD3, CD4, and CD45RO positive, whereas negative for CD5, CD7, CD20, CD30, and CD56. A renal biopsy examination revealed atypical membranous nephropathy with deposition of immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, IgA, C1q, and C3. In this case atypical membranous nephropathy was involved, which is very uncommon and has never been presented in the literature to date. Although ichthyosiform MF usually features a relatively favorable course, diffuse alopecia and the renal involvement in this case might indicate aggressive disease and poor prognosis.

  18. Atypical growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum in subclinical infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvelä-Koski, V; Pohjanvirta, T; Koski, P; Sukura, A

    2006-01-01

    Two growth types of Renibacterium salmoninarum were isolated from subclinically infected rainbow trout, one producing the smooth colonies typical of R. salmoninarum and the other forming a thin film on the surface of the agar with no separate colonies. The atypical growth was present on kidney disease medium agar in primary cultures of the kidney but not on selective kidney disease medium (SKDM). Fluorescent antibody staining of the fresh isolate and polymerase chain reaction amplification were the most reliable techniques to identify the atypical growth of R. salmoninarum. The condition was reversible, with growth reverting from atypical to the smooth colony form in experimentally infected rainbow trout and under laboratory conditions. There was no mortality, or any clinical signs of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the fish challenged with the atypical growth, although small numbers of smooth colonies of R. salmoninarum were isolated from 8% of these fish. The atypical growth reported here may explain some of the failures of culture, when SKDM agar alone is used for the detection of BKD in subclinically infected fish. PMID:16351695

  19. Aberrant ERK 1/2 complex activation and localization in scrapie-infected GT1-1 cells

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    Didonna Alessandro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatal neurodegenerative disorders such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker diseases in humans, scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in animals, are characterized by the accumulation in the brain of a pathological form of the prion protein (PrP denominated PrPSc. The latter derives from the host cellular form, PrPC, through a process whereby portions of its α-helical and coil structures are refolded into β-sheet structures. Results In this work, the widely known in vitro model of prion replication, hypothalamic GT1-1 cell line, was used to investigate cellular and molecular responses to prion infection. The MAP kinase cascade was dissected to assess the phosphorylation levels of src, MEK 1/2 and ERK 1/2 signaling molecules, both before and after prion infection. Our findings suggest that prion replication leads to a hyper-activation of this pathway. Biochemical analysis was complemented with immunofluorescence studies to map the localization of the ERK complex within the different cellular compartments. We showed how the ERK complex relocates in the cytosol upon prion infection. We correlated these findings with an impairment of cell growth in prion-infected GT1-1 cells as probed by MTT assay. Furthermore, given the persistent urgency in finding compounds able to cure prion infected cells, we tested the effects on the ERK cascade of two molecules known to block prion replication in vitro, quinacrine and Fab D18. We were able to show that while these two compounds possess similar effects in curing prion infection, they affect the MAP kinase cascade differently. Conclusions Taken together, our results help shed light on the molecular events involved in neurodegeneration and neuronal loss in prion infection and replication. In particular, the combination of chronic activation and aberrant localization of the ERK complex may lead to a lack of essential neuroprotective and survival factors

  20. Comparison Study on Clinical and Neuropathological Characteristics of Hamsters Inoculated With Scrapie Strain 263K in Different Challenging Pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN ZHANG; XIAO-BO ZHOU; GUI-PING MA; YONG LIU; CAI-MIN XU; XIAO-PING DONG; LAN CHEN; BAO-YUN ZHAN; JUN HAN; XIN-LI XIAO; HAI-YAN TIAN; BIN-LING LI; CHEN GAO; JIAN-MEI GAO

    2004-01-01

    Objective To understand the infectious characteristics of a hamster-adapted scrapie strain 263K with five different routes of infection including intracerebral (i.c.), intraperitoneal (i.p.),intragastrical (i.g.), intracardiac and intramuscular (i. m.) approaches. Methods Hamsters were infected with crude- or fine-prepared brain extracts. The neuropathological changes, PrPSc deposits,and patterns of PK-resistant PrP were analyzed by HE stain, immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot. Reactive gliosis and neuron loss were evaluated by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)and neuron specific enolase (NSE) specific IHC. Results The animals inoculated in i.m. and i.p.ways with crude PrPSc extracts showed clinical signs at the average incubation of 69.2+-2.8 and 65.5±3.9 days. Inoculation in i.c. and intracardiac ways with fine PrPSc extracts (0.00035 g) caused similar,but relative long incubation of around 90 days. Only oneout of eight hamsters challenged ini.g way with low dosage (0.01 g) became ill after a much longer incubation (185 d), while all animals (4/4)with high dosage (0.04 g) developed clinical signs 105 days postinfection. The most remarkable spongiform degeneration and PrPsc deposits were found in brain stem among the five challenge groups generally. The number of GFAP-positive astrocytes increased distinctly in brain stems in all infection groups, while the number of NSE-positive cells decreased significantly in cerebrum, except i.c. group. The patterns of PK-resistant PrP in brains were basically identical among the five infection routes. Conclusion Typical TSE could be induced in hamsters by inoculating strain 263K in the five infection ways. The incubation periods in bioassays depend on infective dosage, administrating pathway and preparation of PrPSc. The neuropathological changes and PrPSc deposits seem to be related with regions and inoculating pathways.

  1. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  2. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

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    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  3. Atypical Imaging Findings in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

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    Zahra Afravi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The incidence of primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSL is increasing. Timely diagnosis of PCNSL can lead to proper therapeutic management. There are some atypical imaging findings that may easily be misdiagnosed as other pathologic processes such as infectious and demyelinative diseases. As a result, histopathologic diagnosis is necessary for all suspected lesions."nPatients and Methods: In this research we studied 120 cases of PCNSL over the past 16 years. Some of them had atypical imaging findings, suggesting many differential diagnoses. Having said that, stereotactic biopsy was performed for all cases and the diagnosis was proved."nResults: We selected some interesting cases with atypical imaging findings of PCNSL, which were unlikely to be diagnosed without histopathologic evaluation. "nConclusion: PCNSL must be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis for other brain lesions. Histopathologic diagnosis is necessary for prompt management.

  4. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Sonja W; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  5. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Sonja W. Scholz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions.

  6. Atypical femur fractures associated with bisphosphonates: from prodrome to resolution

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    Braulio Sastre-Jala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical fractures related to the prolonged use of bisphosphonates are caused by low energy mechanisms and are characterized by oblique and transverse lines and frequent bilateralism. We present a clinical case of a patient who we believe illustrates, both in clinical and radiological aspects, the new definition of atypical femur fracture related to treatment using bisphosphonates treated conservatively and successfully with discharge and teriparatide 20 mcg/80 mcl s.c./24h. The appearance of painful symptoms in the upper thigh, especially if bilateral, in patients treated with bisphosphonates for long periods of time, makes it necessary to dismiss bone lesions that might otherwise suggest atypical fracture. In those cases where the fracture is incomplete, restoring bone metabolism through the administration of teriparatide 20 mcg/80 mcl s.c./24h could prevent displaced fractures.

  7. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. PMID:27064828

  8. EPR dosimetry with synthetic A-type carbonated apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic A-type carbonated apatite prepared in reproducible conditions were irradiated at room temperature with 60 Co γ rays. The EPR spectrum is associated to axial CO2- and orthorhombic CO3- species. Radicals used as dose marker in biological apatite are long live paramagnetic species. The stability of the post-irradiation signal of A-type apatite was investigated for more than one year. Measurements showed variations in the spectra attributed to unstable CO3- species, which can be eliminated by thermal treatments at 100 deg C for 24 hours. The CO2- spectrum can be identified in samples irradiated up to 0.2 Gy. All results indicate the A-type apatite as an appropriate material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  9. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with osteomyelofibrosis

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    Živanović Dubravka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum generally appear on the upper extremities; most frequently they are associated with myeloproliferative disorders, including osteomyelofibrosis. A response to systemic steroids is more pronounced than in classical form. Sometimes it may be the first sign of an underlying malignancy. Case report. We reported a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum developed during the course of a myeloid malignancy - osteomyelofibrosis. The lesions occurred after a minor trauma. Painful blistering plaques, with an elevated, bluish-gray border were located on the dorsal aspect of hands. No skin malignancy was found. The lesions resolved rapidly to systemic steroids. Conclusion. Considering the unusual clinical presentation which makes the diagnosis difficult, as well as the fact that atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum can be the first sign of malignancies, especially myeloproliferative ones, recognizing this entity enables timely guiding future investigations toward their prompt detection.

  10. Gender-Atypical Mental Illness as Male Gender Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michniewicz, Kenneth S; Bosson, Jennifer K; Lenes, Joshua G; Chen, Jason I

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined whether men view gender-atypical (i.e., feminine) psychological disorders as threats to their gender status. Men and women (N = 355) rated their expectations of gender status loss, feelings of distress, and help-seeking intentions in response to 10 different stereotypically masculine and feminine psychological disorders. Men as compared to women expected greater gender status loss for, and reported more distress to, gender-atypical versus gender-typical disorders. Expectations of gender status loss partially mediated the link between participant gender and distress at the thought of gender-atypical disorders. These findings suggest that feminine disorders pose more powerful gender status threats for men than masculine disorders do and that men's expectations of gender status loss for feminine disorders drive their negative reactions to these mental illnesses. The discussion emphasizes the importance of considering the gender-typicality of disorders, and the implications of these findings for clinical interventions. PMID:25595020

  11. Computerized tomography findings on schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brain CTs of 54 endogenous psychotics (27 males, 27 females) who were less than 40 years of age and were first adimitted in Aichi Medical University from 1982 to 1986, and 20 controls (10 males, 10 females) were examined. Using Mitsuda's classification, we devided all the cases into 29 schizophrenics (18 males, 11 females) and 25 atypical psychotics (9 males, 16 females). In order to investigate the differences of CT findings between the two patient groups, the 3rd ventricle index (the ratio of 3rd ventricle width to the internal diameter of the skull), Evans'ratio, lateral ventricle brain ratio (VBR), Sylvian fissure to brain ratio, 4th ventricle to cerebellum ratio were determined. Schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricles as well as Sylvian fissures when compared to controls, but atypical psychotics had not. Moreover, schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricle than atypical psychotics. But in widths of Sylvian fissures there was no statistical significant difference between the two groups. Ventricle enlargements of schizophrenics did not correlate with duration of illness as well as age, and were not results of prior psychiatric treatment such as medication and EST. Therefore the following is suggested that, this abnormal CT findings predate the onset of schizophrenic psychoses. In atypical psychotics the changes of Sylvian fissures correlated with duration of illness, but not with age. Such observations may possibly suggest that recurrence of the illness might finally attain irreversible changes even in atypical psychotics. Finally, the heterogeneity of schizophrenia and the independence of atypical psychosis were also discussed. (author) 53 refs

  12. Phenotypic Switching in Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Neena; Hasan, Fahmi; Fries, Bettina C.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three decades new fungal diseases have emerged that now constitute a major threat, especially for patients with chronic diseases and/or underlying immune defi ciencies. Despite the epidemiologic data, the emergence of stable drug-resistant or hyper-virulent fungal strains in human disease has not been demonstrated as seen in emerging viral and bacterial infections. Fungi are eukaryotic microbes that capitalize on a sophisticated built-in ability to generate phenotypic variabilit...

  13. Decontamination of surgical instruments from prions. II. In vivo findings with a model system for testing the removal of scrapie infectivity from steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Karin; Mielke, Martin; Kratzel, Christine; Joncic, Marion; Oezel, Muhsin; Pauli, Georg; Beekes, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The unusual resistance of agents causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) to chemical or thermal inactivation requires special decontamination procedures in order to prevent accidental transmission of these pathogens by surgical instruments. In the search for effective, instrument-compatible and routinely applicable decontamination procedures, a previous study [Lemmer, K., Mielke, M., Pauli, G. & Beekes, M. (2004). J Gen Virol 85, 3805-3816] identified promising reagents in an in vitro carrier assay using steel wires contaminated with the disease-associated prion protein, PrP(Sc). In the follow-up study presented here, these reagents were validated for their decontamination potential in vivo. Steel wires initially loaded with >or=3 x 10(5) LD(50) of 263K scrapie infectivity were implanted into the brains of hamsters after treatment for decontamination and subsequently monitored for their potential to trigger clinical disease or subclinical cerebral PrP(Sc) deposition within an observation period of 500 days. It was found that routinely usable reagents such as a commercially available alkaline cleaner (pH 12.2) applied for 1 h at 23 degrees C or for 10 min at 55 degrees C and a mixture of 0.2 % SDS and 0.3 % NaOH (pH 12.8) applied for 5 or 10 min at 23 degrees C achieved removal of 263K scrapie infectivity below the threshold of detection (titre reduction of >or=5.5 log(10) units). The increasing use during the past few years of similar model systems by different research groups will facilitate comparison and integration of findings on the decontamination of steel surfaces from prions. Methods identified as highly effective in the 263K steel wire model need to be validated for human TSE agents on different types of instrument surfaces. PMID:18089760

  14. Reduction of protein kinase MARK4 in the brains of experimental scrapie rodents and human prion disease correlates with deposits of PrP(Sc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Han-Shi; Guo, Yan; Tian, Chan; Xie, Wu-Ling; Shi, Qi; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Yin; Wang, Shao-Bin; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Chen, Cao; Liu, Yong; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-09-01

    Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) belongs to a family of kinases that are able to actively phosphorylate the neuronal microtubule-associate proteins (MAPs), such as tau, MAP2 and the ubiquitous MAP4. Abnormal changes in tubulin and the profiles of tau have been previously reported in the human brain and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), which may be associated with abnormal alterations of various cellular kinases. To elucidate the possible role of MARK4 in TSE pathogenesis, the MARK4 levels in the brain tissues of scrapie-infected rodents and human prion diseases were evaluated using western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. The results revealed that at terminal stages of the diseases, MARK4 levels in the brain tissues of the scrapie 263K-infected hamsters, 139A-infected mice and a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, G114V gCJD) correlated with amounts of PrP(Sc) deposits that were almost undetectable. On the other hand MARK4 signals were noticeable in the brain tissues of a fatal familial insomnia (FFI) patient without PrP(Sc). The reduction of MARK4 was closely related to the prolonged incubation times. These results could be reproduced in SK-N-SH and PC12 cell lines after being exposed to the synthetic peptide PrP106-126. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated tau at Ser262 (p-tau262) in cultured cells exposed to PrP106-126, or the ratios of p-tau262/total tau in the brain tissues of 263K-infected hamsters were also significantly decreased. According to our data there is a correlation between a TSE pathological-associated decline of MARK4 in the brain tissues with the deposits of PrP(Sc). Reduction of MARK4 will result in abnormalities of tau phosphorylation, and possibly induce further detachment of microtubules and hinder microtubule transportation. PMID:22692785

  15. Evidence for Broadening Criteria for Atypical Depression Which May Define a Reactive Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Brett Silverstein; Jules Angst

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Arguing that additional symptoms should be added to the criteria for atypical depression. Method. Published research articles on atypical depression are reviewed. Results. (1) The original studies upon which the criteria for atypical depression were based cited fatigue, insomnia, pain, and loss of weight as characteristic symptoms. (2) Several studies of DSM depressive criteria found patients with atypical depression to exhibit high levels of insomnia, fatigue, and loss of appetit...

  16. An Atypical Splenic B Cell Progenitor Population Supports Antibody Production during Plasmodium Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debopam; Wikenheiser, Daniel J; Kennedy, Brian; McGovern, Kathryn E; Stuart, Johnasha D; Wilson, Emma H; Stumhofer, Jason S

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) function to replenish the immune cell repertoire under steady-state conditions and in response to inflammation due to infection or stress. Whereas the bone marrow serves as the primary niche for hematopoiesis, extramedullary mobilization and differentiation of HSPCs occur in the spleen during acute Plasmodium infection, a critical step in the host immune response. In this study, we identified an atypical HSPC population in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice, with a lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(-) (LSK(-)) phenotype that proliferates in response to infection with nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii 17X. Infection-derived LSK(-) cells upon transfer into naive congenic mice were found to differentiate predominantly into mature follicular B cells. However, when transferred into infection-matched hosts, infection-derived LSK(-) cells gave rise to B cells capable of entering into a germinal center reaction, and they developed into memory B cells and Ab-secreting cells that were capable of producing parasite-specific Abs. Differentiation of LSK(-) cells into B cells in vitro was enhanced in the presence of parasitized RBC lysate, suggesting that LSK(-) cells expand and differentiate in direct response to the parasite. However, the ability of LSK(-) cells to differentiate into B cells was not dependent on MyD88, as myd88(-/-) LSK(-) cell expansion and differentiation remained unaffected after Plasmodium infection. Collectively, these data identify a population of atypical lymphoid progenitors that differentiate into B lymphocytes in the spleen and are capable of contributing to the ongoing humoral immune response against Plasmodium infection. PMID:27448588

  17. Role of laboratory in rapid diagnosis of atypical mumps

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    KE Vandana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fairly large number of mumps virus infections present atypically without parotitis leading to delay in diagnosis and increased morbidity. Awareness of such presentations and inclusion of serological test for detecting IgM-specific antibodies could help in solving diagnostic dilemma, especially in unvaccinated individuals from developing countries.

  18. Use of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly: a clinical review

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    Gareri P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Gareri,1 Cristina Segura-García,2 Valeria Graziella Laura Manfredi,1 Antonella Bruni,2 Paola Ciambrone,2 Gregorio Cerminara,2 Giovambattista De Sarro,2 Pasquale De Fazio2 1Elderly Health Care, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Department of Health Sciences, University “Magna Græcia” of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: The use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in the elderly has become wider and wider in recent years; in fact, these agents have novel receptor binding profiles, good efficacy with regard to negative symptoms, and reduced extrapyramidal symptoms. However, in recent years, the use of both conventional and atypical antipsychotics has been widely debated for concerns about their safety in elderly patients affected with dementia and the possible risks for stroke and sudden death. A MEDLINE search was made using the words elderly, atypical antipsychotics, use, schizophrenia, psychosis, mood disorders, dementia, behavioral disorders, and adverse events. Some personal studies were also considered. This paper reports the receptor binding profiles and the main mechanism of action of these drugs, together with their main use in psychiatry and the possible adverse events in elderly people. Keywords: atypical antipsychotics, dementia, elderly, psychosis, mood disorders, side effects

  19. ATYPICAL BULLOUS PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM WITH EARLY LESIONS MIMICKING CHICKEN POX

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh; Kavya Raju; Gopal; Sharath Kumar; Nandini

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT : Pyoderma Gangrenosum (PG) rare neutrophilic dermatoses (1/100,00 0), of which Bullous Pyoderma gangrenosum is an atypical form, which is very rare. Bullous PG is usually associated with haematological disorders like myeloproliferative disorders, haematological malignancies specially AML and several other haematological disorders. It presents as a superficial haemorrhagic bulla which ulcerates, ulcers increase in size and heal with scarring. Treatmen...

  20. Atypical Autism and Tuberous Sclerosis in a Sibling Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, David A.; Bolton, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a sibling pair (ages 21 and 18), both with tuberous sclerosis. One sibling has atypical autism (but no mental retardation or seizure disorder) and the other has a seizure disorder but no autism or mental retardation. Both siblings had multiple bilateral brain lesions. Clinical findings are discussed in relationship to the…

  1. Treatment of atypical trigeminal neuralgia with microvascular decompression

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    Hai Jian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore the methods for achieving pain relief in patients with atypical trigeminal neuralgia (TN using microvascular decompression (MVD. Study Design and Settings: Retrospective study of 26 patients treated during the years 2000 to 2004. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients in whom vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve was identified by high definition magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA were treated with MVD for atypical TN in our department. Clinical presentations, surgical findings and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In this study, single trigeminal division was involved in only 2 patients (8% and two or three divisions in the other 24 patients (92%. Of prime importance is the fact that in 46.2% of the patients, several conflicting vessels were found in association. Location of the conflicts around the circumference of the trigeminal root was supero-medial to the root in 53.5%, supero-lateral in 30.8% and inferior in 15.7%. MVD for atypical TN resulted in complete pain relief in 50% of the patients with complete decompression, partial pain relief in 30.8% and poor pain relief or pain recurrence in 19.2% of the patients without complete decompression postoperatively. Conclusions: Complete decompression of the entire trigeminal root plays an important role in achieving pain relief in patients with atypical TN with MVD.

  2. Einstein A-values of A-type methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper uses the model of a slightly asymmetric top with hindered internal rotation to calculate the total energies, the transition frequencies and Einstein A-values of the A-type CH3OH-molecule. The levels are lower than 352cm-1 above the ground state. It means that there are 340 Levels in total

  3. Benzisoxazole derivatives as Atypical Antipsychotic drugs: A Review

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    Sharath Chandra S P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic medications constitute a diverse series of heterocyclic compounds that are used to treat psychotic problems, particularly schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorders. Heterocyclic molecules such as benzisoxazole derivatives, especially 3-(piperidin-4-yl-1,2-benzisoxazole have been widely used as antipsychotic drugs. Atypical antipsychotic drugs which are derived from benzisoxazole include risperidone, iloperidone and paliperidone.

  4. Early Freezing of Gait: Atypical versus Typical Parkinson Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Abraham; Deep, Aman; Dhall, Rohit; Tran, An; Liu, Ming-Jai

    2015-01-01

    In 18 months, 850 patients were referred to Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center (MAPC). Among them, 810 patients had typical Parkinson disease (PD) and 212 had PD for ≤5 years. Among the 212 patients with early PD, 27 (12.7%) had freezing of gait (FOG). Forty of the 850 had atypical parkinsonism. Among these 40 patients, all of whom had symptoms for ≤5 years, 12 (30.0%) had FOG. FOG improved with levodopa in 21/27 patients with typical PD but did not improve in the 12 patients with atypical parkinsonism. FOG was associated with falls in both groups of patients. We believe that FOG unresponsive to levodopa in typical PD resembles FOG in atypical parkinsonism. We thus compared the 6 typical PD patients with FOG unresponsive to levodopa plus the 12 patients with atypical parkinsonism with the 21 patients with typical PD responsive to levodopa. We compared them by tests of locomotion and postural stability. Among the patients with FOG unresponsive to levodopa, postural stability was more impaired than locomotion. This finding leads us to believe that, in these patients, postural stability, not locomotion, is the principal problem underlying FOG. PMID:25785228

  5. Large saphenous venous graft aneurysm mimicking atypical mediastinal mass

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    Krotin Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Saphenous venous graft (SVG aneurysm is a very rare but potentially fatal complication of the coronary artery bypass surgery. Case report. We reported a case of 72-year-old man admitted to hospital because of atypical chest pain related to body motions in horizontal position, especially to the left side. Pain was followed by dispnea, palpitations, fatigue, cough, yellow sputum expectorations, as well as elevated temperature. He had had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery with saphenous vein grafts (SVGs to the left anterior descending artery (LAD and right coronary artery (RCA 27 years earlier. Chest X-ray revealed a poor-defined shadow in the region of the right atrium. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed an atypical tumorous mediastinal mass near the right atrium and right ventricle that seemed partially calcified on transesophaeal echocardiography (TEE. CT scan confirmed an atypical mediastinal mass in contact with the right ventricle that might be a right ventricle aneurysm, pericardial cyst or SVG aneurysm. Coronary angiography was performed subsequently and it revealed a big saphenous venous graft aneurysm originating from the previous venous graft to the RCA. The aneurysm was resected and a new bypass graft was placed. Histopathology confirmed a true aneurysm of the venous graft. Conclusion. Although SVG aneurysm is a very rare complication of CABG surgery, patients presenting with atypical hilar or mediastinal mass following CABG should always be evaluated firstly for existence of this cardiosurgical complication.

  6. Trends in Scientific Literature on Atypical Antipsychotics in South Korea: A Bibliometric Study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Shen, Winston W.; Pae, Chi-un; Moreno, Raquel; Rubio, Gabriel; Molina, Juan D.; Noriega, Concha; Pérez-Nieto, Miguel A.; Huelves, Lorena; Álamo, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    Objective We have carried out a bibliometric study on the scientific publications in relation to atypical or second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) in South Korea. Methods With the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, we selected those publications made in South Korea whose title included the descriptors atypic* (atypical*) antipsychotic*, second-generation antipsychotic*, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine, sertindole, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride, zotepine...

  7. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Nursing Homes and Pharmaceutical Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Camilla B.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Field, Terry S.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Kanaan, Abir O.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many nursing home (NH) residents are prescribed atypical antipsychotics despite US Food and Drug Administration warnings of increased risk of death in older adults with dementia. Aggressive pharmaceutical marketing has been cited as a potential cause, although data are scarce. The objectives of this study were to describe the current extent and type of pharmaceutical marketing in NHs in one state, and to provide preliminary evidence for the potential influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in NHs. DESIGN Nested mixed-methods, cross-sectional study of NHs in a cluster randomized trial. SETTING 41 NHs in Connecticut. PARTICIPANTS NH administrators, directors of nursing and medical directors (n = 93, response rate 75.6%). MEASUREMENTS Quantitative data, including prescription drug dispensing data (September 2009–August 2010) linked with Nursing Home Compare data (April 2011), were used to determine facility-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use, facility-level characteristics, NH staffing and NH quality. Qualitative data, including semi-structured interviews and surveys of NH leaders conducted in the first quarter of 2011, were used to determine encounters with pharmaceutical marketing. RESULTS Leadership at 46.3% of NHs (19/41) reported pharmaceutical marketing encounters, consisting of educational training, written/Internet-based materials and/or sponsored training. No association was detected between the level of atypical antipsychotic prescribing and reports of any pharmaceutical marketing by at least one NH leader. CONCLUSION NH leaders frequently encounter pharmaceutical marketing through a variety of ways, although the impact on atypical antipsychotic prescribing is unclear. PMID:25688605

  8. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  9. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently defined as a common preventable and treatable disease that is characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory response in the airways and the lung to noxious...... particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association with...

  10. Early Cytokine Elevation, PrPres Deposition, and Gliosis in Mouse Scrapie: No Effect on Disease by Deletion of Cytokine Genes IL-12p40 and IL-12p35

    OpenAIRE

    Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Race, Brent; Striebel, James F.; Carroll, James A.; Phillips, Katie; Chesebro, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are typically associated with an activation of glia and an increased level of cytokines. In our previous studies of prion disease, the cytokine response in the brains of clinically sick scrapie-infected mice was restricted to a small group of cytokines, of which IL-12p40, CCL2, and CXCL10 were present at the highest levels. The goal of our current research was to determine the relationship between cytokine responses, gliosis, and neuropathology during prion disease....

  11. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1 deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity; and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches. During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment.

  12. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posar, Annio; Santucci, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity); and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches). During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment. PMID:24891901

  13. Phenotypic transition of microglia into astrocyte-like cells associated with disease onset in a model of inherited ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Emiliano eTrias; Pablo eDíaz-Amarilla; Silvia eOlivera-Bravo; Eugenia eIsasi; Drechsel, Derek A.; Nathan eLopez; Charles Samuel Bradford; Kyle Edward Ireton; Beckman, Joseph S; Luis Hector Barbeito

    2013-01-01

    Microglia and reactive astrocytes accumulate in the spinal cord of rats expressing the Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked SOD1 G93A mutation. We previously reported that the rapid progression of paralysis in ALS rats is associated with the appearance of proliferative astrocyte-like cells that surround motor neurons. These cells, designated as Aberrant Astrocytes (AbA cells) because of their atypical astrocytic phenotype, exhibit high toxicity to motor neurons. However, the cellular or...

  14. Diversity of Melissococcus plutonius from honeybee larvae in Japan and experimental reproduction of European foulbrood with cultured atypical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Arai

    Full Text Available European foulbrood (EFB is an important infectious disease of honeybee larvae, but its pathogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. The causative agent, Melissococcus plutonius, is a fastidious organism, and microaerophilic to anaerobic conditions and the addition of potassium phosphate to culture media are required for growth. Although M. plutonius is believed to be remarkably homologous, in addition to M. plutonius isolates with typical cultural characteristics, M. plutonius-like organisms, with characteristics seemingly different from those of typical M. plutonius, have often been isolated from diseased larvae with clinical signs of EFB in Japan. Cultural and biochemical characterization of 14 M. plutonius and 19 M. plutonius-like strain/isolates revealed that, unlike typical M. plutonius strain/isolates, M. plutonius-like isolates were not fastidious, and the addition of potassium phosphate was not required for normal growth. Moreover, only M. plutonius-like isolates, but not typical M. plutonius strain/isolates, grew anaerobically on sodium phosphate-supplemented medium and aerobically on some potassium salt-supplemented media, were positive for β-glucosidase activity, hydrolyzed esculin, and produced acid from L-arabinose, D-cellobiose, and salicin. Despite the phenotypic differences, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that M. plutonius-like organisms were taxonomically identical to M. plutonius. However, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, these typical and atypical (M. plutonius-like isolates were separately grouped into two genetically distinct clusters. Although M. plutonius is known to lose virulence quickly when cultured artificially, experimental infection of representative isolates showed that atypical M. plutonius maintained the ability to cause EFB in honeybee larvae even after cultured in vitro in laboratory media. Because the rapid decrease of virulence in cultured M

  15. Diversity of Melissococcus plutonius from honeybee larvae in Japan and experimental reproduction of European foulbrood with cultured atypical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Rie; Tominaga, Kiyoshi; Wu, Meihua; Okura, Masatoshi; Ito, Kazutomo; Okamura, Naomi; Onishi, Hidetaka; Osaki, Makoto; Sugimura, Yuya; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    European foulbrood (EFB) is an important infectious disease of honeybee larvae, but its pathogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. The causative agent, Melissococcus plutonius, is a fastidious organism, and microaerophilic to anaerobic conditions and the addition of potassium phosphate to culture media are required for growth. Although M. plutonius is believed to be remarkably homologous, in addition to M. plutonius isolates with typical cultural characteristics, M. plutonius-like organisms, with characteristics seemingly different from those of typical M. plutonius, have often been isolated from diseased larvae with clinical signs of EFB in Japan. Cultural and biochemical characterization of 14 M. plutonius and 19 M. plutonius-like strain/isolates revealed that, unlike typical M. plutonius strain/isolates, M. plutonius-like isolates were not fastidious, and the addition of potassium phosphate was not required for normal growth. Moreover, only M. plutonius-like isolates, but not typical M. plutonius strain/isolates, grew anaerobically on sodium phosphate-supplemented medium and aerobically on some potassium salt-supplemented media, were positive for β-glucosidase activity, hydrolyzed esculin, and produced acid from L-arabinose, D-cellobiose, and salicin. Despite the phenotypic differences, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that M. plutonius-like organisms were taxonomically identical to M. plutonius. However, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, these typical and atypical (M. plutonius-like) isolates were separately grouped into two genetically distinct clusters. Although M. plutonius is known to lose virulence quickly when cultured artificially, experimental infection of representative isolates showed that atypical M. plutonius maintained the ability to cause EFB in honeybee larvae even after cultured in vitro in laboratory media. Because the rapid decrease of virulence in cultured M. plutonius was a major

  16. Atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonov S.F.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature presents current data on cli¬nical picture and diagnostics of atypical depression. Rubric “atypical depression” includes a variety of depressive states characterized by reactively caused changes of mood, sensitivity to interpersonal contacts, inverted vegetative and somatic symptoms such as increased appetite and hypersomnia. The article considers the place of atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders. Positions of foreign authors that produce atypical depression as a clinical entity in the structure of Bipolar affective disorder II type are represented, the views of other authors on the structure of atypical depression are considered. The analysis of national concept of non-circular depression is carried out. Questions of atypical affective conditions acquire special significance due to preparation of International Classification of Diseases of the 11th revision, because inclusion in it of Bipolar affective disorder II type, a manifestation of which is considered to be atypical depressions, is under discussion.

  17. Atypical feminized male’s agonistic behavior relative to males and females of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Becerril-Morales

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early maturity during tilapia culture is a recurring problem. To avoid this, a series of techniques have been developed, including the production of YY-males. This technique involves the use of hormones to produce phenotypic females (XY genotype. However, incomplete transformations are frequently observed and the produced atypical feminized males (AFM could display an ambiguity in the phenotypic expression of behavioral patterns. The aim of this study was to measure the frequency and intensity of aggressive behavior as well as the role that initial residence plays when involving three phenotypes (males, females and AFM. The experiment consisted of three stages. Resident fish were AFM in the first stage, males in the second and females in the third. In each stage the resident fish confronted males, females and AFM acting as intruders. Aggressive behavior was exercised more frequently by resident fish. Intersexual confrontations showed higher levels of aggression compared to intrasexual confrontations. The frequency of confrontations was not significantly different in confrontations involving AFM, however, differences were observed in intensity of aggression. It is possible that an incomplete transformation at physiological level could be responsible for an inaccurate decoding of signal during confrontations.

  18. CT diagnosis of appendicitis with atypical clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of CT in diagnosis of appendicitis with atypical clinical features. Methods: CT manifestations of 20 cases of appendicitis, which were not initially considered on clinical presentation, confirmed surgically and pathologically were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The CT findings of appendicitis included: (1) The appendix enlarged in diameter, with wall thickening and enhancement after administration of IV contrast material (7 cases), presence of appendicolith in 4 cases. (2) pericecal inflammation (14 cases). (3) Localized abscess of right lower quadrant (11 cases), calcified appendicolith seen in 2 cases. CT misdiagnosed 2 cases as tumour of ascending colon, and another 2 cases as pelvic inflammatory disease. Conclusions: The clinical diagnosis of appendicitis is very difficult when patients present with atypical signs and symptoms, but in most cases, the correct diagnosis of appendicitis could be made on the basis of CT findings

  19. AN ATYPICAL PRESENTATION OF GROWING SKULL FRACTURE: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing skull fracture (GSF or craniocerebral erosion or leptomeningeal cyst, is characterized by progressive diastatic enlargement of fracture line. Growing skull fracture is a rare neurological complication and ac counts for 1.2 - 1.6% of the head injury patients. GSF is generally seen in children less than 3 year of age. Authors present an atypical case of growing skull fracture in comminuted type of skull fracture which was timely and successfully managed with very good outcome. Atypical presentation, risk factors, etiopathogenesis, management and outcome in GSF is discussed along with review of literature. Delayed diagnosis and improper treatment could worsen this condition while timely surgical intervention can hav e excellent outcome.

  20. Atypical form of cat scratch disease in immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cat scratch disease (CSD is an acute infectious disease with benign course caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae. Clinically, it is usually manifested as regional lymphadenopathy and mild infective syndrome. Rare forms of the disease which usually occur in immunocompromised presons are: encephalitis, transverse myelitis, neuroretinitis, granulomatosus conjunctivitis, arthritis, hepatitis etc. Case report. We presented an atypical form of cat scratch disease in a young immunocompetent female person. The disease was manifested with prolonged fever, rash, purulent lymphadenitis and hepatitis. The diagnosis was based on characteristic patohystological finding and exclusion of the other causes of lymphadenopathy. The patient was treated by antibiotics for a few weeks, with surgical incision and drainage of the purulent lymphadenitis. Conclusion. Atypical forms of CSD could be an important differential-diagnostic problem, especially if there is no opportunity for serological confirmation of the disease.

  1. [The atypical course of syphilis in HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrle, G; Rasokat, H; Kurz, K; Steigleder, G K

    1989-05-15

    We report on 3 HIV patients showing atypical courses of syphilis. Both the history and serology of the first patient proved a recent re-infection with T. pallidum, whereas the histopathological findings corresponded to an advanced stage of the disease (S II-III). The second patient showed the clinical picture of syphilis maligna with slowly converting and slightly positive serological reactions. The third patient had a refractory syphilis and an early relapse. Our observations suggest that syphilis might take an unusual course in HIV patients. Considering our total HIV clientèle (800 patients greater than or equal to WR 2) the frequency of these atypical cases must be rated very low (0.38%). PMID:2741530

  2. Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy with Atypical Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karagiannis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To report a case of acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR with atypical electrophysiology findings. Case Presentation. A 23-year-old-female presented with visual acuity deterioration in her right eye accompanied by photopsia bilaterally. Corrected distance visual acuity at presentation was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Fundus examination was unremarkable. Visual field (VF testing revealed a large scotoma. Pattern and full-field electroretinograms (PERG and ERG revealed macular involvement associated with generalized retinal dysfunction. Electrooculogram (EOG light rise and the Arden ratio were within normal limits bilaterally. The patient was diagnosed with AZOOR due to clinical findings, visual field defect, and ERG findings. Conclusion. This is a case of AZOOR with characteristic VF defects and clinical symptoms presenting with atypical EOG findings.

  3. Magnetic field in atypical prominence structures: Bubble, tornado and eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Levens, P J; Ariste, A López; Labrosse, N; Dalmasse, K; Gelly, B

    2016-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of prominences have been obtained with the THEMIS telescope during four years of coordinated campaigns. Our aim is now to understand the conditions of the cool plasma and magnetism in `atypical' prominences, namely when the measured inclination of the magnetic field departs, to some extent, from the predominantly horizontal field found in `typical' prominences. What is the role of the magnetic field in these prominence types? Are plasma dynamics more important in these cases than the magnetic support? We focus our study on three types of `atypical' prominences (tornadoes, bubbles and jet-like prominence eruptions) that have all been observed by THEMIS in the He I D_3 line, from which the Stokes parameters can be derived. The magnetic field strength, inclination and azimuth in each pixel are obtained by using the Principal Component Analysis inversion method on a model of single scattering in the presence of the Hanle effect. The magnetic field in tornadoes is found to be more ...

  4. Combined Papillated Bowen Disease and Clear Cell Atypical Fibroxanthoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Suárez-Vilela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of papillated Bowen disease (PBD, associated with a clear cell atypical fibroxanthoma (CCAFXA. The epidermal lesion showed a bowenoid papillomatous growth pattern with histologic features suggestive of infection by human papilloma virus (HPV. In the dermis a neoplasm made up by spindled or polygonal cells with wide clear cytoplasm and moderate nuclear pleomorphism was found. Immunohistochemical characteristics of these two lesions were clearly different. The atypical cells of the intraepidermal proliferation were positive for AE1-AE3 anticytokeratin antibody, EMA, p16, p53 and p63. The dermal tumor was positive for vimentin, CD10, CD68, CD99, alpha-1-antitrypsin and c-kit. Histological features and immunohistochemical profile of the dermal tumor corresponded to a CCAFXA, a very uncommon neoplasm of which only 10 cases have been reported. In situ hybridization for numerous types of HPVs was negative in both lesions.

  5. Sensitivity of atypical lateral fire spread to wind and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Colin. C.; Sharples, Jason J.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents new knowledge of the environmental sensitivity of a dynamic mode of atypical wildland fire spread on steep lee-facing slopes. This is achieved through a series of idealized numerical simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere-fire models. The sensitivity of the atypical lateral fire spread across lee slopes is tested for a varying background wind speed, wind direction relative to the terrain aspect, and lee slope steepness. The results indicate that the lateral spread characteristics are highly sensitive to each of these environmental conditions, and there is a broad agreement with the empirical thresholds calculated for lateral spread events observed in the 2003 Canberra bushfires. A theory to explain these environmental thresholds and their apparent interdependency is presented. The results are expected to have important implications for the management of wildland fires in rugged terrain.

  6. Atypical C-ANCA following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Jolles, S; Deacock, S; Turnbull, W; Silvestrini, R; Bunn, C; White, P.; Ward, M

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: (1) To assess a range of intravenous immunoglobulin products for atypical classical antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (C-ANCA) staining and to determine if this is present in patients treated with high dose intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg/month) and replacement doses (200 mg/kg fortnightly); (2) using the United Kingdom national external quality assessment scheme (NEQAS), to determine if laboratories could differentiate this pattern from classical ANCA. METHODS: ANCA testing was pe...

  7. Atypical Papular Purpuric Eruption Induced by Parvovirus B19 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Şeyma Kayalı; Nilden Tuygun; Halise Akça; Can Demir Karacan

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection’s most common dermatological manifestation is erythema infectiosum as also known the fifth disease. Rare clinical presentations of parvovirus B 19 like papulopurpuric gloves and socks syndrome and acropetechial syndrome has also been described re­cently. This study presents report of a case with atypical feature and distribution of rash due to parvovirus B19 in­fection. We want to emphasize that pediatricians should consider parvovirus B19 infection of any patient who...

  8. Figurative language processing in atypical populations: The ASD perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mila eVulchanova; David eSaldaña; Sobh eChahboun; Valentin eVulchanov

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of experimental and clinical research documenting problems in figurative language processing in atypical populations with a focus on the Autistic Spectrum. Research in the comprehension and processing of figurative language in autism invariably documents problems in this area. The greater paradox is that even at the higher end of the spectrum or in the cases of linguistically talented individuals with Asperger syndrome, where structural la...

  9. Magnetic field in atypical prominence structures: Bubble, tornado and eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Levens, P. J.; Schmieder, B.; Ariste, A. López; Labrosse, N.; Dalmasse, K.; Gelly, B.

    2016-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of prominences have been obtained with the THEMIS telescope during four years of coordinated campaigns. Our aim is now to understand the conditions of the cool plasma and magnetism in `atypical' prominences, namely when the measured inclination of the magnetic field departs, to some extent, from the predominantly horizontal field found in `typical' prominences. What is the role of the magnetic field in these prominence types? Are plasma dynamics more important...

  10. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Palma LMP; Langman CB

    2016-01-01

    Lilian M Pereira Palma,1 Craig B Langman2  1Pediatric Nephrology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil; 2The Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, and the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial bed...

  11. Childhood atypical meningioma with perineural spread: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Feng-Yu.; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Wong, Ho-Fai; Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan); Wu, Chieh-Tsai [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan); Lin, Kuang-Lin [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Meningiomas are uncommon in children. When they occur, they are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. Childhood meningiomas are generally large and commonly associated with cyst formation and an unusual location. Perineural tumor spread, occasionally associated with head and neck malignancies, is very rare in meningiomas. We present the MR findings of an atypical meningioma with perineural spread in a 4.5-year-old girl. (orig.)

  12. Epithelioid Schwannomas: An Analysis of 58 Cases Including Atypical Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jesse; Gardner, Jerad M; Edgar, Mark; Weiss, Sharon W

    2016-05-01

    The histologic features and outcome of 58 cases of epithelioid schwannoma were studied to determine the significance of atypical histologic features. Cases were retrieved from personal consultation files from 1999 to 2013. Patients (31 male and 26 female patients) ranged in age from 14 to 80 years (median, 38 y). Two patients had schwannomatosis 1. Tumors developed in the dermis/subcutis (n=56) or muscle (n=2) of the upper extremity (34.5%), lower extremity (34.5%), thorax/abdomen/back (18%), and less common anatomic locations including the scalp, neck, lip, and breast. They ranged in size from 0.25 to 4.5 cm (median, 2.0 cm). Typically circumscribed and surrounded by a perineurium, they comprised single or small groups of epithelioid schwann cells with a moderate amphophilic cytoplasm and occasional nuclear pseudoinclusions. Stroma varied from myxoid to hyalinized, often with thick-walled vessels (55 cases). Mitotic rate ranged from 0 to 9 mitoses/10 high-power field (HPF) (2.37 mm) in the most active areas (mean, 2 to 3 mitoses/10 HPFs). Thirteen cases (22%) were "atypical," defined by a high mitotic rate (≥3 mitoses per 10 HPFs) and nuclear size variation (≥3:1). All (56/56) expressed S100 protein; type IV collagen invested groups or individual cells (16/17). Melanoma markers were negative, except for melan A (1 case). Follow-up in 39 patients (median, 78 mo; range, 6 to 174 mo) indicated that 31 (79%) were alive without disease (including 9/13 atypical cases; median, 78 mo), 7 (18%) were alive with unknown status, and 1 patient had died of unrelated causes. One tumor recurred, but none metastasized. Epithelioid schwannomas, even those with atypical features, are benign and do not constitute a histologic continuum with epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, which typically occur in deep soft tissues and have more anaplastic features. PMID:26752543

  13. Atypical cerebral and cerebellar language organisation: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Dun, Kim; Witte, Elke; Daele, Wendy Van; Van Hecke, Wim; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background In the majority of right-handed subjects, language processing is subserved by a close interplay between the left cerebral hemisphere and right cerebellum. Within this network, the dominant fronto-insular region and the contralateral posterior cerebellum are crucially implicated in oral language production. Case Presentation We report atypical anatomoclinical findings in a right-handed patient with an extensive right cerebellar infarction and an older left fronto-insular stroke. Sta...

  14. Atypicality in presentation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome caused by olanzapine

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra Biswaranjan; Mishra Baikunthanath; Sahoo Saddichha; Arora Manu; Khess C.R.J

    2007-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is the most serious of acute neurological side effects produced by antipsychotic medication, characterized by hyperthermia, rigidity, altered consciousness and autonomic dysfunction, the prevalence of which varies from 0.4-1.4%. NMS is usually seen in treatment with high potency typical antipsychotics and very rarely with atypical antipsychotics. However, NMS cases have been reported with risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine. The presen...

  15. Endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the ovary arising in atypical endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian endometriosis can transform into malignant tumors, and ovarian carcinomas relatively frequently contain foci of endometriosis. In this study, the author reviewed 15 cases of endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the ovary in the last 15 years of our pathology laboratory in search for the presence of endometriosis within the tumor. Six (40%) of the 15 endometrioid adenocarcinoma were found to have endometriosis in the tumor. All of the endometriosis were atypical. The age of the 6 patients ra...

  16. Atypical Attentional Networks and the Emergence of Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Keehn, Brandon; Müller, Ralph-Axel; Townsend, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The sociocommunicative impairments that define autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are not present at birth but emerge gradually over the first two years of life. In typical development, basic attentional processes may provide a critical foundation for sociocommunicative abilities. Therefore early attentional dysfunction in ASD may result in atypical development of social communication. Prior research has demonstrated that persons with ASD exhibit early and lifelong impairments in attention. The p...

  17. Early adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of atypical meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Michael D; Waqar, Mueez; Farah, Jibril Osman; Farrell, Michael; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; McManus, Robin; Looby, Seamus; Hussey, Deirdre; Fitzpatrick, David; Certo, Francesco; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Atypical meningiomas have a greater propensity to recur than benign meningiomas and the benefits of early adjuvant radiotherapy are unclear. Existing studies report conflicting results. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the role of early adjuvant radiotherapy following surgical resection of atypical meningioma. A triple center case-note review of adults with newly-diagnosed atypical meningiomas between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Pathology diagnosis was made according to the World Health Organization classification in use at the time of surgery. Patients with multiple meningiomas, neurofibromatosis type 2 and radiation-induced meningiomas were excluded. Extent of resection was defined as gross total resection (GTR; Simpson Grade I-III) or subtotal resection (STR; Simpson Grade IV-V). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. One hundred thirty-three patients were identified with a median age of 62years (range 22-86years) and median follow-up of 57.4months (range 0.1-152.2months). Tumors were mostly located in the convexity (50.4%) or falcine/parasagittal regions (27.1%). GTR (achieved in 85%) was associated with longer progression free survival (PFS) (5year PFS 81.2% versus 40.08%, log-rank=11.117, p=0.001) but not overall survival (OS) (5year OS 76.6% versus 39.7%, log-rank=3.652, p=0.056). Following GTR, early adjuvant radiotherapy was administered to 28.3% of patients and did not influence OS (5year OS 77.0% versus 75.7%, log-rank=0.075, p=0.784) or PFS (5year PFS 82.0% versus 79.3%, log-rank=0.059, p=0.808). Although extent of resection emerged as an important prognostic variable, early adjuvant radiotherapy did not influence outcome following GTR of atypical meningiomas. Prospective randomized controlled trials are planned. PMID:26775147

  18. Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia with Trisomy 13: a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-yu Hu; Chao-hui Yuan; Kui Tan; Zhen-zhen Chen

    2011-01-01

    ATYPICAL chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML),which shows both myeloproliferative and myeIodysplastic features,is a type of myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disease as defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms.1 Because of the presence of neutrophilic leukocytosis,aCML may resemble chronic myeIogenous leukemia (CML).However,in contrast with CML,aCML does not have the Philadelphia chromosome or the bcr/abl fusion gene.

  19. Off-label indications for atypical antipsychotics: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Nimatoudis, Ioannis; Iacovides, Apostolos; Kaprinis, George

    2004-01-01

    Introduction With the introduction of newer atypical antipsychotic agents, a question emerged, concerning their use as complementary pharmacotherapy or even as monotherapy in mental disorders other than psychosis. Material and method MEDLINE was searched with the combination of each one of the key words: risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine with key words that refered to every DSM-IV diagnosis other than schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and dementia and memory d...

  20. Elevated rates of atypical handedness in paedophilia: theory and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Rachel L; Lykins, Amy D; Cantor, James M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple factors determine handedness including genetics, prenatal stress and post-natal environmental conditions. Atypical handedness, whether manifest as increased sinistrality or decreased strength of lateral preference, has been noted in a wide variety of populations with neuropathology. Those with atypical sexual preferences, specifically paedophilia, also manifest reduced rates of right-handedness. This paper uses the largest sample of phallometrically assessed men to date to establish the pattern of atypical handedness in paedophilia. Specifically, whereas prior research has largely characterized participants dichotomously as right-handed or non-right-handed and/or used self-report of writing hand, this paper expands upon such reports by using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory's laterality quotient. Participants' handedness and phallometrically assessed sexual preference were analyzed both as continuous and categorical variables, and the responses of those scoring in the range of ambiguous-handedness were evaluated to ascertain whether they were ambiguously handed or more accurately described as mixed-handed. Results indicated those producing scores in the range of ambiguous-handedness demonstrated response patterns consistent with ambiguous-handedness, rather than mixed-handedness. Paedophiles demonstrated high rates of non-right-handedness primarily manifested as sinistrality, whereas those who had a sexual preference for pubescent children evidenced increased ambiguous-handedness. Results support a view of ambiguous-handedness as less pathological than previously hypothesized, and of a neurodevelopmental origin of paraphilic sexual preferences. PMID:24666135

  1. Atypical Findings of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveGuillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy that occurs mostly after prior infection. The diagnosis of this syndrome is dependent heavily on the history and examination, although cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrodiagnostic testing usually confirm the diagnosis. This is a retrospective study which was performed to investigate the atypical features of GBS.Materials & MethodsThirty three patients (21/63.6% males and 12/36.4% females with GBS were retrospectively studied and prospectively evaluated at the Child Neurology institute of Mofid Children Hospital of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences between May 2011 and September 2012.ResultsThe mean age was 5.4 years (range, 1.5-10.5.Twenty one patients (87.9 % had previous history of infections. Eight patients (24.2% admitted with atypical symptoms like upper limb weakness (3%, ptosis (3%, neck stiffness (3%, inability to stand (proximal weakness (9.1%, headache (3% and dysphagia (3%.According to disease process, weakness was ascending in 26 (78.8%, descending in 5 (15.2% and static in 2 (6.1% patients. Cranial nerve involvement was found in 8(24.3% children, most commonly as facial palsy in 3 (9.1%.ConclusionIn this study, 24.3% of our patients presented with atypical symptoms of GBS as upper limb weakness, ptosis, neck stiffness, inability to stand (proximal weakness, headache and dysphagia

  2. Atypical full-field digital mammographic findings of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic significance of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) for atypical breast cancer findings. Methods: Seven hundred-eighteen cases with breast cancer were examined using FFDM and atypical mammographic findings were found in 134 cases. Craniocaudal (CC) view and mediolateral oblique (MLO) view were conducted for each patient. Mediolateral view or spot view was achieved if necessary. Preoperative localization was conducted for the patients with nonpalpable breast cancers. Results: (1) The masses with well-circumscribed margin on mammography were more common in infiltrating ductal carcinoma (22/106), mucinous carcinoma (8/10), medullary carcinoma (5/6), and increased with age and reduction of the mass density. (2) Long spiculation, architectural distortion, patchy high density were mainly found in infiltrating ductal carcinoma and 30-40 (24 cases), 41-50 (34 cases) years old patients. Long speculation was mainly found in 30-40 years old patients (10/30). (3) High homogenous density and subcutaneous edema in the entire breast and mass-like area were most frequently found in infiltrating ductal carcinoma at 30-40 (2 cases)and 41-50 (5 cases) years old. High density and subcutaneous edema were only found in dense breast (8 cases). Conclusion: The atypical findings of breast cancer in full-field digital mammography are associated with the pathological type of cancer, patient age and the gland density of the breast. (authors)

  3. Rotational velocities of A-type stars. III. Velocity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, F.; Zorec, J.; Gómez, A. E.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:A sample of v sin i of B9 to F2-type main sequence single stars has been built from highly homogeneous {v sin i} parameters determined for a large sample cleansed of objects presenting the Am and Ap phenomenon as well as of all known binaries. The aim is to study the distributions of rotational velocities in the mass range of A-type stars for normal single objects. Methods: Robust statistical methods are used to rectify the {v sin i} distributions for the projection effect and the error distribution. The equatorial velocity distributions are obtained for about 1100 stars divided in six groups defined by the spectral type, under the assumption of randomly orientated rotational axes. Results: We show that late B and early A-type main-sequence stars have genuine bimodal distributions of true equatorial rotational velocities probably due to angular momentum loss and redistribution that the star underwent before reaching the main sequence. A striking lack of slow rotators is noticed among intermediate and late A-type stars. Full Table [see full text] is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/463/671 Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Atypical features of nanophthalmic macula- a spectral domain OCT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Aparna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report atypical features on Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT in a case of non-familial pure adult nanophthalmos. Case presentation A 39 year old male hyperope was found to have biometric and fundus findings typical of nanophthalmos. The additional atypical features included serous pigment epithelial detachment (PED in right eye and a cuff of subretinal fluid with underlying yellow deposits along superotemporal arcade in the left eye. Fundus flourescein angiogram showed hyperfluorescence due to window defect, dye pooling due to serous PED in right eye and leak superior to disc in right eye and superotemporally in left eye. Cirrus-SD OCT horizontal line scan passing through the fovea showed extensive inner limiting membrane corrugations causing distorted foveal contour in both eyes. A large juxtafoveal serous PED and a small extrafoval PED were seen with folds in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE-choriocapillary layer in the right eye. Conclusion Structural disruptions in the RPE-choriocapillary complex in the form of folds or juxtafoveal serous PED and RPE folds can be atypical features of nanophthalmic macula better discerned on high resolution OCT.

  5. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Resistance Phenotypes and Phenotypic Highlighting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    BĂLĂŞOIU, MARIA; BĂLĂŞOIU, A.T.; MĂNESCU, RODICA; AVRAMESCU, CARMEN; IONETE, OANA

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa genus bacteria are well known for their increased drug resistance (phenotypic ang genotypic resistance). The most important resistance mechanisms are: enzyme production, reduction of pore expression, reduction of the external membrane proteins expression, efflux systems, topoisomerase mutations. These mechanisms often accumulate and lead to multidrug ressitance strains emergence. The most frequent acquired resistance mechanisms are betalactamase-type enzyme production (ESBLs, AmpC, carbapenemases), which determine variable phenotypes of betalactamines resistance, phenotypes which are associated with aminoglycosides and quinolones resistance. The nonenzymatic drug resistance mechanisms are caused by efflux systems, pore reduction and penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) modification, which are often associated to other resistance mechanisms. Phenotypic methods used for testing these mechanisms are based on highlighting these phenotypes using Kirby Bauer antibiogram, clinical breakpoints, and “cut off” values recommended by EUCAST 2013 standard, version 3.1. PMID:25729587

  6. Impact of BCRP/MXR, MRP1 and MDR1/P-Glycoprotein on thermoresistant variants of atypical and classical multidrug resistant cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Ulrike; Lage, Hermann; Jordan, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    The impact of the ABC transporters breast cancer resistance protein/mitoxantrone resistance associated transporter (BCRP/MXR), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and multidrug resistance gene-1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/PGP) on the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in chemoresistance...... and thermoresistance was investigated in the parental human gastric carcinoma cell line EPG85-257P, the atypical MDR subline EPG85-257RNOV, the classical MDR subline EPG85-257RDB and their thermoresistant counterparts EPG85-257P-TR, EPG85-257RNOV-TR and EPG85-257RDB-TR. Within the atypical MDR subline...... EPG85-257RNOV expression of BCRP/MXR and of MRP1 were clearly enhanced (vs. parental and classical MDR lines). MDR1/PGP expression was distinctly elevated in the classical MDR subline EPG85-257RDB (vs. parental and atypical MDR sublines). In all thermoresistant counterparts basal expression of BCRP...

  7. Evidence for Broadening Criteria for Atypical Depression Which May Define a Reactive Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Silverstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Arguing that additional symptoms should be added to the criteria for atypical depression. Method. Published research articles on atypical depression are reviewed. Results. (1 The original studies upon which the criteria for atypical depression were based cited fatigue, insomnia, pain, and loss of weight as characteristic symptoms. (2 Several studies of DSM depressive criteria found patients with atypical depression to exhibit high levels of insomnia, fatigue, and loss of appetite/weight. (3 Several studies have found atypical depression to be comorbid with headaches, bulimia, and body image issues. (4 Most probands who report atypical depression meet criteria for “somatic depression,” defined as depression associated with several of disordered eating, poor body image, headaches, fatigue, and insomnia. The gender difference in prevalence of atypical depression results from its overlap with somatic depression. Somatic depression is associated with psychosocial measures related to gender, linking it with the descriptions of atypical depression as “reactive” appearing in the studies upon which the original criteria for atypical depression were based. Conclusion. Insomnia, disordered eating, poor body image, and aches/pains should be added as criteria for atypical depression matching criteria for somatic depression defining a reactive depressive disorder possibly distinct from endogenous melancholic depression.

  8. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients, a reivew. Part I: atypical osteoarticular tuberculosis and tuberculous osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the resurgence of pulmonary tuberculosis and musculoskeletal tuberculosis in North America and Europe over the last 20 years, the typical pattern of extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis has been changing; presentation of the disease often mimics that of neoplasia. However, certain radiographic features may offer some clues to the more benign nature of the process and its inflammatory and infectious nature. Although the diagnosis of extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis depends largely on clinical context, it is the radiologist's role to guide the imaging workup to initiate the specific treatment as early as possible. As in classic extraspinal tuberculosis, delayed diagnosis may lead to deformity of the involved joint and permanent disability. This review considers atypical osteoarticular tuberculosis and tuberculous osteomyelitis. We discuss examples of these atypical presentations. All patients were permanent residents in Europe and North America, and all were immunocompetent. (author)

  9. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  10. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  11. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  12. BRAF Mutation Is Associated With a Specific Cell Type With Features Suggestive of Senescence in Ovarian Serous Borderline (Atypical Proliferative) Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeppernick, Felix; Ardighieri, Laura; Hannibal, Charlotte G;

    2014-01-01

    Serous borderline tumor also known as atypical proliferative serous tumor (APST) is the precursor of ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC). In this study, we correlated the morphologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes of 71 APSTs and 18 LGSCs with the mutational status of KRAS and BRAF, the...... LGSCs, EC cells were found in only 2, and both contained BRAF mutations. The EC cells were present admixed with cuboidal and columnar cells lining the papillae and appeared to be budding from the surface, resulting in individual cells and clusters of detached cells "floating" above the papillae...... of ovarian tumors by showing that BRAF mutation is associated with cellular senescence and the presence of a specific cell type characterized by abundant EC. This "oncogene-induced senescence" phenotype may represent a mechanism that impedes progression of APSTs to LGSC....

  13. MODY3 in the child with type 2 diabetes mellitus phenotype: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T L Kuraeva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available MODY is a heterogeneous group of diseases that stem from certain genetic mutations and are characterized by β-cell dysfunction, early clinical onset (before the age of 25 and autosomal dominant inheritance. Nowadays many studies address atypical variants of diabetes mellitus (DM and consequential problems in differential diagnosis. Though generally patients with MODY have normal body weight, the ongoing spread of obesity will probably produce comorbid forms and thus alter clinical picture. We present a case of DM in a 13-year-old patient that characterizes development of MODY3 in type 2 DM-like phenotype.

  14. Genetic testing in familial AD and FTD: mutation and phenotype spectrum in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S G; Schwartz, M; Batbayli, M; Waldemar, G; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominantly transmitted Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are genetically heterogeneous disorders. To date, three genes have been identified in which mutations cause early-onset autosomal dominant inherited AD: APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2. Mutations in two genes on...... chromosome 17, the MAPT and the PGRN genes, are associated with autosomal dominant inherited FTD. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutation spectrum and describe genotype-phenotype correlations in families with inherited dementia. The identification of novel mutations and/or atypical genotype...

  15. CD21-positive follicular dendritic cells: A possible source of PrPSc in lymph node macrophages of scrapie-infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Lynn M; Cheevers, William P; Davis, William C; Knowles, Donald P; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2003-04-01

    Natural sheep scrapie is a prion disease characterized by the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in brain and lymphoid tissues. Previous studies suggested that lymph node macrophages and follicular dendritic cells (FDC) accumulate PrP(Sc). In this study, lymph nodes were analyzed for the presence of PrP(Sc) and macrophage or FDC markers using dual immunohistochemistry. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the C-terminus of PrP reacted with CD172a+ macrophages and CD21+ FDC processes in secondary follicles. However, a PrP N-terminus-specific mAb reacted with CD21+ FDC processes but not CD172a+ macrophages in secondary follicles. Neither the PrP N-terminus nor C-terminus-specific mAb reacted with CD172a+ macrophages in the medulla. These results indicate that lymph node follicular macrophages acquire PrP(Sc) by phagocytosis of CD21+ FDC processes. The results also suggest that follicular macrophages have proteases that process full-length PrP(Sc) to N-terminally truncated PrP(Sc). PMID:12651600

  16. Remarkable reduction of MAP2 in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents and human prion disease possibly correlated with the increase of calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Gong, Han-Shi; Zhang, Jin; Xie, Wu-Ling; Tian, Chan; Chen, Cao; Shi, Qi; Wang, Shao-Bin; Xu, Yin; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) belongs to the family of heat stable MAPs, which takes part in neuronal morphogenesis, maintenance of cellular architecture and internal organization, cell division and cellular processes. To obtain insight into the possible alteration and the role of MAP2 in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the MAP2 levels in the brain tissues of agent 263K-infected hamsters and human prion diseases were evaluated. Western blots and IHC revealed that at the terminal stages of the diseases, MAP2 levels in the brain tissues of scrapie infected hamsters, a patient with genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (G114V gCJD) and a patient with fatal familial insomnia (FFI) were almost undetectable. The decline of MAP2 was closely related with prolonged incubation time. Exposure of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell line to cytotoxic PrP106-126 peptide significantly down-regulated the cellular MAP2 level and remarkably disrupted the microtubule structure, but did not alter the level of tubulin. Moreover, the levels of calpain, which mediated the degradation of a broad of cytoskeletal proteins, were significantly increased in both PrP106-126 treated SK-N-SH cells and brain tissues of 263K prion-infected hamsters. Our data indicate that the decline of MAP2 is a common phenomenon in TSEs, which seems to occur at an early stage of incubation period. Markedly increased calpain level might contribute to the reduction of MAP2. PMID:22272295

  17. Solitary Atypical Adenomatous Hyperplasia in a 12-Year-Old Girl

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Moran; Lee, Yang-Haeng; Kim, Bomi; Yoon, Young Chul; Wi, Jin Hong

    2016-01-01

    Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia is a premalignant lesion reflecting a focal proliferation of atypical cells. These lesions are usually observed as incidental findings in lungs that have been resected due to other conditions, such as lung cancer. We report the youngest case of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia on record in a 12-year-old girl. In this patient, the lesion was found in association with pneumothorax.

  18. Healthcare Costs of Atypical Antipsychotic Use for Patients with Bipolar Disorder in a Medicaid Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Qiu; Fu, Alex Z; Gordon G. Liu; Christensen, Dale B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A large body of clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of atypical antipsychotic use in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Facing increasing budget pressure, third-party payers, such as state Medicaid programmes in the US, are demanding better understanding of the medical costs beyond atypical antipsychotic drug costs alone in treating bipolar disorder. Objective: To examine healthcare costs associated with the atypical antipsychotic treatments for bipolar disorder from a...

  19. Solitary Atypical Adenomatous Hyperplasia in a 12-Year-Old Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Moran; Lee, Yang-Haeng; Kim, Bomi; Yoon, Young Chul; Wi, Jin Hong

    2016-01-01

    Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia is a premalignant lesion reflecting a focal proliferation of atypical cells. These lesions are usually observed as incidental findings in lungs that have been resected due to other conditions, such as lung cancer. We report the youngest case of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia on record in a 12-year-old girl. In this patient, the lesion was found in association with pneumothorax. PMID:27065090

  20. Atypical acute urticaria in children and its relationship with urticarial vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Zafer; ÖZMEN, Serap; SÜRMELİ, Sara; ARDA, Nilüfer

    2011-01-01

    In childhood, urticarial lesions are sometimes associated with purpura. This form might be identified as atypical, and may also be related to urticarial vasculitis (UV). The aim of this study was to assess the clinicopathologic characteristics of UV in children with atypical urticaria. Materials and methods: Fifteen children with atypical urticaria were evaluated with medical history, physical examination, and laboratory and skin punch biopsy findings. Results: Infections were detected as...

  1. Atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia in older adults: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Sonja; McArthur, Eric; Reiss, Jeffrey P.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Hackam, Daniel G.; Weir, Matthew A.; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of case reports have suggested a possible association between atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia. Currently, there are no reliable estimates of hyponatremia risk from atypical antipsychotic drugs. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the 30-day risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia in older adults dispensed an atypical antipsychotic drug relative to no antipsychotic use. Design The design of this study was a retrospective, population-ba...

  2. Atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders (literature review)

    OpenAIRE

    Leonov S.F.; Shusterman T.Y.; Rokutov S.V.; Shornikov A.V.

    2014-01-01

    The review of literature presents current data on cli¬nical picture and diagnostics of atypical depression. Rubric “atypical depression” includes a variety of depressive states characterized by reactively caused changes of mood, sensitivity to interpersonal contacts, inverted vegetative and somatic symptoms such as increased appetite and hypersomnia. The article considers the place of atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders. Positions of foreign authors that produce a...

  3. Atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders (literature review).

    OpenAIRE

    Spirina, I. D.; Leonov, S. F.; Shusterman, T. Y.; Rokutov, S. V.; Shornikov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    The review of literature presents current data on cli­nical picture and diagnostics of atypical depression. Rubric “atypical depression” includes a variety of depressive states characterized by reactively caused changes of mood, sensitivity to interpersonal contacts, inverted vegetative and somatic symptoms such as increased appetite and hypersomnia. The article considers the place of atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders. Positions of foreign authors that produce a...

  4. Modeling and Estimation Techniques for Wide-Area Network Traffic with Atypical Components

    OpenAIRE

    Minton, Carl Edward

    2002-01-01

    A critical first step to improving existing and designing future wide-area networks is an understanding of the load placed on these networks. Efforts to model traffic are often confounded by atypical traffic - traffic particular to the observation site not ubiquitously applicable. The causes and characteristics of atypical traffic are explored in this thesis. Atypical traffic is found to interfere with parsimonious analytic traffic models. A detection and modeling tech...

  5. Phenotypic plasticity, costs of phenotypes, and costs of plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Hilary S; Maughan, Heather; Steiner, Uli

    2008-01-01

    Why are some traits constitutive and others inducible? The term costs often appears in work addressing this issue but may be ambiguously defined. This review distinguishes two conceptually distinct types of costs: phenotypic costs and plasticity costs. Phenotypic costs are assessed from patterns of...... covariation, typically between a focal trait and a separate trait relevant to fitness. Plasticity costs, separable from phenotypic costs, are gauged by comparing the fitness of genotypes with equivalent phenotypes within two environments but differing in plasticity and fitness. Subtleties associated with both...... types of costs are illustrated by a body of work addressing predator-induced plasticity. Such subtleties, and potential interplay between the two types of costs, have also been addressed, often in studies involving genetic model organisms. In some instances, investigators have pinpointed the mechanistic...

  6. Atypical lymphocytes in malaria mimicking dengue infection in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polrat Wilairatana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polrat Wilairatana1, Noppadon Tangpukdee1, Sant Muangnoicharoen1, Srivicha Krudsood2, Shigeyuki Kano31Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Tropical Medicine and Malaria, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Patients with uncomplicated falciparum or vivax malaria usually present with acute febrile illness and thrombocytopenia similar to dengue infection. We retrospectively studied atypical lymphocytes (AL and atypical lymphocytosis (ALO, defined as AL > 5% of total white blood cells in 1310 uncomplicated malaria patients. In 718 falciparum malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 53.2% and 5.7% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–10%, whereas in 592 vivax malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 55.4% and 9.5% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–14%. After antimalarial treatment, AL and ALO declined in both falciparum and vivax malaria. However, AL and ALO remained in falciparum malaria on days 7, 14, and 21, whereas AL and ALO remained in vivax malaria on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. In both falciparum and vivax malaria patients, there was a positive correlation between AL and total lymphocytes, but a negative correlation between AL and highest fever on admission, white blood cells, and neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets (P < 0.05. In conclusion, AL or ALO may be found in uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria mimicking dengue infection. In tropical countries where both dengue and malaria are endemic, presence of AL or ALO in any acute febrile patients with thrombocytopenia (similar to the findings in dengue malaria could not be excluded. Particularly if the patients have risk of malaria infection, confirmative microscopic examination for malaria should be carried out

  7. Atypical Presentation of Cavernous Sinus Infection with Intracavernous ICA Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Pant, Bhawana; Joshi, H. C. K.; Isser, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    In a typical presentation of intracavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm and cavernous sinus infection there is involvement of 3rd, 4th and 6th cranial nerves along with 2nd and 5th cranial nerve. Here we present a case of a 32 years old male with unilateral mycotic intracavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm with a history of head injury. Atypical features in this case was involvement of distantly situated multiple cranial nerves and sparing the 5th cranial nerve and optic nerve whic...

  8. Atypical Papular Purpuric Eruption Induced by Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyma Kayalı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 infection’s most common dermatological manifestation is erythema infectiosum as also known the fifth disease. Rare clinical presentations of parvovirus B 19 like papulopurpuric gloves and socks syndrome and acropetechial syndrome has also been described re­cently. This study presents report of a case with atypical feature and distribution of rash due to parvovirus B19 in­fection. We want to emphasize that pediatricians should consider parvovirus B19 infection of any patient who has leukopenia presenting with petechial/purpuric eruption of an unclear origin.

  9. Deep venous thrombosis and atypical antipsychotics: three cases report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikhmoonesi Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep venous Thrombosis is a serious, possible life threatening event which is often ignored in psychiatric Settings. Purpose In this paper three cases of deep venous Thrombosis (DVT following the use of olanzapine and risperidone are presented. Methods The data of Three patients was collected from hospital records. Results The patients were in good general physical health and had no personal or familial history of DVT. The patients were not overweight (BMI  Conclusion Risk of DVT exists in patients under treatment with atypical antipsychotics in spite of no pre existing risk factor.

  10. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation

  11. Dengue Fever Presenting Atypically with Viral Conjunctivitis and Subacute Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheraz, Faizan; Tahir, Hassan; Saqi, Jannavi; Daruwalla, Vistasp

    2016-06-01

    The majority of dengue viral infections are asymptomatic, though symptoms may range from self-limiting febrile illness to life threatening hemorrhagic manifestations. As the burden of disease is dramatically rising in recent years, more patients with atypical presentations and rare complications are increasingly reported. Dengue virus may rarely involve different organ systems including CNS, liver, and heart. However, involvement of eye and thyroid is extremely rare. We present a case of 32-year old patient who presented with conjunctivitis and subacute thyroiditis and was found to have dengue viral infection as the cause of these conditions. PMID:27376214

  12. Lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve: typical and atypical MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Bernadette Zhi Ying [Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); University College London, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Amrami, Kimberly K.; Wenger, Doris E. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Dyck, P. James B. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology, Rochester, MN (United States); Scheithauer, Bernd W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of nerve, usually affecting the median nerve. The MRI appearance is characteristic. We describe two cases of lipomatosis of nerve involving the sciatic nerve, an extremely unusual location for this lesion, in patients with sciatic neuropathy. These cases share the typical features previously described in the literature for other nerves, but also contain atypical features not previously highlighted, relating to the variability in distribution and extent of the fatty deposition. Recognition of the MRI appearance of this entity is important in order to avoid unnecessary attempts at surgical resection of this lesion. (orig.)

  13. Lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve: typical and atypical MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipomatosis of nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of nerve, usually affecting the median nerve. The MRI appearance is characteristic. We describe two cases of lipomatosis of nerve involving the sciatic nerve, an extremely unusual location for this lesion, in patients with sciatic neuropathy. These cases share the typical features previously described in the literature for other nerves, but also contain atypical features not previously highlighted, relating to the variability in distribution and extent of the fatty deposition. Recognition of the MRI appearance of this entity is important in order to avoid unnecessary attempts at surgical resection of this lesion. (orig.)

  14. AMELANOTIC MELANOMA WITH ATYPICAL CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND MULTIPLE METASTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revathy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 52 year old woman presented with a history of asymptomatic skin lesions over left leg for the past 4 months. On examination she had multiple skin coloured papules and plaques over left leg. Oedema was also seen over left leg. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry proved the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Radiological investigation showed metastasis to lung, liver and brain. The patient was asymptomatic at the time of admission but she developed rapid metastasis within a very short span of time. This case is reported for the rare atypical presentation of malignant melanoma.

  15. Atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy in a 5-generation family.

    OpenAIRE

    Hittner, H M; Ferrell, R E; Borda, R. P.; Justice, J

    1984-01-01

    Five generations of a family with autosomal dominant atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy (A-VMD) were studied. This dystrophy is similar to autosomal dominant Best's vitelliform dystrophy (B-VMD) but clinically more closely resembles sporadic pseudovitelliform macular degeneration (P-VMD). Of the family members who were 14 years or older 43 (24 females and 19 males) of the 101 at risk (43%) were affected. Vision varied from 20/20 to 20/200. Field defects and tritan colour defects were inva...

  16. Atypical Findings of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children

    OpenAIRE

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; Mohammadkazem BAKHSHANDEH BALI; Mohammad Mahdi Nasehi; Seyedeh Mohaddese Taheri Otaghsara; Mohammad Ghofrani

    2013-01-01

    How to cite this article: Karimzadeh P, Bakhshandeh Bali MK, Nasehi MM, Taheri Otaghsara SM, Ghofrani M. Atypical Findings of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012;6(4):17-22. AbstractObjectiveGuillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy that occurs mostly after  prior infection. The diagnosis of this syndrome is dependent heavily on the history and examination, although cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrodiagnostic testing usually conf...

  17. The expanding phenotypic spectra of kidney diseases: insights from genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokman, Marijn F; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Giles, Rachel H; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Eerde, Albertien M

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to the identification of previously unrecognized phenotypes associated with classic kidney disease genes. In addition to improving diagnostics for genetically heterogeneous diseases and enabling a faster rate of gene discovery, NGS has enabled an expansion and redefinition of nephrogenetic disease categories. Findings from these studies raise the question of whether disease diagnoses should be made on clinical grounds, on genetic evidence or a combination thereof. Here, we discuss the major kidney disease-associated genes and gene categories for which NGS has expanded the phenotypic spectrum. For example, COL4A3-5 genes, which are classically associated with Alport syndrome, are now understood to also be involved in the aetiology of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. DGKE, which is associated with nephrotic syndrome, is also mutated in patients with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. We examine how a shared genetic background between diverse clinical phenotypes can provide insight into the function of genes and novel links with essential pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, we consider genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to the observed phenotypic heterogeneity of kidney diseases and discuss the challenges in the interpretation of genetic data. Finally, we discuss the implications of the expanding phenotypic spectra associated with kidney disease genes for clinical practice, genetic counselling and personalized care, and present our recommendations for the use of NGS-based tests in routine nephrology practice. PMID:27374918

  18. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  19. Capturing phenotypes for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    Deep phenotyping followed by integrated computational analysis of genotype and phenotype is becoming ever more important for many areas of genomic diagnostics and translational research. The overwhelming majority of clinical descriptions in the medical literature are available only as natural language text, meaning that searching, analysis, and integration of medically relevant information in databases such as PubMed is challenging. The new journal Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies will require authors to select Human Phenotype Ontology terms for research papers that will be displayed alongside the manuscript, thereby providing a foundation for ontology-based indexing and searching of articles that contain descriptions of phenotypic abnormalities-an important step toward improving the ability of researchers and clinicians to get biomedical information that is critical for clinical care or translational research. PMID:27148566

  20. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Deans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility.

  1. Next-generation phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Scott J; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Carragher, Neil O

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) strategies are defined by screening and selection of hit or lead compounds based on quantifiable phenotypic endpoints without prior knowledge of the drug target. We outline the challenges associated with traditional phenotypic screening strategies and propose solutions and new opportunities to be gained by adopting modern PDD technologies. We highlight both historical and recent examples of approved drugs and new drug candidates discovered by modern phenotypic screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of a new era of PDD underpinned by a wealth of technology advances in the areas of in vitro model development, high-content imaging and image informatics, mechanism-of-action profiling and target deconvolution. PMID:27357617

  2. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Andrew R; Lewis, Suzanna E; Huala, Eva; Anzaldo, Salvatore S; Ashburner, Michael; Balhoff, James P; Blackburn, David C; Blake, Judith A; Burleigh, J Gordon; Chanet, Bruno; Cooper, Laurel D; Courtot, Mélanie; Csösz, Sándor; Cui, Hong; Dahdul, Wasila; Das, Sandip; Dececchi, T Alexander; Dettai, Agnes; Diogo, Rui; Druzinsky, Robert E; Dumontier, Michel; Franz, Nico M; Friedrich, Frank; Gkoutos, George V; Haendel, Melissa; Harmon, Luke J; Hayamizu, Terry F; He, Yongqun; Hines, Heather M; Ibrahim, Nizar; Jackson, Laura M; Jaiswal, Pankaj; James-Zorn, Christina; Köhler, Sebastian; Lecointre, Guillaume; Lapp, Hilmar; Lawrence, Carolyn J; Le Novère, Nicolas; Lundberg, John G; Macklin, James; Mast, Austin R; Midford, Peter E; Mikó, István; Mungall, Christopher J; Oellrich, Anika; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Parkinson, Helen; Ramírez, Martín J; Richter, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N; Ruttenberg, Alan; Schulz, Katja S; Segerdell, Erik; Seltmann, Katja C; Sharkey, Michael J; Smith, Aaron D; Smith, Barry; Specht, Chelsea D; Squires, R Burke; Thacker, Robert W; Thessen, Anne; Fernandez-Triana, Jose; Vihinen, Mauno; Vize, Peter D; Vogt, Lars; Wall, Christine E; Walls, Ramona L; Westerfeld, Monte; Wharton, Robert A; Wirkner, Christian S; Woolley, James B; Yoder, Matthew J; Zorn, Aaron M; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility. PMID:25562316

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease a case report, with special attention to the electroencephalogram in this disorder and to its possible relationships to kuru, scrapie and «mad cow disease»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Chapman

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 58-year-old Brazillian cattle rancher and businessman is presented. The EEG was normal, which is consistent with the fact that it was made during the first half of his illness; in a later stage suppression of normal rhythms by slow moderate voltage waves would be expected. The resemblances of kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease» to C-J disease are discussed. In each of these 4 illnesses the patient or affected animal (scrapie and «mad cow disease" (a has a widespread spongiform encephalopathy and consequent dementia, myoclonic epilepsy and cerebellar and corticospinal symptoms, (b Each illness is caused by a virus (or virus-like organism called a PrP or prion which is unusually resistant to heat and entirely resistant to ultraviolet light and x-rays, (c This causative agent can be transmitted to other mammals by intracerebral injection or, in the proved cases of 3 of them, by the oral route. Unresolved questions about C-J disease include the following: Are C-J disease, kuru, scrapie and "mad cow disease" essentially similar illnesses caused by the same virus or by subtle variants of it? What is the incubation period of C-J disease, and does its virus exist for long periods of time in some asymptomatic persons, some of whom may never become neurologically ill? How does this virus enter the bodies of most persons with C-J disease, and why does the clinical disease characteristically occur only in middle age?

  4. Dual mechanism of action of the atypical tetracycline chelocardin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanek, Jennifer J; Lukežič, Tadeja; Teichert, Ines; Petković, Hrvoje; Bandow, Julia E

    2016-06-01

    Classical tetracyclines targeting the protein biosynthesis machinery are commonly applied in human and veterinary medicine. The development and spread of resistance seriously compromise the successful treatment of bacterial infections. The atypical tetracycline chelocardin holds promise as it retains activity against tetracycline-resistant strains. It has been suggested that chelocardin targets the bacterial membrane, thus differing in mode of action from that of classical tetracyclines. We investigated the mechanism of action of chelocardin using global proteome analysis. The proteome profiles after sublethal chelocardin stress were compared to a reference compendium containing antibiotic response profiles of Bacillus subtilis. This approach revealed a concentration-dependent dual mechanism of action. At low concentrations, like classical tetracyclines, chelocardin induces the proteomic signature for peptidyl transferase inhibition demonstrating that protein biosynthesis inhibition is the dominant physiological challenge. At higher concentrations B. subtilis mainly responds to membrane stress indicating that at clinically relevant concentrations the membrane is the main antibiotic target of chelocardin. Studying the effects on the membrane in more detail, we found that chelocardin causes membrane depolarization but does not lead to formation of large pores. We conclude that at growth inhibiting doses chelocardin not only targets protein biosynthesis but also corrupts the integrity of the bacterial membrane. This dual mechanism of action might prove beneficial in slowing the development of new resistance mechanisms against this atypical tetracycline. PMID:26969785

  5. OBESITY IS AN UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE DRUG REACTION TO ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemlata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics are an important advance in the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illness, and have become widely used as first - line pharmacotherapy for psychosis. This study is a longitudinal prospective observational study of ADRs of Atypical Antipsychotic drugs in patients of psychiatric illness. Information of ADRs was data based and collected from OPD. The noted ADRs were assessed by using Naranjo’s probability assessment scale, and WHO (UMC causality assessment scale. Majority of patients in this study belonged to 21 - 30 years age group which was 24% of the total. According to the severity of ADRs, majority of cases were reported of having weight gain 38. 46% followed by sedation 19. 23%, dry mouth 13. 46% and orthostatic hypote nsion 5. 76%. 88. 47% were reported as type A and 11. 53% were reported as type B. Definite (certain relationship was established in 30. 40% patients while probable in 57. 62% and 11. 53% ADRs were categorized as possible. The ADRs can be prevented by col lecting reliable information about their frequencies and possible risk factors.

  6. Fungal rhinosinusitis with atypical presentation - a report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael da Costa Monsanto; Rodrigo Silva Orem; Fernanda Resende e Silva; Fabio Hiroshi Okuyama; Fabio Tadeu Moura Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    Rhinosinusitis affects approximately 20% of the population, and the chronic rhinosinusitis represents over 90% of all cases of rhinosinusitis. The correct diagnosis is important for proper treatment and to predict its evolution. This study presents two cases of atypical frontal sinus disease, which the follow-up revealed a diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis. The present study aims to describe the cases of two patients with atypical lesions on the left frontal sinus; the treatment options, surgical approach, results, diagnosis and follow-up are further discussed. A significant increase in the reported cases of fungal rhinosinusitis has been seen in the last two decades, justified by the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and steroids, as well as the increased number of immunocompromised individuals. This study reports the cases of two patients with a type of fungal rhinosinusitis named "fungal ball", characterized by a tangle of hyphae in the sinuses without tissue invasion. The treatment included surgical removal of the fungal infectious process with aeration of the affected sinus, and the procedure was successfully performed in our patients.

  7. Atypical dermatophilosis of sheep in Kenya : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Wabacha

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of an atypical form of ovine dermatophilosis affecting the lips and muzzle with a very high morbidity in weaners and hoggets in Kenya is reported. Clinical diagnosis of ovine dermatophilosis was made and confirmed by direct microscopic examination as well as isolation and identification of Dermatophilus congolensis from scab material from the affected sheep. The morbidity rate within the flock was 31.8 % (237 / 745 with 98.3 % (233 / 237 of the affected sheep being weaners and hoggets. No fatalities were recorded. The lesions, confined in the lips and the muzzle, were swelling of both the upper and lower lips, circumscribed lumps in the skin of both the upper and lower lips, oedema of the head and the submandibular area and scabs and crusts on the lips and muzzle. Within 1 week following treatment with long acting oxytetracycline (20 % at a rate of 20 mg/kg body weight, intramuscularly and a topical application of oxytetracycline spray, lumps regressed in size and were covered by dark-brown scabs. Removal of the dark-brown scabs revealed erythematous areas covered with purulent material and horny erythematous projections (papillae projecting from the surfaces. Within the 2nd week, the horny erythematous projections formed greyish scabs, which later peeled off leaving alopaecic areas around the lips. The paper highlights atypical dermatophilosis of sheep and we believe that this is the first published report of an outbreak of ovine dermatophilosis in Kenya.

  8. Breast Metastases from Extramammary Malignancies: Typical and Atypical Ultrasound Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast metastases from extramammary malignancies are uncommon. The most common sources are lymphomas/leukemias and melanomas. Some of the less common sources include carcinomas of the lung, ovary, and stomach, and infrequently, carcinoid tumors, hypernephromas, carcinomas of the liver, tonsil, pleura, pancreas, cervix, perineum, endometrium and bladder. Breast metastases from extramammary malignancies have both hematogenous and lymphatic routes. According to their routes, there are common radiological features of metastatic diseases of the breast, but the features are not specific for metastases. Typical ultrasound (US) features of hematogenous metastases include single or multiple, round to oval shaped, well-circumscribed hypoechoic masses without spiculations, calcifications, or architectural distortion; these masses are commonly located superficially in subcutaneous tissue or immediately adjacent to the breast parenchyma that is relatively rich in blood supply. Typical US features of lymphatic breast metastases include diffusely and heterogeneously increased echogenicities in subcutaneous fat and glandular tissue and a thick trabecular pattern with secondary skin thickening, lymphedema, and lymph node enlargement. However, lesions show variable US features in some cases, and differentiation of these lesions from primary breast cancer or from benign lesions is difficult. In this review, we demonstrate various US appearances of breast metastases from extramammary malignancies as typical and atypical features, based on the results of US and other imaging studies performed at our institution. Awareness of the typical and atypical imaging features of these lesions may be helpful to diagnose metastatic lesions of the breast

  9. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just MJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marek J Just Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, Piekary Medical Centre, Piekary Slaskie, Poland Abstract: Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido, physiological arousal (lubrication/erection, orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders’ treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (α-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic. Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. Keywords: schizophrenia, galactorrhea, hyperprolactinemia, mood disorders, anorgasmia

  10. Atypical centromeres in plants—what they can tell us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuacos, Maria; H. Franklin, F. Chris; Heckmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The centromere, visible as the primary constriction of condensed metaphase chromosomes, is a defined chromosomal locus essential for genome stability. It mediates transient assembly of a multi-protein complex, the kinetochore, which enables interaction with spindle fibers and thus faithful segregation of the genetic information during nuclear divisions. Centromeric DNA varies in extent and sequence composition among organisms, but a common feature of almost all active eukaryotic centromeres is the presence of the centromeric histone H3 variant cenH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). These typical centromere features apply to most studied species. However, a number of species display “atypical” centromeres, such as holocentromeres (centromere extension along almost the entire chromatid length) or neocentromeres (ectopic centromere activity). In this review, we provide an overview of different atypical centromere types found in plants including holocentromeres, de novo formed centromeres and terminal neocentromeres as well as di-, tri- and metapolycentromeres (more than one centromere per chromosomes). We discuss their specific and common features and compare them to centromere types found in other eukaryotic species. We also highlight new insights into centromere biology gained in plants with atypical centromeres such as distinct mechanisms to define a holocentromere, specific adaptations in species with holocentromeres during meiosis or various scenarios leading to neocentromere formation. PMID:26579160

  11. Breast Metastases from Extramammary Malignancies: Typical and Atypical Ultrasound Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Sung Hee [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Catholic University of Daegu College of Medicine, Daegu 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Young; Han, Boo-Kyung; Shin, Jung Hee [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk Jung [Department of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Yoon [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Breast metastases from extramammary malignancies are uncommon. The most common sources are lymphomas/leukemias and melanomas. Some of the less common sources include carcinomas of the lung, ovary, and stomach, and infrequently, carcinoid tumors, hypernephromas, carcinomas of the liver, tonsil, pleura, pancreas, cervix, perineum, endometrium and bladder. Breast metastases from extramammary malignancies have both hematogenous and lymphatic routes. According to their routes, there are common radiological features of metastatic diseases of the breast, but the features are not specific for metastases. Typical ultrasound (US) features of hematogenous metastases include single or multiple, round to oval shaped, well-circumscribed hypoechoic masses without spiculations, calcifications, or architectural distortion; these masses are commonly located superficially in subcutaneous tissue or immediately adjacent to the breast parenchyma that is relatively rich in blood supply. Typical US features of lymphatic breast metastases include diffusely and heterogeneously increased echogenicities in subcutaneous fat and glandular tissue and a thick trabecular pattern with secondary skin thickening, lymphedema, and lymph node enlargement. However, lesions show variable US features in some cases, and differentiation of these lesions from primary breast cancer or from benign lesions is difficult. In this review, we demonstrate various US appearances of breast metastases from extramammary malignancies as typical and atypical features, based on the results of US and other imaging studies performed at our institution. Awareness of the typical and atypical imaging features of these lesions may be helpful to diagnose metastatic lesions of the breast.

  12. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of early-onset schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrdlicka M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Michal Hrdlicka, Iva Dudova Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs have been successfully used in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS. This review summarizes the randomized, double-blind, controlled studies of AAPs in EOS, including clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. No significant differences in efficacy between AAPs were found, with the exception of clozapine and ziprasidone. Clozapine demonstrated superior efficacy in treatment-resistant patients with EOS, whereas ziprasidone failed to demonstrate efficacy in the treatment of EOS. Our review also focuses on the onset of action and weight gain associated with AAPs. The data on onset of action of AAPs in pediatric psychiatry are scanty and inconsistent. Olanzapine appears to cause the most significant weight gain in patients with EOS, while ziprasidone and aripiprazole seem to cause the least. Keywords: early-onset schizophrenia, atypical antipsychotics, efficacy, onset of action, weight gain

  13. Atypical Face Perception in Autism: A Point of View?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Karine; Guy, Jacalyn; Habak, Claudine; Wilson, Hugh R; Pagani, Linda; Mottron, Laurent; Bertone, Armando

    2015-10-01

    Face perception is the most commonly used visual metric of social perception in autism. However, when found to be atypical, the origin of face perception differences in autism is contentious. One hypothesis proposes that a locally oriented visual analysis, characteristic of individuals with autism, ultimately affects performance on face tasks where a global analysis is optimal. The objective of this study was to evaluate this hypothesis by assessing face identity discrimination with synthetic faces presented with and without changes in viewpoint, with the former condition minimizing access to local face attributes used for identity discrimination. Twenty-eight individuals with autism and 30 neurotypical participants performed a face identity discrimination task. Stimuli were synthetic faces extracted from traditional face photographs in both front and 20° side viewpoints, digitized from 37 points to provide a continuous measure of facial geometry. Face identity discrimination thresholds were obtained using a two-alternative, temporal forced choice match-to-sample paradigm. Analyses revealed an interaction between group and condition, with group differences found only for the viewpoint change condition, where performance in the autism group was decreased compared to that of neurotypical participants. The selective decrease in performance for the viewpoint change condition suggests that face identity discrimination in autism is more difficult when access to local cues is minimized, and/or when dependence on integrative analysis is increased. These results lend support to a perceptual contribution of atypical face perception in autism. PMID:25683613

  14. Differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva Oleg N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete sequencing of bacterial genomes has become a common technique of present day microbiology. Thereafter, data mining in the complete sequence is an essential step. New in silico methods are needed that rapidly identify the major features of genome organization and facilitate the prediction of the functional class of ORFs. We tested the usefulness of local oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns to recognize and differentiate types of atypical oligonucleotide composition in DNA sequences of bacterial genomes. Results A total of 163 bacterial genomes of eubacteria and archaea published in the NCBI database were analyzed. Local OU patterns exhibit substantial intrachromosomal variation in bacteria. Loci with alternative OU patterns were parts of horizontally acquired gene islands or ancient regions such as genes for ribosomal proteins and RNAs. OU statistical parameters, such as local pattern deviation (D, pattern skew (PS and OU variance (OUV enabled the detection and visualization of gene islands of different functional classes. Conclusion A set of approaches has been designed for the statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences of bacterial genomes. These methods are useful for the visualization and differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition prior to or accompanying gene annotation.

  15. Mass loss in main-sequence A-type stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, T.; Catala, C.

    1992-04-01

    We present new observations of the H-alpha line profile for five main-sequence A-type stars, where very high SNRs were achieved. A search for weak asymmetries was carried out to detect a stellar wind, but the many telluric absorption lines in this range prevent us from taking the full benefit of the high SNRs. This situation was improved by modeling the telluric absorptions to remove them from the observed spectra, but the H-alpha profiles were nevertheless found to be quite symmetric. We calculated the profile of the H-alpha line for a grid of model atmospheres of an A-type star including a weak wind, in order to assess an upper limit on the mass loss rate. The asymmetry is found to be sensitive to the velocity law and to the turbulent velocity of the wind, but its first moment depends much less on them. The upper limits deduced on the mass loss rate are between 1 and 2 x 10 exp -10 solar mass/yr. An improvement up to a factor 10 could be anticipated if new observations could be secured from a much drier location, achieving similar SNRs.

  16. Traditional and Atypical Presentations of Anxiety in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Kendall, Philip C.; Berry, Leandra; Souders, Margaret C.; Franklin, Martin E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Miller, Judith; Herrington, John

    2014-01-01

    We assessed anxiety consistent (i.e., "traditional") and inconsistent (i.e., "atypical") with diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM) definitions in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Differential relationships between traditional anxiety, atypical anxiety, child characteristics, anxiety predictors and ASD-symptomology were…

  17. Atypical speech and language development : a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Luinge, Margreet R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. AIM: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  18. Automated flagging influences the inconsistency and bias of band cell and atypical lymphocyte morphological differentials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, W. van der; Scott, C.S.; Keijzer, M.H. de

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated inter- and intra-observer variabilities of band cell and atypical lymphocyte differentials and the influence of instrument flagging information on resulting microscopic differentials. Five stained slides with a range of band cell counts and five with variable numbers of atypical

  19. [Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia. The spectrum from Kimura disease to atypical pyogenic granuloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustrow, A; Mahrle, G

    1987-04-15

    A patient showed the "atypical pyogenic granuloma" of the head in combination with atopic dermatitis and proceeding pyogenic granuloma of the back. The diagnostic aspects of angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) including Kimura's disease, subcutaneous ALHE, and atypical pyogenic granuloma are discussed. PMID:3111112

  20. The involvement of limbic structures in typical and atypical absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onat, F.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Nehlig, A.; Snead, O.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical and atypical seizures of absence epilepsy are thought to be generated by a rhythmogenic interplay between the cortex and the thalamus. However, the question remains as to which other subcortical and extrathalamic structures are involved in the pathophysiology of typical and atypical absence

  1. Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Atypical Depression: A Pilot Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Lauren M.; Munroe, Mary K.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions for atypical depression (AD) have been relatively ignored in the clinical research literature, despite evidence that the atypical subtype of major depression is marked by earlier age of onset, longer duration of mood episode, greater symptom severity, and poorer response to pharmacologic treatment. Given the symptom…

  2. Cognitive Function and Depression in Symptom Resolution in Schizophrenia Patients Treated with an Atypical Antipsychotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stip, Emmanuel; Mancini-Marie, Adham

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate which cognitive and affective features contribute most to responder/non-responder group separation during a switching trial with atypical antipsychotic. Design: A prospective open trial with an atypical antipsychotic (olanzapine). Patients: One hundred and thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for…

  3. X-ray diffraction analysis of scrapie prion: intermediate and folded structures in a peptide containing two putative alpha-helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H; Kirschner, D A

    1997-05-01

    Small proteinaceous infectious particles called prions cause certain neurodegenerative diseases in human and animals. Limited proteolysis of infectious scrapie prions PrP(Sc) yields an N-truncated polypeptide termed PrP 27-30, which encompasses residues 90 to 231 of PrP(Sc) and which assembles into 100 to 200 A wide amyloid rods. It has been hypothesized that the infectious prion is converted from its non-infectious cellular form (PrP(C)) by means of an alpha-helical to beta-sheet conformational change. Secondary structure analysis, computer modeling, and structural biophysics methods support this hypothesis. Residues 90 to 145 of PrP, which contain two putative alpha-helical domains H1 and H2, may be of particular relevance to the disease pathogenesis, as C-terminal truncation at residue 145 was found in a patient with an inherited prion disease. Moreover, our recent X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the peptide consisting of these residues (designated SHa 90-145) closely models the amyloidogenic beta-sheet core of PrP. In the current study, we have analyzed in detail the X-ray diffraction patterns of SHa 90-145. Two samples were examined: one that was dehydrated under ambient conditions whilst in an external magnetic field (to induce fibril orientation), and another that was sealed after partial drying. The dried, magnetically oriented sample showed a cross-beta diffraction pattern in which the fiber axis (rotation axis) was parallel to the H-bonding direction of the beta-sheets. The major wide-angle peaks indicate the presence of approximately 40 A wide beta-crystallites, which constitute the protofilament. Each crystallite is composed of several orthogonal unit cells, normal to the fiber (a-axis) direction, having lattice constants a = 9.69 A, b = 6.54 A, and c = 18.06 A. Electron density maps were calculated by iterative Fourier synthesis using beta-silk as an initial phase model. The distribution of density indicated that there were two types of beta

  4. Gender Atypicality and Anxiety Response to Social Interaction Stress in Homosexual and Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Roi; Cohen, Hagit; Diamond, Gary M

    2016-04-01

    Gender non-conforming behavior and a homosexual sexual orientation have both been linked to higher levels of anxiety. This study examined the independent and interactive effects of gender atypicality and sexual orientation on levels of state anxiety immediately following a stressful social interaction task among a sample of homosexual and heterosexual Israeli men (n = 36). Gender atypicality was measured via both self-report and observer ratings. State anxiety was measured via both self-report immediately subsequent to the stressful social interaction task and pre- to post task changes in salivary cortisol. Results showed that self-reported gender atypicality and heterosexual sexual orientation predicted higher levels of self-reported social interaction anxiety, but not changes in cortisol. There were no sexual orientation by gender behavior interactions and there were no significant effects for observer rated gender atypicality. These findings suggest that gender atypicality, not homosexuality, place individuals at risk for increased anxiety. PMID:25946903

  5. $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetric field theories on 3-manifolds with A-type boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    General half-BPS A-type boundary conditions are formulated for N=2 supersymmetric field theories on compact 3-manifolds with boundary. We observe that under suitable conditions manifolds of the real A-type admitting two complex supersymmetries (related by charge conjugation) possess, besides a contact structure, a natural integrable toric foliation. A boundary, or a general co-dimension-1 defect, can be inserted along any leaf of this preferred foliation to produce manifolds with boundary that have the topology of a solid torus. We show that supersymmetric field theories on such manifolds can be endowed with half-BPS A-type boundary conditions. We specify the natural curved space generalization of the A-type projection of bulk supersymmetries and analyze the resulting A-type boundary conditions in generic 3d non-linear sigma models and YM/CS-matter theories.

  6. Abnormally upregulated αB-crystallin was highly coincidental with the astrogliosis in the brains of scrapie-infected hamsters and human patients with prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Yin; Ren, Ke; Xie, Wu-Ling; Yan, Yu-E; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Shi, Qi; Liu, Yong; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2013-11-01

    αB-crystallin is a member of the small heat shock protein family constitutively presenting in brains at a relatively low level. To address the alteration of αB-crystallin in prion disease, the αB-crystallin levels in the brains of scrapie agent 263 K-infected hamsters were analyzed. The levels of αB-crystallin were remarkably increased in the brains of 263 K-infected hamsters, showing a time-dependent manner along with incubation time. Immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescent (IFA) assays illustrated more αB-crystallin-positive signals in the regions of the cortex and thalamus containing severe astrogliosis. Double-stained IFA verified that the αB-crystallin signals colocalized with the enlarged glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes, but not with neuronal nuclei-positive cells. IHC and IFA of the serial brain sections of infected hamsters showed no colocalization and correlation between PrP(Sc) deposits and αB-crystallin increase. Moreover, increased αB-crystallin deposits were observed in the brain sections of parietal lobe of a sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) case, parietal lobe and thalamus of a G114V genetic CJD case, and thalamus of a fatal family insomnia (FFI) case, but not in a parietal lobe of FFI where only very mild astrogliosis was addressed. Additionally, the molecular interaction between αB-crystallin and PrP was only observed in the reactions of recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli, but not either in that of brain homogenates or in that of the cultured cell lysates expressing human PrP and αB-crystallin. Our data indicate that brain αB-crystallin is abnormally upregulated in various prion diseases, which is coincidental with astrogliosis. Direct interaction between αB-crystallin and PrP seems not to be essential during the pathogenesis of prion infection. PMID:23832485

  7. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J; Lewis, Teresa D; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis. PMID:23056373

  8. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis.

  9. Rare non-traumatic periprosthetic femoral fracture with features of an atypical femoral fracture: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Sakai, Yoshitada; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atypical femoral fractures have emerged as one of the potential complications of bisphosphonates during the past decade. The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research published a Task Force report on atypical femoral fractures in 2010 and a second report in 2014. Although the current definition of atypical femoral fractures in these reports excludes periprosthetic fractures, each of three published case reports describe a bisphosphonate-associated atypical femoral fracture t...

  10. Disease isolates of Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and non-typeable S. pneumoniae presumptively identified as atypical S. pneumoniae in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Rolo

    Full Text Available We aimed to obtain insights on the nature of a collection of isolates presumptively identified as atypical Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from invasive and non-invasive infections in Spain. One-hundred and thirty-two isolates were characterized by: optochin susceptibility in ambient and CO(2-enriched atmosphere; bile solubility; PCR-based assays targeting pneumococcal genes lytA, ply, pspA, cpsA, Spn9802, aliB-like ORF2, and a specific 16S rRNA region; multilocus sequence analysis; and antimicrobial susceptibility. By multilocus sequence analysis, 61 isolates were S. pseudopneumoniae, 34 were pneumococci, 13 were S. mitis, and 24 remained unclassified as non-pneumococci. Among S. pseudopneumoniae isolates, 51 (83.6% were collected from respiratory tract samples; eight isolates were obtained from sterile sources. High frequency of non-susceptibility to penicillin (60.7% and erythromycin (42.6% was found. Only 50.8% of the S. pseudopneumoniae isolates displayed the typical optochin phenotype originally described for this species. None harbored the cpsA gene or the pneumococcal typical lytA restriction fragment length polymorphism. The Spn9802 and the specific 16S rRNA regions were detected among the majority of the S. pseudopneumoniae isolates (n = 59 and n = 49, respectively. The ply and pspA genes were rarely found. A high genetic diversity was found and 59 profiles were identified. Among the S. pneumoniae, 23 were capsulated and 11 were non-typeable. Three non-typeable isolates, associated to international non-capsulated lineages, were recovered from invasive disease sources. In conclusion, half of the atypical pneumococcal clinical isolates were, in fact, S. pseudopneumoniae and one-fourth were other streptococci. We identified S. pseudopneumoniae and non-typeable pneumococci as cause of disease in Spain including invasive disease.

  11. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Soloveva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  12. Cholesterol granuloma of the orbit: An atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A R Rizvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol granuloma is a rare, well-defined lesion of the orbit. In the orbit, diploe of the frontal bone is involved almost exclusively. We report an atypical case of cholesterol granuloma involving superomedial quadrant of orbit. A 42-year-old male presented with progressive, painless, proptosis with infero-temporal displacement of left eye. A large mass was felt beneath the bony orbital margin in the superomedial quadrant of the left orbit. Computerized tomography (CT scan revealed an extraconal superomedial, heterogeneous enhancing mass which was isodense with brain and pushing the globe inferolaterally and anteriorly. Excision biopsy of the tumor revealed the typical features of a cholesterol granuloma without any epithelial elements. Cholesterol granuloma of the orbit is a rare entity, but it can be diagnosed and differentiated from other lesions of the superior orbit by its characteristic clinical, radiological and histopathological features. An appropriate intervention in time carries a good prognosis with almost no recurrence.

  13. Epidermoid cyst of the testis: An atypical sonographic appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ting; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Pan, Chin-Chen; Shen, Shu-Huei; Chou, Yi-Hong; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Lai, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yung-Hui; Wang, Jane; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2016-09-01

    Epidermoid cysts are rare. They represent the most common benign tumor of the testis. The sonographic appearances of testicular epidermoid cysts usually include avascular, mostly lamellated, heterogeneous internal echotexture, with hypoechoic and hyperechoic concentric rings, accounting for the typical onion-ring appearance. On MRI, epidermoid cysts show a low-signal-intensity center, with internal concentric rings of alternating high- and low-signal intensity on T2-weighted images, which correlates with the onion-ring appearance. We report a patient with testicular epidermoid cyst with atypical ultrasound and MRI appearances that led to the erroneous initial diagnosis of "burned-out" tumor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:448-451, 2016. PMID:27028726

  14. Gaze Perception Develops Atypically in Children with Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Webster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mindblindness model is the main model of social cognitive development in autism. This model assumes that eye direction detection and eye contact detection develop typically in autism (Baron-Cohen, 1995. The model's assumption of maturational development implies that when these skills are abnormal, they must either be absent or developmentally delayed. In contrast, the atypical modularisation hypothesis predicts that these skills can develop deviantly—successfully but atypically—in children with autism. Two computer-based tasks were used to assess eye direction detection and eye contact detection in children with autism and in typically developing children. These skills were developmentally deviant in children with autism. The findings support a model of social cognition in autism that accounts for developmental processes.

  15. Atypical post-finasteride syndrome: A pharmacological riddle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Finasteride and dutasteride are commonly used 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. While finasteride is a selective inhibitor of 5-alpha reductase Type II, dutasteride inhibits 5- alpha reductase Type I and II. The United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of finasteride for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH as well as androgenic alopecia (AGA while dutasteride is approved only for BPH. Off-label use of dutasteride is not uncommon in AGA as well. Although the postfinasteride syndrome (PFS is a well-established entity, its symptomatology is quite variable. Here, we describe a case of an atypical PFS in a patient treated with dutasteride and finasteride for AGA. The multisystem involvement and irreversible nature of this case warrant its reporting.

  16. Atypical post-finasteride syndrome: A pharmacological riddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anita K; Sharma, Neetu; Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride are commonly used 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. While finasteride is a selective inhibitor of 5-alpha reductase Type II, dutasteride inhibits 5- alpha reductase Type I and II. The United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of finasteride for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) as well as androgenic alopecia (AGA) while dutasteride is approved only for BPH. Off-label use of dutasteride is not uncommon in AGA as well. Although the postfinasteride syndrome (PFS) is a well-established entity, its symptomatology is quite variable. Here, we describe a case of an atypical PFS in a patient treated with dutasteride and finasteride for AGA. The multisystem involvement and irreversible nature of this case warrant its reporting. PMID:27298504

  17. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor: an unusual presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Chirag D. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1136, Annenberg 8-06, New York, NY (United States); Krieger, Mark D.; McComb, J. Gordon [Children' s Hospital of Los Angeles, Division of Neurosurgery, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Atypical teratoid/ rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system is a rare, highly aggressive malignancy of infancy. Although it is reported infrequently in the literature, it has often been histologically confused with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET)/medulloblastoma (MB) but has a much worse prognosis. We present an infant with two AT/RT tumors, one suprasellar in location and the other within the vermis without evidence of tumor elsewhere. What makes this case unusual is that there were two separate lesions in different cranial compartments, with no evidence of subarachnoid seeding. In addition, the lesions had different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics even though they were histologically the same. (orig.)

  18. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia: Atypical appeareance in an older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabudak Ozlem

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 76-year-old man presenting with a chronic, non-healing ulcer of six-year duration on his left zygomatic area. The skin biopsy specimen taken from the lesion, showed increased vascular proliferation, edematous endothelial cells in the dermal blood vessels and perivascular eosinophilic/lymphocytic infiltration. The routine and specific blood tests were unremarkable. On the basis of these features, the patient was diagnosed as having angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE. We present the case because of its rarity in older people, atypical clinical appearance; and stress the consideration of ALHE in the differential diagnosis of chronic non-healing superficial ulcers confined to face and neck.

  19. Skin biopsies in the evaluation of atypical optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielory, L; Kupersmith, M; Warren, F; Bystryn, J; Frohman, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with atypical clinical presentations of common optic neuropathies such as optic neuritis (ON), anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), or optic neuropathy of unknown etiology (UON) are difficult to distinguish from inflammatory autoimmune optic neuropathy (AON) which is typically associated with a poor visual prognosis, unless treated with high doses of corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents. The authors retrospectively evaluated 34 patients [AON (n = 12); AION (n = 5); ON (n = 9); UON (n = 8)] with visual loss which deteriorated over weeks to months or followed an atypical course, for the presence of immunological markers suggestive of AON. These markers included serological testing for antiphospholipid (APA) and antinuclear (ANA) antibodies, and evaluation of histopathologic and immunofluorescent staining of skin biopsies. All patients underwent a skin biopsy. Four of the 12 patients with AON had urticarial cutaneous lesions which revealed leukocytoclastic and/or lymphohistiocytic vasculitis. Seven of the remaining eight AON patients had skin biopsies of non-lesional skin which revealed immunoreactant deposition. Seven of the 21 skin biopsies obtained from the non-AON patients had findings of vacuolization or mild perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes (n = 5) and immunofluorescent deposits (n = 2). Abnormal skin biopsies (92%;p = 0.0009) and circulating APA (82%; p = 0.013) were common in AON patients while ANA was not statistically increased in AON patients (p = 0.06) when compared to the remaining patients as a whole. AON patients typically demonstrate evidence of systemic autoimmune involvement, as manifested by cutaneous abnormalities such as urticarial vasculitis and/or immunoreactant deposition and circulating APA. These may serve as markers for identifying AON patients who may be treated with immunomodulatory agents. PMID:22822778

  20. Reversible acute methotrexate leukoencephalopathy: atypical brain MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziereisen, France; Damry, Nash; Christophe, Catherine [Queen Fabiola Children' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Dan, Bernard [Queen Fabiola Children' s University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Brussels (Belgium); Azzi, Nadira; Ferster, Alina [Queen Fabiola Children' s University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-03-15

    Unusual acute symptomatic and reversible early-delayed leukoencephalopathy has been reported to be induced by methotrexate (MTX). We aimed to identify the occurrence of such atypical MTX neurotoxicity in children and document its MR presentation. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical findings and brain MRI obtained in 90 children treated with MTX for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or non-B malignant non-Hodgkin lymphoma. All 90 patients had normal brain imaging before treatment. In these patients, brain imaging was performed after treatment completion and/or relapse and/or occurrence of neurological symptoms. Of the 90 patients, 15 (16.7%) showed signs of MTX neurotoxicity on brain MRI, 9 (10%) were asymptomatic, and 6 (6.7%) showed signs of acute leukoencephalopathy. On the routine brain MRI performed at the end of treatment, all asymptomatic patients had classical MR findings of reversible MTX neurotoxicity, such as abnormal high-intensity areas localized in the deep periventricular white matter on T2-weighted images. In contrast, the six symptomatic patients had atypical brain MRI characterized by T2 high-intensity areas in the supratentorial cortex and subcortical white matter (n=6), cerebellar cortex and white matter (n=4), deep periventricular white matter (n=2) and thalamus (n=1). MR normalization occurred later than clinical recovery in these six patients. In addition to mostly asymptomatic classical MTX neurotoxicity, MTX may induce severe but reversible unusual leukoencephalopathy. It is important to recognize this clinicoradiological presentation in the differential diagnosis of acute neurological deterioration in children treated with MTX. (orig.)

  1. Atypical adenocarcinoma of the colon : radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyse unusual radiologic manifestations of colonic adenocarcinoma, and to correlate these with pathologic findings. Radiologic findings of ten patients with atypical adenocarcinoma of the colon were retrospectively evaluated. The unusual radiologic findings were defined as terminal ileal involvement of the cecal mass, long segmental involvement of oner 9cm, and exophytic tumor growth. Radiologic and sonographic findings were compared with pathologic specimens obtained from surgical resection. Involvement of the terminal ileum was noted in three cases, long segmental involvement of 11 cm in five cases, and exophytic mass in two. of three cases with thickening of the terminal ileum, two revealed the infiltration of cancer into the terminal ileum through the ileocecal valve, and the other revealed vascular congesion and edema on microscopic examination. Five cases with long segmental involvement of over 11 cm comprised on e of cancer totally infiltrated through the submucosal and proper muscle layer, one of inflammatory thickening distal to the cancer, two of inflammatory change of pericolic fat and serosal adhesion and one of a large intraluminal fungating mass. In the cases of exophytic mass, one with a larger extraluminal and a smaller intraluminal component revealed necrosis and abscess on pathologic examination, accounting for low attenuation on CT, whereas the other, with exophytic growth, disclosed abundant pools of mucin, resulting in low attenuation on CT. These two cases could not be differentiated from submucosal tumors. Atypical colon cancer may have various manifestations, such as thickening of the terminal ileum, involvement of a long segment, and an exophytically growing mass. An appreciation of the radiologic findings of this cancer may therefore help in differential diagnosis in cases simulating colitis or submucosal tumors of the colon, such as lymphoma or leiomyoma

  2. Atypical integration of motion signals in Autism Spectrum Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E Robertson

    Full Text Available Vision in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC is characterized by enhanced perception of local elements, but impaired perception of global percepts. Deficits in coherent motion perception seem to support this characterization, but the roots and robustness of such deficits remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the dynamics of the perceptual decision-making network known to support coherent motion perception. In a series of forced-choice coherent motion perception tests, we parametrically varied a single stimulus dimension, viewing duration, to test whether the rate at which evidence is accumulated towards a global decision is atypical in ASC. 40 adult participants (20 ASC performed a classic motion discrimination task, manually indicating the global direction of motion in a random-dot kinematogram across a range of coherence levels (2-75% and stimulus-viewing durations (200-1500 ms. We report a deficit in global motion perception at short viewing durations in ASC. Critically, however, we found that increasing the amount of time over which motion signals could be integrated reduced the magnitude of the deficit, such that at the longest duration there was no difference between the ASC and control groups. Further, the deficit in motion integration at the shortest duration was significantly associated with the severity of autistic symptoms in our clinical population, and was independent from measures of intelligence. These results point to atypical integration of motion signals during the construction of a global percept in ASC. Based on the neural correlates of decision-making in global motion perception our findings suggest the global motion deficit observed in ASC could reflect a slower or more variable response from the primary motion area of the brain or longer accumulation of evidence towards a decision-bound in parietal areas.

  3. Integrating molecular, phenotypic and environmental data to elucidate patterns of crocodile hybridization in Belize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekkala, Evon R; Platt, Steven G; Thorbjarnarson, John B; Rainwater, Thomas R; Tessler, Michael; Cunningham, Seth W; Twomey, Christopher; Amato, George

    2015-09-01

    The genus Crocodylus comprises 12 currently recognized species, many of which can be difficult to differentiate phenotypically. Interspecific hybridization among crocodiles is known to occur in captivity and has been documented between some species in the wild. The identification of hybrid individuals is of importance for management and monitoring of crocodilians, many of which are Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) listed. In this study, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers were evaluated for their use in confirming a suspected hybrid zone between American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) and Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) populations in southern Belize where individuals and nests exhibiting atypical phenotypic features had previously been observed. Patterns observed in both phenotypic and molecular data indicate possible behavioural and ecological characteristics associated with hybridization events. The results of the combined analyses found that the majority of suspected hybrid samples represent crosses between female C. acutus and male C. moreletii. Phenotypic data could statistically identify hybrids, although morphological overlap between hybrids and C. moreletii reduced reliability of identification based solely on field characters. Ecologically, C. acutus was exclusively found in saline waters, whereas hybrids and C. moreletii were largely absent in these conditions. A hypothesized correlation between unidirectional hybridization and destruction of C. acutus breeding habitats warrants additional research. PMID:26473062

  4. Gain of chromosome arm 1q in atypical meningioma correlates with shorter progression-free survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Aims: Atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas have moderately high recurrence rates; even for completely resected tumours, approximately one-third will recur. Post-operative radiotherapy (RT) may aid local control and improve survival, but carries the risk of side effects. More accurate prediction of recurrence risk is therefore needed for patients with atypical meningioma. Previously, we used high-resolution array CGH to identify genetic variations in 47 primary atypical meningiomas and found that approximately 60% of tumors show gain of 1q at 1q25.1 and 1q25.3 to 1q32.1 and that 1q gain appeared to correlate with shorter progression-free survival. This study aimed to validate and extend these findings in an independent sample. Methods: 86 completely resected atypical meningiomas (with 25 recurrences) from two neurosurgical centres in Ireland were identified and clinical follow up was obtained. Utilizing a dual-colour interphase FISH assay, 1q gain was assessed using BAC probes directed against 1q25.1 and 1q32.1. Results: The results confirm the high prevalence of 1q gain at these loci in atypical meningiomas. We further show that gain at 1q32.1 and age each correlate with progression-free survival in patients who have undergone complete surgical resection of atypical meningiomas. Conclusions: These independent findings suggest that assessment of 1q copy number status can add clinically useful information for the management of patients with atypical meningiomas.

  5. Leaf segmentation in plant phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharr, Hanno; Minervini, Massimo; French, Andrew P.; Klukas, Christian; Kramer, David M.; Liu, Xiaoming; Luengo, Imanol; Pape, Jean Michel; Polder, Gerrit; Vukadinovic, Danijela; Yin, Xi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based plant phenotyping is a growing application area of computer vision in agriculture. A key task is the segmentation of all individual leaves in images. Here we focus on the most common rosette model plants, Arabidopsis and young tobacco. Although leaves do share appearance and shape cha

  6. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system in children: an atypical series and review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenton, Laura Z. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, 1056 East 19th Avenue B125, CO 80218, Denver (United States); Foreman, Nicholas K. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, Children' s Hospital, 1056 East 19th Avenue B125, CO 80218, Denver (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Primary atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RhT) of the central nervous system is a recently described, highly malignant neoplasm in infants and young children. This tumor is an unusual combination of mixed cellular elements, similar but not typical of teratomas, and rhabdoid cells. This tumor is most common in the posterior fossa in children less than 2 years, and is radiologically similar to medulloblastoma. No pathognomonic imaging features are present. The two tumors can be separated on histologic, molecular, and cytogenetic grounds. Separation of these two tumor types is crucial because the prognosis for AT/RhT is grim even with current multimodality treatment. We present four consecutive cases of AT/RhT, three in locations other than the cerebellum, seen at our institution in a 14-month period, indicating that this tumor may be more common than previously thought. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of two sets of immunohistochemical and Western blot confirmatory methods in the detection of typical and atypical BSE cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenlee Justin J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three distinct forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, defined as classical (C-, low (L- or high (H- type, have been detected through ongoing active and passive surveillance systems for the disease. The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of two sets of immunohistochemical (IHC and Western blot (WB BSE confirmatory protocols to detect C- and atypical (L- and H-type BSE forms. Obex samples from cases of United States and Italian C-type BSE, a U.S. H-type and an Italian L-type BSE case were tested in parallel using the two IHC sets and WB methods. Results The two IHC techniques proved equivalent in identifying and differentiating between C-type, L-type and H-type BSE. The IHC protocols appeared consistent in the identification of PrPSc distribution and deposition patterns in relation to the BSE type examined. Both IHC methods evidenced three distinct PrPSc phenotypes for each type of BSE: prevailing granular and linear tracts pattern in the C-type; intraglial and intraneuronal deposits in the H-type; plaques in the L-type. Also, the two techniques gave comparable results for PrPSc staining intensity on the C- and L-type BSE samples, whereas a higher amount of intraglial and intraneuronal PrPSc deposition on the H-type BSE case was revealed by the method based on a stronger demasking step. Both WB methods were consistent in identifying classical and atypical BSE forms and in differentiating the specific PrPSc molecular weight and glycoform ratios of each form. Conclusions The study showed that the IHC and WB BSE confirmatory methods were equally able to recognize C-, L- and H-type BSE forms and to discriminate between their different immunohistochemical and molecular phenotypes. Of note is that for the first time one of the two sets of BSE confirmatory protocols proved effective in identifying the L-type BSE form. This finding helps to validate the suitability of the BSE confirmatory tests for BSE

  8. Metformin for the Prevention of Weight Gain due to Atypical Antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmiye Kaya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive weight gain, hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia are significant clinical adverse effects that appear as a result of the treatment with second generation atypical antipsychotic drugs. These drugs possibly cause weight gain by stimulating appetite and increasing insulin resistance. Amantadine, nizatidine, ranitidine, famotidine, topiramate, reboxetine and metformin are notified as the effective drugs which were used in order to prevent the weight gain due to atypical antipsychotic drugs. As an antidiabetic agent, metformin draws attention due to reducing weight gain and correcting insulin resistance. The aim of this paper was to evaluate studies searching fort he effect of metformin on weight-gain due to atypical antipsychotics.

  9. Phenotypic constraints and phenotypic hitchhiking in a promiscuous enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Andreas; Weikert, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Covarying phenotypic traits can limit natural selection’s ability to modify these traits. Most evolutionary studies on trait covariation use the comparative method to study complex traits of multicellular organisms. Simpler traits have the advantage of being amenable to experimental evolution. Here we study such a simple molecular system, the TEM-1 beta-lactamase protein, a promiscuous enzyme that hydrolyses antibiotics, and thus confers antibiotic resistance to bacteria. We mutagenized large...

  10. Barth syndrome without tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin deficiency: a possible ameliorated phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowron, Ann; Honeychurch, Julie; Williams, Maggie; Tsai-Goodman, Beverley; Clayton, Nicol; Jones, Lucy; Shortland, Graham J; Qureshi, Shakeel A; Heales, Simon J R; Steward, Colin G

    2015-03-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked disorder characterised by cardiac and skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGCA). Patients have TAZ gene mutations which affect metabolism of cardiolipin, resulting in low tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin (CL(4)), an increase in its precursor, monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), and an increased MLCL/CL(4) ratio. During development of a diagnostic service for BTHS, leukocyte CL(4) was measured in 156 controls and 34 patients with genetically confirmed BTHS. A sub-group of seven subjects from three unrelated families was identified with leukocyte CL(4) concentrations within the control range. This had led to initial false negative disease detection in two of these patients. MLCL/CL(4) in this subgroup was lower than in other BTHS patients but higher than controls, with no overlap between the groups. TAZ gene mutations in these families are all predicted to be pathological. This report describes the clinical histories of these seven individuals with an atypical phenotype: some features were typical of BTHS (five have had cardiomyopathy, one family has a history of male infant deaths, three have growth delay and five have 3-MGCA) but none has persistent neutropenia, five have excellent exercise tolerance and two adults are asymptomatic. This report also emphasises the importance of measurement of MLCL/CL(4) ratio rather than CL(4) alone in the biochemical diagnosis of the BTHS. PMID:25112388

  11. Comprehension of atypical literary text and scholastic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božin Aurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of gaining insight into literary text comprehension and the linkage between that comprehension and scholastic achievement during the first years of schooling, a research was conducted on the sample of 152 third and fourth grade pupils from one urban and one rural school. After having read silently a selected atypical excerpt from one literary text, interviewed pupils filled out the questionnaire constructed for the purposes of this research starting from the 11 categories of text comprehension singled out based on the theory of comprehension and interpretation of literary text and the current curriculum. In the first part of the research we applied the Children's orientation scale by Malka Margalit, and school marks were used as a measurement of scholastic achievement. Research results point out that, among other things, inferring on the basis of what has been read poses the greatest difficulty for third and fourth graders, that is, that almost three quarters of them are not capable of determining the meaning of some representative sentences from that text. In the positive sense, it was established that almost three quarters of them perceive beautiful poetic expressions and about 80% of them can at least to a certain extent recognize character descriptions, emotional situations and moods, that is, discover significant facts. Answers to the questions regarding the majority of categories of text comprehension are significantly correlated with scholastic achievement. As expected, the highest correlations between the measures on text comprehension categories are with the marks in native (Serbian language. Partial correlations between the measures on certain categories of text comprehension and measurements of scholastic achievement (excluding the influence of feeling of coherence are not significantly different from bivariate. Based on the obtained data, authors conclude that the utilized system of categories can be a useful tool for

  12. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within thealphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of “atypical” DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis

  13. Deciphering the Galaxy Guppy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Shaddock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal breeding hobbyists have been useful to science because they identify and isolate colorcoat mutations that geneticists can in turn use in their studies of the development and differentiation ofcolor cells. This paper discusses a very interesting color mutant, the Japanese Galaxy, tracing its creationfrom back to a self-educated genetics hobbyist, Hoskiki Tsutsui. The paper discusses a constituent genepreviously studied by Dr. Violet Phang, the snakeskin gene (the linked body and fin genes Ssb and Sst.And it discusses a gene previously unknown to science, the Schimmelpfennig Platinum gene (Sc.Through crossing experiments, the author determines that the combination of these two genes producesan intermediate phenotype, the Medusa. Incorporating the Grass (Gr, another gene unknown to sciencegene into the Medusa through a crossover produces the Galaxy phenotype. Microscope studies of thesnakeskin pattern in Galaxies and snakeskins reveals some parallels with similar studies made of theZebrafish Danio.

  14. Phenotypic variability in Meesmann's dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Niels; Hjortdal, Jesper; Nielsen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    symptoms often include blurred vision and ocular irritation. Typical cases may be entirely free of complaints. Intermittent pain episodes, such as occur in recurrent erosion syndrome, are not the rule. Genetic sequencing indicated a familial relationship with the originally described Meesmann family......'s dystrophy occurs worldwide. The largest family described is the original German one, now supplemented with a Danish branch. Despite the presence of an identical genetic defect, the clinical phenotype varies. This suggests that non-KRT12-related mechanisms are responsible for the variation.......PURPOSE: To describe the phenotypic variability in Meesmann's microcystic dystrophy of the corneal epithelium based on a review of the literature and the presentation of a Danish family. METHODS: We carried out a clinical examination of the family and genetic sequencing of DNA. RESULTS: Subjective...

  15. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis. PMID:25480879

  16. Research on the significance of TSPOT.TB test in diagnosing the atypical pulmonary tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Li; Qi-Huang Chen; Yan-Yu Pan; Wei-Zheng Chen; Wen-Feng Lin; Sai-Li Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of the TSPOT.TB test in diagnosing the atypical pulmonary tuberculosis.Methods:A total of 100 patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis were diagnosed by TSPOT.TB test and TST, and the difference between the two detection methods was compared.Results:The positive detection rate in the atypical pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly higher than that in the pulmonary tuberculosis group. The sensitivity (94.21), specificity (94.50), PPV (74.20), NPV (94.17), and LR+ (6.14) in the atypical pulmonary tuberculosis group by TSPOT.TB test were significantly higher than those by TST, while LR-(0.13) was significantly lower than that by TST.Conclusions:When compared with TST, TSPOT. TB test has a higher clinical application value, possesses advantages of rapidness and sensitivity, and plays a vital role in diagnosing atypical pulmonary tuberculosis.

  17. Viral and atypical bacterial infections in the outpatient pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Nielsen, Lars P; Schiotz, Peter Oluf

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory viral and atypical bacterial infections are associated with pulmonary exacerbations and hospitalisations in cystic fibrosis patients. We wanted to study the impact of such infections on children attending the outpatient clinic. METHODS: Seventy-five children were followed...

  18. Relations between A-type granites and copper mineralization as exemplified by the Machangqing Cu deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the relations between the Machangqing rockbody which corresponds to the A-type granites and porphyry copper mineralization in terms of petrochemistry,trace element geochemistry,fluid inclusion geochemistry and isotope geochemistry.The results show that the Machangqing porphyry copper deposit was formed from the fluid predominated by magmatic fluid.This kind of ore-forming fluid was just differentiated from the magma responsible for the A-type granites.Therefore,as viewed from whether they contain water or not,the A-type granites can,at least,be divided into two types:water-bearing and water-free.The water-bearing A-type granites can serve as the host of porphyry copper deposits under certain geological conditions.

  19. Relations between A-type granites and copper mineralization as exemplified by the Machangqing Cu deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕献武; 胡瑞忠; 叶造军; 邵树勋

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the relations between the Machangqing rockbody which corresponds to the A-type granites and porphyry copper mineralization in terms of petrochemistry, trace element geochemistry, fluid inclusion geochemistry and isotope geochemistry. The results show that the Machangqing porphyry copper deposit was formed from the fluid predominated by mag-matic fluid. This kind of ore-forming fluid was just differentiated from the magma responsible for the A-type granites. Therefore, as viewed from whether they contain water or not, the A-type granites can, at least, be divided into two types: water-bearing and water-free. The water-bearing A-type granites can serve as the host of porphyry copper deposits under certain geological conditions.

  20. Evaluation of Atypical Lymphocyte Warnings of Sysmex XE-4000 in Outpatient Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueling GUO; Tingbo ZHANG; Maofan WANG

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the atypical lymphocyte warnings of Sysmex XE-4000 in outpatient children. [Method] Randomly 280 specimens of outpatient children were selected to analyze atypical lymphocytes with Sysmex XE-4000 and artificial smear microscopy simultaneously. [Result] With artificial smear microscopy as the gold standard, the atypical lymphocyte warnings of Sysmex XE-4000 in outpatient children exhibited a sensitivity of 97.4%, specificity of 69.3%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 55%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 98.5%. [Conclusion] Sysmex XE-4000 shows a high sensitivity in atypical lymphocyte warnings, which can reduce the number of blood smears, improve the specificity of microscopy, and decline the labor intensity of inspection personnel. However, there are stil certain false positives to be confirmed by artificial microscopy.

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma associated with atypical glandular cells on liquid-based cervical cytology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chummun, K

    2012-12-01

    In 2008, the management of women in Ireland with atypical glandular cells changed to immediate referral to colposcopy. The optimal management of these women is unclear. A balance between the detection of occult disease and overtreatment is required.

  2. Bronchiectasis Exacerbations: The Role of Atypical Bacteria and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenios I Metaxas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aside from the known role of common bacteria, there is a paucity of data regarding the possible role of atypical bacteria and viruses in exacerbations of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

  3. Patients with atypical hyperplasia of the endometrium should be treated in oncological centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie Leisby; Ulrich, Lian; Høgdall, Claus

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of undiagnosed endometrial carcinoma (EC) among women with a preoperative diagnosis of atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) in correlation to age, BMI and menopause. METHODS: Data extracted from the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) covering women...

  4. Phenotypic expression in mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernsen, P L; Wevers, R. A.; Gabreëls, F J; Lamers, K J; Sonnen, A E; Stekhoven, J H

    1987-01-01

    beta-glucuronidase deficiency is an extremely rare disorder which is known to have a considerable phenotypic variation. A survey of the clinical findings in 19 previously reported patients with mucopolysaccharidosis VII is presented together with the results of clinical and biochemical studies in two further patients. Because a similar clinical picture is present in a heterozygotic sister it is doubted whether all signs and symptoms can be attributed to the beta-glucuronidase deficiency. The ...

  5. [Plasticity of the cellular phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The tragical consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs in 1945 were to lead to the discovery of hematopoietic stem cells and their phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental factors. These concepts were much later extended to the founding cells of other tissues. In the following collection of articles, the mechanisms underlying this plasticity, at the frontiers of developmental biology and oncology, are illustrated in the case of various cell types of neural origin and of some tumours. PMID:21501574

  6. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, John E.; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance – with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used – an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but a...

  7. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, MFA; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Bio...

  9. Genetic background of phenotypic variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A noteworthy feature of the living world is its bewildering variability. A key issue in several biological disciplines is the achievement of an understanding of the hereditary basis of this variability. Two opposing, but not necessarily irreconcilable conceptions attempt to explain the underlying mechanism. The gene function paradigm postulates that phenotypic variance is generated by the polymorphism in the coding sequences of genes. However, comparisons of a great number of homologous gene and protein sequences have revealed that they predominantly remained functionally conserved even across distantly related phylogenic taxa. Alternatively, the gene regulation paradigm assumes that differences in the cis-regulatory region of genes do account for phenotype variation within species. An extension of this latter concept is that phenotypic variability is generated by the polyrnorphism in the overall gene expression profiles of gene networks.In other words, the activity of a particular gene is a system property determined both by the cis-regulatory sequences of the given genes and by the other genes of a gene network, whose expressions vary among individuals, too. Novel proponents of gene function paradigm claim that functional genetic variance within the coding sequences of regulatory genes is critical for the generation of morphological polymorphism. Note, however, that these developmental genes play direct regulatory roles in the control of gene expression.

  10. Atypical ultrasound features of parathyroid tumours may bear a relationship to their clinical and biochemical presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Chandramohan, Anuradha; Sathyakumar, Kirthi; John, Reetu Amrita; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Abraham, Deepak; Thomas V Paul; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe atypical ultrasound features of parathyroid lesions and correlate them with clinical presentation and histopathology. Materials and methods Retrospective review of 264 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent ultrasound imaging prior to parathyroidectomy was performed. Patients with atypical ultrasound findings (n = 26) were identified; imaging findings were correlated with clinical presentation and histopathology. Results Twenty-one (80 %) lesions were a...

  11. Atypical depression: useful concept, but it's time to revise the DSM-IV criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E

    2009-12-01

    Stewart et al (2009) have outlined the evidence in support of the validity of the DSM-IV definition of the 'With Atypical Features' episode specifier. Although recognizing the historical significance and clinical utility of the concept of atypical depression, this article takes issue with the DSM-IV criteria. It is concluded that mood reactivity, the A or obligative criterion, is neither significantly associated with the other symptomatic criteria nor useful to diagnose atypical depression, and thus should be eliminated. Problems with operationalization, specification, and reliability of ratings of the diagnostic criteria further limit validity. Despite these limitations in classification, many of the features associated with atypical depression are linked to an early onset of affective illness, including trait-like interpersonal sensitivity, comorbid social anxiety and agoraphobia, a history of childhood physical or sexual trauma, and indicators of the 'soft' side of the bipolar spectrum. Neurophysiologic studies also suggest that chronic, early-onset atypical depressions differ from both melancholia and normality. Re-analyses of the Columbia group's seminal studies suggest that preferential response to phenelzine vs imipramine--arguably the strongest validator of atypical depression--similarly appears to be limited to patients with chronic, early-onset syndromes. The criteria for atypical depression need to be revised in DSM-V, including sharpening the operational definitions for the specific symptoms. The importance of age of onset and comorbid anxiety warrant further study. Research examining the validity of a subform of atypical depression characterized by trait-like interpersonal sensitivity and a chronic, early-onset course may further enhance the clinical utility of the DSM-V classification. PMID:19741592

  12. CHALLENGE WITH ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC DRUGS IN RISPERIDONE INDUCED NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Mendhekar, D.N.; Jiloha, R.C.; M M Mehndiratta; War, L.

    2002-01-01

    There are several reports available on neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) associated with risperidone but when a more stringent criterion is applied there are only a few. Report on challenge and rechallenge with various atypical antipsychotic drugs in re-emergence of post NMS psychosis is scanty. Our aim of presenting this is to highlight the differential response of various atypical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of post NMS psychosis. This paper reports a young male with mild mental...

  13. Clonal Relationship among Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Different Animal Species and Humans▿

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Rodrigo A.; Sircili, Marcelo P.; Leomil, Luciana; Matté, Maria Helena; Trabulsi, Luiz R.; Elias, Waldir P.; Irino, Kinue; Antonio F. Pestana de Castro

    2009-01-01

    Forty-nine typical and atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains belonging to different serotypes and isolated from humans, pets (cats and dogs), farm animals (bovines, sheep, and rabbits), and wild animals (monkeys) were investigated for virulence markers and clonal similarity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The virulence markers analyzed revealed that atypical EPEC strains isolated from animals have the potential to cause dia...

  14. Atypical presentations and rare metastatic sites of renal cell carcinoma: a review of case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Cindolo Luca; Metaxa Linda; Sountoulides Petros

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Renal cell carcinoma is a potentially lethal cancer with aggressive behavior and a propensity for metastatic spread. Due to the fact that the patterns of metastases from renal cell carcinomas are not clearly defined, there have been several reports of cases of renal cell carcinoma associated with rare metastatic sites and atypical presenting symptoms. The present review focuses on these atypical rare clinical presentations of renal cell carcinomas both at the time of diagnosis of the...

  15. Using atypical symptoms and red flags to identify non-demyelinating disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Siobhan B

    2012-01-01

    Red flags and atypical symptoms have been described as being useful in suggesting alternative diagnoses to multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS); however, their diagnostic utility has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to establish the predictive value of red flags and the typicality\\/atypicality of symptoms at presentation in relation to the final diagnosis of patients referred with suspected MS.

  16. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  17. Scirrhous hepatocellular carcinoma displaying atypical findings on imaging studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo Ryang Kim; Susumu Imoto; Taisuke Nakajima; Kenji Ando; Keiji Mita; Katsumi Fukuda; Ryo Nishikawa; Yu-ichiro Koma; Toshiyuki Matsuoka; Masatoshi Kudo; Yoshitake Hayashi

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 15-mm scirrhous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a 60-year-old man with B-type cirrhosis. Ultrasound disclosed a 15-mm hypoechoic nodule in segment 7. Contrast-enhanced US revealed heterogeneous, not diffuse, hypervascularity in the early phase and a defect in the Kupffer phase. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a heterogeneous hypervascular nodule in the early phase and a low-density area in the late phase. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed iso- to hypointensity at T1 and high intensity at T2-weighted sequences. Contrast-enhanced MRI also revealed a heterogeneous hypervascular nodule in the early phase and washout in the late phase. Super-paramagnetic iron oxide-MRI revealed a hyperintense nodule. CT during hepatic arteriography and CT during arterial portography revealed heterogeneous hyperattenuation and a perfusion defect, respectively. Based on these imaging findings the nodule was diagnosed as a mixed well-differentiated and moderately-differentiated HCC. Histologically, the nodule was moderately-differentiated HCC characterized by typical cytological and structural atypia with dense fibrosis. Immunohistochemically, the nodule was positive for heterochromatin protein 1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin, and negative for cytokeratin 19. From the above findings, the nodule was diagnosed as scirrhous HCC. Clinicians engaged in hepatology should exercise caution with suspected scirrhous HCC when imaging studies reveal atypical findings, as shown in our case on the basis of chronic liver disease.

  18. An atypical meningioma demystified and advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina Voultsinou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old male presented with visuospatial processing disturbances. Family history was free. Conventional and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies were performed. On T2 and fluid attenuation inversion recovery images, an increased signal intensity extra-axial lesion was demonstrated. Post-contrast scans depicted homogeneous intense contrast medium enhancement. T2FNx01 star sequence was negative for hemorrhagic or calcification foci. Diffusion-weighted imaging findings were indicative of malignant behavior and magnetic resonance venography confirmed superior sagittal sinus infiltration. Increased cerebral blood volume values were observed and peri-lesional oedema on perfusion-weighted imaging was also demonstrated. The signal intensity-time curve depicted the characteristic meningioma pattern. Spectroscopy showed increased choline and alanine levels, but decreased N-acetyl-aspartate levels. Conventional MRI is adequate for typical types of meningiomas. However, the more atypical ones, in which even the histopathologic specimen may demonstrate characteristics of typical meningioma, could be easier diagnosed with advanced MRI techniques.

  19. ATYPICAL BULLOUS PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM WITH EARLY LESIONS MIMICKING CHICKEN POX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Pyoderma Gangrenosum (PG rare neutrophilic dermatoses (1/100,00 0, of which Bullous Pyoderma gangrenosum is an atypical form, which is very rare. Bullous PG is usually associated with haematological disorders like myeloproliferative disorders, haematological malignancies specially AML and several other haematological disorders. It presents as a superficial haemorrhagic bulla which ulcerates, ulcers increase in size and heal with scarring. Treatment is mainly to identify and treat the cause. Pyoderma Gangrenosum shows rapid response to oral corticosteroid therapy. 1 , 3 . Clinical presentation: A 32yr old female presented with fever, multiple vesicles on face, upper limb, lower limb and trunk, and these early lesions looked like chicken pox lesions. Lesions increased in size to form haemorrhagic bullas which eroded to form ulcers, ulcers rapidly increased in size with necrotic base and erythematous to violaceous border. Investigation: Haemoglobin: 5.7gm%, Peripheral smear: normocytic and normochromic anaemia. Skin Biopsy: Sub corneal blisters with dermal and perifollicular n eutrophilic infiltrate. A diagnosis of Bullous Pyoderma gangrenosum was made. Patient’s anaemia was treated; oral prednisolone and topical steroids were started. Patient showed marked improvement to treatment.

  20. Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor of the lateral ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Darmoul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RTs are rare and highly malignant embryonal central nervous system neoplasms, usually seen in very young children with rapid fatal outcome despite aggressive treatment. They are most commonly located in the posterior fossa. Intraventricular location is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases of lateral ventricle location were reported in the literature. We report the fifth case of lateral ventricle AT/RT in a 2-month-old male who presented with rapid increase of his head circumference. Brain computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed heterogeneous huge mass within the left lateral ventricle extending to the parieto-occipital parenchyma and markedly enhancing by contrast. The baby underwent left transparietal approach with complete removal of the tumor. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of AT/RT. An aggressive chemotherapy was administrated postoperatively. The outcome is good without neurological deficit or recurrence after 3 years and half of follow-up.

  1. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  2. Age-related penetrance of hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Maren; Rybicki, Lisa A; Winter, Aurelia; Hoffmann, Michael M; Reiermann, Stefanie; Linke, Hannah; Arbeiter, Klaus; Patzer, Ludwig; Budde, Klemens; Hoppe, Bernd; Zeier, Martin; Lhotta, Karl; Bock, Andreas; Wiech, Thorsten; Gaspert, Ariana; Fehr, Thomas; Woznowski, Magdalena; Berisha, Gani; Malinoc, Angelica; Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2011-11-01

    Hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a dramatic disease frequently leading to dialysis, is associated with germline mutations of the CFH, CD46, or CFI genes. After identification of the mutation in an affected aHUS patient, single-site gene testing of relatives is the preventive care perspective. However, clinical data for family counselling are scarce. From the German-Speaking-Countries-aHUS-Registry, 33 index patients with mutations were approached for permission to offer relatives screening for their family-specific mutations and to obtain demographic and clinical data. Mutation screening was performed using direct sequencing. Age-adjusted penetrance of aHUS was calculated for each gene in index cases and in mutation-positive relatives. Sixty-one relatives comprising 41 parents and 20 other relatives were enrolled and mutations detected in 31/61. In total, 40 research participants had germline mutations in CFH, 19 in CD46 and in 6 CFI. Penetrance at age 40 was markedly reduced in mutation-positive relatives compared to index patients overall with 10% versus 67% (P < 0.001); 6% vs. 67% (P < 0.001) in CFH mutation carriers and 21% vs. 70% (P= 0.003) in CD46 mutation carriers. Age-adjusted penetrance for hereditary aHUS is important to understand the disease, and if replicated in the future, for genetic counselling. PMID:21906045

  3. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: an atypical abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislain, L; Heylen, A; Alexis, F; Tintillier, M

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is traditionally associated with risk factors (sports, female incontinence surgery). Typical features of pubic symphysis infection include abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain that increases upon standing and walking, causing limping to occur. Acute onset of fever is often associated. It is important to distinguish septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from its aseptic homologue, improperly called 'osteitis pubis' in English literature. This general term is mostly used to designate a mechanical pubic pain and has several aetiological meanings (joint stress, postoperative pain, rheumatic diseases). However, some authors consider the infection of the pubic symphysis as a variant of osteitis pubis, placing the two diseases in the continuum of the same entity. This confusion in pubic pathology related to its rarity and its atypical presentation, may in some cases lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delay. In this article, we would like to make practitioners aware of this uncommon and often ignored anatomical site, so that it can recover its place in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. PMID:25227947

  4. MRI features of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Biao [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, XinHua Hospital (Chongming Branch), Shanghai (China); Feng, Xiao Yuan [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2013-08-15

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RTs) are rare, highly malignant tumors of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young children. To investigate the MRI features of AT/RT, with special emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS). MRI findings of 11 children with AT/RT were reviewed retrospectively, including DWI in 9 AT/RT children and MRS in 6 children. The neoplasms were infratentorial in 4 children and supratentorial in 5 children, both infra- and supratentorial in 1 child and multifocal in 1 child. AT/RT produced heterogeneous signal intensity from peripheral cysts in 7/11 (63%) and hemorrhage in 7/11 (63%). All lesions showed contrast enhancement of varying degrees. Seven (63%) had peritumoral edema. Nine (82%) were hyperintense on DWI with a mean {+-} SD ADC of 0.60 {+-} 0.13 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. Six lesions (55%) exhibited elevated levels of choline and decreased NAA, and three had lipid peaks. A childhood intracranial tumor with off-midline location, peripheral cystic components, hemorrhage, low ADC, and lipid peaks on MRS suggests AT/RT to be considered a differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Physiological and molecular characterization of atypical isolates of Malassezia furfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Sierra, R; Cárdenas, M E; Grajales, A; Restrepo, S; Cepero de García, M C; Celis, A

    2009-01-01

    The species constituting the genus Malassezia are considered to be emergent opportunistic yeasts of great importance. Characterized as lipophilic yeasts, they are found in normal human skin flora and sometimes are associated with different dermatological pathologies. We have isolated seven Malassezia species strains that have a different Tween assimilation pattern from the one typically used to differentiate M. furfur, M. sympodialis, and M. slooffiae from other Malassezia species. In order to characterize these isolates of Malassezia spp., we studied their physiological features and conducted morphological and molecular characterization by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing of the 26S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA-internal transcribed spacer 2 regions in three strains from healthy individuals, four clinical strains, and eight reference strains. The sequence analysis of the ribosomal region was based on the Blastn algorithm and revealed that the sequences of our isolates were homologous to M. furfur sequences. To support these findings, we carried out phylogenetic analyses to establish the relationship of the isolates to M. furfur and other reported species. All of our results confirm that all seven strains are M. furfur; the atypical assimilation of Tween 80 was found to be a new physiological pattern characteristic of some strains isolated in Colombia. PMID:18971363

  6. Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1 D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2 typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3 atypical HUS (aHUS: Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4 recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5 familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS.

  7. EVOLUTION OF ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF A-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equatorial velocity of A-type stars undergoes an acceleration in the first third of the main sequence (MS) stage, but the velocity decreases as if the stars were not undergoing any redistribution of angular momentum in the external layers in the last stage of the MS phase. Our calculations show that the acceleration and the decrease of the equatorial velocity can be reproduced by the evolution of the differential rotation zero-age MS model with the angular momentum transport caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the MS stage. The acceleration results from the fact that the angular momentum stored in the interiors of the stars is transported outward. In the last stage, the core and the radiative envelope are uncoupling, and the rotation of the envelope is a quasi-solid rotation; the uncoupling and the expansion of the envelope indicate that the decrease of the equatorial velocity approximately follows the slope for the change in the equatorial velocity of the model without any redistribution of angular momentum. When the fractional age 0.3 ∼MS ∼< 0.5, the equatorial velocity remains almost constant for stars whose central density increases with age in the early stage of the MS phase, while the velocity decreases with age for stars whose central density decreases with age in the early stage of the MS phase.

  8. Levels and Atypical Evolutions of the Romanian Demographic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Ionela Aceleanu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the XXth century, especially in the second half thereof, the approach views of the relation between the population and economy (both of them regarded in dynamics have multiplied themselves, the points of view as regards this subject becoming not only much more diverse but also opposite. All these views are characterised by the population transformation in endogenous factor (in internal, intrinsic side of the economic development (of the economic growth, factor that, at its turn, is determined by the economic processes. The double position of the population in the demo-economical relations system - as main production factor and as virtual recipient of produced goods - is a strong argument in the favour of the demographic factor as endogenous factor of growth and economic development. The correlations between the two variables are diverse and very difficultly to be quantified. It is known that the effect of the demographic impact upon the economic factor is felt after many years from the date of the demo-economic phenomenon occurring. So, within the last decades, the research intended to identify certain essential, durable relations between the population evolution and the economic growth became more intensive. On this line there are presented atypical evolutions and levels of demographic processes in Romania.

  9. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Abiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i What is the prevalence of AO in the community?\t(ii What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  10. Rest Mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Cara E.; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F.; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I.

    2015-01-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest. PMID:25712696

  11. Pilocytic astrocytoma presenting with atypical features on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshiteru; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Takahashi, Mayu; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Akiba, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Takehiro; Ueta, Kunihiro; Miyaoka, Ryo; Umemura, Takeru; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma, which is classified as a grade I astrocytic tumor by the World Health Organization, is the most common type of glioma in children and young adults. Pilocytic astrocytoma generally appears as a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhancing lesion, frequently with cystic components on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it has been reported that the MRI appearance of pilocytic astrocytoma may be similar to that of high-grade gliomas in some cases. We here report on 6 cases of pilocytic astrocytoma with atypical MRI findings, including small cyst formation, heterogeneously enhancing tumor nodules, irregularly enhancing tumor nodules, and enhancing tumor nodules with internal hemorrhage. All tumors were successfully resected, and the histological diagnoses were pilocytic astrocytoma. When the tumor is located near a cerebral cistern or ventricle, the risk of leptomeningeal dissemination is increased. Furthermore, partial resection has also been associated with a higher risk of recurrence and leptomeningeal dissemination. To date, all but one patient are alive and recurrence-free. Because the preoperative diagnosis influences the decision on the extent of resection and because of the high risk of leptomeningeal dissemination associated with these tumors, careful and correct diagnosis by MRI is important. PMID:25454397

  12. An Atypical Presentation of Allergic Myocardial İnfarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Oktay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute coronary syndromes secondary to hypersensitivity reactions related with allergic factors are defined as Kounis syndrome. Doxycycline is an antibiotic commonly used in clinical practice. In this report, we described an atypical presentation of Kounis syndrome in a patient who was admitted to the emergency service complaining of chest pain, generalized rash and fever. She was taking doxycycline for 3 days because of urinary tract infection. Non specific ST-T changes were seen on electrocardiography, positive troponin levels were detected and global left ventricular wall motion abnormalities were defined by echocardiography. The patient had no conventional risk factor for acute coronary syndrome. Normal coronary angiography results, improved left ventricular functions and symptoms by antihistaminic and steroid treatments were consistent with Kounis syndrome. All patients admitted with the concurrence of chest pain and allergic symptoms should be asked about exposure to allergens. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 202-4

  13. Rotation and surface abundance peculiarities in A-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Yoichi; Kang, Dong-Il; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Kang-Min

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt of clarifying the connection between the photospheric abundance anomalies and the stellar rotation as well as of exploring the nature of "normal A" stars, the abundances of seven elements (C, O, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ba) and the projected rotational velocity for 46 A-type field stars were determined by applying the spectrum-fitting method to the high-dispersion spectral data obtained with BOES at BOAO. We found that the peculiarities (underabundances of C, O, and Ca; an overabundance of Ba) seen in slow rotators efficiently decrease with an increase of rotation, which almost disappear at v_e sin i > 100 km s^-1. This further suggests that stars with sufficiently large rotational velocity may retain the original composition at the surface without being altered. Considering the subsolar tendency (by several tenths dex below) exhibited by the elemental abundances of such rapidly-rotating (supposedly normal) A stars, we suspect that the gas metallicity may have decreased since our Sun was born, contra...

  14. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursani, Mohammad A; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). CASE REPORT A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. CONCLUSIONS Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various auto-inflammatory disorders may share pathogenic commonalities. PMID:27530224

  15. Atypical Findings of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Karimzadeh P, Bakhshandeh Bali MK, Nasehi MM, Taheri Otaghsara SM, Ghofrani M. Atypical Findings of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012;6(4:17-22. AbstractObjectiveGuillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy that occurs mostly after  prior infection. The diagnosis of this syndrome is dependent heavily on the history and examination, although cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrodiagnostic testing usually confirm the diagnosis. This is a retrospective study which was performed to investigate the atypical features of GBS.Materials & MethodsThirty three patients (21/63.6% males and 12/36.4% females with GBS were retrospectively studied and prospectively evaluated at the Child Neurology institute of Mofid Children Hospital of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences between May 2011 and September 2012.ResultsThe mean age was 5.4 years (range, 1.5-10.5.Twenty one patients (87.9 % had previous history of infections. Eight patients (24.2% admitted with atypical symptoms like upper limb weakness (3%, ptosis (3%, neck stiffness (3%, inability to stand (proximal weakness (9.1%, headache (3% and dysphagia (3%.According to disease process, weakness was ascending in 26 (78.8%, descending in 5 (15.2% and static in 2 (6.1% patients. Cranial nerve involvement was found in 8(24.3% children, most commonly as facial palsy in 3 (9.1%.ConclusionIn this study, 24.3% of our patients presented with atypical symptoms of GBS as upper limb weakness, ptosis, neck stiffness, inability to stand (proximal weakness, headache and dysphagia References:Hughes RA, Cornblath DR. Guillain-Barré syndrome. Lancet. 2005 Nov 5;366(9497:1653-66.McGillicuddy DC, Walker O, Shapiro NI, Edlow JA. Guillain-Barré syndrome in the emergency department. Ann Emerg Med. 2006 Apr;47(4:390-3.Cosi V, Versino M. Guillain-Barré syndrome. Neurol Sci. 2006;27(Suppl 1:S47-51.Hughes RA, Cornblath DR. Guillain

  16. The Alternative Pathway of Complement and the Evolving Clinical-Pathophysiological Spectrum of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bruce E

    2016-08-01

    Complement-mediated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) comprises approximately 90% of cases of aHUS, and results from dysregulation of endothelial-anchored complement activation with resultant endothelial damage. The discovery of biomarker ADAMTS13 has enabled a more accurate diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and an appreciation of overlapping clinical features of TTP and aHUS. Given our present understanding of the pathogenic pathways involved in aHUS, it is unlikely that a specific test will be developed. Rather the use of biomarker data, complement functional analyses, genomic analyses and clinical presentation will be required to diagnose aHUS. This approach would serve to clarify whether a thrombotic microangiopathy present in a complement-amplifying condition arises from the unmasking of a genetically driven aHUS versus a time-limited complement storm-mediated aHUS due to direct endothelial damage in which no genetic predisposition is present. Although both scenarios result in the phenotypic expression of aHUS and involve the alternate pathway of complement activation, long-term management would differ. PMID:27524217

  17. An atypical case of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with co-inheritance of a variably penetrant POLG1 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staropoli John F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs, or Batten disease comprise the most common Mendelian form of childhood-onset neurodegeneration, but the functions of the known underlying gene products remain poorly understood. The clinical heterogeneity of these disorders may shed light on genetic interactors that modify disease onset and progression. Case presentation We describe a proband with congenital hypotonia and an atypical form of infantile-onset, biopsy-proven NCL. Pathologic and molecular work-up of this patient identified CLN5 mutations as well as a mutation―previously described as incompletely penetrant or a variant of unknown significance―in POLG1, a nuclear gene essential for maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number. The congenital presentation of this patient is far earlier than that described for either CLN5 patients or affected carriers of the POLG1 variant (c.1550 G > T, p.Gly517Val. Assessment of relative mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial membrane potential in the proband and control subjects suggested a pathogenic effect of the POLG1 change as well as a possible functional interaction with CLN5 mutations. Conclusions These findings suggest that an incompletely penetrant variant in POLG1 may modify the clinical phenotype in a case of CLN5 and are consistent with emerging evidence of interactions between NCL-related genes and mitochondrial physiology.

  18. Atypical Mole (Atypical Nevus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... melanoma). Remember the ABCDEs of melanoma lesions: A - Asymmetry: One half of the lesion does not mirror ... York: Mosby, 2003. Last Updated: 22 Dec 2008 Information for other ages: Child Teen Table of Contents: ...

  19. Knowledge-based analysis of phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoendorf, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism, and they are widely recorded in biology and medicine. To facilitate data integration, ontologies that formally describe phenotypes are being developed in several domains. I will describe a formal framework to describe phenotypes. A formalized theory of phenotypes is not only useful for domain analysis, but can also be applied to assist in the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, and I will show how our results on the ontology of phenotypes is now applied in biomedical research.

  20. EFSA BIOHAZ Panel (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the scrapie situation in the EU after 10 years of monitoring and control in sheep and goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    To assess the effectiveness of the strategies implemented in the European Union (EU) to control Classical scrapie (CS), epidemiological data have been compared in the context of the efforts in terms of control measures applied over time. Official EU surveillance data and results from questionnaire...... trends and geographical distribution: among the 13 countries reporting a consistent number of cases, the trend analysis shows a statistically significant decreasing trend only for six of them. Variations in the implementation of genetic and non-genetic measures for the control of CS may explain the...... failure to improve the disease situation in the remaining seven MSs. At a national level, a reduction in CS seems to be linked to better-achieving BP-CSs. Control options applied to CS in sheep and goats indicate that a CS eradication policy that relies solely on the detection of infected flocks by post...

  1. Gamma c-signaling cytokines induce a regulatory T cell phenotype in malignant CD4+ T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprzycka, Monika; Zhang, Qian; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka;

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that malignant mature CD4(+) T lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL) variably display some aspects of the T regulatory phenotype. Whereas seven cell lines representing a spectrum of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoproliferative disorders expressed...... that FOXP3-expressing cells were common among the CD7-negative enlarged atypical and small lymphocytes at the early skin patch and plaque stages. Their frequency was profoundly diminished at the tumor stage and in the CTCL lymph node lesions with or without large cell transformation. These results...... indicate that the T regulatory cell features are induced in CTCL T cells by common gamma chain signaling cytokines such as IL-2 and do not represent a fully predetermined, constitutive phenotype independent of the local environmental stimuli to which these malignant mature CD4(+) T cells become exposed....

  2. The phenotype and neural correlates of language in autism: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wouter B; Zwiers, Marcel P; van der Gaag, Rutger-Jan; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2008-10-01

    Although impaired communication is one of the defining criteria in autism, linguistic functioning is highly variable among people with this disorder. Accumulating evidence shows that language impairments in autism are more extensive than commonly assumed and described by formal diagnostic criteria and are apparent at various levels. Phenotypically, most people with autism have semantic, syntactic and pragmatic deficits, a smaller number are known to have phonological deficits. Neurophysiologically, abnormal processing of low-level linguistic information points to perceptual difficulties. Also, abnormal high-level linguistic processing of the frontal and temporal language association cortices indicates more self-reliant and less connected neural subsystems. Early sensory impairments and subsequent atypical neural connectivity are likely to play a part in abnormal language acquisition in autism. This paper aims to review the available data on the phenotype of language in autism as well as a number of structural, electrophysiological and functional brain-imaging studies to provide a more integrated view of the linguistic phenotype and its underlying neural deficits, and to provide new directions for research and therapeutic and experimental applications. PMID:18562003

  3. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    OpenAIRE

    IyyakuttyRavi

    2013-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with ‘B’ genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on ‘A’ genome. In particular, bananas with ‘ABB’ genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite f...

  4. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Iyyakkutty; Uma, Subbaraya; Vaganan, Muthu Mayil; Mustaffa, Mohamed M.

    2013-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with “B” genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on “A” genome. In particular, bananas with “ABB” genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite f...

  5. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Bottiglieri; Rosario Rullo; Aldo Di Luccia; Elisa Pieragostini

    2010-01-01

    In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC). The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40&nbs...

  6. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Soloveva; Michel Liuzzi; Jin Yeop Kim; Hi Chul Kim; Jin Yeong Heo; Yong-Jun Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the bio...

  7. Atypical sulcal anatomy in young children with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Auzias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder is associated with an altered early brain development. However, the specific cortical structure abnormalities underlying this disorder remain largely unknown. Nonetheless, atypical cortical folding provides lingering evidence of early disruptions in neurodevelopmental processes and identifying changes in the geometry of cortical sulci is of primary interest for characterizing these structural abnormalities in autism and their evolution over the first stages of brain development. Here, we applied state-of-the-art sulcus-based morphometry methods to a large highly-selective cohort of 73 young male children of age spanning from 18 to 108 months. Moreover, such large cohort was selected through extensive behavioral assessments and stringent inclusion criteria for the group of 59 children with autism. After manual labeling of 59 different sulci in each hemisphere, we computed multiple shape descriptors for each single sulcus element, hereby separating the folding measurement into distinct factors such as the length and depth of the sulcus. We demonstrated that the central, intraparietal and frontal medial sulci showed a significant and consistent pattern of abnormalities across our different geometrical indices. We also found that autistic and control children exhibited strikingly different relationships between age and structural changes in brain morphology. Lastly, the different measures of sulcus shapes were correlated with the CARS and ADOS scores that are specific to the autistic pathology and indices of symptom severity. Inherently, these structural abnormalities are confined to regions that are functionally relevant with respect to cognitive disorders in ASD. In contrast to those previously reported in adults, it is very unlikely that these abnormalities originate from general compensatory mechanisms unrelated to the primary pathology. Rather, they most probably reflect an early disruption on developmental trajectory

  8. Atypical presentation of colon adenocarcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumwine Lynnette K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the most common histopathological type of colorectal cancer. In Western Europe and the United States, it is the third most common type and accounts for 98% of cancers of the large intestine. In Uganda, as elsewhere in Africa, the majority of patients are elderly (at least 60 years old. However, more recently, it has been observed that younger patients (less than 40 years of age are presenting with the disease. There is also an increase in its incidence and most patients present late, possibly because of the lack of a comprehensive national screening and preventive health-care program. We describe the clinicopathological features of colorectal carcinoma in the case of a young man in Kampala, Uganda. Case presentation A 27-year-old man from Kampala, Uganda, presented with gross abdominal distension, progressive loss of weight, and fever. He was initially screened for tuberculosis, hepatitis, and lymphoma, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome infection. After a battery of tests, a diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma was finally established with hematoxylin and eosin staining of a cell block made from the sediment of a liter of cytospun ascitic fluid, which showed atypical glands floating in abundant extracellular mucin, suggestive of adenocarcinoma. Ancillary tests with alcian blue/periodic acid Schiff and mucicarmine staining revealed that it was a mucinous adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed strong positivity with CDX2, confirming that the origin of the tumor was the colon. Conclusions Colorectal carcinoma has been noted to occur with increasing frequency in young adults in Africa. Most patients have mucinous adenocarcinoma, present late, and have rapid disease progression and poor outcome. Therefore, colorectal malignancy should no longer be excluded from consideration only on the basis of a patient's age. A high index of suspicion is important in the

  9. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with a hybrid complement gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Venables

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1-5; aliases CFHR1-5. CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS. The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1-21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A that has been previously described in association with aHUS. CONCLUSIONS: CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene.

  10. Atypical Endometriosis: a Clinicopathologic Study of 163 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the clinicopathologic features of atypical endometriosis (AEM), and to discuss the relations between AEMs and tumors.METHODS A retrospective analysis was performed on 163 cases of AEMs. The changes in the glandular epithelium, stroma, and their background and the relationship with coexisting tumors were observed.RESULTS The AEMs account of for 4.4% (163/3,724) of the endometriosis (EM) cases. Of 172 AEM foci of 163 patients, 168 were in the ovary, and the other 4 were in the fallopian tube, cervix and uterine serosa. Of the cases of ovarian EM, 6.8% were AEM. All of the 27 cases (15.7%) of the AEMs associated with a tumor were found in the ovaries, of which 15 were malignant,9 borderline, and 3 benign. Of the ovary AEMs, 14.9% were associated with a borderline or malignant tumor. The AEM epithelia were mainly arranged in the form of surface epithelia, with only a few glands. Present were characteristic features of moderate to marked pleomorphism, epithelial tufting, bud or firework-like structures on microscopy. Epithelial metaplastic changes were observed in 86 cases (50%) of the 172 AEM foci. Epithelium, endometrioid stroma, and fibrotic-collagen formed a three-layer structure in the wall of the AEM cysts. The endometrioid stroma were usually thin compared to the fibro-collagen tissue. The transformation from an AEM to a tumor was found in most of the malignant tumors.CONCLUSION AEM lesions have some features which are similar and also differ from both of the tumor and EM. AEMs have a relative higher potential for tumorigenesis and canceration, especially for ovarian cancer.The process of damage, repair, and scarring in EM foci over a long period may play a role in the development of EM into AEM and eventally into tumor formation.

  11. Preparation and cellular response of porous A-type carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave sintering using the activated carbon as embedding material was applied in preparation of porous A-type carbonated hydroxyapatite ceramics with nano(nCHA) and submicron (mCHA) structure. By examining the linear shrinkages and the compressive strengths of samples at different temperatures, a suitable microwave sintering temperature was achieved. The microwave sintering method was successfully used to prepare A-type CHA with nano or submicron structure, and the mechanism of the formation of A-type carbonate groups was discussed also. Compared with the samples prepared by the conventional sintering method (mHA), the nCHA bioceramics synthesized by the microwave sintering approach had smaller grain size and more uniform microstructure, and showed a compressive strength similar to the conventional samples. In vitro dissolution test proved that nCHA exhibits better degradation property in comparison to pure HA. Rat osteoblasts were cultured with nCHA, mCHA and mHA to evaluate their biocompatibility, and nCHA showed significant enhancement of cells in attachment, proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, carbonate groups can be easily introduced to HA crystal structure using the activated carbon as embedding material, and microwave sintering is an effective and simple method in preparing A-type CHA with a nanostructure. Results from this in vitro biological study suggest that porous A-type carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoceramics may be a much better candidate for clinical use in terms of bioactivity. - Highlights: ► We prepared porous A-type carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoceramics with microwave sintering. ► We examined physico-chemical characterization and osteoblast response. ► The nanoceramics have a comparable compressive strength to samples with conventional sintering method. ► The nanoceramics enhance degradation property, osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. ► The activated carbon is favorable for preheating samples and providing

  12. Exome Sequencing Identification of EP300 Mutation in a Proband with Coloboma and Imperforate Anus: Possible Expansion of the Phenotypic Spectrum of Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Koji; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Arakawa, Michiko; Nishi, Eriko; Kitazawa, Noritaka; Higuchi, Tsukasa; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Izumi, Kosuke

    2015-07-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, broad thumbs and halluces, growth retardation, and intellectual disability. In about 8% of RSTS cases, mutations are found in EP300. Previously, the EP300 mutation has been shown to cause the highly variable RSTS phenotype. Using exome sequencing, we identified a de novo EP300 frameshift mutation in a proband with coloboma, facial asymmetry and imperforate anus with minimal RSTS features. Previous molecular studies have demonstrated the importance of EP300 in oculogenesis, supporting the possibility that EP300 mutation may cause ocular coloboma. Since a wide phenotypic spectrum is well known in EP300-associated RSTS cases, the atypical phenotype identified in our proband may be an example of rare manifestations of RSTS. PMID:26279656

  13. Atypical leg symptoms: does routine measurement of the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) in primary care benefit patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Oesterling, Christine; Kalia, Amun; Chetcuti, Thomas; Walker, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background : Managing patients with atypical leg symptoms in primary care can be problematic. Determining the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) may be readily performed to help diagnose peripheral arterial disease, but is often omitted where signs and symptoms are unclear. Question : Does routine measurement of ABPI in patients with atypical leg symptoms aid management increase satisfaction and safely reduce hospital referral? Methodology : Patients with atypical leg symptoms but ...

  14. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, Mfa; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains. PMID:26587340

  15. Occurrence and significance of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida in non-salmonid and salmonid fish species : A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, T.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    1998-01-01

    , non-salmonids as well as salmonids, inhabiting fresh water, brackish water and marine environments in northern and central Europe, South Africa, North America, Japan and Australia. In non-salmonid fish species, infections with atypical strains often manifest themselves as superficial skin ulcerations...... information is available about the ecology, spread and survival of atypical strains in water. The commonly used therapeutic methods for the control of diseases in farmed fish caused by atypical A. salmonicida are generally effective against the atypical strains. Resistance to different antibiotics and...

  16. Evolution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in the vertebrates: an atypical butyrylcholinesterase from the Medaka Oryzias latipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Pezzementi

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE are thought to be the result of a gene duplication event early in vertebrate evolution. To learn more about the evolution of these enzymes, we expressed in vitro, characterized, and modeled a recombinant cholinesterase (ChE from a teleost, the medaka Oryzias latipes. In addition to AChE, O. latipes has a ChE that is different from either vertebrate AChE or BChE, which we are classifying as an atypical BChE, and which may resemble a transitional form between the two. Of the fourteen aromatic amino acids in the catalytic gorge of vertebrate AChE, ten are conserved in the atypical BChE of O. latipes; by contrast, only eight are conserved in vertebrate BChE. Notably, the atypical BChE has one phenylalanine in its acyl pocket, while AChE has two and BChE none. These substitutions could account for the intermediate nature of this atypical BChE. Molecular modeling supports this proposal. The atypical BChE hydrolyzes acetylthiocholine (ATCh and propionylthiocholine (PTCh preferentially but butyrylthiocholine (BTCh to a considerable extent, which is different from the substrate specificity of AChE or BChE. The enzyme shows substrate inhibition with the two smaller substrates but not with the larger substrate BTCh. In comparison, AChE exhibits substrate inhibition, while BChE does not, but may instead show substrate activation. The atypical BChE from O. latipes also shows a mixed pattern of inhibition. It is effectively inhibited by physostigmine, typical of all ChEs. However, although the atypical BChE is efficiently inhibited by the BChE-specific inhibitor ethopropazine, it is not by another BChE inhibitor, iso-OMPA, nor by the AChE-specific inhibitor BW284c51. The atypical BChE is found as a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored amphiphilic dimer (G(2 (a, which is unusual for any BChE. We classify the enzyme as an atypical BChE and discuss its implications for the evolution of ACh

  17. Typical Versus Atypical Anorexia Nervosa Among Adolescents: Clinical Characteristics and Implications for ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silén, Yasmina; Raevuori, Anu; Jüriloo, Elisabeth; Tainio, Veli-Matti; Marttunen, Mauri; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2015-09-01

    There is scant research on the clinical utility of differentiating International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 diagnoses F50.0 anorexia nervosa (typical AN) and F50.1 atypical anorexia. We reviewed systematically records of 47 adolescents who fulfilled criteria for ICD-10 F50.0 (n = 34) or F50.1 (n = 13), assessing the impact of diagnostic subtype, comorbidity, background factors and treatment choices on recovery. Atypical AN patients were significantly older (p = 0.03), heavier (minimum body mass index 16.7 vs 15.1 kg/m(2) , p = 0.003) and less prone to comorbidities (38% vs 71%, p = 0.04) and had shorter, less intensive and less costly treatments than typical AN patients. The diagnosis of typical versus atypical AN was the sole significant predictor of treatment success: recovery from atypical AN was 4.3 times (95% confidence interval [1.1, 17.5]) as likely as recovery from typical AN. Overall, our findings indicate that a broader definition of AN may dilute the prognostic value of the diagnosis, and therefore, ICD-11 should retain its distinction between typical and atypical AN. PMID:26010207

  18. Lichen sclerosus: a potpourri of misdiagnosed cases based on atypical clinical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventolini G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gary Ventolini, Ravi Patel, Robert Vasquez Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Permian Basin, Odessa, TX, USA Objective: Lichen sclerosus (LS is a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-induced disease that primarily affects the epidermis and dermis of the external genital-anal region. Intense and recalcitrant pruritus is the hallmark of LS. Physical exam reveals thinning, hyperkeratosis, and parchment-like appearance. However, the classic symptom and signs of LS may not always be present and patients may be asymptomatic for pruritus. Hence, we describe 15 misdiagnosed cases with atypical clinical presentations. We believe that the absence of pruritus contributed to their initial misdiagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of atypical presentations of LS. Methods: Data base review of de-identified clinical case pictures was performed. All patients had histopathology-confirmed diagnoses of LS. The data base file contains 800 cases of vulvovaginal disorders. The Institutional Review Board (IRB considered that searching a de-identified data base of pictures did not require IRB approval. Results: We identified 15 different atypical clinical cases. Patient ages were 18–75 years old. These patients were asymptomatic for pruritus and were misdiagnosed before they presented to the vulvovaginal specialized clinic. Conclusion: Fifteen patients asymptomatic for pruritus with histopathology-confirmed diagnosis of LS were identified. They illustrate atypical clinical presentations that LS may have. Keywords: vulvovaginal, vulvar, atypical, lichen sclerosus, asymptomatic

  19. Effect of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion on Patients with Atypical Symptoms Related to Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Sun, Yuqing; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Background A considerable number of patients with cervical spondylosis complain about one or multiple atypical symptoms such as vertigo, palpitations, headache, blurred vision, hypomnesia, and/or nausea. It remains unclear whether surgical intervention for cervical spondylosis can also effectively alleviate those symptoms. The current study was performed to see if anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) offers such an extra benefit for patients with cervical spondylosis. Objective To investigate if patients who received ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy can also achieve alleviation of certain atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylosis after the surgery in the long run. Methods Sixty-seven patients who underwent ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy were involved in this study. All these patients also complained about various associated atypical symptoms. They were followed up for 26 to 145 months after the surgery. Severity and frequency scores of the atypical symptoms before the surgery and at last follow-up were compared by paired t tests. Results Most patients reported significantly alleviated symptoms at the last follow-up compared with before the surgery. The severity of vertigo, headache, nausea, and palpitations were significantly alleviated at the last follow-up (with p values of p cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy, but it is not effective in alleviating symptoms such as tinnitus, blurred vision, and hypomnesia. It can be considered for alleviating atypical symptoms when other treatment options prove ineffective. PMID:27168319

  20. Detection and identification of the atypical bovine pestiviruses in commercial foetal bovine serum batches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Xia

    Full Text Available The recently emerging atypical bovine pestiviruses have been detected in commercial foetal bovine serum (FBS of mainly South American origin so far. It is unclear how widely the viruses are presented in commercial FBS of different geographic origins. To further investigate the possible pestivirus contamination of commercially available FBS batches, 33 batches of FBS were obtained from ten suppliers and analysed in this study for the presence of both the recognised and the atypical bovine pestiviruses. All 33 batches of FBS were positive by real-time RT-PCR assays for at least one species of bovine pestiviruses. According to the certificate of analysis that the suppliers claimed for each batch of FBS, BVDV-1 was detected in all 11 countries and BVDV-2 was detected exclusively in the America Continent. The atypical pestiviruses were detected in 13 batches claimed to originate from five countries. Analysis of partial 5'UTR sequences showed a high similarity among these atypical bovine pestiviruses. This study has demonstrated, for the first time that commercial FBS batches of different geographic origins are contaminated not only with the recognised species BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, but also with the emerging atypical bovine pestiviruses.