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Sample records for atypical hemolytic uremic

  1. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical MalaCards: genetic atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Anemia Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  2. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, Karolien H.; Florquin, Sandrine; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Verlaak, René; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Weening, Jan J.; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of

  3. Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Azar Nickavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1 D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2 typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3 atypical HUS (aHUS: Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4 recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5 familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS.

  4. Complement Mutations in Diacylglycerol Kinase-ε–Associated Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Sánchez Chinchilla, Daniel; Pinto, Sheila; Hoppe, Bernd; Adragna, Marta; Lopez, Laura; Justa Roldan, Maria Luisa; Peña, Antonia; Lopez Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by vascular endothelial damage caused by complement dysregulation. Consistently, complement inhibition therapies are highly effective in most patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Recently, it was shown that a significant percentage of patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome carry mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, an intracellular protein with no obvious role in complement. These data support an alternative, complement-independent mechanism leading to thrombotic microangiopathy that has implications for treatment of early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. To get additional insights into this new form of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, the diacylglycerol kinase-ε gene in a cohort with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was analyzed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Eighty-three patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (<2 years) enrolled in the Spanish atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome registry between 1999 and 2013 were screened for mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε. These patients were also fully characterized for mutations in the genes encoding factor H, membrane cofactor protein, factor I, C3, factor B, and thrombomodulin CFHRs copy number variations and rearrangements, and antifactor H antibodies. Results Four patients carried mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, one p.H536Qfs*16 homozygote and three compound heterozygotes (p.W322*/p.P498R, two patients; p.Q248H/p.G484Gfs*10, one patient). Three patients also carried heterozygous mutations in thrombomodulin or C3. Extensive plasma infusions controlled atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrences and prevented renal failure in the two patients with diacylglycerol kinase-ε and thrombomodulin mutations. A positive response to plasma infusions and complement inhibition treatment was also observed in the patient with concurrent diacylglycerol

  5. Complement mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε-associated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Chinchilla, Daniel; Pinto, Sheila; Hoppe, Bernd; Adragna, Marta; Lopez, Laura; Justa Roldan, Maria Luisa; Peña, Antonia; Lopez Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-09-05

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by vascular endothelial damage caused by complement dysregulation. Consistently, complement inhibition therapies are highly effective in most patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Recently, it was shown that a significant percentage of patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome carry mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, an intracellular protein with no obvious role in complement. These data support an alternative, complement-independent mechanism leading to thrombotic microangiopathy that has implications for treatment of early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. To get additional insights into this new form of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, the diacylglycerol kinase-ε gene in a cohort with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was analyzed. Eighty-three patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (<2 years) enrolled in the Spanish atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome registry between 1999 and 2013 were screened for mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε. These patients were also fully characterized for mutations in the genes encoding factor H, membrane cofactor protein, factor I, C3, factor B, and thrombomodulin CFHRs copy number variations and rearrangements, and antifactor H antibodies. Four patients carried mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, one p.H536Qfs*16 homozygote and three compound heterozygotes (p.W322*/p.P498R, two patients; p.Q248H/p.G484Gfs*10, one patient). Three patients also carried heterozygous mutations in thrombomodulin or C3. Extensive plasma infusions controlled atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrences and prevented renal failure in the two patients with diacylglycerol kinase-ε and thrombomodulin mutations. A positive response to plasma infusions and complement inhibition treatment was also observed in the patient with concurrent diacylglycerol kinase-ε and C3 mutations. Data suggest that complement dysregulation influences

  6. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome triggered by varicella infection

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    Pauline Condom

    2017-01-01

    The current case describes an aHUS associated to varicella infection as demonstrated by the simultaneous occurrence of the viral infection and aHUS manifestations. Apart from typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome which is triggered by bacteria mostly Shiga toxin producing Echerichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae or Shigella, aHUS may be linked to viral infections such as HIV, EBV and enteroviruses, but very rarely by varicella. This case highlights a possible even rare complication of varicella infection a very common childhood disease. This complication could be avoided by to anti-VZV vaccination.

  7. An international consensus approach to the management of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loirat, C.; Fakhouri, F.; Ariceta, G.; Besbas, N.; Bitzan, M.; Bjerre, A.; Coppo, R.; Emma, F.; Johnson, S.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Langman, C.B.; Lapeyraque, A.L.; Licht, C.; Nester, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Riedl, M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Walle, J. Vande; Vivarelli, M.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) emerged during the last decade as a disease largely of complement dysregulation. This advance facilitated the development of novel, rational treatment options targeting terminal complement activation, e.g., using an anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab). We review

  8. A case of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome as an early manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Dong Kyun Han

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children younger than 4 years and is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. HUS associated with diarrheal prodrome is usually caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 or by Shigella dysenteriae, which generally has a better outcome. However, atypical cases show a tendency to relapse with a poorer prognosis. HUS has been reported to be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in children. The characteristics and the mechanisms underlying this condition are largely unknown. In this study, we describe the case of an 11-year-old boy in whom the diagnosis of ALL was preceded by the diagnosis of atypical HUS. Thus, patients with atypical HUS should be diagnosed for the possibility of developing ALL.

  9. Recurrent atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome after renal transplantation: treatment with eculizumab

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    Ana B. Latzke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare entity. It is characterized by a thrombotic microangiopathy (nonimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure, with a typical histopathology of thickening of capillary and arteriolar walls and an obstructive thrombosis of the vascular lumen. The syndrome is produced by a genetic or acquired deregulation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, with high rates of end stage renal disease, post-transplant recurrence, and high mortality. Mutations associated with factor H, factor B and complement C3 show the worst prognosis. Even though plasma therapy is occasionally useful, eculizumab is effective both for treatment and prevention of post-transplant recurrence. We describe here an adult case of congenital aHUS (C3 mutation under preventive treatment with eculizumab after renal transplantation, with neither disease recurrence nor drug-related adverse events after a 36-months follow-up.

  10. Targeting renin-angiotensin system in malignant hypertension in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    V Raghunathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is common in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and often difficult to control. Local renin-angiotensin activation is believed to be an important part of thrombotic microangiopathy, leading to a vicious cycle of progressive renal injury and intractable hypertension. This has been demonstrated in vitro via enhanced tissue factor expression on glomerular endothelial cells which is enhanced by angiotensin II. We report two pediatric cases of atypical HUS with severe refractory malignant hypertension, in which we targeted the renin-angiotensin system by using intravenous (IV enalaprilat, oral aliskiren, and oral enalapril with quick and dramatic response of blood pressure. Both drugs, aliskiren and IV enalaprilat, were effective in controlling hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensive medications. These appear to be promising alternatives in the treatment of severe atypical HUS-induced hypertension and hypertensive emergency.

  11. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: Laboratory characteristics, complement-amplifying conditions, renal biopsy, and genetic mutations

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    Mohammad A Hossain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, consumptive thrombocytopenia, and widespread damage to multiple organs including the kidney. The syndrome has a high mortality necessitating the need for an early diagnosis to limit target organ damage. Because thrombotic microangiopathies present with similar clinical picture, accurate diagnosis of aHUS continues to pose a diagnostic challenge. This article focuses on the role of four distinct aspects of aHUS that assist clinicians in making an accurate diagnosis of aHUS. First, because of the lack of a single specific laboratory test for aHUS, other forms of thrombotic microangiopathies such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-associated HUS must be excluded to successfully establish the diagnosis of aHUS. Second, application of the knowledge of complement-amplifying conditions is critically important in making an accurate diagnosis. Third, when available, a renal biopsy can reveal changes consistent with thrombotic microangiopathy. Fourth, genetic mutations are increasingly clarifying the underlying complement dysfunction and gaining importance in the diagnosis and management of patients with aHUS. This review concentrates on the four aspects of aHUS and calls for heightened awareness in making an accurate diagnosis of aHUS.

  12. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

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    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  13. Eculizumab Therapy Leads to Rapid Resolution of Thrombocytopenia in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Han-Mou Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eculizumab is highly effective in controlling complement activation in patients with the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS. However, the course of responses to the treatment is not well understood. We reviewed the responses to eculizumab therapy for aHUS. The results show that, in patients with aHUS, eculizumab therapy, when not accompanied with concurrent plasma exchange therapy, led to steady increase in the platelet count and improvement in extra-renal complications within 3 days. By day 7, the platelet count was normal in 15 of 17 cases. The resolution of hemolytic anemia and improvement in renal function were less predictable and were not apparent for weeks to months in two patients. The swift response in the platelet counts was only observed in one of five cases who received concurrent plasma exchange therapy and was not observed in a case of TMA due to gemcitabine/carboplatin. In summary, eculizumab leads to rapid increase in the platelet counts and resolution of extrarenal symptoms in patients with aHUS. Concurrent plasma exchange greatly impedes the response of aHUS to eculizumab therapy. Eculizumab is ineffective for gemcitabine/carboplatin associated TMA.

  14. C3 Glomerulopathy and Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Two Important Manifestations of Complement System Dysfunction

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    Ravneet Bajwa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The advances in our understanding of the alternative pathway have emphasized that uncontrolled hyperactivity of this pathway causes 2 distinct disorders that adversely impact the kidney. In the so-called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, renal dysfunction occurs along with thrombocytopenia, anemia, and target organ injury to multiple organs, most commonly the kidney. On the other hand, in the so-termed C3 glomerulopathy, kidney involvement is not associated with thrombocytopenia, anemia, or other system involvement. In this report, we present 2 cases of alternative pathway dysfunction. The 60-year-old female patient had biopsy-proven C3 glomerulopathy, while the 32-year-old female patient was diagnosed with aHUS based on renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and normal ADAMTS-13 level. The aHUS patient was successfully treated with the monoclonal antibody (eculizumab for complement blockade. The patient with C3 glomerulopathy did not receive the monoclonal antibody. In this patient, management focused on blood pressure and proteinuria control with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. This article focuses on the clinical differences, pathophysiology, and treatment of aHUS and C3 glomerulopathy.

  15. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome post Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

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    Sami eAlasfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1-2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (Infection-induced HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease (ESRD. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a (C5a and subsequent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence.

  16. Factor H autoantibody is associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

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    Brocklebank, Vicky; Johnson, Sally; Sheerin, Thomas P; Marks, Stephen D; Gilbert, Rodney D; Tyerman, Kay; Kinoshita, Meredith; Awan, Atif; Kaur, Amrit; Webb, Nicholas; Hegde, Shivaram; Finlay, Eric; Fitzpatrick, Maggie; Walsh, Patrick R; Wong, Edwin K S; Booth, Caroline; Kerecuk, Larissa; Salama, Alan D; Almond, Mike; Inward, Carol; Goodship, Timothy H; Sheerin, Neil S; Marchbank, Kevin J; Kavanagh, David

    2017-11-01

    Factor H autoantibodies can impair complement regulation, resulting in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, predominantly in childhood. There are no trials investigating treatment, and clinical practice is only informed by retrospective cohort analysis. Here we examined 175 children presenting with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United Kingdom and Ireland for factor H autoantibodies that included 17 children with titers above the international standard. Of the 17, seven had a concomitant rare genetic variant in a gene encoding a complement pathway component or regulator. Two children received supportive treatment; both developed established renal failure. Plasma exchange was associated with a poor rate of renal recovery in seven of 11 treated. Six patients treated with eculizumab recovered renal function. Contrary to global practice, immunosuppressive therapy to prevent relapse in plasma exchange-treated patients was not adopted due to concerns over treatment-associated complications. Without immunosuppression, the relapse rate was high (five of seven). However, reintroduction of treatment resulted in recovery of renal function. All patients treated with eculizumab achieved sustained remission. Five patients received renal transplants without specific factor H autoantibody-targeted treatment with recurrence in one who also had a functionally significant CFI mutation. Thus, our current practice is to initiate eculizumab therapy for treatment of factor H autoantibody-mediated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome rather than plasma exchange with or without immunosuppression. Based on this retrospective analysis we see no suggestion of inferior treatment, albeit the strength of our conclusions is limited by the small sample size. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Faruk Öktem

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a severe disease with microangiopathic anemia, thrombocytopenia and leading cause of acute renal failure in children. Several etiological factors causing to HUS have been identified, like infections, genetic mutations, drugs, systemic diseases. In this review, we present the new classification of the disease, detailed information about pathogenesis, diagnostic methods and therapeutic approaches.

  18. Thrombotic Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia without Evidence of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Şinasi Özsoylu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent issue of this journal Dr. Oymak and her colleagues presented a clinically and genetically well-studied 5-year-old boy who was seen with severe microangiopathic hemolytic anemia without laboratory findings of renal involvement despite complement factor H gene mutations [1]. Because of Yeneral’s extensive review [2] on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS published recently in the Turkish Journal of Hematology, I brought it to readers’ attention that more recently some authors do not use ‘aHUS’, which was historically used to distinguish heterogeneous uncharacterized syndromes from Shiga toxin-related HUS, since the term lacks both specificity and suggested causes [3]. Though in our patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura renal involvement was documented at the beginning but not in the last two recurrences, neither serum nor urinary findings indicated kidney involvement [4]. Although the discussions of Dr. Oymak et al. are well taken, the term ‘microangiopathic hemolytic anemia’ is covering the syndrome to a large extent as suggested by George and Nester

  19. Anticardiolipin antibodies in D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Alfen-van der Velden, J. van; Onland, W.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The diarrhea-associated form of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) is characterized by a triad of symptoms, namely thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Histopathological studies of patients with D+ HUS show microthrombi in arterioles and glomeruli of the kidney. Recently,

  20. Unexpected Findings in a Child with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: An Example of How Genomics Is Changing the Clinical Diagnostic Paradigm

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    Eleanor G. Seaby

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available CBL is a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 11 encoding a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Germline CBL mutations are dominant. Pathogenic de novo mutations result in a phenotype that overlaps Noonan syndrome (1. Some patients with CBL mutations go on to develop juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML, an aggressive malignancy that usually necessitates bone marrow transplantation. Using whole exome sequencing methods, we identified a known mutation in CBL in a 4-year-old Caucasian boy with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, moyamoya phenomenon, and dysmorphology consistent with a mild Noonan-like phenotype. Exome data revealed loss of heterozygosity across chromosome 11q consistent with JMML but in the absence of clinical leukemia. Our finding challenges conventional clinical diagnostics since we have identified a pathogenic variant in the CBL gene previously only ascertained in children presenting with leukemia. The increasing affordability of expansive sequencing is likely to increase the scope of clinical profiles observed for previously identified pathogenic variants and calls into question the interpretability and indications for clinical management.

  1. Analysis of patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome treated at the Mie University Hospital: concentration of C3 p.I1157T mutation.

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    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Fan, Xinping; Ishikawa, Eiji; Ito, Masaaki; Amano, Keishirou; Toyoda, Hidemi; Komada, Yoshihiro; Ohishi, Kohshi; Katayama, Naoyuki; Yoshida, Yoko; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Ikejiri, Makoto; Wada, Hideo; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by abnormalities of the complement system and has a significantly poor prognosis. The clinical phenotypes of 12 patients in nine families with aHUS with familial or recurrent onset and ADAMTS13 activity of ≥20 % treated at the Mie University Hospital were examined. In seven of the patients, the first episode of aHUS occurred during childhood and ten patients experienced a relapse. All patients had renal dysfunction and three had been treated with hemodialysis. Seven patients experienced probable triggering events including common cold, influenza, bacterial infection and/or vaccination for influenza. All patients had entered remission, and renal function was improved in 11 patients. DNA sequencing of six candidate genes, identified a C3 p.I1157T missense mutation in all eight patients in six families examined and this mutation was causative for aHUS. A causative mutation THBD p.D486Y was also identified in an aHUS patient. Four missense mutations, CFH p.V837I, p.Y1058H, p.V1060L and THBD p.R403K may predispose to aHUS manifestation; the remaining seven missense mutations were likely neutral. In conclusion, the clinical phenotypes of aHUS are various, and there are often trigger factors. The C3 p.I1157T mutation was identified as the causative mutation for aHUS in all patients examined, and may be geographically concentrated in or around the Mie prefecture in central Japan.

  2. An audit analysis of a guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea negative (atypical) hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, S.; Stojanovic, J.; Ariceta, G.; Bitzan, M.; Besbas, N.; Frieling, M.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Langman, C.; Licht, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Riedl, M.; Siomou, E.; Kar, N.C. van de; Walle, J.V.; Loirat, C.; Taylor, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, the European Paediatric Study Group for Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (HUS) published a clinical practice guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea-negative HUS (now more widely referred to as atypical HUS, aHUS). The therapeutic component of the guideline

  3. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after bone marrow transplantation

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    Arai, Ayako; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Tanikawa, Shu [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1998-06-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated for the subsequent development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS developed in seven patients (four males and three females, five acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), one acute myelogenous leukemia, one non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma) between 36-196 days after BMT. Four patients were recipients of autologous BMT and three were those of allogeneic BMT. Six patients were preconditioned with the regimens including fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). ALL and preconditioning regimen with TBI were suspected to be the risk factors for the development of HUS. Cyclosporin A (CSP) administration was discontinued in three patients who had been given CSP for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Predonisolone was given to the three patients and plasma exchange was performed in one patient. Both hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia were resolved in virtually all patients, while creatinine elevation has persisted along with hypertension in one patient. (author)

  4. Guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea-negative hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariceta, G.; Besbas, N.; Johnson, S.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Licht, C.; Loirat, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Taylor, C.M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Vandewalle, J.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.

    2009-01-01

    This guideline for the investigation and initial treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is intended to offer an approach based on opinion, as evidence is lacking. It builds on the current ability to identify the etiology of specific diagnostic sub-groups of HUS. HUS in children is

  5. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: New Developments in Pathogenesis and Treatment

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    Olivia Boyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome is defined by the characteristic triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. In children, most cases of HUS are caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, especially Escherichia coli O157:H7. Common vehicles of transmission include ground beef, unpasteurized milk, and municipal or swimming water. Shiga-toxin-associated HUS is a main cause of acute renal failure in young children. Management remains supportive as there is at present no specific therapy to ameliorate the prognosis. Immediate outcome is most often favourable but long-term renal sequelae are frequent due to nephron loss. Atypical HUS represents 5% of cases. In the past 15 years, mutations in complement regulators of the alternative pathway have been identified in almost 60% of cases, leading to excessive complement activation. The disease has a relapsing course and more than half of the patients either die or progress to end-stage renal failure. Recurrence after renal transplantation is frequent.

  6. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    OpenAIRE

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Silviu GrisaruUniversity of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there ...

  7. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

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    Grisaru S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Silviu GrisaruUniversity of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS. In most cases (90%, this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures.Keywords: hemolytic, uremic, E.coli O157:H7, thrombotic, microangiopathy, complement system

  8. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome-associated Encephalopathy Successfully Treated with Corticosteroids.

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    Hosaka, Takashi; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-11-01

    The encephalopathy that occurs in association with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli), has a high mortality rate and patients sometimes present sequelae. We herein describe the case of a 20-year-old woman who developed encephalopathy during the convalescent stage of HUS caused by E.coli O26. Hyperintense lesions were detected in the pons, basal ganglia, and cortex on diffusion-weighted brain MRI. From the onset of HUS encephalopathy, we treated the patient with methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy alone. Her condition improved, and she did not present sequelae. Our study shows that corticosteroids appear to be effective for the treatment of some patients with HUS encephalopathy.

  9. [Microalbuminuria in pediatric patients diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos C, María Paz; Del Salas, Paulina; Zambrano, Pedro O

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by the presence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney failure. It is the leading cause of acute kidney failure in children under 3 years of age. A variable number of patients develop proteinuria, hypertension, and chronic renal failure. To evaluate the renal involvement in pediatric patients diagnosed with HUS using the microalbumin/creatinine ratio. Descriptive concurrent cohort study that analyzed the presence of microalbuminuria in patients diagnosed with HUS between January 2001 and March 2012, who evolved without hypertension and normal renal function (clearance greater than 90ml/min using Schwartz formula). Demographic factors (age, sex), clinical presentation at time of diagnosis, use of antibiotics prior to admission, and need for renal replacement therapy were evaluated. Of the 24 patients studied, 54% were male. The mean age at diagnosis was two years. Peritoneal dialysis was required in 45%, and 33% developed persistent microalbuminuria. Antiproteinuric treatment was introduce in 4 patients, with good response. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range 6 months to 11 years). The serum creatinine returned to normal in all patients during follow up. The percentage of persistent microalbuminuria found in patients with a previous diagnosis of HUS was similar in our group to that described in the literature. Antiproteinuric treatment could delay kidney damage, but further multicenter prospective studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  11. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C (cblC) disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay P; Greenberg, Cheryl R; Prasad, Asuri N; Prasad, Chitra

    2007-12-01

    Diarrhea-positive hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a common cause of acute renal failure in children. Diarrhea-negative (D-), or atypical HUS, is etiologically distinct. A Medline search identified seven previously reported D- cases of HUS secondary to cobalamin C (cblC) disease presenting in infancy. An infantile presentation is reported to be associated with a high mortality rate (6/7 cases). We describe the results of a 5-year longitudinal follow-up in a child diagnosed with D- HUS secondary to cblC disease in infancy. Mutation analysis in this patient identified homozygosity for the 271 dupA mutation (c.271 dupA) in the cblC MMACHC gene. We briefly review the published experience in cblC-associated HUS to highlight the clinical characteristics of this uncommon, but potentially treatable, condition.

  12. ADAMTS13 Gene Mutations in Children with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoung Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Kim, Nam Keun

    2011-01-01

    We investigated ADAMTS13 activity as well as the ADAMTS13 gene mutation in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Eighteen patients, including 6 diarrhea-negative (D-HUS) and 12 diarrhea-associated HUS (D+HUS) patients, were evaluated. The extent of von Willebrand factor (VWF) degradation was assayed by multimer analysis, and all exons of the ADAMTS13 gene were PCR-amplified using Taq DNA polymerase. The median and range for plasma activity of ADAMTS13 in 6 D-HUS and 12 D+HUS patients were 71.8% (22.8-94.1%) and 84.9% (37.9-119.9%), respectively, which were not statistically significantly different from the control group (86.4%, 34.2-112.3%) (p>0.05). Five ADAMTS13 gene mutations, including 2 novel mutations [1584+2T>A, 3941C>T (S1314L)] and 3 polymorphisms (Q448E, P475S, S903L), were found in 2 D-HUS and one D+HUS patients, which were not associated with deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity. Whether these mutations without reduced ADAMTS13 activity are innocent bystanders or predisposing factors in HUS remains unanswered. PMID:21488199

  13. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures.

  14. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    John L. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease.

  15. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without...... the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains......, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli....

  16. Renoscintigraphy in assessment of renal lesions in children after hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, P.; Marczak, E.; Romanowicz, G.; and others.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of renoscintigraphic examination in monitoring of patients after the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. 27 children mean 9 years the hemolytic-uremic syndrome underwent the complex of biochemical, ultrasound and renoscintigraphic examinations. The abnormal renoscintigraphic was seen in 85.1% of children, while the alternative test described the renal lesion in 29-66%. Renoscintigraphic examination seems to be the most sensitive in monitoring of remote sequel in patients after HUS. Those patients should undergone long-lasting observation, for the sake of possibility of development of renal insufficiency. (author). 14 refs

  17. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, C. Wim; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Rossen, John W. A.; van der Kuip, Martijn; van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E.

  18. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelie, H.; Baars, J. W.; Rodenhuis, S.; Van Dijk, M. A.; de Glas-Vos, C. W.; Thomas, B. L.; van Oers, R. H.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy intensification may lead to new forms of toxicity such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. METHODS: Three patients are described who developed this complication 4 to 6 months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell support. The literature on this subject is

  19. Late Onset Cobalamin Disorder and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Nephrotic Syndrome

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    Gianluigi Ardissino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is an unrare and severe thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA caused by several pathogenetic mechanisms among which Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and complement dysregulation are the most common. However, very rarely and particularly in neonates and infants, disorders of cobalamin metabolism (CblC can present with or be complicated by TMA. Herein we describe a case of atypical HUS (aHUS related to CblC disease which first presented in a previously healthy boy at age of 13.6 years. The clinical picture was initially dominated by nephrotic range proteinuria and severe hypertension followed by renal failure. The specific treatment with high dose of hydroxycobalamin rapidly obtained the remission of TMA and the complete recovery of renal function. We conclude that plasma homocysteine and methionine determinations together with urine organic acid analysis should be included in the diagnostic work-up of any patient with TMA and/or nephrotic syndrome regardless of age.

  20. ADAMTS-13 level in children with severe diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: Unmasking new association

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    Naglaa A Khalifa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 leads to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Few studies have reported reduced activity of ADAMTS-13 in patients with atypical and typical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. We hypothesized that ADAMTS-13 deficiency might play a role in the pathogenesis of severe HUS. This study aimed to evaluate the ADAMTS-13 level in severe typical HUS. This prospective case–control study was carried out in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit and Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University from February 2013 to February 2014. The study included 15 consecutive children with typical HUS as well as 15 healthy children as a control group. Routine laboratory investigations were performed. Assessment of serum ADAMTS-13 level was performed using the Quantikine human ADAMTS-13 ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 16. Nonparametric values were expressed as median and range, and the median of two groups was tested by Mann–Whitney test. The serum ADAMTS-13 level was significantly lower in HUS patients when compared to the control group (P < 0.05. There were significant negative correlations between ADAMTS-13 level and duration on dialysis, as well as serum urea and creatinine. Furthermore, there were significant positive correlations between serum ADAMTS-13 level and both hemoglobin level and platelet count. Our study suggests that the ADAMTS-13 level was decreased in children with severe typical HUS and its deficiency correlated with disease severity.

  1. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  2. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  3. Dangerous drug interactions leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome following lung transplantation

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    Parissis Haralabos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report our experience of a rather uncommon drug interaction, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Methods Two consecutive cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome were diagnosed in our service. In both patients the use of macrolides in patients taking Tacrolimus, resulted in high levels of Tacrolimus. Results The first patient was a 48 years old female with Bilateral emphysema. She underwent Single Sequential Lung Transplantation. She developed reperfusion injury requiring prolonged stay. Tacrolimus introduced (Day 51. The patient remained well up till 5 months later; Erythromycin commenced for chest infection. High Tacrolimus levels and a clinical diagnosis of HUS were made. She was treated with plasmapheresis successfully. The second case was a 57 years old female with Emphysema & A1 Antithrypsin deficiency. She underwent Right Single Lung Transplantation. A2 rejection with mild Obliterative Bronchiolitis diagnosed 1 year later and she switched to Tacrolimus. She was admitted to her local Hospital two and a half years later with right middle lobe consolidation. The patient commenced on amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Worsening renal indices, high Tacrolimus levels, hemolytic anemia & low Platelets were detected. HUS diagnosed & treated with plasmapheresis. Conclusions There are 21 cases of HUS following lung transplantation in the literature that may have been induced by high tacrolimus levels. Macrolides in patients taking Cyclosporin or Tacrolimus lead to high levels. Mechanism of action could be glomeruloconstrictor effect with reduced GFR increased production of Endothelin-1 and increased Platelet aggregation.

  4. [Historical stages of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Argentina (1964-2009)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardo, Marcela

    2012-10-01

    The aim is to present an historical time frame of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) in Argentina. From a public policy approach, the history of the disease is analyzed as an object of health policy and seeks to contribute in understanding the multiple dimensions of illness. As a medical and scientific issue, as a social problem and a matter of health policy, the article describes three phases ranging from its discovery up to the national program of HUS adopted in 2009. This article aims to provide an overview of developments in biomedical knowledge and the emergence of the issue in both social and political problem.

  5. Shigella sonnei and hemolytic uremic syndrome: A case report and literature review

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    Casey Adams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a well-described process that is known to cause severe renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. HUS is typically associated with toxins (shiga-like and shigella toxin found in strains of E. coli and Shigella spp [1–3]. We present a case of a 27 year-old man with jaundice, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction who was found to have HUS in the setting of Shigella sonnei infection. Outside of developing countries, cases of HUS related to S. sonnei are largely unreported.

  6. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Plasmodium vivax malaria successfully treated with plasma exchange

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    V S Keskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in an adult patient with Plasmodium vivax malaria. The patient presented with worsening anemia, persistent thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. HUS was diagnosed based on the high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated reticulocyte count and presence of schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Kidney biopsy showed features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Complete hematological remission was achieved after five sessions of therapeutic plasma exchange. Renal function partially recovered and stabilized at discharge. Vivax malaria, generally considered benign, may be rarely associated with HUS.

  7. Successful Management of a Rare Cause of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome With Eculizumab in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alparslan, Caner; Yavaşcan, Önder; Kasap Demir, Belde; Atmiş, Bahriye; Karabay Bayazit, Aysun; Leblebisatan, Göksel; Öncel, Elif P; Alaygut, Demet; Mutlubaş, Fatma; Aksu, Nejat

    2018-03-23

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. It very rarely coexists with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging before, simultaneously, or after the diagnosis has been made, and management of the patient may be difficult. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with HUS and initially managed by hemodialysis (HD). Thereafter, HUS progressed, and neurological findings developed. The patient was treated with eculizumab, agressive blood pressure control, and antiepileptic drugs. At the fifth month of follow-up, the patient was diagnosed with acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia with fever, bone pain, hepatosplenomegaly, and pancytopenia. After initiation of ALL treatment, he had no episodes of HUS, despite cessation of eculizumab. In conclusion, eculizumab may be a treatment of choice to prevent further systemic damage in recurrent HUS episodes of patients with borderline changes in the bone marrow until ALL is constantly diagnosed.

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and hypertensive crisis post dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervin Tri Hadianto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS clinically manifests as acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Acute renal failure with oliguria, hypertension, and proteinuria usually develops in affected patients.1,2 In children under 15 years of age, typical HUS occurs at a rate of 0.91 cases per 100,000 population.3 The initial onset of this disease usually happens in children below 3 years of age. Incidence is similar in boys and girls. Seasonal variation occurs, with HUS peaking in the summer and fall. In young children, spontaneous recovery is common. In adults, the probability of recovery is low when HUS is associated with severe hypertension.2

  9. Severe pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome in an 8-month-old girl

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    Tahar Gargah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure, represents one of the major causes of acute renal failure in infancy and childhood. The typical form occurring after an episode of diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli is the most frequent in children. Other microorganisms also may be responsible for HUS, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes more severe forms of the disease. We report an 8-month-old girl who presented with pneumonia and subsequently developed HUS. Renal biopsy showed characteristic lesion of thrombotic microangiopathy and extensive cortical necrosis. She was managed with peritoneal dialysis but did not improve and developed severe sepsis due to staphylococcal peritonitis, resulting in the death of the patient. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced HUS is uncommon, but results in severe disease in the young. There is a high risk of these patients developing end-stage kidney disease in the long term.

  10. Purtscher-Like Retinopathy Associated with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Başak Bostancı

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of infectious crystalline keratopathy in a patient with Graft-versus-Host disease (GVHD who developed satellite fungal keratitis. A 51-year-old man was referred for bilateral total persistent corneal epithelial defects with severe dry eye. Although persistent epithelial defect healed with medical therapy, he developed stromal keratitis with satellite lesions confirmed to be secondary to Candida albicans. After three months of antifungal treatment and debridement, improvement of the infiltrates was obtained. Crystalline keratopathy is an important clinical entity which may develop due to several causes. The microbial causes include not only bacteria but fungi as well. Careful investigation must be performed, especially for immune-compromised patients, in order to provide appropriate and timely treatment.

  11. Enteroaggregative, Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O111:H2 Associated with an Outbreak of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Stefano; Karch, Helge; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patrizia; Schmidt, Herbert; Minelli, Fabio; Bingen, Edouard; Caprioli, Alfredo

    1998-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111:H2 strains from an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome showed aggregative adhesion to HEp-2 cells and harbored large plasmids which hybridized with the enteroaggregative E. coli probe PCVD432. These strains present a novel combination of virulence factors and might be as pathogenic to humans as the classic enterohemorrhagic E. coli. PMID:9508328

  12. Whole-Genome Characterization and Strain Comparison of VT2f-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grande, Laura; Michelacci, Valeria; Bondì, Roslen; Gigliucci, Federica; Franz, Eelco; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Schlager, Sabine; Minelli, Fabio; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in humans cause disease ranging from uncomplicated intestinal illnesses to bloody diarrhea and systemic sequelae, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Previous research indicated that pigeons may be a reservoir for a population of verotoxigenic E. coli

  13. Anticardiolipin antibodies in classic pediatric hemolytic-uremic syndrome: a possible pathogenic role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, L G; Olavarría, F; Elgueta, M; Moya, P; Mezzano, S

    1998-01-01

    Anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies have been associated with thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and an increased risk of thrombosis in different vascular locations, even in the absence of lupus. The classic hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a postinfectious acute renal failure characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and the presence of widespread glomerular thrombosis in the kidney, with pathogenic mechanisms that remain to be identified. In order to establish the frequency of aCL antibodies in this syndrome and to identify a possible role in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, 17 patients were studied during the reactant phase of the disease looking for an association between the presence of aCL antibodies (isotypes IgG, IgA and IgM) and the main clinical variables of the syndrome. In 8 patients IgG aCL was present, 2 patients had IgM aCL, and 1 had IgA antibodies on the solid-phase ELISA aCL assays, but no association could be demonstrated with the clinical variables studied. Although it might correspond to an epiphenomenon related to the triggering intestinal infection, a pathogenic role cannot be discarded and additional studies should be performed.

  14. Efficacy of rituximab and plasmapharesis in an adult patient with antifactor H autoantibody-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Clemence; Garrouste, Cyril; Coppo, Paul; Evrard, Bertrand; Lautrette, Alexandre; Heng, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antifactor H antibody (anti-CFHAb) is found in 6% to 25% cases of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in children, but has been only exceptionally reported in adults. There is no consensus about the best treatment for this type of aHUS. We report the case of an adult patient treated successfully with plasma exchange (PE), steroids, and rituximab. A 27-year-old Caucasian male presented to hospital with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. One week earlier, he had digestive problems with diarrhea. The diagnosis of anti-CFHAb-associated aHUS (82,000 AU/mL) without CFHR gene mutations was established. He received Rituximab 375 mg/m2 (4 pulses) with PE and steroids. This treatment achieved renal and hematological remission at day (D) 31 and negative anti-CFHAb at D45 (<100 AU/mL). At D76, a fifth rituximab pulse was performed while CD19 was higher than 10/mm3. Steroids were stopped at month (M) 9. The patient has not relapsed during long-term follow-up (M39). Rituximab therapy can be considered for anti-CFHAb-associated aHUS. Monitoring of anti-CFHAb titer may help to guide maintenance therapeutic strategies including Rituximab infusion. PMID:27684863

  15. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS): a 24-year clinical experience with 178 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Primo; Harvey Danielle; Levandovsky Mark; Wun Ted

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS) are related and uncommon disorders with a high fatality and complication rate if untreated. Plasma exchange therapy has been shown to produce high response rates and improve survival in patients with many forms of TTP-HUS. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 178 consecutively treated patients with TTP-HUS and analyzed whether clinical or laboratory characteristics could predict for imp...

  16. Clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to cobalamin C disorder in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Liang; Song, Wen-Qi; Peng, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Rong; He, Le-Jian; Fu, Li-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C disorder (cbl-C disorder). We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 3 children with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder who had been treated between April 1, 2009 and October 31, 2013. The 3 patients with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder presented with progressive hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, poor feeding, and failure to thrive. Two of the 3 patients once had high blood pressure. The mutations of c.609G>A (p.W203X), c.217C>T (p.R73X) and c.365A>T (p.H122L) in the methylmalonic aciduria (cobalamin deficiency) cbl-C type, with homocystinuria gene were detected in the 3 patients. In these patients the levels of lactate dehydrogenase and homocysteine in serum were elevated and the level of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in urine was also elevated. After treatment with hydroxocobalamin, 2 patients were discharged with no obvious abnormal growth and neurological development and 1 patient died of multiple organ failure. The results of this study demonstrated that cbl-C disorder should be investigated in any child presenting with HUS. The high concentrations of homocysteine and MMA could be used for timely recognization of the disease. Once the high levels of plasma homocystein and/or plasma or urine MMA are detected, the treatment with parenteral hydroxocobalamin should be prescribed immediately. The early diagnosis and treatment would contribute to the good prognosis of the disease.

  17. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Beyers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC database infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD. Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS.

  18. Dehydration at admission increased the need for dialysis in hemolytic uremic syndrome children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Alejandro; Martin, Sandra Mariel; Toledo, Ismael; Alvarado, Caupolican; Wainsztein, Raquel Eva

    2012-08-01

    Oligoanuric forms of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) usually have more severe acute stage and higher risk of chronic sequelae than nonoligoanuric forms. During the diarrheal phase, gastrointestinal losses could lead to dehydration with pre-renal injury enhancing the risk of oligoanuric D+ HUS. Furthermore, it had been shown that intravenous volume expansion during the prodromal phase could decrease the frequency of oligoanuric renal failure. Thus, we performed this retrospective study to determine whether dehydration on admission is associated with increased need for dialysis in D+ HUS patients. Data from 137 children was reviewed, which were divided into two groups according to their hydration status at admission: normohydrated (n = 86) and dehydrated (n = 51). Laboratory parameters of the dehydrated patients reflected expected deteriorations (higher urea, higher hematocrit and lower sodium, bicarbonate, and pH) than normohydrated ones. Likewise, the dehydrated group had a higher rate of vomiting and need for dialysis (70.6 versus 40.7 %, p = 0.0007). Our data suggests that dehydration at hospital admission might represent a concomitant factor aggravating the intrinsic renal disease in D+ HUS patients increasing the need for dialysis. Therefore, the early recognition of patients at risk of D+ HUS is encouraged to guarantee a well-hydrated status.

  19. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Late Renal Injury and Changing Incidence—A Single Centre Experience in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Robitaille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To assess trends in the incidence of pediatric diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS and document long-term renal sequelae. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children with D+ HUS admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital in Montreal, Canada, from 1976 to 2010. In 2010, we recontacted patients admitted before 2000. Results. Of 337 cases, median age at presentation was 3.01 years (range 0.4–14. Yearly incidence peaked in 1988 and 1994-95, returning to near-1977 levels since 2003. Twelve patients (3.6% died and 19 (5.6% experienced long-term renal failure. Almost half (47% The patients required dialysis. Need for dialysis was the best predictor of renal sequelae, accounting for 100% of severe complications. Of children followed ≥1 year (, mean follow-up years, 19 had severe and 18 mild-to-moderate kidney injury, a total sequelae rate, of 18.6%. Ten years or more after-HUS (, mean follow-up years, 8 (9.4% patients demonstrated serious complications and 22 (25.9% mild-to-moderate, including 14 (16% microalbuminuria: total sequelae, 35.3%. Conclusions. Patients with D+ HUS should be monitored at least 5 years, including microalbuminuria testing, especially if dialysis was required. The cause of the declining incidence of D+HUS is elusive. However, conceivably, improved public health education may have played an important role in the prevention of food-borne disease.

  20. A novel strategy for hemolytic uremic syndrome: successful treatment with thrombomodulin α.

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    Honda, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Mineo, Eri; Nagamori, Yukako; Nakamura, Shinya; Bando, Yuki; Ishii, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a life-threatening infectious disease in childhood for which there is no confirmed therapeutic strategy. Endothelial inflammation leading to microthrombosis formation via complement activation is the main pathology of HUS. Thrombomodulin is an endothelial membrane protein that has anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory effects, including the suppression of complement activity. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) is a novel therapeutic medicine for disseminated intravascular coagulation. We administered rTM to 3 patients with HUS for 7 days and investigated the outcomes in view of the patients' prognoses, changes in biochemical markers, complications, and adverse effects of rTM. Symptoms and laboratory data improved after initiation of rTM in all 3 patients. Abnormal activation of complements was also dramatically suppressed in 1 patient. The patients recovered without any complications or adverse effects of rTM. They were discharged having normal neurologic status and with no renal dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of rTM being used to treat HUS. These case reports show the positive effect of rTM in patients with HUS. Randomized controlled studies should be performed to assess the efficacy and safety of rTM for children with HUS.

  1. Investigation of an outbreak of bloody diarrhea complicated with hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Otar Chokoshvili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In July–August 2009, eight patients with bloody diarrhea complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS were admitted to hospitals in Tbilisi, Georgia. We started active surveillance in two regions for bloody diarrhea and post-diarrheal HUS. Of 25 case-patients who developed HUS, including the initial 8 cases, half were ⩾15 years old, 67% were female and seven (28% died. No common exposures were identified. Among 20 HUS case-patients tested, Shiga toxin was detected in the stools of 2 patients (one with elevated serum IgG titers to several Escherichia coli serogroups, including O111 and O104. Among 56 persons with only bloody diarrhea, we isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O104:H4 from 2 and Shigella from 10; 2 had serologic evidence of E. coli O26 infection. These cases may indicate a previously unrecognized burden of HUS in Georgia. We recommend national reporting of HUS and improving STEC detection capacity.

  2. End-stage renal disease from hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United States, 1995-2010.

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    Sexton, Donal J; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig A; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N

    2015-10-01

    Management of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has evolved rapidly, and optimal treatment strategies are controversial. However, it is unknown whether the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from HUS has changed, and outcomes on dialysis in the United States are not well described. We retrospectively examined data for patients initiating maintenance renal replacement therapy (RRT) (n = 1,557,117), 1995-2010, to define standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and outcomes of ESRD from HUS) (n = 2241). Overall ESRD rates from HUS in 2001-2002 were 0.5 cases/million per year and were higher for patients characterized by age 40-64 years (0.6), ≥65 years (0.7), female sex (0.6), and non-Hispanic African American race (0.7). Standardized incidence ratios remained unchanged (P ≥ 0.05) between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010 in the overall population. Compared with patients with ESRD from other causes, patients with HUS were more likely to be younger, female, white, and non-Hispanic. Over 5.4 years of follow-up, HUS patients differed from matched controls with ESRD from other causes by lower rates of death (8.3 per 100 person-years in cases vs. 10.4 in controls, P < 0.001), listing for renal transplant (7.6 vs. 8.6 per 100 person-years, P = 0.04), and undergoing transplant (6.9 vs. 9 per 100 person-years, P < 0.001). The incidence of ESRD from HUS appears not to have risen substantially in the last decade. However, given that HUS subtypes could not be determined in this study, these findings should be interpreted with caution. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  3. Acute dialysis-associated peritonitis in children with D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Adragna, Marta; Balestracci, Alejandro; García Chervo, Laura; Steinbrun, Silvina; Delgado, Norma; Briones, Liliana

    2012-04-01

    Acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the preferred therapy for renal replacement in children with post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS), but peritonitis remains a frequent complication of this procedure. We reviewed data from 149 patients with D+ HUS who had undergone acute PD with the aim of determining the prevalence and risk factors for the development of peritonitis. A total of 36 patients (24.2%) presented peritonitis. The median onset of peritonitis manifestations was 6 (range 2-18) days after the initiation of dialysis treatment, and Gram-positive microorganisms were the predominant bacterial type isolated (15/36 patients). The patients were divided into two groups: with or without peritonitis, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that a longer duration of the oligoanuric period, more days of dialysis, catheter replacement, stay in the intensive care unit, and hypoalbuminemia were significantly associated to the development of peritonitis. The multivariate analysis, controlled by duration of PD, identified the following independent risk factors for peritonitis: catheter replacement [p = 0.037, odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.73], stay in intensive care unit (p = 0.0001, OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.65-4.19), and hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.0076, OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.10-1.91). Based on these findings, we conclude that the optimization of the aseptic technique during catheter manipulation and early nutritional support are targets for the prevention of peritonitis, especially in critically ill patients.

  4. Protection from hemolytic uremic syndrome by eyedrop vaccination with modified enterohemorrhagic E. coli outer membrane vesicles.

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    Kyoung Sub Choi

    Full Text Available We investigated whether eyedrop vaccination using modified outer membrane vesicles (mOMVs is effective for protecting against hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS caused by enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7 infection. Modified OMVs and waaJ-mOMVs were prepared from cultures of MsbB- and Shiga toxin A subunit (STxA-deficient EHEC O157:H7 bacteria with or without an additional waaJ mutation. BALB/c mice were immunized by eyedrop mOMVs, waaJ-mOMVs, and mOMVs plus polymyxin B (PMB. Mice were boosted at 2 weeks, and challenged peritoneally with wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs at 4 weeks. As parameters for evaluation of the OMV-mediated immune protection, serum and mucosal immunoglobulins, body weight change and blood urea nitrogen (BUN/Creatinin (Cr were tested, as well as histopathology of renal tissue. In order to confirm the safety of mOMVs for eyedrop use, body weight and ocular histopathological changes were monitored in mice. Modified OMVs having penta-acylated lipid A moiety did not contain STxA subunit proteins but retained non-toxic Shiga toxin B (STxB subunit. Removal of the polymeric O-antigen of O157 LPS was confirmed in waaJ-mOMVs. The mice group vaccinated with mOMVs elicited greater humoral and mucosal immune responses than did the waaJ-mOMVs and PBS-treated groups. Eyedrop vaccination of mOMVs plus PMB reduced the level of humoral and mucosal immune responses, suggesting that intact O157 LPS antigen can be a critical component for enhancing the immunogenicity of the mOMVs. After challenge, mice vaccinated with mOMVs were protected from a lethal dose of wtOMVs administered intraperitoneally, conversely mice in the PBS control group were not. Collectively, for the first time, EHEC O157-derived mOMV eyedrop vaccine was experimentally evaluated as an efficient and safe means of vaccine development against EHEC O157:H7 infection-associated HUS.

  5. Efficacy of rituximab and plasmapharesis in an adult patient with antifactor H autoantibody-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: A case report and literature review.

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    Deville, Clemence; Garrouste, Cyril; Coppo, Paul; Evrard, Bertrand; Lautrette, Alexandre; Heng, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Antifactor H antibody (anti-CFHAb) is found in 6% to 25% cases of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in children, but has been only exceptionally reported in adults. There is no consensus about the best treatment for this type of aHUS. We report the case of an adult patient treated successfully with plasma exchange (PE), steroids, and rituximab.A 27-year-old Caucasian male presented to hospital with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. One week earlier, he had digestive problems with diarrhea. The diagnosis of anti-CFHAb-associated aHUS (82,000 AU/mL) without CFHR gene mutations was established.He received Rituximab 375 mg/m (4 pulses) with PE and steroids. This treatment achieved renal and hematological remission at day (D) 31 and negative anti-CFHAb at D45 (<100 AU/mL). At D76, a fifth rituximab pulse was performed while CD19 was higher than 10/mm. Steroids were stopped at month (M) 9. The patient has not relapsed during long-term follow-up (M39).Rituximab therapy can be considered for anti-CFHAb-associated aHUS. Monitoring of anti-CFHAb titer may help to guide maintenance therapeutic strategies including Rituximab infusion.

  6. Whole-Genome Characterization and Strain Comparison of VT2f-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Michelacci, Valeria; Bondì, Roslen; Gigliucci, Federica; Franz, Eelco; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Schlager, Sabine; Minelli, Fabio; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in humans cause disease ranging from uncomplicated intestinal illnesses to bloody diarrhea and systemic sequelae, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Previous research indicated that pigeons may be a reservoir for a population of verotoxigenic E. coli producing the VT2f variant. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize a set of VT2f-producing E. coli strains from human patients with diarrhea or HUS and from healthy pigeons. We describe a phage conveying the vtx2f genes and provide evidence that the strains causing milder diarrheal disease may be transmitted to humans from pigeons. The strains causing HUS could derive from VT2f phage acquisition by E. coli strains with a virulence genes asset resembling that of typical HUS-associated verotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:27584691

  7. Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy.

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    Lee, Benjamin C; Mayer, Chad L; Leibowitz, Caitlin S; Stearns-Kurosawa, D J; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-08-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection.

  8. Idiopathic combined, autoantibody-mediated ADAMTS-13/factor H deficiency in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome in a 17-year-old woman: a case report

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    Patschan Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome is a life-threatening condition with various etiopathogeneses. Without therapy approximately 90% of all patients die from the disease. Case presentation We report the case of a 17-year-old Caucasian woman with widespread hematomas and headache. Due to hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytosis, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected and plasma exchange therapy was initiated immediately. Since her thrombocyte level did not increase during the first week of therapy, plasma treatment had to be intensified to a twice-daily schedule. Further diagnostics showed markedly reduced activities of both ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 - also known as von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease and factor H. Test results for antibodies against both proteins were positive. While plasma exchange therapy was continued, rituximab was given once weekly for four consecutive weeks. After the last dose, thrombocytes and activities of ADAMTS-13 and factor H increased into the normal range. Our patient improved and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusions Since no clinical symptoms/laboratory findings indicated a malignant or specific autoimmune-mediated disorder, the diagnosis made was thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome due to idiopathic combined, autoantibody-mediated ADAMTS-13/factor H deficiency.

  9. Risk factors for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome in a cohort of adult patients with STEC 0104:H4 infection.

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    Alexander Zoufaly

    Full Text Available The outbreak of Shiga toxin producing E.coli O104:H4 in northern Germany in 2011 was one of the largest worldwide and involved mainly adults. Post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS occurred in 22% of STEC positive patients. This study's aim was to assess risk factors for HUS in STEC-infected patients and to develop a score from routine hospital parameters to estimate patient risks for developing HUS. In a cohort analysis, adult patients with STEC infection were included in five participating hospitals in northern Germany between May and July 2011. Clinical data were obtained from questionnaires and medical records, laboratory data were extracted from hospitals' electronic data systems. HUS was defined as thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and acute renal dysfunction. Random forests and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for HUS and develop a score using the estimated coefficients as weights. Among 259 adults with STEC infection, vomiting (OR 3.48,95%CI 1.88-6.53, visible blood in stools (OR 3.91,95%CI1.20-16.01, age above 75 years (OR 3.27, 95%CI 1.12-9.70 and elevated leukocyte counts (OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.10-1.31, per 1000 cells/mm(3 were identified as independent risk factors for HUS. A score using these variables has an area under the ROC curve of 0.74 (95%CI 0.68-0.80. Vomiting, visible blood in stools, higher leukocyte counts, and higher age indicate increased risk for developing HUS. A score using these variables might help to identify high risk patients who potentially benefit from aggressive pre-emptive treatment to prevent or mitigate the devastating consequences of HUS.

  10. Arterial hypertension in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome after kidney transplantation.

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    Hoenecke, Johannes; Hartmann, Hans; Melk, Anette

    2015-08-01

    The development of arterial hypertension after KTX is a well-known complication. HUS is a systemic disease associated with arterial hypertension during long-term follow-up. Our goal was to report on the severity of arterial hypertension after KTX in patients with typical and atypical HUS. We analyzed the course of 197 patients with HUS, of which 22 (n = 10 with typical HUS; n = 12 with atypical HUS) developed ESRF and received KTX as renal replacement therapy. We analyzed data from 1766 casual BP and 85 24-h ABPM measurements. In addition, we evaluated the used antihypertensive strategy. Comparison between the two patient groups revealed that patients with atypical HUS had significantly higher casual SBP-SDS and DBP-SDS values after KTX despite similar intensity of antihypertensive treatment. These data were supported by analysis of ABPM profiles showing comparable results for the interval 1-5 yr after KTX. Patients with atypical HUS had a greater severity of arterial hypertension despite similar treatment strategies and intensity of treatment. Our observation, even though in a small cohort, supports recent genetic studies showing arterial hypertension closely associated with HUS-causing mutations in patients with atypical HUS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Unusual Manifestation of Severe Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in an Infant with Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Jung-Pin Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon etiologic organism in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Historically, severe S. pneumoniae-associated HUS usually has a poor clinical outcome. The clinical manifestations of marked jaundice and hepatic dysfunction in this form of HUS are extremely rare. We report a 10-month-old female infant with S. pneumoniae-associated HUS who had the unusual manifestation of severely elevated conjugated bilirubin and hepatic transaminases. Screening for viral hepatitis was negative, and evidence of biliary obstruction and hepatotoxic drug exposure was also absent. The patient was treated with antihypertensive agents for 2.5 months and required peritoneal dialysis for a period of 26 days. Hepatic function returned to normal on the 8th day of hospitalization. Renal function was mildly impaired at 1-year follow-up. Our report suggests that severe conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a rare manifestation of S. pneumoniae-associated HUS in children. It is important for pediatricians that pneumococcal infection with severe hematologic and renal disorders should be investigated for evidence of S. pneumoniae-associated HUS. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S17-S22

  12. Acute Renal Replacement Therapy in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Single Center 16 Years of Experience

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    Silviu Grisaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is becoming more prevalent among hospitalized children, its etiologies are shifting, and new treatment modalities are evolving; however, diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS remains the most common primary disease causing AKI in young children. Little has been published about acute renal replacement therapy (ARRT and its challenges in this population. We describe our single center's experience managing 134 pediatric patients with D+HUS out of whom 58 (43% required ARRT over the past 16 years. In our cohort, all but one patient were started on peritoneal dialysis (PD. Most patients, 47 (81%, received acute PD on a pediatric inpatient ward. The most common recorded complications in our cohort were peritoneal fluid leaks 13 (22%, peritonitis 11 (20%, and catheter malfunction 5 (9%. Nine patients (16% needed surgical revision of their PD catheters. There were no bleeding events related to PD despite a mean platelets count of 40.9 (±23.5 × 103/mm3 and rare use of platelets infusions. Despite its methodological limitations, this paper adds to the limited body of evidence supporting the use of acute PD as the primary ARRT modality in children with D+HUS.

  13. Soluble CD40 Ligand and Oxidative Response Are Reciprocally Stimulated during Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Maria J. Abrey Recalde

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, produced by Escherichia coli, is the main pathogenic factor of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, which is characterized by the obstruction of renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi. It is well known that the oxidative imbalance generated by Stx induces platelet activation, contributing to thrombus formation. Moreover, activated platelets release soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, which in turn contributes to oxidative imbalance, triggering the release of reactive oxidative species (ROS on various cellular types. The aim of this work was to determine if the interaction between the oxidative response and platelet-derived sCD40L, as consequence of Stx-induced endothelium damage, participates in the pathogenic mechanism during HUS. Activated human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC by Stx2 induced platelets to adhere to them. Although platelet adhesion did not contribute to endothelial damage, high levels of sCD40L were released to the medium. The release of sCD40L by activated platelets was inhibited by antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, we found increased levels of sCD40L in plasma from HUS patients, which were also able to trigger the respiratory burst in monocytes in a sCD40L-dependent manner. Thus, we concluded that platelet-derived sCD40L and the oxidative response are reciprocally stimulated during Stx2-associated HUS. This process may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion and the microangiopathic lesions.

  14. Soluble CD40 Ligand and Oxidative Response Are Reciprocally Stimulated during Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Abrey Recalde, Maria J.; Alvarez, Romina S.; Alberto, Fabiana; Mejias, Maria P.; Ramos, Maria V.; Fernandez Brando, Romina J.; Bruballa, Andrea C.; Exeni, Ramon A.; Alconcher, Laura; Ibarra, Cristina A.; Amaral, María M.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), produced by Escherichia coli, is the main pathogenic factor of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is characterized by the obstruction of renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi. It is well known that the oxidative imbalance generated by Stx induces platelet activation, contributing to thrombus formation. Moreover, activated platelets release soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), which in turn contributes to oxidative imbalance, triggering the release of reactive oxidative species (ROS) on various cellular types. The aim of this work was to determine if the interaction between the oxidative response and platelet-derived sCD40L, as consequence of Stx-induced endothelium damage, participates in the pathogenic mechanism during HUS. Activated human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC) by Stx2 induced platelets to adhere to them. Although platelet adhesion did not contribute to endothelial damage, high levels of sCD40L were released to the medium. The release of sCD40L by activated platelets was inhibited by antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, we found increased levels of sCD40L in plasma from HUS patients, which were also able to trigger the respiratory burst in monocytes in a sCD40L-dependent manner. Thus, we concluded that platelet-derived sCD40L and the oxidative response are reciprocally stimulated during Stx2-associated HUS. This process may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion and the microangiopathic lesions. PMID:29068360

  15. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS: a 24-year clinical experience with 178 patients

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    Lara Primo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS are related and uncommon disorders with a high fatality and complication rate if untreated. Plasma exchange therapy has been shown to produce high response rates and improve survival in patients with many forms of TTP-HUS. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 178 consecutively treated patients with TTP-HUS and analyzed whether clinical or laboratory characteristics could predict for important short- and long-term outcome measures. Results Overall 30-day mortality was 16% (n = 27. 171 patients (96% received plasma exchange as the principal treatment, with a mean of 8 exchanges and a mean cumulative infused volume of 42 ± 71 L of fresh frozen plasma. The rate of complete response was 65% or 55% depending on whether this was defined by a platelet count of 100,000/μl or 150,000/μl, respectively. The rate of relapse was 18%. The Clinical Severity Score did not predict for 30-day mortality or relapse. The time to complete response did not predict for relapse. Renal insufficiency at presentation was associated with a decreased risk of relapse, with each unit increase in serum creatinine associated with a 40% decreased odds of relapse. 72% of our cohort had an idiopathic TTP-sporadic HUS, while 17% had an underlying cancer, received a solid organ transplant or were treated with a mitomycin-based therapy. The estimated overall 5-year survival was 55% and was significantly better in those without serious underlying conditions. Conclusion Plasma exchange therapy produced both high response and survival rates in this large cohort of patients with TTP-HUS. The Clinical Severity Score did not predict for 30-day mortality or relapse, contrary to our previous findings. Interestingly, the presence of renal insufficiency was associated with a decreased risk of relapse. The most important predictor of mortality was the presence or absence of a serious

  16. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS): a 24-year clinical experience with 178 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandovsky, Mark; Harvey, Danielle; Lara, Primo; Wun, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS) are related and uncommon disorders with a high fatality and complication rate if untreated. Plasma exchange therapy has been shown to produce high response rates and improve survival in patients with many forms of TTP-HUS. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 178 consecutively treated patients with TTP-HUS and analyzed whether clinical or laboratory characteristics could predict for important short- and long-term outcome measures. Results Overall 30-day mortality was 16% (n = 27). 171 patients (96%) received plasma exchange as the principal treatment, with a mean of 8 exchanges and a mean cumulative infused volume of 42 ± 71 L of fresh frozen plasma. The rate of complete response was 65% or 55% depending on whether this was defined by a platelet count of 100,000/μl or 150,000/μl, respectively. The rate of relapse was 18%. The Clinical Severity Score did not predict for 30-day mortality or relapse. The time to complete response did not predict for relapse. Renal insufficiency at presentation was associated with a decreased risk of relapse, with each unit increase in serum creatinine associated with a 40% decreased odds of relapse. 72% of our cohort had an idiopathic TTP-sporadic HUS, while 17% had an underlying cancer, received a solid organ transplant or were treated with a mitomycin-based therapy. The estimated overall 5-year survival was 55% and was significantly better in those without serious underlying conditions. Conclusion Plasma exchange therapy produced both high response and survival rates in this large cohort of patients with TTP-HUS. The Clinical Severity Score did not predict for 30-day mortality or relapse, contrary to our previous findings. Interestingly, the presence of renal insufficiency was associated with a decreased risk of relapse. The most important predictor of mortality was the presence or absence of a serious underlying disorder. PMID

  17. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8 levels in urine and serum of patents with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    van Setten, P A; van Hinsbergh, V W; van den Heuvel, L P; Preyers, F; Dijkman, H B; Assmann, K J; van der Velden, T J; Monnens, L A

    1998-06-01

    The epidemic form of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in children is hallmarked by endothelial cell damage, most predominantly displayed by the glomerular capillaries. The influx of mononuclear (MO) and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) into the glomeruli may be an important event in the initiation, prolongation, and progression of glomerular endothelial cell damage in HUS patients. The molecular mechanisms for the recruitment of these leukocytes into the kidney are unclear, but monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-8 are suggested to be prime candidates. In this study, we analyzed the presence of both chemokines in 24-h urinary (n = 15) and serum (n = 14) samples of HUS children by specific ELISAs. Furthermore, kidney biopsies of three different HUS children were examined for MO and PMN cell infiltration by histochemical techniques and electron microscopy. Whereas the chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8 were present in only very limited amounts in urine of 17 normal control subjects, serial samples of HUS patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of both chemokines. HUS children with anuria showed higher initial and maximum chemokine levels than their counterparts without anuria. A strong positive correlation was observed between urinary MCP-1 and IL-8 levels. Whereas initial serum IL-8 levels were significantly increased in HUS children, serum MCP-1 levels were only slightly elevated compared with serum MCP-1 in control children. No correlation was found between urinary and serum chemokine concentrations. Histologic and EM studies of HUS biopsy specimens clearly showed the presence of MOs and to a lesser extent of PMNs in the glomeruli. The present data suggest an important local role for MOs and PMNs in the process of glomerular endothelial-cell damage. The chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8 may possibly be implicated in the pathogenesis of HUS through the recruitment and activation of MOs and PMNs, respectively.

  18. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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  19. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye

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    Thomas Guillard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection.

  20. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome with acute encephalopathy in a pregnant woman infected with epidemic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: characteristic brain images and cytokine profiles.

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    Ito, M; Shiozaki, A; Shimizu, M; Saito, S

    2015-05-01

    A food-poisoning outbreak due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) occurred in Toyama, Japan. The case of a 26-year-old pregnant woman with hemolytic-uremic syndrome who developed acute encephalopathy due to EHEC infection after eating raw meat is presented herein. On day 2 following admission, a cesarean section was performed because of a non-reassuring fetal status. Fecal bacterial culture confirmed an O111/O157 superinfection. Intensive care therapies including continuous hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange were performed. After the operation, the patient developed encephalopathy for which steroid pulse therapy was added. Her condition improved gradually and she was discharged 55 days after delivery. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Circulating microRNAs in patients with Shiga-Toxin-producing E. coli O104:H4 induced hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Johan M Lorenzen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In early May 2011, an outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS first developed in Northern Germany and spread to 15 other countries in Europe. The outbreak-strain O104:H4, which combined virulence factors of typical enteroaggregative and Shiga-Toxin-producing E. coli was associated with an unusual high rate of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Also an unexpected high rate of coma and seizures leading to mechanical ventilation and ICU treatment was observed. MicroRNAs are small ribonucleotides orchestrating gene expression. We tested whether circulating microRNAs in serum of HUS patients during the 2011 epidemics are altered in this patient cohort and related to clinical manifestations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We profiled microRNAs using RNA isolated from serum of patients and healthy age-matched controls. The results were validated in 38 patients at baseline, 29 patients during follow-up and 21 age-matched healthy controls by miRNA-specific quantitative RT-PCR. Circulating levels of miR-24, miR-126 were increased in HUS patients versus controls. There was no association between these microRNAs and renal function or the need for renal replacement therapy. In contrast, levels of miR-126 were associated with neurological symptoms at baseline and during follow-up. In addition, miR-126 (on admission and miR-24 (on admission and during follow-up were associated with platelet count. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Circulating microRNAs are strongly altered in this patient cohort and associated with neurological symptoms as well as platelet count.

  2. Idiopathic Atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome presenting with acute dystonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maduemem, Rizwan K E

    2017-09-01

    Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. The atypical HUS (aHUS) results from over activation of complement system with formation of micro thrombi and damage to endothelial cells resulting in renal impairment in 50 % and death in 25 %, commonly in untreated patients. We report an intriguing case of aHUS presenting with acute onset of movement disorder and fluctuating delirium.

  3. Quantitative MRI shows cerebral microstructural damage in hemolytic-uremic syndrome patients with severe neurological symptoms but no changes in conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenborn, Karin; Worthmann, Hans; Heeren, Meike [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Neurology, Hannover (Germany); Bueltmann, Eva; Donnerstag, Frank; Giesemann, Anja M.; Goetz, Friedrich; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Ding, Xiao-Qi [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Kielstein, Jan; Schwarz, Anke [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Nephrology and Hypertension, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Severe neurological symptoms in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (STEC-HUS) are often accompanied by none or only mild alterations of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aims to analyze if quantitative MRI is able to reveal cerebral pathological alterations invisible for conventional MRI. In nine patients with STEC-HUS associated severe neurological symptoms but inconspicuous cerebral MRI findings maps of the parameters T2 relaxation time, relative proton density (PD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated. Quantitative values of these parameters were measured at the basal ganglia, thalamus, and white matter of the frontal and parietal lobe and compared to those of nine age- and sex-matched controls. Significant T2 prolongation (p < 0.01) was found in the basal ganglia of all patients compared to controls. PD and ADC were not significantly altered. A significant reduction of FA in patients was seen at caput nuclei caudati (p < 0.01). Prolonged T2 relaxation time indicates cerebral microstructural damages in these patients despite their inconspicuous MRI findings. T2 relaxometry could be used as a complementary tool for the assessment of metabolic-toxic brain syndromes. (orig.)

  4. Upregulation of Shiga toxin receptor CD77/Gb3 and interleukin-1β expression in the brain of EHEC patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome and neurologic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Christian; Krasemann, Susanne; Löffler, Judith; Püschel, Klaus; Magnus, Tim; Glatzel, Markus

    2015-03-01

    In 2011, a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections occurred in northern Germany, which mainly affected adults. Out of 3842 patients, 104 experienced a complicated course comprising hemolytic uremic syndrome and neurological complications, including cognitive impairment, aphasia, seizures and coma. T2 hyperintensities on magnet resonance imaging (MRI) bilateral in the thalami and in the dorsal pons were found suggestive of a metabolic toxic effect. Five of the 104 patients died because of toxic heart failure. In the present study, the post-mortem neuropathological findings of the five EHEC patients are described. Histological investigation of 13 brain regions (frontal, temporal, occipital cortex, corpora mammillaria, thalamus, frontal operculum, corona radiata, gyrus angularis, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebellar vermis and cerebellar hemisphere) showed no thrombosis, ischemic changes or fresh infarctions. Further, no changes were found in electron microscopy. In comparison with five age-matched controls, slightly increased activation of microglia and a higher neuronal expression of interleukin-1β and of Shiga toxin receptor CD77/globotriaosylceramide 3 was observed. The findings were confirmed by Western blot analyses. It is suggested that CD77/globotriaosylceramide upregulation may be a consequence to Shiga toxin exposure, whereas increased interleukin-1β expression may point to activation of inflammatory cascades. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Early Conversion from Tacrolimus to Belatacept in a Highly Sensitized Renal Allograft Recipient with Calcineurin Inhibitor-Induced de novo Post-Transplant Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Vasishta S. Tatapudi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney transplantation is the first-line therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease since it offers greater long-term survival and improved quality of life when compared to dialysis. The advent of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI-based maintenance immunosuppression has led to a clinically significant decline in the rate of acute rejection and better short-term graft survival rates. However, these gains have not translated into improvement in long-term graft survival. CNI-related nephrotoxicity and metabolic side effects are thought to be partly responsible for this. Case Presentation: Here, we report the conversion of a highly sensitized renal transplant recipient with pretransplant donor-specific antibodies from tacrolimus to belatacept within 1 week of transplantation. This substitution was necessitated by the diagnosis of CNI-induced de novo post-transplant hemolytic uremic syndrome. Conclusion: Belatacept is a novel costimulation blocker that is devoid of the nephrotoxic properties of CNIs and has been shown to positively impact long-term graft survival and preserve renal allograft function in low-immunologic-risk kidney transplant recipients. Data regarding its use in patients who are broadly sensitized to human leukocyte antigens are scarce, and the increased risk of rejection associated with belatacept has been a deterrent to more widespread use of this immunosuppressive agent. This case serves as an example of a highly sensitized patient that has been successfully converted to a belatacept-based CNI-free regimen.

  6. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica esporádica pós-parto Sporadic postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Elza M. Moreira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anemia hemolítica microangiopática associado à trombocitopenia participa de um grupo de doenças que freqüentemente apresentam suas características clínicas muito semelhantes, sendo difícil distingui-las. A síndrome hemolítico-urêmica é dividida em duas apresentações: a forma não esporádica, que acomete comumente crianças após infecção bacteriana causando diarréia sanguinolenta, possui bom prognóstico; e a forma esporádica, que acomete adultos, sendo bem descritos casos em mulheres pósparto, é a forma sistêmica de trombocitopenia microangiopática de pior prognóstico com alta morbidade e mortalidade, cuja falência renal é o distúrbio predominante. Relatamos um caso de síndrome hemolítico-urêmica pós-parto em paciente previamente sadia, que apresentou quadro de insuficiência renal, anemia hemolítica e trombocitopenia. Instituída a terapêutica de suporte adequada e precocemente, a paciente evoluiu satisfatoriamente com normalização dos níveis pressóricos e recuperação da função renal.Microangiopathic hemolytic associated with thrombocytopenia is part of a disease group that frequently show likeness and that's why become difficult to separate them. There are two types of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS; the non sporadic type and the epidemic or "typical" type that is common on childreen that is associated with diarrhea and infection caused by verotoxinaproducing E. coli with a good prognostic; and the sporadic postpartum period. It is the systemic type of mocroangiophatic thrombocytopenia of poor prognostic with high morbidity and mortality which renal failure is the main disturb. We reported a case of HUS occuring in postpartum previously healthy, that showed abrupt renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. After proper therapy the patient developed a normal blood pressure and recovery renal function.

  7. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A doença pneumocócica é importante problema de saúde pública e raramente há associação desta infecção com a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU grave. O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso de um paciente com esta associação. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Criança do sexo masculino, com 17 meses de idade, admitida no hospital com insuficiência respiratória aguda e necessitando de suporte ventilatório. O exame radiológico mostrava extensa opacidade homogênea em hemitórax direito. A hemocultura foi positiva para Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nos exames de admissão, notaram-se: hemoglobina de 6,5g/dL, 38.000 plaquetas/mm³, uréia de 79mg/dL e creatinina de 1,64mg/dL. No primeiro dia, apresentou oligoanúria e hipervolemia, necessitando de hemodiafiltração. Evoluiu com disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e óbito no sétimo dia. A necrópsia mostrou áreas extensas de necrose cortical e tubular renal, com depósito de fibrina nas arteríolas. COMENTÁRIOS: A SHU associada ao pneumococo apresenta morbidade e mortalidade elevadas. Em crianças com doença pneumocócica invasiva e acometimento hematológico ou renal grave, deve-se estar atento a esta rara complicação. Merecem investigação os seguintes aspectos relacionados à doença: a função da detecção precoce de antígenos T ativados no diagnóstico e terapêutica, o papel do fator H na patogênese, o método ideal de substituição renal e a definição do prognóstico em longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal diseases are a major public health problem. Severe hemolytic-uremic syndrome is an uncommon complication. The aim of this study is to report a child with this complication. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male child with 17 months old was admitted to the hospital, due to acute respiratory failure, needing ventilatory support. Roentgenogram demonstrated massive condensation of right lung and Streptococcus pneumonia was isolated from blood cultures. Laboratory tests showed

  8. Blood urea nitrogen to serum creatinine ratio is an accurate predictor of outcome in diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome, a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenswijk, Werner; Vanmassenhove, Jill; Raes, Ann; Dhont, Evelyn; Vande Walle, Johan

    2017-03-01

    Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common thrombotic microangiopathy during childhood and early identification of parameters predicting poor outcome could enable timely intervention. This study aims to establish the accuracy of BUN-to-serum creatinine ratio at admission, in addition to other parameters in predicting the clinical course and outcome. Records were searched for children between 1 January 2008 and 1 January 2015 admitted with D+HUS. A complicated course was defined as developing one or more of the following: neurological dysfunction, pancreatitis, cardiac or pulmonary involvement, hemodynamic instability, and hematologic complications while poor outcome was defined by death or development of chronic kidney disease. Thirty-four children were included from which 11 with a complicated disease course/poor outcome. Risk of a complicated course/poor outcome was strongly associated with oliguria (p = 0.000006) and hypertension (p = 0.00003) at presentation. In addition, higher serum creatinine (p = 0.000006) and sLDH (p = 0.02) with lower BUN-to-serum creatinine ratio (p = 0.000007) were significantly associated with development of complications. A BUN-to-sCreatinine ratio ≤40 at admission was a sensitive and highly specific predictor of a complicated disease course/poor outcome. A BUN-to-serum Creatinine ratio can accurately identify children with D+HUS at risk for a complicated course and poor outcome. What is Known: • Oliguria is a predictor of poor long-term outcome in D+HUS What is New: • BUN-to-serum Creatinine ratio at admission is an entirely novel and accurate predictor of poor outcome and complicated clinical outcome in D+HUS • Early detection of the high risk group in D+HUS enabling early treatment and adequate monitoring.

  9. Clonal Diversity of Chilean Isolates of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli from Patients with Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome, Asymptomatic Subjects, Animal Reservoirs, and Food Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Maritza; Prado, Valeria; Trucksis, Michele; Arellano, Carolina; Borie, Consuelo; Alexandre, Marcela; Fica, Alberto; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    To determine clonal relationship among Chilean enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains from different sources (clinical infections, animal reservoirs, and food), 54 EHEC isolates (44 of E. coli O157, 5 of E. coli O111, and 5 of E. coli O26) were characterized for virulence genes by colony blot hybridization and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By colony blotting, 12 different genotypes were identified among the 44 E. coli O157 isolates analyzed, of which the genetic profile stx1+ stx2+ hly+ eae+ was the most prevalent. All human O157 strains that were associated with sporadic cases of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) carried both the stx1 and stx2 toxin-encoding genes and were eaeA positive. Only 9 of 13 isolates from human controls were stx1+ stx2+, and 8 carried the eaeA gene. Comparison of profiles obtained by PFGE of XbaI-digested genomic DNA showed a great diversity among the E. coli O157 isolates, with 37 different profiles among 39 isolates analyzed. Cluster analysis of PFGE profiles showed a wide distribution of clinical isolates obtained from HUS cases and asymptomatic individuals and a clonal relationship among O157 isolates obtained from HUS cases and pigs. Analysis of virulence genes showed that a correlation exists among strains with the genotype stx1+ stx2+ eae+ and pathogenic potential. A larger difference in the PFGE restriction patterns was observed among the EHEC strains of serogroups O26 and O111. These results indicate that several different EHEC clones circulate in Chile and suggest that pigs are an important animal reservoir for human infections by EHEC. Guidelines have been proposed for better practices in the slaughter of animals in Chile. PMID:9986852

  10. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbel, Ulrike; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Schmitt, Peter; Dohrmann, Thorsten; Schroeder, Maria; Magnus, Tim; Kluge, Stefan; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Bi, Xiaoming; Fiehler, Jens; Sedlacik, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and aimed to identify a plausible cause. Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years) were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved) magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA) assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP), as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2. SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4). Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35) was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4); hematocrit (n = 33) was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2). Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83%) (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2). SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015), hematocrit (r = 0.65, P effect of blood transfusions in patients with HUS and neurological symptoms.

  11. Antibody Response to Shiga Toxins in Argentinean Children with Enteropathic Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome at Acute and Long-Term Follow-Up Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Bentancor, Leticia V.; Mejías, María Pilar; Ramos, María Victoria; Exeni, Andrea; Exeni, Claudia; Laso, María del Carmen; Exeni, Ramón; Isturiz, Martín A.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2011-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that include diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Systemic Stx toxemia is considered to be central to the genesis of HUS. Distinct methods have been used to evaluate anti-Stx response for immunodiagnostic or epidemiological analysis of HUS cases. The development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot (WB) assay to detect the presence of specific antibodies to Stx has introduced important advantages for serodiagnosis of HUS. However, application of these methods for seroepidemiological studies in Argentina has been limited. The aim of this work was to develop an ELISA to detect antibodies against the B subunit of Stx2, and a WB to evaluate antibodies against both subunits of Stx2 and Stx1, in order to analyze the pertinence and effectiveness of these techniques in the Argentinean population. We studied 72 normal healthy children (NHC) and 105 HUS patients of the urban pediatric population from the surrounding area of Buenos Aires city. Using the WB method we detected 67% of plasma from NHC reactive for Stx2, but only 8% for Stx1. These results are in agreement with the broad circulation of Stx2-expressing STEC in Argentina and the endemic behavior of HUS in this country. Moreover, the simultaneous evaluation by the two methods allowed us to differentiate acute HUS patients from NHC with a great specificity and accuracy, in order to confirm the HUS etiology when pathogenic bacteria were not isolated from stools. PMID:21559455

  12. Síndrome urémico hemolítico. Tratamiento de la glomerulopatía secundaria Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Treatment of secondary glomerulopathy

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    María G. Caletti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La insuficiencia renal crónica es la complicación más grave del síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH. En el año 1996 se publicó la secuencia histológica de su evolución en pacientes con períodos oligoanúricos prolongados. En los últimos años se han propuesto diferentes esquemas terapéuticos para enlentecer la evolución a la insuficiencia renal crónica terminal en distintas nefropatías, diabéticas y no diabéticas, cuya expresión puede comenzar aun en la adolescencia. En este trabajo se comenta la respuesta a dos esquemas terapéuticos de dos grupos de pacientes con SUH que presentaron proteinuria con o sin hipertensión arterial e insuficiencia renal. Se enfatiza la indicación de la dieta hiposódica y controlada en proteínas en el mismo momento del alta del paciente y la incorporación de un inhibidor de la enzima de conversión de angiotensina II, iECA, (enalapril al comienzo de la aparición de la proteinuria.Chronic renal failure (CRF is the most severe complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. In 1996, the histological sequence of changes in patients with long lasting oligoanuric periods was clarified. In the last years different therapeutic schemes have been proposed in order to slacken the development of terminal CRF in different renal conditions secondary to diabetes and other diseases. Some of these cases can suffer the onset of renal failure at adolescence. In this review, response to two treatment schemes in different patients with HUS and proteinuria with or without hypertension or renal failure is commented. Early indication of poor sodium diet and strict control of protein intake at the very moment of hospital discharge is strongly recommended, as well as angiotensin II conversion inhibiting enzymes (iACE at the appearance of proteinuria.

  13. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or technician places a strip of chemically treated paper, called a dipstick, into the child's urine sample. Patches on the dipstick change color when albumin is present in the urine. Urine albumin-to- ...

  14. Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/24q

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    Dino Mijatovic

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF. Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. In the next week of, what initially appeared as typical HUS, she developed MOF, including ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions.

  15. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  16. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Löbel

    Full Text Available Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF and aimed to identify a plausible cause.Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP, as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2.SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4. Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35 was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4; hematocrit (n = 33 was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2. Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83% (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2. SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015, hematocrit (r = 0.65, P < 0.001, and TTP (r = 0.35, P = 0.036. No correlation of SWI with blood pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, creatinine, and urea level was observed. Findings suggest that the loss of venous contrast is related to an increase in CBF secondary to severe anemia related to HUS. SWI contrast of patients with pathological conventional MRI findings was significantly lower compared to patients with normal MRI (mean SWI score, 1

  17. Microangiopatias trombóticas: púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica e síndrome hemolítico-urêmica Thrombotic microangiopathies: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura / hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goretti Polito

    2010-09-01

    complemento. Uma série de mutações e polimorfismo em genes que codificam proteínas reguladoras do complemento sozinhas ou em combinação podem levar a SHU atípica. Aproximadamente 60% dos casos de SHU atípica têm mutações do tipo "perda da função" em genes que codificam as proteínas reguladoras do complemento, as quais protegem as células hospedeiras da ativação do complemento: fator H do complemento (FHC, fator I (FIC e proteína cofator de membrana (PCM ou CD46, ou mutações do tipo "ganho da função" em genes que codificam o FHC ou C3. Além disso, aproximadamente 10% dos pacientes com SHU atípica têm deficiência na função do FHC devido a anticorpos anti-FHC. Mesmo que as MATs sejam condições altamente heterogêneas, um terço dos pacientes tem deficiência severa da ADA-MTS13. Transfusões de plaquetas são contraindicadas nesses pacientes. Infusão de plasma ou plasma exchange (PE é o único tratamento eficiente.Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs are pathological conditions characterized by generalized microvascular occlusion by platelet thrombi, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Two typical phenotypes of TMAs are hemolytic- uremic syndrome (HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP. Other disorders occasionally present with similar manifestations. Depending on whether renal or brain lesions prevail, two pathologically indistinguishable but somehow clinically different disorders have been described: HUS and TTP. Injury to the endothelial cell is the central and likely inciting factor in the sequence of events leading to TMA. Loss of physiological thromboresistance, leukocyte adhesion to damaged endothelium, complement consumption, abnormal von Willebrand factor release and fragmentation, and increased vascular shear stress may then sustain and amplify the microangiopathic process. Intrinsic abnormalities of the complement system and of the von Willebrand factor pathway may account for a genetic predisposition to the

  18. Escherichia coli enterohemorrágica y síndrome urémico hemolítico en Argentina Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Argentina

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    Mariana A. Rivero

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH.es un desorden multisistémico caracterizado por presentar insuficiencia renal aguda, anemia hemolítica microangiopática y trombocitopenia. Constituye la principal causa de insuficiencia renal aguda y la segunda causa de insuficiencia renal crónica y de transplante renal en niños en la Argentina. Actualmente, nuestro país presenta el registro más alto de SUH en todo el mundo, con aproximadamente 420 casos nuevos declarados anualmente y una incidencia de 12.2/100 000 niños menores de 5 años de edad. Se reconocen múltiples agentes etiológicos, aunque se considera a la infección por Escherichia coli enterohemorrágica (EHEC como la principal etiología de SUH. La gran mayoría de brotes epidémicos y casos esporádicos en humanos se han asociado con el serotipo O157:H7, aunque otros serotipos han sido también aislados, y éstos son un subgrupo de E. coli verocitotoxigénico (VTEC..El bovino es considerado el principal reservorio de VTEC. El contagio al hombre frecuentemente se debe al consumo de alimentos cárneos y lácteos contaminados, deficientemente cocidos o sin pasteurizar, o al contacto directo con los animales o con sus heces, consumo de agua, frutas o verduras contaminadas. También puede producirse contagio mediante el contacto interhumano.The hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS is a multisystemic disorder that is characterized by the onset of acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. It is the most common cause of acute renal failure and the second cause of chronic renal failure and renal transplantation in children in Argentina. Our country has the highest incidence of HUS in the world, with approximately 420 new cases observed each year with an incidence of 12.2 cases per 100 000 children in the age group 0-5 years. Numerous etiologic factors have been associated with HUS but the infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is considered the

  19. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  20. Hemolytic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003270.htm Hemolytic crisis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemolytic crisis occurs when large numbers of red blood cells ...

  1. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen your condition or lead to complications. Hemolytic Anemia and Children Parents of children who have hemolytic anemia usually ... members, friends, and your child's classmates about hemolytic anemia. You also may want to tell your child's teachers or other caregivers about the condition. Let ...

  2. The challenge of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanain Hani Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA is a Coomb's-negative hemolytic anemia characterized by red cell fragmentation (schistocytes. Thrombotic microangiopathy anemia, including thrombotic thrombocytopenia and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, malignant hypertension, preeclampsia are among the most common causes. We present a case of MAHA presenting with thrombocytopenia initially diagnosed as MAHA secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and received five sessions plasmapheresis without improvement but with worsening of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On further inquiry, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was identified, and the patient showed dramatic recovery after the trial of B12 and folate.

  3. Postdiarrheal Shiga Toxin-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Similar to Septic Shock Síndrome urémico hemolítico símil shock séptico, posterior a diarrea mediada por toxina shiga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia G. Valles

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response of host endothelial cells is included in the development of vascular damage observed in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC infection, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The response to a non-conventional treatment for a group of D+ HUS (diarrhea positive HUS patients, with clinical hemodynamic parameters of septic shock was evaluated in this prospective study (1999-2003. Twelve children 2.8 ± 0.6 years old, with D+ HUS produced by E. coli infection with serological evidence of Shiga toxin, presenting severe unstable hemodynamic parameters and neurological dysfunction at onset, were studied. The protocol included fresh frozen plasma infusions, methylprednisolone pulses (10mg/k/day for three consecutive days and plasma exchange for five days, starting after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU. The twelve patients with increased pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM score: 18 ± 2 after admission to intensive care unit (ICU, required dialysis for 17.4 ± 4 days, mechanical ventilator assistance for 10 ± 1 days and early inotropic drugs support for 10.5 ± 1 days. Neurological dysfunction included generalized tonic-clonic seizures lasting for 5.4 ± 1 days, n:8. Focal seizures were present in the remaining patients. Dilated cardiomyopathy was present in 6 children. Eight children suffered hemorrhagic colitis. Nine patients survived. Within one year of the injury, neurological sequelae, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS 3 and 4, were present in two patients, chronic renal failure in one patient. We suggest that early introduction of this protocol could benefit D+ HUS patients with hemodynamic instability and neurological dysfunction at onset. Further studies are likely to elucidate the mechanisms involved in this early adverse clinical presentation of D+ HUS patients.La respuesta inflamatoria de la célula endotelial se incluye en el desarrollo del daño vascular observado en la infección por Escherichia coli

  4. Actualización en el tratamiento del síndrome urémico hemolítico endémico: Patogénesis y tratamiento de la complicación sistémica más grave de las infecciones por Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga Update on the treatment of endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome: Pathogenesis and treatment of the most severe systemic complication of infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina J. Fernández-Brando

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available La forma típica o post-diarreica del síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH es la complicación más grave de las infecciones por cepas de Escherichia coli productoras de toxina Shiga (STEC. En la Argentina el SUH es un problema crítico de salud pública, ya que representa la principal causa de falla renal aguda en la infancia, la segunda causa de falla renal crónica, y aporta el 20% de los casos de transplante renal durante la infancia y la adolescencia. A pesar de los avances en el conocimiento de su patogénesis, el único tratamiento actual de los pacientes con SUH es de sostén, y no existen terapias específicas ni preventivas. En la presente revisión expondremos los conocimientos básicos de los mecanismos patogénicos y discutiremos los enfoques terapéuticos tradicionales e innovadores, con especial foco en la situación nacional y los aportes hechos por grupos de la Argentina.The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, giving account for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in our country. In spite of the extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in national status and contributions made by Argentinean groups.

  5. Atypicality of Atypical Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Farah, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To review the current definition of atypicality, discuss the unique features of each atypical antipsychotic, and determine whether the available drugs in this class really meet the classical definition of atypicality.

  6. Atypically presenting kaposiform hemangioendothelioma of the knee: ultrasound findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem Toslak, Iclal; Stegman, Matthew; Reiter, Michael P; Barkan, Güliz A; Borys, Dariusz; Lim-Dunham, Jennifer E

    2018-04-10

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) is a rare vascular tumor of early childhood and infancy. Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon, a common complication of KHE, is characterized by life-threatening thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and consumption coagulopathy. There may be atypical cases that do not present with Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon and do have atypical imaging findings. Knowledge of atypical imaging features may assist radiologists in identifying KHE. In this report, we present a 4-year-old case of KHE with atypical ultrasound findings.

  7. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  8. Hypothermia in Uremic Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabatchnick, E; Langston, C; Olson, B; Lamb, K E

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of uremic hypothermia (UH) and the effects of improving uremia on body temperature have not been determined in veterinary patients. To determine the prevalence of UH and correlations between uremia and body temperature in patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis (IHD). Uremic dogs (n = 122) and cats (n = 79) treated by IHD at the Bobst Hospital of the Animal Medical Center from 1997 to 2013. Retrospective review of medical records. The prevalence of hypothermia was 38% in azotemic cats and 20.5% in azotemic dogs. Statistically significant temperature differences were observed between uremic and nonuremic dogs (nonuremic: mean, 100.8°F; range, 91.2-109.5°F; uremic: mean, 99.9°F; range, 95.6-103.8°F; P cats (nonuremic: mean, 100.6°F; range, 94.0-103.8°F; uremic: mean, 99.3°F; range, 92.3-103.4°F; P dog dialysis patients, significant models included (1) timing (pre-dialysis versus post-dialysis) with weight class (small [P dogs), (2) timing with serum creatinine concentration (P = .021), and (3) timing with BUN concentration (P cat dialysis patients, there was a significant interaction between timing and weight as a categorical variable (cats and dogs. Uremic patients are hypothermic compared to ill nonuremic patients and body temperatures increase when uremia is corrected with IHD in dogs and in cats >5 kg. In cats, UH seems to be a more prevalent phenomenon driven by uremia. Uremic hypothermia does occur in dogs, but body weight is a more important predictor of body temperature. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Effect of oral granisetron in uremic pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layegh Pouran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Renal itch is a relatively common and distressing problem for patients with chronic renal failure. Granisetron, is a potent and selective inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors. There have been some studies about the effect of ondansetron in uremic pruritus and one case report has recently described relief of renal itch with granisetron. Aims : To evaluate the effect of Granisetron on uremic pruritus in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD and Hemodialysis (HD patients. Methods: To study the prevalence of uremic pruritus, patients on CAPD and HD were asked to complete a pruritus questionnaire.Their replies were scored based on numerical scales. Pruritus was graded, according to the total points for each patient, as mild, moderate or severe. Fourteen patients with moderate to severe pruritus were enrolled in the trial. During treatment, patients received granisetron (1 mg tablet twice a day P.O, for a period of 1 month. They were asked to score the severity of pruritus twice a day. Results : Seventy seven percent of the patients responded to the treatment and at 1 st , 2 nd and 4 th week the mean values of the pruritus scores were 23, 16 and 8 points respectively. Before starting treatment the score was 31 points ( P =0.03. Weekly clinical and laboratory examination showed no important side effects. Conclusion : Granisetron might be an effective, safe and well tolerated drug for the treatment of uremic pruritus.

  10. Penile gangrene due to calcific uremic arteriopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... 2Department of Medicine, Nephrology Unit, 3Department of Medicine, Infectious Disease Unit, King Fahad. Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Correspondence to: Dr. .... Russell R, Brookshire MA, Zekonis M, Moe SM. Distal calcific uremic arteriolopathy in a hemodialysis patient responds to ...

  11. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jitske; Fedecostante, M.; Wilmer, M.; Peters, J.G.; Kreuser, U.M.; Broek, P.H.; Mensink, R.A.; Boltje, T.J.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wetzels, J.F.; van der Heuvel, L.P.; Hoenderop, J.G.; Masereeuw, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed

  12. Hemolytic potential of hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, S D; Bartlett, R H; Ceccio, S L

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hemolytic potentials of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation. To generate controlled cavitation events, a venturigeometry hydrodynamic device, called a Cavitation Susceptibility Meter (CSM), was constructed. A comparison between the hemolytic potential of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation was investigated with a single-pass flow apparatus and a recirculating flow apparatus, both utilizing the CSM. An analytical model, based on spherical bubble dynamics, was developed for predicting the hemolysis caused by discrete bubble cavitation. Experimentally, discrete bubble cavitation did not correlate with a measurable increase in plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb), as predicted by the analytical model. However, attached cavitation did result in significant PFHb generation. The rate of PFHb generation scaled inversely with the Cavitation number at a constant flow rate, suggesting that the size of the attached cavity was the dominant hemolytic factor.

  13. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Bacteremia with beta-hemolytic Streptococci groups A, B, C and G has a mortality rate of approximately 20%. In this study we analyzed the association of various patient risk factors with mortality. Records from 241 patients with beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed with particular...... attention to which predisposing factors were predictors of death. A logistic regression model found age, burns, immunosuppressive treatment and iatrogenic procedures prior to the infection to be significant predictors of death, with odds ratios of 1.7 (per decade), 19.7, 3.6 and 6.8, respectively...

  14. Penile calcific uremic arteriolopathy occurring postparathyroidectomy in a hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Omar Bashir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA, also known as calciphylaxis, is a rare condition most frequently seen in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The clinical picture is characterized by painful skin lesions and ulcerations. The underlying pathology is medial calcification and intimal proliferation with microthrombi of small arteries. CUA is commonly associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and high serum calcium and phosphate products. This article reports an atypical case where CUA developed after parathyroidectomy and in the course of treatment of hungry bone syndrome. The patient was on hemodialysis for 14 years. He had developed secondary hyperparathyroidism and severe osteodystrophy. Calcium, Vitamin-D supplements, and calcimimetics failed to control his condition. He underwent parathyroidectomy but developed hungry bone syndrome postoperatively. He was managed with large doses of calcium and active Vitamin-D analogs to maintain his serum calcium. Two weeks later, he developed a painful single lesion on the tip of the penis which was diagnosed as CUA on clinical and radiographic evidence. The patient refused surgical intervention and opted for traditional treatment with honey and herbs with an excellent outcome. The case highlights the risk of CUA complicating the aggressive management of post-parathyroidectomy hungry bone syndrome.

  15. Atypical Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-medications/index.shtml. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Atypical antidepressants: Pharmacology, admininstration, and ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 23, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Discontinuing antidepressant medications in adults. ...

  16. Lactobacillus bulgaricus mutants decompose uremic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun-Huan; Jiang, Ya-Fen; Jiang, Yun-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    We aim to obtain a probiotic strain from Lactobacillus bulgaricus by testing its capability to decompose uremic toxins to provide new intestinal bacteria for the treatment of chronic renal failure. Original L. bulgaricus was cultured with the serum of uremic patients and then mutated by physical (ultraviolet) and chemical (diethyl sulfate) methods repeatedly. Using creatinine decomposition rate as an observed index, we selected the best strains which decreased the most concentration of the creatinine. We then tested its ability to decompose urea, uric acid, serum phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and homocysteine and its genetic stability. After inductive and mutagenic treatment, DUC3-17 was selected. Its decomposition rate of creatinine, urea nitrogen, uric acid, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, and homocysteine were 17.23%, 36.02%, 9.84%, 15.73%, 78.26%, and 12.69%, respectively. The degrading capacity was sustained over five generations. After directional induction and compound mutation, L. bulgaricus has greater capacity to decompose uremic toxins, with a stable inheritance.

  17. The uremic environment and muscle dysfunction in man and rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Eidemak, I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients reaching end-stage renal disease experience debilitating fatigue, with progression of this disease, rendering patients dysfunctional in their everyday lives. Methods: In vivo measurements of muscle function, assessed using surface electromyography (EMG), were made on 25...... patients prior to and after a session of hemodialysis (HD) treatment, alongside in vitro measurements of muscle function in isolated rat muscles incubated in normal or uremic conditions approximating to those found in uremic rats (rat uremic: RU) or uremic humans (human uremic: HU). Results: HD...... significantly affected plasma values, e.g. reducing urea (69%), creatinine (62%), potassium (23%) and phosphate (48%) concentrations in patients (all pimproved the EMG frequency of 2nd dorsal interosseous (fast-twitch) (p

  18. Molecular Characterization of Human Atypical Sorbitol-Fermenting Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O157 Reveals High Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossow, Annelene; Zhang, Wenlan; Bielaszewska, Martina; Rhode, Sophie; Hansen, Kevin; Fruth, Angelika; Rüter, Christian; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Alongside the well-characterized enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7, serogroup O157 comprises sorbitol-fermenting typical and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC/aEPEC) strains that carry the intimin-encoding gene eae but not Shiga toxin-encoding genes (stx). Since little is known about these pathogens, we characterized 30 clinical isolates from patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) or uncomplicated diarrhea with respect to their flagellin gene (fliC) type and multilocus sequence type (MLST). Moreover, we applied whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to determine the phylogenetic relationship with other eae-positive EHEC serotypes and the composition of the rfbO157 region. fliC typing resulted in five fliC types (H7, H16, H34, H39, and H45). Isolates of each fliC type shared a unique ST. In comparison to the 42 HUS-associated E. coli (HUSEC) strains, only the stx-negative isolates with fliCH7 shared their ST with EHEC O157:H7/H(-) strains. With the exception of one O157:H(-) fliCH16 isolate, HUS was exclusively associated with fliCH7. WGS corroborated the separation of the fliCH7 isolates, which were closely related to the EHEC O157:H7/H(-) isolates, and the diverse group of isolates exhibiting different fliC types, indicating independent evolution of the different serotypes. This was also supported by the heterogeneity within the rfbO157 region that exhibited extensive recombinations. The genotypic subtypes and distribution of clinical symptoms suggested that the stx-negative O157 strains with fliCH7 were originally EHEC strains that lost stx The remaining isolates form a distinct and diverse group of atypical EPEC isolates that do not possess the full spectrum of virulence genes, underlining the importance of identifying the H antigen for clinical risk assessment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Inflammatory Biomarkers and Liver Histopathology in Non-Uremic and Uremic Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengu Tatar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between hepatic activity index (HAI and fibrosis score (FS with inflammation biomarkers in non-uremic and uremic hepatitis C positive patients. Methods: Fifty chronic hepatitis C (cHepC positive patients, having a liver biopsy were included in this study. Liver biopsies were scored according to modified ISHAC scoring system. 25 healthy controls of similar age and gender were also enrolled as control group. Serum YKL-40, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR, thrombocyte/lymphocyte ratio (PLR, CRP and Immunoglobulin (IgG, A and M levels were used to determine inflammation. AST to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI score was also evaluated. According to biopsy findings patients were divided into 2 groups: low (0–2 and severe (3–6 FS. Results: Patients with cHepC had increased inflammation compared to the healthy controls. End-stage renal disease (ESRD patients had higher levels of inflammation markers (NLR, IgG, CRP and YKL-40 and lower HCV RNA levels, HAI and FS compared to non-uremic patients. When patients were grouped into 2 according to FS as mild and severe, IgG (p < 0.001, YKL-40 (p = 0.02 levels and APRI score (p = 0.002 were significantly higher compared to mild FS (p = 0.002. YKL-40 levels (t value: 3.48; p = 0.001 and APRI score (t value: 4.57, p < 0.001 were found as independent associated with FS in non-uremic patients. However, in adjusted models, only APRI score (t value: 3.98, p = 0.002 was an independent associated with FS in ESRD patients. Conclusion: In non-uremic cHepC patients, YKL-40 levels and APRI score may be valuable markers of FS. In ESRD patients, there is not sufficient data for prediction of HAI and FS. In these patients, APRI score may provide better information.

  20. Uremic frost: a harbinger of impending renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saardi, Karl M; Schwartz, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Uremic frost is a striking cutaneous finding seen in patients with severe kidney disease. Familiarity with this condition can be a life-saving signal to initiate urgent dialysis. Uremic frost generally occurs at blood urea nitrogen levels of approximately 200 mg/dl, although it may arise with less severe uremia. Recently confirmed urea transporters in the skin may play a role in the development of uremic frost. Alternatively, damage to the cutaneous microvasculature and pilosebaceous units, as seen in chronic kidney disease, could account for the high levels of urea deposited outside the skin. The treatment of uremic frost is largely aimed at correcting the underlying cause of uremia and the other life-threatening conditions associated with renal failure. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  2. Clinical aspects of a nationwide epidemic of severe haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudmundsdottir Helga

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Report a nationwide epidemic of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O103:H25 causing hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS in children. Methods Description of clinical presentation, complications and outcome in a nationwide outbreak. Results Ten children (median age 4.3 years developed HUS during the outbreak. One of these was presumed to be a part of the outbreak without microbiological proof. Eight of the patients were oligoanuric and in need of dialysis. Median need for dialysis was 15 days; one girl did not regain renal function and received a kidney transplant. Four patients had seizures and/or reduced consciousness. Cerebral oedema and herniation caused the death of a 4-year-old boy. Two patients developed necrosis of colon with perforation and one of them developed non-autoimmune diabetes. Conclusion This outbreak of STEC was characterized by a high incidence of HUS among the infected children, and many developed severe renal disease and extrarenal complications. A likely explanation is that the O103:H25 (eae and stx2-positive strain was highly pathogen, and we suggest that this serotype should be looked for in patients with HUS caused by STEC, especially in severe forms or outbreaks.

  3. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  4. Uric Acid: The Unknown Uremic Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-Becerra, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    This review brings together concepts of uric acid metabolism affecting renal parenchyma and its function and the current therapies to reduce hyperuricemia (HyU) and avoid renal disease progression. High uric acid plays an important role in several chronic diseases including kidney diseases such as lithiasis, gout nephropathy, and preeclampsia. In the last 30 years, it has been shown that reducing HyU with low protein and low purine diets in addition to allopurinol creates physiopathological conditions that produce a slight increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In recent years, in a new era of research in clinical, genetics, pharmacological, and epidemiologic fields, they have been moving forward to support the idea that reduction in HyU could benefit the chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (stage III-IV), thereby avoiding the drop of GFR for undefined mechanisms. There are several clinical trials in progress that show the HyU reducing to very low values and an increased GFR. In a young population, when treating HyU there is a reduction in high blood pressure. There are some reports showing that HyU could play a role in the diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, there have been some speculations that HyU treatment could stop the progression of CRF modifying the natural history of the diseases. So there will be new clinical trials with old and new medication and metabolic procedure to maintain a very low blood levels in the unknown uremic toxin know as uric acid which seems to be the toxin to the damage kidney. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Sodium Thiosulfate Therapy for Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Steven M.; Meade, Debra; Wang, Weiling; Hymes, Jeffrey; Lacson, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objective Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is an often fatal condition with no effective treatment. Multiple case reports and case series have described intravenous sodium thiosulfate (STS) administration in CUA, but no studies have systematically evaluated this treatment. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 172 patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis who had CUA and were treated with STS between August 2006 and June 2009 at Fresenius Medical Care North America. Of these, 85% completed STS therapy. Clinical, laboratory, and mortality data were abstracted from clinical information systems. Responses to survey questionnaires sent to treating physicians regarding patient-level outcomes were available for 53 patients. Effect on CUA lesions and mortality were summarized as CUA outcomes. Relevant laboratory measures, weight (using pairwise comparisons of values before, during, and after STS), and adverse events were summarized as safety parameters. Results Mean age of the cohort was 55 years, and 74% of patients were women. Median STS dose was 25 g, and median number of doses was 38. Among surveyed patients, CUA completely resolved in 26.4%, markedly improved in 18.9%, improved in 28.3%, and did not improve in 5.7%; in the remaining patients (20.8%), the response was unknown. One-year mortality in patients treated with STS was 35%. Adverse events, laboratory abnormalities, and weight-related changes were mild. Significant reductions in serum phosphorous (P=0.02) and parathyroid hormone (P=0.01) were noted during STS treatment in patients who completed the therapy. Conclusions Although conclusive evidence regarding its efficacy is lacking, a majority of patients who received STS demonstrated clinical improvement in this study. PMID:23520041

  6. Late complications following total-body irradiation and bone marrow rescue in mice: predominance of glomerular nephropathy and hemolytic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Down, J.D.; Berman, A.J.; Mauch, P.; Warhol, M.

    1990-01-01

    Late mortality and pathology were assessed in various mouse strains following total-body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation. Long-term survival data revealed both radiation dose- and strain-dependent onset of mortality between 1 and 2 years post-treatment. Renal damage appeared to have contributed to the late mortality in most treatment groups as shown by glomerular lesions, elevated blood urea nitrogen and an accompanying fall in hematocrit. Hemolysis was deduced to be the major cause of anemia, as concluded from results of 51 Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival. No decrease in erythropoiesis was evident as seen from spleen and bone marrow 59 Fe uptake. These findings are together consistent with the manifestation of a hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with kidney glomeruli representing the principal sites of injury responsible for both renal dysfunction and microangiopathic hemolysis. (author)

  7. Late complications following total-body irradiation and bone marrow rescue in mice: predominance of glomerular nephropathy and hemolytic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Down, J.D.; Berman, A.J.; Mauch, P. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Warhol, M. (Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Pathology); Yeap, B. (Dana Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Late mortality and pathology were assessed in various mouse strains following total-body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation. Long-term survival data revealed both radiation dose- and strain-dependent onset of mortality between 1 and 2 years post-treatment. Renal damage appeared to have contributed to the late mortality in most treatment groups as shown by glomerular lesions, elevated blood urea nitrogen and an accompanying fall in hematocrit. Hemolysis was deduced to be the major cause of anemia, as concluded from results of {sup 51}Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival. No decrease in erythropoiesis was evident as seen from spleen and bone marrow {sup 59}Fe uptake. These findings are together consistent with the manifestation of a hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with kidney glomeruli representing the principal sites of injury responsible for both renal dysfunction and microangiopathic hemolysis. (author).

  8. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja X; McCormick, Sally P; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2010-01-01

    Uremic patients have increased plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) is a subfraction of LDL, where apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is disulfide bound to apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Lp(a) binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), and uremia increases lipop...

  9. [Atipical uremic hemolityc syndrome in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Calatayud, Ángel Augusto; Briones-Garduño, Jesús Carlos; Álvarez-Goris, Mercedes Del Pilar; Sánchez Zamora, Ricardo; Torres Aguilar, Angélica A; Mendoza-Mórales, Rosa Elba

    2016-01-01

    Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome is one of the main variants of thrombotic microangiopathy, and is characterized by excessive complement activation in the microvasculature. It is also characterised by the clinical triad; non-immune haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. In addition, 60% of patients have mutations in the genes encoding complement regulators (factor H, factor I, membrane cofactor proteins, and thrombomodulin), activators (factor B and C3), as well as autoantibodies against factor H. Multiple factors are required for the disease to manifest itself, including a trigger and gene mutations with adequate penetration. Being one of the differential diagnoses of preeclampsia- eclampsia and HELLP syndrome means that the clinician must be familiar with the disease due to its high mortality, which can be modified with early diagnosis and comprehensive treatment. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Hematological outcome in neonatal alloimmune hemolytic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, Mirjam Eva Aafke

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on several aspects related to the hematological outcome of infants with hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to red blood cell alloimmunization, including pathogenesis and management of the disease. The presence of leukocytopenie and thrombocytopenia support the

  11. Role of bone photonic densitometry in uremic osteodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specchi Bighi, E.; Baldelli, S.; Argalia, G.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the role of bone photonic densitometry in uremic osteodystrophy. Bone mineral contenent (BMC) and bone density (BD) have been measured in 80 hemodialyzed patients by double photonic emission densitometry. Photonic densitometry shows an higher sensibility to quantitative changes in bone mineral contenent than metacarpal index (IM). Photonic densitometry is unable to differentiate osteoporosis from osteomalacia; this differential diagnosis can be obtained by radiological analysis: low BD and low IM means osteoporosis, low BD and resorptive changes in cortical bone means osteomalacia and/or hyperparathyroidism. Photonic densitometry is particulary suitable for uremic osteodystrophy follow-up because of its easy ripetibility and innocuousness and for its close correlation with iPTH variations

  12. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  13. Nanoporous biomaterials for uremic toxin adsorption in artificial kidney systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wee-Keat; Ishikawa, Kunio; Othman, Radzali; Yeoh, Fei-Yee

    2017-07-01

    Hemodialysis, one of the earliest artificial kidney systems, removes uremic toxins via diffusion through a semipermeable porous membrane into the dialysate fluid. Miniaturization of the present hemodialysis system into a portable and wearable device to maintain continuous removal of uremic toxins would require that the amount of dialysate used within a closed-system is greatly reduced. Diffused uremic toxins within a closed-system dialysate need to be removed to maintain the optimum concentration gradient for continuous uremic toxin removal by the dialyzer. In this dialysate regenerative system, adsorption of uremic toxins by nanoporous biomaterials is essential. Throughout the years of artificial kidney development, activated carbon has been identified as a potential adsorbent for uremic toxins. Adsorption of uremic toxins necessitates nanoporous biomaterials, especially activated carbon. Nanoporous biomaterials are also utilized in hemoperfusion for uremic toxin removal. Further miniaturization of artificial kidney system and improvements on uremic toxin adsorption capacity would require high performance nanoporous biomaterials which possess not only higher surface area, controlled pore size, but also designed architecture or structure and surface functional groups. This article reviews on various nanoporous biomaterials used in current artificial kidney systems and several emerging nanoporous biomaterials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1232-1240, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Khatami S.F; Behjati SH.

    2007-01-01

    Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newbor...

  15. Value of carotid intimal–medial thickness as independent predictor of endothelial dysfunction in uremic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosni A. Younis

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: (1 The study confirmed that carotid IMT and brachial artery FMD can be used in interventional studies in which cardiovascular risk is modified and increased in the uremic patients. (2 There was negative correlation between brachial FMD and C-IMT in the uremic patients.

  16. Uremic Toxins Enhance Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis is considerably increased in statin users with end-stage renal failure (ESRF. Uremic toxins, which accumulate in patients with ESRF, exert cytotoxic effects that are mediated by various mechanisms. Therefore, accumulation of uremic toxins might increase statin-induced cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of four uremic toxins—hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionate, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate—on statin-induced myopathy. Differentiated rhabdomyosarcoma cells were pre-treated with the uremic toxins for seven days, and then the cells were treated with pravastatin or simvastatin. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by viability assays and flow cytometry. Pre-treatment with uremic toxins increased statin- but not cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. In addition, the pre-treatment increased statin-induced apoptosis, which is one of the cytotoxic factors (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. However, mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol reversed the effects of uremic toxins and lowered statin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. These results demonstrate that uremic toxins enhance statin-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The mechanism underlying this effect might be associated with small G-protein geranylgeranylation. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patients with ESRF is likely due to the accumulation of uremic toxins.

  17. SEVERE IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after liver transplantation is represen- ted in this article. The cause of complication was so-called passenger lymphocyte syndrome (a type of graft- versus-host disease. Two plasmapheresis sessions and Ig (0.5 g/kg in combination with increased maintenance immunosuppression with a short course of oral methylprednisolone in a total dose of 150 mg during 12 days were effective. The patient was discharged from hospital 34 days after transplantation in a satisfactory condition with a stable hemoglobin level. 

  18. Nicorandil-Induced Hyperkalemia in a Uremic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Hao Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicorandil is an antianginal agent with nitrate-like and ATP-sensitive potassium channel activator properties. After activation of potassium channels, potassium ions are expelled out of the cells, which lead to membrane hyperpolarization, closure of voltage-gated calcium channels, and finally vasodilation. We present a uremic case suffering from repeated junctional bradycardia, especially before hemodialysis. After detailed evaluation, nicorandil was suspected to be the cause of hyperkalemia which induced bradycardia. This case reminds us that physicians should be aware of this potential complication in patients receiving ATP-sensitive potassium channel activator.

  19. Increased parathyroid expression of klotho in uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, J.; Martuseviciene, G.; Santini, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    /6 nephrectomy rat model of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Parathyroid klotho gene expression and protein were significantly increased in severely uremic hyperphosphatemic rats, but not affected by moderate uremia and normal serum phosphorus. Calcitriol suppressed klotho gene and protein expression in severe...... secondary hyperparathyroidism, despite a further increase in plasma phosphate. Both FGFR1 IIIC and Na+/K+-ATPase gene expression were significantly elevated in severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. Parathyroid gland klotho expression and the plasma calcium ion concentration were inversely correlated. Thus......, our study suggests that klotho may act as a positive regulator of PTH expression and secretion in secondary hyperparathyroidism....

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  1. Hemolytic anemia caused by kinking of dacron grafts implanted in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hemolytic anemia caused by a kinked Dacron graft is a rare complication after repair of acute aortic dissection. We present a case of hemolytic anemia due to kinking of previously implanted Dacron graft for ascending aorta dissection treated by surgery and replaced with new Dacron. Case Details: We report a ...

  2. A noninvasive method for the prediction of fetal hemolytic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Kravchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the diagnosis of fetal hemolytic disease.Subjects and methods. A study group consisted of 42 pregnant women whose newborn infants had varying degrees of hemolytic disease. The women were divided into 3 subgroups according to the severity of neonatal hemolytic disease: 1 pregnant women whose neonates were born with severe hemolytic disease (n = 14; 2 those who gave birth to babies with moderate hemolytic disease (n = 11; 3 those who delivered infants with mild hemolytic disease (n = 17. A comparison group included 42 pregnant women whose babies were born without signs of hemolytic disease. Curvesfor blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery were analyzed in a fetus of 25 to 39 weeks’ gestation.Results. The peak systolic blood flow velocity was observed in Subgroup 1; however, the indicator did not exceed 1.5 MoM even in severe fetal anemic syndrome. The fetal middle artery blood flow velocity rating scale was divided into 2 zones: 1 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity from the median to the obtained midscore; 2 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity of the obtained values of as high as 1.5 MoM.Conclusion. The value of peak systolic blood flow velocity being in Zone 2, or its dynamic changes by transiting to this zone can serve as a prognostic factor in the development of severe fetal hemolytic disease. 

  3. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  4. [Adsorbent effect of activated carbon on small molecular uremic toxin and its influence factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yun-sheng; Li, Jun

    2003-06-01

    To analyze the adsorbent effect of activated carbon on uremic toxin and its influence factors. Uremic toxins (urea, creatinine and uric acid) were dissolved in the distilled water to obtain uremic toxic solution. Activated carbon was added to the solution, and the concentrations of uremic toxins were measured at different time spots. To determine the influence factors, some possible related materials, such as bile, amino acid, Ringer's, solution of glucose, HCl or NaOH respectively were added simultaneously. The concentrations of toxins in uremic toxic solution decreased 5 min after adding the activated carbon. The concentration of urea was the lowest at 30 min, but it increased after 50 min; while the concentrations of creatinine and uric acid reached the lowest level from 10 to 30 min after adding the activated carbon, and maintained at the same level after that. The bile, amino acid, electrolyte, glucose and pH value did not influence the adsorption of uric acid significantly, but they influenced the adsorption of urea and creatinine. Bile and amino acid influenced the concentration of urea remarkably, following glucose, NaOH and HCl. The effect of pH 2.0 solution on the creatinine concentration was the most significant, following glucose. Activated carbon has adsorptive effect on uremic toxins, but its adsorptive effect decreases as time goes on. Bile, glucose, amino acid, NaOH and HCl can affect the adsorptive effect of activated carbon on uremic toxins to some extent.

  5. Uremic Solutes in Chronic Kidney Disease and Their Role in Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A J G van den Brand

    Full Text Available To date, over 150 possible uremic solutes have been listed, but their role in the progression of CKD is largely unknown. Here, the association between a selected panel of uremic solutes and progression in CKD patients was investigated.Patients from the MASTERPLAN study, a randomized controlled trial in CKD patients with a creatinine clearance between 20 and 70 ml/min per 1.73m2, were selected based on their rate of eGFR decline during the first five years of follow-up. They were categorized as rapid (decline >5 ml/min per year or slow progressors. Concentrations of eleven uremic solutes were obtained at baseline and after one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds for rapid to slow progression by uremic solute concentrations at baseline. Variability in uremic solute levels was assessed using scatter plots, and limits of variability were calculated.In total, 40 rapidly and 40 slowly progressing patients were included. Uremic solutes were elevated in all patients compared to reference values for healthy persons. The serum levels of uremic solutes were not associated with rapid progression. Moreover, we observed substantial variability in solute levels over time.Elevated concentrations of uremic solutes measured in this study did not explain differences in rate of eGFR decline in CKD patients, possibly due to lack of power as a result of the small sample size, substantial between patient variability, and variability in solute concentrations over time. The etiology of intra-individual variation in uremic solute levels remains to be elucidated.

  6. Uremic Solutes in Chronic Kidney Disease and Their Role in Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, Jan A J G; Mutsaers, Henricus A M; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Blankestijn, Peter J; van den Broek, Petra H; Russel, Frans G M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2016-01-01

    To date, over 150 possible uremic solutes have been listed, but their role in the progression of CKD is largely unknown. Here, the association between a selected panel of uremic solutes and progression in CKD patients was investigated. Patients from the MASTERPLAN study, a randomized controlled trial in CKD patients with a creatinine clearance between 20 and 70 ml/min per 1.73m2, were selected based on their rate of eGFR decline during the first five years of follow-up. They were categorized as rapid (decline >5 ml/min per year) or slow progressors. Concentrations of eleven uremic solutes were obtained at baseline and after one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds for rapid to slow progression by uremic solute concentrations at baseline. Variability in uremic solute levels was assessed using scatter plots, and limits of variability were calculated. In total, 40 rapidly and 40 slowly progressing patients were included. Uremic solutes were elevated in all patients compared to reference values for healthy persons. The serum levels of uremic solutes were not associated with rapid progression. Moreover, we observed substantial variability in solute levels over time. Elevated concentrations of uremic solutes measured in this study did not explain differences in rate of eGFR decline in CKD patients, possibly due to lack of power as a result of the small sample size, substantial between patient variability, and variability in solute concentrations over time. The etiology of intra-individual variation in uremic solute levels remains to be elucidated.

  7. Hemolytic anemias during pregnancy and the reproductive years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintz, U.; Moohr, J.W.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1977-11-01

    Anemia is a common phenomenon in women during the reproductive years. In pregnancy, it is associated with an increased incidence of maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality. The approach to the investigation of anemic women suspected of having hemolytic anemia of either congenital or acquired etiology is the subject of this article. Various conditions in the pregnant women can have hematologic consequences for the newborn infant; these conditions include sensitization to fetal blood cells, infections, drug ingestion and the possession of genes for hereditary hemolytic disorders, which may be transmitted to the fetus. Because several forms of hemolytic anemias are hereditary or are caused by an altered gene, genetic consultation is important.

  8. Parathyroid hormone dependent T cell proliferation in uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, E; Ladefoged, Jens; Brandi, L

    1993-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is combined with an impairment of the immune system. The T cell may be a target for the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Rats with CRF have high blood levels of PTH. Therefore, the present investigation examined some aspects of the T cell function in both normal...... and CRF rats before and after parathyroidectomy and after an isogenic kidney transplantation. The T cell proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was significantly higher in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures obtained from CRF rats than from normal rats. After...... parathyroidectomy the T cells of normal as well as of uremic rats could still be significantly stimulated by PHA, but now no significant difference was seen. When CRF was reversed after an isogenic kidney transplantation and PTH reversed to levels in the normal range, the T cell proliferative response to PHA...

  9. VDR activation and uremic cardiopathy: myths and paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Brancaccio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of vitamin D receptor (VDR activators for the control of secondary hyperparathyroidism has been clarified during the last few decades; however, their possible activity in conditioning cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality has become of interest more recently. On the basis of experimental studies showing that VDR activating therapy is associated with a reduction of cardiac hypertrophy, the PRIMO Study (an international randomized controlled trial [RCT] was carried out a few years ago, but the results were disappointing, as the group of uremic patients on dialysis treated for 48 weeks with paricalcitol showed no differences in comparison with controls in terms of regression of heart hypertrophy. The aim of this editorial is to analyze the possible reasons for such results, and to help understand the actual role of VDR activators in dialysis patients in controlling cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  10. Atypical unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome mimicking a middle cerebral artery infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camidag, Ilkay [Dept. of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Cho, Yang Je; Park, Mina; Lee, Seung Koo [Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is usually a reversible clinical and radiological entity associated with typical features on brain MR or CT imaging. However, the not-so-uncommon atypical radiological presentations of the condition are also present and they may go unrecognised as they are confused with other conditions. Here, we report a very rare case of atypical, unilateral PRES in a 49-year-old uremic, post-transplant female patient who presented with seizures. Initial MRI showed high-grade occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) and lesions suggestive of subacute infarction in the ipsilateral frontotemporoparietal lobe. Patient symptoms had resolved a day after the onset without any specific treatment but early follow-up CT findings suggested hemorrhagic transformation. Follow-up MRI performed 2 years later showed complete disappearence of the lesions and persisting MCA occlusion.

  11. Atypical unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome mimicking a middle cerebral artery infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camidag, Ilkay; Cho, Yang Je; Park, Mina; Lee, Seung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is usually a reversible clinical and radiological entity associated with typical features on brain MR or CT imaging. However, the not-so-uncommon atypical radiological presentations of the condition are also present and they may go unrecognised as they are confused with other conditions. Here, we report a very rare case of atypical, unilateral PRES in a 49-year-old uremic, post-transplant female patient who presented with seizures. Initial MRI showed high-grade occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) and lesions suggestive of subacute infarction in the ipsilateral frontotemporoparietal lobe. Patient symptoms had resolved a day after the onset without any specific treatment but early follow-up CT findings suggested hemorrhagic transformation. Follow-up MRI performed 2 years later showed complete disappearence of the lesions and persisting MCA occlusion

  12. The Uremic Toxin Acrolein Promotes Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siyabeldin E. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia is a major complication of end stage renal disease. The anemia is mainly the result of impaired formation of erythrocytes due to lack of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Compelling evidence, however, points to the contribution of accelerated erythrocyte death, which decreases the life span of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Erythrocytes could be sensitized to cytosolic Ca2+ by ceramide. In end stage renal disease, eryptosis may possibly be stimulated by uremic toxins. The present study explored, whether the uremic toxin acrolein could trigger eryptosis. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin-V-binding, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide from fluorescent antibodies. Results: A 48 h exposure to acrolein (30 - 50 µM did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i but significantly decreased forward scatter and increased annexin-V-binding. Acrolein further triggered slight, but significant hemolysis and increased ceramide formation in erythrocytes. Acrolein (50 µM induced annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted in the nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+. Acrolein augmented the annexin-V-binding following treatment with Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM. Conclusion: Acrolein stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of ceramide formation with subsequent sensitisation of the erythrocytes to cytosolic Ca2+.

  13. Characterisation of uremic "Middle molecular"fractions by gas chromatography mass spectrometry, isotachophoresis, and liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoots, A.C.; Mikkers, F.E.P.; Claessens, H.A.; Smet, de R.; Landschoot, van N.; Ringoir, S.M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Uremic ultrafiltrates (and normal serum, for comparison) were fractionated by means of gel filtration. The collected fractions were further investigated by combined analytical techniques: "high- performance" liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and isotachophoresis.

  14. Antimicrobial, hemolytic and thrombolytic activities of some new N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Hemolytic and thrombolytic activities were determined by measuring absorbance before and after incubation of blood cells with test compound. Results: Compound 9d strongly inhibited Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli with zone of ...

  15. Hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A De Carli

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic activity of live isolates and clones of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The isolates were tested against human erythrocytes. No hemolytic activity was detected by the isolates of T. foetus. Whereas the isolates of T. vaginalis lysed erythrocytes from all human blood groups. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be detected. Our preliminary results suggest that hemolysis depend on the susceptibility of red cell membranes to destabilization and the intervention of cell surface receptors as a mechanism of the hemolytic activity. The mechanism could be subject to strain-species-genera specific variation of trichomonads. The hemolytic activity of T. vaginalis is not due to a hemolysin or to a product of its metabolism. Pretreatment of trichomonads with concanavalin A reduced levels of hemolysis by 40%.

  16. A zebrafish model for uremic toxicity: role of the complement pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Nathaniel; Lectura, Melisa; Thurman, Josh; Reinecke, James; Raff, Amanda C; Melamed, Michal L; Reinecke, James; Quan, Zhe; Evans, Todd; Meyer, Timothy W; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Many organic solutes accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and some are poorly removed with urea-based prescriptions for hemodialysis. However, their toxicities have been difficult to assess. We have employed an animal model, the zebrafish embryo, to test the toxicity of uremic serum compared to control. Serum was obtained from stable ESRD patients predialysis or from normal subjects. Zebrafish embryos 24 h postfertilization were exposed to experimental media at a water:human serum ratio of 3:1. Those exposed to serum from uremic subjects had significantly reduced survival at 8 h (19 ± 18 vs. 94 ± 6%, p 50 kDa, respectively). Heating serum abrogated its toxicity. EDTA, a potent inhibitor of complement by virtue of calcium chelation, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum compared to untreated uremic serum (96 ± 5 vs. 28 ± 20% survival, p < 0.016, chelated vs. nonchelated serum, respectively). Anti-factor B, a specific inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum, compared to untreated uremic serum (98 ± 6 vs. 3 ± 9% survival, p < 0.016, anti-factor B treated vs. nontreated, respectively). Uremic serum is thus more toxic to zebrafish embryos than normal serum. Furthermore, this toxicity is associated with a fraction of large size, is inactivated by heat, and is reduced by both specific and nonspecific inhibitors of complement activation. Together these data lend support to the hypothesis that at least some uremic toxicities may be mediated by complement. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  19. Spontaneous variability of pre-dialysis concentrations of uremic toxins over time in stable hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Eloot

    Full Text Available Numerous outcome studies and interventional trials in hemodialysis (HD patients are based on uremic toxin concentrations determined at one single or a limited number of time points. The reliability of these studies however entirely depends on how representative these cross-sectional concentrations are. We therefore investigated the variability of predialysis concentrations of uremic toxins over time.Prospectively collected predialysis serum samples of the midweek session of week 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, and 16 were analyzed for a panel of uremic toxins in stable chronic HD patients (N = 18 while maintaining dialyzer type and dialysis mode during the study period.Concentrations of the analyzed uremic toxins varied substantially between individuals, but also within stable HD patients (intra-patient variability. For urea, creatinine, beta-2-microglobulin, and some protein-bound uremic toxins, Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC was higher than 0.7. However, for phosphorus, uric acid, symmetric and asymmetric dimethylarginine, and the protein-bound toxins hippuric acid and indoxyl sulfate, ICC values were below 0.7, implying a concentration variability within the individual patient even exceeding 65% of the observed inter-patient variability.Intra-patient variability may affect the interpretation of the association between a single concentration of certain uremic toxins and outcomes. When performing future outcome and interventional studies with uremic toxins other than described here, one should quantify their intra-patient variability and take into account that for solutes with a large intra-patient variability associations could be missed.

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  1. Atypical Presentations of Tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegaard, Karah; Boersma, Beth; Keegan, James

    2017-05-01

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative coccobacillus that causes a condition commonly referred to as tularemia. There has been a dramatic increase in tularemia cases reported in South Dakota, many of which were challenging to diagnose due to atypical clinical manifestations. We describe an interesting case of pneumonic tularemia and summarize six similar cases, several of which presented with lung nodules suggestive of malignancy. According to the literature, this is only the third outbreak of pneumonic tularemia reported in the U.S. We believe it is important for clinicians to be aware of the increased incidence of tularemia in the area and to be vigilant in the diagnosis and management of these atypically presenting cases. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  2. Conns' syndrome - atypical presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Modi, K D; Jha, Sangeeta; Jha, Ratan

    2009-01-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism (Conns' syndrome) commonly presents with a combination of clinical features of hypokalemia and hypertension. Atypical presentations like normotension, normokalemia and neurological ailments are described in few cases. We encountered two such cases, the first presenting with acute neurological complaint and second case having insignificant hypertension. Both the patients had a characteristic biochemical and imaging profile consistent with primary hyperaldosteronism and responded to surgical resection of adrenal adenoma. (author)

  3. Urea, a true uremic toxin: the empire strikes back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wei Ling; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2017-01-01

    Blood levels of urea rise with progressive decline in kidney function. Older studies examining acute urea infusion suggested that urea was well-tolerated at levels 8-10× above normal values. More recent in vitro and in vivo work argue the opposite and demonstrate both direct and indirect toxicities of urea, which probably promote the premature aging phenotype that is pervasive in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Elevated urea at concentrations typically encountered in uremic patients induces disintegration of the gut epithelial barrier, leading to translocation of bacterial toxins into the bloodstream and systemic inflammation. Urea induces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells as well as endothelial dysfunction, thus directly promoting cardiovascular disease. Further, urea stimulates oxidative stress and dysfunction in adipocytes, leading to insulin resistance. Finally, there are widespread indirect effects of elevated urea as a result of the carbamylation reaction, where isocyanic acid (a product of urea catabolism) alters the structure and function of proteins in the body. Carbamylation has been linked with renal fibrosis, atherosclerosis and anaemia. In summary, urea is a re-emerging Dark Force in CKD pathophysiology. Trials examining low protein diet to minimize accumulation of urea and other toxins suggest a clinical benefit in terms of slowing progression of CKD. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Uremic bone diseases - Clinical laboratorial, scintigraphic and radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, W.C.F. da.

    1982-01-01

    This paper evaluated the uremic bone disease in 10 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 10 on hemodialysis and 10 submited to renal transplantation. According to biochemical evaluation we observed hypocalcemia in some patients on dialysis and hipercalcemia in a renal transplanted and in another on peritoneal dialysis. However, there was no significative difference in the serum calcium concentration between the groups and the control group. Hiperphosphatemia occured in 8 patients on peritoneal dialysis and in 9 on hemodialysis and slight hiperphosphatemia occured in 2 renal transplanted patient. The product calcium X phosphorus was elevated in 2 patients on peritoneal dialysis and in 2 on hemodialysis. The magnesium serum concentration were hight in all patients on dialysis and the alkaline phosphatase serum levels were hight in 3 patients dialysis peritoneal and 4 on hemodialysis. A skeleton curvey showed abnormalities in 3 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 5 on hemodialysis and of 5 renal transplanted patients. However there was no significant difference between these results. The bone scanning was abnormal in 6 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 9 patients on hemodialysis and in 8 renal transplanted. The positive results of bone scanning compared with X ray were statistically significative. Bone scanning was the most sensitive method used to detect early abnormalities. (author)

  5. [Coagulation factor VII levels in uremic patients and theirs influence factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Wei, Wen-Ning; Song, Shan-Jun

    2004-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate coagulation factor VII level in uremic patients with chronic renal failure and to explore theirs influence factors. The plasma levels of coagulation factor VII were detected in 30 uremic patients with chronic renal failure before and after hemodialysis for 1 month, the factor VII activity (FVII:C) was determined by one-stage coagulation method, while activated factor VII (FVIIa) was measured by one-stage coagulation method using recombinant soluble tissue factor, and factor VII antigen was detected by ELISA. The results showed that: (1) The FVIIa, FVII:C and FVIIAg levels in chronic uremic patients before hemodialysis were 4.00 +/- 0.86 microg/L, (148.5 +/- 40.4)% and (99.8 +/- 21.1)% respectively, which were significantly increased, as compared with healthy controls [2.77 +/- 1.02 microg/L, (113.1 +/- 33.0)% and (73.7 +/- 18.3)% respectively, P factor VII was positively correlated with levels of blood uria nitrogen and serum creatinine before hemodialysis but not after hemodialysis. It is concluded that the enhanced levels of coagulation factor VII in chronic uremic patients suggested abnormal activated state, herperactivity and elevated production of factor VII which correlated with renal functional injury. The abnormality of factor VII in uremia may be aggravated by hemodialysis. Coagulation factor (FVII) may be a risk factor for cardiovascular events in uremic patients who especially had been accepted long-term hemodialysis.

  6. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

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    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  7. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

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    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  9. Ulcerative Uremic Stomatitis - Review of the Literature and A Rare Case Report

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    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uremic Stomatitis (US represents a comparatively uncommon intraoral complication seen, mostly, in cases of end-stage renal disease or undiagnosed or untreated chronic renal failure. Its frequency has diminished due to the advent of renal dialysis. Clinically uremic stomatitis is characterized by the presence of painful plaques and crusts that are usually distributed on the buccal and labial mucosa, dorsal or ventral surface of the tongue, gingiva, and floor of the mouth. Ultimate treatment consists of improvement of blood urea concentration and underlying renal failure is supported by enhancement of oral hygiene with antiseptic mouthwashes and antimicrobial/antifungal agents, if necessary. Here we report a rare case of ulcerative type of uremic stomatitis occurring in a patient of chronic renal failure due to sudden relapse of uremia and reviewed the possible pathophysiology of oral symptoms of chronic renal failure.

  10. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy

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    Kim Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60–80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA.

  11. Atypical Manifestations of Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, E. A.; Lauener, R. W.; McIntosh, H. W.

    1964-01-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism usually present with symptoms of hypermetabolism with or without goitre and/or eye signs. Occasionally, however, the chief complaints are not immediately suggestive of hyperthyroidism. Patients with hyperthyroidism are described who presented with such atypical manifestations as periodic muscular paralysis, myasthenia, myopathy, encephalopathy, psychosis, angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation, heart failure without underlying heart disease, skeletal demineralization, pretibial myxedema, unilateral eye signs, and pitting edema of the ankles. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14178405

  12. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  13. Immunoglobulin for alloimmune hemolytic disease in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; Scheffer-Rath, Mirjam Ea; Lopriore, Enrico; de Haas, Masja; Liley, Helen G

    2018-03-18

    Exchange transfusion and phototherapy have traditionally been used to treat jaundice and avoid the associated neurological complications. Because of the risks and burdens of exchange transfusion, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been suggested as an alternative therapy for alloimmune hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) to reduce the need for exchange transfusion. To assess the effect and complications of IVIg in newborn infants with alloimmune HDN on the need for and number of exchange transfusions. We performed electronic searches of CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase (Ovid), Web of Science, CINAHL (EBSCOhost), Academic Search Premier, and the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and controlled-trials.com in May 2017. We also searched reference lists of included and excluded trials and relevant reviews for further relevant studies. We considered all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of IVIg in the treatment of alloimmune HDN. Trials must have used predefined criteria for the use of IVIg and exchange transfusion therapy to be included. We used the standard methods of Cochrane and its Neonatal Review Group. We assessed studies for inclusion and two review authors independently assessed quality and extracted data. We discussed any differences of opinion to reach consensus. We contacted investigators for additional or missing information. We calculated risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for categorical outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) for continuous variables. We used GRADE criteria to assess the risk of bias for major outcomes and to summarize the level of evidence. Nine studies with 658 infants fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Term and preterm infants with Rh or ABO (or both) incompatibility were included. The use of exchange transfusion decreased significantly in the immunoglobulin treated group (typical RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.49; typical RD -0.22, 95% CI -0.27 to

  14. Quantitative risk assessment of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with consumption of bulk milk sold directly from producer to consumer in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntuli, Victor; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Bonilauri, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    ,000 servings consumed, the expected median numbers of HUS cases per year from raw PDBM were 52 for 5 years and younger and 3.2 for older than 5 years. The median numbers of cases per year for pasteurized PDBM were 47 for 5 years and younger and 2.9 for older than 5 years. Sensitivity analysis revealed...

  15. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

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    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  16. In vitro assessment of recombinant, mutant immunoglobulin G anti-D devoid of hemolytic activity for treatment of ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Leif K; Green, Trine H; Sandlie, Inger

    2008-01-01

    A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D.......A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D....

  17. STUDY OF UREMIC TOXIN FLUXES ACROSS NANOFABRICATED HEMODIALYSIS MEMBRANES USING IRREVERSIBLE THERMODYNAMICS

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    Assem Hedayat

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: Nanofabricated hemodialysis membranes with a reduced thickness and an applied electric potential can enhance the effective diffusivity and electro-migration flux of the respective uremic toxins by 3 orders of magnitude as compared to those passing through the high flux hemodialyzer.

  18. Insulin resistance in uremia: Insulin receptor kinase activity in liver and muscle from chronic uremic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchin, F.; Ittoop, O.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the partially purified insulin receptors from liver and skeletal muscle in a rat model of severe chronic uremia. 125 I-insulin binding was higher in the liver from uremic rats when compared with ad libitum- and pair-fed controls. Furthermore, the ability of insulin to stimulate the autophosphorylation of the β-subunit and insulin receptor kinase activity using Glu 80 , Tyr 20 as exogenous phosphoacceptor was increased in the liver of the uremic animals. The structural characteristics of the receptors, as determined by electrophoretic mobilities of affinity labeled α-subunit and the phosphorylated β-subunit, were normal in uremia. 125 I-insulin binding and insulin receptor kinase activity were similar in the skeletal muscle from uremic and pair- and ad libitum-fed animals. Thus the data are supportive of the hypothesis that in liver and muscle of chronic uremic rats, insulin resistance is due to a defect(s) distal to the insulin receptor kinase

  19. Cerebro-renal interactions: impact of uremic toxins on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kimio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has received attention as an important problem in recent years. Causes of CI with CKD are multifactorial, and include cerebrovascular disease, renal anemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, dialysis disequilibrium, and uremic toxins (UTs). Among these causes, little is known about the role of UTs. We therefore selected 21 uremic compounds, and summarized reports of cerebro-renal interactions associated with UTs. Among the compounds, uric acid, indoxyl sulfate, p-cresyl sulfate, interleukin 1-β, interleukin 6, TNF-α, and PTH were most likely to affect the cerebro-renal interaction dysfunction; however, sufficient data have not been obtained for other UTs. Notably, most of the data were not obtained under uremic conditions; therefore, the impact and mechanism of each UT on cognition and central nervous system in uremic state remains unknown. At present, impacts and mechanisms of UT effects on cognition are poorly understood. Clarifying the mechanisms and establishing novel therapeutic strategies for cerebro-renal interaction dysfunction is expected to be subject of future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of dialysable solutes in the mediation of uremic encephalopathy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, J J; Lawrence, P L; DeBoer, D K; Shoemaker, M O; Sulser, D; Tolchard, S; Teschan, P E

    1990-03-01

    This study addresses mechanisms of the clinical, encephalopathic uremic illness and its suppression by dialysis. Renoprival rats were treated with peritoneal dialysis (8 exchanges per day, 30 min dwell), or untreated (attrition group), and their EEG's were automatically sampled overnight and subjected to power spectrum analysis as an index of encephalopathy. As in man the background rhythm of the quantified EEG (Q.EEG) in the attrition group slowed with time as extracellular fluid composition became increasingly abnormal; these changes were normalized by therapeutic dialysis (TD) using standard, commercial dialysate. However, Q.EEG slowing was only partially normalized by solute-specific dialysis using "mock uremic dialysate" (M-UD), prepared from laboratory chemicals to equal plasma concentrations in preterminal uremic rats of urea, creatinine, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride. When only phosphate was added to TD, the Q.EEG slowed to the same level achieved after M-UD. We conclude that uremic encephalopathy in this model is produced by an unknown neurotoxin and augmented by one or more of the M-UD solutes, phosphate being a likely candidate. To localize the encephalopathic effect, regional brain glucose uptake was estimated in 20 discrete brain areas. Significance of reduced uptake in three areas is discussed.

  1. Cardiovascular alcification in diabetic nephropathy patients in uremic stage and analysis on its risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yang; Lin Shan; Jia Junya; Yan Tiekun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of arterial vascular calcification (VC) in uremic patients undergoing diabetic nephropathy (DN) and explore its risk factors. Methods: Demographic and clinical data were collected in the patients latest diagnosed as uremia and not received dialysis treatment. The uremic patients were divided into DN group and non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) group. And 20 healthy subjects were chosen as control group from the Physical Examination Room. The patients'sex and ages were similar in the 3 groups. VC was semi-quantitatively evaluated by plain radiographic films from abdomen, pelvis and hands. The clinical and laboratorial parameters related to VC were detected and analyzed. Results: 1)The present study included 20 (51.28%) DN uremic patients and 19 (48.72%) NDN uremic patients. The average diabetic duration in the DN patients was (8.11 ± 7.39) years. 2)Among the 39 uremic patients, VC was found on radiographic films in 29 cases (74.36%), including 23 cases (58.97%) with the con-score 1-3 and 6 cases (15.38%) with 3-6 scores. And VC was not detected in control group. Bone density analysis showed that osteopenia occupied 14 cases (35.90%) in all and the T-score was-0.81 ± 0.87. 3)Linear correlation analysis revealed that VC was correlated with serum calcium and phosphate (r=0.026, P 0.05). VC score was significantly correlated with the diabetic duration (r=0.790, P<0.001). Logistic regression revealed that the diabetes duration was the independent risk factors (P<0.05) for VC. The reflections of serum calcium and phosphate were rejected. 4)The prevalence of VC in DN group (95.0%) was higher than that in NDN group (42.1%, P<0.05). And the VC score in DN group(3.18 ± 1.77) was higher than that in NDN group (1.56 ± 0.97, P<0.05). Conclusion: There is a higher VC prevalence rate and more VC severity in DN uremic patients than in NDN patients. Diabetes duration is an independent risk factor for VC. Preventing from the high serum glucose

  2. Effects of growth hormone treatment on the pituitary expression of GHRH receptor mRNA in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Susana; Rodríguez, Julián; Santos, Fernando; Weruaga, Ana; Fernández, Marta; Carbajo, Eduardo; García, Enrique

    2002-09-01

    A decreased ability of pituitary cells to secrete growth hormone (GH) in response to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulation has been shown in young uremic rats. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of uremia and GH treatment on pituitary GHRH receptor expression. Pituitary GHRH receptor mRNA levels were analyzed by RNase protection assay in young female rats made uremic by subtotal nephrectomy, either untreated (UREM) or treated with 10 IU/kg/day of GH (UREM-GH), and normal renal function animals fed ad libitum (SAL) or pair-fed with the UREM group (SPF). Rats were sacrificed 14 days after the second stage nephrectomy. Renal failure was confirmed by concentrations (X +/- SEM) of serum urea nitrogen (mmol/L) and creatinine (micromol/L) in UREM (20 +/- 1 and 89.4 +/- 4.5) and UREM-GH (16 +/- 1 and 91.4 +/- 6.9) that were much higher (P growth retarded as shown by a daily longitudinal tibia growth rate below (P growth rate acceleration (213 +/- 6 microm/day). GHRH receptor mRNA levels were no different among the SAL (0.43 +/- 0.03), SPF (0.43 +/- 0.08) and UREM (0.44 +/- 0.04) groups, whereas UREM-GH rats had significantly higher values (0.72 +/- 0.07). The status of pituitary GHRH receptor is not modified by nutritional deficit or by severe uremia causing growth retardation. By contrast, the growth promoting effect of GH administration is associated with stimulated GHRH receptor gene expression.

  3. Uremic anorexia: a consequence of persistently high brain serotonin levels? The tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, A; Selgas, R; Codoceo, R; Bajo, A

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia is a frequent part of uremic syndrome, contributing to malnutrition in dialysis patients. Many factors have been suggested as responsible for uremic anorexia. In this paper we formulate a new hypothesis to explain the appetite disorders in dialysis patients: "the tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis." We review current knowledge of normal hunger-satiety cycle control and the disorders described in uremic patients. There are four phases in food intake regulation: (1) the gastric phase, during which food induces satiety through gastric distention and satiety peptide release; (2) the post absorptive phase, during which circulating compounds, including glucose and amino acids, cause satiety by hepatic receptors via the vagus nerve; (3) the hepatic phase, during which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration is the main stimulus inducing hunger or satiety, with cytokines inhibiting ATP production; and (4) the central phase, during which appetite is regulated through peripheral (circulating plasma substances and neurotransmitters) and brain stimuli. Brain serotonin is the final target for peripheral mechanisms controlling appetite. High brain serotonin levels and a lower serotonin/dopamine ratio cause anorexia. Plasma and brain amino acid concentrations are recognized factors involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and appetite control. Tryptophan is the substrate of serotonin synthesis. High plasma levels of anorectics such as tryptophan (plasma and brain), cholecystokinin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, and leptin, and deficiencies of nitric oxide and neuropeptide Y have been described in uremia; all increase intracerebral serotonin. We suggest that brain serotonin hyperproduction due to a uremic-dependent excess of tryptophan may be the final common pathway involved in the genesis of uremic anorexia. Various methods of ameliorating anorexia by decreasing the central effects of serotonin are proposed.

  4. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Mohamed Osama; Ahmed, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual) manifestations of Graves' disease (GD), that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD. PMID:22132347

  5. Evaluation of anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of Aitchisonia rosea

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    Shahid Rasool

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic effect of Aitchisonia rosea. The anticonvulsant effect was studied at doses 400 and 800 mg/kg against pentylenetetrazole, strychnine and picrotoxin-induced seizures in albino mice. The antimicrobial assay was conducted by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. Hemolytic effect was analyzed by reported method. Phenolic compounds present in the n-butanol fraction of the plant were estimated by HPLC. The plant showed maximum response against drug-induced convulsions and provided protection to animals at both doses. It also showed maximum zone of inhibition and highly significant MIC against all bacterial and fungal strains. The plant protected the RBCs from hemolysis. The highest amount of phenolics found was caffeic acid (7.5 ± 0.04.

  6. Severe late anemia of hemolytic disease of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Simon; James, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Late anemia is a well-recognized complication of Rhesus hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The incidence of Rhesus HDN is declining, with a tendency for more severely affected pregnancies to be managed in specialist centres. Consequently, many paediatric departments may see relatively few affected infants with comparatively mild disease, and the risk of late anemia in such cases may not always be appreciated. Two cases of infants born with evidence of Rhesus isoimmunization noted at birth and encountering no immediate problems other than mild hyperbilirubinemia are described. After an uneventful early neonatal course, both infants were discharged without follow-up and presented in the second to third weeks of life with severe, life-threatening anemia, leading to neurological sequelae in one case. The importance of close surveillance, including hemoglobin measurements, in all infants with Rhesus hemolytic disease, irrespective of initial severity, is reiterated. PMID:20212966

  7. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: An enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  8. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class......Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can...... be classified according to previously suggested radiologic characteristics and how this classification relates to prognosis. Searching the databases of eight tertiary referral centres we identified 90 adult patients (61 women, 29 men; mean age 34 years) with ≥1 AIIDL. We collected their demographic, clinical...

  9. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is for ...

  10. Anti-M causing delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, J.B.; Riglin, H.; Branch, D.R.; Gallagher, M.T.; Petz, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A 52-year-old gravida 1, para 1 woman with M- red cells experienced a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction and exhibited an anti-M antibody following the infusion of four units of M+ red cells. Measurements of erythrocyte survival using 51 Cr-labeled donor M+ and M- red cells and in vitro studies of monocyte-macrophage phagocytosis of sensitized reagent red cells implicate anti-M in the pathogenesis of hemolysis

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin in ABO and Rh hemolytic diseases of newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Fatemeh; Mamouri, Gholam A; Babaei, Homa

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate whether the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in newborn infants with isoimmune hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility is an effective treatment in reducing the need for exchange transfusion. This study included all direct Coombs' test positive Rh and ABO isoimmunized babies, who admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from October 2003 to October 2004. Significant hyperbilirubinemia was defined as rising by >or=0.5 mg/dl per hour. Babies were randomly assigned to received phototherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) 0.5 g/kg over 4 hours, every 12 hours for 3 doses (study group) or phototherapy alone (control group). Exchange transfusion was performed in any group if serum bilirubin exceeded >or=20mg/dl or rose by >or=1mg/dl/h. A total of 34 babies were eligible for this study (17 babies in each group). The number of exchange transfusion, duration of phototherapy and hospitalization days, were significant shorter in the study group versus control group. When we analyzed the outcome results in ABO and Rh hemolytic disease separately, the efficacy of IVIg was significantly better in Rh versus ABO isoimmunization. Late anemia was more common in the IVIg group 11.8% versus 0%, p=0.48. Adverse effects were not observed during IVIg administration. Administration of IVIg to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to Rh hemolytic disease reduced the need for exchange transfusion but in ABO hemolytic disease there was no significant difference between IVIg and double surface blue light phototherapy.

  12. Hemolytic disease of the newborn- anti c antibody induced hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Kandraju, Hemasree; Devi, Surekha A

    2012-02-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn, as a cause of early jaundice, is not uncommon. This is mostly due to Rh (D), ABO incompatibility and rarely due to other minor blood group incompatibility. The authors report two cases of Rh anti c isoimmunization presenting as significant early neonatal jaundice within the 20 h of life. Both the babies were treated with intensive phototherapy. One baby underwent exchange transfusion and the other required packed cell transfusion for anemia.

  13. Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn from anti-e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R M; Dotzler, S A; Winter, L W; Kerecman, J D

    2008-03-01

    Maternal antibody-mediated fetal red blood cell destruction secondary to non-D Rhesus (Rh) antibodies is a significant cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Here, we report a rare case of severe HDN associated with maternal antibody to Rh e. In addition to severe anemia, the infant developed thrombocytopenia, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and cholelithiasis. Resolution of the infant's cholelithiasis occurred following treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid.

  14. [The immunometaboic effects of benfotiamine and riboxine on hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteshev, B S; Lazareva, G A; Prokopenko, L G

    2002-01-01

    Single (80 mg/kg) or multiply repeated (30 mg/kg) intramuscular injections of phenylhydrazine decrease the functional activity of mononuclear blood cells and the reduces immunological reactivity of the organism. Benfotiamine and riboxin decrease the extent of changes in the immunological response to a single administration of phenylhydrazine but do not significantly influence the immunological functions impaired by repeated injections of the hemolytic toxin.

  15. Complement factor H deficiency and endocapillary glomerulonephritis due to paternal isodisomy and a novel factor H mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Schmidt, I M; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a regulator of the alternative complement activation pathway. Mutations in the CFH gene are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II and C3 glomerulonephritis. Here, we report a 6-month-old CFH-deficient child...

  16. haemolytic-uraemic syndrome in children from south India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though rare in children, D- HUS is an important disorder in paediatric .... in three (Fig. 2). Glomerular changes included focal seg mental ... has been linked to 40% of cases. Drugs, .... Characterization of the cytokine immune response in ... system abnormalities in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clin.

  17. Genotype/phenotype correlations in complement factor h deficiency arising from uniparental isodisomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Valerie; Darlay, Rebecca; Wong, William

    2013-01-01

    We report a male infant who presented at 8 months of age with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) responsive to plasma therapy. Investigation showed him to have complement factor H (CFH) deficiency associated with a homozygous CFH mutation (c.2880delT [p.Phe960fs]). Mutation screening of th...

  18. Serratamolide is a hemolytic factor produced by Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

  19. Identification and Quantitative Assessment of Uremic Solutes as Inhibitors of Renal Organic Anion Transporters, OAT1 and OAT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Chia-Hsiang; Yoshida, Kenta; Zhao, Ping; Meyer, Timothy W; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2016-09-06

    One of the characteristics of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the accumulation of uremic solutes in the plasma. Less is known about the effects of uremic solutes on transporters that may play critical roles in pharmacokinetics. We evaluated the effect of 72 uremic solutes on organic anion transporter 1 and 3 (OAT1 and OAT3) using a fluorescent probe substrate, 6-carboxyfluorescein. A total of 12 and 13 solutes were identified as inhibitors of OAT1 and OAT3, respectively. Several of them inhibited OAT1 or OAT3 at clinically relevant concentrations and reduced the transport of other OAT1/3 substrates in vitro. Review of clinical studies showed that the active secretion of most drugs that are known substrates of OAT1/3 deteriorated faster than the renal filtration in CKD. Collectively, these data suggest that through inhibition of OAT1 and OAT3, uremic solutes contribute to the decline in renal drug clearance in patients with CKD.

  20. Elimination of Endogenous Toxin, Creatinine from Blood Plasma Depends on Albumin Conformation: Site Specific Uremic Toxicity & Impaired Drug Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Ankita; Rehan, Mohd; Subbarao, Naidu; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Uremic syndrome results from malfunctioning of various organ systems due to the retention of uremic toxins which, under normal conditions, would be excreted into the urine and/or metabolized by the kidneys. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the renal elimination of uremic toxin creatinine that accumulate in chronic renal failure. Quantitative investigation of the plausible correlations was performed by spectroscopy, calorimetry, molecular docking and accessibility of surface area. Alkalinization of normal plasma from pH 7.0 to 9.0 modifies the distribution of toxin in the body and therefore may affect both the accumulation and the rate of toxin elimination. The ligand loading of HSA with uremic toxin predicts several key side chain interactions of site I that presumably have the potential to impact the specificity and impaired drug binding. These findings provide useful information for elucidating the complicated mechanism of toxin disposition in renal disease state. PMID:21386972

  1. The plasma leptin concentration is closely associated with the body fat mass in nondiabetic uremic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Nielsen, P K; Olgaard, K

    1999-01-01

    filtration rate seemed to have a limited influence on the plasma leptin concentration in nondiabetic uremic subjects matched by body fat mass to controls. The plasma leptin concentration was closely associated with the body fat mass, and the leptin level might, therefore, be useful as an indicator of the fat......Plasma leptin is associated with the body mass index and, more precisely, with the body fat mass. Plasma leptin has been found to be elevated in uremic patients. This study aimed at investigating the plasma leptin concentration and associations between plasma leptin, body fat mass, and glomerular.......4 (3.1-59.5) ng/ml versus 5.4 (1.6-47.5) ng/ml (median and range in parentheses; p

  2. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National Universty Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  3. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  4. Scintigraphic measurements of the heart-blood-pool in dialyzed chronic uremic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, E.S.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Narai, G.; Szegedi Orvostudomanyi Egyetem; Szegedi Orvostudomanyi Egyetem

    1976-01-01

    The authors have carried out scintigraphic measurements of the heart in order to diagnose the presence of an exudative pericarditis 50 times in 26 dialyzed uremic patients. Within the one year's observation 13 patients had an exudative pericarditis from the beginning on. In 8 cases a regression of the exudation could be observed. The examination has a low risk for the patient and is suitable to demonstrate clinically relevant pericardial liquid accumulation. (orig.) [de

  5. Randomized, Double-blind Study with Glycerol and Paraffin in Uremic Xerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaskas, Elias; Szepietowski, Jacek C.; Bessis, Didier; Ioannides, Dimitrios; Ponticelli, Claudio; Ghienne, Corinne; Taberly, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Uremic xerosis is a bothersome condition that is poorly responsive to moisturizing and emollient therapy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A randomized, double-blind, intraindividual (left versus right comparison), multicentric clinical study was performed on 100 patients with moderate to severe uremic xerosis for 7 days, during which the patients applied twice daily an emulsion combining glycerol and paraffin (test product) on one allocated lower leg, and the emulsion alone (comparator) on the other lower leg. This was followed by an open-labeled use of the test product on all of the xerotic areas for 49 days. The main efficacy parameter was treatment response on each lower leg, as defined by a reduction from baseline of at least two grades in a five-point clinical score on day 7. Results Among the 99 patients analyzed, the test product was highly effective with a treatment response in 72 patients (73%), whereas 44 patients (44%) responded to the comparator (P < 0.0001, intergroup analysis). This was associated with an objective reduction in the density and thickness of the scales on day 7 (P < 0.0001 compared with the comparator) and a substantial improvement of the uremic pruritus (75%) and quality of life of the patients at study end (P < 0.001, intragroup analysis). The test product was very well tolerated, with product-related local intolerance (exacerbated pruritus, local burning, or erythema) occurring in only five patients (5%). Conclusions Uremic xerosis can be managed successfully when an appropriate emollient therapy is used. PMID:21258039

  6. Uremic Toxins and Lipases in Haemodialysis: A Process of Repeated Metabolic Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Stegmayr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe kidney disease results in retention of uremic toxins that inhibit key enzymes for lipid breakdown such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL and hepatic lipase (HL. For patients in haemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD the LPL activity is only about half of that of age and gender matched controls. Angiopoietin, like protein 3 and 4, accumulate in the uremic patients. These factors, therefore, can be considered as uremic toxins. In animal experiments it has been shown that these factors inhibit the LPL activity. To avoid clotting of the dialysis circuit during HD, anticoagulation such as heparin or low molecular weight heparin are added to the patient. Such administration will cause a prompt release of the LPL and HL from its binding sites at the endothelial surface. The liver rapidly degrades the release plasma compound of LPL and HL. This results in a lack of enzyme to degrade triglycerides during the later part of the HD and for another 3–4 h. PD patients have a similar baseline level of lipases but are not exposed to the negative effect of anticoagulation.

  7. Role of Vitamin D in Maintaining Renal Epithelial Barrier Function in Uremic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Mihajlovic

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As current kidney replacement therapies are not efficient enough for end-stage renal disease (ESRD treatment, a bioartificial kidney (BAK device, based on conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC, could represent an attractive solution. The active transport activity of such a system was recently demonstrated. In addition, endocrine functions of the cells, such as vitamin D activation, are relevant. The organic anion transporter 1 (OAT-1 overexpressing ciPTEC line presented 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1, 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1 and vitamin D receptor (VDR, responsible for vitamin D activation, degradation and function, respectively. The ability to produce and secrete 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3, was shown after incubation with the precursor, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3. The beneficial effect of vitamin D on cell function and behavior in uremic conditions was studied in the presence of an anionic uremic toxins mixture. Vitamin D could restore cell viability, and inflammatory and oxidative status, as shown by cell metabolic activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS production, respectively. Finally, vitamin D restored transepithelial barrier function, as evidenced by decreased inulin-FITC leakage in biofunctionalized hollow fiber membranes (HFM carrying ciPTEC-OAT1. In conclusion, the protective effects of vitamin D in uremic conditions and proven ciPTEC-OAT1 endocrine function encourage the use of these cells for BAK application.

  8. Uremic myopathy: Is oxidative stress implicated in muscle dysfunction in uremia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia eKaltsatou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is accompanied by progressive muscle weakness and premature fatigue, in part linked to hypokinesis and in part to uremic toxicity. These changes are associated with various detrimental biochemical and morphological alterations. All of these pathological parameters are collectively termed ureamic myopathy. Various interventions while helpful can’t fully remedy the pathological phenotype. Complex mechanisms that stimulate muscle dysfunction in uremia have been proposed, and oxidative stress could be implicated. Skeletal muscles continuously produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS at rest and more so during contraction. The aim of this mini review is to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how ROS and RNS generation might contribute to muscle dysfunction in uremia. Thus a systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. While few studies met our criteria their findings are discussed making reference to other available literature data. Oxidative stress can direct muscle cells into a catabolic state and chronic exposure to it leads to wasting. Moreover, redox disturbances can significantly affect force production per se. We conclude that oxidative stress can be in part responsible for some aspects of uremic myopathy. Further research is needed to discern clear mechanisms and to help efforts to counteract muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in uremic patients.

  9. Effect of AST-120 on Endothelial Dysfunction in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Inami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic kidney disease (CKD represents endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte adhesion is recognized as the initial step of arteriosclerosis. Indoxyl sulfate (IS is considered to be a risk factor for arteriosclerosis in CKD. Oral adsorbent AST-120 retards deterioration of renal function, reducing accumulation of IS. In the present study, we determined the monocyte adhesion in the adenine-induced uremic rats in vivo and effects of AST-120 on the adhesion molecules. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into control, control+AST-120, adenine, and adenine+AST-120 groups. The number of monocytes adherent to the endothelium of thoracic aorta by imaging the entire endothelial surface and the mRNA expressions of adhesion and atherosclerosis-related molecules were examined on day 49. The mRNA expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were also examined. Results. Adenine increased the number of adherent monocytes, and AST-120 suppressed the increase. The monocyte adhesion was related to serum creatinine and IS in sera. Overexpression of VCAM-1 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the arterial walls was observed in uremic rats. IS induced increase of the ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions in vitro. Conclusion. It appears that uremic condition introduces the monocyte adhesion to arterial wall and AST-120 might inhibit increasing of the monocyte adherence with CKD progression.

  10. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabron, A; Moreira, G; Bordin, J O

    1999-01-07

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are frequently transfused with red blood cells (RBC). Recently we reported that the calculated risk of RBC alloimmunization per transfussed unit in Brazilian patients with SCA is 1.15%. We describe a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with SCA. A 35-year-old Brazilian female with homozygous SCA was admitted for a program of partial exchange transfusion prior to cholecystectomy. Her blood group was O RhD positive and no atypical RBC alloantibody was detected using the indirect antiglobulin technique. Pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) was 8.7 g/dL and isovolumic partial exchange transfusion was performed using 4 units of ABO compatible packed RBC. Five days after the last transfusion she developed generalized joint pain and fever of 39 degrees C. Her Hb level dropped from 12.0 g/dL to 9.3 g/dL and the unconjugated bilirrubin level rose to 27 mmol/L. She was jaundiced and had hemoglobinuria. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 48.7% HbS, 46.6% HbA1, 2.7% HbA2, and 2.0% HbF. The patient's extended RBC phenotype was CDe, K-k+, Kp(a-b+), Fy(a-b-), M+N+s+, Le(a+b-), Di(a-). An RBC alloantibody with specificity to the Rh system (anti-c, titer 1:16.384) was identified by the indirect antiglobulin test. The Rh phenotype of the RBC used in the last packed RBC transfusion was CcDEe. The patient was discharged, asymptomatic, 7 days after admission.

  11. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  13. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruth R. Palla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab, PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab, and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab, have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789–1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089–1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin’s lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5–12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202–204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373–378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  14. Neutropenia in infants with hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Esther; Johnston, Donna L

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the incidence, outcome and risk factors of neutropenia in infants with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). A retrospective chart review was performed on infants with HDN. Of 69 evaluable infants, 45% developed neutropenia. Only one infectious complication was recorded. In most instances the neutropenia resolved spontaneously, but in seven infants it persisted for a median of 397 days. Males were at higher risk for developing neutropenia, but severity of HDN, antibody specificity, or therapy were not significant risk factors. Neutropenia is a common feature of HDN, regardless of severity of disease, treatment received, or antibody specificity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Does the adequacy parameter Kt/V(urea reflect uremic toxin concentrations in hemodialysis patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Eloot

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis aims at removing uremic toxins thus decreasing their concentrations. The present study investigated whether Kt/V(urea, used as marker of dialysis adequacy, is correlated with these concentrations. Predialysis blood samples were taken before a midweek session in 71 chronic HD patients. Samples were analyzed by colorimetry, HPLC, or ELISA for a broad range of uremic solutes. Solute concentrations were divided into four groups according to quartiles of Kt/V(urea, and also of different other parameters with potential impact, such as age, body weight (BW, Protein equivalent of Nitrogen Appearance (PNA, Residual Renal Function (RRF, and dialysis vintage. Dichotomic concentration comparisons were performed for gender and Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Analysis of Variance in quartiles of Kt/V(urea did not show significant differences for any of the solute concentrations. For PNA, however, concentrations showed significant differences for urea (P<0.001, uric acid (UA, p-cresylsulfate (PCS, and free PCS (all P<0.01, and for creatinine (Crea and hippuric acid (HA (both P<0.05. For RRF, concentrations varied for β₂-microglobulin (P<0.001, HA, free HA, free indoxyl sulfate, and free indole acetic acid (all P<0.01, and for p-cresylglucuronide (PCG, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF, free PCS, and free PCG (all P<0.05. Gender and body weight only showed differences for Crea and UA, while age, vintage, and diabetes mellitus only showed differences for one solute concentration (UA, UA, and free PCS, respectively. Multifactor analyses indicated a predominant association of concentration with protein intake and residual renal function. In conclusion, predialysis concentrations of uremic toxins seem to be dependent on protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance and residual renal function, and not on dialysis adequacy as assessed by Kt/V(urea. Efforts to control intestinal load of uremic toxin precursors by dietary or other

  16. Atypical sexual behavior during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleminault, Christian; Moscovitch, Adam; Yuen, Kin; Poyares, Dalva

    2002-01-01

    This article reports a case series of atypical sexual behavior during sleep, which is often harmful to patients or bed partners. Eleven subjects underwent clinical evaluation of complaints of sleep-related atypical sexual behavior. Complaints included violent masturbation, sexual assaults, and continuous (and loud) sexual vocalizations during sleep. One case was a medical-legal case. Sleep logs, clinical evaluations, sleep questionnaires, structured psychiatric interviews, polysomnography, actigraphy, home electroencephalographic monitoring during sleep, and clinical electroencephalographic monitoring while awake and asleep were used to determine clinical diagnoses. Atypical sexual behaviors during sleep were associated with feelings of guilt, shame, and depression. Because of these feelings, patients and bed partners often tolerated the abnormal behavior for long periods of time without seeking medical attention. The following pathologic sleep disorders were demonstrated on polysomnography: partial complex seizures, sleep-disordered breathing, stage 3 to 4 non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep parasomnias, and REM sleep behavior disorder. These findings were concurrent with morning amnesia. The atypical behaviors were related to different syndromes despite the similarity of complaints from bed partners. In most cases the disturbing and often harmful symptoms were controlled when counseling was instituted and sleep disorders were treated. In some cases treatment of seizures or psychiatric disorders was also needed. Clonazepam with simultaneous psychotherapy was the most common successful treatment combination. The addition of antidepressant or antiepileptic medications was required in specific cases.

  17. MANIFESTATIONS OF AGGRESSIVE ATYPICAL KAPOSI'S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... weight loss (86.8%), skin nodules (86.4%) and diarrhoea (55.3%). Virtually, all occupational groups were affected, with students, civil servants and businessmen topping the list. Key Words: Atypical Aggressive Kaposi's sarcoma, HIV infection. African Journal Of Clinical And Experimental Microbiology Jan 2004 Vol.5 No.1 ...

  18. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  19. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tank, Kashmira P.; Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson–Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30–60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  20. Neonatal management and outcome in alloimmune hemolytic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Isabelle M C; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; van der Bom, Johanna G; van Klink, Jeanine M M; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) occurs when fetal and neonatal erythroid cells are destroyed by maternal erythrocyte alloantibodies, it leads to anemia and hydrops in the fetus, and hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus in the newborn. Postnatal care consists of intensive phototherapy and exchange transfusions to treat severe hyperbilirubinemia and top-up transfusions to treat early and late anemia. Other postnatal complications have been reported such as thrombocytopenia, iron overload and cholestasis requiring specific management. Areas covered: This review focusses on the current neonatal management and outcome of hemolytic disease and discusses postnatal treatment options as well as literature on long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Expert commentary: Despite major advances in neonatal management, multiple issues have to be addressed to optimize postnatal management and completely eradicate kernicterus. Except for strict adherence to guidelines, improvement could be achieved by clarifying the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HDFN. Several pharmacotherapeutic agents should be further researched as alternative treatment options in hyperbilirubinemia, including immunoglobulins, albumin, phenobarbital, metalloporphyrins, zinc, clofibrate and prebiotics. Larger trials are warranted to evaluate EPO, folate and vitamin E in neonates. Long-term follow-up studies are needed in HDFN, especially on thrombocytopenia, iron overload and cholestasis.

  1. Hemolytic porcine intestinal Escherichia coli without virulence-associated genes typical of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  2. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    . Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. RESULTS: We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all...

  3. Functional genomic analysis identifies indoxyl sulfate as a major, poorly dialyzable uremic toxin in end-stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jhawar

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure is characterized by progressive renal scarring and accelerated arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease despite what is considered to be adequate hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In rodents with reduced renal mass, renal scarring has been attributed to poorly filtered, small protein-bound molecules. The best studied of these is indoxyl sulfate (IS.We have attempted to establish whether there are uremic toxins that are not effectively removed by hemodialysis. We examined plasma from patients undergoing hemodialysis, employing global gene expression in normal human renal cortical cells incubated in pre- and post- dialysis plasma as a reporter system. Responses in cells incubated with pre- and post-dialysis uremic plasma (n = 10 were compared with responses elicited by plasma from control subjects (n = 5. The effects of adding IS to control plasma and of adding probenecid to uremic plasma were examined. Plasma concentrations of IS were measured by HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography.Gene expression in our reporter system revealed dysregulation of 1912 genes in cells incubated with pre-dialysis uremic plasma. In cells incubated in post-dialysis plasma, the expression of 537 of those genes returned to baseline but the majority of them (1375 remained dysregulated. IS concentration was markedly elevated in pre- and post-dialysis plasma. Addition of IS to control plasma simulated more than 80% of the effects of uremic plasma on gene expression; the addition of probenecid, an organic anion transport (OAT inhibitor, to uremic plasma reversed the changes in gene expression.These findings provide evidence that hemodialysis fails to effectively clear one or more solutes that effect gene expression, in our reporter system, from the plasma of patients with uremia. The finding that gene dysregulation was simulated by the addition of IS to control plasma and inhibited by addition of an OAT inhibitor to uremic plasma identifies IS

  4. TGF-beta1 immunohistochemistry and promoter methylation in chronic renal failure rats treated with Uremic Clearance Granules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Bin Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the explain the mechanism related to therapeutic effects of Uremic Clearance Granules (Niaoduqing Keli in Chinese on adenine-induced Chronic Renal Failure in rats. Thirty 8-week-old male Wistar rats were selected and randomly divided in to 3 groups: Normal Control Group (NCGconsisted of 10 rats, Chronic Renal Failure Pathological Control Group (PCG 10 rats, and Uremic Clearance Granules Treatment Group (UCG 10 rats. Each rat in PCG and UCG was fed with adenine-enriched diets, containing 10 g adenine per kg food for 6 weeks. After fed with adenine, each rat in UCG was administered orally with 2 ml solution of Uremic Clearance Granules for 6 weeks. The concentration of Uremic Clearance Granules solution was 0.42 g/ml which was 10 times of human. On days 42 and 84, the serum levels of creatinine, Blood Urea Nitrogen and homocysteine were determined. The methylation of TGFbeta1 promoter was tested by methylation-specific PCR. TGF-beta1 mRNA and protein expression in rat renal cortex were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and Immunohistochemistry. (1 Experimented on model of Chronic Renal Failure in rats, the preparation was proved to be able to reduce serum creatinine, Blood Urea Nitrogen, and homocysteine (p<0.05, improve renal function. (2 The expression of TGF-beta1 in mRNA and protein level were down-regulated. (3 TGF-beta1 promoter was demethylated at some loci in PCG, and was recovered in UCG. After treatment with Uremic Clearance Granules, the Chronic Renal Failure Wistar rat's kidney function was recovered. The recovery may be result of the remethylation of TGF-beta1 promoter and then lead to TGF-beta1 be transcripted and translated normally. The experimental study explain the molecular mechanism by which Uremic Clearance Granules treat Chronic Renal Failure.

  5. Atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Richard N; Ader, Marilyn

    2005-04-01

    Persistent reports have linked atypical antipsychotics with diabetes, yet causative mechanisms responsible for this linkage are unclear. Goals of this review are to outline the pathogenesis of nonimmune diabetes and to survey the available literature related to why antipsychotics may lead to this disease. We accessed the literature regarding atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis using PubMed. The search included English-language publications from 1990 through October 2004. Keywords used included atypical antipsychotics plus one of the following: glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance, obesity, or diabetes. In addition, we culled information from published abstracts from several national and international scientific meetings for the years 2001 through 2004, including the American Diabetes Association, the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. The latter search was necessary because of the paucity of well-controlled prospective studies. We examined publications with significant new data or publications that contributed to the overall comprehension of the impact of atypical antipsychotics on glucose metabolism. We favored original peer-reviewed articles and were less likely to cite single case studies and/or anecdotal information. Approximately 75% of the fewer than 150 identified articles were examined and included in this review. Validity of data was evaluated using the existence of peer-review status as well as our own experience with methodology described in the specific articles. The metabolic profile caused by atypical antipsychotic treatment resembles type 2 diabetes. These agents cause weight gain in treated subjects and may induce obesity in both visceral and subcutaneous depots, as occurs in diabetes. Insulin resistance, usually associated with obesity, occurs to varying degrees with different antipsychotics, although more comparative studies with direct assessment of resistance are

  6. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Koranne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  7. Fluctuation theorems and atypical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, M; Lahiri, S; Jayannavar, A M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have studied simple models that can be solved analytically to illustrate various fluctuation theorems. These fluctuation theorems provide symmetries individually to the distributions of physical quantities such as the classical work (W c ), thermodynamic work (W), total entropy (Δs tot ) and dissipated heat (Q), when the system is driven arbitrarily out of equilibrium. All these quantities can be defined for individual trajectories. We have studied the number of trajectories which exhibit behaviour unexpected at the macroscopic level. As the time of observation increases, the fraction of such atypical trajectories decreases, as expected at the macroscale. The distributions for the thermodynamic work and entropy production in nonlinear models may exhibit a peak (most probable value) in the atypical regime without violating the expected average behaviour. However, dissipated heat and classical work exhibit a peak in the regime of typical behaviour only.

  8. Susceptibility to β-lactams in β-hemolytic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonofiglio, Laura; Gagetti, Paula; García Gabarrot, Gabriela; Kaufman, Sara; Mollerach, Marta; Toresani, Inés; Vigliarolo, Laura; von Specht, Martha; Lopardo, Horacio A

    2018-03-13

    Group A (GAS), B (GBS), C (GCS) and G (GGS) β-hemolytic streptococci are important human pathogens. They cause infections of different severity and frequency. Nowadays, after 70 years of use, penicillin is still universally active against GAS, GCS and GGS. However, therapeutic failures have been recorded in 2-28% of pharyngitis cases (median: 12%) attributable to different causes. By contrast, some GBS with reduced susceptibility to penicillin have been described, especially in Japan. In this group of bacteria, it is important to highlight that confirmation by reference methods is mandatory when decreased susceptibility to penicillin is suspected as well as checked for the detection of the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. An Atypical Presentation on Insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-16

    PUBLICATIONS/ PRESENTATIONS 1. TO: CLINICAL RESEARCH 2. FROM: (Author’s Name, Rank, Grade, Office Symbol) 3. GME/GHSE STUDENT: 4. PROTOCOL NUMBER: Kluesner...PROCESSING OF PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH/TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS/ PRESENTATIONS 1st ENDORSEMENT (59 MDW/SGVU Use Only) TO: Clinical Research Division 24...CAPT JOSEPH KLUESNER FROM: 59 MDW/SGYU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 1. Your paper, entitled An Atypical Presentation of Insulinoma

  10. Atypical work and employment continuity

    OpenAIRE

    Addison, John T.; Surfield, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Atypical employment arrangements such as agency temporary work and contracting have long been criticized as offering more precarious and unstable work than regular employment. Using data from two datasets – the CAEAS and the NLSY79 – we determine whether workers who take such jobs rather than regular employment, or the alternative of continued job search, subsequently experience greater or lesser employment continuity. Observed differences between the various working arrangements are starkest...

  11. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L; Jo, Kyoung H

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the "zombie" centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology.

  12. Atypical Centrioles During Sexual Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer eAvidor-Reiss

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL. We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the zombie centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology.

  13. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Meat Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Zanolli Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  14. Rasburicase-induced Hemolytic Anemia in an Adolescent With Unknown Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Manzilat; Audino, Anthony N; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-01-01

    Rasburicase, used in the prevention and treatment of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), may cause hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Although routine screening for G6PD deficiency has been recommended, given the turnaround time for test results and the urgency to treat TLS, such screening may not be feasible. We report a case of rasburicase-induced hemolytic anemia without methemoglobinemia in an adolescent with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, TLS, and previously unrecognized G6PD deficiency. Previous reports of hemolytic anemia with rasburicase are reviewed, mechanisms discussed, and preventative strategies presented.

  15. Modified Lipids and Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Class of Uremic Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nans Florens

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with an enhanced oxidative stress and deep modifications in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. First, many oxidized lipids accumulate in CKD and were shown to exert toxic effects on cells and tissues. These lipids are known to interfere with many cell functions and to be pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory, especially in the cardiovascular system. Some, like F2-isoprostanes, are directly correlated with CKD progression. Their accumulation, added to their noxious effects, rendered their nomination as uremic toxins credible. Similarly, lipoproteins are deeply altered by CKD modifications, either in their metabolism or composition. These impairments lead to impaired effects of HDL on their normal effectors and may strongly participate in accelerated atherosclerosis and failure of statins in end-stage renal disease patients. This review describes the impact of oxidized lipids and other modifications in the natural history of CKD and its complications. Moreover, this review focuses on the modifications of lipoproteins and their impact on the emergence of cardiovascular diseases in CKD as well as the appropriateness of considering them as actual mediators of uremic toxicity.

  16. Modified Lipids and Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Class of Uremic Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florens, Nans; Calzada, Catherine; Lyasko, Egor; Juillard, Laurent; Soulage, Christophe O

    2016-12-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an enhanced oxidative stress and deep modifications in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. First, many oxidized lipids accumulate in CKD and were shown to exert toxic effects on cells and tissues. These lipids are known to interfere with many cell functions and to be pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory, especially in the cardiovascular system. Some, like F2-isoprostanes, are directly correlated with CKD progression. Their accumulation, added to their noxious effects, rendered their nomination as uremic toxins credible. Similarly, lipoproteins are deeply altered by CKD modifications, either in their metabolism or composition. These impairments lead to impaired effects of HDL on their normal effectors and may strongly participate in accelerated atherosclerosis and failure of statins in end-stage renal disease patients. This review describes the impact of oxidized lipids and other modifications in the natural history of CKD and its complications. Moreover, this review focuses on the modifications of lipoproteins and their impact on the emergence of cardiovascular diseases in CKD as well as the appropriateness of considering them as actual mediators of uremic toxicity.

  17. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  18. Effect of treatment with human apolipoprotein A-I on atherosclerosis in uremic apolipoprotein-E deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja Xenia; Bro, Susanne; Andersen, Mikkel H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Uremia markedly increases the risk of atherosclerosis. Thus, effective anti-atherogenic treatments are needed for uremic patients. This study examined effects of non-lipidated recombinant human apoA-I (h-apoA-I) and a recombinant trimeric apoA-I molecule (TripA-I) on lipid metabolism a...

  19. Lung papillary adenocarcinoma complicated with paraneoplastic autoimmune hemolytic anemia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Limin; Wang, Huaquan; Qu, Wen; Fang, Fang; Dong, Qi-e; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged woman presented at our facility and was diagnosed after surgery with lung papillary adenocarcinoma. Seven years earlier, she had suffered from autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which was refractory. Following lung surgery, the AIHA was cured.

  20. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Pakshir

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species.

  1. A Rare Case; Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-jkb

    OpenAIRE

    İlknur Tolunay; Meral Oruç; Orkun Tolunay

    2015-01-01

    Jka and Jkb antibodies (Kidd blood group system) can cause acute and delayed type transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn. Jka and Jkb antibodies are seen after events like blood transfusions, pregnancy, abortion and curettage. Hemolytic disease of newborn related to Kidd-Jkb incompatibility is rare and mostly has a good prognosis. The patient was consulted to our department because of 20 hours of jaundice after birth. He was treated with intensive phot...

  2. Immunoglobulin transfusion in hemolytic disease of the newborn: place in therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mundy CA; Bhatia J

    2015-01-01

    Cynthia A Mundy, Jatinder Bhatia Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Georgia Regents University, Children's Hospital of Georgia, GA, USA Abstract: Hemolytic disease of the newborn continues to be a common neonatal disorder that requires a comprehensive understanding on the part of those caring for infants. Common treatments include hydration and phototherapy. Exchange transfusion is used in severe hemolytic disease, but infants undergoing this treatment are exposed to ...

  3. Cationic uremic toxins affect human renal proximal tubule cell functioning through interaction with the organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schophuizen, Carolien M S; Wilmer, Martijn J; Jansen, Jitske; Gustavsson, Lena; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-12-01

    Several organic cations, such as guanidino compounds and polyamines, have been found to accumulate in plasma of patients with kidney failure due to inadequate renal clearance. Here, we studied the interaction of cationic uremic toxins with renal organic cation transport in a conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cell line (ciPTEC). Transporter activity was measured and validated in cell suspensions by studying uptake of the fluorescent substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium-iodide (ASP(+)). Subsequently, the inhibitory potencies of the cationic uremic toxins, cadaverine, putrescine, spermine and spermidine (polyamines), acrolein (polyamine breakdown product), guanidine, and methylguanidine (guanidino compounds) were determined. Concentration-dependent inhibition of ASP(+) uptake by TPA, cimetidine, quinidine, and metformin confirmed functional endogenous organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) expression in ciPTEC. All uremic toxins tested inhibited ASP(+) uptake, of which acrolein required the lowest concentration to provoke a half-maximal inhibition (IC50 = 44 ± 2 μM). A Dixon plot was constructed for acrolein using three independent inhibition curves with 10, 20, or 30 μM ASP(+), which demonstrated competitive or mixed type of interaction (K i = 93 ± 16 μM). Exposing the cells to a mixture of cationic uremic toxins resulted in a more potent and biphasic inhibitory response curve, indicating complex interactions between the toxins and ASP(+) uptake. In conclusion, ciPTEC proves a suitable model to study cationic xenobiotic interactions. Inhibition of cellular uptake transport was demonstrated for several uremic toxins, which might indicate a possible role in kidney disease progression during uremia.

  4. [Contribution of blue-green pigments to hemolytic activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultural fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyzh, A É; Nikandrov, V N

    2011-01-01

    To assess the contribution of blue-green pigments of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to hemolytic activity of its cultural fluid. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Eight hospital strains and reference strain ATCC 15442 were used. Growth dynamics of strains as well as features of accumulation of hemolytic and phospholipase activity were studied. Purified samples of pyoverdin and pyocyanin were extracted by gel-chromatography and chloroform extraction methods. Hemolytic and lecitinase activities of the samples as well as effect of active oxygen scavengers and chelating agents on these activities were studied. Dynamics of accumulation of hemolytic activity significantly differed from that of phospholipase activity when strains were grown in liquid medium. Chromatographic separation of the pigments from cultural fluid supernatants sharply reduced its hemolytic activity. Purified samples of pyoverdin and pyocyanin were capable to lyse erythrocytes and chicken egg lecitin. These characteristics of the pigments were inhibited by nitroblue tetrazolium and sensitive to chelating agents. Conclusion. Pyoverdin and pyocyanin of pathogenic strains of P. aeruginosa are capable to lyse erythrocytes and suspension of purified chicken egg lecitin, they contribute to total hemolytic activity of pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas, which is not determined only by phospholipase C produced by microorganism. Lytic activity of the pigments is blocked by nitroblue tetrazolium and susceptible to some chelating agents. Apparently, this activity is mediated by superoxide radical and determined by presence of metals with transient valence in pigments' molecules.

  5. Intravenous Immunoglobulin G Treatment in ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn, is it Myth or Real?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beken, Serdar; Hirfanoglu, Ibrahim; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Altuntas, Nilgun; Unal, Sezin; Turan, Ozden; Onal, Esra; Ergenekon, Ebru; Koc, Esin; Atalay, Yildiz

    2014-03-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been used as a component of the treatment of hemolytic disease of the newborn. There is still no consensus on its use in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn routinely. The aim of this study is to determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with ABO incompatibility is necessary. One hundred and seventeen patients with ABO hemolytic disease and positive Coombs test were enrolled into the study. The subjects were healthy except jaundice. Infants were divided into two groups: Group I (n = 71) received one dose of IVIG (1 g/kg) and LED phototherapy whereas Group II (n = 46) received only LED phototherapy. One patient received erythrocyte transfusion in Group I, no exchange transfusion was performed in both groups. Mean duration of phototherapy was 3.1 ± 1.3 days in Group I and 2.27 ± 0.7 days in Group II (p hemolytic disease. Meticulus follow-up of infants with ABO hemolytic disease and LED phototherapy decreases morbidity. IVIG failed to show preventing hemolysis in ABO hemolytic disease.

  6. Differential regulation of renal Klotho and FGFR1 in normal and uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Herencia, Carmen; Pendón-Ruiz de Mier, Maria Victoria; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Maria Encarnación; Diaz-Tocados, Juan M; Vergara, Noemi; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Salmerón, Maria Dolores; Richards, William G; Felsenfeld, Arnold; Kuro-O, Makoto; Almadén, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Mariano

    2017-09-01

    In renal failure, hyperphosphatemia occurs despite a marked elevation in serum fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Abnormal regulation of the FGFR1-Klotho receptor complex may cause a resistance to the phosphaturic action of FGF23. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regulation of renal Klotho and FGF receptor (FEFR)-1 in healthy and uremic rats induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. In normal rats, the infusion of rat recombinant FGF23 enhanced phosphaturia and increased renal FGFR1 expression; however, Klotho expression was reduced. Uremic rats on a high-phosphate (HP) diet presented hyperphosphatemia with marked elevation of FGF23 and an increased fractional excretion of phosphate (P) that was associated with a marked reduction of Klotho expression and an increase in FGFR1. After neutralization of FGF23 by anti-FGF23 administration, phosphaturia was still abundant, Klotho expression remained low, and the FGFR1 level was reduced. These results suggest that the expression of renal Klotho is modulated by phosphaturia, whereas the FGFR1 expression is regulated by FGF23. Calcitriol (CTR) administration prevented a decrease in renal Klotho expression. In HEK293 cells HP produced nuclear translocation of β-catenin, together with a reduction in Klotho. Wnt/β-catenin inhibition with Dkk-1 prevented the P-induced down-regulation of Klotho. The addition of CTR to HP medium was able to recover Klotho expression. In summary, high FGF23 levels increase FGFR1, whereas phosphaturia decreases Klotho expression through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway.-Muñoz-Castañeda, J. R., Herencia, C., Pendón-Ruiz de Mier, M. V., Rodriguez-Ortiz, M. E., Diaz-Tocados, J. M., Vergara, N., Martínez-Moreno, J. M., Salmerón, M. D., Richards, W. G., Felsenfeld, A., Kuro-O, M., Almadén, Y., Rodríguez, M. Differential regulation of renal Klotho and FGFR1 in normal and uremic rats. © FASEB.

  7. Comparison of Oral Manifestations of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Uremic Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

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    Seyed Javad Kia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Chronic renal failure (CRF, also known as chronic kidney disease, caused by devastated nephron mass of the kidney results in uremia. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and glomerulonephritis are common etiologic factors of CRF. This condition causes miscellaneous oral manifestations especially in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to comparison oral manifestations of diabetic and non-diabetic uremic patients undergoing hemodialysis.   Methods: A total of 95 patients who undergoing hemodialysis in Razi hospital in Rasht city participated in this descriptive analytical study. Patients were divided into two diabetic and non- diabetic groups. Oral cavity examinations were done by latex gloves and single use mirror. Objective and subjective oral manifestations such as xerostomia, bad taste, mucosal pain, uremic odor, coating tongue, petechial, purpura, pale oral mucosa, ulcer, dental erosion and candida infection were recorded in questionnaire. After gathering of information, the data were analyzed by SPSS 15 software using t-test and chi square statistical test.   Results: About 60% of patients (57 person were men and 40 % (38 person were women. The mean age of patients was 48 years (range of 20 -76 years. Common subjective oral manifestation in both groups was xerostomia and most common objective oral manifestations were pale oral mucosa, uremic odor and coating tongue respectively. The DMFT index in diabetic group was significantly higher (17.3±7.63 than non-diabetic patients (12.4±8.26. There was no significant statistical correlation between the time of dialysis, number of dialysis appointment during the week and objective and subjective oral manifestations in two groups.   Conclusion: Although, the present study has shown an increase in oral manifestations in diabetic patients undergoing hemodialysis relative to non-diabetic group, but this increase was not statistically significant. On the other hand

  8. Mecanismos básicos da encefalopatia urêmica Mechanisms underlying uremic encephalopathy

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    Giselli Scaini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Em pacientes com insuficiência renal, a encefalopatia é um problema comum que pode ser provocado pela uremia, deficiência de tiamina, diálise, rejeição de transplante, hipertensão, desequilíbrios hidroeletrolíticos e toxicidades medicamentosas. Em geral a encefalopatia se apresenta como um complexo de sintomas que progride de uma leve obnubilação sensitiva até delírio e coma. Esta revisão discute questões importantes com relação aos mecanismos de base da fisiopatologia da encefalopatia urêmica. A fisiopatologia da encefalopatia urêmica é até hoje incerta, mas postula-se o envolvimento de diversos fatores; trata-se de um processo complexo e provavelmente multifatorial. Distúrbios hormonais, estresse oxidativo, acúmulo de metabólitos, desequilíbrio entre os neurotransmissores excitatórios e inibitórios, e distúrbio do metabolismo intermediário foram identificados como fatores contribuintes. A despeito do progresso continuado na terapêutica, a maior parte das complicações neurológicas da uremia, como a encefalopatia urêmica, não respondem plenamente à diálise e muitas delas são desencadeadas ou agravadas pela diálise ou transplante renal. Por outro lado, estudos prévios demonstraram que a terapia antioxidante pode ser utilizada como terapia coadjuvante para o tratamento destas complicações neurológicas.In patients with renal failure, encephalopathy is a common problem that may be caused by uremia, thiamine deficiency, dialysis, transplant rejection, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances or drug toxicity. In general, encephalopathy presents with a symptom complex progressing from mild sensorial clouding to delirium and coma. This review discusses important issues regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy. The pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy up to now is uncertain, but several factors have been postulated to be involved; it is a complex and probably

  9. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  10. Alloimmunization in autoimmune hemolytic anemia patient: The differential adsorption approach

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    Ravi C Dara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients of β-thalassemia major are dependent on regular blood transfusions for their entire lifetime. Development of antibodies against red blood cell (RBC antigen which may be alloantibody or autoantibody, several times as a result of frequent red cell component transfusions, further complicates the subsequent transfusion therapy. Among the autoantibodies, warm-reactive autoantibodies are commoner and interfere in the pretransfusion testing. These RBC autoantibodies present in patient's serum potentially react with all the cells of antibody identification panel giving “pan-reactive” picture and making alloantibody identification complex. In this report, we present our approach in a thalassemia patient who presented with warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia, low hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl, and three significant alloantibodies (anti-D, anti-S, and anti-Jk b which were masked by pan-reactive warm autoantibody(s. Differential adsorption was used to unmask underlying alloantibodies. We suggest that differential adsorption procedure is an effective and efficient method for autoantibody adsorption, detection, and identification of masked alloantibody(s, especially in patients with low hemoglobin and history of recent blood transfusion.

  11. [Wavelength Selection in Hemolytic Evaluation Systems with Spectrophotometry Detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Su, Baochang; Ye, Xunda; Luo, Man

    2016-04-01

    Spectrophotometry is a simple hemolytic evaluation method commonly used in new drugs,biomedical materials and blood products.It is for the quantitative analysis of the characteristic absorption peaks of hemoglobin.Therefore,it is essential to select the correct detection wavelength when the evaluation system has influences on the conformation of hemoglobin.Based on the study of changes in the characteristic peaks over time of the hemolysis supernatant in four systems,namely,cell culture medium,phosphate buffered saline(PBS),physiological saline and banked blood preservation solution,using continuous wavelength scanning,the selections of detection wavelength were proposed as follows.In the cell culture medium system,the wavelength of 415 nm should be selected within 4h;,near 408 nm should be selected within 4~72h.In PBS system,within 4h,541 nm,577nm or 415 nm should be selected;4~72h,541 nm,577nm or near 406 nm should be selected.In physiological saline system,within 4h,414 nm should be selected;4~72h,near 405 nm should be selected;within 12 h,541nm or 577 nm could also be selected.In banked blood preservation solution system,within 72 h,415nm,540 nm or 576 nm should be selected.

  12. A Rare Association of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia with Gastric Adenocarcinoma

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    Kavita Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old male presented with dyspnea on exertion for at least two months. He also complained of progressive dysphagia and weight loss of 35 pounds over the last eight months. Initial blood tests showed hemoglobin of 6.1 g/dl, reticulocytes count of 19.7%, total bilirubin of 3.2 mg/dl, lactate dehydrogenase of 600 U/L, and haptoglobin of less than 8 mg/dl, and direct Coombs test was positive for warm immunoglobulin G. The impression was autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. The evaluation of dysphagia with esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a single irregular 4 cm malignant appearing ulcerated mass at the incisura angularis of the stomach. The mass was confirmed as adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Diagnostic laparoscopy was positive for malignant cells and he was diagnosed with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Other extensive workup to determine the etiology of AIHA was negative (described in detail below. Surgery was deferred primarily due to metastasis of cancer. Initially, hemoglobin was stabilized by intravenous methylprednisolone, high dose immunoglobulins, and packed red blood cell transfusions. After a few weeks, hemoglobin started trending down again. The patient was weaned off steroids and paradoxically IgG-mediated autohemolysis was controlled with the initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Our case highlights a rare occurrence of AIHA in association with gastric adenocarcinoma.

  13. [Detection and analysis of ABO Hemolytic disease in newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao-Xia; Dong, Qing-Song

    2014-10-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the incidence and the model of ABO hemolytic disease in newborn (ABO-HDN) and the results of the three hemolysis test, so as to provide the evidences for clinical diagnosis and therapy. A total of 227 cases of maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility from January 2013 to October 2013 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University were enrolled in the study. The ABO blood group of newborn and mother was detemined and three hemolysis tests (direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test, RBC antibody release test) were performed. The results indicated that in 227 cases of ABO incompatible pregnancies,186 cases were ABO-HDN (81.94%). There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies (P > 0.05). The positive ratio of direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test and RBC antibody release test were 59.14% (110/186), 84.78% (156/186) and 94.62% (176/186) respectively. It is concluded that the incidence of ABO-HDN is high. The main models of ABO-HDN were O-A and O-B. There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies. Three hemolysis tests are high sensitivity and are helpful in early diagnosis and early treatment of HDN.

  14. [Development of an Atypical Response Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Mark; Linden, James

    The development of an objective diagnostic scale to measure atypical behavior is discussed. The Atypical Response Scale (ARS) is a structured projective test consisting of 17 items, each weighted 1, 2, or 3, that were tested for convergence and reliability. ARS may be individually or group administered in 10-15 minutes; hand scoring requires 90…

  15. Genomic Damage in Endstage Renal Disease—Contribution of Uremic Toxins

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    Helga Stopper

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-a. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation.

  16. Effect of interleukin-2 and methylprednisolone on in vitro transformation of uremic lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, E; Ladefoged, J; Ødum, Niels

    1986-01-01

    The functional relationship in vitro between mitogen-induced lymphocyte transformation, lymphocyte response to interleukin-2 (IL-2) and steroid, and production of IL-2 was examined in patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis (HD) or on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD......). The lymphocyte responses to optimal stimulation with phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and pokeweed mitogen were depressed in lymphocyte cultures from HD patients, while CAPD lymphocyte cultures responded normally. However, at suboptimal phytohemagglutinin stimulation both CAPD lymphocyte and HD lymphocyte...... responses were subnormal. Uremic lymphocyte cultures were more sensitive to the immunosuppressive effect of methylprednisolone. Addition of IL-2 normalized the phytohemagglutinin responses of suboptimally stimulated CAPD lymphocyte cultures and clearly improved the mitogen responses of the HD lymphocyte...

  17. Removal of uremic retention products by hemodialysis is coupled with indiscriminate loss of vital metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hao; Mao, Jia-Rong; Chen, Hua; Su, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dan-Qian; Zhao, Ying-Yong; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2017-12-01

    Although dialysis ameliorates uremia and fluid and electrolytes disorders, annual mortality rate remains high in dialysis population reflecting its shortcoming in replacing renal function. Unlike the normal kidney, dialysis causes dramatic shifts in volume and composition of body fluids and indiscriminate removal of vital solutes. Present study was undertaken to determine the impact of hemodialysis on plasma metabolites in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. 80 hemodialysis patients and 80 age/gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-high-definition mass spectrometry, we measured plasma metabolites before, during, and after hemodialysis procedure and in blood entering and leaving the dialysis filter. Principal component analysis revealed significant difference in concentration of 214 metabolites between healthy control and ESRD patients' pre-dialysis plasma (126 increased and 88 reduced in ESRD group). Comparison of post-dialysis with pre-dialysis data revealed significant changes in the 362 metabolites. Among ESI + metabolites 195 decreased and 55 increased and among ESI - metabolites 82 decreased and 30 increased following hemodialysis. Single blood passage through the dialyzer caused significant changes in 323 metabolites. Comparison of ESRD patients' post-hemodialysis with healthy subjects' data revealed marked differences in metabolic profiles. We identified 55 of the 362 differential metabolites including well known uremic toxins, waste products and vital biological compounds. In addition to uremic toxins and waste products hemodialysis removes large number of identified and as-yet un-identified metabolites. Depletion of vital biological compounds by dialysis may contribute to the high morbidity and annual mortality rate in this population. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice.

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    Line S Bisgaard

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in uremic settings, insight into new treatment options with effects on both parameters is warranted. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves glucose homeostasis, and is approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that GLP-1 also dampens inflammation and atherosclerosis. Our aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX. Uremic (n = 29 and sham-operated (n = 14 atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s.c. once daily or vehicle for 13 weeks. As expected, uremia increased aortic atherosclerosis. In the remnant kidneys from NX mice, flow cytometry revealed an increase in the number of monocyte-like cells (CD68+F4/80-, CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells, suggesting that moderate uremia induced kidney inflammation. Furthermore, markers of fibrosis (i.e. Col1a1 and Col3a1 were upregulated, and histological examinations showed increased glomerular diameter in NX mice. Importantly, liraglutide treatment attenuated atherosclerosis (~40%, p < 0.05 and reduced kidney inflammation in NX mice. There was no effect of liraglutide on expression of fibrosis markers and/or kidney histology. This study suggests that liraglutide has beneficial effects in a mouse model of moderate uremia by reducing atherosclerosis and attenuating kidney inflammation.

  19. Anti-hemolytic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Solenostemon Monostachyus (P.Beauv.) Briq. leaves in 2-butoxyethanol-hemolytic induced rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osikoya, Iyanuoluwa Olubukola; Afolabi, Israel Sunmola; Rotimi, Solomon Oladapo; Okafor, Adaobi Mary-Joy

    2018-04-01

    Traditional medicine is largely used to sustain global health requirements. Determining the biological activities of Solenostemon monostachyus is essential to provide a platform for treating hemolytic diseases. The methanolic extract of the leaves was orally administered for 5 days at 150 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg of body weight doses to determine concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and the activities of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) of plasma in the kidney, spleen and liver of 2-butoxyethanol hemolytic-induced rats. A dose of 150 mg of extract/kg of body weight significantly increased (p<0.05) HO-1 in the kidney. COX-2 activity was significantly reduced (p<0.05) mainly in the kidney untreated hemolytic induced rats. All treatments significantly increased (p<0.05) TNF-α concentrations in the kidney and spleen. HO-1 gene expression was downregulated, indicating stress reduction in the liver, by an extract dose of 200 mg/kg of body weight and caffeic acid and was upregulated, indicating stress in the spleen, by an extract dose of 150-200 mg/kg of body weight. A dose of 200-250 mg of extract/kg of body weight resulted in relatively good anti-inflammatory properties, and may possess healing properties in patients with hemolytic related diseases.

  20. Specific features of a neonatal period in infants following intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion for fetal hemolytic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the characteristics of a neonatal period in infants following intrauterine blood transfusion for Rh-induced fetal hemolytic disease. It is shown that the early diagnosis and detection of the signs of fetal hemolytic disease, and intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion may prolong pregnancy, ensure the birth of a baby with normal anthropometric indicators, optimize his/her neonatal period and prognosis of severe hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn.

  1. Nonmotor Features in Atypical Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kailash P; Stamelou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism (AP) comprises mainly multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD), which are distinct pathological entities, presenting with a wide phenotypic spectrum. The classic syndromes are now called MSA-parkinsonism (MSA-P), MSA-cerebellar type (MSA-C), Richardson's syndrome, and corticobasal syndrome. Nonmotor features in AP have been recognized almost since the initial description of these disorders; however, research has been limited. Autonomic dysfunction is the most prominent nonmotor feature of MSA, but also gastrointestinal symptoms, sleep dysfunction, and pain, can be a feature. In PSP and CBD, the most prominent nonmotor symptoms comprise those deriving from the cognitive/neuropsychiatric domain. Apart from assisting the clinician in the differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease, nonmotor features in AP have a big impact on quality of life and prognosis of AP and their treatment poses a major challenge for clinicians. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Atypical gorlin′s syndrome

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    Yesudian Devakar

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old woman presented with complaints of skin lesions on her face, palms and soles. On examination, 8 to 10 well-defined, pigmented nodules with raised and pearly borders were seen on the face. Multiple pits were present on the palms and soles. Biopsy of both lesions revealed the presence of basal cell epitheliomas. The patient also gave history of removal of a keratocyst of mandible 10 years back. The case was diagnosed as Gorlin′s syndrome. It is atypical due to the low number of basal cell epitheliomas, the occurrence of only a single odontogenic cyst and the absence of other features usually associated with this condition

  3. Are Atypical Things More Popular?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jonah; Packard, Grant

    2018-04-01

    Why do some cultural items become popular? Although some researchers have argued that success is random, we suggest that how similar items are to each other plays an important role. Using natural language processing of thousands of songs, we examined the relationship between lyrical differentiation (i.e., atypicality) and song popularity. Results indicated that the more different a song's lyrics are from its genre, the more popular it becomes. This relationship is weaker in genres where lyrics matter less (e.g., dance) or where differentiation matters less (e.g., pop) and occurs for lyrical topics but not style. The results shed light on cultural dynamics, why things become popular, and the psychological foundations of culture more broadly.

  4. Atypical combinations and scientific impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzi, Brian; Mukherjee, Satyam; Stringer, Michael; Jones, Ben

    2013-10-25

    Novelty is an essential feature of creative ideas, yet the building blocks of new ideas are often embodied in existing knowledge. From this perspective, balancing atypical knowledge with conventional knowledge may be critical to the link between innovativeness and impact. Our analysis of 17.9 million papers spanning all scientific fields suggests that science follows a nearly universal pattern: The highest-impact science is primarily grounded in exceptionally conventional combinations of prior work yet simultaneously features an intrusion of unusual combinations. Papers of this type were twice as likely to be highly cited works. Novel combinations of prior work are rare, yet teams are 37.7% more likely than solo authors to insert novel combinations into familiar knowledge domains.

  5. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy for significant hyperbilirubinemia in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miqdad, A M; Abdelbasit, O B; Shaheed, M M; Seidahmed, M Z; Abomelha, A M; Arcala, O P

    2004-09-01

    Although intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been reported in hyperbilirubinemia of Rh hemolytic disease, its use in ABO hemolytic disease has been reported in only a few studies. In our institute we have observed that almost 30% of babies with hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease required exchange transfusion. To determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease would reduce the need for exchange transfusion as a primary goal in these babies. This was a prospective study involving all newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to direct Coombs-positive ABO hemolytic disease. All healthy term babies with ABO hemolytic disease with positive direct Coombs test in the period between 2000 and 2002 were identified. Significant hyperbilirubinemia was defined as hyperbilirubinemia requiring phototherapy and/or rising by 8.5 micromol/l per h (0.5 mg/dl per h) or more to require exchange transfusion. Babies were randomly assigned into two groups: group 1 (study group) received phototherapy plus IVIG (500 mg/kg); and group 2 (control group) received phototherapy alone. Exchange transfusion was carried out in any group if at any time the bilirubin level reached 340 micromol/l (20 mg/dl) or more, or rose by 8.5 micromol/l per h (0.5 mg/dl per h) in group 2. A total of 112 babies were enrolled over 2 years, 56 in each group. Exchange transfusion was carried out in four babies in the study group, while 16 babies in the control group required exchange. Late anemia was not of concern in either group. No adverse effects related to IVIG administration were recorded. Administration of IVIG to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease with positive direct Coomb's test reduces the need for exchange transfusion without producing immediate adverse effects.

  7. N-terminal amphipathic helix as a trigger of hemolytic activity in antimicrobial peptides: a case study in latarcins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyansky, Anton A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Vorontsova, Olga V; Samsonova, Olga V; Egorova, Natalya S; Krylov, Nicolay A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

    2009-07-21

    In silico structural analyses of sets of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are performed. Differences between hemolytic and non-hemolytic AMPs are revealed in organization of their N-terminal region. A parameter related to hydrophobicity of the N-terminal part is proposed as a measure of the peptide propensity to exhibit hemolytic and other unwanted cytotoxic activities. Based on the information acquired, a rational approach for selective removal of these properties in AMPs is suggested. A proof of concept is gained through engineering specific mutations that resulted in elimination of the hemolytic activity of AMPs (latarcins) while leaving the beneficial antimicrobial effect intact.

  8. Radiation resistance of a hemolytic micrococcus isolated from chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors on a highly radiation-resistant hemolytic micrococcus isolated from chicken meat were studied. NaCl tolerance and gamma radiation resistance of the cells were growth phase-related. The cells were resistant to injury from drying or freezing/thawing. Under certain conditions, cells in the frozen state required approximately 5 Mrad to inactivate 90% of the population; 0.2 Mrad injured an equivalent proportion. Survival curve of the cells heated at 60 0 C showed a unique pattern which was in three distinct phases. Heat-stressed cells were much more sensitive to radiation inactivation than unheated cells. When suspended in fresh m-Plate Count Broth (PCB), the injured cells repaired without multiplication during incubation at 32 0 C. The repair process in this bacterium, however, was slower compared to thermally injured organisms studied by other workers. An improved replica-plating technique, was devised for isolation of radiation-sensitive mutants of pigmented bacteria. A simple method to demonstrate radiation-inducible radiation resistance in microbial cells was developed. The new method required neither washing/centrifugation nor procedures for cell enumeration. Mutagenesis treatment of radiation-resistant micrococcal bacterium with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) followed by FPR and screening steps resulted in isolation of two radiation-sensitive mutants. The more sensitive mutant strain, designated as 702, was seven times as sensitive to gamma or UC radiation as the wild type. No apparent difference was observed between 702 and the wild type in (1) cell morphology, colonial morphology, and pigment production or (2) tolerance to NaCl, drying/storage, freezing/thawing, and heating. Sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment (for curing) of wild type did not result in isolation of a radiation-sensitive mutant

  9. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni effect on the hemolytic potential of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansano, S; Rivas, A; Pina-Pérez, M C; Martinez, A; Rodrigo, D

    2017-06-05

    The effect of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni on the hemolytic potential of Listeria monocytogenes was studied by means of the assessment of the Listeriolysin O (LLO) production. The three factors under study, stevia concentration in the range [0-2.5] % (w/v), incubation temperature (10 and 37°C), and exposure time (0-65h) significantly affected (p≤0.05) the hemolytic activity of L. monocytogenes. Results showed that at the lower incubation temperature the hemolytic potential of the bacterium was significantly reduced, from 100% at 37°C to 8% at 10°C (after 65h of incubation) in unsupplemented substrate (0% stevia). Irrespective of the temperature, 10 or 37°C, supplementation of the medium with stevia at 2.5 % (w/v) reduced the bacterium's hemolytic activity by a maximum of 100%. Furthermore, the time of exposure to 2.5 % (w/v) stevia concentration was also a significant factor reducing the hemolytic capability of L. monocytogenes. The possibility of reducing the pathogenic potential of L. monocytogenes (hemolysis) by exposure to stevia should be confirmed in real food matrices, opening a research niche with a valuable future impact on food safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to multiple maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kara Beth; Rossi, Karen Q; Nagaraja, Haikady N; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether women with combinations of red blood cell antibodies are more likely to develop significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn than those with single antibodies. A retrospective exposure cohort study was conducted of pregnant women with red blood cell antibodies. The development of significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn was then compared between patients with single antibodies and those with multiple antibodies. Data analysis was limited to pregnancies delivering since the year 2000. Thirteen percent of the patients referred to our program had multiple red blood cell antibodies. Odds of developing significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn for patients with anti-Rh(D) combined with at least 1 additional red blood cell antibody were 3.65 times the odds for women with anti-Rh(D) antibodies in isolation (95% confidence interval, 1.84-7.33). In the setting of multiple antibodies including anti-Rh(D), Rh-positive fetuses/neonates have an increased odds of developing significant hemolytic disease even if the fetus is negative for the other corresponding red blood cell antigen. Women with multiple red blood cell antibodies are more likely to develop significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn than those with a single antibody especially in the presence of anti-(Rh)D. This pathophysiology may suggest a more aggressive immune response in women who develop more than 1 red blood cell antibody. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

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    Rajesh Sonani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct were high. This patient′s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT, antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2 nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4 th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  12. Anti-Mur as the most likely cause of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtary, Sara; Gikas, Anastasia; Glader, Bertil; Andrews, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Although rare in the United States, anti-Mur is relatively common in Southeast Asia and has been reported to have clinical significance in Chinese and Taiwanese populations. The infant was full term and the second child of a Chinese mother and Vietnamese father, presenting with jaundice. He was clinically diagnosed with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The direct antiglobulin test indicated that the infant's red blood cells were coated only with anti-IgG. Anti-Mur was identified in the maternal serum and the neonate's plasma. The father was found to be positive for the Mur antigen. The cause of the infant's hemolytic anemia was determined to be most likely anti-Mur. Since anti-Mur is implicated in causing hemolytic disease of the newborn, it is important to recognize this antibody more commonly found in Asian patients in the United States as the Mur+ phenotype has a higher prevalence in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  13. Computerized tomography in atypical Pott's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, M.N.B.; Wang, E.H.M.

    1993-01-01

    Classical Pott's disease is described as a two-vertebrae disease with the destruction of the intervening invertebral disc. Computerized tomography has been used in the differential diagnosis of spine infections and neoplasms. We reviewed CT scans of patients seen at the Philippine General Hospital over a two-year period with atypical presentations of atypical tuberculous spondylitis. We used the computerized tomography findings described as characteristic of classical Pott's disease as criteria in evaluating the CT scans of patients diagnosed to have Atypical Pott's Disease. Although the number of patients prevented sensitivity and specificity studies to be done, our results strongly suggest that the same CT criteria used to diagnose Classical Pott's Disease may also be used to diagnose Pott's disease in its atypical form. (Author.). 13 refs

  14. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  15. Atypical presentations of Wolframs syndrome

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    S Saran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary or sporadic neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD. The classically described presentation is of insulin-dependent diabetes, followed by optic atrophy, central diabetes insipidus, and sensory neural deafness. Also included are less well-described presentations of Wolframs syndrome. We here present three cases of atypical presentation of this syndrome. Case 1: A 15-year-old boy with insulin-dependent diabetes was presented for evaluation of depressive symptoms associated with suicidal tendency. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are described with Wolframs syndrome, and wolframin gene, in recessive inheritance, is associated with psychiatric illnesses without other manifestations of Wolframs syndrome. Case 2: A 17-year-old diabetic boy on insulin with good control of blood sugar presented for evaluation of delayed puberty. Central hypogonadism and other anterior pituitary hormone dysfunctions are the less publicized hormone dysfunctions in Wolframs syndrome. Case 3: A 23-year-old female who was on insulin for diabetes for the past 14 years, got admitted for evaluation of sudden loss of vision. This patient had developed a vitreous hemorrhage and, on evaluation, was found to have optic atrophy, sensory neural hearing loss, and diabetes insipidus, and presented differently from the gradual loss of vision described in Wolframs syndrome. Conclusion: Wolframs syndrome being a multisystem degenerative disorder can have myriad other manifestations than the classically described features. Neuropsychiatric manifestations, depression with suicidal risk, central hypogonadism, and secondary adrenal insufficiency are among the less well-described manifestations of this syndrome.

  16. Contribution of hly homologs to the hemolytic activity of Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Naoko; Fukamachi, Haruka; Arimoto, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a periodontal pathogen that requires iron for its growth. Although this organism has hemolytic activity, the precise nature of its hemolytic substances and their associated hemolytic actions are yet to be fully determined. In the present study, we identified and characterized several putative hly genes in P. intermedia ATCC25611 which appear to encode hemolysins. Six hly genes (hlyA, B, C, D, E, and hlyI) of P. intermedia were identified by comparing their nucleotide sequences to those of known hly genes of Bacteroides fragilis NCTC9343. The hlyA-E, and hlyI genes were overexpressed individually in the non-hemolytic Escherichia coli strain JW5181 and examined its contribution to the hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar plates. E. coli cells expressing the hlyA and hlyI genes exhibited hemolytic activity under anaerobic conditions. On the other hand, only E. coli cells stably expressing the hlyA gene were able to lyse the red blood cells when cultured under aerobic conditions. In addition, expression of the hlyA and hlyI genes was significantly upregulated in the presence of red blood cells. Furthermore, we found that the growth of P. intermedia was similar in an iron-limited medium supplemented with either red blood cells or heme. Taken together, our results indicate that the hlyA and hlyI genes of P. intermedia encode putative hemolysins that appear to be involved in the lysis of red blood cells, and suggest that these hemolysins might play important roles in the iron-dependent growth of this organism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

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    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  18. Immunoglobulin transfusion in hemolytic disease of the newborn: place in therapy

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    Mundy CA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia A Mundy, Jatinder Bhatia Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Georgia Regents University, Children's Hospital of Georgia, GA, USA Abstract: Hemolytic disease of the newborn continues to be a common neonatal disorder that requires a comprehensive understanding on the part of those caring for infants. Common treatments include hydration and phototherapy. Exchange transfusion is used in severe hemolytic disease, but infants undergoing this treatment are exposed to many adverse effects. Intravenous immunoglobulin is a newer strategy that is showing promise in the treatment of the disease. This review discusses the current use and future expectations of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in newborns. Keywords: hyperbilirubinemia, ABO incompatibility, neonatal jaundice 

  19. Hemolytic and urease activities in vibrios isolated from fresh and frozen oysters

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    Renata Albuquerque Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study aimed to survey the Vibrio microbiota of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae obtained from restaurants in Fortaleza, State of Ceará, Brazil, and to identify virulence factors. METHODS: The isolated vibrios were submitted to biochemical identification and were tested for hemolytic and urease activities. RESULTS: The isolated strains belonged to 13 species, with predominance of Vibrio mimicus. Of the strain isolates only from fresh samples, 20.5% and 2.8% showed hemolytic and urease activities, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the little-publicized claim that Vibrio species other than V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus can represent a health risk to public health.

  20. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    OpenAIRE

    Usman, Adiyyatu Sa?idu; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ramli, Noraida; Diggi, Sirajo A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting wit...

  1. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, C S; Suchitha, S; Manjunath, G V; Murthy, Srinivas

    2013-09-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive mother.

  2. Hemolytic Porcine Intestinal Escherichia coli without Virulence-Associated Genes Typical of Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:21965399

  3. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  4. Reversal of uremic tumoral calcinosis by optimization of clinical treatment of bone and mineral metabolism disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Espiga Maioli

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumoral calcinosis is an uncommon type of extraosseous calcification characterized by large rubbery or cystic masses containing calcium-phosphate deposits. The condition prevails in the periarticular tissue with preservation of osteoarticular structures. Elevated calcium-phosphorus products and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism are present in most patients with uremic tumoral calcionosis (UTC. Case report of an obese secondary to chronic glomerulonephritis, undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD reported the appearance of painless tumors in the medial surface of fifth finger and left arm. Tumoral calcinosis was confirmed by left biceps biopsy. Poor adherence to CAPD. The patient was transferred to the "tidal" modality of peritoneal dialysis and after was treated by hemodialysis, despite the persistence of severe hyperparathyroidism progressive reduction of UTC until near to its complete disappearance. Nowadays, one year after patient received deceased-donor kidney transplantation, he presents with an improvement in secondary hyperparathyroidism. UTC should be included in the elucidation of periarticular calcification of every patient on dialysis. Relevant laboratory findings such as secondary hyperparathyroidism and elevated calcium- phosphorus products in the presence of periarticular calcification should draw attention to the diagnosis of UTC.

  5. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Line S; Bosteen, Markus H; Fink, Lisbeth N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosc......Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis...... aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX)). Uremic (n = 29) and sham-operated (n = 14) atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s.......c. once daily) or vehicle for 13 weeks. As expected, uremia increased aortic atherosclerosis. In the remnant kidneys from NX mice, flow cytometry revealed an increase in the number of monocyte-like cells (CD68+F4/80-), CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells, suggesting that moderate uremia induced kidney inflammation...

  6. Severe Hemolytic Jaundice in a Neonate with a Novel COL4A1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotaki, Seiichi; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hamabata, Takayuki; Kumakura, Akira; Shiota, Mitsutaka; Arai, Hiroshi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hata, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    We report our experience with a preterm infant with severe hemolytic jaundice who required exchange transfusion just after birth. The patient was negative for alloimmune hemolysis as a result of maternal-fetal blood type incompatibility, and tests for inherited defects in erythrocyte metabolism, membrane function, and hemoglobin synthesis were normal. We also performed a bone marrow examination, but could not identify the cause of hemolysis. The patient had several other complications, including porencephaly, epilepsy, elevated serum levels of creatine kinase, and persistent microscopic hematuria. Later, we detected a genetic mutation in COL4A1, which was recently found to be associated with hemolytic anemia. We therefore believe that all of the patient's clinical features, including hemolytic anemia, were due to the mutation in COL4A1. Genetic testing for COL4A1 mutations is recommended in neonates who exhibit hemolytic disease of unknown etiology, especially when other complications compatible with COL4A1-related disorders are present. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Hemolytic and cytotoxic properties of saponin purified from Holothuria leucospilota sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mozhgan; Parivar, Kazem; Baharara, Javad; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Asili, Javad

    2014-10-01

    Holothuroids (sea cucumbers) are members of the phylum echinodermata, which produce saponins. Saponins exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, we isolated the crude saponins from the body wall of the dominant Iranian species of sea cucumber, Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota). The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of saponins in the Persian Gulf H. leucospilota and study the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of these compounds. The body wall of sea cucumber was dried and powdered and the crude saponins were isolated using various solvents. The crude saponins were further purified by column chromatography using HP-20 resin. The foam test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), hemolytic assay, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of saponins. Cytotoxicity was analyzed using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. The foam test, hemolytic assay, and TLC supported the presence of saponin compounds in the 80% ethanol fraction of H. leucospilota. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the extract showed hydroxyl (-OH), alkyl (C-H), ether (C-O) and ester (-C=O) absorption characteristic of teriterpenoid saponins. The C-O-C absorption indicated glycoside linkages to the sapogenins. The crude saponin extracted from sea cucumber was cytotoxic to A549 cells. The 80% ethanol fraction of saponin isolated from H. leucospilota exhibited hemolytic activity and offers promise as an anti-cancer candidate.

  8. [Neonatal ABO incompatibility underlies a potentially severe hemolytic disease of the newborn and requires adequate care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senterre, T; Minon, J-M; Rigo, J

    2011-03-01

    ABO allo-immunization is the most frequent hemolytic disease of the newborn and ABO incompatibility is present in 15-25 % of pregnancies. True ABO alloimmunization occurs in approximately one out of 150 births. Intensity is generally lower than in RhD allo-immunization. We report on three cases showing that ABO allo-immunization can lead to severe hemolytic disease of the newborn with potentially threatening hyperbilirubinemia and complications. Early diagnosis and adequate care are necessary to prevent complications in ABO incompatibility. A direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of diagnosis and should be performed at birth on cord blood sampling in all group infants born to O mothers, especially if of African origin. Risk factor analysis and attentive clinical monitoring during the first days of life are essential. Vigilance is even more important for infants discharged before the age of 72 h. Every newborn should be assessed for the risk of developing severe hyperbilirubinemia and should be examined by a qualified healthcare professional in the first days of life. Treatment depends on the total serum bilirubin level, which may increase very rapidly in the first 48 h of life in cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn. Phototherapy and, in severe cases, exchange transfusion are used to prevent hyperbilirubinemia encephalopathy. Intravenous immunoglobulins are used to reduce exchange transfusion. Treatments of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn should be provided and performed by trained personnel in neonatal intensive care units. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfraz Saleemi

    2014-01-01

    Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies.

  11. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Christiansen, I; Harbo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...

  12. Effect of l-arginine therapy on plasma NO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 3/ levels, and blood pressure in uremic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, M.; Khemomal, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Normal kidney function is regulated by Nitric oxide (NO) and Superoxide (O/sub 2/-) in the body, and consequently controls blood pressure. Nitric Oxide promotes natriuresis and diuresis, and therefore results in reduction of blood pressure. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of L-arginine supplementation on blood pressure, urinary protein, nitrite and nitrate in addition to blood urea, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance in uremic rabbits. Methods: This study was carried out in the Department of Biochemistry Basic Medical Sciences Institute, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi. A total of 48 rabbits were included in the study. Twenty-four of the rabbits on surgical intervention were prepared as uremic and so became hypertensive as well. Two groups were uremic, one group was given L-arginine and the other was remained untreated. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured on week 0, week 2, week 4, and week 6, while blood and urine was collected on week 0 and week 6. Results: On supplementation with L-arginine to uremic rabbits systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased significantly. Nitrite/nitrate and urinary protein were corrected to some extent while blood urea and serum creatinine were unaffected. Conclusion: L-arginine has a beneficial role as blood pressure lowering agent in uremic rabbits. It corrects NO/sub 2/NO/sub 3/ plasma level and proteinuria which is indicator of renal failure. (author)

  13. Breaking down the complement system: a review and update on novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Yuvaram N V; Siedlecki, Andrew M; Francis, Jean M

    2017-03-01

    The complement system represents one of the more primitive forms of innate immunity. It has increasingly been found to contribute to pathologies in the native and transplanted kidney. We provide a concise review of the physiology of the complement cascade, and discuss current and upcoming complement-based therapies. Current agents in clinical use either bind to complement components directly or prevent complement from binding to antibodies affixed to the endothelial surface. These include C1 esterase inhibitors, anti-C5 mAbs, anti-CD20 mAbs, and proteasome inhibitors. Treatment continues to show efficacy in the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and antibody-mediated rejection. Promising agents not currently available include CCX168, TP10, AMY-101, factor D inhibitors, coversin, and compstatin. Several new trials are targeting complement inhibition to treat antineutrophilic cystoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, C3 glomerulopathy, thrombotic microangiopathy, and IgA nephropathy. New agents for the treatment of the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome are also in development. Complement-based therapies are being considered for targeted therapy in the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and antibody-mediated rejection, C3 glomerulopathy, and ANCA-associated vasculitis. A few agents are currently in use as orphan drugs. A number of other drugs are in clinical trials and, overall, are showing promising preliminary results.

  14. Perianal atypical leiomyoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pingliang; Ou, Hailing; Huang, Shen; Wei, Longxiang; Zhang, Sen; Liu, Jiali; Geng, Shuguang; Yang, Kun

    2017-12-01

    Reports on perianal atypical leiomyoma, a perianal tumor, are rare. We confirmed a perianal atypical leiomyoma by its clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and immunohistochemistry. A 28-year-old female with a perianal mass found more than 4 years ago. The 5cm_4cm_4cm sized mass was located on the left side of the anus and vagina; The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed: A 4.1cm × 5.2cm × 4.9cm sized round mass was observed on the left side of the circumference. Perianal atypical leiomyoma. anal peripheral mass resection was performed under lumbar anesthesia. The postoperative course was uneventful, healing, the patient was discharged. Perianal atypical leiomyomas are benign tumors, but with the clinically atypical leiomyoma, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between potential malignant smooth muscle tumors,and there may be malignant changes. Surgery should ensure complete resection, and to avoid postoperative recurrence, there should be a regular follow-up.

  15. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS USE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Potočnik-Dajčman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Classical antipsychotics – neuroleptics are one of the most frequently prescribed psychotropic drugs in child psychiatry. Atypical antipsychotics are used for the same indications – psychotic (schizophrenia as well as unpsychotic disorders (pervasive developmental disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders and tics disorders. It is surprising that the studies on their use with regard to this age group are rather rare. They are carried out on a small number of samples and only exceptionally double blind. This article summarizes published clinical experience with atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents. A short overview of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and side effects is given. Schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders are major indications for use of atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents, but they have also been successfully used for other disorders such as aggressive behaviour, tics and anorexia nervosa.Conclusions. With better side-effect profile, some of the atypical antipsychotics are expected to be doctrinally recognised as the first-line treatment for childhood schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders. However, more long-term studies carried out on a larger sample are needed. Atypical antipsychotics are already used in everyday practice as first-line treatment of childhood and adolescents schizophrenia.

  16. Sigma E regulators control hemolytic activity and virulence in a shrimp pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimonsri Rattanama

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Vibrio are important marine and aquaculture pathogens. Hemolytic activity has been identified as a virulence factor in many pathogenic vibrios including V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi and V. vulnificus. We have used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the hemolytic activity of shrimp-pathogenic V. harveyi strain PSU3316. Out of 1,764 mutants screened, five mutants showed reduced hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar and exhibited virulence attenuation in shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei. Mutants were identified by comparing transposon junction sequences to a draft of assembly of the PSU3316 genome. Surprisingly none of the disrupted open reading frames or gene neighborhoods contained genes annotated as hemolysins. The gene encoding RseB, a negative regulator of the sigma factor (σ(E, was interrupted in 2 out of 5 transposon mutants, in addition, the transcription factor CytR, a threonine synthetase, and an efflux-associated cytoplasmic protein were also identified. Knockout mutations introduced into the rpoE operon at the rseB gene exhibited low hemolytic activity in sheep blood agar, and were 3-to 7-fold attenuated for colonization in shrimp. Comparison of whole cell extracted proteins in the rseB mutant (PSU4030 to the wild-type by 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed 6 differentially expressed proteins, including two down-regulated porins (OmpC-like and OmpN and an upregulated protease (DegQ which have been associated with σ(E in other organisms. Our study is the first report linking hemolytic activity to the σ(E regulators in pathogenic Vibrio species and suggests expression of this virulence-linked phenotype is governed by multiple regulatory pathways within the V. harveyi.

  17. Analysis of multidrug resistant group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility forming small, less hemolytic colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Banno

    Full Text Available Group B streptococci (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae are the leading cause of neonatal invasive diseases and are also important pathogens for elderly adults. Until now, nearly all GBS with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS have shown β-hemolytic activity and grow on sheep blood agar. However, we have previously reported three PRGBS clinical isolates harboring a CylK deletion that form small less hemolytic colonies. In this study, we examined the causes of small, less hemolytic colony formation in these clinical isolates. Isogenic strains were sequenced to identify the mutation related to a small colony size. We identified a 276_277insG nucleic acid insertion in the thiamin pyrophosphokinase (tpk gene, resulting in premature termination at amino acid 103 in TPK, as a candidate mutation responsible for small colony formation. The recombinant strain Δtpk, which harbored the 276_277insG insertion in the tpk gene, showed small colony formation. The recombinant strain ΔcylK, which harbored the G379T substitution in cylK, showed a reduction in hemolytic activity. The phenotypes of both recombinant strains were complemented by the expression of intact TPK or CylK, respectively. Moreover, the use of Rapid ID 32 API and VITEK MS to identify strains as GBS was evaluated clinical isolates and recombinant strains. VITEK MS, but not Rapid ID 32 API, was able to accurately identify the strains as GBS. In conclusion, we determined that mutations in tpk and cylK caused small colonies and reduced hemolytic activity, respectively, and characterized the clinical isolates in detail.

  18. Uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate level is associated with prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hua Tang

    Full Text Available Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients.

  19. Quantitative ultrasound technique at the phalanges in discriminating between uremic and osteoporotic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guglielmi, G.; De Terlizzi, F.; Aucella, F.; Scillitani, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of quantitative ultrasound technique (QUS) at the phalanges to discriminate between uremic and osteoporotic patients. Three groups of subjects (38 dialytic women, 16 osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures, 19 non-dialytic and non-fractured women) were recruited at the Department of Radiology at 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. The groups were matched for age and body mass index (BMI). On all subjects the following measurements were performed: spinal BMD by QCT and by DXA, Femoral BMD by DXA, phalangeal QUS. For QUS measurements, the DBM Sonic (IGEA, Carpi, Italy) was applied to the metaphysis of the proximal phalanges of the last four fingers of the hand. Osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures showed significantly lower values of spinal BMD by QCT and DXA and Ward's Triangle BMD with respect to hemodialytic patients (p < 0.005). All QUS values, except for BTT and SoS, showed lower values in osteoporotic women with respect to hemodialytic patients (p < 0.05). Control group showed higher values of AD-SoS, BTT and SoS than hemodialytic patients (p < 0.005) while the two groups did not differ for BMD values measured with both QCT and DXA. UBPI and FWA data showed a similar behaviour to DXA and QCT results, whereas BTT and SoS showed a completely different behaviour. AD-SoS was the only parameter that could effectively discriminate among the three groups (ANOVA, p < 0.0001). We conclude that phalangeal QUS can discriminate between hemodialysed patients and controls with similar bone mineral density, and can also discriminate between hemodialysed and osteoporotic subjects with vertebral fractures. Different characteristics of ultrasound signal can be ascribed to each bone tissue condition, enabling a clear differentiation of bone tissue changes occurring in menopause, osteoporosis and renal osteodystrophy

  20. Early Detection of Subclinical Uremic Cardiomyopathy Using Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanin, Noha; Alkemary, Alkhateeb

    2016-04-01

    Overhydration has a deleterious effect on cardio myocytes. This study was designated to evaluate left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction in patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) using conventional, tissue Doppler and two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE). Forty controls and 90 CKD patients, aged 49.3 ± 14 years old, were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups depending on their glomerular filtration rate. Group 1 (≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ), group 2 (≤60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ), and group 3 (≤60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) and on regular dialysis for at least 12 months). Pulsed-Doppler and tissue Doppler studies were used to estimate LV filling pressure E/E'. Using 2DSTE, circumferential, radial, and longitudinal functions of the LV have been measured. LV longitudinal systolic strain, early, and late diastolic strain rates were significantly reduced in CKD patients (-16.9 ± 3.8%, 1.6 ± 0.5%, and 1.3 ± 0.4% in CKD vs. -22.5 ± 0.6%, 2.3 ± 0.2%, and 1.9 ± 0.1% in controls, P < 0.001 for all), and no difference was observed in terms of the circumferential LV functions (-22.4 ± 1.7 vs. -22.5 ± 1.4, P = 0.567). Severity of the kidney dysfunction appears to parallel with the rise of E/E' significantly (P < 0.001). In CKD, although the longitudinal and radial systolic functions were reduced, LV ejection fraction may remain within normal limits due to the preservation of the circumferential functions. Early detection of uremic cardiomyopathy might provide useful information for the risk stratification and decide the proper dialysis therapy in these patients. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Vitamin D treatment attenuates cardiac FGF23/FGFR4 signaling and hypertrophy in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifheit-Nestler, Maren; Grabner, Alexander; Hermann, Laura; Richter, Beatrice; Schmitz, Karin; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Yanucil, Christopher; Faul, Christian; Haffner, Dieter

    2017-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and excess of circulating fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) contribute to cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). FGF23 activates FGF receptor 4 and (FGFR4) calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling in cardiac myocytes, thereby causing left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Here, we determined if 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) inhibits FGF23-induced cardiac signaling and LVH. 5/6 nephrectomized (5/6 Nx) rats were treated with different doses of calcitriol for 4 or 10 weeks and cardiac expression of FGF23/FGFR4 and activation of calcineurin/NFAT as well as LVH were analyzed. FGFR4 activation and hypertrophic cell growth were studied in cultured cardiac myocytes that were co-treated with FGF23 and calcitriol. In 5/6Nx rats with LVH, we detected elevated FGF23 expression in bone and myocardium, increased cardiac expression of FGFR4 and elevated cardiac activation of calcineurin/NFAT signaling. Cardiac expression levels of FGF23 and FGFR4 significantly correlated with the presence of LVH in uremic rats. Treatment with calcitriol reduced LVH as well as cardiac FGFR4 expression and calcineurin/NFAT activation. Bone and cardiac FGF23 expression were further stimulated by calcitriol in a dose-dependent manner, but levels of intact cardiac FGF23 protein were suppressed by high-dose calcitriol. In cultured cardiac myocytes, co-treatment with calcitriol blocked FGF23-induced activation of FGFR4 and hypertrophic cell growth. Our data suggest that in CKD, cardioprotective effects of calcitriol stem from its inhibitory actions on the cardiac FGF23/FGFR4 system, and based on their counterbalancing effects on cardiac myocytes, high FGF23 and low calcitriol synergistically contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel, selective vitamin D analog suppresses parathyroid hormone in uremic animals and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zella, Julia B; Plum, Lori A; Plowchalk, David R; Potochoiba, Michael; Clagett-Dame, Margaret; DeLuca, Hector F

    2014-01-01

    The use of 1α-hydroxylated vitamin D therapy to control secondary hyperparathyroidism in renal failure patients has been a success story, culminating with the demonstration of increased life expectancy in patients treated with these compounds. However, hypercalcemic episodes have been a recurrent problem with these therapies and have resulted in the added use of calcium mimetics. Clearly there is good reason to search for improved vitamin D therapy. In our inventory of vitamin D compounds, 2-methylene-19-nor-(20S)-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (2MD) surfaced as a potential candidate. This was based on its preferential localization in the parathyroid gland and a clear suppression of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels without a change in serum calcium in a clinical trial in postmenopausal women. 2MD has now been tested in the rat 5/6-nephrectomy model of renal failure, and in postmenopausal women to determine if it can suppress serum PTH at doses that do not elevate serum calcium and serum phosphorus concentrations. Daily oral treatment of uremic rats on 2.5 ng/bw/day of 2MD dramatically suppressed PTH without a change in serum calcium or serum phosphorus. Further, PTH was suppressed in postmenopausal women after only 3 daily oral doses of 2MD that continued for 4 weeks with no change in serum calcium or serum phosphorus. These results coupled with a pharmacokinetic half-life of ~24 h suggest that 2MD given either daily or at the time of dialysis may be a superior therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic renal failure patients.

  3. Quantitative ultrasound technique at the phalanges in discriminating between uremic and osteoporotic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmi, G. [Department of Radiology, Scientific Institute Hospital ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , Viale Cappuccini 1, 71013 San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)]. E-mail: guglielmi_g@hotmail.com; De Terlizzi, F. [IGEA srl, Carpi (Italy); Aucella, F. [Division of Nephrology, Scientific Institute Hospital ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy); Scillitani, A. [Division of Endocrinology, Scientific Institute Hospital ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    This study was conducted to test the ability of quantitative ultrasound technique (QUS) at the phalanges to discriminate between uremic and osteoporotic patients. Three groups of subjects (38 dialytic women, 16 osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures, 19 non-dialytic and non-fractured women) were recruited at the Department of Radiology at 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. The groups were matched for age and body mass index (BMI). On all subjects the following measurements were performed: spinal BMD by QCT and by DXA, Femoral BMD by DXA, phalangeal QUS. For QUS measurements, the DBM Sonic (IGEA, Carpi, Italy) was applied to the metaphysis of the proximal phalanges of the last four fingers of the hand. Osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures showed significantly lower values of spinal BMD by QCT and DXA and Ward's Triangle BMD with respect to hemodialytic patients (p < 0.005). All QUS values, except for BTT and SoS, showed lower values in osteoporotic women with respect to hemodialytic patients (p < 0.05). Control group showed higher values of AD-SoS, BTT and SoS than hemodialytic patients (p < 0.005) while the two groups did not differ for BMD values measured with both QCT and DXA. UBPI and FWA data showed a similar behaviour to DXA and QCT results, whereas BTT and SoS showed a completely different behaviour. AD-SoS was the only parameter that could effectively discriminate among the three groups (ANOVA, p < 0.0001). We conclude that phalangeal QUS can discriminate between hemodialysed patients and controls with similar bone mineral density, and can also discriminate between hemodialysed and osteoporotic subjects with vertebral fractures. Different characteristics of ultrasound signal can be ascribed to each bone tissue condition, enabling a clear differentiation of bone tissue changes occurring in menopause, osteoporosis and renal osteodystrophy.

  4. Correction of anemia in uremic mice by genetically modified peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbinder, Tom; Sufaro, Yuval; Yusim, Igor; Byk, Gerardo; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2003-06-01

    During peritoneal dialysis, mesothelial cells become detached from the peritoneum and accumulate in the dialysate. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of peritoneal effluent (PF)-derived human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) as target for gene therapy. We used erythropoietin (EPO) as our target gene. Various extracellular matrixes (ECM) were tested for optimal adhesion and growth of HPMC. The EPO gene was introduced to mouse peritoneal mesothelial cells (MPMC) and HPMC by transfection or retroviral transduction. EPO secretion from PMC was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the TF-1 cell proliferation assay. We performed intraperitoneal or intramuscular transplantations of the genetically modified cells into regular or 5/6 nephrectomized Balb/c mice and nude mice. Finally, we measured serum EPO and hematocrit levels. ECM-coated plates provided up to sixfold increase in the efficiency of PMC isolation from PF. Gelatin coated dishes (20 microg/cm2) were found optimal for isolation of PF-HPMC. RPR-120535 liposome was found to be best for PMC transduction. In vitro studies showed EPO secretion from modified HPMC over 6 months. Intraperitoneal transplantation aided with collagen matrix was the most effective. EPO, in MPMC transplanted mice, was detected up to 3 weeks (peak at 13 +/- 1 mIU/mL), and anemia of uremic mice was corrected (35.3 +/- 0.9 mIU/mL to 41.9 +/- 1.1 mIU/mL). PF-HPMC can be considered as an appropriate target for gene therapy since these cells can be efficiently isolated, modified, and transplanted. Nevertheless, implantation techniques in the peritoneum should be directed at obtaining longer duration of transgene expression in vivo, and means should be developed for enabling regulated expression of the gene.

  5. Atypical Rulings of the Indonesian Constitutional Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisariyadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In deciding judicial review cases, the Court may issue rulings that is not in accordance to what is stipulated in the Constitutional Court Law (Law Number 8 Year 2011. Atypical rulings means that the court may reconstruct a provision, delay the legislation/rulings enactment or give instruction to lawmakers. In addition, the court also introduce the “conditionally (unconstitutional” concept. This essay attempts to identify and classify these atypical rulings, including conditionally (un constitutional rulings, by examined the constitutional court judicial review rulings from 2003 to 2015. This study will provide a ground work for advance research on typical rulings by the Indonesian constitutional court.

  6. Atypical visual loss in giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thystrup, Jan Deichmann; Knudsen, G M; Mogensen, A M

    1994-01-01

    Three patients with atypical ocular involvement due to histologically verified giant cell arteritis are reported. Prior to diagnosis, the first patient had periods of amaurosis fugax. He presented with normal vision. In spite of high-dose systemic corticosteroid therapy, he became blind in the te......Three patients with atypical ocular involvement due to histologically verified giant cell arteritis are reported. Prior to diagnosis, the first patient had periods of amaurosis fugax. He presented with normal vision. In spite of high-dose systemic corticosteroid therapy, he became blind...

  7. Successfully Treated Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Two Cases of a High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis with Intravenous Sodium Thiosulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Joshua L.; Miyata, Kana N.; Dadzie, Kobena A.; Gruber, Steven J.; Sulica, Roxana; Winchester, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is a rare and potentially fatal disorder of calcification involving subcutaneous small vessels and fat in patients with renal insufficiency. We describe the successful use of intravenous sodium thiosulfate (STS) for the treatment of CUA in two patients. The first case was complicated by the development of a severe anion gap metabolic acidosis, which was accompanied by a seizure. Both patients had complete wound healing within five months. Although STS should be considered in the treatment of CUA, little is known about pharmacokinetics and additional studies are required to determine dosing strategies to minimize severe potential side effects. PMID:25506005

  8. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  9. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  10. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Non-diabetic atypical necrobiosis lipoidica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One 8 year female child had asymptomatic, anaesthetic, hypohidrotic, atrophic, yellowish, waxy plaque on the front of left thigh since 2 months. No nerve thickening was observed clinically or histopathologically. Hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, epidermal atrophy, degeneration of collagen, mononuclear granulomas and perivascular mononuclear infiltrate confirmed the clinical diagnosis of atypical necrobiosis lipoidica.

  12. Atypical fractures on long term bisphosphonates therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussein, W

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates reduce fractures risk in patients with osteoporosis. A new pattern of fractures is now being noted in patients on prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. We report a case of an atypical femoral fracture with preceding pain and highlight the characteristics of these fractures.

  13. Diabetic muscle infarction: atypical MR appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.; Mangwana, S.; Kapoor, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a case of diabetic muscle infarction which had atypical features of hyperintensity of the affected muscle on T1-weighted images. Biopsy was performed which revealed diffuse extensive hemorrhage within the infarcted muscle. We believe increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images should suggest hemorrhage within the infarcted muscle. (orig.)

  14. Atypical Food Packaging Affects The Persuasive Impact of Product Claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, M.L.; Fransen, P.W.J.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Smit, E.G.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical food packaging draws attention in the retail environment, and therefore increases product salience. However, until now, no research has focused on how atypical packaging affects the persuasive impact of other food information. In the present study, we propose that atypical packaging

  15. Atypical food packaging affects the persuasive impact of product claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, I.; Fransen, M.L.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Smit, E.G.

    Atypical food packaging draws attention in the retail environment, and therefore increases product sal- ience. However, until now, no research has focused on how atypical packaging affects the persuasive impact of other food information. In the present study, we propose that atypical packaging

  16. Isolation, characterization, and investigation of surface and hemolytic activities of a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan-Noude, Gholamreza; Housaindokht, Mohammadreza; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigeh Fazly

    2005-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 was grown in BHIB medium supplemented with Mn2+ for 96 h at 37 degrees C in a shaker incubator. After removing the microbial biomass, a lipopeptide biosurfactant was extracted from the supernatant. Its structure was established by chemical and spectroscopy methods. The structure was confirmed by physical properties, such as Hydrophile-Lipophile Balance (HLB), surface activity and erythrocyte hemolytic capacity. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) and erythrocyte hemolytic capacity of the biosurfactant were compared to those of surfactants such as SDS, BC (benzalkonium chloride), TTAB (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide) and HTAB (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide). The maximum hemolytic effect for all surfactants mentioned was observed at concentrations above cmc. The maximum hemolytic effect of synthetic surfactants was more than that of the biosurfactant produced by B. subtilis ATCC 6633. Therefore, biosurfactant would be considered a suitable surface-active agent due to low toxicity to the membrane.

  17. Evaluation of Trace Elements in Augmentation of Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Uremic Serum-Exposed Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD are at higher risk for rhabdomyolysis induced by statin than patients with normal kidney function. Previously, we showed that this increase in the severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis was partly due to uremic toxins. However, changes in the quantity of various trace elements in ESKD patients likely contribute as well. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of trace elements on statin-induced toxicity in rhabdomyosarcoma cells exposed to uremic serum (US cells for a long time. Cell viability, apoptosis, mRNA expression, and intracellular trace elements were assessed by viability assays, flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR, and ICP-MS, respectively. US cells exhibited greater simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity than cells long-time exposed with normal serum (NS cells (non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Intracellular levels of Mg, Mn, Cu, and Zn were significantly less in US cells compared to that in NS cells (p < 0.05 or 0.01. Pre-treatment with TPEN increased simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity and eliminated the distinction between both cells of simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that Zn deficiencies may be involved in the increased risk for muscle complaints in ESKD patients. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in ESKD patients may be partly due to trace elements deficiencies.

  18. Exploring Protein Binding of Uremic Toxins in Patients with Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease and during Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Deltombe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As protein binding of uremic toxins is not well understood, neither in chronic kidney disease (CKD progression, nor during a hemodialysis (HD session, we studied protein binding in two cross-sectional studies. Ninety-five CKD 2 to 5 patients and ten stable hemodialysis patients were included. Blood samples were taken either during the routine ambulatory visit (CKD patients or from blood inlet and outlet line during dialysis (HD patients. Total (CT and free concentrations were determined of p-cresylglucuronide (pCG, hippuric acid (HA, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, indoxyl sulfate (IS and p-cresylsulfate (pCS, and their percentage protein binding (%PB was calculated. In CKD patients, %PB/CT resulted in a positive correlation (all p < 0.001 with renal function for all five uremic toxins. In HD patients, %PB was increased after 120 min of dialysis for HA and at the dialysis end for the stronger (IAA and the highly-bound (IS and pCS solutes. During one passage through the dialyzer at 120 min, %PB was increased for HA (borderline, IAA, IS and pCS. These findings explain why protein-bound solutes are difficult to remove by dialysis: a combination of the fact that (i only the free fraction can pass the filter and (ii the equilibrium, as it was pre-dialysis, cannot be restored during the dialysis session, as it is continuously disturbed.

  19. Parvovirus B19-triggered acute hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia in a child with Evans syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELPIS MANTADAKIS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19 is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Case report. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thromocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Conclusion: Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present with reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  20. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Mamoune

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  1. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kara B; Scrape, Scott R; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse.

  2. Parvovirus B19-triggered Acute Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in a Child with Evans Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikidou, Panagiota; Grapsa, Anastassia; Bezirgiannidou, Zoe; Chatzimichael, Athanassios; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2018-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19) is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with the presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  3. Hemolytic and Cytotoxic Properties of Saponin Purified from Holothuria leucospilota Sea Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Soltani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holothuroids (sea cucumbers are members of the phylum echinodermata, which produce saponins. Saponins exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, we isolated the crude saponins from the body wall of the dominant Iranian species of sea cucumber, Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota. The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of saponins in the Persian Gulf H. leucospilota and study the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of these compounds. Methods: The body wall of sea cucumber was dried and powdered and the crude saponins were isolated using various solvents. The crude saponins were further purified by column chromatography using HP-20 resin. The foam test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC, hemolytic assay, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR confirmed the presence of saponins. Cytotoxicity was analyzed using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay on A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. Results: The foam test, hemolytic assay, and TLC supported the presence of saponin compounds in the 80% ethanol fraction of H. leucospilota. The infrared (IR spectrum of the extract showed hydroxyl (-OH, alkyl (C-H, ether (C-O and ester (–C=O absorption characteristic of teriterpenoid saponins. The C-O-C absorption indicated glycoside linkages to the sapogenins. The crude saponin extracted from sea cucumber was cytotoxic to A549 cells. Conclusion: The 80% ethanol fraction of saponin isolated from H. leucospilota exhibited hemolytic activity and offers promise as an anti-cancer candidate.

  4. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakshir, K; Mohamadi, T; Khodadadi, H; Motamedifar, M; Zomorodian, K; Alipour, S; Motamedi, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Globally, dermatophytes are the most common filamentous group of fungi causing cutaneous mycoses. Dermatophytes were shown to secrete a multitude of enzymes that play a role in their pathogenesis. There is limited data on co-hemolytic (CAMP-like) effect of different bacterial species on dermatophyte species. In this study, we sought to the evaluate exoenzyme activity and co-hemolytic effect of four bacteria on clinical dermatophytes isolated from patients in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 clinical dermatophyte species were isolated from patients suffering dermatophytosis and identified by conventional methods. Hemolytic activity was evaluated with Columbia 5% sheep blood agar. Proteolytic activity was determined by plate clearance assay method, using gelatin 8% agar. CAMP-like factor was evaluated with four bacteria, namely, S. areus, S. saprophyticus, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae. Fisher's exact test was run for statistical analysis. Results: T. mentagrophytes was the most predominant agent (27 [32.1%]) followed by T. verrucosum(20 [23.8%]), T. tonsurans (10 [11.9%]), Microsporum canis (7 [8.3%]), T. rubrum (6 [7.1%]), E. floccosum (6 [7.1%]), M. gypseum (5 [6%]), and T. violaceum (3[3.6%]). The most common clinical area of dermatophytosis was the skin. All the isolates expressed the zone of incomplete alpha hemolysis. All the isolates had CAMP- positive reaction with S. aureus and the other bacteria were CAMP-negative. All the isolates expressed proteolytic activity and no significant differences were noted among diverse genera of dermatophytes and severities of proteolytic activity. Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species. PMID:28959790

  5. Report of a case with Hodgkin's lymphoma, tuberculosis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    OpenAIRE

    TUĞCU, Deniz; KEBUDİ, Rejin; ZÜLFİKAR, Bülent; AYAN, İnci; GÖRGÜN, Ömer; AĞAN, Mehmet; SOMER, Alper; AKINCI, Ferhan

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been described in association with malignancies including Hodgkin's disease (HD). In this article, a patient with diagnoses of H D, tuberculosis and hemolytic anemia is reported. Both tuberculosis and HD may present with similar symptoms and signs, and one of the diagnoses may be overlooked. The physicians should be aware of the simultaneous occurrence of both of these diseases when they are faced with initial therapeutic failure, during care of H D and tuberculosis patients.

  6. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: Current trends and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Sabita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of hemolytic disease of the newborn has changed over the last few decades. With the implementation of Rhesus D immunoprophylaxis, hemolytic disease due to ABO incompatibility and other alloantibodies has now emerged as major causes of this condition. Though in developing countries, anti D is still a common antibody in pregnant women, many Asian countries have identified alloantibodies other than anti D as a cause of moderate-severe hemolytic disease. The most concerned fact is that, some of these have been described in Rh D positive women. It appears that universal antenatal screening in all pregnant women needs to be initiated, since Rh D positive women are just as likely as D negative women to form alloantibodies. Many developed nations have national screening programs for pregnant women. This is necessary to ensure timely availability of antigen negative blood and reduce effects on the newborn. Although universal screening seems justified, the cost and infrastructure required would be immense. Developing countries and under resourced nations need to consider universal antenatal screening and frame guidelines accordingly.

  7. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: Current trends and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Ravneet; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of hemolytic disease of the newborn has changed over the last few decades. With the implementation of Rhesus D immunoprophylaxis, hemolytic disease due to ABO incompatibility and other alloantibodies has now emerged as major causes of this condition. Though in developing countries, anti D is still a common antibody in pregnant women, many Asian countries have identified alloantibodies other than anti D as a cause of moderate-severe hemolytic disease. The most concerned fact is that, some of these have been described in Rh D positive women. It appears that universal antenatal screening in all pregnant women needs to be initiated, since Rh D positive women are just as likely as D negative women to form alloantibodies. Many developed nations have national screening programs for pregnant women. This is necessary to ensure timely availability of antigen negative blood and reduce effects on the newborn. Although universal screening seems justified, the cost and infrastructure required would be immense. Developing countries and under resourced nations need to consider universal antenatal screening and frame guidelines accordingly. PMID:21572705

  8. [A case of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Dia antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Min; Im, Sun Ju; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Eun Yup; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2007-10-01

    Here we report a severe case of hemolytic anemia of the newborn with kernicterus caused by anti-Di(a) antibody. A full term male infant was transferred due to hyperbilirubinemia on the third day of life. Despite single phototherapy, the baby's total bilirubin had elevated to 30.1 mg/dL. After exchange transfusion, total bilirubin decreased to 11.45 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the infant's red cells was positive. The maternal and infant's sera showed a negative reaction in routine antibody detection tests, but were positive in Di(a) panel cells. The frequency of the Di(a) antigen among the Korean population is estimated to be 6.4-14.5%. Anti-Di(a) antibody could cause a hemolytic reaction against transfusion or hemolytic disease of the newborn. We suggest the need for reagent red blood cell panels to include Di(a) antigen positive cells in antibody identification test for Korean.

  9. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting with severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, while the other had moderate anemia and unconjugated hyperbilrubinemia. Although both the neonates were treated by phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin, one of them received double volume exchange transfusion. Conclusion: There appeared to be an increase in the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by Rh antibodies other than anti-D. In this case report, both patients presented with anemia and hyperbilirubinemia but were successfully treated, with a favorable outcome.

  10. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweidan AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander J Sweidan,1,2 Adam K Brys,3 David D Sohn,1,2 Milan R Sheth4 1University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, St Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, USA; 3School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Long Beach Memorial Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. Keywords: hypereosinophilia, eosinophils, myeloproliferative disorder, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leukemia

  11. Prognostic significance of atypical papillary urothelial hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierczynski, Sharon L; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2002-05-01

    Typical papillary hyperplasia, a recently recognized precursor lesion to low-grade papillary urothelial neoplasms, consists of undulating folds of cytologically benign urothelium. Well-developed, branching fibrovascular cores of a papillary neoplasm are not evident. We have noted lesions with the architectural pattern of papillary hyperplasia; however, the overlying urothelium demonstrated varying degrees of cytologic atypia. We identified 15 cases of atypical papillary hyperplasia (13 males, 2 females, age 55 to 92) with overlying urothelium showing cytologic atypia. Of these cases, 8 (53%) were received in consultation. Of the 15 cases, 8 exhibited overlying flat carcinoma in situ (CIS), 4 had overlying dysplasia, and 3 were transitional between papillary hyperplasia with atypia and the earliest lesions of papillary neoplasia. Of these cases, 5 patients had multiple specimens with atypical papillary hyperplasia (range, 2 to 8) over time. Concurrent to the diagnosis of atypical papillary hyperplasia, there were 25 different urothelial lesions: CIS (n = 11), papilloma (n = 1), papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential with CIS (n = 1), high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma (n = 10; 3 with CIS), small-cell carcinoma (n = 1), and infiltrating urothelial carcinoma (n = 1). Of 11 patients with known prior history, 2 had 12 prior urothelial neoplasms (9 low-grade papillary neoplasms, 2 papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential, and 1 high-grade papillary cancer). Of 10 patients with atypical papillary hyperplasia and a minimum of 1 year of follow-up, 9 had 19 recurrences: CIS (n = 4), papilloma (n = 1), papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential (n = 1), infiltrating urothelial carcinoma (n = 3; 1 with CIS), and high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma (n = 10; 5 with invasion and 2 with CIS). Whether the papillary hyperplasia had overlying CIS or dysplasia did not affect the correlation with urothelial neoplasms. Immunohistochemical analysis

  12. Cyclosporine Induces Endothelial Cell Release of Complement-Activating Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Brandon; Klawitter, Jelena; Goldberg, Ryan; McCullough, James W.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cooper, James E.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Defective control of the alternative pathway of complement is an important risk factor for several renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Infections, drugs, pregnancy, and hemodynamic insults can trigger episodes of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in susceptible patients. Although the mechanisms linking these clinical events with disease flares are unknown, recent work has revealed that each of these clinical conditions causes cells to release microparticles. We hypothesized that microparticles released from injured endothelial cells promote intrarenal complement activation. Calcineurin inhibitors cause vascular and renal injury and can trigger hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here, we show that endothelial cells exposed to cyclosporine in vitro and in vivo release microparticles that activate the alternative pathway of complement. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles caused injury to bystander endothelial cells and are associated with complement-mediated injury of the kidneys and vasculature in cyclosporine-treated mice. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles did not bind factor H, an alternative pathway regulatory protein present in plasma, explaining their complement-activating phenotype. Finally, we found that in renal transplant patients, the number of endothelial microparticles in plasma increases 2 weeks after starting tacrolimus, and treatment with tacrolimus associated with increased C3 deposition on endothelial microparticles in the plasma of some patients. These results suggest that injury-associated release of endothelial microparticles is an important mechanism by which systemic insults trigger intravascular complement activation and complement-dependent renal diseases. PMID:24092930

  13. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  14. Atypical femoral fractures related to bisphosphonate therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Pankaj Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BP are a commonly prescribed class of drugs for the prevention of osteoporosis-related fractures. Paradoxically, however, they have recently been linked to atypical fractures in the shaft of the femur. Since many physicians including radiologists, are not aware of this entity, the incidence is likely underreported. These fractures usually occur in the sub-trochanteric region of the femur in the setting of low-energy trauma. It starts as a fracture line involving the lateral cortex and then progresses medially to give rise to a complete fracture. The fracture line is usually transverse, and there is a medial spike associated with a complete fracture. These fractures can be bilateral. Awareness of these atypical fractures and their radiological appearance should enable their early and accurate detection and thus lead to specific treatment.

  15. Primary lateral sclerosis mimicking atypical parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlinah, Ibrahim M; Bhatia, Kailash P; Østergaard, Karen

    2007-01-01

    of the atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Here we describe five patients initially referred with a diagnosis of levodopa-unresponsive atypical parkinsonism (n = 4) or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (n = 1), but subsequently found to have features consistent with PLS instead. Onset age varied from 49 to 67......Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), the upper motor neurone variant of motor neurone disease, is characterized by progressive spinal or bulbar spasticity with minimal motor weakness. Rarely, PLS may present with clinical features resembling parkinsonism resulting in occasional misdiagnosis as one...... in all patients. Anterior horn cell involvement developed in three cases. Early gait disturbances resulting in falls were seen in all patients and none of them responded to dopaminergic medications. Two patients underwent dopamine transporter (DaT) SPECT scanning with normal results. Other features...

  16. Herpes zoster - typical and atypical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Roy Rafael; Peleg, Roni

    2017-08-01

    Varicella- zoster virus infection is an intriguing medical entity that involves many medical specialties including infectious diseases, immunology, dermatology, and neurology. It can affect patients from early childhood to old age. Its treatment requires expertise in pain management and psychological support. While varicella is caused by acute viremia, herpes zoster occurs after the dormant viral infection, involving the cranial nerve or sensory root ganglia, is re-activated and spreads orthodromically from the ganglion, via the sensory nerve root, to the innervated target tissue (skin, cornea, auditory canal, etc.). Typically, a single dermatome is involved, although two or three adjacent dermatomes may be affected. The lesions usually do not cross the midline. Herpes zoster can also present with unique or atypical clinical manifestations, such as glioma, zoster sine herpete and bilateral herpes zoster, which can be a challenging diagnosis even for experienced physicians. We discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of Herpes Zoster, typical and atypical presentations.

  17. Recurrent conjunctival atypical fibroxanthoma in Pigmentosum Xeroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà-Ibáñez, M; Barreiro-González, A; Barranco González, H; Aviñó Martínez, J; Évole-Buselli, M; Harto-Castaño, M Á

    2018-02-01

    A 7 year-old boy with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and who presents a recurrent conjunctival atypical fibroxanthoma after two surgeries. This is the third procedure and the patient is treated with a surgical excision of the tumour and cryotherapy at the surgical bed. Due to the risk of recurrence, topical Mitomycin C 0,02% was added at post-operative care achieving a good clinical outcome. Surgical exeresis with cryotherapy and topical Mitomycin C is an effective treatment for a case of an atypical fibroxanthoma with a high potential for recurrence and invasion. An ophthalmologic follow-up is required for these patients, as well as general paediatric care and support aids. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  19. [Psychotic forms of atypical autism in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simashkova, N V

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine clinical borders of psychotic forms of atypical autism in children, its psychopathological and age-specific manifestations as well as nosological peculiarities and to specify its pathogenetic features. Eighty patients with childhood endogenous autism, Rett syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome have been studied during 14 years. The study showed that psychoses similar by symptoms and course, which are characterized by attacks and regressive-catatonic disorders, may develop in the course of atypical autism. These psychoses develop on the background of dysontogenesis with consequent replacement of the following stages: autistic, regressive, catatonic, with returning to the autistic stage between attacks. Psychopathological similarity of these psychoses in different disorders correlated with EEG changes of the same type (appearance of the marked I-rhythm at the regressive stage of psychosis).

  20. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V.

    2003-01-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  1. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  2. Aspects of atypical degenerative lesions of vertebrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battikha, J.G.; Garcia, J.F.; Wettstein, P.

    1981-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, several authors have reported aspects of degenerative disease of the vertebral column with irregularity and sclerosis of the margins of the vertebral bodies [2, 4, 7-9, 13, 15, 17]. Twenty cases of such atypical degenerative vertebral lesions have been studied over a two year period and their radiological characteristics have been compared with vertebral lesions of infective origin and in the rheumatoid disorders. (orig.)

  3. Atypical Localized Rheumatoid Nodule: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KORHAN BARIS BAYRAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid nodules can be seen in about 30% of patiens with rheumatoid arthritis. They are occasionally localized subcutaneous, but they can rarely seen in visceral organs. Their appearance can be confused with many clinical conditions when they have atypical localizations. To exclude the presence of a malignancy, these lesions should always be investigated. We aimed to discuss a patient with rheumatoid nodule localized in close neighborhood of hyoid bone, presumed as malignancy.

  4. Typical and atypical presentations of aspergilloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villajos, M.; Darnell, A.; Gallardo, X.; Castaner, E.; Mata, J. M.; Paedavila, E.

    1999-01-01

    To show the different forms of radiological presentations of aspergilloma, emphasizing the importance of recognizing the atypical forms. The explorations of 11 patients with aspergilloma were examined retrospectively between 1993 and 1997. These patients were studied using conventional X-rays and computed tomography (CT): Typical and atypical radiological findings were observed. In two patients, who presented recurrent hemoptysis, a percutaneous installation of amphotericin B was carried out with tomographic control. Out of the 11 patients, two were female and nine male. In eight of the cases the radiological findings showed an intercavity injury with different evolutionary forms, while in three of the cases there was a progressive pleural swelling. In the two patients treated pertinaciously, no significant radiological changes were observed, however, neither of them showed hemoptysis again. The pleural swelling adjacent to the cavity and/or the swelling of the cavity wall are atypical radiological presentations of the aspergilloma, that can accompany or precede the appearance of this illness. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Flat epithelial atypia and atypical ductal hyperplasia: carcinoma underestimation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingegnoli, Anna; d'Aloia, Cecilia; Frattaruolo, Antonia; Pallavera, Lara; Martella, Eugenia; Crisi, Girolamo; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the underestimation rate of carcinoma upon surgical biopsy after a diagnosis of flat epithelial atypia and atypical ductal hyperplasia and 11-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. A retrospective review was conducted of 476 vacuum-assisted breast biopsy performed from May 2005 to January 2007 and a total of 70 cases of atypia were identified. Fifty cases (71%) were categorized as pure atypical ductal hyperplasia, 18 (26%) as pure flat epithelial atypia and two (3%) as concomitant flat epithelial atypia and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Each group were compared with the subsequent open surgical specimens. Surgical biopsy was performed in 44 patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia, 15 patients with flat epithelial atypia, and two patients with flat epithelial atypia and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Five cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia were upgraded to ductal carcinoma in situ, three cases of flat epithelial atypia yielded one ductal carcinoma in situ and two cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, and one case of flat epithelial atypia/atypical ductal hyperplasia had invasive ductal carcinoma. The overall rate of malignancy was 16% for atypical ductal hyperplasia (including flat epithelial atypia/atypical ductal hyperplasia patients) and 20% for flat epithelial atypia. The presence of flat epithelial atypia and atypical ductal hyperplasia at biopsy requires careful consideration, and surgical excision should be suggested.

  6. Protein-energy wasting and uremic failure to thrive in children with chronic kidney disease: they are not small adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Noureddin; Rhee, Connie M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-12-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), a condition of decreased body protein and fat mass, is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a potent predictor of mortality in this population. In adults with CKD, PEW has typically been defined on the basis of (1) deranged biochemical parameters, (2) reduced body mass, (3) reduced muscle mass, and (4) decreased dietary protein intake. Emerging data suggest that PEW may also commonly afflict children with CKD and have a negative impact on growth and development ("uremic failure to thrive"), yet it remains comparatively understudied and less well characterized in these patients. Given the challenges of applying adult-defined PEW criteria to the pediatric population, the authors of a recent study entitled "Protein energy wasting in children with chronic kidney disease" [Abraham et al. (2014) Pediatr Nephrol 29:1231-1238] have sought to develop a scoring system and three alterative definitions for this condition using a combination of biochemical markers, clinical measurements, and subjective reporting in children in the CKiD cohort: (1) minimal PEW definition (≥2 adult-defined PEW criteria); (2) standard PEW definition (≥3 adult-defined PEW criteria); (3) modified PEW definition (≥3 adult-defined PEW criteria, plus short stature or poor growth). These authors observed that meeting the modified PEW definition was associated with a significantly increased risk of hospitalization in unadjusted analyses, i.e., a 2.2-fold higher risk, and trended towards increased risk in multivariable adjusted analyses, i.e., 2.0-fold higher risk. At the present time, future studies validating these findings and developing further refined definitions and/or scoring systems for the detection and management of PEW in children and uremic failure to thrive are urgently needed.

  7. Use of recombinant erythropoietin for the management of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn of a K0 phenotype mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoura, Antonia; Korakaki, Eftychia; Hatzidaki, Eleftheria; Saitakis, Emmanuel; Maraka, Sofia; Papamastoraki, Isabella; Matalliotakis, Emmanuel; Foundouli, Kaliopi; Giannakopoulou, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Very few people do not express any Kell antigens on their red blood cells (K0 phenotype). They can be immunized by transfusion or pregnancy and develop antibodies against Kell system antigens. These maternal antibodies can cause severe hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn, as a result of the suppression of erythropoiesis and hemolysis. Multiple intrauterine transfusions in the management of severe hemolytic disease have been shown to cause erythropoietic suppression as well. Recombinant erythropoietin has been successfully used in the management of late anemia of infants with Rh hemolytic disease and in 1 case of KEL1 (Kell)-associated hemolytic disease. The authors present the case of severe hemolytic disease of a newborn due to KEL5 (Ku) isoimmunization of his K0 phenotype mother. Regular intrauterine transfusions were performed to manage the severe fetal anemia (Hb 3 g/dL). A male infant was born at the 36th week of gestation having normal hemoglobin (15.8 g/dL) and developed only mild hyperbilirubinemia. On the 15th day of life, the infant's hematocrit had fallen to 27.3%, with low reticulocyte count and low erythropoietin level. The infant was managed successfully with recombinant erythropoietin.

  8. Cholestasis in neonates with red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease: incidence, risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; Rath, Mirjam E A; Lindenburg, Irene T M; Oepkes, Dick; van Zwet, Erik W; Walther, Frans J; Lopriore, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Etiology of cholestatic liver disease in neonates with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) has been associated with iron overload due to intrauterine red cell transfusions (IUTs). Data on the incidence and severity of cholestasis in neonates with HDN are scarce, and little is known about pathogenesis, risk factors, neonatal management and outcome. To evaluate incidence, risk factors, management and outcome of cholestasis in neonates with red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease. All (near-) term neonates with HDN due to red cell alloimmunization admitted to our center between January 2000 and July 2010 were included in this observational study. Liver function tests (including conjugated bilirubin) were routinely performed in the neonatal period. We recorded the presence of cholestasis, investigated several potential risk factors and evaluated the management and outcome in affected neonates. A total of 313 infants with red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease treated with or without IUTs were included. The incidence of cholestasis was 13% (41/313). Two risk factors were independently associated with cholestasis: treatment with at least one IUT (OR 5.81, 95% CI 1.70-19.80, p = 0.005) and rhesus D type of alloimmunization (OR 4.66, 95% CI 1.05-20.57, p = 0.042). Additional diagnostic tests to investigate possible causes of cholestasis were all negative. In 5 infants (12%), supportive medical and nutritional therapy was started, and one neonate required iron chelation therapy. Cholestasis occurs in 13% of neonates with HDN due to red cell alloimmunization, and it is independently associated with IUT treatment and rhesus D type of alloimmunization. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Atypical Pneumonia: Updates on Legionella, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lokesh; Losier, Ashley; Tolbert, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Marion, Chad R

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has multiple causes and is associated with illness that requires admission to the hospital and mortality. The causes of atypical CAP include Legionella species, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma. Atypical CAP remains a diagnostic challenge and, therefore, likely is undertreated. This article reviews the advancements in the evaluation and treatment of patients and discusses current conflicts and controversies of atypical CAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Zinc-induced hemolytic anemia caused by ingestion of pennies by a pup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, K.S.; Jain, A.V.; Inglesby, H.B.; Clarkson, W.D.; Johnson, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    A 4-month-old Pomeranian pup was examined because of anorexia, salivation, and persistent vomiting. Initial laboratory testing revealed marked hemolytic anemia with spherocytosis. Survey abdominal radiography revealed 4 metal objects which, when removed by gastrotomy, were identified as pennies. Of 4 pennies, 3 were minted since 1983 and were heavily pitted over the surface and rim. Partially digested pennies were composed of a copper-plated high zinc concentration alloy. Further laboratory testing indicated a marked increase in serum zinc concentration in the pup (28.8 mg/L), confirming metal toxicosis. Serum zinc concentrations decreased during recovery

  12. Molecular characterization and multidisciplinary management of Gerbich hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Rebecca N; Gourri, Elise; Gassner, Christoph; Banez-Sese, Grace; Salam, Abdus; Denomme, Gregory A; Yang, Elizabeth

    2018-06-01

    Gerbich (Ge) antigens are high frequency red cell antigens expressed on glycophorin C (GYPC) and glycophorin D. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to Gerbich antibody is rare and presents a clinical challenge, as Gerbich negative blood is scarce. We report a case of HDFN due to maternal Ge3 negative phenotype and anti-Ge3 alloimmunization, successfully managed by transfusion of maternal blood. Molecular testing revealed that the mother has homozygous deletion of exon 3 of GYPC, the father is homozygous wildtype for GYPC, and the infant is obligate heterozygote expressing Ge3. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, E.J.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  14. Autosomal dominant craniometaphyseal dysplasia with atypical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D R; Fialkov, J A

    2002-03-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare genetic disorder of bone modelling characterised by hyperostosis and sclerosis of the craniofacial bones, and abnormal modelling of the metaphyses. Clinically, autosomal dominant (AD) CMD is characterised by facial distortion and cranial-nerve compression. The goals of surgical treatment for AD CMD are cosmetic recontouring of the sclerotic craniofacial bones, correction of nasal obstruction and correction or prevention of neurological manifestations. We describe the successful correction of AD CMD craniofacial manifestations in an individual with atypical findings, and outline an approach for correcting the craniofacial deformities associated with this rare disorder. Copyright 2002 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  15. Wilson’s disease: Atypical imaging features

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    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a genetic movement disorder with characteristic clinical and imaging features. We report a 17- year-old boy who presented with sialorrhea, hypophonic speech, paraparesis with repeated falls and recurrent seizures along with cognitive decline. He had bilateral Kayser Flescher rings. Other than the typical features of Wilson’s disease in cranial MRI, there were extensive white matter signal abnormalities (T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities and gyriform contrast enhancement which are rare imaging features in Wilson's disease. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose Wilson’s disease when atypical imaging features are present.

  16. Viral pneumonias: Typical and atypical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M.; Bleck, J.S.; Schirg, E.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features of viral pneumonias are summarized and discussed. Although viral infections of the lung belong to atypical pneumonias they demonstrate not always the radiographic pattern of an interstitial pneumonia. Characteristic radiographic findings are quite rare. In most cases the microbial etiology cannot be predicted from chest radiographs. The appearance varies depending on the virulence of the organism and the resistence of the host. In this regard knowledge of epidemiological data as well as patients condition and underlying disease is of utmost importance. Differentiation between community- and hospital-acquired infection may be very helpful. (orig.) [de

  17. Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO): atypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Waseem; Cheripalli, Praveen; Tangella, Krishnarao

    2011-05-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare acquired condition characterized by phosphaturia, hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. We report an unusual presentation in a 15-year-old healthy male with a two-week history of cough and chest pain. The chest radiograph showed right middle lobe opacity and chest CT revealed a mass in the extra pleural space. A biopsy showed chondro-myxoidstroma with osteoid formation. Diagnosis was confirmed with the above findings and hypophosphatemia. The patient's symptoms resolved after complete surgical excision of the mass. Tumor-induced osteomalacia, although a rare disorder, can be a diagnostic challenge, especially in patients presenting with atypical symptoms.

  18. [Analysis of Correlation between IgG Titer of Pregnant Women and Neonatal Hemolytic Complications of Different Blood Groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hai-Hui; Huang, Hong-Hai; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Pi, You-Jun

    2017-10-01

    To study the relationship between IgG titer of pregnant women and hemolytic disease of newborn(HDN) with different blood groups. Four hundred pregnant women, including pregnant women with type O blood, were selected from May 2014 to January 2015 in our hospital for inspection and a couple of different blood groups, the IgG titer of pregnant women were detected in the inspection process. According to neonatal HDN, newborns were divided into 2 groups: HDN group(85 cases) and non-HDN group(315 cases). The incidence of postpartum neonatal hemolytic disease was tracked and the correlation of IgG titers with HDN were systematically analyzed. In the production and inspection process, the IgG titer in pregnant women was divided into groups. the comparison of HDN incidence rate in 4 groups of IgG titer >64 and IgG titer group showed that the prevalence of ABO hemolytic disease of newborn were 96.9%, 79.6%, 63, 7% and 28.8%, there was a certain correlation of pregnant women IgG titers with ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn, that is, with the increase of IgG titer, the incidence of hemolytic disease of newborns increased in certain degree (r=0.8832), the risk in 4 groups of neonatal HDN was higher than that in IgG titer 64 HDN group. There is a certain corelation between prevalence of ABO-HDN and IgG titer of pregnant women. For these pregnant women, the control of the pregnant women IgG titer has a positive clinical significance to reduce the incidence of hemolytic disease of the newborn.

  19. [Establishment and validation of a neonatal pig model of hemolytic jaundice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Fu; Ma, Yue-Lan; Nie, Ling; Chen, Shuan; Jin, Mei-Fang; Wang, San-Lan

    2016-05-01

    To establish a neonatal pig model of hemolytic jaundice. Twelve seven-day-old purebred Yorkshire pigs were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group (n=6 each). Immunization of New Zealand white rabbits was used to prepare rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell antibodies, and rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell serum was separated. The neonatal pigs in the experimental group were given an intravenous injection of rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell serum (5 mL), and those in the control group were given an intravenous injection of normal saline (5 mL). Venous blood samples were collected every 6 hours for routine blood test and liver function evaluation. The experimental group had a significantly higher serum bilirubin level than the control group at 18 hours after the injection of rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell serum (64±30 μmol/L vs 20±4 μmol/L; Pjaundice simulates the pathological process of human hemolytic jaundice well and provides good biological and material bases for further investigation of neonatal hemolysis.

  20. Post Blood Transfusion Hypertensive Encephalopathy in a Child with Congenital Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiman Arshpreet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children having hemolytic anemias who have received multiple blood transfusions exhibit a rare complication of development of hypertension and seizures following transfusion, which may or may not be associated with intracranial hemorrhage. Case description: A 9-year-old boy presented with history of progressive paleness of body and weakness for the 30 days. There was a history of blood transfusion one week ago and multiple transfusions for one year of age. Examination revealed tachycardia, tachypnea, severe pallor and splenohepatomegaly. Blood work revealed a hemoglobin level of 4.0 grams with peripheral smear findings suggestive of hemolytic anemia. After blood transfusion, child complained of difficulty in breathing, vomiting and visual loss, followed by convulsions. Blood pressure was 180/110 mmHg. Seizure was controlled with intravenous midazolam and hypertension with furosemide and labetalol. CT brain was normal. As hypertension got under control, child gradually gained consciousness. Conclusion: A less intensive transfusion regimen among such patients along with prompt management of hypertension can prevent this potentially fatal syndrome.

  1. Hemolytic disease in the newborn - history and prevention in the world and the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavy, Jiri

    2010-06-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn with its typical signs and poor prognosis has been known for centuries. Historically it can be divided into three pathological states which are fetal hydrops (hydrops fetus universalis), neonatal jaundice (icterus neonati gravis familiaris) and fetal anemia (anemia neonati). Almost 70 reports with quite accurate descriptions were found up to the end of 19th century. The patho physiological basis of the condition began to be studied at the beginning of the last century and the development of our knowledge is an example of the cooperation between pathologists, pediatricians, hematologists and later, obstetricians, immunologists and geneticists. Despite all the advances in this field it remains a serious disease up to this time. It is not managed successfully in all cases and despite successful immunological prophylaxis there are cases when we need to administer intrauterine transfusion based on the information received by dopplerometric measurement of arteria cerebri perfusion and fetal blood sampling. Review of lover cited literature. The history of the hemolytic disease in the newborn, its condition and approaches to it has not been recently compiled in the Czech Republic.

  2. Ext The effect of littoralis leaf extract on Hemolytic Value (HC50 of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jiang WANG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Umbelliferae littoralis leaf extract on the Hemolytic Value (HC50 of mice, and to provide the basis for the development and utilization medicinal resources and edible resources. Methods: Prepare littoralis leaf water extract and alcohol extract, and set different dose treatment groups and blank control group, and continuously deliver American ginseng capsule for 15 days. Inject sRBC according to the weight on the tenth day. Take the blood serum from eyeball blood after 5 days. Put supernatant of 1ml and Dulbecco's reagent of 3ml in the test tube, and mix the 10% sRBC of 0.25ml and Dulbecco's reagent of 4ml together in another test tube, and measure absorbance at 540nm fine control (SA liquid tubing as blank, HC50 value were calculated. Results: Different extracts of stems and littoralis leaf were given to the mice for 15 days, and hemolytic value of the mice in water extract 4.68g/kg dose group, alcohol extract 4.68g/kg dose group and American ginseng capsule group significantly increased while comparing with the blank control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Littoralis Leaf plays an important role in regulating human immunity.

  3. Investigation into the hemolytic activity of tentacle venom from jellyfish Cyanea nozakii Kishinouye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-03-01

    Cyanea nozakii Kishinouy e ( C. nozakii), a giant cnidarian of the class Scyphomedusae, order Semaeostomeae and family Cyaneidae, is widely distributed in the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea, and is abundant from late summer to early autumn. Venom produced by C. nozakii during mass agglomerations can contaminate seawater resulting in death of the halobios and seriously damage commercial fisheries. Swimmers and fishermen commonly suff er painful stings from this jellyfish, resulting in local edema, tingling, breathing difficulties, depressed blood pressure and even death. Such effects arise from the complex mixture of biologically active molecules that make up jellyfish venom. In the present study, the hemolytic activity of venom from tentacles of C. nozakii and factors aff ecting its activity were assayed. The HU50 ( defined as the amount of protein required to lyse 50 % of erythrocytes) of the venom against dove and chicken erythrocytes was 34 and 59 μg/mL, respectively. Carboxylmethyl chitosan and glycerol could increase hemolytic activity at concentrations greater than 0.06% and 0.2 mol/L, respectively.

  4. An improved microculture-hemolytic spot assay for the study of carrier-specific antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Weisman, Z; Mozes, E; Bentwich, Z

    1984-11-30

    A microculture system based on limiting dilution and a hemolytic spot assay was adapted for study of the carrier-specific anti-hapten response in vitro. Spleen or lymph node cells from normal mice or mice immunized with NIP-ovalbumin (NIP-OVA) or NIP-human thyroglobulin (NIP-Tg) were cultured for 5 days by the microculture technique. The anti-hapten (anti-NIP) response was measured by assaying the supernatants of the microcultures in a hemolytic spot test with NIP coupled to sheep red blood cells. A micro-ELISA reader was adapted to read the degree of lysis in the spot assay which gives an objective quantitation of the degree of lysis and thus reduces the number of culture replicates. In vivo induced specific helper cells in mice immunized with the carrier protein, human thyroglobulin, as well as carrier-specific T cell factors, gave rise to carrier-specific anti-NIP responses. The microculture system may enhance the expression of T-cell helper function when suppressor cells or their precursors are present in the initial cell preparation.

  5. A Fatal Case of Severe Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-Jkb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Duck

    2006-01-01

    The Kidd blood group is clinically significant since the Jk antibodies can cause acute and delayed transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In general, HDN due to anti-Jkb incompatibility is rare and it usually displays mild clinical symptoms with a favorable prognosis. Yet, we apparently experienced the second case of HDN due to anti-Jkb with severe clinical symptoms and a fatal outcome. A female patient having the AB, Rh(D)-positive boodtype was admitted for jaundice on the fourth day after birth. At the time of admission, the patient was lethargic and exhibited high pitched crying. The laboratory data indicated a hemoglobin value of 11.4 mg/dL, a reticulocyte count of 14.9% and a total bilirubin of 46.1 mg/dL, a direct bilirubin of 1.1 mg/dL and a strong positive result (+++) on the direct Coomb's test. As a result of the identification of irregular antibody from the maternal serum, anti-Jkb was detected, which was also found in the eluate made from infant's blood. Despite the aggressive treatment with exchange transfusion and intensive phototherapy, the patient died of intractable seizure and acute renal failure on the fourth day of admission. Therefore, pediatricians should be aware of the clinical courses of hemolytic jaundice due to anti-Jkb, and they should be ready to treat this disease with active therapeutic interventions. PMID:16479082

  6. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  7. A hemolytic pigment of Group B Streptococcus allows bacterial penetration of human placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidbey, Christopher; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Burnside, Kellie; Ngo, Lisa; Becraft, Alexis K.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.; Hitti, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infection of the amniotic fluid is a significant cause of fetal injury, preterm birth, and newborn infections. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important human bacterial pathogen associated with preterm birth, fetal injury, and neonatal mortality. Although GBS has been isolated from amniotic fluid of women in preterm labor, mechanisms of in utero infection remain unknown. Previous studies indicated that GBS are unable to invade human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), which represent the last barrier to the amniotic cavity and fetus. We show that GBS invades hAECs and strains lacking the hemolysin repressor CovR/S accelerate amniotic barrier failure and penetrate chorioamniotic membranes in a hemolysin-dependent manner. Clinical GBS isolates obtained from women in preterm labor are hyperhemolytic and some are associated with covR/S mutations. We demonstrate for the first time that hemolytic and cytolytic activity of GBS is due to the ornithine rhamnolipid pigment and not due to a pore-forming protein toxin. Our studies emphasize the importance of the hemolytic GBS pigment in ascending infection and fetal injury. PMID:23712433

  8. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Di (a) Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Di(a) is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Di(a) antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Di(a) must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis.

  9. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  10. Perinatal care in British Columbia: Diagnosis and management of hemolytic disease of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyment, A. F.; Manning, R. Elizabeth; Kinnis, Claire

    1974-01-01

    We undertook to measure standards of perinatal care in British Columbia by studying the management of hemolytic disease of the newborn as the sample situation. Our data show that many isoimmunized pregnant women are delivered in hospitals that have infrequent experience with this problem, and by physicians who have little experience with this disease. The physician referral pattern, in regard to maternal isoimmunization, indicated that the more severely affected patients were managed by specialists, particularly those attached to teaching hospitals. However, 25% of the infants treated by exchange transfusion were managed by nonspecialists in nonteaching hospitals. Hospital record search, used as a method of medical audit and as a source of data for comparison with physician reports, did not result in dependable or complete information. Rates of disagreement between items from two data sources, physician report and hospital record, were frequently very high. Our experience suggests that comparison of these two data sources is not an ideal method of assessment of quality of care. A smaller caseload of isoimmunized pregnant women will result from the present prevention program. Nevertheless, cases will continue to occur. Our work supports the conclusion that a program of continuing education covering the diagnosis and management of hemolytic disease of the newborn is still necessary. PMID:4213290

  11. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashif Jethava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate’s red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+ red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis.

  12. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung with initial presentation of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chun Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a rare entity of lung malignancy that is subclassified into high-grade or low-grade types according to its histological features. High-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a more aggressive form of malignancy, with a tendency towards lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. Cancer-related microangiopathic hemolytic anemia as a less common situation of paraneoplastic syndrome may be encountered with metastatic malignancy, but has not been reported previously in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung. Herein, we report a 78-year-old male patient who presented with hemoptysis for one day. Laboratory tests showed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. A chest X-ray demonstrated consolidation in the left lung field. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the left upper lobe, and a subsequent bronchoscopic biopsy was performed. The histopathological results indicated a high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. The patient refused systemic chemotherapy, and palliative radiation therapy only was conducted for local disease control. The patient has performed well for 12 months to date since diagnosis of the tumor.

  13. Hemolytic activity of Fusobacterium necrophorum culture supernatants due to presence of phospholipase A and lysophospholipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, P M; Kendall, C J; Stauffer, L R; Holland, J W

    1979-01-01

    Culture supernatants of Fusobacterium necrophorum demonstrated hemolytic activity. The hemolysin(s), which was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, was temperature-dependent and heat labile. The spectrum of hemolytic activity against various erythrocytes included rabbit, human, and dog erythrocytes. Goats, sheep, and bovine erythrocytes showed only trace hemolysis. According to results of thin-layer chromatography, the hemolysin hydrolyzed rabbit erythrocyte phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl choline, and bovine phosphatidyl choline. Hydrolysis of egg yolk phosphatidyl choline, bovine phosphatidyl ethanolamine, cholesterol, 1,2-dipalmitin, 1,3-dipalmitin, sphingomyelin, or triolein was not detected by thin layer chromatography. A more sensitive procedure utilizing gas-liquid chromatography revealed that, of the substrates tested, the following were bein hydrolyzed: bovine and egg yolk phosphatidyl choline, lysophosphatidyl choline, alpha-palmito-beta-eleoyl-L-alpha lecithin and alpha-oleoyl-betal-palmitoyl-L-alpha lecithin. Substrates which were weakly hydrolyzed were bovine phosphatidyl ethanolamine, DL-alpha-hosphatidyl ethanolamine dipalmitoyl, 1,2-dipalmitin, 1,3-dipalmitin, and triolein.

  14. Lactobacilli interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes hemolytic activity and adherence to host epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil D Saroj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus (GAS, a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of GAS. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS. Conditioned medium (CM from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289 and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  15. Hypophosphatemia and hemolytic anemia associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L G; Hardy, R M; Weiss, D J; Bartges, J W

    1993-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia associated with hemolytic anemia was diagnosed in five cats with diabetes mellitus and in one cat with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis. The hematocrit began decreasing within 24 to 48 hours after documented hypophosphatemia in each case. The anemia resolved in all five surviving cats. Because of the temporal relationship and lack of other detectable causes, hemolytic anemia was presumed to be caused by hypophosphatemia. There were increased Heinz bodies in three of six hypophosphatemic cats during episodes of hemolysis. Intravenous potassium phosphate administration corrected the hypophosphatemia in four of five cats. The effective dosages of intravenous phosphate ranged from 0.011 to 0.017 mmol of phosphate/kg/h for 6 to 12 hours. Hypocalcemia (5.4 to 8.7 mg/dL) occurred in four of five cats treated with intravenous phosphate; however, only one cat developed clinical signs attributable to hypocalcemia. Based on this retrospective study, we recommend monitoring serum phosphorus concentration every 6 to 12 hours in cats likely to become hypophosphatemic. Treatment of hypophosphatemia in cats is warranted because of the apparent increased susceptibility of cats to hypophosphatemia-induced hemolysis. Cats with severe hypophosphatemia (< or = 1.5 mg/dL) should be given oral or parenteral phosphate if contraindications do not exist.

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Splenectomy in Children: Report of the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Henry E; Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Smithers, Charles; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St. Peter, Shawn; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of children with congenital hemolytic anemia (CHA) undergoing total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) remain unclear. In this study, we collected data from 100 children with CHA who underwent TS or PS from 2005–2013 at 16 sites in the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium using a patient registry. We analyzed demographics and baseline clinical status, operative details, and outcomes at 4, 24, and 52 weeks after surgery. Results were summarized as hematologic outcomes, short-term adverse events (AEs) (≤ 30 days after surgery), and long-term AEs (31–365 days after surgery). For children with hereditary spherocytosis, after surgery there was an increase in hemoglobin (baseline 10.1 ± 1.8 gm/dl, 52 week 12.8 ± 1.6 gm/dl; mean ± SD), decrease in reticulocyte and bilirubin as well as control of symptoms. Children with sickle cell disease had control of clinical symptoms after surgery, but had no change in hematologic parameters. There was an 11% rate of short-term AEs and 11% rate of long-term AEs. As we accumulate more subjects and longer follow-up, use of a patient registry should enhance our capacity for clinical trials and engage all stakeholders in the decision-making process. PMID:25382665

  17. Hemolytic anemia after ingestion of the natural hair dye Lawsonia inermis (henna) in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardes, Daniel J; Ross, Linda A; Markovich, Jessica E

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical presentation and case management of a dog that developed hemolytic anemia and evidence of renal tubular dysfunction after ingestion of a natural hair dye containing Lawsonia inermis (henna). To review cases of henna toxicity reported in the human literature. An 8-year-old female spayed Border Collie was presented 5 days after ingestion of a box of natural hair dye. The dog was showing signs of lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. A serum biochemistry profile, complete blood count, and urinalysis demonstrated evidence of renal tubular dysfunction and a regenerative anemia without spherocytosis. The dog was treated with a transfusion of packed RBCs and IV fluids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Repeat diagnostics showed resolution of the anemia and no lasting evidence of tubular dysfunction. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case in the veterinary literature of toxicity following ingestion of Lawsonia inermis (henna). Henna ingestion was associated with the development of hemolytic anemia and acute kidney injury. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  18. Experimental transmission of atypical scrapie to sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiropoulos John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in small ruminants has been an EU regulatory requirement since 2002. A number of European countries have subsequently reported cases of atypical scrapie, similar to previously published cases from Norway, which have pathological and molecular features distinct from classical scrapie. Most cases have occurred singly in flocks, associated with genotypes considered to be more resistant to classical disease. Experimental transmissibility of such isolates has been reported in certain ovinised transgenic mice, but has not previously been reported in the natural host. Information on the transmissibility of this agent is vital to ensuring that disease control measures are effective and proportionate. Results This report presents the successful experimental transmission, in 378 days, of atypical scrapie to a recipient sheep of homologous genotype with preservation of the pathological and molecular characteristics of the donor. This isolate also transmitted to ovinised transgenic mice (Tg338 with a murine phenotype indistinguishable from that of Nor 98. Conclusion This result strengthens the opinion that these cases result from a distinct strain of scrapie agent, which is potentially transmissible in the natural host under field conditions.

  19. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  20. Prevalence of atypical swallowing: a kinesiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, A; Cattaneo, R; Spadaro, A; Marchetti, E; Barone, A

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of kinesiographic coincidence between the most cranial position during deglutition of mandible and habitual occlusal position and to evaluate the distribution of clinical diagnosis according to the kinesiographic pattern of deglutition. 201 random patients in waiting list for dental treatment and classified as orthodontic patients, prosthetic patients, TMD patients and control patients, were evaluated. Kinesiographic records were acquired using K7I and positioning a magnetic sensor frame integral with the head and with the sensory field balanced on an artificial magnet adhering to the mucosa covering the roots of the lower mandibular incisors. The kinesiographic occlusal position was compared to the kinesiographic most cranial position of the mandible during swallowing. 99 patients displayed a discrepancy between the most cranial position during swallowing and the occlusal position. 102 patients did not show any discrepancy. In this group the kinesiographic most cranial position during swallowing coincided with the occlusal position. The finding suggests that computerised kinesiography could be useful to study deglutition, detecting in a reliable way the movement pattern. Atypical deglutition seems to be less atypical than previously though in dental patient population and, despite these data confirm its correlation with malocclusion, we noted an inverse correlation with necessity of prosthetic treatment and no higher prevalence in TMD patients.

  1. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) and denosumab reduce the risk of spine and nonspine fractures. Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) located in the subtrochanteric region and diaphysis of the femur have been reported in patients taking BPs and in patients on denosumab, but they also occur in patients with no exp......Bisphosphonates (BPs) and denosumab reduce the risk of spine and nonspine fractures. Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) located in the subtrochanteric region and diaphysis of the femur have been reported in patients taking BPs and in patients on denosumab, but they also occur in patients...... with no exposure to these drugs. In this report, we review studies on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and medical management of AFFs, published since 2010. This newer evidence suggests that AFFs are stress or insufficiency fractures. The original case definition was revised to highlight radiographic features...... a minor to a major feature. The association with specific diseases and drug exposures was removed from the minor features, because it was considered that these associations should be sought rather than be included in the case definition. Studies with radiographic review consistently report significant...

  2. Intraocular lens calculations in atypical eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aazim A Siddiqui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery is the most performed surgical procedure in the field of ophthalmology. The process of intraocular lens (IOL calculations is a critical step to achieving successful outcomes. Many IOL formulae exist to guide surgeons through the difficult process of picking the most appropriate lens to achieve a certain target refraction. However, these formulae reach within 0.50 diopters of the target refraction only 75% of the time, leaving 25% of the eyes with a significant refractive surprise. A literature review was performed to investigate all the relevant published material on the history, progress, and recent advancements of IOL calculations. Based on this review, the appropriate history, evolution, progress, limitations, and recent advancements are analyzed and explained. Although the modern IOL formulae and biometric devices perform well for average eyes, they are suboptimal for eyes with atypical biometric parameters and also those that are postrefractive and keratoconic. There has not been a single, perfect formula that can resolve the complexities of this process. Various methods of formula optimization and newer generation of IOL formulae and devices may hold the key to improving outcomes in both typical and atypical eyes. These solutions minimize refractive error by introducing new input parameters and complex mathematical techniques to better estimate postoperative lens position.

  3. An atypical case of Reye's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maehara, Fumiaki; Goto, Katsuya; Okudera, Toshio; Mitsudome, Akihisa; Hara, Kunio; Shiraishi, Masayuki

    1982-01-01

    An atypical case of Reye's syndrome was reported with emphasis on usefulness of CT for the diagnosis and follow-up study of this disease. The patient was a 13-month-old girl who had been transferred to our hospital because of status epilepticus, a comatous state and a high temperature. She was diagnosed as having Reye's syndrome according to data of liver function tests, findings in CSF and body CT which revealed swelling of the liver with diminished attenuation value suggesting fatty infiltration. However, there were atypical features in this patient: epileptic seizures since age 5 months, no vomiting at the time of onset and no evidence of brain swelling on CT in acute phase. She was discharged 2 months later with impaired neuropsychological functions of marked degree. When she was 2 year-old, she again went into status epilepticus, was comatous and had a high temperature. She was dead when she arrived at emergency room of our hospital. Autopsy findings revealed features of Reye's syndrome as follows: abundant accumulation of small fat droplets without nuclear displacement in the liver, fatty infiltration in the kidney and myocardium, and mild swelling in the cerebral cortex with marked ventricular dilatation. The possibility of recurrence of Reye's syndrome was discussed based on the clinical and autopsy findings. The value of CT in the diagnosis and the follow-up study of this disease was emphasized. (author)

  4. A liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry method to measure a selected panel of uremic retention solutes derived from endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loor, Henriette de; Poesen, Ruben [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Nephrology, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Leger, Wout; Dehaen, Wim [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Division of Molecular Design and Synthesis, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Augustijns, Patrick [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, Drug Delivery and Disposition, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Evenepoel, Pieter [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Nephrology, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Meijers, Björn, E-mail: bjorn.meijers@uzleuven.be [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Nephrology, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-09-14

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease, which is, at least partly, mediated by the accumulation of so-called uremic retention solutes. Although there has been an increasing interest in the behavior of these solutes, derived from both the endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism, methods to simultaneously and accurately measure a broad panel of relevant uremic retention solutes remain scarce. We developed a highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. A high throughput sample preparation was used with extraction of analytes from 50 μl serum using Ostro plate technology. For most solutes, stable isotopes labelled metabolites were used as internal standards. Chromatography was achieved using an Acquity UPLC CSH Fluoro Phenyl column. The total run time was 8 min, the mobile phase was a gradient of 0.1% formic acid in Milli-Q water and pure methanol at a flow rate of 0.5 ml min{sup −1}. Detection was performed using a tandem mass spectrometer with alternated positive and negative electrospray ionization. Calibration curves were linear for all solutes. Precision was assessed according to the NCCLS EP5-T guideline, being below 15% for all metabolites. Mean recoveries were between 83 and 104% for all metabolites. The validated method was successfully applied in a cohort of 488 patients with CKD. We developed and validated a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of 15 uremic retention solutes derived from endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism. This method allows for studying the behavior and relevance of these solutes in patients with CKD. - Highlights: • Simultaneous quantification of fifteen relevant uremic retention solutes. • Comprehensive validation, highly sensitive and high through-put LC-MSMS method. • Comparison of different blood tubes. • Freeze-thaw stability. • Successful implementation in a

  5. Childhood Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... teratoid/rhabdoid tumor. There is no standard staging system for central nervous system atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor. The extent or spread ... different types of treatment for patients with central nervous system atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor. Different types of treatment ...

  6. 'Atypical' bacteria are a common cause of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To assess the proportion of cases of community· acquired pneumonia caused by 'atypical' bacteria, inclUding the recently discovered Chlamydia pneumoniae, and to compare the clinical, radiographic and laboratory features of patients with and without 'atypical' bacteria. Methods. A prospective serological ...

  7. Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired pneumonia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with ...

  8. Typical and Atypical Dementia Family Caregivers: Systematic and Objective Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda O.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J.; Zuber, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This systematic, objective comparison of typical (spouse, children) and atypical (in-law, sibling, nephew/niece, grandchild) dementia family caregivers examined demographic, caregiving and clinical variables. Analysis was of 1,476 caregivers, of whom 125 were atypical, from the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH I and II)…

  9. Hemodialysis does not alter in vitro hepatic CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 metabolic activity in uremic serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decker BS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Brian S Decker,1,2 Kalisha D O'Neill,1,2 Mary A Chambers,1,2 James E Slaven,3 Zhangsheng Yu,3 David R Jones,2,4 Sharon M Moe1,21Division of Nephrology, 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Biostatistics, 4Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: There is a paucity of studies evaluating the change in liver metabolism in subjects receiving hemodialysis. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of uremic toxins on hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 metabolism before and after a 4-hour hemodialysis session. Midazolam and dextromethorphan were incubated with uremic serum collected from subjects before and after the 4-hour hemodialysis session. Analysis and quantification of the 1'-OH-midazolam and 4-OH-midazolam and dextrorphan metabolites were performed by high-pressure liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis using the Student's t-test (paired was used to compare the amount of metabolite formed. The mean amount of 1'-OH-midazolam, 4-OH-midazolam, and dextrorphan metabolites formed before and after hemodialysis did not significantly differ. There was no significant difference in CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 metabolic activity in uremic serum before and after hemodialysis.Keywords: hemodialysis, uremia, CYP3A4, CYP2D6, metabolism

  10. Uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep quality in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: potential role of homocysteine and parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Katrin; Blaschke, Sabine; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Becker, Andreas; Anderson-Schmidt, Heike; Cohrs, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aetiology of uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS) remains unclear. Our research investigated whether an elevated plasma concentration of the excitatory amino acid homocysteine might be associated with RLS occurrence in patients with chronic renal insufficiency on hemodialysis. Total plasma homocysteine as well as creatinine, urea, folate, parathyroid hormone, hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, phosphate, calcium, magnesium, and albumin levels were compared between 26 RLS-affected (RLSpos) and 26 non-affected (RLSneg) patients on chronic hemodialysis. We further compared subjective sleep quality between RLSpos and RLSneg patients using the Pittsburgh-Sleep-Quality-Index and investigated possible relationships between laboratory parameters and sleep quality. Taking individual albumin concentrations into account, a significant positive correlation between total plasma homocysteine and RLS occurrence was observed (r= 0.246; p=0.045). Sleep quality was significantly more reduced in RLSpos compared to RLSneg patients and RLS severity correlated positively with impairment of sleep quality. Bad sleep quality in all patients was associated with higher concentrations of parathyroid hormone. Our results suggest a possible aetiological role of homocysteine in uremic RLS. They confirm that uremic RLS is an important factor causing sleep impairment in patients on hemodialysis. Higher parathyroid hormone levels might also be associated with bad sleep quality in these patients. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. [Atypical cerebellar neurocytoma resembling a hemangioblastoma. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista Martínez, Olalla; Rivas López, Luis Alfredo; Pombo Otero, Jorge Francisco; Amaro Cendón, Santiago; Bravo García, Christian; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Through August 2013, 105 cases of intracranial extraventricular neurocytoma (EVN) had been described; 6% were located in cerebellum and 22% were atypical EVN. A rare morphologic form of neurocytoma, atypical EVN has had only 24 cases reported to date. Its prognosis is poorer than the typical central neurocytoma. This case report describes an atypical cerebellar EVN, a form that has not been reported yet, hence the interest of this article. We emphasise its cystic nature and mural nodule, in an infrequent presentation. EVN are low-incidence tumours that we need to take into consideration when making the differential diagnosis of cystic cerebellar lesions with mural nodule. Given that the prognosis of atypical EVNs depends on the atypical nature and on the grade of resection, medical follow up has to be more constant, due to the greater degree of recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Nardo, Davide [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A. [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gardner, Ann [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  13. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, Marco; Salmaso, Dario; Nardo, Davide; Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A.; Jacobsson, Hans; Gardner, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in 99m Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  14. [Etiologies of non-hemolytic jaundice in infants: a retrospective analysis of 3113 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Hongmei

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the causes of non-hemolytic jaundice among infants in Chongqing, China from the period of 1982 to 2011 and to determine whether the etiologies have changed over the past 30 years. The medical records of 3 113 infants,aged 1 month to 1 year,admitted to our hospital with non-hemolytic jaundice were collected and stratified according to decade-long time periods: group A (1982-1991), n=537; group B (1992-2001), n=786; group C (2002-2011), n=1 790. Data on sex, age, etiology and bilirubin level were retrospectively assessed using the chi-square test. In the three groups, boys consistently accounted for the majority of cases (group A:74.3%, group B:66.7%, group C:62.6%). In group A, 52% of the patients were 1-2 months of age; the peak age of patients in both group B and C was 2-3 months (group B:67.8%, group C:61.0%). Group A showed the highest level of patients with mildly elevated total bilirubin level (80.3%); however, moderately elevated total bilirubin level was most frequent in group B (53.4%) and group C (49.7%). The main etiologic diagnoses of the patients in group A were cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection (31.7%), sepsis (18.2%), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1.3%), and biliary tract anomalies (1.3%); 46.6% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group B were CMV infection (36.0%), sepsis (21.5%), breast milk jaundice (2.0%), and HBV (1.9%); 37.9% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group C were CMV infection (42.6%), sepsis (7.5%), breast milk jaundice (17.7%), and biliary tract anomalies (2.46%); 29.1% of the cases had unclear cause. In Chongqing, infective factors, especially CMV, remain the main cause of nonhemolytic jaundice in infants, but bacterial etiologies have declined over the past 30 years.Non-infective factors, such as biliary tract anomalies and inherited metabolic diseases, have trended upwards. Although there has been great progress in the clinical management of

  15. Anorexia Nervosa/Atypical Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Lindsay; Weiselberg, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate among all psychiatric illnesses, as it can result in significant psychopathology along with life-threatening medical complications. Atypical anorexia nervosa is a new variant described in the latest DSM edition, which has much in common with anorexia nervosa and also can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The evolution of the criteria for these illnesses is reviewed, and the two are compared and contrasted in this article. Important labs to monitor for in those with these illnesses, along with an emphasis on the monitoring of vital signs and weight, are reviewed here. The necessity for close psychiatric monitoring of safety concerns, including suicidal thoughts, is also stressed. The etiology and the treatment of these illnesses are reviewed from a biopsychosocial approach; and lastly, the prognosis of these illnesses is discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Extensive hypertrophic lupus erythematosus: Atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus (LE is a disease with a wide spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations. Clinical features of patients with LE show a great variation, and for this reason it is difficult to develop a unifying concept of this disease. Our objective is to present a case of hypertrophic LE with atypical morphology and extensive involvement, who responded favorably to isotretinoin. Diagnosis of hypertrophic lupus erythematosus (HLE was confirmed by characteristic histopathological findings. Combination therapy with isotretinoin and hydroxychloroquine resulted in flattening and repression of previously refractory skin lesions. Sometimes, HLE lesions may present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. In long standing lesions, squamous cell carcinoma may arise. Therefore, HLE requires adequate therapy with clinical and histopathological follow up.

  17. Atypical fibroxanthoma on a bald scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Noriaki; Takenaka, Hideya; Kishimoto, Saburo

    2005-10-01

    We present the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of an atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) on the bald scalp of an 81-year-old French man who had worked at a private high school in Japan as a janitor for over 40 years. The patient had a history of basal cell carcinoma on the nape, and chronic solar radiation seemed to be a predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of this association. This case showed the typical clinical and histopathological characteristics of AFX, and the immunohistochemical results suggested differentiation of histiocytes and myofibroblasts. The AFX was completely resected, and the patient has not had tumor recurrence or metastasis for over four postoperative years. This case therefore provides further support to the theory that AFX displays a clinically benign course, even though it is essentially a malignant tumor histologically located in the dermis. Therefore, we must excise AFX completely with great care and perform regular physical examinations for several years after operation.

  18. Refractory Rheumatic Disorder: Atypical Postpregnancy Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Mourgues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a young patient with severe osteoporosis that was initially revealed when she presented with polyarthralgia during her second pregnancy. Postpartum, the pain increased and her X-ray did not show any abnormalities. A bone scintigraphy was performed. It indicated an inflammatory rheumatic disorder. Six months after partum, an investigation of right coxalgia revealed a spontaneous basicervical fracture. Given the persistent polyarthralgia, the patient underwent a new scintigraphy, which revealed areas of what looked to be old rib and L1 fractures. A subsequent full body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan revealed signal abnormalities that could indicate multiple lower limb bone fractures. Despite exhaustive biological, radiological, and histological testing, no secondary cause for the osteoporosis was found. The patient was started on teriparatide. We finally concluded that, despite the atypical presentation, the patient was suffering from postpregnancy osteoporosis. It is possible that the frequency of occurrence of this still poorly understood disease is underestimated.

  19. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  20. A bone fide atypical fibroxanthoma of penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cuomo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesenchymal tumors of the penis are very rare and they have vascular origin. We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a painless nodule of 2.0 cm in diameter located in the penile foreskin. There was no history of urinary or sexually transmitted disease. An excisional biopsy revealed a markedly pleomorphic sarcoma resembling atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX associated with a squamous cell carcinoma in situ. The patient refused a wide re-excision and was free of disease after 36 months. Because the different therapeutic management and prognosis, differential diagnosis should be made with sarcomatoid squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma: A diagnosis of AFX or malignant fibrous histiocytoma may be considered only after the complete exclusion of these two entities.

  1. An atypical presentation of amoebic hepatic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo Ramírez, Eduardo; Ruz Hernández, Mario; Guanche Garcell, Humberto; Castañeda Hernández, Mirtha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: amoebic hepatic abscess is the extraintestinal manifestation of an infection by entamoeba histolytica. Estimations are made that 10% of the world population has been infected by the parasite, being more frequent in tropical regions, where overcrowding and bad sanitary conditions occur. Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asian and India have considerable health problems, resulting from this disease. In Cuba amoebiasis has been proved not to be one of the most frequent parasitism cases. Case presentation: male patient of age 48 years and of Indian nationality, presenting clinical findings, which proves a unique lesion in the right liver lobule, diagnosed by ultrasound scan and nuclear magnetic resonance. The presence is confirmed of serum antibodies against entamoeba histolytica. Treatment with metronidazole produced clinical and radiological improvement. Conclusions: atypical clinical presentation constitutes a remarkable element worthy considered in daily clinical practice. (author)

  2. Atypical features of hyperthyroidism in Blacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalk, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is reportedly uncommon in the indigenous populations of Africa. The presenting symptoms volunteered, the symptoms elicited by direct questioning, and the results of physical examination were therefore prospectively compared in 60 Black and 56 White patients with thyrotoxicosis attending a single thyroid clinic. Fewer Blacks than Whites volunteered information about weight loss, while more Blacks complained only of the presence of a goitre. A 'chance' diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was made more frequently in Blacks. Symptomatology elicited by direct questioning and findings on physical examination were generally similar in each group, except that Blacks presented more frequently with complicated disease (cardiac failure and overt myopathy) and infiltrative ophthalmopathy. The frequency with which hyperthyroidism presents 'atypically' in Black compared with White patients may reflect educational, socio-economic and cultural differences in the Black and White populations, and may partly explain the infrequency with which this disease is diagnosed in Blacks

  3. Medicago truncatula CYP716A12 Is a Multifunctional Oxidase Involved in the Biosynthesis of Hemolytic Saponins[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Panara, Francesco; Tava, Aldo; Scaramelli, Laura; Porceddu, Andrea; Graham, Neil; Odoardi, Miriam; Piano, Efisio; Arcioni, Sergio; May, Sean; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2011-01-01

    Saponins, a group of glycosidic compounds present in several plant species, have aglycone moieties that are formed using triterpenoid or steroidal skeletons. In spite of their importance as antimicrobial compounds and their possible benefits for human health, knowledge of the genetic control of saponin biosynthesis is still poorly understood. In the Medicago genus, the hemolytic activity of saponins is related to the nature of their aglycone moieties. We have identified a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP716A12) involved in saponin synthesis in Medicago truncatula using a combined genetic and biochemical approach. Genetic loss-of-function analysis and complementation studies showed that CYP716A12 is responsible for an early step in the saponin biosynthetic pathway. Mutants in CYP716A12 were unable to produce hemolytic saponins and only synthetized soyasaponins, and were thus named lacking hemolytic activity (lha). In vitro enzymatic activity assays indicate that CYP716A12 catalyzes the oxidation of β-amyrin and erythrodiol at the C-28 position, yielding oleanolic acid. Transcriptome changes in the lha mutant showed a modulation in the main steps of triterpenic saponin biosynthetic pathway: squalene cyclization, β-amyrin oxidation, and glycosylation. The analysis of CYP716A12 expression in planta is reported together with the sapogenin content in different tissues and stages. This article provides evidence for CYP716A12 being a key gene in hemolytic saponin biosynthesis. PMID:21821776

  4. Medicago truncatula CYP716A12 is a multifunctional oxidase involved in the biosynthesis of hemolytic saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Panara, Francesco; Tava, Aldo; Scaramelli, Laura; Porceddu, Andrea; Graham, Neil; Odoardi, Miriam; Piano, Efisio; Arcioni, Sergio; May, Sean; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2011-08-01

    Saponins, a group of glycosidic compounds present in several plant species, have aglycone moieties that are formed using triterpenoid or steroidal skeletons. In spite of their importance as antimicrobial compounds and their possible benefits for human health, knowledge of the genetic control of saponin biosynthesis is still poorly understood. In the Medicago genus, the hemolytic activity of saponins is related to the nature of their aglycone moieties. We have identified a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP716A12) involved in saponin synthesis in Medicago truncatula using a combined genetic and biochemical approach. Genetic loss-of-function analysis and complementation studies showed that CYP716A12 is responsible for an early step in the saponin biosynthetic pathway. Mutants in CYP716A12 were unable to produce hemolytic saponins and only synthetized soyasaponins, and were thus named lacking hemolytic activity (lha). In vitro enzymatic activity assays indicate that CYP716A12 catalyzes the oxidation of β-amyrin and erythrodiol at the C-28 position, yielding oleanolic acid. Transcriptome changes in the lha mutant showed a modulation in the main steps of triterpenic saponin biosynthetic pathway: squalene cyclization, β-amyrin oxidation, and glycosylation. The analysis of CYP716A12 expression in planta is reported together with the sapogenin content in different tissues and stages. This article provides evidence for CYP716A12 being a key gene in hemolytic saponin biosynthesis.

  5. Long-term neurodevelopmental outcome after intrauterine transfusion for hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn: the LOTUS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenburg, Irene T.; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E.; van Klink, Jeanine M.; Verduin, Esther; van Kamp, Inge L.; Walther, Frans J.; Schonewille, Henk; Doxiadis, Ilias I.; Kanhai, Humphrey H.; van Lith, Jan M.; van Zwet, Erik W.; Oepkes, Dick; Brand, Anneke; Lopriore, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    To determine the incidence and risk factors for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in children with hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn treated with intrauterine transfusion (IUT). Neurodevelopmental outcome in children at least 2 years of age was assessed using standardized tests, including the

  6. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simona Spaccavento, Marina Del Prete, Angela Craca, Anna Loverre IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Cassano Murge, Bari, Italy Background: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS and aphasia. Aim: We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods: A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results: Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20, low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall, and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion: Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in

  7. Atypical Neurotransmitters and the Neurobiology of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joca, Samia Regiane; Moreira, Fabricio Araujo; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report that the mechanism of action of antidepressants involves the facilitation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in the brain in the 1960s, the leading hypothesis about the neurobiology of depression has been the so called "monoaminergic hypothesis". However, a growing body of evidence from the last two decades also supports important involvement of non-monoaminergic mechanisms in the neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action. The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) and endocannabinoid signaling in the brain during the 1990s challenged the wellestablished criteria of classical neurotransmission. These transmitters are synthesized and released on demand by the postsynaptic neurons, and may act as a retrograde messenger on the presynaptic terminal, modulating neurotransmitter release. These unconventional signaling mechanisms and the important role as neural messengers have classified NO and endocannabinoids as atypical neurotransmitters. They are able to modulate neural signaling mediated by the main conventional neurotransmitters systems in the brain, including the monoaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling systems. This review aims at discussing the fundamental aspects of NO- and endocannabinoid-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to the neurobiology of depression. Both preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of these atypical neurotransmitters in the neurobiology of depression, and in the antidepressant effects are presented here. The evidence is discussed on basis of their ability to modulate different neurotransmitter systems in the brain, including monoaminergic and glutamatergic ones. A better comprehension of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms in the neurobiology depression could provide new avenues for the development of novel non-monoamine based antidepressants.

  8. Kinetics of hemolytic plaque formation. IV. IgM plaque inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLisi, C

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the inhibition of hemolytic plaques formed against IgM antibodies is presented. The starting point is the equations of DeLisi and Bell (1974) which describe the kinetics of plaque growth, and DeLisi and Goldstein (1975) which describe inhibition of IgG plaques. However, the physical chemical models which were used previously to describe IgG inhibition data are shown to be inadequate for describing the characteristics of IgM inhibition curves. Moreover, it is shown that the experimental results place severe restrictions on the possible choices of physical chemical models for IgM upon which to base the calculations. It is argued that in order to account even qualitatively for all the data, one must assume (1) a very restricted motion of IgMs about the Fab hinge region and (2) a very narrow secretion rate distribution of IgM by antibody secreting cells. (auth)

  9. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  10. Specific features of red blood cell morphology in hemolytic disease neonates undergoing intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the characteristics of red blood cell morphology in infants who have undergone intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion for hemolytic disease of the fetus. The infants are shown to have a reduction in the mean volume of red blood cells and in their mean level of hemoglobin, a decrease in the fraction of fetal hemoglobin and an increase in oxygen tension at half saturation. The above morphological characteristics of red blood cells remain decreased during the neonatal period after exchange transfusion or others, as clinically indicated, which seems to suggest that the compensatory-adaptive mechanisms to regulate hematopoiesis are exhausted and a donor’s red blood cells continue to be predominant.

  11. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

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    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  12. Kell hemolytic disease of the fetus. Combination treatment with plasmapheresis and intrauterine blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, S; Machado, P; Pecos, P; Coloma, M; Rebollo, S; Raya, J M

    2011-08-01

    We report the case of a 36-year old pregnant woman with a Kell alloimmunization (anti-K1), probably secondary to a previous blood transfusion, and a severe hemolytic disease of the fetus. Once the first fetal blood transfusion by cordocentesis was performed, we started treatment with repeated plasmapheresis to maintain anti-K1 titer below 1:32. With this scheme we did not need to perform a second intrauterine fetal blood transfusion and only mild anemia was found in the newborn. Taking into account that the rate of serious complications with plasmapheresis is lower than that related with intrauterine blood transfusion, this could be an alternative approach to repeated transfusions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A SKIN TEST FOR DETECTING GROUP C HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION CAUSING EPIZOOTIC LYMPHADENITIS IN GUINEA PIGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Johannes K.

    1936-01-01

    1. A skin test with a crude bacterial extract prepared from group C (Lancefield) hemolytic streptococci was used as a means of detecting possible carriers of the streptococcus causing epizootic lymphadenitis in guinea pigs. A positive test similar to a positive tuberculin reaction was considered presumptive evidence of present or recent infection with this streptococcus. 2. 20 positive reactors were found in 330 supposedly normal guinea pigs. 3. 195 negatively reacting animals were used as a breeding stock which yielded 1,296 progeny over a period of 15 months. None of the breeding stock or their progeny showed evidence of spontaneous lymphadenitis. Skin tests of 100 of the progeny were all negative. 4. The use of this skin test as a means of obtaining guinea pig breeding stock free of the streptococcus causing spontaneous lymphadenitis is suggested. PMID:19870552

  14. Rhesus-D zygosity and hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn

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    Mostafa Moghaddam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alloimmunization against the Rhesus-D (RhD antigen still remains as a major cause of hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN. Determination of paternal RhDzygosity is performed by molecular testing and is valuable for the management of alloimmunized pregnant women. A 30-year-old pregnant woman with AB negative blood group presented with two consecutive abortions and no history of blood transfusion. By application of the antibody screening, identification panel, and selected cells, she was found to be highly alloimmunized. RhDzygosity was performed on her partner and was shown to be homozygous for RhD. The sequence- specific priming-polymerase chain reaction used in this report is essential to establish whether the mother requires an appropriate immunoprophylaxis or the fetus is at risk of HDFN.

  15. Adrenal failure followed by status epilepticus and hemolytic anemia in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

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    Bures Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 14 year old boy who presented with the symptoms abdominal pain, fever and proteinuria. A hematoma in the region of the right pararenal space was diagnosed. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were positive and serum cortisol was normal. Ten days after admission the boy suddenly suffered generalized seizures due to low serum sodium. As well, the patient developed hemolytic anemia, acute elevated liver enzymes, hematuria and increased proteinuria. At this time a second hemorrhage of the left adrenal gland was documented. Adrenal function tests revealed adrenal insufficiency. We suspected microthromboses in the adrenals and secondary bleeding and treated the boy with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and phenprocoumon. Conclusion Adrenal failure is a rare complication of APS in children with only five cases reported to date. As shown in our patient, this syndrome can manifest in a diverse set of simultaneously occurring symptoms.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes.

  17. Pre-, Pro-, and Synbiotics: Do They Have a Role in Reducing Uremic Toxins? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Megan Rossi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper assessed the effectiveness of pre-, pro-, and synbiotics on reducing two protein-bound uremic toxins, p-cresyl sulphate (PCS and indoxyl sulphate (IS. Methods. English language studies reporting serum, urinary, or fecal PCS and/or IS (or their precursors following pre-, pro-, or synbiotic interventions (>1 day in human adults were included. Population estimates of differences in the outcomes between the pre- and the postintervention were estimated for subgroups of studies using four meta-analyses. Quality was determined using the GRADE approach. Results. 19 studies met the inclusion criteria, 14 in healthy adults and five in haemodialysis patients. Eight studies investigated prebiotics, six probiotics, one synbiotics, one both pre- and probiotics, and three studies trialled all three interventions. The quality of the studies ranged from moderate to very low. 12 studies were included in the meta-analyses with all four meta-analyses reporting statistically significant reductions in IS and PCS with pre- and probiotic therapy. Conclusion. There is a limited but supportive evidence for the effectiveness of pre- and probiotics on reducing PCS and IS in the chronic kidney disease population. Further studies are needed to provide more definitive findings before routine clinical use can be recommended.

  18. Differential diagnosis between secondary hyperparathyroidism and aluminum intoxication in uremic patients: Usefulness of 99mTc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnaert, P.; Van Hooff, I.; Schoutens, A.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-one patients in chronic end-stage renal failure and 4 patients with a functioning kidney transplant presented with spontaneous hypercalcemia or intolerance to vitamin D3 sterols and/or oral calcium supplements. Bone iliac crest biopsy with aluminum staining and Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy with determination of Fogelman score were performed in all cases. Two patients had aluminum-induced osteomalacia (AL O). Thirty-eight biopsies showed renal osteodystrophy (secondary hyperparathyroidism or various combinations of osteitis fibrosa and osteomalacia): 19 with positive staining for aluminum (RO + AL) and 19 without aluminum deposits (RO). The series also comprised 2 cases of pure osteomalacia (OM), 2 cases of osteoporosis (OP), and 1 case of osteoporosis with aluminum accumulation (OP + AL). Mean Fogelman score in RO patients (9.1 +/- 0.3) was significantly higher than in all other categories (5.9 +/- 0.5 for RO + AL, and scores ranging from 0 to 8 in the last 7 patients, p less than 0.01). Patients with massive aluminum accumulation in bone (greater than 75% of the total trabecular surface) showed no or very low uptake of the isotope by the skeleton. Fogelman scores of 9 or higher were always associated with histological secondary hyperparathyroidism. 99m Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy is helpful to distinguish aluminum intoxication from secondary hyperparathyroidism in uremic patients

  19. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. Malignant atypical cell in urine cytology: a diagnostic dilemma

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    Kakkar Nandita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to find out the characteristic morphology of malignant atypical cells which were missed on routine cytology of urine. Materials and methods In this retrospective study, we examined detailed cytomorphology of 18 cases of atypical urinary cytology which were missed on routine examination and were further proved on histopathology as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of bladder. The cytological features of these cases were compared with 10 cases of benign urine samples. Results There were 11 cases of high grade TCC and 7 cases of low grade TCC on histopathology of the atypical urine samples. Necrosis in the background and necrosed papillae were mostly seen in malignant atypical cells. The comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei (single cells with deep black structure-less nuclei were only observed in malignant atypical cells. The most consistent features in malignant atypical cells were: i high nuclear and cytoplasmic (N/C ratio ii nuclear pleomorphism iii nuclear margin irregularity iv hyperchromasia and v chromatin abnormalities Conclusion The present study emphasizes that nuclear features such as high N/C ratio, hyperchromasia and chromatin abnormalities are particularly useful for assessing the malignant atypical cells. Other cytological features such as comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei are also helpful for diagnosis but have limited value because they are less frequently seen.

  1. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

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    D. V. A. Khoa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS, Duroc (DU, Berlin miniature pig (BMP, German Landrace (LR, Pietrain (PIE, and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig. Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK. Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9 as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future.

  2. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn: Modern Practice and Future Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Delaney, Meghan

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) sensitization occurs in some women in response to exposure to paternally derived RBC antigens during pregnancy or to nonself antigens on transfused RBCs during their lifetime. Once sensitized, future pregnancies may be at risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although great strides have been made over the past few decades in terms of identifying blood group antigens and in predicting fetal anemia through the use of noninvasive monitoring, many questions remain in terms of understanding RBC alloimmunization risk factors, preventative therapies, and treatment strategies. At the present time, there is room for improvement in these areas in both developed and developing countries. Evidence-based, universal guidelines describing recommended RBC antigen matching transfusion strategies for girls or women, before pregnancy or during intrauterine transfusions, would be welcomed. A better understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of Rh immunoglobulin, first introduced more than half of a century ago and one of the most successful immunoprophylaxis therapies in existence today, would also be a large step forward. For example, answers to questions of the role(s) that fetal RBC clearance, antigen masking, antigen modulation, and immune suppression play in the effectiveness of Rh immunoglobulin may help to guide the development of novel preventative therapies during pregnancy for immunization to RhD and non-RhD antigens. Furthermore, a better understanding of the importance of anti-RhD or other alloantibody glycosylation patterns may be beneficial not only in developing such novel immunoprophylaxis therapies but also in predicting the clinical significance of existing maternal alloantibodies. One other area of need includes the development of therapies beyond intrauterine transfusions to mitigate the dangers of maternal alloantibodies to developing fetuses. We challenge physicians, scientists, and funding agencies to prioritize studies of

  3. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  4. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions.

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    Kalpesh B Ishnava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria.The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0. Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract.The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36μg/ml and 182.19μg/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50 value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein.Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria.

  5. [Tonsillopharyngitis outbreak caused by foodborne group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Vera, Juan; Figueroa Murillo, Estrella; Cruz Calderón, María Victoria; Pérez Alonso, Aránzazu

    2011-08-01

    Although infrequent, some authors have reported outbreaks of foodborne tonsillopharyngitis. On May 11, 2010 a series of cases of tonsillopharyngitis among those attending a fellowship meeting on 8 March was notified to the Epidemiological Surveillance Network in Andalusia (SVEA). The aim of this study is to epidemiologically characterise the outbreak. Descriptive analysis of reported cases and case - control exposure to the implicated food. The variables taken into account were age, sex, symptoms and start date. Sources of information used were the records of the SVEA and individual digital report (DIRAYA). Frequencies and attack rates were calculated, and a Bayesian analysis for the comparison of difference in proportions of disease was carried out for a 95% probability or credibility range (IP). Among the 130 attendees at a communion 41 cases of tonsillopharyngitis (attack rate 31.5%) were detected, and in smears Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated. The most affected age group was the 25-44 year-olds, 16 (39,0%); 68.6% (24) female. The egg salad showed a probability greater than 80% P(Δ>0.10 and Δ>0.15) for a 95% IP of risk of disease after intake and a probability of having a lower risk of no disease. It was a Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal outbreak, the epidemiological evidence indicates exposure to common single source, hence the hypothesis of dietary origin, the implicated food was egg salad. Contributing factors could be cross-contamination after preparation favoured by the bad practice and the conditions of the place.

  6. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2 had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  7. Atypical real estate objects: legal regime and control system

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    Voskresenskaya Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The legal concept of immovable things raises controversy in legal practice. Determining and understanding the definition of real estate, the complexity and diversity of these objects, a growing appearance of so-called atypical properties (such as sport stadiums, roads, boreholes, analyzing legislation and judicial practice of this field – all these issues call for a deep study of this topic. There is a conflicting arbitration practice, the subject of which is the learning of the legal nature of atypical real estate (for instance, asphalt playgrounds, car parks, fences, wells. The object of the research is the learning of the legal status of atypical real estate.

  8. Radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Pearcy, E.A.; Conces, D.J. Jr.; Mathur, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 95 patients with the new diagnosis of atypical turberculosis were reviewed to determine if any significant differences between atypical tuberculosis and that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be discerned. Findings included upper lobe involvement in B4 of the 95 patients and cavities in 76, with nearly equal groups having no, moderate, or extensive surrounding alveolar disease. Nodules were common; in six patients a nodule was the sole manifestation of disease. Adenopathy was seen in 12 of the 95 patients, atlectasis in 45, pleural thickening in 90, and effusions in three. These radiographic findings did not allow the radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

  9. Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; El-Sayeh, Hany George G; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of aripiprazole compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (March 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral aripiprazole with oral forms of amisulpride, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes four trials with 1404 participants on two out of eight possible comparisons - aripiprazole versus olanzapine and aripiprazole versus risperidone. The overall number of participants leaving the studies early was considerable (38.5%), limiting the validity of the findings, but with no significant differences between groups. Aripiprazole was less efficacious than olanzapine in terms of the general mental state (PANSS total score: n=794, 2 RCTs, MD 4.96 CI 1.85 to 8.06), but it was associated with fewer side

  10. [Apropos of atypical melancholia with Sustiva (efavirenz)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J P; Halleguen, O; Picard, A; Lang, J M; Danion, J M

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has changed dramatically in recent years as a result of the development of new drugs which allows a variety of multitherapy combinations more adapted to patients' needs and thereby improving compliance. Efavirenz is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In addition to a potent antiretroviral activity, efavirenz is an easy-to-take drug with once-daily dosing and is usually well tolerated. Efavirenz, however, may induce psychic alterations which are variable and atypical in both their clinical presentation and severity. As early as the first days of treatment, efavirenz may provoke surprising phenomena such as nightmares, vivid dreams, hallucinations or illusions, and twilight states. Depersonalization and derealization episodes, personality alterations, stream of thought troubles and unusual thought contents, atypical depression and cognitive disorders have also been observed. These phenomena may occur either early or later on treatment. The prevalence of severe psychic disorders is less than 5%, but they are often responsible for harmful treatment discontinuations. Psychiatric side effects are heterogeneous and probably not related to pre-existing psychologic weakness. We do not have enough data to evaluate these side effects and their etiopathogeny. The drug could act directly on the central nervous system since it crosses the blood-brain barrier, on the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems. Some authors have compared efavirenz-induced psychic effects to those associated with LSD and found structural similarities between the two molecules. However, the heterogeneity and low prevalence of the psychiatric side effects of efavirenz suggest and individual sensitivity. In order to improve patient care, a better clinical approach, neuropsychological evaluation, and functional brain imagery should be used to progress in the analysis and comprehension of these disorders. We discuss in this paper the case of Mister H. This HIV

  11. Delayed Recurrence of Atypical Pulmonary Carcinoid Cluster: A Rare Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Surani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid is one of the most common tumors of the gastrointestinal tract followed by the tracheobronchial tree. Bronchial carcinoid compromises 20% of total carcinoid and accounts for 1–5% of pulmonary malignancies. Carcinoid can be typical or atypical, with atypical carcinoid compromises 10% of the carcinoid tumors. Carcinoid usually presents as peripheral lung lesion or solitary endobronchial abnormality. Rarely it can present as multiple endobronchial lesion. We hereby present a rare case of an elderly gentleman who had undergone resection of right middle and lower lobe of lung for atypical carcinoid. Seven years later he presented with cough. CT scan of chest revealed right hilar mass. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed numerous endobronchial polypoid lesions in the tracheobronchial tree. Recurrent atypical carcinoid was then confirmed on biopsy.

  12. The Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Psychotic Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Devi

    2007-01-01

    Convulsive therapy and its progeny, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), were originally used for the treatment of catatonic schizophrenia, and there is little doubt that ECT remains an effective intervention for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, current practice tends to favor the use of ECT in severe or treatment refractory affective disorders, and its use in schizophrenia and other nonaffective (atypical) psychotic disorders has become controversial. Case reports have suggested a role for ECT in two specific atypical psychotic disorders: Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. In this article, we review the atypical psychotic disorders and report a series of five case examples that signify the role of ECT in atypical psychotic presentations, particularly when the symptoms resemble those found in Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. PMID:20428309

  13. Animal behavior models of the mechanisms underlying antipsychotic atypicality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geyer, M.A.; Ellenbroek, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    This review describes the animal behavior models that provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the critical differences between the actions of typical vs. atypical antipsychotic drugs. Although many of these models are capable of differentiating between antipsychotic and other psychotropic

  14. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  15. Atypical handedness in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležalová, Irena; Schachter, Steven; Chrastina, Jan; Hemza, Jan; Hermanová, Markéta; Rektor, Ivan; Pažourková, Marta; Brázdil, Milan

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of our study was to investigate the handedness of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We also sought to identify clinical variables that correlated with left-handedness in this population. Handedness (laterality quotient) was assessed in 73 consecutive patients with MTLE associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Associations between right- and left-handedness and clinical variables were investigated. We found that 54 (74.0%) patients were right-handed, and 19 (26%) patients were left-handed. There were 15 (36.6%) left-handed patients with left-sided seizure onset compared to 4 (12.5%) left-handed patients with right-sided seizure onset (p=0.030). Among patients with left-sided MTLE, age at epilepsy onset was significantly correlated with handedness (8years of age [median; min-max 0.5-17] in left-handers versus 15years of age [median; min-max 3-30] in right-handers (p<0.001). Left-sided MTLE is associated with atypical handedness, especially when seizure onset occurs during an active period of brain development, suggesting a bi-hemispheric neuroplastic process for establishing motor dominance in patients with early-onset left-sided MTLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The neurogenetics of atypical parkinsonian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L; Clark, Mary C; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2014-04-01

    Although classic Parkinson disease is the disorder most commonly associated with the clinical feature of parkinsonism, there is in fact a broader spectrum of disease represented by a collection of phenotypically similar neurodegenerative conditions that mimic many of its core features. These atypical parkinsonian disorders most commonly include progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, disorders both associated with frontotemporal dementia, as well as multiple system atrophy and dementia with Lewy bodies. Although the clinical distinction of these disorders still remains a challenge to physicians, recent advances in genetics are poised to tease apart the differences. Insights into the molecular etiologies underlying these conditions will improve diagnosis, yield a better understanding of the underlying disease pathology, and ultimately lend stimulation to the development of potential treatments. At the same time, the wide range of phenotypes observed from mutations in a single gene warrants broad testing facilitated by advances in DNA sequencing. These expanding genomic approaches, ranging from the use of next-generation sequencing to identify causative or risk-associated gene variations to the study of epigenetic modification linking human genetics to environmental factors, are poised to lead the field into a new age of discovery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Persistent consequences of atypical early number concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle M. M. Mazzocco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available How does symbolic number knowledge performance help identify young children at risk for poor mathematics achievement outcomes? In research and practice, classification of mathematics learning disability (MLD, or dyscalculia is typically based on composite scores from broad measures of mathematics achievement. These scores do predict later math achievement levels, but do not specify the nature of math difficulties likely to emerge among students at greatest risk for long-term mathematics failure. Here we report that gaps in 2nd and 3rd graders’ number knowledge predict specific types of errors made on math assessments at Grade 8. Specifically, we show that early whole number misconceptions predict slower and less accurate performance, and atypical computational errors, on Grade 8 arithmetic tests. We demonstrate that basic number misconceptions can be detected by idiosyncratic responses to number knowledge items, and that when such misconceptions are evident during primary school they persist throughout the school age years, with variable manifestation throughout development. We conclude that including specific qualitative assessments of symbolic number knowledge in primary school may provide greater specificity of the types of difficulties likely to emerge among students at risk for poor mathematics outcomes.

  18. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  19. Atypical Presentation of Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fu Wah Ho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blunt thoracic aorta injury (BAI is second only to head injury as cause of mortality in blunt trauma. While most patients do not survive till arrival at the hospital, for the remainder, prompt diagnosis and treatment greatly improve outcomes. We report an atypical presentation of BAI, highlighting the diagnostic challenges of this condition in the emergency department. Case Presentation. A previously well 25-year-old male presented 15 hours after injury hemodynamically stable with delirium. There were no signs or symptoms suggestive of BAI. Sonography showed small bilateral pleural effusions. Chest radiograph showed a normal mediastinum. Eventually, CT demonstrated a contained distal aortic arch disruption. The patient underwent percutaneous endovascular thoracic aortic repair and recovered well. Conclusion. This catastrophic lesion may present with few reliable signs and symptoms; hence, a high index of suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis and definitive surgical management. This paper discusses the diagnostic utility of clinical features, injury mechanism, and radiographic modalities. Consideration of mechanism of injury, clinical features, and chest radiograph findings should prompt advanced chest imaging.

  20. Stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas was made. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these two meningeal neoplasms. The difference was significant and it was moreover seen that there was no overlap between the two groups....... The results demonstrate that atypical meningiomas can be distinguished from benign meningiomas by an objective stereological estimation of nuclear volume....

  1. Atypical presentation of macrophagic myofasciitis 10 years post vaccination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Aisling M

    2012-02-03

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of muscle believed to be due to persistence of vaccine-derived aluminium hydroxide at the site of injection. The condition is characterised by diffuse myalgias, arthralgia and fatigue. We describe a patient with histologically confirmed MMF whose presentation was atypical with left chest and upper limb pain beginning more than 10 years post vaccination. Treatment with steroids led to symptomatic improvement. Although rare, clinicians should consider MMF in cases of atypical myalgia.

  2. Atypical meningococcal meningitis with rashless presentation:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunita; Singh Manpreet; Kapoor Dheeraj

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is the major health problem in developing world. The clinical presentation is varied, ranging from transient fever and bacteraemia to fulminant disease with death ensuing within hours of the onset of clinical symptoms. The classical clinical manifestations of meningococcal disease have been well described, but atypical presentations if unrecognized, may lead to a delay in treatment and fatal outcome. We here report a case presented with atypical presentation of meningococcal meningitis without classical rash, which was diagnosed and managed successfully.

  3. Globalization and deregulation: does flexicuritiy protect atypically employed?

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, Hartmut; Tangian, Andranik S.

    2006-01-01

    "Hitherto, discussion of flexicurity has focused on normal employment (permanent full-time), with atypical work receiving only cursory attention. Nevertheless, the most affected are just atypically employed (= other than normally employed). To monitor effects of flexicurity policies in Europe, flexicurity indices are constructed from: (a) scores of the strictness of employment protection legislation provided by the OECD, (b) qualitative juridical data on social security benefits (unemployment...

  4. Atypical Focal Osteomyelitis as Initial Manifestation of AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Akiki; Y. Bilde

    2011-01-01

    Persistent pain development after a skeletal contusion rarely poses the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. We report the case of a fibular head contusion as an initial manifestation of a focal abscess development in a healthy young patient. The traditional treatment of surgical drainage revealed the presence of an atypical Mycobacterium haemophilum isolates in the abscess. This lead to further investigations that concluded and established the diagnosis of AIDS. Conclusion. Isolation of an atypical M...

  5. Generic penetration in the retail atypical antipsychotic market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderts, Susan; Kalali, Amir H; Buckley, Peter

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we explore the penetration of generic atypical antipsychotics in the United States market before and after the availability of generic risperidone in July 2008. Analysis suggests that, overall, generic penetration into the atypical antipsychotic market has grown from approximately three percent in January 2008 to more than 25 percent in December 2009. Similar trends are uncovered when branded and generic prescriptions are analyzed by specialty.

  6. An Atypical Case of Pityriasis Rosea Gigantea after Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papakostas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a common erythematosquamous eruption, typically presenting along the cleavage lines of the skin. A wide spectrum of atypical manifestations may challenge even the most experienced physician. Here we report a rare case of a suberythrodermic pityriasis rosea with gigantic plaques after an influenza vaccination, and we discuss the possible triggers of atypical manifestations of such a common dermatological disease in the setting of an altered immunity.

  7. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certain drugs Infection Chemotherapy and other medicines Malaria Alcoholism AIDS Lupus Enlarged spleen Pregnancy Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura Hemolytic uremic ...

  8. Atypical sonographic patterns of fibroadenoma of the breast : pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, Shin Ho; Kim, Myung Sook; Pae, Won Kil [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To correlate the atypical sonographic patterns of fibroadenoma of the breast with the pathologic findings. Among 203 surgically proven 43 which were sonographically atypical fibroadenomas, were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic criteria for atypical variety, as seen on sonography, were an ill-defined margin, microlobulated or irregular shape, heterogeneous internal echo-pattern, posterior shadowing, microcalcification, and clefts. The atypical sonographic patterns of these 43 fibroadenomas were analysed and compared with the pathologic findings. Among 43 lesions, ill-defined margins or irregular shapes were seen in 15 cases, heterogeneous internal echo-patterns in 27, posterior attenuation in nine, and clefts in seven. Thirty-seven (86%) of the 43 were predominantly ductal or had a mixed ductal and stromal component. Eleven (73.3%) of fifteen ill-defined margin or irregular shaped lesions were caused by interdigitation of surrounding normal breast parenchyma and mass. Twenty two (81.5%) of 27 heterogeneous internal echo-pat-terns were related to dilated ducts, phyllodes features, collagen bundles, adenosis, microcalcification, or fat vacuoles. Eight (88.9%) of nine posterior attenuations were caused by collagen bundles, microcalcification, ductal proliferation or dilatation. All seven cases showing clefts revealed phyllodes features and dilated ducts. Most atypical fibroadenomas had a predominantly ductal or mixed component. Ill-defined margin or irregular shape was mainly due to interdigitation of normal surrounding parenchyma. Variable histologic features were related to the heterogeneous internal echo-pattern, posterior shadowing, and the clefts revealed by atypical sonographic findings.

  9. Atypical sonographic patterns of fibroadenoma of the breast : pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kook, Shin Ho; Kim, Myung Sook; Pae, Won Kil

    1999-01-01

    To correlate the atypical sonographic patterns of fibroadenoma of the breast with the pathologic findings. Among 203 surgically proven 43 which were sonographically atypical fibroadenomas, were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic criteria for atypical variety, as seen on sonography, were an ill-defined margin, microlobulated or irregular shape, heterogeneous internal echo-pattern, posterior shadowing, microcalcification, and clefts. The atypical sonographic patterns of these 43 fibroadenomas were analysed and compared with the pathologic findings. Among 43 lesions, ill-defined margins or irregular shapes were seen in 15 cases, heterogeneous internal echo-patterns in 27, posterior attenuation in nine, and clefts in seven. Thirty-seven (86%) of the 43 were predominantly ductal or had a mixed ductal and stromal component. Eleven (73.3%) of fifteen ill-defined margin or irregular shaped lesions were caused by interdigitation of surrounding normal breast parenchyma and mass. Twenty two (81.5%) of 27 heterogeneous internal echo-pat-terns were related to dilated ducts, phyllodes features, collagen bundles, adenosis, microcalcification, or fat vacuoles. Eight (88.9%) of nine posterior attenuations were caused by collagen bundles, microcalcification, ductal proliferation or dilatation. All seven cases showing clefts revealed phyllodes features and dilated ducts. Most atypical fibroadenomas had a predominantly ductal or mixed component. Ill-defined margin or irregular shape was mainly due to interdigitation of normal surrounding parenchyma. Variable histologic features were related to the heterogeneous internal echo-pattern, posterior shadowing, and the clefts revealed by atypical sonographic findings

  10. Dialysis water treated by reverse osmosis decreases the levels of C-reactive protein in uremic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Thomé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a major complication of chronic renal failure. Microinflammation is involved in atherogenesis and is associated with uremia and dialysis. The role of dialysate water contamination in inducing inflammation has been debated. Our aim was to study inflammatory markers in patients on chronic dialysis, before and 3 to 6 months after switching the water purification system from deionization to reverse osmosis. Patients had demographic, clinical and nutritional information collected and blood drawn for determination of albumin, ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in both situations. Acceptable levels of water purity were less than 200 colony-forming units of bacteria and less than 1 ng/ml of endotoxin. Sixteen patients died. They had higher median CRP (26.6 vs 11.2 mg/dl, P = 0.007 and lower median albumin levels (3.1 vs 3.9 g/l, P < 0.05 compared to the 31 survivors. Eight patients were excluded because of obvious inflammatory conditions. From the 23 remaining patients (mean age ± SD: 51.3 ± 13.9 years, 18 had a decrease in CRP after the water treatment system was changed. Overall, median CRP was lower with reverse osmosis than with deionization (13.2 vs 4.5 mg/l, P = 0.022, N = 23. There was no difference in albumin, cytokines, subjective global evaluation, or clinical and biochemical parameters. In conclusion, uremic patients presented a clinically significant reduction in CRP levels when dialysate water purification system switched from deionization to reverse osmosis. It is possible that better water treatments induce less inflammation and eventually less atherosclerosis in hemodialysis patients.

  11. Dehydration upon admission is a risk factor for incomplete recovery of renal function in children with haemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, José M; Kohout, Isolda; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute renal failure and the second leading cause of chronic renal failure in children. The factors that affect incomplete renal function recovery prior to hospital admission are poorly understood. To analyse the risk factors that determine incomplete recovery of renal function prior to hospitalisation in children with HUS. A retrospective case-control study. age, sex, duration of diarrhoea, bloody stools, vomiting, fever, dehydration, previous use of antibiotics, and incomplete recovery of renal function (proteinuria, hypertension, reduced creatinine clearance, and chronic renal failure during follow-up). Patients of both sexes under 15 years of age were included. Of 36 patients, 23 were males (65.3%; 95%CI: 45.8 to 80.9), with an average age of 2.5 ± 1.4 years. Twenty-one patients required dialysis (58%; 95% CI: 40.8 to 75.8), and 13 (36.1%; 95% CI: 19.0 to 53.1) did not recover renal function. In the bivariate model, the only significant risk factor was dehydration (defined as weight loss >5%) [(OR: 5.3; 95% CI: 1.4 to 12.3; P=.0220]. In the multivariate analysis (Cox multiple regression), only dehydration was marginally significant (HR: 95.823; 95% CI: 93.175 to 109.948; P=.085). Our data suggest that dehydration prior to admission may be a factor that increases the risk of incomplete recovery of renal function during long-term follow-up in children who develop HUS D+. Consequently, in patients with diarrhoea who are at risk of HUS, dehydration should be strongly avoided during outpatient care to preserve long-term renal function. These results must be confirmed by larger prospective studies.

  12. Ways to develop the prophylaxis of post-transfusion hemolytic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Bahovadinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transfusion hemolytic complications (РНС remain аn urgent рrоblem in medical practice despite the improvement of selecting methods of compatible blood transfusion for patients. The numbеr of РНС remains still high (1 in 6 000 - 29 000 transfusions. Aim: to analyze cases of РНС registered in health care facilities (HCF in the Republic of Tajikistan. Method of investigation. Retrospective analysis of materials of national аnd regional committees оп investigation of РНС cases, histories fro hospital archives. During the period 1989-2014 in health facilities were registered 86 cases of РНС approximately 850 000 doses of red bооd cell transfusions containing blооd components, or 1 in 9418 doses of red blood cell-containing blood components. РНС reasons were: incompatibility of АВО blооd group system - 32 (37,3 %, antigen D of blооd group Rhesus factor system - 34 (39,53 %, according to minor blood group antigens of Rhesus factor and Kell blood group system (С, с, Е, е, К - 16 (18,6 %. In 4 cases (4,6 % the cases of РНС were hemolytic transfusions of erythrocyte-containing bags as а result of improper storage in domestic refrigeration without control of temperature storage. Causes of development 78 out of 86 РНС (90,69 % were HCF doctors' mistakes, 8 (9,31 % - mistakes of health personnel of health facilities departments of blood transfusion аnd regional blооd centers. Reducing the frequency of PHC is impossible without training physicians оn transfusion medicine, introduction of modern methods of phenotyping erythrocyte antigens of recipients and donors оn major transfusion significant blood group antigens the АВО system by direct and cross-over methods, Rhesus (С, с, Е, е, Kell (К of patients requiring multiple transfusions, as well as to girls and women of childbearing age.

  13. Grafting synthetic transmembrane units to the engineered low-toxicity α-hemolysin to restore its hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Mihoko; Harima, Kousuke; Takei, Toshiaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Endo, Sumire; Akiyama, Kimio; Muraoka, Takahiro; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-12-01

    The chemical modification of proteins to provide desirable functions and/or structures broadens their possibilities for use in various applications. Usually, proteins can acquire new functions and characteristics, in addition to their original ones, via the introduction of synthetic functional moieties. Here, we adopted a more radical approach to protein modification, i.e., the replacement of a functional domain of proteins with alternative chemical compounds to build "cyborg proteins." As a proof of concept model, we chose staphylococcal α-hemolysin (Hla), which is a well-studied, pore-forming toxin. The hemolytic activity of Hla mutants was dramatically decreased by truncation of the stem domain, which forms a β-barrel pore in the membrane. However, the impaired hemolytic activity was significantly restored by attaching a pyrenyl-maleimide unit to the cysteine residue that was introduced in the remaining stem domain. In contrast, negatively charged fluorescein-maleimide completely abolished the remaining activity of the mutants.

  14. Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Di b treated with phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jee; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Jang, Hyun-Sik; Park, Hae-Il; Park, Yeon-Joon; Choi, Hyun Ah; Chun, Chung-Sik; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2008-01-01

    The Di(b) antigen usually occurs with high incidence, except in certain Asian and South American Indian populations. In general, hemolysis caused by anti-Di(b) is not severe and its clinical course is benign. We report a Korean neonate with severe hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by anti-Di(b). The phenotype and genotype of the Diego blood group system of the patient and his mother were Di(a+b+) and Di(a+b-), respectively. The mother's serum and eluate from the neonate's erythrocytes contained anti-Di(b). This case was successfully managed with phototherapy and high dose iv immunoglobulin. Since most commercial antibody detection panels do not contain Di(b-) red cells, it is important to consider anti-Di(b) in cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by an antibody against a high frequency antigen.

  15. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  16. Amisulpride versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; da Mota Neto, Joaquim I Silveira; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of amisulpride compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We updated this search in July 2012 and added 47 new trials to the awaiting classification section. Selection criteria We included randomised, at least single-blind, trials comparing oral amisulpride with oral forms of aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For continuous data we calculated weighted mean differences (MD), for dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results The review currently includes ten short to medium term trials with 1549 participants on three comparisons: amisulpride versus olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. The overall attrition rate was considerable (34.7%) with no significant difference between groups. Amisulpride was similarly effective as olanzapine and risperidone and more effective than ziprasidone (leaving the study early due to inefficacy: n=123, 1 RCT, RR 0.21 CI 0.05 to 0.94, NNT 8 CI 5 to 50

  17. Megadose Methylprednisolone (MDMP Treatment in a Patient with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA Resistant to Conventional Corticosteroid Administration: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şinasi Özsoylu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A female in the Netherlands with severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA was treated with conventional corticosteroid (2 mg/kg/d in divided doses and blood transfusions for 18 months without improvement. The presented patient responded to megadose methylprednisolone (MDMP 30 mg/kg/d for 3 d, followed by 20 mg/kg for 4 d, and subsequently 10, 5, 2, and 1 mg/kg/d each for 1 week.

  18. Hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by a new deletion of the entire beta-globin cluster.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirastu, M; Kan, Y W; Lin, C C; Baine, R M; Holbrook, C T

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new type of gamma delta beta-thalassemia in four generations of a family of Scotch-Irish descent. The proposita presented with hemolytic disease of the newborn, which was characterized by a microcytic anemia. Initial restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA showed no grossly abnormal patterns, but studies of polymorphic restriction sites and gene dosage revealed an extensive deletion that removed all the beta- and beta-like globin genes from the affected chromosome. In situ ...

  19. The value of transcutaneous method of bilirubin measurement in newborn population with the risk of ABO hemolytic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoniene, Dalia; Buinauskiene, Jūrate; Markūniene, Egle

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY. To evaluate the correlation between total serum bilirubin (TSB) and transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) levels in newborn infants at risk of ABO hemolytic disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS. During a prospective study, 130 full-term (>or=37 weeks of gestation) newborn infants with diagnosed ABO blood group incompatibility were examined. TSB level was measured at the age of 6 hours; further measurements were performed at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the first measurement. Blood samples were collected from the peripheral veins. In clinical laboratory, total serum bilirubin level was measured using Jendrassik-Grof method. TcB level in the forehead was measured using a noninvasive bilirubinometer BiliCheck (SpectRX Inc, Norcross, GA) according to the manufacturer's instructions within +/-30 min after getting a blood sample. RESULTS. During the study, 387 double tests were performed to measure TSB and TcB levels. TSB level (114.83 [62.85] micromol/L) closely correlated with TcB level (111.51 [61.31] micromol/L) (r=0.92, Por=98 micromol/L, ABO hemolytic disease in newborns may be diagnosed with 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity; positive predictive value was 62% and negative predictive value was 100%. While a newborn's age increases, TcB sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing ABO hemolytic disease decrease. CONCLUSION. While evaluating bilirubin level transcutaneously according to nomograms of serum bilirubin level, the results should be considered with caution, especially for newborns with a risk of ABO hemolytic disease. The hour-specific nomograms of transcutaneous bilirubin level should be used to evaluate hyperbilirubinemia using only a noninvasive method.

  20. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported

  1. Contribution to the food products' analysis: A research and evaluation on the hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alam, Josephine; Millet, Maurice; Chbani, Asma; Fajloun, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides are a real concern for the society as their use has become critical, leading sometimes to their accumulation as residues in fruits and vegetables. After examining the pesticides sold in Northern Lebanon, this study is focused on the analysis and identification of pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables that are harvested in this region and treated with the locally sold pesticides. Results show: first, (i) a use of Zineb by the name of another pesticide Micronized Sulfur to avoid prosecution; (ii) a significant presence of Metalaxyl in lemons and oranges; (iii) a significant presence of Trifluralin in strawberries; and (iv) a significant presence of Zineb in lemons and tomatoes. Second, with the use of hemolytic tests on human blood results show: (i) a critical concentration and a significant hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon; and (ii) an absence of hemolytic effect in the collected fractions of the different analyzed fruit extracts containing pesticides. Finally, this work is the first step for pesticides' analysis in vegetables and fruits in Lebanon, initiating a wider analytical study in order to control and examine the use of pesticides which, according to our results, could have an adverse effect on human health over a long term.

  2. Vegetable Peel Waste for the Production of ZnO Nanoparticles and its Toxicological Efficiency, Antifungal, Hemolytic, and Antibacterial Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, T. V.; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Sarkar, Gargi; Suthindhiran, K.

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are important materials when making different products like sun screens, textiles, and paints. In the current study, the photocatalytic effect of prepared ZnO NPs from Moringa oleifera ( M. oleifera) was evaluated on degradation of crystal violet (CV) dye, which is largely released from textile industries and is harmful to the environment. Preliminarily, ZnO NP formation was confirmed using a double beam ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer; further, the NP size was estimated using XRD analysis and the functional group analysis was determined using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the synthesized NPs was found to be a hexagonal shape using SEM and TEM analysis and elemental screening was analyzed using EDX. ZnO NPs were shown sized 40-45 nm and spherical in shape. The degradation percentage of ZnO NPs was calculated as 94% at 70 min and the rate of the reaction -k = 0.0282. The synthesized ZnO NPs were determined for effectiveness on biological activities such as antifungal, hemolytic, and antibacterial activity. ZnO NPs showed good antifungal activity against Alternaria saloni and Sclerrotium rolfii strains. Further, we have determined the hemolytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO NPs and we got successive results in antibacterial and hemolytic activities.

  3. Physical and Psychological Morbidity in Adolescents With Atypical Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Susan M; Whitelaw, Melissa; Le Grange, Daniel; Yeo, Michele; Hughes, Elizabeth K

    2016-04-01

    Adolescents with atypical anorexia nervosa (AN) have lost significant weight but are not underweight. This study aimed to describe the physical and psychological morbidity of adolescents diagnosed with atypical AN, and to compare them with underweight adolescents with AN. All first presentations of atypical AN (n = 42) and full-threshold AN (n = 118) to a specialist pediatric eating disorder program between July 2010 and June 2014 were examined. Diagnosis was assessed by using the Eating Disorder Examination and anthropometric measurement. Psychological morbidity measures included eating and weight concerns, bingeing, purging, compulsive exercise, and psychiatric comorbidity. Compared with AN, more adolescents with atypical AN were premorbidly overweight or obese (71% vs 12%). They had lost more weight (17.6 kg vs 11.0 kg) over a longer period (13.3 vs 10.2 months). There was no significant difference in the frequency of bradycardia (24% vs 33%;) or orthostatic instability (43% vs 38%). We found no evidence of a difference in frequency of psychiatric comorbidities (38% vs 45%) or suicidal ideation (43% vs 39%). Distress related to eating and body image was more severe in atypical AN. Atypical AN considerably affects physical and psychological functioning, despite adolescents presenting within or above the normal weight range. There was little evidence that the morbidity of adolescents with atypical AN was any less severe than that of adolescents with full-threshold AN. The findings support the need for vigilance around weight loss in adolescents, regardless of body size. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: successful seletive splenic artery embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    matteo molica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy.

  5. Sulfaguanidine cocrystals: Synthesis, structural characterization and their antibacterial and hemolytic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Asghar; Azim, Yasser; Khan, Shahper Nazeer; Khan, Asad U

    2018-02-05

    Sulfaguanidine (SG), belongs to the class of sulfonamide drug used as an effective antibiotic. In the present work, using crystal engineering approach two novel cocrystals of SG were synthesized (SG-TBA and SG-PT) with thiobarbutaric acid (TBA) and 1,10-phenanthroline (PT), characterized by solid state techniques viz., powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. A comparative antibacterial activity and hemolytic potential was done on SG drug, coformers and their cocrystals. The tested cocrystals formulations showed almost two fold higher antibacterial activity against the tested strains of bacteria Gram-positive bacteria (S. mutans and E. faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, K. pneumonia and E. clocae) over SG alone and their coformers. Cocrystal SG-TBA showed better antibacterial activity and reduced hemolysis, thereby, reduced cytotoxicity than SG-PT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-Related Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Three Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The association between primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is uncommon; only fourteen such case reports have been described. In this report, three patients who developed AIHA on the basis of PBC underwent successful therapy with corticosteroids and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA. Patient 3 was more complicated, suffering from PBC, Evans syndrome, Sjögren syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome simultaneously. This has not previously been reported in the world literature. Review of all fifteen cases showed that there is a prominent occurrence sequence that AIHA might take place on the basis of PBC. With sufficient doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressant therapy, besides hemolysis under effective control, liver function also improved. According to the criteria of secondary AIHA, we may call them PBC-related AIHA. Thus, patients with PBC with serum bilirubin levels rising suddenly should undergo screening for associated hemolysis. Recommended treatment for PBC-related AIHA includes sufficient doses of corticosteroids to control the hemolysis in the acute phase, and immunosuppressant or adequate dose of UDCA to maintain therapy. These case reports have been increasing in recent years, so further reserch is needed to illustrate the incidence and natural courses of these two organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

  7. Characterization of autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia following treatment with interferon alfa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencomo Hernandez, Antonio; Gutierrez Diaz, Adys; Avila Cabrera, Onel; Rodriguez, Luis Ramon

    2012-01-01

    We studied 13 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by interferon alfa. They underwent tests for immune protein detection and characterization of IgG subclasses in RBCs by direct antiglobulin test (PAD) and the microplate technique. Also they were applied ELISA test for quantifying immunoglobulins in the red blood cells. It was detected the presence of IgG and C3 in 53.84 % of cases, IgG alone in 23.07 % and in 15.38 % were identified IgG and IgA autoantibodies. In 11 patients the presence of IgG1 was showed and also in one case the subclass IgG3 autoantibodies was identified. The ELISA detected antibodies at concentrations of 183 IgG molecules per erythrocyte in a patient with negative PAD. In high-grade hemolysis patients, it was found a concentration of autoantibodies between 1 500 and 3 180 molecules of IgG per erythrocyte, while in low-grade hemolysis patients it behaved between 183 and 1 000 molecules. There was a negative correlation between Hb and plasma haptoglobin values with the number of IgG molecules per erythrocyte and a positive correlation between the latter with the reticulocyte count

  8. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M

    2016-02-01

    Maternal-fetal red cell antigen incompatibility can lead to alloimmunization, maternal immunoglobulin transplacental transfer, and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). The use of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) has sharply decreased the incidence of and mortality from HDFN due to RhD allosensitization. The ability to identify pregnancies/fetuses at risk of HDFN has significantly improved due to paternal molecular RHD zygosity testing, and non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics for detecting putative antigen(s) (notably RhD) in fetuses utilizing cff-DNA in maternal plasma. Fetal RHD genotyping using cff-DNA has become increasingly accurate for fetal RHD detection, prompting some countries to implement targeted RAADP through mass screening programs of RhD-negative pregnant women. Along with middle cerebral artery Doppler ultrasonography for predicting fetal anemia, non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics have greatly decreased the need for invasive diagnostic procedures in pregnancies at risk for severe HDFN. This review highlights these molecular advancements in HDFN-related prenatal diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Case report: Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernman, Riina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Korhonen, Anu; Haimila, Katri; Sareneva, Inna; Sulin, Kati; Kuosmanen, Malla; Sainio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anti-G is commonly present with anti-D and/or anti-C and can confuse serological investigations. in general, anti-G is not considered a likely cause of severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), but it is important to differentiate it from anti-D in women who should be administered anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. We report one woman with three pregnancies severely affected by anti-C+G requiring intrauterine treatment and a review of the literature. In our case, the identification of the correct antibody was delayed because the differentiation of anti-C+G and anti-D+C was not considered important during pregnancy since the father was D-. In addition, anti-C+G and anti-G titer levels were not found to be reliable as is generally considered in Rh immunization. Severe HDFN occurred at a maternal anti-C+G antibody titer of S and anti-G titer of 1 in comparison with the critical titer level of 16 or more in our laboratory. close collaboration between the immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low.

  10. Prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: what have we learned from animal models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Leal, Yoelys; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2017-11-01

    This review aims to highlight recent advances in our understanding of how anti-red blood cell (RBC) antibodies prevent erythrocyte immunization with an emphasis on new murine models. New murine models with clinically relevant human erythrocyte antigens have been used to understand the alloimmunization process and its inhibition. The search to elucidate the mechanism of action of IgG-mediated inhibition of erythrocyte alloimmunization has provided new evidence in support of a potential role for epitope masking, immune deviation and/or antigen modulation in this process. In addition, recent evidence suggests that blends of monoclonal antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes on the RBC surface can improve the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies approaching that of polyclonal IgG. Animal models with defined alloantigens have helped to identify important mechanistic components that lead to alloimmunization and its inhibition by IgG. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms leading to hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is required to develop the most effective prevention strategies for future patients.

  11. Immunologic basis and immunoprophylaxis of RhD induced hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payam Khaja Pasha, Roya; Shokri, Fazel

    2008-12-01

    RhD antigen is the most immunogenic and clinically significant antigen of red blood cells after ABO system. It has historically been associated with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) which is now routinely prevented by the administration of polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin. This management of HDN has proven to be one of the most successful cases of prophylactic treatment based on antibody mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Despite the increasing efficiency of treatment, the mechanism of action of anti-D is not completely defined. There is a widespread interest in obtaining a reliable therapeutic monoclonal anti-D, due to difficulty of maintaining a pool of high titer volunteer donors for plasma collection and also increasing demand for antenatal prophylaxis and safety issues with plasma derived products. Candidate monoclonal anti-D preparations should demonstrate appropriate functionality in both in vitro and in vivo assays comparable to polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin. These criteria are reviewed in addition to the factors regulating development of D specific immune response in D negative individuals and its suppression in HDN prophylaxis.

  12. [Recombinant erythropoietin as treatment for hyporegenerative anemia following hemolytic disease of the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Bacciedoni, Viviana; García, Cecilia; Schvartzman, Gabriel; Vain, Néstor

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study is to report results of erythropoietin treatment for late hyporegenerative anemia in the hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Reports previously published concern only a few cases, with controversial results. Case series report concerning 50 neonates with HDN due to Rh, ABO or KpA antigens, aged more than 7 days. Erythropoietin treatment started when hematocrit dropped to levels requiring transfusion, with an inappropriate reticulocyte response (Reticulocyte Production Index <1). At start of treatment mean age was 24.3 +/- 12.0 days (range 8-65 days), hematocrit 24.1 +/- 2.8% (range 18-30%), and Reticulocyte Production Index 0.34 +/- 0.25 (range 0.05-0.98). Hematocrit and Reticulocyte Production Index showed significant increases after 7 and 14 days of treatment (p <0.001). No difference was observed either between infants with Rh-HDN and ABO-HDN or between Rh-HDN patients with or without intrauterine transfusions. Seven infants (14%) required one packed RBC transfusion during erythropoietin therapy, 2 of them within 72 hours from starting treatment. The percentage of transfused infants showed no difference either between ABO-HDN and Rh-HDN or between Rh-HDN with and without intrauterine transfusions. Moderate, short-lasting neutropenia, not associated to infections, was observed in 11 patients. No other adverse effect was observed. The administration of erythropoietin appears to be a safe and useful therapy. Its efficacy should be confirmed by randomized studies.

  13. Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D. C.; Rai, Sunita; Mehra, Aakash; Kaur, M. M.; Sao, Satya; Gaur, Ajay; Sapra, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET) with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh) HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates's and mother's blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb's cross-matched compatible with neonates’ and mother's serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET) was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01%) in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions. PMID:21938234

  14. Prenatal testing for hemolytic disease of the newborn and fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia - current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avent, Neil D

    2014-12-01

    Incompatibility of red cell and platelet antigens can lead to maternal alloimmunization causing hemolytic disease of the fetus & newborn and fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia respectively. As the molecular background of these polymorphisms emerged, prenatal testing using initially fetal DNA obtained from invasively obtained amniotic fluid or chorionic villus was implemented. This evolved into testing using maternal plasma as source of fetal DNA, and this is in routine use as a safe non-invasive diagnostic that has no risk to the fetus of alloimmunization or spontaneous miscarriage. These tests were initially applied to high risk pregnancies, but has been applied on a mass scale, to screen fetuses in D-negative pregnant populations as national screening programs. Fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia management has had comparatively small take up in non-invasive testing for causative fetal platelet alleles (e.g., HPA-1A), but mass scale genotyping of mothers to identify at risk HPA-1b1b pregnancies and their treatment with prophylactic anti-HPA-1A is being considered in at least one country (Norway).

  15. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-Lan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah; Squires, Jerry E

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies to the high-incidence red blood cell (RBC) antigen Lan (Langereis) are typically immunoglobulin G and have been shown to fix complement and cause hemolysis of Lan antigen-positive RBCs. Only three cases of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) have been reported involving anti-Lan and all have been characterized as "mild." A 26-year-old Hispanic female presented in her fifth pregnancy for routine obstetric care. Due to progressively rising anti-Lan titers, middle cerebral artery (MCA) Dopplers were performed. At 32 weeks of gestation, the antibody titer had reached 128; the MCA Doppler indicated that fetal anemia was severe. An intrauterine transfusion with Lan antigen-negative RBCs was performed and a viable infant was delivered 25 days later. Three cases of HDFN associated with anti-Lan have been previously reported. While these cases have been associated with somewhat variable serologic findings, none have resulted in fetal demise or severe symptomatology requiring pre- or postnatal intervention other than routine phototherapy. The current report, however, suggests that in some instances anti-Lan can result in a more severe form of HDFN requiring more aggressive prenatal therapy. In spite of previous case reports suggesting that anti-Lan is associated with relatively mild HDFN, this case suggests that in some instances, this antibody can cause severe HDFN requiring prenatal intervention. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates′ and mother′s blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb′s cross-matched compatible with neonates′ and mother′s serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01% in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions.

  17. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  18. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue "best match" packed red blood cells (PRBC to these patients. Results: A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28% were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5% of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the ′best match′ blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Conclusion: Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  19. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, Rafiq Uz; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD) with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue best match packed red blood cells (PRBC) to these patients. A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28%) were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5%) of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the "best match" blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  20. Hematologic outcomes after total splenectomy and partial splenectomy for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Jason Smithers, C; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St Peter, Shawn D; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L; Rice, Henry E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the hematologic response to total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) in children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) or sickle cell disease (SCD). The Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium registry collected hematologic outcomes of children with CHA undergoing TS or PS to 1 year after surgery. Using random effects mixed modeling, we evaluated the association of operative type with change in hemoglobin, reticulocyte counts, and bilirubin. We also compared laparoscopic to open splenectomy. The analysis included 130 children, with 62.3% (n=81) undergoing TS. For children with HS, all hematologic measures improved after TS, including a 4.1g/dl increase in hemoglobin. Hematologic parameters also improved after PS, although the response was less robust (hemoglobin increase 2.4 g/dl, p<0.001). For children with SCD, there was no change in hemoglobin. Laparoscopy was not associated with differences in hematologic outcomes compared to open. TS and laparoscopy were associated with shorter length of stay. Children with HS have an excellent hematologic response after TS or PS, although the hematologic response is more robust following TS. Children with SCD have smaller changes in their hematologic parameters. These data offer guidance to families and clinicians considering TS or PS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hematologic outcomes after total splenectomy and partial splenectomy for congenital hemolytic anemia☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R.; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M.; Smithers, C. Jason; Brown, Rebeccah L.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C.; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T.; Scott, J. Paul; St Peter, Shawn D; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B.; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E.; Dassinger, Melvin S.; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L.; Rice, Henry E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to define the hematologic response to total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) in children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) or sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods The Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium registry collected hematologic outcomes of children with CHA undergoing TS or PS to 1 year after surgery. Using random effects mixed modeling, we evaluated the association of operative type with change in hemoglobin, reticulocyte counts, and bilirubin. We also compared laparoscopic to open splenectomy. Results The analysis included 130 children, with 62.3% (n = 81) undergoing TS. For children with HS, all hematologic measures improved after TS, including a 4.1 g/dl increase in hemoglobin. Hematologic parameters also improved after PS, although the response was less robust (hemoglobin increase 2.4 g/dl, p < 0.001). For children with SCD, there was no change in hemoglobin. Laparoscopy was not associated with differences in hematologic outcomes compared to open. TS and laparoscopy were associated with shorter length of stay. Conclusion Children with HS have an excellent hematologic response after TS or PS, although the hematologic response is more robust following TS. Children with SCD have smaller changes in their hematologic parameters. These data offer guidance to families and clinicians considering TS or PS. PMID:26613837

  2. Tracing the associations between sex, the atypical and the combined atypical-melancholic depression subtypes: A path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Stephanie; Vandeleur, Caroline L; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra A; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Castelao, Enrique; Glaus, Jennifer; Lasserre, Aurélie M; Müller, Mario; Rössler, Wulf; Angst, Jules; Preisig, Martin

    2016-01-15

    Numerous studies have examined determinants leading to preponderance of women in major depressive disorder (MDD), which is particularly accentuated for the atypical depression subtype. It is thus of interest to explore the specific indirect effects influencing the association between sex and established depression subtypes. The data of 1624 subjects with a lifetime diagnosis of MDD derived from the population-based PsyCoLaus data were used. An atypical (n=256), a melancholic (n=422), a combined atypical and melancholic features subtype (n=198), and an unspecified MDD group (n=748) were constructed according to the DSM-IV specifiers. Path models with direct and indirect effects were applied to the data. Partial mediation of the female-related atypical and combined atypical-melancholic depression subtypes was found. Early anxiety disorders and high emotion-orientated coping acted as mediating variables between sex and the atypical depression subtype. In contrast, high Body Mass Index (BMI) served as a suppression variable, also concerning the association between sex and the combined atypical-melancholic subtype. The latter association was additionally mediated by an early age of MDD onset and early/late anxiety disorders. The use of cross-sectional data does not allow causal conclusions. This is the first study that provides evidence for a differentiation of the general mechanisms explaining sex differences of overall MDD by depression subtypes. Determinants affecting the pathways begin early in life. Since some of them are primarily of behavioral nature, the present findings could be a valuable target in mental health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Atypical E2f functions are critical for pancreas polyploidization.

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    Ramadhan B Matondo

    Full Text Available The presence of polyploid cells in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas has been reported for four decades. In rodents, pancreatic polyploidization is initiated after weaning and the number of polyploid cells increases with age. Surprisingly the molecular regulators and biological functions of polyploidization in the pancreas are still unknown. We discovered that atypical E2f activity is essential for polyploidization in the pancreas, using an inducible Cre/LoxP approach in new-born mice to delete ubiquitously the atypical E2f transcription factors, E2f7 and E2f8. In contrast to its critical role in embryonic survival, conditional deletion of both of both atypical E2fs in newborn mice had no impact on postnatal survival and mice lived until old age. However, deficiency of E2f7 or E2f8 alone was sufficient to suppress polyploidization in the pancreas and associated with only a minor decrease in blood serum levels of glucose, insulin, amylase and lipase under 4 hours starvation condition compared to wildtype littermates. In mice with fewer pancreatic polyploid cells that were fed ad libitum, no major impact on hormones or enzymes levels was observed. In summary, we identified atypical E2fs to be essential for polyploidization in the pancreas and discovered that postnatal induced loss of both atypical E2fs in many organs is compatible with life until old age.

  4. Atypical E2f functions are critical for pancreas polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matondo, Ramadhan B; Moreno, Eva; Toussaint, Mathilda J M; Tooten, Peter C J; van Essen, Saskia C; van Liere, Elsbeth A; Youssef, Sameh A; Bongiovanni, Laura; de Bruin, Alain

    2018-01-01

    The presence of polyploid cells in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas has been reported for four decades. In rodents, pancreatic polyploidization is initiated after weaning and the number of polyploid cells increases with age. Surprisingly the molecular regulators and biological functions of polyploidization in the pancreas are still unknown. We discovered that atypical E2f activity is essential for polyploidization in the pancreas, using an inducible Cre/LoxP approach in new-born mice to delete ubiquitously the atypical E2f transcription factors, E2f7 and E2f8. In contrast to its critical role in embryonic survival, conditional deletion of both of both atypical E2fs in newborn mice had no impact on postnatal survival and mice lived until old age. However, deficiency of E2f7 or E2f8 alone was sufficient to suppress polyploidization in the pancreas and associated with only a minor decrease in blood serum levels of glucose, insulin, amylase and lipase under 4 hours starvation condition compared to wildtype littermates. In mice with fewer pancreatic polyploid cells that were fed ad libitum, no major impact on hormones or enzymes levels was observed. In summary, we identified atypical E2fs to be essential for polyploidization in the pancreas and discovered that postnatal induced loss of both atypical E2fs in many organs is compatible with life until old age.

  5. Ichthyosiform mycosis fungoides with alopecia and atypical membranous nephropathy

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    Qiang Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a rare case of variant of mycosis fungoides (MF: ichthyosiform MF with alopecia and atypical membranous nephropathy. The diagnosis was made based on the following findings: generalized ichthyosis-like eruption, alopecia, enlarged superficial lymph nodes, proteinuria, and hematuria, the histological features of the skin biopsy from both ichthyotic and alopecic lesions with immunohistochemical staining, and the renal biopsy examination with immunofluorescence. The histological examination of ichthyotic and alopecic lesions displayed a predominant infiltration of atypical lymphocytes in the upper dermis with the characteristics of epidermotropism and folliculotropism. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that most infiltrated atypical lymphocytes were CD3, CD4, and CD45RO positive, whereas negative for CD5, CD7, CD20, CD30, and CD56. A renal biopsy examination revealed atypical membranous nephropathy with deposition of immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, IgA, C1q, and C3. In this case atypical membranous nephropathy was involved, which is very uncommon and has never been presented in the literature to date. Although ichthyosiform MF usually features a relatively favorable course, diffuse alopecia and the renal involvement in this case might indicate aggressive disease and poor prognosis.

  6. Sertindole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Lewis, Ruth; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and, if so, how much the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. Objectives To evaluate the effects of sertindole compared with other second generation antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) and ClinicalTrials.gov (February 2009). Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral sertindole with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes two short-term low-quality randomised trials (total n=508) both comparing sertindole with risperidone. One third of participants left the studies early (2 RCTs, n=504, RR 1.23 CI 0.94 to 1.60). There was no difference in efficacy (2 RCTs, n=493, WMD PANSS total change from baseline 1.98 CI −8.24 to 12.20). Compared with relatively high doses of risperidone (between 4 and 12 mg/day), sertindole produced significantly less akathisia and parkinsonism (1 RCT, n=321, RR 0.24 CI 0.09 to 0.69, NNT 14, CI 8 to 100). Sertindole produced more cardiac effects (2 RCTs, n=508, RR QTc prolongation 4.86 CI 1.94 to 12.18), weight change (2 RCTs, n=328, WMD 0.99 CI 0.12 to 1.86) and male sexual dysfunction (2 RCTs, n=437, RR 2.90 CI 1.32 to 6.35, NNH 13 CI 8 to 33

  7. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with

  8. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with osteomyelofibrosis

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    Živanović Dubravka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum generally appear on the upper extremities; most frequently they are associated with myeloproliferative disorders, including osteomyelofibrosis. A response to systemic steroids is more pronounced than in classical form. Sometimes it may be the first sign of an underlying malignancy. Case report. We reported a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum developed during the course of a myeloid malignancy - osteomyelofibrosis. The lesions occurred after a minor trauma. Painful blistering plaques, with an elevated, bluish-gray border were located on the dorsal aspect of hands. No skin malignancy was found. The lesions resolved rapidly to systemic steroids. Conclusion. Considering the unusual clinical presentation which makes the diagnosis difficult, as well as the fact that atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum can be the first sign of malignancies, especially myeloproliferative ones, recognizing this entity enables timely guiding future investigations toward their prompt detection.

  9. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Atypical femur fractures associated with bisphosphonates: from prodrome to resolution

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    Braulio Sastre-Jala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical fractures related to the prolonged use of bisphosphonates are caused by low energy mechanisms and are characterized by oblique and transverse lines and frequent bilateralism. We present a clinical case of a patient who we believe illustrates, both in clinical and radiological aspects, the new definition of atypical femur fracture related to treatment using bisphosphonates treated conservatively and successfully with discharge and teriparatide 20 mcg/80 mcl s.c./24h. The appearance of painful symptoms in the upper thigh, especially if bilateral, in patients treated with bisphosphonates for long periods of time, makes it necessary to dismiss bone lesions that might otherwise suggest atypical fracture. In those cases where the fracture is incomplete, restoring bone metabolism through the administration of teriparatide 20 mcg/80 mcl s.c./24h could prevent displaced fractures.

  11. Atypical presentation of HELLP syndrome: clinical case report

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    Juan Manuel Tobar Parra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a case of HELLP syndrome with atypical presentation form. Background: HELLP syndrome is a complication of preeclampsia, characterized by: haemolysis, elevation of liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia; Can present atypical, without hypertension or proteinuria, 10-20% of the cases. Case report: 38 year old female patient, with a pregnancy of 38.5 weeks of gestation, treated at the Hospital Universitario San José de Popayán (Colombia. Atypical HELLP syndrome is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with thrombocytopenia, impaired liver enzymes, but no evidence of proteinuria or hypertension. Gestation is terminated by cesarean section and magnesium sulfate is given for 24 hours, with adequate post-surgical evolution, clinical improvement of the symptomatology presented, normalization of liver enzymes and platelet elevation. Conclusion: Knowledge of this syndrome, although of rare occurrence, allows a fast action, an effective diagnosis and treatment, to avoid morbidity and greater maternal fetal mortality.

  12. Computerized tomography findings on schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Toyonobu; Kito, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takeo

    1988-01-01

    The brain CTs of 54 endogenous psychotics (27 males, 27 females) who were less than 40 years of age and were first adimitted in Aichi Medical University from 1982 to 1986, and 20 controls (10 males, 10 females) were examined. Using Mitsuda's classification, we devided all the cases into 29 schizophrenics (18 males, 11 females) and 25 atypical psychotics (9 males, 16 females). In order to investigate the differences of CT findings between the two patient groups, the 3rd ventricle index (the ratio of 3rd ventricle width to the internal diameter of the skull), Evans'ratio, lateral ventricle brain ratio (VBR), Sylvian fissure to brain ratio, 4th ventricle to cerebellum ratio were determined. Schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricles as well as Sylvian fissures when compared to controls, but atypical psychotics had not. Moreover, schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricle than atypical psychotics. But in widths of Sylvian fissures there was no statistical significant difference between the two groups. Ventricle enlargements of schizophrenics did not correlate with duration of illness as well as age, and were not results of prior psychiatric treatment such as medication and EST. Therefore the following is suggested that, this abnormal CT findings predate the onset of schizophrenic psychoses. In atypical psychotics the changes of Sylvian fissures correlated with duration of illness, but not with age. Such observations may possibly suggest that recurrence of the illness might finally attain irreversible changes even in atypical psychotics. Finally, the heterogeneity of schizophrenia and the independence of atypical psychosis were also discussed. (author) 53 refs

  13. The Efficacy of Acute Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Mustafa M.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Rush, A. John; Knapp, Rebecca G.; Fink, Max; Rummans, Teresa A.; Rasmussen, Keith; Claassen, Cynthia; Petrides, Georgios; Biggs, Melanie M.; Mueller, Martina; Sampson, Shirlene; Bailine, Samuel H.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Kellner, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), with or without atypical features, who were treated with acute bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Method Analyses were conducted with 489 patients who met DSM-IV criteria for MDD. Subjects were identified as typical or atypical on the basis of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV obtained at baseline prior to ECT. Depression symptom severity was measured by the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D24) and the 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology–Self-Report (IDS-SR30). Remission was defined as at least a 60% decrease from baseline in HAM-D24 score and a total score of 10 or below on the last 2 consecutive HAM-D24 ratings. The randomized controlled trial was performed from 1997 to 2004. Results The typical (N = 453) and atypical (N = 36) groups differed in several sociodemographic and clinical variables including gender (p = .0071), age (p = .0005), treatment resistance (p = .0014), and age at first illness onset (p < .0001) and onset of current episode (p = .0008). Following an acute course of bilateral ECT, a considerable portion of both the typical (67.1%) and the atypical (80.6%) groups reached remission. The atypical group was 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1 to 6.2) times more likely to remit than the typical group after adjustment for age, psychosis, gender, clinical site, and depression severity based on the HAM-D24. Conclusion Acute ECT is an efficacious treatment for depressed patients with typical or atypical symptom features. PMID:18278988

  14. [Auricular sporotrichosis. Atypical case report simulating bacterial cellulitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Reyes, Juan; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio; González, Gloria M; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    Sporotrichosis is the most common subcutaneous or implantation mycosis in Mexico. The case of a preauricular cutaneous-fixed sporotrichosis simulating atypical bacterial cellulitis is reported in an elderly patient with no history of trauma. The biopsy showed a suppurative granuloma with scarce yeast. Sporothrix schenckii was identified in the culture and confirmed by molecular biology. She was treated with itraconazole and a clinical and mycological cure was obtained. The case of atypical presentation is presented, coming from a semi-arid zone with extreme weather.

  15. Atypical Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Use of Clozapine

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    Quevedo-Florez Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is a medical emergency of infrequent presentation in the emergency department, which is associated with the use of psychiatric drugs, such as typical and atypical antipsychotics. Our case addresses a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia for 10 years, who had been receiving clozapine and clonazepam as part of their treatment. This patient presents the symptoms of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome without fever, which improves with treatment especially with the withdrawal of clozapine. In the absence of fever and clinical improvement, the patient is considered to have an atypical presentation of this disease.

  16. Medicolegal aspects of atypical firearm injuries: a case report.

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    Gürses, Murat Serdar; Akan, Okan; Eren, Bülent; Durak, Dilek; Türkmen, Nursel; Cetin, Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    Our case was a twenty year-old man, who was injured during the military duty with G3 infantry rifle in the training area. An atypical firearm entry wound on the left side of sternum which was 4.5 cm in diameter, and was surrounded by six irregular skin burn wounds by a flash-suppressor and a 0.7 cm diameter firearm exit wound at space on the left midscapular line. Our case emphasizes that the interpretation of properties of these atypical firearm entry wounds need to be carefully assessed by physicians.

  17. Management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children and adolescents: A single center experience

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    Nazan Sarper

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present and discuss the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. Materials and Methods: The medical records of all patients (n=19 diagnosed in a tertiary hematology center between 1999 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed.Results: Median age at diagnosis of AIHA was 5 years (range: 4 months-17 years. In all, 13 patients had primary (idiopathic AIHA, whereas 2 had primary Evans Syndrome (ES, 2 had autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS+ES, and 1 had Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS+AIHA. Among the 13 primary idiopathic AIHA patients, 9 recovered following a 4-8-week course of prednisolone treatment without relapses, whereas 3 patients required a longer course of prednisolone. One AIHA patient that was very resistant to prednisolone recovered after cyclosporine A was added to the treatment. All patients with primary idiopathic AIHA were in remission for a median of 3 years (range: 4 months-10 years at the time this manuscript was written. Among the patients with primary ES, 2 had relapses similar to the ALPS patients. Splenectomy was performed in 1 primary ES patient, who at the time this report was written was also in remission. One ALPS patient required the addition of mycophenolate mofetil due to prednisolone resistance. The WAS patient was treatment resistant and died due to septicemia.Conclusions: Primary AIHA in pediatric patients generally has an acute onset and good response to corticosteroids. Primary or secondary ES has a chronic or relapsing course, and treatment may require other immunosuppressive agents in addition to corticosteroids. Complications of splenectomy must not be underestimated in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. AIHA often causes considerable morbidity and mortality in WAS.

  18. Priming dose of phenylhydrazine protects against hemolytic and lethal effects of 2-butoxyethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palkar, Prajakta S.; Philip, Binu K.; Reddy, Ramesh N.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2007-01-01

    Protection against a high dose of a toxicant by prior exposure to another toxicant is called heteroprotection. Our objective was to establish a heteroprotection model in RBCs. Female Sprague Dawley rats treated with an LD90 dose of 2-butoxyethanol (BE, 1500 mg/kg in water, 5 ml/kg po) 14 days after priming with 0.9% NaCl suffered 90% mortality by 15 days, whereas all rats receiving the LD90 dose of BE 14 days after priming with phenylhydrazine (PHZ, 125 mg/kg in 0.9% NaCl, 3 ml/kg po) survived. Hematocrit decreased from normal 45% to 24% by day 3 after PHZ priming and improved thereafter. Increasing the time interval between the priming and LD90 dose to 21 days abolished the heteroprotection. RBCs obtained on days 7 and 14 after PHZ priming unlike those on day 21 were resilient to the hemotoxic metabolite of BE, butoxyacetic acid (BAA). Unaltered hepatic alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities upon PHZ priming suggested that bioactivation of BE to BAA was unaffected. Lower renal (6 and 12 h) and hepatic (12 h) BAA levels and 3 fold higher excretion of BAA in PHZ-primed rat urine suggested a protective role of toxicokinetics. Higher erythropoietin, reticulocytes, and resiliency of PHZ-primed rat RBCs indicated that newly formed RBCs are resilient to hemolytic BAA. The antioxidant levels in the PHZ-primed rat RBCs did not indicate a protective role in heteroprotection. In conclusion, the resistance of PHZ-primed rats against BE-induced hemotoxicity and lethality is mediated by a combination of altered toxicokinetics, robust erythropoiesis, and resiliency of new RBCs

  19. [The importance of antenatal immunoprophylaxis for prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcević, Mirta; Mataija, Marina; Sović, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Matijević, Ratko; Kukuruzović, Monika

    2011-03-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is a consequence of maternal alloimmunization against fetal red blood cell antigens. Alloimmunization against D antigen from Rhesus (Rh) blood group system is particularly important because of its strong immunogenicity. During the last few decades, the introduction of RhD prophylaxis by postpartum administration of anti-D immunoglobulin to RhD negative women, now improved with antenatal prophylaxis, has led to a dramatic decrease in perinatal mortality and morbidity from HDFN. However, severe cases have not disappeared, mostly due to prophylaxis failure. In our case, inappropriate prenatal care during the first pregnancy in an RhD negative mother resulted in primary immunization. In the next pregnancy with an RhD positive child, the mother's secondary immune response was extremely strong and led to early development of severe fetal anemia. The fetus survived thanks to the treatment with intrauterine transfusions (IUT), but they caused suppression of erythropoiesis, which lasted for months after birth. The long lasting, late anemia was treated with repeated postnatal red cell transfusions and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Despite the severity of HDFN in our case, the short-term outcome is good. The boy has normal growth until now, but due to the possibility of an adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcome, this case requires continuous follow up. It also reminds of the fact that RhD alloimmunization remains an actual problem in daily routine. Antenatal prophylaxis is a crucial step in quality care of those who are at a risk of HDFN.

  20. Fatal hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn associated with anti-Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrard, Thierry; Pham, Bach-Nga; Arnaud, Lionel; Fleutiaux, Sophie; Brossard, Yves; Guerin, Bénédicte; Desmoulins, Isabelle; Rouger, Philippe; Le Pennec, Pierre-Yves

    2008-09-01

    Jr(a) is a high-prevalence red cell (RBC) antigen. The clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) is controversial. When hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) occurred, most reported cases were clinically mild. We report the first case of fatal HDFN due to anti-Jr(a). A 28-year-old Caucasian woman with transfusion history was monitored at the 29th week of pregnancy (G4P1). An ultrasound scan showed fetal cardiomegaly and hepatomegaly. An antibody directed against a high-prevalence antigen was detected, but without conclusive identification. An emergency cesarean section was performed at the 36th week. The newborn was hydropic and showed severe anemia. Death occurred 30 hours after birth. Serologic methods were performed to investigate the mother's RBCs and serum. An in vitro functional cellular assay and semiquantitative measurement of anti-Jr(a) were used to determine the clinical significance of the antibody. Anti-Jr(a) was identified in the serum and Jr(a-) phenotype was confirmed. The anti-Jr(a) titer was 1024, with predominant immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and minor IgG4 subclasses. The functional cellular assay was consistent with an antibody unlikely to cause HDFN. Semiquantitative measurement of anti-Jr(a) showed a reactivity equivalent to a 25 IU per mL (5 microg/mL) concentration of anti-D, a value associated with a significant risk of HDFN. This is the first documented case of fatal HDFN due to anti-Jr(a). Therefore, we recommend close monitoring of pregnant women with a high-titer anti-Jr(a), especially those with an incompatible transfusion history and/or multiple pregnancies. This case report provides new arguments about the clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) in the transfusion setting.