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Sample records for atypical hemolytic uremic

  1. Clinical grand rounds: atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Hodgkins, Kavita S; Bobrowski, Amy E; Lane, Jerome C; Langman, Craig B

    2012-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, lifethreatening, chronic, genetic disease of uncontrolled alternative pathway complement activation. The understanding of the pathophysiology and genetics of this disease has expanded over recent decades and promising new developments in the management of aHUS have emerged. Regardless of the cause of aHUS, with or without a demonstrated mutation or autoantibody, blockade of terminal complement activation through C5 is of high interest as a mechanism to ameliorate the disease. Eculizumab, an existing monoclonal antibody directed against C5 with high affinity, prevents the perpetuation of the downstream activation of the complement cascade and the damage caused by generation of the anaphylotoxin C5a and the membrane attack complex C5b-9, by blocking C5 cleavage. We report the successful use of eculizumab in a patient after kidney transplantation and discuss the disease aHUS.

  2. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation.

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    Olie, K.H.; Florquin, S.; Groothoff, J.W.; Verlaak, R.; Strain, L.; Goodship, T.H.; Weening, J.J.; Davin, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of imme

  3. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Palma, Lilian M Pereira; Langman, Craig B

    2016-01-01

    The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach.

  4. Terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab in atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legendre, C.M.; Licht, C.; Muus, P.; Greenbaum, L.A.; Babu, S.; Bedrosian, C.; Bingham, C.; Cohen, D.J.; Delmas, Y.; Douglas, K.; Eitner, F.; Feldkamp, T.; Fouque, D.; Furman, R.R.; Gaber, O.; Herthelius, M.; Hourmant, M.; Karpman, D.; Lebranchu, Y.; Mariat, C.; Menne, J.; Moulin, B.; Nurnberger, J.; Ogawa, M.; Remuzzi, G.; Richard, T.; Sberro-Soussan, R.; Severino, B.; Sheerin, N.S.; Trivelli, A.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Goodship, T.; Loirat, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a genetic, life-threatening, chronic disease of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma exchange or infusion may transiently maintain normal levels of hematologic measures but does not treat the underlying systemic disease. METHODS: We

  5. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Palma LMP

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lilian M Pereira Palma,1 Craig B Langman2  1Pediatric Nephrology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil; 2The Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, and the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach. Keywords: acute kidney injury, ESRD, thrombotic microangiopathy, kidney, alternative complement pathway, complement blockade

  6. Liver-kidney transplantation to cure atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Saland, Jeffrey M; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2009-05-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is often associated with mutations in genes encoding complement regulatory proteins and secondary disorders of complement regulation. Progression to kidney failure and recurrence with graft loss after kidney transplantation are frequent. The most common mutation is in the gene encoding complement factor H. Combined liver-kidney transplantation may correct this complement abnormality and prevent recurrence when the defect involves genes encoding circulating proteins that are synthesized in the liver, such as factor H or I. Good outcomes have been reported when surgery is associated with intensified plasma therapy. A consensus conference to establish treatment guidelines for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was held in Bergamo in December 2007. The recommendations in this article are the result of combined clinical experience, shared research expertise, and a review of the literature and registry information. This statement defines groups in which isolated kidney transplantation is extremely unlikely to be successful and a combined liver-kidney transplant is recommended and also defines those for whom kidney transplant remains a viable option. Although combined liver-kidney or isolated liver transplantation is the preferred therapeutic option in many cases, the gravity of risk associated with the procedure has not been eliminated completely, and assessment of risk and benefit requires careful and individual attention.

  7. Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Azar Nickavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1 D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2 typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3 atypical HUS (aHUS: Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4 recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5 familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS.

  8. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation.

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    Olie, Karolien H; Florquin, Sandrine; Groothoff, Jaap W; Verlaak, René; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Timothy H J; Weening, Jan J; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of immediate recurrent HUS. Prophylactic plasma exchange before and after transplantation was used. Two months after transplantation, concomitant with a reduction in plasma exchange frequency, the plasma creatinine increased from 70 micro mol/l to 194 micro mol/l in 2 weeks without thrombocytopenia or signs of hemolytic anemia. The patient had minimal clinical symptoms and a presumptive diagnosis of graft rejection was made. Despite treatment with six daily pulses of methylprednisolone, plasma creatinine continued to increase and a graft biopsy was therefore undertaken. This showed the typical appearance of a thrombotic microangiopathy without any evidence of rejection. Despite daily plasmapheresis and replacement of cyclosporine with tacrolimus, there was no improvement and transplant nephrectomy was undertaken. This patient demonstrates that HUS can recur in a kidney transplant without the diagnostic hematological features and emphasizes the need for early transplant biopsy in such patients showing a decline in transplant function.

  9. Neurological involvement in a child with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Koehl, Bérengère; Boyer, Olivia; Biebuyck-Gougé, Nathalie; Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Boddaert, Nathalie; Niaudet, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old boy, diagnosed with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) due to a hybrid factor H. He progressed to end-stage renal failure despite plasmatherapy and underwent bilateral nephrectomy because of uncontrolled hypertension. Three days after, he had partial complex seizures with normal blood pressure, normal blood count and normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which recurred 1 month later. Eight months later, he had a third episode of seizures, with hemoglobin of 10 g/dl without schizocytes, low haptoglobin of 0.18 g/l, and moderate thrombocytopenia (platelets 98 × 10(9)/l). He remained hypertensive and deeply confused for 2 days. The third MRI showed bilateral symmetrical hyperintensities of the cerebral pedunculas, caudate nuclei, putamens, thalami, hippocampi, and insulae suggesting thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to a relapse of HUS rather than reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), usually occipital and asymmetrical. Plasmatherapy led to a complete neurological recovery within 2 days although hypertension had remained uncontrolled. The fourth MRI 10 weeks after, on maintenance plasmatherapy, was normal and clinical examination remained normal, except for high blood pressure. In conclusion, brain MRI allows differentiating thrombotic microangiopathy lesions from RPLS in atypical HUS, which is crucial since lesions may be reversible with plasmatherapy.

  10. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Recurrence after Renal Transplantation

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    Bouatou, Yassine; Bacchi, Véronique Frémeaux; Villard, Jean; Moll, Solange; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Hadaya, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Risk for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) recurrence after renal transplantation is low with an isolated membrane cofactor protein mutation (MCP). We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a MCP who underwent kidney transplantation with a good evolution at 12 months. At 15 and 35 months, 2 episodes of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), after a miscarriage and a preeclampsia, were misinterpreted as triggered by tacrolimus. After each episode however serum creatinine returned to baseline. Five years after transplantation, she had a self-limited rhinosinusitis followed 3 weeks later by an oliguric renal failure. Her complement profile was normal. Graft biopsy showed C3 glomerulonephritis with no “humps” on electron microscopy. No significant renal function improvement followed methylprednisolone pulsing. A second biopsy showed severe acute TMA lesions with C3 glomerular deposits. Despite weekly eculizumab for 1 month, dialysis was resumed. A new workup identified the “at-risk” complement factor H haplotype. Thus, aHUS recurrence should be ruled out in aHUS patients considered at low recurrence risk when a TMA is found in graft biopsy. Prompt eculizumab therapy should be considered to avoid graft loss as aHUS recurrence can first present as a C3 glomerulonephritis. PMID:27500215

  11. Peripheral gangrene in children with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Malina, Michal; Gulati, Ashima; Bagga, Arvind; Majid, Mohammad A; Simkova, Eva; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe clinical manifestation, frequent recurrence, and poor long-term prognosis. It is usually caused by abnormalities in complement regulation. We report 2 cases of children affected by a catastrophic extrarenal complication. A 4-year-old Indian girl developed gangrene of the finger tips 2 days after initial presentation of aHUS. Factor H autoantibodies were identified. Renal function continued to decline despite daily plasma exchanges, and she was started on peritoneal dialysis 5 days after admission. The distal tips of the left hand remained gangrenous with a line of demarcation. Three weeks later, she did not return for follow-up and died at home because of dialysis-related complications. An Arabic girl developed end-stage renal disease due to aHUS in the fourth month after birth. A de novo activating C3 mutation was found. At age 9 months, she suddenly developed ischemic changes in fingers of both hands and several toes. The lesions progressed, and several finger tips became gangrenous despite intense plasma exchange therapy. The decision was made to administer complement blocking therapy with the C5 antibody eculizumab. All nonnecrotic digits rapidly regained perfusion. The 3 already gangrenous fingers healed with loss of the end phalanges. During maintenance, eculizumab aHUS activity subsided completely and some late recovery of renal function was observed. aHUS may present by thrombotic macroangiopathy of small peripheral arteries. Eculizumab appears effective in preserving tissue viability if administered before gangrene occurs and should be considered as first-line rescue therapy in such cases.

  12. Sensitive, reliable and easy-performed laboratory monitoring of eculizumab therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Bergseth, G.; Velden, T.J.A.M. van der; Westra, D.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Mollnes, T.E.

    2015-01-01

    Complement C5 inhibitor eculizumab treatment in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is effective, but associated with high costs. Complement inhibition monitoring in these patients has not been standardized. In this study we evaluated novel functional assays for application in routine follow-up. We d

  13. Eculizumab as rescue therapy for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with normal platelet count.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, E.M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Cransberg, K.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in childhood is a rare disease with frequent progression to end-stage renal disease and a high recurrence after kidney transplantation. Eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to complement protein C5, may be beneficial in the trea

  14. Eculizumab as rescue therapy for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with normal platelet count

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    E.M. Dorresteijn (Eiske); N.C. van de Kar (Nicole); K. Cransberg (Karlien)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in childhood is a rare disease with frequent progression to end-stage renal disease and a high recurrence after kidney transplantation. Eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to complement protein C5, may be beneficial

  15. Eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates need for dialysis in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

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    Ohanian M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Maro Ohanian, Christian Cable, Kathleen HalkaDepartment of Hematology and Oncology, Scott and White Healthcare, The Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USAAbstract: This case report describes how eculizumab reversed neurologic impairment and improved renal damage in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. A 50-year-old female, after presenting with diarrhea and abdominal pain, developed pancolitis, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. The patient underwent total abdominal colectomy. Pathology confirmed ischemic colitis with scattered mesenteric microthrombi. Due to mental and respiratory decline, she remained intubated. Continuous venovenous hemodialysis was initiated. Renal failure, neurologic changes, hemolysis, thrombotic microangiopathy, and low complement levels all suggested atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab 900 mg was administered intravenously on hospital day 6 and continued weekly for four doses followed by maintenance therapy. She recovered neurologically and renally after the third dose, and hematologically by the sixth dose. Her recovery has been sustained on long-term eculizumab treatment. In severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates the need for dialysis. The optimal duration of treatment with eculizumab remains to be determined.Keywords: eculizumab, thrombotic microangiopathy, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

  16. Recurrent atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with factor I mutation in a living related renal transplant recipient.

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    Chan, Micah R; Thomas, Christie P; Torrealba, Jose R; Djamali, Arjang; Fernandez, Luis A; Nishimura, Carla J; Smith, Richard J H; Samaniego, Millie D

    2009-02-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, or the nondiarrheal form of hemolytic uremic syndrome, is a rare disorder typically classified as familial or sporadic. Recent literature has suggested that approximately 50% of patients have mutations in factor H (CFH), factor I (CFI), or membrane cofactor protein (encoded by CD46). Importantly, results of renal transplantation in patients with mutations in either CFH or CFI are dismal, with recurrent disease leading to graft loss in the majority of cases. We describe an adult renal transplant recipient who developed recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome 1 month after transplantation. Bidirectional sequencing of CFH, CFI, and CD46 confirmed that the patient was heterozygous for a novel missense mutation, a substitution of a serine reside for a tyrosine residue at amino acid 369, in CFI. This report reemphasizes the importance of screening patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome for mutations in these genes before renal transplantation and shows the challenges in the management of these patients.

  17. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  18. Epidemiology, clinical presentation, and pathophysiology of atypical and recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Besbas, N.; Jungraithmayr, T.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Karch, H.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Loirat, C.; Proesmans, W.; Prufer, F.; Rizzoni, G.; Taylor, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) includes a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Among the identified causes of HUS are infections, particularly infections with Shiga toxin-producing ESCHERICHIA COLI (STEC), complement disorders, and disorders interfering with the degradation of von Willebrand

  19. Efficacy and safety of eculizumab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome from 2-year extensions of phase 2 studies

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    Licht, C.; Greenbaum, L.A.; Muus, P.; Babu, S.; Bedrosian, C.L.; Cohen, D.J.; Delmas, Y.; Douglas, K.; Furman, R.R.; Gaber, O.A.; Goodship, T.; Herthelius, M.; Hourmant, M.; Legendre, C.M.; Remuzzi, G.; Sheerin, N.; Trivelli, A.; Loirat, C.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, possibly life-threatening disease characterized by platelet activation, hemolysis and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) leading to renal and other end-organ damage. We originally conducted two phase 2 studies (26 weeks and 1 year) evaluating eculiz

  20. Complement factor H-associated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in monozygotic twins: Concordant presentation, discordant response to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Davin; K.H. Olie; R. Verlaak; F. Horuz; S. Florquin; J.J. Weening; J.W. Groothoff; L. Strain; T.H.J. Goodship

    2006-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome not associated with diarrhea (diarrhea negative, atypical) is less common than the diarrhea-positive typical form, but frequently results In end-stage renal failure. Although there are anecdotal cases of successful treatment with fresh frozen plasma alone, the value of this

  1. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Secondary to Lupus Nephritis, Responsive to Eculizumab

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    Raufi, Alexander G.; Scott, Shruti; Darwish, Omar; Harley, Kevin; Kahlon, Kanwarpal; Desai, Sheetal; Lu, Yuxin; Tran, Minh-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS). Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) – a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage. Although plasma exchange is considered first-line therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura – a TMA classically associated with autoimmune depletion of ADAMTS-13 – aHUS demonstrates less reliable responsiveness to this modality. Instead, use of the late complement inhibitor Eculizumab has emerged as an effective modality for the management of such patients. Diagnosis of aHUS, however, is largely clinically based, relying heavily upon a multidisciplinary approach. Herein we present the case of a patient with atypical HUS successfully treated with Eculizumab in the setting of Class IV-G (A) lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia.

  2. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to lupus nephritis, responsive to eculizumab

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    Alexander G. Raufi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS. Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs – a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage. Although plasma exchange is considered first-line therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura – a TMA classically associated with autoimmune depletion of ADAMTS-13 – aHUS demonstrates less reliable responsiveness to this modality. Instead, use of the late complement inhibitor Eculizumab has emerged as an effective modality for the management of such patients. Diagnosis of aHUS, however, is largely clinically based, relying heavily upon a multidisciplinary approach. Herein we present the case of a patient with atypical HUS successfully treated with Eculizumab in the setting of Class IV-G (A lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia.

  3. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

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    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  4. Eculizumab Therapy Leads to Rapid Resolution of Thrombocytopenia in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Han-Mou Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eculizumab is highly effective in controlling complement activation in patients with the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS. However, the course of responses to the treatment is not well understood. We reviewed the responses to eculizumab therapy for aHUS. The results show that, in patients with aHUS, eculizumab therapy, when not accompanied with concurrent plasma exchange therapy, led to steady increase in the platelet count and improvement in extra-renal complications within 3 days. By day 7, the platelet count was normal in 15 of 17 cases. The resolution of hemolytic anemia and improvement in renal function were less predictable and were not apparent for weeks to months in two patients. The swift response in the platelet counts was only observed in one of five cases who received concurrent plasma exchange therapy and was not observed in a case of TMA due to gemcitabine/carboplatin. In summary, eculizumab leads to rapid increase in the platelet counts and resolution of extrarenal symptoms in patients with aHUS. Concurrent plasma exchange greatly impedes the response of aHUS to eculizumab therapy. Eculizumab is ineffective for gemcitabine/carboplatin associated TMA.

  5. Postoperative Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Complement C3 Mutation

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    Eiji Matsukuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS can be distinguished from typical or Shiga-like toxin-induced HUS. The clinical outcome is unfavorable; up to 50% of affected patients progress to end-stage renal failure and 25% die during the acute phase. Multiple conditions have been associated with aHUS, including infections, drugs, autoimmune conditions, transplantation, pregnancy, and metabolic conditions. aHUS in the nontransplant postsurgical period, however, is rare. An 8-month-old boy underwent surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Neurological disturbances, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia developed 25 days later, and aHUS was diagnosed. Further evaluation revealed that his complement factor H (CFH level was normal and that anti-FH antibodies were not detected in his plasma. Sequencing of his CFH, complement factor I, membrane cofactor protein, complement factor B, and thrombomodulin genes was normal. His ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin-1 repeats 13 activity was also normal. However, he had a potentially causative mutation (R425C in complement component C3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that his father and aunt also had this mutation; however, they had no symptoms of aHUS. We herein report a case of aHUS that developed after cardiovascular surgery and was caused by a complement C3 mutation.

  6. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

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    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  7. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: update on the complement system and what is new.

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    Hirt-Minkowski, Patricia; Dickenmann, Michael; Schifferli, Jürg A

    2010-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and predominant renal impairment. It is characterized by the absence of Shiga toxin-producing bacteria as a triggering factor. During the last decade, aHUS has been demonstrated to be a disorder of the complement alternative pathway dysregulation, as there is a growing list of mutations and polymorphisms in the genes encoding the complement regulatory proteins that alone or in combination may lead to aHUS. Approximately 60% of aHUS patients have so-called 'loss-of-function' mutations in the genes encoding the complement regulatory proteins, which normally protect host cells from complement activation: complement factor H (CFH), factor I (CFI) and membrane cofactor protein (MCP or CD46), or have 'gain-of-function' mutations in the genes encoding the complement factor B or C3. In addition, approximately 10% of aHUS patients have a functional CFH deficiency due to anti-CFH antibodies. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of aHUS have led to a revised classification of the syndrome. Normal plasma levels of CFH and CFI do not preclude the presence of a mutation in these genes. Further, genotype-phenotype correlations of aHUS have clinical significance in predicting renal recovery and transplant outcome. Therefore, it is important to make a comprehensive analysis and perform genetic screening of the complement system in patients with aHUS to allow a more precise approach, especially before transplantation. This may also provide opportunities for more specific treatments in the near future, as complement inhibition could represent a therapeutic target in these patients who have a considerably poor prognosis in terms of both mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease and a great risk of disease recurrence after transplantation.

  8. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

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    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus.

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-06-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood.

  10. A Case Report and Literature Review of Eculizumab Withdrawal in Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Borja; de Lorenzo, Alberto; Vega, Cristina; de Alvaro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 37 Final Diagnosis: SHUa Symptoms: Abdominal discomfort • nausea • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Recent advances in the treatment of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) have resulted to better long-term survival rates for patients with this life-threatening disease. However, many questions remain such as whether or not long-term treatment is necessary in some patients and what are the risks of prolonged therapy. Case Report: Here, we discuss the case of a 37-year-old woman with CFH and CD46 genetic abnormalities who developed aHUS with severe renal failure. She was successfully treated with three doses of rituximab and a three month treatment with eculizumab. After eculizumab withdrawal, symptoms of thrombotic micro-angiopathy (TMA) recurred, therefore eculizumab treatment was restarted. The patient exhibited normal renal function and no symptoms of aHUS at one-year follow-up with further eculizumab treatment. Conclusions: This case highlights the clinical challenges of the diagnosis and management of patient with aHUS with complement-mediated TMA involvement. Attention was paid to the consequences of the treatment withdrawal. Exact information regarding genetic abnormalities and renal function associated with aHUS, as well as estimations of the relapse risk and monitoring of complement tests may provide insights into the efficacy of aHUS treatment, which will enable the prediction of therapeutic responses and testing of new treatment options. Improvements in our understanding of aHUS and its causes may facilitate the identification of patients in whom anti-complement therapies can be withdrawn without risk. PMID:27974740

  11. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome post Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami eAlasfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1-2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (Infection-induced HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease (ESRD. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a (C5a and subsequent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence.

  12. Adjustment of Eculizumab Dosage Pattern in Patients with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome with Suboptimal Response to Standard Treatment Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Roselló, Carmen; Baltar Martín, José María; Castillo Eraso, Lorena; de Álvaro Moreno, Fernando; Martínez Vea, Alberto; Visus-Fernández de Manzanos, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), complement blocking by eculizumab rapidly halts the process of thrombotic microangiopathy and it is associated with clear long-term hematologic and renal improvements. Eculizumab treatment consists of a 4-week initial phase with weekly IV administration of 900 mg doses, followed by a maintenance phase with a 1,200 mg dose in the fifth week and every 14 ± 2 days thereafter. We present three patients with aHUS and suboptimal response to eculizumab treatment at the usual administration dosage who showed hematologic and renal improvements after an adjustment in the eculizumab treatment protocol. PMID:28025630

  13. Posttransplantation cytomegalovirus-induced recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with a factor H mutation: successful treatment with intensive plasma exchanges and ganciclovir.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, K.H.; Goodship, T.H.; Verlaak, R.; Florquin, S.; Groothoff, J.W.; Strain, L.; Weening, J.J.; Davin, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can recur after renal transplantation and often leads to graft loss. In some series of familial HUS, the risk of early graft loss due to recurrence of HUS approaches 100% despite any therapy. This led some authors to claim that kidney transplantation is contr

  14. Successful isolated liver transplantation in a child with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and a mutation in complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, W; Milford, D V; Goodship, T H J; Sharif, K; Mirza, D F; McKiernan, P J

    2010-09-01

    A male infant was diagnosed with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) at the age of 5.5 months. Sequencing of the gene (CFH) encoding complement factor H revealed a heterozygous mutation (c.3644G>A, p.Arg1215Gln). Despite maintenance plasmapheresis he developed recurrent episodes of aHUS and vascular access complications while maintaining stable renal function. At the age of 5 years he received an isolated split liver graft following a previously established protocol using pretransplant plasma exchange (PE) and intratransplant plasma infusion. Graft function, renal function and disease remission are preserved 2 years after transplantation. Preemptive liver transplantation prior to the development of end stage renal disease is a valuable option in the management of aHUS associated with CFH mutations.

  15. Adjustment of Eculizumab Dosage Pattern in Patients with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome with Suboptimal Response to Standard Treatment Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camino García Monteavaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, complement blocking by eculizumab rapidly halts the process of thrombotic microangiopathy and it is associated with clear long-term hematologic and renal improvements. Eculizumab treatment consists of a 4-week initial phase with weekly IV administration of 900 mg doses, followed by a maintenance phase with a 1,200 mg dose in the fifth week and every 14±2 days thereafter. We present three patients with aHUS and suboptimal response to eculizumab treatment at the usual administration dosage who showed hematologic and renal improvements after an adjustment in the eculizumab treatment protocol.

  16. Eculizumab for atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome in India: First report from India and the challenges faced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, S. K.; Rohatgi, S.; Dragon-Durey, M. A.; Raghunathan, V.; Dhaliwal, M.; Rawat, A.; Jha, P.; Bansal, S. B.; Raina, R.; Kher, V.

    2017-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Plasma therapy is the mainstay of treatment for aHUS. The availability of the first effective anti-complement therapeutic agent, eculizumab, has dramatically changed the outlook of this disease. However, its use in clinical practice raises important questions, such as who should receive the drug, when to start such therapy, and is it safe to stop treatment once the disease is controlled. We describe here for the 1st time in India, use of eculizumab in a 12-year-old boy with aHUS. We also describe in this report challenges faced in procuring the drug, and an ideal, evidence-based method of treating aHUS in children. PMID:28182046

  17. Eculizumab: safety and efficacy after 17 months of treatment in a renal transplant patient with recurrent atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châtelet, V; Lobbedez, T; Frémeaux-Bacchi, V; Ficheux, M; Ryckelynck, J Ph; Hurault de Ligny, B

    2010-12-01

    In a recent study, eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody which targets complement factor C5, appeared to resolve hemolysis and thrombocytopenia leading to recovery of renal function in a transplant patient during an episode of an atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. We report the efficacy of eculizumab in a patient who presented with a recurrence of atypical hemolytic syndrome at 3 years after renal transplantation. After 17 months of eculizumab treatment, and without concomitant plasma therapy, renal function was maintained, the need for blood transfusions reduced, and acute thrombotic microangiopathy and hemolysis controlled. These data suggested that eculizumab should be considered to be a permanent treatment for this patient.

  18. Pulse cyclophosphamide therapy and clinical remission in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with anti-complement factor H autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Olivia; Balzamo, Eve; Charbit, Marina; Biebuyck-Gougé, Nathalie; Salomon, Rémi; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Niaudet, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    We report 3 children with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with anti-complement factor H (CFH) autoantibodies who presented with sustained remission with low antibody titers and normal kidney function after plasma exchanges (PEs) and cyclophosphamide pulses. The 3 children initially presented with acute vomiting, fatigue, gross hematuria, hypertension, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, nephrotic syndrome, and acute kidney injury. C3 levels were normal in patients 1 and 3 and low in patient 2 (0.376 mg/mL [0.376 g/L]). CFH antibody titers were increased (15,000 to > 32,000 arbitrary units [AU]). Patient 1, an 11-year-old boy, was treated with 12 PEs, leading to a decrease in CFH antibody titer (to 800 AU). A first relapse 1 month later was treated with 6 PEs and 4 rituximab infusions. A second relapse 3 months later required 5 PEs, and the patient received oral steroids (0.5 mg/d/kg body weight) and 5 cyclophosphamide pulses (1 g/1.73 m(2)), leading to sustained remission with normal kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 120 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [2.0 mL/s/1.73 m(2)]) and a stable decrease in CFH antibody titer (to 2,000 AU) 3 years later. Patient 2, a 5-year-old boy, required dialysis therapy for 2 weeks. He received 3 plasma infusions without remission. Six PEs associated with 2 cyclophosphamide pulses (0.5 g/1.73 m(2)) and steroids (1 mg/d/kg body weight) led to rapid remission, with eGFR of 107 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [1.78 mL/s/1.73 m(2)] and a prolonged decrease in CFH antibody titer after 15 months (1,300 AU). Patient 3, a 16-month-old boy, was treated with oral steroids (1 mg/d/kg body weight), 2 PEs, and 2 cyclophosphamide pulses (0.5 g/1.73 m(2)), resulting in a stable decrease in CFH antibody titer to 276 AU. Kidney function quickly normalized (eGFR, 110 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [1.83 mL/s/1.73 m(2)]) and has remained normal after 14 months. All 3 patients show a homozygous deletion mutation of the CFHR1 and CFHR3 genes

  19. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the O157:H7 strain of E. coli , the bacteria will lodge in the digestive tract and produce toxins that can enter the bloodstream. A child with hemolytic uremic syndrome may develop signs and symptoms similar to those seen with gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the lining of the stomach, ...

  20. Characterization of a New DGKE Intronic Mutation in Genetically Unsolved Cases of Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Caterina; Lemaire, Mathieu; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Bettoni, Serena; Bick, David; Helbling, Daniel; Veith, Regan; Valoti, Elisabetta; Donadelli, Roberta; Murer, Luisa; Neunhäuserer, Maria; Breno, Matteo; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Lifton, Richard; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Genetic and acquired abnormalities causing dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. However, in a substantial proportion of patients the disease-associated alterations are still unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing were performed in two unrelated families with infantile recessive aHUS. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals was used to test for the presence of aberrant mRNA species. Expression of mutant diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE) protein was evaluated with western blotting. Results Whole-exome sequencing analysis with conventional variant filtering parameters did not reveal any obvious candidate mutation in the first family. The report of aHUS-associated mutations in DGKE, encoding DGKE, led to re-examination of the noncoding DGKE variants obtained from next-generation sequencing, allowing identification of a novel intronic DGKE mutation (c.888+40A>G) that segregated with disease. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals revealed aberrant forms of DGKE mRNA predicted to cause profound abnormalities in the protein catalytic site. By whole-genome sequencing, the same mutation was found in compound heterozygosity with a second nonsense DGKE mutation in all affected siblings of another unrelated family. Homozygous and compound heterozygous patients presented similar clinical features, including aHUS presentation in the first year of life, multiple relapsing episodes, and proteinuria, which are prototypical of DGKE-associated aHUS. Conclusions This is the first report of a mutation located beyond the exon-intron boundaries in aHUS. Intronic mutations such as these are underreported because conventional filtering parameters used to process next-generation sequencing data routinely

  1. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertig, Alexandre; Ridel, Christophe; Rondeau, Eric

    2010-07-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is related to a renal thrombotic microangiopathy, inducing hypertension and acute renal failure (ARF). Its pathogenesis involves an activation/lesion of microvascular endothelial cells, mainly in the renal vasculature, secondary to bacterial toxins, drugs, or autoantibodies. An overactivation of the complement alternate pathway secondary to a heterozygote deficiency of regulatory proteins (factor H, factor I or MCP) or to an activating mutation of factor B or C3 can also result in HUS. Less frequently, renal microthrombi are due to an acquired or a constitutional deficiency in ADAMTS-13, the protease cleaving von Wilebrand factor. Hemolytic anemia with schistocytes, thrombocytopenia without evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation, and renal failure are consistently found. In typical HUS, a prodromal diarrhea, with blood in the stools, is observed, related to pathogenic enterobacteria, most frequently E. Coli O157:H7. HUS may also occur in the post partum period, and is then related to a factor H or factor I deficiency. HUS may also occur after various treatments such as mitomycin C, gemcitabine, ciclosporin A, or tacrolimus, and as reported more recently bevacizumab, an anti VEGF antibody. Atypical HUS are not associated with diarrhea, may be sporadic or familial, and can be related to an overactivation of the complement alternate pathway. More recently, some of them have been related to a mutation of thrombomodulin, which also regulates the alternate pathway of complement. In adults, several HUS are encountered in the course of chronic nephropathies: nephroangiosclerosis, chronic glomerulonephritis, post irradiation nephropathy, scleroderma, disseminated lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome. Overall the prognosis of HUS has improved, with a patient survival greater than 85% at 1 year. Chronic renal failure is observed as a sequella in 20 to 65% of the cases. Plasma infusions and plasma exchanges are effective in

  2. Maintenance of kidney function following treatment with eculizumab and discontinuation of plasma exchange after a third kidney transplant for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with a CFH mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, Jean-Claude; Gracchi, Valentina; Bouts, Antonia; Groothoff, Jaap; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Tim

    2010-04-01

    Kidney transplant in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with a poor outcome because of recurrent disease, especially in patients known to have a factor H mutation. Long-term prophylactic plasma exchange and combined liver-kidney transplant have prevented graft loss caused by recurrence. However, the mortality associated with liver transplant is not negligible, and prophylactic plasma exchange requires permanent vascular access and regular hospitalization and exposes the patient to potential allergic reactions to plasma. Eculizumab is a high-affinity humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to C5 and thus prevents generation of C5a and the membrane attack complex. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl with aHUS associated with a mutation in the gene for complement factor H (CFH; c.3572C>T, Ser1191Leu) who was highly dependent on plasma exchange. Because of severe allergic reactions to plasma after the third renal graft, eculizumab was introduced in place of plasma exchange without problems. This and other reports suggest that the promise of complement inhibitors in the management of aHUS is going to be fulfilled.

  3. Liver damage in the hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, A; Donckerwolcke, R A; Kuijten, R H; van der Heiden, C

    1977-06-01

    During the recovery stage of the hemolytic uremic syndrome in 2 cases an increase of serum levels of GOT, GPT, LDH, gammaGT, 5'ND and AP was noticed, without signs of a recurrence of the disease. In one patient also jaundice and hepatomegaly were found. The observations suggest a parenchymal damage of the liver.

  4. An audit analysis of a guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea negative (atypical) hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, S.; Stojanovic, J.; Ariceta, G.; Bitzan, M.; Besbas, N.; Frieling, M.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Langman, C.; Licht, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Riedl, M.; Siomou, E.; Kar, N.C. van de; Walle, J.V.; Loirat, C.; Taylor, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, the European Paediatric Study Group for Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (HUS) published a clinical practice guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea-negative HUS (now more widely referred to as atypical HUS, aHUS). The therapeutic component of the guideline (c

  5. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keshtkar-Jahromi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS can be associated with different infectious etiologies, but the relationship between pseudomembranous colitis and HUS was first described in the 1970s in some childhood patients. There is very limited published literature on Clostridium difficile-associated HUS. We report a case of C. difficile-related HUS in an adult patient and provide a review of the literature.

  6. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and Clostridium difficile colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Mohebtash, Mahsa

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can be associated with different infectious etiologies, but the relationship between pseudomembranous colitis and HUS was first described in the 1970s in some childhood patients. There is very limited published literature on Clostridium difficile-associated HUS. We report a case of C. difficile-related HUS in an adult patient and provide a review of the literature. PMID:23882375

  7. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Ayako; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Tanikawa, Shu [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1998-06-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated for the subsequent development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS developed in seven patients (four males and three females, five acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), one acute myelogenous leukemia, one non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma) between 36-196 days after BMT. Four patients were recipients of autologous BMT and three were those of allogeneic BMT. Six patients were preconditioned with the regimens including fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). ALL and preconditioning regimen with TBI were suspected to be the risk factors for the development of HUS. Cyclosporin A (CSP) administration was discontinued in three patients who had been given CSP for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Predonisolone was given to the three patients and plasma exchange was performed in one patient. Both hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia were resolved in virtually all patients, while creatinine elevation has persisted along with hypertension in one patient. (author)

  8. Guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea-negative hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariceta, G.; Besbas, N.; Johnson, S.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Licht, C.; Loirat, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Taylor, C.M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Walle, J. van de; Zimmerhackl, L.B.

    2009-01-01

    This guideline for the investigation and initial treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is intended to offer an approach based on opinion, as evidence is lacking. It builds on the current ability to identify the etiology of specific diagnostic sub-groups of HUS. HUS in children is mos

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Acinetobacter hemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio Lucas; Lipinski, Rubens Wolfe

    2014-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae have been associated with bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. However, there have been only a couple of reports describing bloody diarrhea associated with Acinetobacter spp. and there are no reports of these bacteria causing HUS in children. Here, we report the case of a nine-month-old boy with bloody diarrhea who developed non-oliguric renal failure. The clinical and laboratory findings supported the diagnosis of Acinetobacter hemolyticus infection associated with HUS. The patient responded favorably to antibiotic therapy plus conservative treatment. In conclusion, Acinetobacter infection should be considered as a plausible cause of HUS in cases where E. coli infection is not involved. The rapid transformation ability of Acinetobacter is a matter of concern.

  10. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with paraquat intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ha Nee; Bae, Eun Jin; Hwang, Kyungo; Kang, Yeojin; Yun, Seongeun; Cho, Hyun Seop; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old patient with paraquat intoxication resulting in the requirement for hemoperfusion, hemodialysis, and plasma exchange. His initial serum paraquat level was 0.24 µg/mL (0.0-0.1 µg/mL). Activated charcoal (50 g) was administered orally, and high-dose N-acetylcysteine (150 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. In addition, immediate 4 h hemoperfusion was also performed for three consecutive days after admission. Hemodialysis was started on the 4th day after admission because of uremia. On the 9th day after admission, laboratory findings demonstrated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS): microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), thrombocytopenia, elevated reticulocyte count, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Plasma exchange was performed three times consecutively. Anemia and thrombocytopenia were improved, and LDH was normalized after plasma exchange. Urine output increased to 2240 mL/day on the 18th day after admission, and hemodialysis was discontinued. He is currently being observed at our follow-up clinic without renal impairment or pulmonary dysfunction for 1.5 years since discharge. We should suspect paraquat-associated HUS when thrombocytopenia and anemia are maintained for a long time after paraquat intoxication.

  11. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  12. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: New Developments in Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Boyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome is defined by the characteristic triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. In children, most cases of HUS are caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, especially Escherichia coli O157:H7. Common vehicles of transmission include ground beef, unpasteurized milk, and municipal or swimming water. Shiga-toxin-associated HUS is a main cause of acute renal failure in young children. Management remains supportive as there is at present no specific therapy to ameliorate the prognosis. Immediate outcome is most often favourable but long-term renal sequelae are frequent due to nephron loss. Atypical HUS represents 5% of cases. In the past 15 years, mutations in complement regulators of the alternative pathway have been identified in almost 60% of cases, leading to excessive complement activation. The disease has a relapsing course and more than half of the patients either die or progress to end-stage renal failure. Recurrence after renal transplantation is frequent.

  13. 非典型溶血尿毒综合征分子遗传学研究进展%Progress on molecular genetics in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高力敏

    2011-01-01

    非典型溶血尿毒综合征是一种罕见的有遗传倾向的疾病,易患基因主要是补体旁路途径活化的调控基因:补体因子H基因、膜辅助蛋白基因和补体因子Ⅰ基因.但其总突变率约为50%,突变类型包括错义突变、无义突变、缺失突变、插入突变和剪切位点突变.遗传方式有常染色体隐性遗传和常染色体显性遗传,显性遗传的三个突变基因均为不完全外显.%Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome(aHUS) has recently been shown to be a rare disease of genetic predisposition, including genes of complement factor H(CFH), membrane cofactor protein(MCP, CD46)and complement factor Ⅰ(CFI), which are complement regulatory genes. Genes mutation is about 50%,involving the three genes mutation, including nonsense mutation, missen mutation, silent mutation, splice mutation and insertion mutation. Autosomal dominant inheritance and autosomal recessive inheritance have been reported, however, for autosomal dominant inheritance, the three genes mutations are incomplete penetrance.

  14. Inherited complement regulatory protein deficiency predisposes to human disease in acute injury and chronic inflammatory statesthe examples of vascular damage in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and debris accumulation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Anna; Kavanagh, David; Atkinson, John P

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we examine the role of complement regulatory activity in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These diseases are representative of two distinct types of complement-mediated injury, one being acute and self-limited, the other reflecting accumulation of chronic damage. Neither condition was previously thought to have a pathologic relationship to the immune system. However, alterations in complement regulatory protein genes have now been identified as major predisposing factors for the development of both diseases. In aHUS, heterozygous mutations leading to haploinsufficiency and function-altering polymorphisms in complement regulators have been identified, while in AMD, polymorphic haplotypes in complement genes are associated with development of disease. The basic premise is that a loss of function in a plasma or membrane inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway allows for excessive activation of complement on the endothelium of the kidney in aHUS and on retinal debris in AMD. These associations have much to teach us about the host's innate immune response to acute injury and to chronic debris deposition. We all experience cellular injury and, if we live long enough, will deposit debris in blood vessel walls (atherosclerosis leading to heart attacks and strokes), the brain (amyloid proteins leading to Alzheimer's disease), and retina (lipofuscin pigments leading to AMD). These are three common causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. The clinical, genetic, and immunopathologic understandings derived from the two examples of aHUS and AMD may illustrate what to anticipate in related conditions. They highlight how a powerful recognition and effector system, the alternative complement pathway, reacts to altered self. A response to acute injury or chronic debris accumulation must be appropriately balanced. In either case, too much activation or too little regulation promotes

  15. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Cristina; Goldstein, Jorge; Silberstein, Claudia; Zotta, Elsa; Belardo, Marcela; Repetto, Horacio A

    2008-10-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, plaquetopenia and kidney damage. It is the leading cause of acute renal failure in pediatric age and the second for chronic renal failure. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the first etiologic agent of HUS being its main reservoir cattle and transmitted via contaminated food. At present, there is no specific treatment to reduce the progression of HUS. The study of the mechanisms by which STEC infects and Shiga toxin induces HUS can help to find new strategies to prevent this disease.

  16. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clinical manifestations. Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical manifestation are described in children with epidemic HUS. The intestinal involvement in the prodromic period, is outlined and the most common disturbances such acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, leucocitosis hypertension, neurological, pancreatic and cardiac manifestations are described. We discuss the acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia. The etiopathogenic treatment and the control of renal sequelae are also discussed.

  17. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  18. Hemolytic uremic syndrome in Argentina: An attack scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Troncoso

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Escherichia coli epidemic in Germany gave a lesson at an international level. There is no time to solve food security problems when an epidemic is on the way. The epidemic in Germany exposed the fissures in the control systems of the Federal Risk Evaluation Institute of this country, as well as showing the incompetency of health authorities, who had great difficulty in resolving the situation. To summarize, the possibility of prevention was confused with the utopian idea of non-occurrence. It was not less important the public’s recognition and the “awakening” of health ministers in the European Union as regards the proven fact that pathogenic and even lethal microorganisms may be present in the food we eat. Argentina has the highest incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome in the world, and the next epidemic is likely not to occur in Germany, but in any other country, such as Argentina. In order to avoid complicity, we do not wish to remain silent about the situation in Argentina. Therefore, this is the writer’s motive for writing this article, which describes the scientific advances and the ethical pitfalls related to a disease transmitted by food, particularly hemolytic uremic syndrome, in Argentina.

  19. Hemolytic uremic syndrome in Argentina:An attack scenario

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alcides Troncoso

    2013-01-01

    The recent Escherichia coli epidemic in Germany gave a lesson at an international level. There is no time to solve food security problems when an epidemic is on the way. The epidemic in Germany exposed the fissures in the control systems of the Federal Risk Evaluation Institute of this country, as well as showing the incompetency of health authorities, who had great difficulty in resolving the situation. To summarize, the possibility of prevention was confused with the utopian idea of non-occurrence. It was not less important the public’s recognition and the “awakening” of health ministers in the European Union as regards the proven fact that pathogenic and even lethal microorganisms may be present in the food we eat. Argentina has the highest incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome in the world, and the next epidemic is likely not to occur in Germany, but in any other country, such as Argentina. In order to avoid complicity, we do not wish to remain silent about the situation in Argentina. Therefore, this is the writer’s motive for writing this article, which describes the scientific advances and the ethical pitfalls related to a disease transmitted by food, particularly hemolytic uremic syndrome, in Argentina.

  20. Hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathogenesis and update of interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Marina S; Exeni, Ramón A; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2009-08-01

    The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, accounting for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in Argentina. Despite extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in Argentinean contribution. The hope that a better understanding of transmission dynamics and pathogenesis of this disease will produce better therapies to prevent the acute mortality and the long-term morbidity of HUS is the driving force for intensified research.

  1. Hemolytic uremic syndrome as a primary manifestation of acute human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, A M; Ventura, A; Almeida, C; Correia, M; Tavares, V; Mota, M; Seabra, J

    2009-05-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection but it occurs in advanced stages of human immunodeficiency virus disease. As in other forms of hemolytic uremic syndrome plasmapheresis seems to be the treatment of choice. The authors present an unusual case of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with acute human immunodeficiency virus infection in a 38 year-old black male. The patient was admitted with fever, asthenia, nausea, diarrhea, and reduced urinary output. He was found to have anemia, thrombocytopenia and severe renal failure. Hemolytic uremic syndrome was diagnosed and he was started on plasmapheresis and hemodialysis. Serological tests were consistent with acute human immunodeficiency virus infection: the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for human immunodeficiency virus was weakly positive, Western Blot test was negative and human immunodeficiency virus RNA quantification was positive, with > 1,000,000 copies/microl. After 4 daily treatment sessions, patient's clinical condition improved and hemoglobin, platelets, lactic dehydrogenase and renal function normalized.

  2. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  3. The autoimmune disease DEAP-hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Müller, Dominik; Micklisch, Sven; Riedl, Magdalena; Zimmerhackl, Lothar-Bernd; Hofer, Johannes

    2010-09-01

    DEAP-HUS (deficiency of CFHR plasma proteins and factor H [FH] autoantibody positive hemolytic uremic syndrome [HUS]) is a new form of HUS characterized by a deletion of genes coding for FH-related proteins and the presence of autoantibodies directed to FH. These disease-associated autoantibodies inhibit FH (CFH) surface binding functions, which results in a defective regulation of the alternative pathway and damage of endothelial cells. Here we describe two representative patients with DEAP-HUS who both developed end-stage renal failure with the background of homozygous deletion of CFHR1 and CFHR3 genes and the presence of FH autoantibodies. Based on the retrospective diagnosis of DEAP-HUS 2 to 12 months after the initial clinical presentation, subsequent immunosuppressive therapy was initiated. The autoantibody titers decreased, and the complement status of the patients improved, as indicated by increased C3 levels. Thus early diagnosis of DEAP-HUS and immunosuppressive treatments are important factors to treat this particular type of HUS.

  4. Recurrence of hemolytic uremic syndrome after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, B; Albano, L; Vocila, F; Mzoughi, S; Aoudia, R; Guitard, J; Ribes, D; Vachet-Copponat, H; Mourad, G; Bienaimé, F; Dahan, P; Frémeaux-Bacchi, V; Cassuto, E

    2007-10-01

    Non-Shiga toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (non-Stx-HUS) is a rare disease. The clinical outcome is often unfavorable: 50% of patients progress to end-stage renal failure. Several mutations in complement regulatory genes predispose to non-Stx-HUS. Transplantation outcomes are poor among patients with either mutation in the genes encoding complement H or I factors, with 80% graft loss due to HUS recurrence. In contrast, patients with mutation in the gene encoding MCP have no disease relapse after transplantation. There are no treatment guidelines for non-Stx-HUS recurrence. Herein we have presented 8 patients with non-Stx-HUS recurrence after transplantation during the last 10 years in the South of France. HUS recurrence, which occurred early after transplantation in all but 1 patient, was treated by plasma exchange (PE) with substitution by fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Three patients still treated with long-term plasma therapy have no recurrence at 15, 19, or 24 months. An international registry would help to define new guidelines.

  5. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease.

  6. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without...... the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains......, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli....

  7. Shigatoxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: current molecular mechanisms and future therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keir LS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay S Keir,1 Stephen D Marks,2 Jon Jin Kim21Academic Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol; 2Department of Paediatric Nephrology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in childhood. Ninety percent of cases are secondary to gastrointestinal infection with shigatoxin-producing bacteria. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of shigatoxin leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome and the emerging role of the complement system and vascular endothelial growth factor in its pathogenesis. We also review the evidence for treatment options to date, in particular antibiotics, plasma exchange, and immunoadsorption, and link this to the molecular pathology. Finally, we discuss future avenues of treatment, including shigatoxin-binding agents and complement inhibitors, such as eculizumab.Keywords: hemolytic uremic syndrome, shigatoxin, diarrhea, Escherichia coli, complement, alternative pathway, eculizumab

  8. Novel sequence variation affects GPIb α in post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokina, E.; Jakobi, A.J.; Urbanus, R.T; Huizinga, E.G.; Sluiter, H.; Middel, C.; Westra, D.; van Heerde, W.L.; van de Kar, N.; van den Heuvel, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is one of the major causes of renal failure in children. In most cases the disease is caused by infection with Shiga toxin- producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and preceded by diarrhea. Only in 15% of cases STEC infection leads to HUS. Genetic predisposition

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome due to Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteremia after a dog bite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobe, TJM; Franssen, CFM; Zijlstra, JG; de Jong, PE; Stegeman, CA

    1999-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is known to have several causes, including infectious diseases, drugs, pregnancy, and malignant disease. We report a patient who developed acute renal failure attributable to HUS in the course of Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteremia. Acute tubular necrosis as well

  10. Decrease of thrombomodulin contributes to the procoagulant state of endothelium in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, G.C.; Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Velden, T.J.A.M. van der; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Palermo, M.S.; Monnens, L.L.

    2003-01-01

    The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy that causes acute renal failure in children. The etiology of this disease is a toxin called Shiga-like toxin (Stx), present in certain strains of gram-negative bacteria. Vascular endothelial cell (EC) injury appear

  11. Detection of apoptosis in kidney biopsies of patients with D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Monnens, L.A.H.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Gubler, M.C.; Kockx, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the presence of apoptotic cells in renal biopsy material of seven patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) by using an improved and stringent terminal deoxynucleotidyl nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique. Renal biopsy material was taken in the second or third

  12. DIARRHEA, UROSEPSIS AND HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME CAUSED BY THE SAME HETEROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, C. Wim; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Rossen, John W. A.; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bokenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E.

  13. Vero cytotoxin binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes among households with children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Heuvelink, A.E.; Boer, E. de; Nauta, J.; Walle, J. van der; Schröder, C.H.; Hinsbergh, V.W.H. van; Chart, H.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2001-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the leading cause of acute renal failure in childhood, can be caused by different serotypes of vero cytotoxin (VT; i.e., Shiga toxin)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). Recently, VT was shown to bind to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in the systemic circulation

  14. A classification of hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besbas, N.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Loirat, C.; Proesmans, W.; Remuzzi, G.; Rizzoni, G.; Taylor, C.M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Zimmerhackl, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnostic terms hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) are based on historical and overlapping clinical descriptions. Advances in understanding some of the causes of the syndrome now permit many patients to be classified according to etiology. The increase

  15. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  16. Treatment and outcome of Shiga-toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiring, Johanna; Andreoli, Sharon P; Zimmerhackl, Lothar Bernd

    2008-10-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute renal failure in childhood and the reason for chronic renal replacement therapy. It leads to significant morbidity and mortality during the acute phase. In addition to acute morbidity and mortality, long-term renal and extrarenal complications can occur in a substantial number of children years after the acute episode of HUS. The most common infectious agents causing HUS are enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC)-producing Shiga toxin (and belonging to the serotype O157:H7) and several non-O157:H7 serotypes. D(+) HUS is an acute disease characterized by prodromal diarrhea followed by acute renal failure. The classic clinical features of HUS include the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. HUS mortality is reported to be between 3% and 5%, and death due to HUS is nearly always associated with severe extrarenal disease, including severe central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Approximately two thirds of children with HUS require dialysis therapy, and about one third have milder renal involvement without the need for dialysis therapy. General management of acute renal failure includes appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, antihypertensive therapy if necessary, and initiation of renal replacement therapy when appropriate. The prognosis of HUS depends on several contributing factors. In general "classic" HUS, induced by EHEC, has an overall better outcome. Totally different is the prognosis in patients with atypical and particularly recurrent HUS. However, patients with severe disease should be screened for genetic disorders of the complement system or other underlying diseases.

  17. Is therapeutic plasma exchange indicated for patients with gemcitabine-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Ethan McCaleb; Jones, Benjamin Scott; Marques, Marisa B

    2009-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) has been described as an uncommon complication of gemcitabine. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis of gemcitabine-induced aHUS (GiHUS) and the published experience with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). To illustrate GiHUS, we present a patient who developed hypertension and peripheral edema while receiving gemcitabine and subsequently was found to have thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and normal ADAMTS-13 activity. Although laboratory parameters improved on suspending gemcitabine, they worsened after reinstitution of the drug. Thrombocytopenia and hemolysis ceased once the drug was permanently discontinued without therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). The pathological characteristics of GiHUS suggest damage of the glomeruli endothelial lining, leading to occlusion by fibrin-rich thrombi. Among 26 patients described in the literature not treated with TPE, 56% recovered from GiHUS, whereas only 30% of 18 patients treated with TPE did. The difference in recovery rate may have been confounded by the severity of GiHUS as suggested by the rate of dialysis in each group: 10/26 (38%) patients who did not receive TPE were dialyzed compared with 11/18 (61%) of those who had plasma exchange. Thus, although the currently available evidence is not decisive for use or non use of TPE, we suggest that the most important therapeutic intervention in GiHUS is discontinuation of the drug. Apheresis medicine specialists should be aware of this specific type of aHUS and provide treatment advice based on the currently available evidence.

  18. A case of severe preeclampsia diagnosed as post-partum hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-qing; WANG Jing; JIANG Yuan-hui; YE Rong-hua; ZHAO Yang-yu

    2012-01-01

    Post-partum hemolytic uremic syndrome (PHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia,renal dysfunction,and low platelets after birth with rapid progression and poor prognosis.Here,we reported a rare case of severe preeclampsia diagnosed as hemolytic uremic syndrome after birth.The patient was diagnosed with PHUS and underwent intermittent plasma exchange with supportive treatment including glucocorticoid injections and transfusion of suspended red blood cells.After these treatments,the patient experienced no apparent remission and chronic renal dysfunction occurred on her.PHUS is a severe emergency with acute onset,rapid progress,and poor prognosis.Early detection,diagnosis,and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis.

  19. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  20. Dangerous drug interactions leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome following lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissis Haralabos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report our experience of a rather uncommon drug interaction, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Methods Two consecutive cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome were diagnosed in our service. In both patients the use of macrolides in patients taking Tacrolimus, resulted in high levels of Tacrolimus. Results The first patient was a 48 years old female with Bilateral emphysema. She underwent Single Sequential Lung Transplantation. She developed reperfusion injury requiring prolonged stay. Tacrolimus introduced (Day 51. The patient remained well up till 5 months later; Erythromycin commenced for chest infection. High Tacrolimus levels and a clinical diagnosis of HUS were made. She was treated with plasmapheresis successfully. The second case was a 57 years old female with Emphysema & A1 Antithrypsin deficiency. She underwent Right Single Lung Transplantation. A2 rejection with mild Obliterative Bronchiolitis diagnosed 1 year later and she switched to Tacrolimus. She was admitted to her local Hospital two and a half years later with right middle lobe consolidation. The patient commenced on amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Worsening renal indices, high Tacrolimus levels, hemolytic anemia & low Platelets were detected. HUS diagnosed & treated with plasmapheresis. Conclusions There are 21 cases of HUS following lung transplantation in the literature that may have been induced by high tacrolimus levels. Macrolides in patients taking Cyclosporin or Tacrolimus lead to high levels. Mechanism of action could be glomeruloconstrictor effect with reduced GFR increased production of Endothelin-1 and increased Platelet aggregation.

  1. Shiga toxin activates complement and binds factor H: evidence for an active role of complement in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Dorothea; Khan, Abdul Basit; Naim, Asma; Grif, Katharina; Brockmeyer, Jens; Karch, Helge; Joannidis, Michael; Clark, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Fidanzi, Sonja; Stoiber, Heribert; Dierich, Manfred P; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B; Würzner, Reinhard

    2009-05-15

    Infections with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are a major cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxins (Stxs), especially Stx2, are believed to represent major virulence factors of EHEC, contributing to HUS pathogenesis. Beside EHEC-associated HUS, there are hereditary atypical forms of HUS, which are mostly caused by mutations of complement regulators. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether or not complement is also involved in the pathogenesis of EHEC-induced typical HUS, by being activated either directly or indirectly by involvement of its inhibitors. Purified Stx2 markedly activated complement via the alternative pathway and was found to bind to factor H (FH), however, only when it was active. No apparent cleavage or destruction of FH was visible, and cofactor activity in fluid phase was unaffected, but clearly delayed for surface-attached FH, where it is essential for host cell protection. Binding studies using FH constructs revealed that Stx2 binds to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 6-8 and SCRs18-20, but not to SCRs16-17, i.e., to regions involved in the surface recognition function of FH. In conclusion, complement, and in particular FH, not only plays an important role in atypical HUS, but most probably also in EHEC-induced HUS.

  2. Moyamoya vasculopathy in a child after hemolytic uremic syndrome: a possible etiopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, M; John, E; Hidalgo, G; Grewal, D; Macmillan, C

    2008-04-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebral vasculopathy of unknown etiology frequently seen in the Asian population. We report a case of moyamoya vasculopathy in an African-American child who had renal failure followed by cerebral ischemia. Our patient presented with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and renal failure, and later developed seizures. We believe that in this patient HUS led to the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease. We suggest that patients with HUS who develop any neurological symptoms should be investigated for moyamoya vasculopathy for early diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Severe transient ADAMTS13 deficiency in pneumococcal-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelras, Sybille; Delmas, Yahsou; Lamireau, Delphine; Villega, Frédéric; Nolent, Paul; Ryman, Anne; Llanas, Brigitte; Brissaud, Olivier; Harambat, Jérôme

    2011-04-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies comprise different entities, including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), and several other conditions. TTP is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and multiorgan failure. TTP is the result of severe von Willebrand factor multimer cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) deficiency that is either inherited or the result of acquired autoantibodies. We report a critically ill 2-year-old girl with invasive pneumococcal disease associated HUS (p-HUS) whose condition was complicated by severe ADAMTS13 deficiency, without detectable inhibitor, in a context of multiple organ failure. The patient recovered with supportive treatment, and ADAMTS13 activity normalized without plasmatherapy. Severe ADAMTS13 deficiency appears to be a manifestation of transient endothelial cell injury in the context of severe sepsis, including invasive p-HUS. The choice of appropriate therapy should not be based on this finding.

  4. Severe pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome in an 8-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar Gargah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure, represents one of the major causes of acute renal failure in infancy and childhood. The typical form occurring after an episode of diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli is the most frequent in children. Other microorganisms also may be responsible for HUS, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes more severe forms of the disease. We report an 8-month-old girl who presented with pneumonia and subsequently developed HUS. Renal biopsy showed characteristic lesion of thrombotic microangiopathy and extensive cortical necrosis. She was managed with peritoneal dialysis but did not improve and developed severe sepsis due to staphylococcal peritonitis, resulting in the death of the patient. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced HUS is uncommon, but results in severe disease in the young. There is a high risk of these patients developing end-stage kidney disease in the long term.

  5. [A case of hemolytic uremic syndrome after adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine in a patient with pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wato, Masaki; Inaba, Tomoki; Ishikawa, Hisashi; Ishikawa, Shigenao; Baba, Nobuyuki; Miyoshi, Masatsugu; Senoh, Tomonori; Nagano, Takuya; Takaguchi, Koichi; Watanabe, Seishiro; Kawai, Kozo

    2010-10-01

    A 63-year-old man with Stage IVa pancreas tail cancer was admitted for a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy; adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine was also administered. The chemotherapy was terminated after 16 courses due to hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. Plasma exchange was performed; however the patient's renal function was diminished, requiring chronic hemodialysis. Physicians should be cautious of hemolytic uremic syndrome as a possible adverse reaction to gemcitabine and be aware that tests are needed for its early detection.

  6. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome associated with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O26:H infection and consumption of unpasteurized cow's milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allerberger, Franz; Friedrich, Alexander W; Grif, Katharina; Dierich, Manfred P; Dornbusch, Hans-Jürgen; Mache, Cristoph J; Nachbaur, Edith; Freilinger, Michael; Rieck, Petra; Wagner, Martin; Caprioli, Alfredo; Karch, Helge; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O26 has emerged as a significant cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). The source and the vehicle of contamination with EHEC O26 are not often identified. We report two Austrian cases of HUS due to E. coli O26:H- affecting an 11-month-old boy

  7. Concurrent presentation of hemolytic uremic syndrome in two adult siblings : effects of plasma therapy on hemolysis and renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Gameren, I I; Rensma, P L; Zijlstra, J G; de Wolf, J; de Jong, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We describe 2 sisters who presented with the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) almost simultaneously. In both patients an upper airway infection with Haemophilus influenzae immediately preceding HUS may have been the environmental trigger. Fresh plasma infusion had only minor therapeutic effects but p

  8. Campylobacter-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Emily Elizabeth; Hangartner, Robert; Macdougall, Iain

    2016-03-01

    Common causes of pulmonary-renal syndrome include anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positive vasculitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We describe a case of life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage associated with Campylobacter hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which we believe is a new disease entity. We hypothesize that the cause of this pulmonary-renal syndrome was an immunological reaction to Campylobacter; and that the initiation of high-dose steroids was responsible for the rapid reversal of the patient's pulmonary and renal impairment. The aim of this article is to raise awareness of this unusual cause of a pulmonary-renal syndrome, guiding physicians to recognize it as a potential complication, and to consider high-dose steroids in managing the condition.

  9. Incomplete hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Argentinean children with bloody diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, E L; Contrini, M M; Devoto, S; de Rosa, M F; Graña, M G; Aversa, L; Gómez, H F; Genero, M H; Cleary, T G

    1995-09-01

    Argentina has an exceptionally high frequency of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). We sought to define prospectively the role of verocytotoxins (Shiga-like toxins [SLTs]) in 254 Argentinean children with grossly bloody diarrhea during spring and summer. Free fecal SLTs (I/II) and/or DNA probe-positive isolates were found in 99 (39%) of the children. During the follow-up period, HUS developed in 6 patients (4 with evidence of recent SLT infection based on stool studies); another 14 patients had some, but not all, of the abnormalities seen in typical HUS. The development of HUS or incomplete HUS in these children was significantly associated with recent SLT-Escherichia coli infection (p = 0.024). The high incidence of SLT-associated bloody diarrhea in Argentina explains, at least partially, the unusually high frequency of HUS. Our data indicate that incomplete forms of HUS may be common in patients with SLT-associated bloody diarrhea.

  10. Role of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes in the Pathophysiology of Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A. Exeni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx, through an interaction with its globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 receptor. Although, Stx is the main pathogenic factor and necessary for HUS development, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the inflammatory response is able to potentiate Stx toxicity. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS and neutrophils (PMN represent two central components of inflammation during a Gram-negative infection. In this regard, patients with high peripheral PMN counts at presentation have a poor prognosis. In the present review, we discuss the contribution of experimental models and patient's studies in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of HUS.

  11. Role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the pathophysiology of typical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A; Fernández, Gabriela C; Palermo, Marina S

    2007-08-10

    Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx), through an interaction with its globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor. Although, Stx is the main pathogenic factor and necessary for HUS development, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the inflammatory response is able to potentiate Stx toxicity. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and neutrophils (PMN) represent two central components of inflammation during a Gram-negative infection. In this regard, patients with high peripheral PMN counts at presentation have a poor prognosis. In the present review, we discuss the contribution of experimental models and patient's studies in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of HUS.

  12. Involvement of the fractalkine pathway in the pathogenesis of childhood hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, María Victoria; Fernández, Gabriela C; Patey, Natasha; Schierloh, Pablo; Exeni, Ramón; Grimoldi, Irene; Vallejo, Graciela; Elías-Costa, Christian; Del Carmen Sasiain, Maria; Trachtman, Howard; Combadière, Christophe; Proulx, François; Palermo, Marina S

    2007-03-15

    Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx) through the interaction with its globotriaosyl ceramide receptor. However, inflammatory processes contribute to the pathogenesis of HUS by sensitizing cells to Stx fractalkine (FKN), a CX(3)C transmembrane chemokine expressed on epithelial and endothelial cells upon activation, is involved in the selective migration and adhesion of specific leukocyte subsets to tissues. Here, we demonstrated a selective depletion of circulating mononuclear leukocytes expressing the receptor for FKN (CX(3)CR1) in patients with HUS. We found a unique phenotype in children with HUS distinct from that seen in healthy, uremic, or infected controls, in which monocytes lost CX(3)CR1, down-modulated CD62L, and increased CD16. In addition, the CD56(dim) natural killer (NK) subpopulation was decreased, leading to an altered peripheral CD56(dim)/CD56(bright) ratio from 10.0 to 4.5. It is noteworthy that a negative correlation existed between the percentage of circulating CX(3)CR1(+) leukocytes and the severity of renal failure. Finally, CX(3)CR1(+) leukocytes were observed in renal biopsies from patients with HUS. We suggest that the interaction of CX(3)CR1(+) cells with FKN present on activated endothelial cells may contribute to renal injury in HUS.

  13. Impaired neutrophils in children with the typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Gómez, Sonia A; Rubel, Carolina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Barrionuevo, Paula; Alduncín, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Exeni, Ramón; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-09-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence suggest that activated neutrophils (PMN) could contribute to endothelial damage in Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (D+HUS). Additionally, while PMN-activating cytokines and PMN-derived products have been found in D+HUS sera, we have demonstrated phenotypic alterations in D+HUS PMN compatible with a deactivation state. Here, we investigated whether D+HUS PMN were actually hyporesponsive, and explored some of the mechanisms probably involved in their derangement. Twenty-two D+HUS children were bled in the acute period, and blood samples from healthy, acute uremic and neutrophilic children were obtained as controls. We evaluated degranulation markers in response to cytokines, intracellular granule content, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in circulating D+HUS and control PMN. The influence of D+HUS-derived plasma and the direct effects of Stx in vitro were evaluated on healthy donors' PMN. We found that D+HUS PMN presented reduced degranulatory capacity in response to cytokines and intracellular granule content, and decreased ROS generation. D+HUS plasma or Stx did not affect the phenotype and function of healthy donors' PMN. These results suggest that upon hospitalization D+HUS PMN are functionally impaired and show features of previous degranulation, indicating a preceding process of activation with release of ROS and proteases involved in endothelial damage.

  14. Low levels of serum erythropoietin in children with endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, R; Donato, H; Rendo, P; Antonuccio, M; Rapetti, M C; Grimoldi, I; Exeni, A; de Galvagni, A; Trepacka, E; Amore, A

    1998-04-01

    Serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels were measured in ten previously non-transfused children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Complete blood cell count, serum EPO, and renal function tests were carried out upon admission and weekly thereafter. Blood samples were obtained: (1) prior to the first transfusion; (2) after the first transfusion but before recovery from renal failure; (3) during the recovery stage. All patients required transfusions (mean 1.8+/-0.8 per child). Absolute values of EPO correlated positively with the hematocrit during the three stages (r = 0.53, 0.36, and 0.12, respectively) which is opposite to expected results. The observed EPO logarithm/predicted EPO logarithm upon admission was low (0.70+/-0.08), falling further during stage 2 (0.57+/-0.03), but increasing thereafter (0.78+/-0.07) without reaching normal values. The reticulocyte production rate followed a parallel course (0.74+/-0.14, 0.54+/-0.11, and 0.60+/-0.10, respectively). On comparing the observed serum EPO levels with those expected, 9 of 11 pre-transfusion samples showed low values; in stage 2, all samples were below normal; in the recovery phase most (77.8%) were still low. Our results show an inadequate EPO synthesis in children with HUS, which could play an important pathogenic role, since it aggravates the severity of the existing hemolytic anemia; the secondary inhibitory effect of repeated transfusions exacerbates this inadequate synthesis.

  15. Induction of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Sabbione, Florencia; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Santiago, Adriana Patricia; Amaral, Maria Marta; Exeni, Ramon; Trevani, Analia Silvina; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a vascular disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure, is caused by enterohemorrhagic Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing bacteria, which mainly affect children. Besides Stx, the inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils (PMN) is essential to HUS evolution. PMN can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) composed of DNA, histones, and other proteins. Since NET are involved in infectious and inflammatory diseases, the aim of this work was to investigate the contribution of NET to HUS. Plasma from HUS patients contained increased levels of circulating free-DNA and nucleosomes in comparison to plasma from healthy children. Neutrophils from HUS patients exhibited a greater capacity to undergo spontaneous NETosis. NET activated human glomerular endothelial cells, stimulating secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Stx induced PMN activation as judged by its ability to trigger reactive oxygen species production, increase CD11b and CD66b expression, and induce NETosis in PMN from healthy donors. During HUS, NET can contribute to the inflammatory response and thrombosis in the microvasculature and thus to renal failure. Intervention strategies to inhibit inflammatory mechanisms mediated by PMN, such as NETosis, could have a potential therapeutic impact towards amelioration of the severity of HUS.

  16. Acute Renal Replacement Therapy in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Single Center 16 Years of Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Silviu Grisaru; Morgunov, Melissa A.; Samuel, Susan M.; Julian P Midgley; Wade, Andrew W; Tee, James B.; Hamiwka, Lorraine A.

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is becoming more prevalent among hospitalized children, its etiologies are shifting, and new treatment modalities are evolving; however, diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) remains the most common primary disease causing AKI in young children. Little has been published about acute renal replacement therapy (ARRT) and its challenges in this population. We describe our single center's experience managing 134 pediatric patients with D+HUS out of whom 5...

  17. [Diabetes mellitus as a rare complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowska-Kalisz, Anna; Tkaczyk, Marcin; Szałapska-Zawodniak, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl was hospitalized in a local hospital with bloody diarrhoea, vomitus and abdominal pain. Because of acute abdominal symptoms she underwent appendectomy after which convulsions and acute respiratory distress were noticed. The child was transferred to the intensive care unit. During the examination she was unconscious, pale, oedematous with scattered ecchymoses, severe hypertension and urine output diminished to several ml per day. Routine blood tests showed microangiopathic anaemia, thrombocytopenia (52000/ul.) and uremia. Proteinuria and hematuria were revealed on urine examination. Among coagulation parameters kaolin-kefalin time (69 s) and D-dimers (2000-4000/ul.) were abnormal. On the strength of history, clinical and laboratory investigation the diagnosis of D-positive hemolytic uremic syndrome was established. Controlled artificial respiration (for 10 weeks), total parenteral alimentation (TPN), antihypertensive treatment and diuretics (furosemide, dopamine) were introduced. Daily temporary access hemodialyses were performed for 4 weeks. Subsequently peritoneal dialysis was started for 2 weeks. Despite the appropriate TPN glucose blood levels were unexpectedly high from first days from admission (200-330 mg%). Intensive intravenous insulin therapy was performed for 50 days. The child was discharged after 72 days with moderate renal function impairment (blood urea-53 mg%, creatinine-1,2 mg%), mild hypertension and proteinuria. Additional factor prone to thrombotic events was the 4G/4G genotype responsible for increased PAI-1 blood concentration, which may result in intensified fibrinolysis inhibition. Diabetes mellitus as a rare immunological complication of haemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected on the following evidence: positive anti-GAD antibodies (ELISA), elevated levels of glycosylated haemoglobin A1c, three-fold reduction of blood C-peptide concentration, negative family history for diabetes. After 12 y of follow up glucose and C

  18. Shiga toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Phillip I

    2009-02-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) of childhood is, in its most common form, a non-immune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. HUS typically follows an enteric infection with a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, usually belonging to serotype O157:H7. The antecedent infection is almost always manifested as non-bloody diarrhea. In about 80% of cases, the diarrhea becomes bloody between one and five days after the onset of diarrhea. The courses of acute gastrointestinal infections, and of HUS, in adults and children are similar. There are no convincing data that this easily recognizable form of microangiopathy is related to any inborn or acquired deficiency of ADAMTS13, and plasma therapies are not justified on either theoretical or empirical grounds. Similarly, there are no realistic animal data to support use of plasma exchange or infusion in children or adults with, or at risk for, HUS secondary to gastrointestinal infection with E. coli O157:H7. Best clinical practices involve rapid and accurate clinical and microbiological identification of infected patients, volume expansion, and support of the intestinal and extraintestinal complications that can ensue during acute enteric infection and associated HUS. Clinical clues include a sequence of events where the stool becomes bloody after a several-day interval of bloody diarrhea, considerable abdominal pain, five or more stools in the 24 h before presentation, pain on defection, and absence of fever at the time of presentation. Diagnosis should rely primarily on sorbitol MacConkey agar culture. Shiga toxin testing should not be used as the only screen to identify infected patients.

  19. Relapsing or refractory idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome: the role of rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramazza, Domenica; Quintini, Gerlando; Abbene, Ignazio; Malato, Alessandra; Saccullo, Giorgia; Lo Coco, Lucio; Di Trapani, Rosa; Palazzolo, Roberto; Barone, Rita; Mazzola, Giuseppina; Rizzo, Sergio; Ragonese, Paolo; Aridon, Paolo; Abbadessa, Vincenzo; Siragusa, Sergio

    2010-12-01

    Idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS) is a rare disease responsive to treatment with plasma exchange (PE) but with a high percentage of relapse or refractory patients. A severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 (<5% of normal activity), congenital or caused by an autoantibody, may be specific for TTP and it has been proposed that severe ADAMTS-13 deficiency now defines TTP. B cells play a key role in both the development and the perpetuation of autoimmunity, suggesting that B-cell depletion could be a valuable treatment approach for patients with idiopathic TTP-HUS. This review of the literature focuses on the role of rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against CD20 antigen expressed by B lymphocytes, in patients with relapsing or refractory TTP-HUS with or without ADAMTS-13 deficiency, suggesting that rituximab may produce clinical remission in a significant proportion of patients. Rituximab therapy reduces plasma requirement and avoids complications related to salvage-immunosuppressive therapy. In conclusion, rituximab provides an effective, well-tolerated, and safe treatment option for patients with idiopathic TTP-HUS, thus giving an alternative approach to the current treatment based on PE.

  20. Differential expression of function-related antigens on blood monocytes in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Ramos, María V; Gómez, Sonia A; Dran, Graciela I; Exeni, Ramón; Alduncín, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Vallejo, Graciela; Elías-Costa, Christian; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-10-01

    Monocytes (Mo) mediate central functions in inflammation and immunity. Different subpopulations of Mo with distinct phenotype and functional properties have been described. Here, we investigate the phenotype and function of peripheral Mo from children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). For this purpose, blood samples from patients in the acute period of HUS (HUS AP) were obtained on admission before dialysis and/or transfusion. The Mo phenotypic characterization was performed on whole blood by flow cytometry, and markers associated to biological functions were selected: CD14 accounting for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness, CD11b for adhesion, Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G type I (FcgammaRI)/CD64 for phagocytosis and cytotoxicity, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR for antigen presentation. Some of these functions were also determined. Moreover, the percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo was evaluated. We found that the entire HUS AP Mo population exhibited reduced CD14, CD64, and CD11b expression and decreased LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor production and Fcgamma-dependent cytotoxicity. HUS AP showed an increased percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo with higher CD16 and lower CD14 levels compared with the same subset from healthy children. Moreover, the CD14++ CD16- Mo subpopulation of HUS AP had a decreased HLA-DR expression, which correlated with severity. In conclusion, the Mo population from HUS AP patients presents phenotypic and functional alterations. The contribution to the pathogenesis and the possible scenarios that led to these changes are discussed.

  1. Cytokine profiles of patients with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O111-induced hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masaki; Kuroda, Mondo; Sakashita, Natsumi; Konishi, Michio; Kaneda, Hisashi; Igarashi, Noboru; Yamahana, Junya; Taneichi, Hiromichi; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Ito, Mika; Saito, Shigeru; Ohta, Kazuhide; Taniguchi, Takumi; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Nakagawa, Masaru; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are related to the pathogenesis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). We assessed the kinetics of the release of cytokines such as neopterin, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the soluble forms of type I and II TNF receptors during EHEC O111-induced HUS (EHEC O111/HUS). Fourteen patients with EHEC O111/HUS were enrolled in this study. Serum concentrations of all cytokines other than TNF-α were significantly elevated in patients with severe HUS compared with those in patients with mild HUS. Although serum concentrations of TNF-α were not significantly higher in patients with severe HUS, most patients with acute encephalopathy showed elevated TNF-α levels. Serum concentrations of these cytokines rapidly and markedly increased, and massive hypercytokinaemia developed 1 day before the diagnosis of HUS in patients with severe HUS. Changes in the number of white blood cells and concentration of serum lactate dehydrogenase were significantly larger between the onset of hemorrhagic colitis and the time of the diagnosis of HUS in patients with severe HUS compared with those in patients with mild HUS. Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of EHEC infection and development of severe complications, including HUS and encephalopathy. Monitoring the cytokine profile may be useful for assessing disease activity of EHEC O111 infections.

  2. Hemolytic uremic syndrome in children:some predictive findings on the disease outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Banihashemi Kambiz; Naeeni KMohammad; Yasseri Mehdi; Ghasemi Saeed; Abutalebi Roba-beh; Pourkhani Maryam

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To decrease or delay the major un-wanted clinical consequences to improve the quality of life in the involved patients.Methods:A retrospective case series study has been made on the forty five pediatric pa-tients admitted to nephrology department of Ali-Asghar Hospital during a period of nearly 10 years.The pa-tients have been divided into two groups of good and poor prognoses according to their clinical outcomes.The routine laboratory records and clinical manifestations extracted and statistically analyzed as independent varia-bles both by univariate and multivariate methods.Results:Forty three patients have been managed successful-ly with only two deaths occurred.According to clinical findings,nineteen patients were classified as poor prog-nosis and the rest were categorized as good prognosis.Multivariate statistical analyses showed that lesser age at the time of admission (age 15 000,P<0.226)were well-interrelated to ominous clinical consequences like convulsion,coma and peritonitis and statistically different between the two groups of patients.Conclusion:Despite the importance of predictive var-iables in the course of Hemolytic uremic syndrome(HUS)in children and their critical influence on the clinical outcome,many aspects of these parameters have been remained to be elucidated comprehensively.Our study showed that simultaneous low age of child at the time of admission with simultaneous high WBC count will re-sult in the poorer prognoses of the patients.This may warn the clinicians to provide more supportive cares for this group of patients.

  3. Effect of diet, enalapril, or losartan in post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caletti, Maria Gracia; Missoni, Mabel; Vezzani, Clarisa; Grignoli, María; Piantanida, Juan Jose; Repetto, Horacio A; Exeni, Ramon; Rasse, Stella Maris

    2011-08-01

    Proteinuria is the main indicator of renal disease progression in many chronic conditions. There is currently little information available on the efficacy, safety, and individual tolerance of patients with post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) nephropathy to therapies involving diet, enalapril, or losartan. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trail was conducted to evaluate the effect of a normosodic-normoproteic diet (Phase I) and the effect of normosodic-normoproteic diet plus enalapril (0.18-0.27 mg/kg/day) or losartan (0.89-1.34 mg/kg/day) (Phase II) on children with D+ HUS, normal renal function, and persistent, mild (5.1-49.9 mg/kg/day) proteinuria. Dietary intervention reduced the mean protein intake from 3.4 to 2.2 mg/kg/day. Of 137 children, proteinuria normalized in 91 (66.4 %) within 23-45 days; the remaining 46 patients were randomized to diet plus placebo (group 1, n = 16), plus losartan (group 2, n = 16), or enalapril (group 3, n = 14). In groups 1, 2, and 3, proteinuria was reduced by 30.0, 82.0, and 66.3%, respectively, and normalized in six (37.5%), three (81.3%), and 11 (78.6%) patients, respectively (χ(2)= 8.9, p = 0.015). These results suggest that: (1) a normosodic-normoproteic diet can normalize proteinuria in the majority of children with D+ HUS with mild sequelae, (2) the addition of enalapril or losartan to such dietary restrictions of protein further reduces proteinuria, and (3) these therapeutic interventions are safe and well tolerated. Whether these short-term effects can be extended to the long-term remains to be demonstrated.

  4. Renoscintigraphy in assessment of renal lesions in children after hemolytic-uremic syndrome; Renoscyntygrafia w ocenie skutkow uszkodzenia nerek u dzieci po przebytym zespole hemolityczno-mocznicowym

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lass, P.; Marczak, E.; Romanowicz, G. [Akademia Medyczna, Gdansk (Poland); and others

    1994-12-31

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of renoscintigraphic examination in monitoring of patients after the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. 27 children mean 9 years the hemolytic-uremic syndrome underwent the complex of biochemical, ultrasound and renoscintigraphic examinations. The abnormal renoscintigraphic was seen in 85.1% of children, while the alternative test described the renal lesion in 29-66%. Renoscintigraphic examination seems to be the most sensitive in monitoring of remote sequel in patients after HUS. Those patients should undergone long-lasting observation, for the sake of possibility of development of renal insufficiency. (author). 14 refs.

  5. Comparison of Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis and Multilocus Sequence Typing for Differentiation of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome-Associated Escherichia coli (HUSEC) Collection Strains▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was compared to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to differentiate hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Although MLVA—like MLST—was highly discriminatory (index of diversity, 0.988 versus 0.984), a low level of concordance demonstrated the limited ability of MLVA to reflect long-term evolutionary events.

  6. CONCURRENT PRESENTATION OF HEMOLYTIC-UREMIC SYNDROME IN 2 ADULT SIBLINGS - EFFECTS OF PLASMA THERAPY ON HEMOLYSIS AND RENAL-FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VONGAMEREN, [No Value; RENSMA, PL; ZIJLSTRA, JG; DEWOLF, J; DEJONG, PE

    1994-01-01

    We describe 2 sisters who presented with the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) almost simultaneously In both patients an upper airway infection with Haemophilus influenzae immediately preceding HUS may have been the environmental trigger. Fresh plasma infusion had only minor therapeutic effects but pl

  7. Gemcitabine-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome mimicking scleroderma renal crisis presenting with Raynaud's phenomenon, positive antinuclear antibodies and hypertensive emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Keisuke; Nobata, Hironobu; Kawai, Hirohisa; Wakamatsu, Ryo; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman who received gemcitabine for advanced gallbladder cancer developed an impaired renal function, thrombocytopenia, Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ischemic changes, a high antinuclear antibody titer and hypertensive emergency that mimicked a scleroderma renal crisis. A kidney biopsy specimen demonstrated onion-skin lesions in the arterioles and small arteries along with ischemic changes in the glomeruli, compatible with a diagnosis of hypertensive emergency (malignant hypertension). The intravenous administration of a calcium channel blocker, the oral administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker and the transfusion of fresh frozen plasma were effective for treating the thrombocytopenia and progressive kidney dysfunction. Gemcitabine induces hemolytic uremic syndrome with accelerated hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon, mimicking scleroderma renal crisis.

  8. Idiopathic combined, autoantibody-mediated ADAMTS-13/factor H deficiency in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome in a 17-year-old woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patschan Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome is a life-threatening condition with various etiopathogeneses. Without therapy approximately 90% of all patients die from the disease. Case presentation We report the case of a 17-year-old Caucasian woman with widespread hematomas and headache. Due to hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytosis, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected and plasma exchange therapy was initiated immediately. Since her thrombocyte level did not increase during the first week of therapy, plasma treatment had to be intensified to a twice-daily schedule. Further diagnostics showed markedly reduced activities of both ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 - also known as von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease and factor H. Test results for antibodies against both proteins were positive. While plasma exchange therapy was continued, rituximab was given once weekly for four consecutive weeks. After the last dose, thrombocytes and activities of ADAMTS-13 and factor H increased into the normal range. Our patient improved and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusions Since no clinical symptoms/laboratory findings indicated a malignant or specific autoimmune-mediated disorder, the diagnosis made was thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome due to idiopathic combined, autoantibody-mediated ADAMTS-13/factor H deficiency.

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome with ischemic glomerulonephropathy and obliterative vasculopathy in a systemic sclerosis patient treated with cyclosporine-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Young, An-Hang; Wang, Hon-Pin; Huang, De-Feng

    2009-05-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is not a commonly reported complication in post-transplantation patients treated with cyclosporine-A (CSA), and is extremely rare in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients treated with this drug. CSA may contribute to the development of chronic ischemic glomerulonephropathy and vasculopathy, features not easily distinguished from SSc-related nephropathy. Here, we describe a 41-year-old Chinese man with diffuse-type SSc treated with CSA who developed thrombocytopenia, acute renal failure and hemolytic anemia and was diagnosed with HUS. Renal function and thrombocytopenia improved gradually after intensive treatment of plasma exchange (PE) and high-dose steroid therapy. After PE, renal biopsy showed ischemic glomerulonephropathy and obliterative vasculopathy. This case illustrates that PE can improve the hematological disorders and characteristic renal changes of HUS in SSc patients treated with CSA. However, this therapy may not be effective in normalizing serum creatinine level in SSc patients once CSA has triggered the normal kidney to develop glomerulonephropathy and vasculopathy with ischemic and sclerotic changes.

  10. Catastrophic relapse of Evans syndrome five years after allogeneic BMT notwithstanding full donor chimerism. Terminal hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmont, A M; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Morandi, F; Ferretti, E; Pezzolo, A; Strada, P; Ravetti, J L; Pistoia, V; Falanga, A; Bacigalupo, A

    2006-09-01

    A patient with severe Evans syndrome received an allo-BMT from his HLA-identical sister on November, 2000. Full marrow and blood donor chimerism were achieved only after 5 donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI), and coincided with complete clinical remission and disappearence of auto-antibodies. Five years later, hemolytic anemia recurred with rapid increase of serum bilirubin to over 50 mg%: he responded to combined therapy, but died on day +17 from admission of an acute hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). All circulating blood cells, including erythrocytes, were 100% donor. Ex vivo cultured and expanded T and B cells from the peripheral blood were also 100% donor. The supernatants from B cell cultures, containing either IgM or IgG, did not react with a panel of erythrocytes. Thus in this typical autoimmune disease with a predominant B cell pathogenesis the donor immune system resulted "innocent of autoimmunity". The persistence of long-lived recipient autoreactive plasma-cell lines in survival niches, still producing autoantibodies, may be hypothesized for this and similar cases. The postulated graft-versus-autoimmunity (GVA) effect was apparently not sufficient to eradicate autoimmunity in this patient.

  11. Arterial hypertension in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenecke, Johannes; Hartmann, Hans; Melk, Anette

    2015-08-01

    The development of arterial hypertension after KTX is a well-known complication. HUS is a systemic disease associated with arterial hypertension during long-term follow-up. Our goal was to report on the severity of arterial hypertension after KTX in patients with typical and atypical HUS. We analyzed the course of 197 patients with HUS, of which 22 (n = 10 with typical HUS; n = 12 with atypical HUS) developed ESRF and received KTX as renal replacement therapy. We analyzed data from 1766 casual BP and 85 24-h ABPM measurements. In addition, we evaluated the used antihypertensive strategy. Comparison between the two patient groups revealed that patients with atypical HUS had significantly higher casual SBP-SDS and DBP-SDS values after KTX despite similar intensity of antihypertensive treatment. These data were supported by analysis of ABPM profiles showing comparable results for the interval 1-5 yr after KTX. Patients with atypical HUS had a greater severity of arterial hypertension despite similar treatment strategies and intensity of treatment. Our observation, even though in a small cohort, supports recent genetic studies showing arterial hypertension closely associated with HUS-causing mutations in patients with atypical HUS.

  12. Bacterial genetic determinants of non-O157 STEC outbreaks and hemolytic-uremic syndrome after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Mark E; Lupp, Claudia; Mascarenhas, Mariola; Vazquez, Alejandra; Coombes, Brian K; Brown, Nat F; Coburn, Bryan A; Deng, Wanyin; Puente, Jose L; Karmali, Mohamed A; Finlay, B Brett

    2006-09-15

    Although O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are the predominant cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in the world, non-O157:H7 serotypes are a medically important cause of HUS that are underdetected by current diagnostic approaches. Because Shiga toxin is necessary but not sufficient to cause HUS, identifying the virulence determinants that predict severe disease after non-O157 STEC infection is of paramount importance. Disease caused by O157:H7 STEC has been associated with a 26-gene pathogenicity island known as O island (OI) 122. To assess the public-health significance of this pathogenicity island, we examined the association between OI122 genes and outbreaks and HUS after non-O157 STEC infection. We found that a subset of OI122 genes is independently associated with outbreaks and HUS after infection with non-O157 STEC. The presence of multiple virulence genes in non-O157 serotypes strengthened this association, which suggests that the additive effects of a variable repertoire of virulence genes contribute to disease severity. In vivo, Citrobacter rodentium mutants lacking outbreak- and HUS-associated genes were deficient for virulence in mice; in particular, nleB mutant bacteria were unable to cause mortality in mice. The present study shows that virulence genes associated epidemiologically with outbreaks and HUS after non-O157 STEC infection are pivotal to the initiation, progression, and outcome of in vivo disease.

  13. Acute Renal Replacement Therapy in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Single Center 16 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Grisaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is becoming more prevalent among hospitalized children, its etiologies are shifting, and new treatment modalities are evolving; however, diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS remains the most common primary disease causing AKI in young children. Little has been published about acute renal replacement therapy (ARRT and its challenges in this population. We describe our single center's experience managing 134 pediatric patients with D+HUS out of whom 58 (43% required ARRT over the past 16 years. In our cohort, all but one patient were started on peritoneal dialysis (PD. Most patients, 47 (81%, received acute PD on a pediatric inpatient ward. The most common recorded complications in our cohort were peritoneal fluid leaks 13 (22%, peritonitis 11 (20%, and catheter malfunction 5 (9%. Nine patients (16% needed surgical revision of their PD catheters. There were no bleeding events related to PD despite a mean platelets count of 40.9 (±23.5 × 103/mm3 and rare use of platelets infusions. Despite its methodological limitations, this paper adds to the limited body of evidence supporting the use of acute PD as the primary ARRT modality in children with D+HUS.

  14. The functional state of neutrophils correlates with the severity of renal dysfunction in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gabriela C; Gomez, Sonia A; Ramos, Maria V; Bentancor, Leticia V; Fernandez-Brando, Romina J; Landoni, Veronica I; Lopez, Laura; Ramirez, Flavia; Diaz, Mario; Alduncin, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Exeni, Ramon; Isturiz, Martin A; Palermo, Marina S

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) is the main cause of acute renal failure in children. The high percentage of patients who develop long-term sequelae constitutes an important medical concern. The identification of parameters that correlate with the degree of renal failure may be useful to plan the best treatment soon after hospitalization. Here, we investigated the functional state of neutrophils (PMN) from HUS patients on admission, before dialysis and/or transfusion, in relation to the severity of renal impairment reached during the acute period (AP). We found that all PMN activation parameters measured in severe cases of HUS (HUS AP3) were statistically lower comparing to children with mild cases of HUS (HUS AP1). As HUS PMN phenotype and dysfunction is compatible with that of cells undergoing cell death, we also studied spontaneous apoptosis. Not only were HUS PMN not apoptotic, but HUS AP3 PMN showed an increased survival. Almost all phenotypic and functional parameters measured on PMN correlated with severity. Our results revealed a marked deactivation of PMN in severe cases of HUS, and suggest that studying the functional state of PMN could be of prognostic value.

  15. Tacrolimus-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James M; Ameduri, Rebecca K

    2016-09-01

    HUS is a well-known entity primarily associated with bacterial infection and is characterized by a classic triad of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and kidney injury. Its atypical form has been associated with calcineurin inhibitors and has been extensively discussed in renal transplantation. We present a case of tacrolimus-associated HUS in a pediatric heart transplant recipient, which we believe to be previously unreported in the literature.

  16. Function of von Willebrand factor in children with diarrhea-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (D+ HUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutor, A H; Thomas, K B; Prüfer, F H; Grohmann, A; Brandis, M; Zimmerhackl, L B

    2001-06-01

    Reports on von Willebrand factor (vWF) in hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) are not unequivocal. Because of potential pathogenic implications, we examined the ability of vWF to bind to collagen in vitro, which reflects its function. Plasma vWF antigen (vWF:Ag) and collagen-binding activity (vWF:CBA) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in children with (1) diarrhea-associated (D+) HUS (n = 27), (2) chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) (n = 8), (3) gastroenteritis (GE) not associated with HUS (n = 15), (4) immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) (n = 40) and from controls (n = 35). Structural vWF was evaluated by multimer analysis. Children with D+ HUS had vWF:Ag of 2.53 and vWF:CBA of 1.98 U/mL. The corresponding values for patients with ITP were 1.35 and 1.82 U/mL, with CRI 1.55 and 1.55 U/mL, and with GE 1.68 and 2.10 U/mL; all values were higher than in controls (1.04 and 1.16 U/mL). The mean ratio of vWF:CBA to vWF:Ag ratio in controls was 1.13; only children with HUS had a dysfunctional vWF, as indicated by a low ratio of 0.78; the ratio was elevated in children with ITP (1.36) and GE (1.27) and was normal in those with CRI (1.06). No ultralarge molecular multimers of vWF were detected in any group, including HUS. The very high concentration of plasma vWF:Ag in HUS probably reflects endothelial cell damage or irritation. In contrast to all other groups, only children with HUS had a dysfunctional vWF, caused either by a primary (due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli) or secondary (due to consumption of functionally active vWF) process. This abnormality was not obvious as structural anomaly by multimer analysis.

  17. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, Thomas; Limelette, Anne; Le Magrex-Debar, Elisabeth; Wynckel, Alain; Gouali, Malika; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Guyot-Colosio, Charlotte; de Champs, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection.

  18. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Guillard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection.

  19. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  20. The Shiga toxin genotype rather than the amount of Shiga toxin or the cytotoxicity of Shiga toxin in vitro correlates with the appearance of the hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Dorothea; Grif, Katharina; Khan, Abdul B; Naim, Asma; Dierich, Manfred P; Würzner, Reinhard

    2007-11-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are believed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), including the potentially life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). In this study, 201 STEC strains collected from patients and environmental sources were investigated with regard to the stx genotypes and pathogenicity. The stx(2) and stx(2c) alleles were associated with high virulence and the ability to cause HUS, whereas stx(2d), stx(2e,)stx(1), and stx(1c) occurred in milder or asymptomatic infections. Quantification of Stx using an enzyme immunoassay and the Vero cell cytotoxicity assay showed no significant differences between the strains associated with HUS and those causing milder diseases. We hypothesize that the stx genotype and perhaps other yet unknown virulence factors rather than the amount of Stx or the in vitro cytotoxicity correlate with the development of HUS.

  1. [Verotoxin as a major laboratory criterion for Escherichia coli O157-induced enteric infection complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome in infants in the Omsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgikh, T I; Kaftyreva, L A; Voĭtovich, M A; Podkolzin, A T; Galileĭskaia, S B; Lazareva, L I

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents the results of etiological interpretation of the outbreak of Escherichia coli O157-induced enteric infection complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome in Omsk in spring 2009. Seventeen infants aged 5 months to 2.5 years were examined; of them 9 patients were on hemodialysis. The diagnosis was verified in 7 children, by isolating verotoxin after fecal enrichment on the concentrating nutrient RIDA Enrichment Bouillon medium containing bile salts and mitomycin C, E. coli O157:H7 cultures on the sorbitol medium and/or by identifying E. coli O157 DNA. Six (4 having verotoxin) infants were found to have rotavirus and noro-virus antigens or DNA/RNA, which may make a contribution into the development of mixed infection and increase the risk of complications.

  2. [Fenotypic and genotypic characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111 strain isolated from patient with hemolytic-uremic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Podsiadły, Edyta; Szych, Jolanta; Semkowicz-Chmielewska, Anna; Demkow, Urszula; Pierzchlewicz, Anna; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157 and non-O157 are important emergance pathogens that can cause diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis with life-threatening complications, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). A few cases of EHEC infections are documented per year in Poland. Among them only one patient with EHEC O157 infection developed HUS. We characterized the first VTEC non-O157 strain isolated from child with HUS in Poland. The VTEC O111 strain produced Stx2 which was cytotoxic for Vero cell. Using DNA microarray analysis we have found set of virulence genes in VTEC O111 strain as: stx2A, stx2B, ehly, eae, tir tccP espA, espJ, cif nleA, nleB, lpfA, iha, efa1, cba. The strain was fenotypic resistant to streptomycin, tetracyclin and sulphonamides (strA, tetA, sul2 genes were detected).

  3. [Update on the treatment of endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathogenesis and treatment of the most severe systemic complication of infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Mejías, María Pilar; Panek, Analía C; Cabrera, Gabriel G; Exeni, Ramón A; Palermo, Marina S

    2011-01-01

    The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, giving account for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in our country. In spite of the extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in national status and contributions made by Argentinean groups.

  4. Chemiluminescence determination of antioxidant property of Zizyphus mistol and Prosopis alba during oxidative stress generated in blood by Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Claudia; Pellarin, María G; Baronetti, José; Rojas, María J; Albesa, Inés; Eraso, Alberto J

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate the antioxidant effect of Zizyphus mistol and Prosopis alba, with the hypothesis that these fruits can counteract the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by toxins produced by Escherichia coli. In the search of nutrients effective against the Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), we detected by chemiluminescence a protective role of both plants, due to their natural antioxidants significantly decreasing the levels of ROS induced by toxins from E. coli in blood. The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) was found to be higher in Z. mistol than in P. alba. The chemical analyses of the phenols and flavonoids present in the fruit extracts indicated that the FRAP correlated with the amount of phenolic compounds, but not with the flavonoids analyzed. Both fruits studied reduce the induction of ROS, and in this way help to prevent the development of complications related to oxidative stress generated in the blood of patients with HUS.

  5. Circulating microRNAs in patients with Shiga-Toxin-producing E. coli O104:H4 induced hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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    Johan M Lorenzen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In early May 2011, an outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS first developed in Northern Germany and spread to 15 other countries in Europe. The outbreak-strain O104:H4, which combined virulence factors of typical enteroaggregative and Shiga-Toxin-producing E. coli was associated with an unusual high rate of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Also an unexpected high rate of coma and seizures leading to mechanical ventilation and ICU treatment was observed. MicroRNAs are small ribonucleotides orchestrating gene expression. We tested whether circulating microRNAs in serum of HUS patients during the 2011 epidemics are altered in this patient cohort and related to clinical manifestations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We profiled microRNAs using RNA isolated from serum of patients and healthy age-matched controls. The results were validated in 38 patients at baseline, 29 patients during follow-up and 21 age-matched healthy controls by miRNA-specific quantitative RT-PCR. Circulating levels of miR-24, miR-126 were increased in HUS patients versus controls. There was no association between these microRNAs and renal function or the need for renal replacement therapy. In contrast, levels of miR-126 were associated with neurological symptoms at baseline and during follow-up. In addition, miR-126 (on admission and miR-24 (on admission and during follow-up were associated with platelet count. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Circulating microRNAs are strongly altered in this patient cohort and associated with neurological symptoms as well as platelet count.

  6. Prevention and treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumi, Masayoshi; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by an over-activated, dysregulated alternative complement pathway due to genetic mutation and environmental triggers. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a serious, life-threatening disease characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, and acute renal failure. Since recurrences of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome frequently lead to end-stage kidney disease even in renal allografts, kidney transplantation for patients with end-stage kidney disease secondary to atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome has long been contraindicated. However, over the past several years, advancements in the management of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. The key factor of this success is eculizumab, a humanized anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, which inhibits terminal membrane-attack complex formation and thrombotic microangiopathy progression. In the setting of kidney transplantation, there are different possible triggers of post-transplant atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome recurrence, such as brain-death related injury, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, infections, the use of immunosuppressive drugs, and rejection. Principal strategies are to prevent endothelial damage that could potentially activate alternative complement pathway activation and subsequently lead to atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome recurrence in kidney allograft. Published data shows that prophylactic eculizumab therapy is highly effective for the prevention of post-transplant atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome recurrence, and prompt treatment with eculizumab as soon as recurrence is diagnosed is important to maintain renal allograft function. Further study to determine the optimal dosing and duration of prophylactic therapy and treatment of post-transplant atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome recurrence is needed.

  7. Síndrome Hemolítico-Urêmica Pós-parto: Relato de Caso Postpartum Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report

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    José Geraldo Lopes Ramos

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU é processo microangiopático associado a insuficiência renal, determinando alta morbidade e mortalidade. A gestação pode ser um fator precipitante, por meio de mecanismos ainda não bem estabelecidos. Entram no diagnóstico diferencial a pré-eclâmpsia, a síndrome HELLP, o fígado gorduroso agudo da gestação e a púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica. Relatamos um caso de SHU ocorrendo no pós-parto imediato em paciente com diagnóstico inicial de pré-eclâmpsia. O diagnóstico diferencial foi fundamentado na perda abrupta da função renal, acompanhada de instabilidade pressórica e sinais clínicos e laboratoriais de hemólise. São destacados os métodos diagnósticos disponíveis, manejo terapêutico e fatores prognósticos baseados em revisão de literatura.The hemolytic - uremic syndrome (HUS presents with a triad of acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia associated with high morbidity and mortality. On the differential diagnosis, other entities must be considered like preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a case of HUS occurring in the immediate postpartum period in a patient initially diagnosed as having preeclampsia. The differential diagnosis was based on abrupt renal failure, blood pressure increase and clinical and laboratorial evidence of hemolysis. Attention is directed to investigation, clinical management and prognosis based on review of the literature.

  8. Quantitative MRI shows cerebral microstructural damage in hemolytic-uremic syndrome patients with severe neurological symptoms but no changes in conventional MRI

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    Weissenborn, Karin; Worthmann, Hans; Heeren, Meike [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Neurology, Hannover (Germany); Bueltmann, Eva; Donnerstag, Frank; Giesemann, Anja M.; Goetz, Friedrich; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Ding, Xiao-Qi [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Kielstein, Jan; Schwarz, Anke [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Nephrology and Hypertension, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Severe neurological symptoms in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (STEC-HUS) are often accompanied by none or only mild alterations of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aims to analyze if quantitative MRI is able to reveal cerebral pathological alterations invisible for conventional MRI. In nine patients with STEC-HUS associated severe neurological symptoms but inconspicuous cerebral MRI findings maps of the parameters T2 relaxation time, relative proton density (PD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated. Quantitative values of these parameters were measured at the basal ganglia, thalamus, and white matter of the frontal and parietal lobe and compared to those of nine age- and sex-matched controls. Significant T2 prolongation (p < 0.01) was found in the basal ganglia of all patients compared to controls. PD and ADC were not significantly altered. A significant reduction of FA in patients was seen at caput nuclei caudati (p < 0.01). Prolonged T2 relaxation time indicates cerebral microstructural damages in these patients despite their inconspicuous MRI findings. T2 relaxometry could be used as a complementary tool for the assessment of metabolic-toxic brain syndromes. (orig.)

  9. Timing and utility of ultrasound in diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: 7-year experience of a large tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatstein, Miguel; Miller, Elka; Garcia-Bournissen, Facundo; Scolnik, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    The authors reviewed the clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from cases of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS D+), diagnosed at our institution, from 2001 to 2008. The timing and utility of ultrasonographic features of HUS D+ were analyzed. The aim of the study was to determine factors that could aid in the early diagnosis of this disease. A total of 13 children with HUS D+ were identified out of 23 patients with HUS diagnosed during this time period. Evidence of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 was found in 9 cases (70%). Ultrasound studies were ordered in 10 patients (71%), all of which showed renal sonographic findings compatible with HUS. Ultrasound was performed at a mean of 13 days after onset of the diarrhea. Of note, 2 patients whose ultrasounds were performed at the beginning of their diarrheal illness manifested ultrasonographic features suggestive of HUS when there was only a mild increase in serum creatinine and no decrease in hemoglobin or platelets, suggesting that ultrasonography can identify renal involvement early in the course of the disease before other systemic signs appear. Early renal ultrasound may be a useful adjunct in the initial evaluation in children with bloody diarrhea. Evidence of increased renal echogenicity in a patient with bloody diarrhea could aid in early recognition of HUS when other diagnoses such as intussusceptions are being entertained, potentially allowing early intervention.

  10. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica esporádica pós-parto Sporadic postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza M. Moreira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anemia hemolítica microangiopática associado à trombocitopenia participa de um grupo de doenças que freqüentemente apresentam suas características clínicas muito semelhantes, sendo difícil distingui-las. A síndrome hemolítico-urêmica é dividida em duas apresentações: a forma não esporádica, que acomete comumente crianças após infecção bacteriana causando diarréia sanguinolenta, possui bom prognóstico; e a forma esporádica, que acomete adultos, sendo bem descritos casos em mulheres pósparto, é a forma sistêmica de trombocitopenia microangiopática de pior prognóstico com alta morbidade e mortalidade, cuja falência renal é o distúrbio predominante. Relatamos um caso de síndrome hemolítico-urêmica pós-parto em paciente previamente sadia, que apresentou quadro de insuficiência renal, anemia hemolítica e trombocitopenia. Instituída a terapêutica de suporte adequada e precocemente, a paciente evoluiu satisfatoriamente com normalização dos níveis pressóricos e recuperação da função renal.Microangiopathic hemolytic associated with thrombocytopenia is part of a disease group that frequently show likeness and that's why become difficult to separate them. There are two types of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS; the non sporadic type and the epidemic or "typical" type that is common on childreen that is associated with diarrhea and infection caused by verotoxinaproducing E. coli with a good prognostic; and the sporadic postpartum period. It is the systemic type of mocroangiophatic thrombocytopenia of poor prognostic with high morbidity and mortality which renal failure is the main disturb. We reported a case of HUS occuring in postpartum previously healthy, that showed abrupt renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. After proper therapy the patient developed a normal blood pressure and recovery renal function.

  11. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A doença pneumocócica é importante problema de saúde pública e raramente há associação desta infecção com a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU grave. O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso de um paciente com esta associação. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Criança do sexo masculino, com 17 meses de idade, admitida no hospital com insuficiência respiratória aguda e necessitando de suporte ventilatório. O exame radiológico mostrava extensa opacidade homogênea em hemitórax direito. A hemocultura foi positiva para Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nos exames de admissão, notaram-se: hemoglobina de 6,5g/dL, 38.000 plaquetas/mm³, uréia de 79mg/dL e creatinina de 1,64mg/dL. No primeiro dia, apresentou oligoanúria e hipervolemia, necessitando de hemodiafiltração. Evoluiu com disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e óbito no sétimo dia. A necrópsia mostrou áreas extensas de necrose cortical e tubular renal, com depósito de fibrina nas arteríolas. COMENTÁRIOS: A SHU associada ao pneumococo apresenta morbidade e mortalidade elevadas. Em crianças com doença pneumocócica invasiva e acometimento hematológico ou renal grave, deve-se estar atento a esta rara complicação. Merecem investigação os seguintes aspectos relacionados à doença: a função da detecção precoce de antígenos T ativados no diagnóstico e terapêutica, o papel do fator H na patogênese, o método ideal de substituição renal e a definição do prognóstico em longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal diseases are a major public health problem. Severe hemolytic-uremic syndrome is an uncommon complication. The aim of this study is to report a child with this complication. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male child with 17 months old was admitted to the hospital, due to acute respiratory failure, needing ventilatory support. Roentgenogram demonstrated massive condensation of right lung and Streptococcus pneumonia was isolated from blood cultures. Laboratory tests showed

  12. Molecular microbiological investigation of an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by dry fermented sausage contaminated with Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, A W; Ratcliff, R M; Doyle, R M; Seymour-Murray, J; Davos, D; Lanser, J A; Paton, J C

    1996-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (SLTEC) strains are a diverse group of organisms which are known to cause diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis in humans. This can lead to potentially fatal systemic sequelae, such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Strains belonging to more than 100 different O:H serotypes have been associated with severe SLTEC disease in humans, of which only O157 strains (which are uncommon in Australia) have a distinguishable cultural characteristic (sorbitol negative). During an outbreak of HUS in Adelaide, South Australia, a sensitive PCR assay specific for Shiga-like toxin genes (slt) was used to test cultures of feces and suspected foods. This enabled rapid confirmation of infection and identified a locally produced dry fermented sausage (mettwurst) as the source of infection. Cultures of feces from 19 of 21 HUS patients and 7 of 8 mettwurst samples collected from their homes were PCR positive for slt-I and slt-II genes. SLTEC isolates belonging to serotype O111:H- was subsequently isolated from 16 patients and 4 mettwurst samples. Subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of chromosomal DNA from these isolates with slt-specific probes indicated that at least three different O111:H- genotypes were associated with the outbreak. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA restricted with XbaI showed that two of these restriction fragment length polymorphism types were closely related, but the third was quite distinct. However, SLTEC strains of other serotypes, including O157:H-, were also isolated from some of the HUS patients. PMID:8784557

  13. Antibody response to Shiga toxins in Argentinean children with enteropathic hemolytic uremic syndrome at acute and long-term follow-up periods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina J Fernández-Brando

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infection is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that include diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Systemic Stx toxemia is considered to be central to the genesis of HUS. Distinct methods have been used to evaluate anti-Stx response for immunodiagnostic or epidemiological analysis of HUS cases. The development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and western blot (WB assay to detect the presence of specific antibodies to Stx has introduced important advantages for serodiagnosis of HUS. However, application of these methods for seroepidemiological studies in Argentina has been limited. The aim of this work was to develop an ELISA to detect antibodies against the B subunit of Stx2, and a WB to evaluate antibodies against both subunits of Stx2 and Stx1, in order to analyze the pertinence and effectiveness of these techniques in the Argentinean population. We studied 72 normal healthy children (NHC and 105 HUS patients of the urban pediatric population from the surrounding area of Buenos Aires city. Using the WB method we detected 67% of plasma from NHC reactive for Stx2, but only 8% for Stx1. These results are in agreement with the broad circulation of Stx2-expressing STEC in Argentina and the endemic behavior of HUS in this country. Moreover, the simultaneous evaluation by the two methods allowed us to differentiate acute HUS patients from NHC with a great specificity and accuracy, in order to confirm the HUS etiology when pathogenic bacteria were not isolated from stools.

  14. Antibody response to Shiga toxins in Argentinean children with enteropathic hemolytic uremic syndrome at acute and long-term follow-up periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Mejías, María Pilar; Ramos, María Victoria; Exeni, Andrea; Exeni, Claudia; Laso, María del Carmen; Exeni, Ramón; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2011-04-29

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that include diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Systemic Stx toxemia is considered to be central to the genesis of HUS. Distinct methods have been used to evaluate anti-Stx response for immunodiagnostic or epidemiological analysis of HUS cases. The development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot (WB) assay to detect the presence of specific antibodies to Stx has introduced important advantages for serodiagnosis of HUS. However, application of these methods for seroepidemiological studies in Argentina has been limited. The aim of this work was to develop an ELISA to detect antibodies against the B subunit of Stx2, and a WB to evaluate antibodies against both subunits of Stx2 and Stx1, in order to analyze the pertinence and effectiveness of these techniques in the Argentinean population. We studied 72 normal healthy children (NHC) and 105 HUS patients of the urban pediatric population from the surrounding area of Buenos Aires city. Using the WB method we detected 67% of plasma from NHC reactive for Stx2, but only 8% for Stx1. These results are in agreement with the broad circulation of Stx2-expressing STEC in Argentina and the endemic behavior of HUS in this country. Moreover, the simultaneous evaluation by the two methods allowed us to differentiate acute HUS patients from NHC with a great specificity and accuracy, in order to confirm the HUS etiology when pathogenic bacteria were not isolated from stools.

  15. Virulence profiling and quantification of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O145:H28 and O26:H11 isolated during an ice cream-related hemolytic uremic syndrome outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvens, Glenn; Possé, Björn; De Schrijver, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Lauwers, Sabine; Piérard, Denis

    2011-03-01

    In September-October 2007, a mixed-serotype outbreak of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O145:H28 and O26:H11 occurred in the province of Antwerp, Belgium. Five girls aged between 2 and 11 years developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, and seven other coexposed persons with bloody diarrhea were identified. Laboratory confirmation of O145:H28 infection was obtained for three hemolytic uremic syndrome patients, one of whom was coinfected with O26:H11. The epidemiological and laboratory investigations revealed ice cream as the most likely source of the outbreak. The ice cream was produced at a local dairy farm using pasteurized milk. VTEC of both serotypes with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were isolated from patients, ice cream, and environmental samples. Quantitative analysis of the ice cream indicated concentrations of 2.4 and 0.03 CFU/g for VTEC O145 and O26, respectively. Virulence typing revealed that the repertoire of virulence genes carried by the O145:H28 outbreak strain was comparable to that of O157 VTEC and more exhaustive as compared to the O26:H11 outbreak strain and nonrelated clinical strains belonging to these serotypes. Taken together, these data suggest that O145:H28 played the most important role in this outbreak.

  16. Síndrome urémico hemolítico. Tratamiento de la glomerulopatía secundaria Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Treatment of secondary glomerulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María G. Caletti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La insuficiencia renal crónica es la complicación más grave del síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH. En el año 1996 se publicó la secuencia histológica de su evolución en pacientes con períodos oligoanúricos prolongados. En los últimos años se han propuesto diferentes esquemas terapéuticos para enlentecer la evolución a la insuficiencia renal crónica terminal en distintas nefropatías, diabéticas y no diabéticas, cuya expresión puede comenzar aun en la adolescencia. En este trabajo se comenta la respuesta a dos esquemas terapéuticos de dos grupos de pacientes con SUH que presentaron proteinuria con o sin hipertensión arterial e insuficiencia renal. Se enfatiza la indicación de la dieta hiposódica y controlada en proteínas en el mismo momento del alta del paciente y la incorporación de un inhibidor de la enzima de conversión de angiotensina II, iECA, (enalapril al comienzo de la aparición de la proteinuria.Chronic renal failure (CRF is the most severe complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. In 1996, the histological sequence of changes in patients with long lasting oligoanuric periods was clarified. In the last years different therapeutic schemes have been proposed in order to slacken the development of terminal CRF in different renal conditions secondary to diabetes and other diseases. Some of these cases can suffer the onset of renal failure at adolescence. In this review, response to two treatment schemes in different patients with HUS and proteinuria with or without hypertension or renal failure is commented. Early indication of poor sodium diet and strict control of protein intake at the very moment of hospital discharge is strongly recommended, as well as angiotensin II conversion inhibiting enzymes (iACE at the appearance of proteinuria.

  17. Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/24q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Mijatovic

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF. Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. In the next week of, what initially appeared as typical HUS, she developed MOF, including ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions.

  18. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, A.E.; Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2001-01-01

    In Europe, haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the most frequent cause of acute renal insufficiency during childhood. In the Netherlands about 20 children per year are seriously affected. Following a prodromal phase of mostly bloody diarrhoea, the main symptoms become evident, namely, haemolytic an

  19. Microangiopatias trombóticas: púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica e síndrome hemolítico-urêmica Thrombotic microangiopathies: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura / hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goretti Polito

    2010-09-01

    complemento. Uma série de mutações e polimorfismo em genes que codificam proteínas reguladoras do complemento sozinhas ou em combinação podem levar a SHU atípica. Aproximadamente 60% dos casos de SHU atípica têm mutações do tipo "perda da função" em genes que codificam as proteínas reguladoras do complemento, as quais protegem as células hospedeiras da ativação do complemento: fator H do complemento (FHC, fator I (FIC e proteína cofator de membrana (PCM ou CD46, ou mutações do tipo "ganho da função" em genes que codificam o FHC ou C3. Além disso, aproximadamente 10% dos pacientes com SHU atípica têm deficiência na função do FHC devido a anticorpos anti-FHC. Mesmo que as MATs sejam condições altamente heterogêneas, um terço dos pacientes tem deficiência severa da ADA-MTS13. Transfusões de plaquetas são contraindicadas nesses pacientes. Infusão de plasma ou plasma exchange (PE é o único tratamento eficiente.Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs are pathological conditions characterized by generalized microvascular occlusion by platelet thrombi, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Two typical phenotypes of TMAs are hemolytic- uremic syndrome (HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP. Other disorders occasionally present with similar manifestations. Depending on whether renal or brain lesions prevail, two pathologically indistinguishable but somehow clinically different disorders have been described: HUS and TTP. Injury to the endothelial cell is the central and likely inciting factor in the sequence of events leading to TMA. Loss of physiological thromboresistance, leukocyte adhesion to damaged endothelium, complement consumption, abnormal von Willebrand factor release and fragmentation, and increased vascular shear stress may then sustain and amplify the microangiopathic process. Intrinsic abnormalities of the complement system and of the von Willebrand factor pathway may account for a genetic predisposition to the

  20. Clinical Analysis of Six Cases of Postpartum Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome%产后溶血性尿毒症综合征6例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许咏梅; 周信芳; 梁宝权

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinic features of postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome (PHUS)for early diagnosis,prompt therapy and better prognosis.Methods A retrospective study was conducted on clinical data of 6 PHUS patients with gestational age over 33 weeks in Suzhou Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University from January 2008 to December 2012.Clinical symptoms and signs,hemolytic uremic related indexes,ultrasonograph and peripheral blood smear of them were analyzed. The study protocol was approved by the Ethical Review Board of Investigation in Human Being of Suzhou Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University.Results All 6 patients had pregnancy combined with severe preeclampsia.After antispasmodic,antihypertensive treatment and promot fetal lung mature,they gave birth by cesarean section,and no neonatal death.The main symptoms were gradually oliguria and anuria without remote cause,hemolytic anemia,thrombocytopenia and sharp decline of renal function after 1-2 days of cesarean section.Through comprehensive treatment based on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT)and plasma exchange,the patient′s conditions were stable and improved,and all patients were discharged from hospital.After 1 year follow up ,3 cases(50.0%)were lost to follow up,1 case(16.7%) with chronic renal insufficiency.Conclusions Preeclampsia is one of the important remote causes of PHUS.It′s necessary to strengthen renal function monitoring of pregnant women with preeclampsia after childbirth,in order to make early diagnosis and give specialized treatment in time,which are significant measures to reduce maternal mortality and ensure mother′s healthy.%目的:探讨产后溶血性尿毒症综合征(PHUS)的临床特征,为该病的早期诊断、及时治疗和改善预后提供依据。方法选择2008年1月至2012年12月南京医科大学附属苏州医院收治的6例PHUS患者的病历资料为研究对象,孕龄≥33孕周。采用回顾性分析法分析其临

  1. Escherichia coli enterohemorrágica y síndrome urémico hemolítico en Argentina Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Rivero

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH.es un desorden multisistémico caracterizado por presentar insuficiencia renal aguda, anemia hemolítica microangiopática y trombocitopenia. Constituye la principal causa de insuficiencia renal aguda y la segunda causa de insuficiencia renal crónica y de transplante renal en niños en la Argentina. Actualmente, nuestro país presenta el registro más alto de SUH en todo el mundo, con aproximadamente 420 casos nuevos declarados anualmente y una incidencia de 12.2/100 000 niños menores de 5 años de edad. Se reconocen múltiples agentes etiológicos, aunque se considera a la infección por Escherichia coli enterohemorrágica (EHEC como la principal etiología de SUH. La gran mayoría de brotes epidémicos y casos esporádicos en humanos se han asociado con el serotipo O157:H7, aunque otros serotipos han sido también aislados, y éstos son un subgrupo de E. coli verocitotoxigénico (VTEC..El bovino es considerado el principal reservorio de VTEC. El contagio al hombre frecuentemente se debe al consumo de alimentos cárneos y lácteos contaminados, deficientemente cocidos o sin pasteurizar, o al contacto directo con los animales o con sus heces, consumo de agua, frutas o verduras contaminadas. También puede producirse contagio mediante el contacto interhumano.The hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS is a multisystemic disorder that is characterized by the onset of acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. It is the most common cause of acute renal failure and the second cause of chronic renal failure and renal transplantation in children in Argentina. Our country has the highest incidence of HUS in the world, with approximately 420 new cases observed each year with an incidence of 12.2 cases per 100 000 children in the age group 0-5 years. Numerous etiologic factors have been associated with HUS but the infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is considered the

  2. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  3. Hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrence after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loirat, Chantal; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2008-09-01

    About 60% of non-Stx-associated aHUS are due to the defect of protection of endothelial cells from complement activation, secondary to mutations in the genes of CFH, MCP, IF, BF, or C3. In addition, 10% of patients have anti-CFH antibodies. While the risk of post-transplant recurrence is less than 1% in Stx-HUS patients, it is approximately 80% in CFH or IF-mutated patients, 20% in MCP-mutated patients, and 30% in patients with no mutation. Patients with anti-CFH antibodies probably also are at risk of recurrence. While MCP-mutated patients can reasonably go to transplantation, recent reports suggest that plasmatherapy started before surgery and maintained life-long may prevent recurrence in CFH-mutated patients. Four successful liver-kidney transplantation utilizing plasmatherapy in CFH-mutated children have been reported recently. In summary, the risk of post-transplant recurrence can now be approached according to genotype. Therefore, aHUS patients should undergo complement determination, screening for anti-CFH antibodies, and genotyping before transplantation. Kidney or kidney + liver transplantation with concomitant plasmatherapy need to be evaluated by prospective trials in patients with hereditary complement abnormalities.

  4. Postdiarrheal Shiga Toxin-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Similar to Septic Shock Síndrome urémico hemolítico símil shock séptico, posterior a diarrea mediada por toxina shiga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia G. Valles

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response of host endothelial cells is included in the development of vascular damage observed in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC infection, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The response to a non-conventional treatment for a group of D+ HUS (diarrhea positive HUS patients, with clinical hemodynamic parameters of septic shock was evaluated in this prospective study (1999-2003. Twelve children 2.8 ± 0.6 years old, with D+ HUS produced by E. coli infection with serological evidence of Shiga toxin, presenting severe unstable hemodynamic parameters and neurological dysfunction at onset, were studied. The protocol included fresh frozen plasma infusions, methylprednisolone pulses (10mg/k/day for three consecutive days and plasma exchange for five days, starting after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU. The twelve patients with increased pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM score: 18 ± 2 after admission to intensive care unit (ICU, required dialysis for 17.4 ± 4 days, mechanical ventilator assistance for 10 ± 1 days and early inotropic drugs support for 10.5 ± 1 days. Neurological dysfunction included generalized tonic-clonic seizures lasting for 5.4 ± 1 days, n:8. Focal seizures were present in the remaining patients. Dilated cardiomyopathy was present in 6 children. Eight children suffered hemorrhagic colitis. Nine patients survived. Within one year of the injury, neurological sequelae, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS 3 and 4, were present in two patients, chronic renal failure in one patient. We suggest that early introduction of this protocol could benefit D+ HUS patients with hemodynamic instability and neurological dysfunction at onset. Further studies are likely to elucidate the mechanisms involved in this early adverse clinical presentation of D+ HUS patients.La respuesta inflamatoria de la célula endotelial se incluye en el desarrollo del daño vascular observado en la infección por Escherichia coli

  5. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - immune hemolytic; Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) ... for no reason, the condition is called idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia . The antibodies may also be caused by: Complication ...

  6. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  7. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may require ongoing treatment. Acquired forms of hemolytic anemia may go away if the cause of the condition is found and corrected. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: March 21, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  8. New aspects in the pathogenesis of enteropathic hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karch, Helge; Friedrich, Alexander W; Gerber, Angela; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B; Schmidt, M Alexander; Bielaszewska, Martina

    2006-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) subtyping suggests that the clinical outcome of infections caused by Shiga toxin-producing ESCHERICHIA COLI (STEC) depends, in large part, on the STX genotype of the infecting strain. Whereas the presence of the STX2 or STX2C genotype is associated with the ability of STEC to cause

  9. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  10. Actualización en el tratamiento del síndrome urémico hemolítico endémico: Patogénesis y tratamiento de la complicación sistémica más grave de las infecciones por Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga Update on the treatment of endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome: Pathogenesis and treatment of the most severe systemic complication of infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina J. Fernández-Brando

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available La forma típica o post-diarreica del síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH es la complicación más grave de las infecciones por cepas de Escherichia coli productoras de toxina Shiga (STEC. En la Argentina el SUH es un problema crítico de salud pública, ya que representa la principal causa de falla renal aguda en la infancia, la segunda causa de falla renal crónica, y aporta el 20% de los casos de transplante renal durante la infancia y la adolescencia. A pesar de los avances en el conocimiento de su patogénesis, el único tratamiento actual de los pacientes con SUH es de sostén, y no existen terapias específicas ni preventivas. En la presente revisión expondremos los conocimientos básicos de los mecanismos patogénicos y discutiremos los enfoques terapéuticos tradicionales e innovadores, con especial foco en la situación nacional y los aportes hechos por grupos de la Argentina.The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, giving account for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in our country. In spite of the extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in national status and contributions made by Argentinean groups.

  11. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and uremic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, GA; Gansevoort, RT; Mark, PB; Rooney, E; McDonagh, TA; Dargie, HJ; Stuart, R; Rodger, C; Jardine, AG

    2005-01-01

    Background. Progressive renal disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, specifically sudden death. We investigated the link between uremic cardiomyopathy, QT interval and dispersal, and arrhythmias (by ambulatory ECG monitoring) in patients at different stages of progress

  12. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Atypical depression By Mayo Clinic Staff Any type of depression can make you feel sad and keep you from enjoying life. However, atypical depression — also called depression with atypical features — means that ...

  13. Normal and pathologic concentrations of uremic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranton, Flore; Cohen, Gerald; De Smet, Rita; Rodriguez, Mariano; Jankowski, Joachim; Vanholder, Raymond; Argiles, Angel

    2012-07-01

    An updated review of the existing knowledge regarding uremic toxins facilitates the design of experimental studies. We performed a literature search and found 621 articles about uremic toxicity published after a 2003 review of this topic. Eighty-seven records provided serum or blood measurements of one or more solutes in patients with CKD. These records described 32 previously known uremic toxins and 56 newly reported solutes. The articles most frequently reported concentrations of β2-microglobulin, indoxyl sulfate, homocysteine, uric acid, and parathyroid hormone. We found most solutes (59%) in only one report. Compared with previous results, more recent articles reported higher uremic concentrations of many solutes, including carboxymethyllysine, cystatin C, and parathyroid hormone. However, five solutes had uremic concentrations less than 10% of the originally reported values. Furthermore, the uremic concentrations of four solutes did not exceed their respective normal concentrations, although they had been previously described as uremic retention solutes. In summary, this review extends the classification of uremic retention solutes and their normal and uremic concentrations, and it should aid the design of experiments to study the biologic effects of these solutes in CKD.

  14. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  15. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  16. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  17. Uremic pleuritis in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid-Farokhi, Farin; Pourdowlat, Guitti; Nikoonia, Mohammad-Reza; Behzadnia, Neda; Kahkouee, Shahram; Nassiri, Amir-Ahmad; Masjedi, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients are predisposed to several complications associated with pleural effusion. In addition, uremia can directly cause pleuritis. However, there are inadequate data about pathogenesis and natural course of uremic pleuritis. In this study, 76 chronic HD patients with pleural effusion admitted to the Respiratory Center of Masih Daneshvari Hospital, in Tehran, Iran between June 2005 and May 2011 were evaluated to figure out the etiology of their pleural disease. Among these patients, patients with uremic pleuritis were identified and studied. The rate of uremic pleuritis was 23.7%. Other frequent etiologies of pleural effusion were parapneumonic effusion (23.7%), cardiac failure (19.7%), tuberculosis (6.6%), volume overload, malignancy, and unknown. In patients with uremic pleuritis, dyspnea was the most common symptom, followed by cough, weight loss, anorexia, chest pain, and fever. Compared to patients with parapneumonic effusion, patients with uremic effusion had a significantly higher rate of dyspnea and lower rate of cough and fever. Pleural fluid analysis showed that these patients had a significantly lower pleural to serum lactic dehydrogenase ratio, total pleural leukocytes, and polymorphonuclear count compared to patients with parapneumonic effusion. Improvement was achieved in 94.1% of patients with uremic pleuritis by continuation of HD, chest tube insertion or pleural decortication; an outcome better than the previous reports. Despite the association with an exudative effusion, inflammatory pleural reactions in patients with uremic pleuritis may not be as severe as infection-induced effusions. Owing to the advancement in HD technology and other interventions, outcome of uremic pleuritis may be improved.

  18. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  19. The uremic environment and muscle dysfunction in man and rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Eidemak, I.;

    2006-01-01

    patients prior to and after a session of hemodialysis (HD) treatment, alongside in vitro measurements of muscle function in isolated rat muscles incubated in normal or uremic conditions approximating to those found in uremic rats (rat uremic: RU) or uremic humans (human uremic: HU). Results: HD......-twitch). In isolated rat muscles, a uremic environment had no significant effect on slow-twitch soleus during field stimulation, however, in fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus, a significant 23% (RU) and 22% (HU) faster rate of decline in force was measured, compared to controls (p

  20. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  1. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This list is not all-inclusive. Alternative Names Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins References Michel M. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer ...

  2. Uremic escape of renal allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Schilfgaarde, R. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); van Breda Vriesman, P.J.C. (Rijksuniversiteit Limburg Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Immunopathology)

    1981-10-01

    It is demonstrated in rats that, in the presence of early postoperative severe but transient uremia, the survival of first set Brown-Norway (BN) renal allografts in Lewis (LEW) recipients is at least three times prolonged when compared to non-uremic controls. This phenomenon is called 'uremic escape of renal allograft rejection'. By means of lethal X-irradiation of donors of BN kidneys transplanted into transiently uremic and non-uremic LEW recipients, the presence of passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence is demonstrated to be obilgatory for this phenomenon to occur. As a result of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence, a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction is elicited in the spleens of LEW recipients of BN kidneys which amplifies the host response. The splenomegaly observed in LEW recipients of BN kidneys is caused not only by this GVH reaction, which is shown to be exquisitely sensitive to even mild uremia. It is also contributed to by a proliferative response of the host against the graft (which latter response is equated with an in vivo equivalent of a unilateral mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)), since the reduction in spleen weights caused by abrogation of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence brought about by lethal donor X-irradiation is increased significantly by early postoperative severe but transient uremia. It is concluded that in uremic escape of renal allograft rejection both reactions are suppressed by uremia during the early post-operative period.

  3. Establishment of a uremic apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model to explore the mechanism of uremic atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To establish a uremic apoE-/-mouse model to observe serum biochemical parameters and features of aortic root atherosclerosis (AS) in the model. Methods A uremic model was induced surgically in apoE-/- mice:electrocautery of the right kidney at 8 weeks of age and nephrectomy (NX) of the left one 2 weeks later. Control mice were sham-operated. Two weeks after NX,renal functions were detected in the uremic and control mice to evaluate the efficiency of the model. After 10 weeks of NX,blood samples we...

  4. Hemolytic disease of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about 120 days in the body. In this disorder, red blood cells in the blood are destroyed earlier than normal. ... Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN); Erythroblastosis fetalis; ... - HDN; ABO incompatibility - HDN; Rh incompatibility - HDN

  5. Atypical Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  6. Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Azık

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fatal hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs is approximately 1:200000 per unit. Acute HTRs occur during or within 24 h after administration of a blood product. Transfusion of incompatible red blood cells (RBCs, and, more rarely, of a large volume of incompatible plasma usually are the causative agents. Delayed HTRs are caused by a secondary immune response to an antigen on the donor’s RBCs. Different mechanisms lead to intra- and extravascular hemolysis, such as complete complement activation, phagocytosis of RBCs covered with C3b by macrophages after incomplete complement activation, or destruction of RBCs covered only with IgG by direct cell to cell contact with K cells. The clinical consequences of HTRs are triggered via several pathophysiological pathways. Formation of anaphylatoxins, release of cytokines causing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, activation of the kinin system, the intrinsic clotting cascade and fibrinolysis result in hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diffuse bleeding, and disruption of microcirculation leading to renal failure and shock. In this review, the symptoms of HTR are introduced, laboratory investigations and treatment are described, and some recommendations for prevention are given. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 127-32

  7. When You are About to Diagnose Chronic Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Please Think More Deep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is one type of immunological diseases which may be primary or secondary characterized by repeated thrombosis that it may be called “sticky blood syndrome”. Although a well-known disease in gynecology, there is no sufficient data in pediatrics field; so we see that it is important to discuss this interesting case.

  8. Undetectable Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Noriyuki; Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakuragi, Shizu; Matsui, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We encountered two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) with undetectable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level at diagnosis. Hemolytic anemia improved by administration of prednisolone (PSL) and HbA1C became measurable after response.

  9. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  10. Continuous enteral feeding in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniar, S; Laouari, D; Motel, V; Kleinknecht, C

    1996-01-01

    Because of constant uremia-induced anorexia, food restriction of normal rats is generally used to study the consequences of uremia. The effects of a normal food supply in uremic rats has never been tested, since no author has succeeded in providing normal intakes. Uremic rats either fed ad lib (U rats, n = 12) or force-fed through a gastric catheter (UF rats, n = 10), and sham-operated rats (C rats, n = 10) were compared from days 7 to 21 after surgery. U rats had lower food intake (13.8 vs. 17 g/day), weight gain (5.16 vs. 6.23 g/day), length gain (4 vs. 5 mm/day), nitrogen balance (228 vs. 279 mg/day) and muscle fractional protein synthesis rate (9.5 vs. 10.6%) measured in vivo by 3H-phenylalanine injection (p feeding may provide a model for normal nutritional supply in uremia.

  11. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kensuke Suzuki; Minehiko Inomata; Shiori Shiraishi; Ryuji Hayashi; Kazuyuki Tobe

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemo...

  12. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  13. Pathophysiology of hemolytic transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Robertson D

    2005-07-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are systemic reactions provoked by immunologic red blood cell (RBC) incompatibility. Clinical and experimental observations of such reactions indicate that they proceed through phases of humoral immune reaction, activation of phagocytes, productions of cytokine mediators, and wide-ranging cellular responses. HTR have many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in HTR suggest that newer biological agents that target complement intermediates or proinflammatory cytokines may be effective agents in the treatment of severe HTRs.

  14. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  16. Maximal conservative therapy of calcific uremic ateriolopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, Charlotte; Janssen van Doorn, Karin; Vermander, Evert; Vlayen, Sonja; Verpooten, Gert A; Couttenye, Marie-Madeleine

    2012-07-01

    We present the case of a 61-year- old female patient in long-term hemodialysis who developed calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) upon administration of the oral calcimimetic agent cinacalcet for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. In May 2009, the baseline serum values were parathormone (PTH) 310 pg/ml, calcium 9.1 mg/dl and phosphorous 6.9 mg/dl. Necrotic wounds in the suprapubic fat tissue were successfully treated first, by correcting the calcium phosphorous product; second, through treatment with sodium thiosulfate and third, through intensive wound care with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and vacuum-assisted closure therapy, with no need for parathyroidectomy. Multiple factors have been described to play a role in the development of CUA. Based on the findings of this case, the treatment of CUA should be aimed at correcting different causes simultaneously.

  17. Thrombosis in the uremic milieu--emerging role of "thrombolome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashar, Moshe; Francis, Jean; Chitalia, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by retention of a number of toxins, which unleash cellular damage. CKD environment with these toxins and a host of metabolic abnormalities (collectively termed as uremic milieu) is highly thrombogenic. CKD represents a strong and independent risk factor for both spontaneous venous and arterial (postvascular injury) thrombosis. Emerging evidence points to a previously unrecognized role of some of the prothrombotic uremic toxins. Here, we provide an overview of thrombosis in CKD and an update on indolic uremic toxins, which robustly increase tissue factor, a potent procoagulant, in several vascular cell types enhancing thrombosis. This panel of uremic toxins, which we term "thrombolome" (thrombosis and metabolome), represents a novel risk factor for thrombosis and can be further explored as biomarker for postvascular interventional thrombosis in patients with CKD.

  18. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosse, Wendell F; Hillmen, Peter; Schreiber, Alan D

    2004-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia due to immune function is one of the major causes of acquired hemolytic anemia. In recent years, as more is known about the immune system, these entities have become better understood and their treatment improved. In this section, we will discuss three areas in which this progress has been apparent. In Section I, Dr. Peter Hillmen outlines the recent findings in the pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), relating the biochemical defect (the lack of glycosylphosphatidylinositol [GPI]-linked proteins on the cell surface) to the clinical manifestations, particularly hemolysis (and its effects) and thrombosis. He discusses the pathogenesis of the disorder in the face of marrow dysfunction insofar as it is known. His major emphasis is on innovative therapies that are designed to decrease the effectiveness of complement activation, since the lack of cellular modulation of this system is the primary cause of the pathology of the disease. He recounts his considerable experience with a humanized monoclonal antibody against C5, which has a remarkable effect in controlling the manifestations of the disease. Other means of controlling the action of complement include replacing the missing modulatory proteins on the cell surface; these studies are not as developed as the former agent. In Section II, Dr. Alan Schreiber describes the biochemistry, genetics, and function of the Fc gamma receptors and their role in the pathobiology of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura due to IgG antibodies. He outlines the complex varieties of these molecules, showing how they vary in genetic origin and in function. These variations can be related to three-dimensional topography, which is known in some detail. Liganding IgG results in the transduction of a signal through the tyrosine-based activation motif and Syk signaling. The role of these receptors in the pathogenesis of hematological diseases due to IgG antibodies is

  19. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  20. Hemolytic and Hemoxidative Activities in Mycoplasma penetrans

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan, T. R.; Joel B Baseman

    2000-01-01

    Mycoplasma penetrans is a newly isolated Mollicute from the urine of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus that demonstrates the capacity to adhere to and invade human cells. A previous report, based on assays with mouse red blood cells (RBCs), indicated that M. penetrans lacked hemolytic activity. In our studies, we incubated different isolates of M. penetrans with various RBC species and observed hemolytic zones surrounding individual mycoplasma colonies. All M. penetrans stra...

  1. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellini, W.; Fattizzo, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects ...

  2. Effect of calcium phosphate crystals induced by uremic serum on calcification of human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘曜蓉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of calcium phosphate crystals induced by uremic serum on calcification of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) .Methods Uremic serum was incubated at 37℃for 3days.Calcium phosphate crystals and uremic supernatant were isolated from uremic serum by ultracentrifugation.

  3. Acupuncture Treatment for 34 Cases of Uremic Cutaneous Pruritus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高红梅; 张万祥; 王莹

    2002-01-01

    @@ Chronic renal insufficiency is the result of renal injuries and progressive deterioration caused by various reasons. At the late stage, i.e. the period of uremia, it may be complicated with abnormalities of various systems. Along with the development and popularization of hemodialysis, the survival time of uremic patients can be prolonged, but uremic pruritus affects greatly the quality of life of the patients. For this purpose, we have treated 68 cases of the patients with acupuncture and western medicine respectively, and made clinical observations on the therapeutic results. A report follows.

  4. A waterborne outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections and hemolytic uremic syndrome: implications for rural water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sonja J; Miller, Gayle; Breuer, Thomas; Kennedy, Malinda; Higgins, Charles; Walford, Jim; McKee, Gary; Fox, Kim; Bibb, William; Mead, Paul

    2002-04-01

    In the summer of 1998, a large outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections occurred in Alpine, Wyoming. We identified 157 ill persons; stool from 71 (45%) yielded E. coli O157:H7. In two cohort studies, illness was significantly associated with drinking municipal water (town residents: adjusted odds ratio=10.1, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1.8-56.4; visitors attending family reunion: relative risk=9.0, 95% CI=1.3-63.3). The unchlorinated water supply had microbiologic evidence of fecal organisms and the potential for chronic contamination with surface water. Among persons exposed to water, the attack rate was significantly lower in town residents than in visitors (23% vs. 50%, p<0.01) and decreased with increasing age. The lower attack rate among exposed residents, especially adults, is consistent with the acquisition of partial immunity following long-term exposure. Serologic data, although limited, may support this finding. Contamination of small, unprotected water systems may be an increasing public health risk.

  5. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Priti; Jain, Rajan; Tripathi, Vaibhav

    2013-10-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  6. Investigations on the adsorbents for uremic middle molecular toxins (II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Yu, Z. Y., Blood Purification, 2nd ed., Beijing: Modern Publishing House, 1994, 273.[2]Babb, A., Popovich, R., Christopher, T. et al., The genesis of the square meter-hour hypothesis, Trans. Am. Soc. Artif. Intern. Organs., 1971, 17: 81.[3]Babb, A., Farrell-ell, R., Uvelli, D. et al., Hemodialyzer evaluation by examination of solute molecular spectra, Trans. Am.Soc. Artif. Intern. Organs., 1972, 18: 98.[4]Babb, A., Strand, H., Uvelli, D. et al., Quantitative description of dialysis treatment: A dialysis index, Kidney Int., 1975, 5:23.[5]Scribner, G. E., The search for the uremic toxin(s), Kidney Int., 1975, 7: 270-274.[6]Giovanetti, S., Barsotti G., Uremic intoxication, Nephron., 1975, 14: 123.[7]Zimmerman, L., Jornvall, H., Bergstrom, J. et al., Characterization of middle molecule compounds, Int. J. Attif. Organs (Suppl.), 1980, 4: 33.[8]Yuan, Z., Zhang, J., Zhao, F. Z. et al., Isolation and preliminary characterization of properties of middle molecules from sera of uremic patients, Chemical Journal of Chinese Universities (in Chinese), 1989, 10:401.[9]Yuan, Z., He, B. L., The proposal and advances of middle molecule hypothesis, Ion Exchange and Adsorption (in Chinese),1997, 13(1): 98.[10]Chu, J. G., Yuan, Z., Teng, X. L. et al., Separation and analysis of middle molecular substances from both of uremic and normal sera, Science in China, Series B (in Chinese), 2000, 30(3): 250.[11]Ftlrst, P., Bergstrom, J., Gordon, A. et al., Separation of peptides of “middle molecular” weight from biological fluids of patients with uremia, Kidney Int., 1975, 7: 272.[12]Zimmerman, L., Baldesten, A., Bergstrom, J. et al., Isotachophoretic separation of middle molecule peptides in uremic body fluids, Clin. Nephrol., 1980, 13: 183.[13]Mabuchi, H., Nakahashi, H., Medium-sized peptides in the blood of patients with uremia, Nephrol., 1983, 33: 232.[14]Mabuchi, H., Nakahashi, H., Profiling of urinary medium sized peptides in

  7. Hematological outcome in neonatal alloimmune hemolytic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, Mirjam Eva Aafke

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on several aspects related to the hematological outcome of infants with hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to red blood cell alloimmunization, including pathogenesis and management of the disease. The presence of leukocytopenie and thrombocytopenia support the

  8. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  9. AUTOIMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA IN CHILDHOOD: CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic anemia brought about by autoimmune antibodies against red cells resulting in shortening of red cell survival. And excessive erythropoiesis as a compensatory response of the marrow is autoimmune hemolytic anemia. There are two types due to wa rm antibodies and cold antibodies. Warm antibodies mediated anemia has hemolysis in spleen mediated by IgG antibody. Macrophage Fc receptor can detect IgG coated red cells in absence of C 3b. It acts in the range of 37 - 42deg c. (1 Cold antibody mediated anemia is mediated by IgM antibody, they bind avidly at 4 deg c. carry hemolysis at low temp. Liver is the major site of hemolysis. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia presents as sudden onset of pallor, jaundice, dark coloured urine, and he pato splenomegaly. In 5 cases cold antibodies were positive, 3 cases warm were positive too. 4 of the 5 cases were females and steroids were effective in management of cold auto immune hemolytic anemia.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M Ittyachen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  11. NOVEL ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Vinay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotics are a group of drugs commonly but not exclusively used to treat psychosis. Antipsychotic agents are grouped in two categories: Typical and Atypical antipsychotics. The first antipsychotic was chlorpromazine, which was developed as a surgical anesthetic. The first atypical anti-psychotic medication, clozapine, was discovered in the 1950s, and introduced in clinical practice in the 1970s. Both typical and atypical antipsychotics are effective in reducing positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Blockade of D2 receptor in mesolimbic pathway is responsible for antipsychotic action. Typical antipsychotics are not particularly selective and also block Dopamine receptors in the mesocortical pathway, tuberoinfundibular pathway, and the nigrostriatal pathway. Blocking D2 receptors in these other pathways is thought to produce some of the unwanted side effects. Atypical antipsychotics differ from typical psychotics in their "limbic-specific" dopamine type 2 (D2-receptor binding and high ratio of serotonin type 2 (5-HT2-receptor binding to D2. Atypical antipsychotics are associated with a decreased capacity to cause EPSs, TD, narcoleptic malignant syndrome, and hyperprolactinemia. Atypical antipsychotic agents were developed in response to problems with typical agents, including lack of efficacy in some patients, lack of improvement in negative symptoms, and troublesome adverse effects, especially extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs and tardive dyskinesia (TD.

  12. [Pharmacokinetics of defibrotide in uremic patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, R; Farma, A; Maggi, G C; Marelli, A

    1991-12-01

    Defibrotide pharmacokinetics were studied in 6 voluntary healthy subjects and in 10 uremic patients undergoing dialysis during which (instead of heparin) defibrotide was administered to prevent fibrino-formation in the circuit. Blood concentrations of the drug were assessed (expressed with reference to the residual glycidic deoxyribose) during a standard dialysis using defibrotide, 3.5, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 minutes after the defibrotide bolus (200 mg) had been injected into the arterial channel. The half-lives of the alpha and beta plasmatic phases were found to be equal at 3.79 and 41.4 min in dialysed subjects and at 1.13 and 16.54 in healthy volunteers. These results indicate that in uremic patients undergoing dialysis at intervals using defibrotide, a longer time is required to eliminate the drug from the circulation. This variation does not however appear to be significant in terms of the therapeutic use of the drug during dialysis.

  13. Binding Affinity and Capacity for the Uremic Toxin Indoxyl Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Devine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein binding prevents uremic toxins from removal by conventional extracorporeal therapies leading to accumulation in maintenance dialysis patients. Weakening of the protein binding may enhance the dialytic elimination of these toxins. In ultrafiltration and equilibrium dialysis experiments, different measures to modify the plasma binding affinity and capacity were tested: (i, increasing the sodium chloride (NaCl concentration to achieve a higher ionic strength; (ii, increasing the temperature; and (iii, dilution. The effects on the dissociation constant KD and the protein bound fraction of the prototypical uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate (IS in plasma of healthy and uremic individuals were studied. Binding of IS corresponded to one site binding in normal plasma. KD increased linearly with the NaCl concentration between 0.15 (KD = 13.2 ± 3.7 µM and 0.75 M (KD = 56.2 ± 2.0 µM. Plasma dilution further reduced the protein bound toxin fraction by lowering the protein binding capacity of the plasma. Higher temperatures also decreased the protein bound fraction of IS in human plasma. Increasing the NaCl concentration was effective to weaken the binding of IS also in uremic plasma: the protein bound fraction decreased from 89% ± 3% to 81% ± 3% at 0.15 and 0.75 M NaCl, respectively. Dilution and increasing the ionic strength and temperature enhance the free fraction of IS allowing better removal of the substance during dialysis. Applied during clinical dialysis, this may have beneficial effects on the long-term outcome of maintenance dialysis patients.

  14. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  15. Perceptions of and preferences for sweet taste in uremic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisle, F; Dartois, A M; Kleinknecht, C; Broyer, M

    1990-07-01

    Uremic children have low energy intakes, with little appetite for sweet foods. Likewise, sucrose-rich diets are poorly accepted by uremic rats, which suggests that uremia causes a relative aversion for sucrose. Hemodialyzed children (no. = 39, mean age = 160 mo) and healthy controls (no. = 25, mean age = 122 mo) were compared for perception of sweet taste intensity in two familiar foods (soft white cheese and apple sauce) and for preference for sweetness. The food stimuli were prepared in five sucrose concentrations: 1%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% for cheese; 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 60% for apple sauce. Children were presented with pairs of stimuli of adjacent concentrations and asked, in a forced choice, to identify the sweeter stimulus and to express their preferences. The hemodialyzed children made more mistakes (19%) than the controls (5%) when asked to rank sweetness in the soft cheese (i.e., with low concentrations). Both groups made an equal number of mistakes when asked to rank sweetness in the apple sauce. Preferences for sweetness were markedly different. In cheese, the highest sucrose concentration was preferred by 21.9% of the hemodialyzed children vs 41% of the controls. The lowest sucrose concentration was selected by 15.6% of the hemodialyzed children vs 4.6% of the controls. Similar preference trends were observed for apple sauce. We conclude that abnormally low preferences for sweet foods can contribute to insufficient caloric intake in uremic children.

  16. Gases as uremic toxins: is there something in the air?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Joachim; Westhof, Timm; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Ingrosso, Diego; Perna, Alessandra F

    2014-03-01

    The field of uremic toxicity comprises the study of a large number of different substances, classified in relation to various characteristics, for example, protein-binding, dimensions, and so forth. The endogenous compounds of a gaseous nature have received much attention lately from the scientific community because of their increasingly recognized importance in health and disease. Among these substances, some are uremic toxins per se, others are related to uremic toxins, or can become toxic under some circumstances. We divided them into two broad categories: organic and inorganic compounds. Among the organic compounds are phenols, indols, 2-methoxyresorcinol, p-hydroxy hippuric acid and phenyl acetic acid, trimethylamine, and dimethylamine; among the inorganic solutes are ammonia, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide. In this article, these substances are described in relation to the elements that they affect or by which they are affected in uremia, which are the blood, breath, stools, and the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, the effect of the dialysis procedure on exhaled gases are described.

  17. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja X; McCormick, Sally P; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2010-01-01

    lipoprotein-associated OxPL. Thus, Lp(a) may be particularly atherogenic in a uremic setting. We therefore investigated whether transgenic (Tg) expression of human Lp(a) increases atherosclerosis in uremic mice. Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in Tg mice with expression of human apo(a) (n...... = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo...... with both apo(a) and Lp(a). In conclusion, expression of apo(a) or Lp(a) increased uremia-induced atherosclerosis. Binding of OxPL on apo(a) and Lp(a) may contribute to the atherogenicity of Lp(a) in uremia....

  18. Atypical Optic Neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Eric D; Boudreault, Katherine; Rizzo, Joseph F; Falardeau, Julie; Cestari, Dean M

    2015-12-01

    Classic demyelinative optic neuritis is associated with multiple sclerosis and typically carries a good prognosis for visual recovery. This disorder is well characterized with respect to its presentation and clinical features by baseline data obtained through the optic neuritis treatment trial and numerous other studies. Atypical optic neuritis entails clinical manifestations that deviate from this classic pattern of features. Clinical signs and symptoms that deviate from the typical presentation should prompt consideration of less common etiologies. Atypical features to consider include lack of pain, simultaneous or near-simultaneous onset, lack of response to or relapse upon tapering from corticosteroids, or optic nerve head or peripapillary hemorrhages. The most important alternative etiologies to consider and the steps towards their respective diagnostic evaluations are suggested for these atypical features.

  19. Canine autoimmune hemolytic anemia: management challenges

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    Swann JW

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available James W Swann,1 Barbara J Skelly2 1Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is one of the most common manifestations of canine immune-mediated disease, yet treatment regimens remain nonstandardized and, in some cases, controversial. The main reason for this, as for most diseases in veterinary medicine, is the lack of large-scale placebo-controlled trials so that the efficacy of one treatment over another can be established. Most of the evidence used for treatment comes from retrospective studies and from personal preference and experience, and because of this, treatment regimens tend to vary among institutions and individual clinicians. Management of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia includes immunosuppression, thromboprophylaxis, and supportive care measures to help prevent and treat concurrent conditions. Keywords: IMHA, canine immune-mediated disease, management regimens

  20. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death some...

  1. HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA IMUNNE-MEDIATED IN DOGS

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    R. C. Castilho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the reduction in the number of red blood cells, caused by the immune system, the immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA is the most common disease among the hemolytic anemias and occurs more frequently in dogs (Nelson & Couto, 2010, wherein the most affected breeds are Cocker Spaniel, Poodle, Doberman and Collie (ETTINGER; FELDMAN 2004; THRALL et al 2007.. There is no pathognomonic sign for the diagnosis of the immune-mediated hemolytic anemia; however, laboratory findings show regenerative anemia, spherocytosis, positive results in Coombs' test and rarely, monocytes with hemosiderin or erythrocytes phagocytosis, but even with these findings, the primary and secondary IMHA can not be differentiate from each other. Differentiation can only be achieved when there is a deep investigation into the cause of the anemia. The IMHA therapeutics starts with the support treatment and follows with an immunosuppressive therapy. In relation to IMHA Mortality rates, the numbers range from 25% to 50% (Thrall, 2007, or above 70% (CARR; Panciera; Kidd, 2002.

  2. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo;

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  3. Atypical unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome mimicking a middle cerebral artery infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camidag, Ilkay [Dept. of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Cho, Yang Je; Park, Mina; Lee, Seung Koo [Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is usually a reversible clinical and radiological entity associated with typical features on brain MR or CT imaging. However, the not-so-uncommon atypical radiological presentations of the condition are also present and they may go unrecognised as they are confused with other conditions. Here, we report a very rare case of atypical, unilateral PRES in a 49-year-old uremic, post-transplant female patient who presented with seizures. Initial MRI showed high-grade occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) and lesions suggestive of subacute infarction in the ipsilateral frontotemporoparietal lobe. Patient symptoms had resolved a day after the onset without any specific treatment but early follow-up CT findings suggested hemorrhagic transformation. Follow-up MRI performed 2 years later showed complete disappearence of the lesions and persisting MCA occlusion.

  4. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome

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    Priti Arun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  5. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

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    Sean R. Stowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions.

  6. Nonextracorporeal Methods for Decreasing Uremic Solute Concentration : A Future Way To Go?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Bjorn; Glorieux, Griet; Poesen, Ruben; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2014-01-01

    The uremic milieu is consequential to a disrupted balance between availability of retention solutes and the excretory capacity of the kidneys. Although metabolism is the prime contributor to the internal milieu, a significant fraction of uremic retention solute originates from other sources. The mai

  7. A zebrafish model for uremic toxicity: role of the complement pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Nathaniel; Lectura, Melisa; Thurman, Joshua M; Reinecke, James; Raff, Amanda C; Melamed, Michal L; Quan, Zhe; Evans, Todd; Meyer, Timothy W; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Many organic solutes accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and some are poorly removed with urea-based prescriptions for hemodialysis. However, their toxicities have been difficult to assess. We have employed an animal model, the zebrafish embryo, to test the toxicity of uremic serum compared to control. Serum was obtained from stable ESRD patients predialysis or from normal subjects. Zebrafish embryos 24 h postfertilization were exposed to experimental media at a water:human serum ratio of 3:1. Those exposed to serum from uremic subjects had significantly reduced survival at 8 h (19 ± 18 vs. 94 ± 6%, p 50 kDa, respectively). Heating serum abrogated its toxicity. EDTA, a potent inhibitor of complement by virtue of calcium chelation, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum compared to untreated uremic serum (96 ± 5 vs. 28 ± 20% survival, p < 0.016, chelated vs. nonchelated serum, respectively). Anti-factor B, a specific inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum, compared to untreated uremic serum (98 ± 6 vs. 3 ± 9% survival, p < 0.016, anti-factor B treated vs. nontreated, respectively). Uremic serum is thus more toxic to zebrafish embryos than normal serum. Furthermore, this toxicity is associated with a fraction of large size, is inactivated by heat, and is reduced by both specific and nonspecific inhibitors of complement activation. Together these data lend support to the hypothesis that at least some uremic toxicities may be mediated by complement.

  8. Comparison of uremic pruritus between patients undergoing hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

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    Ji-Won Min

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Our data demonstrate the difference in prevalence, intensity, and risk factors of uremic pruritus between HD and PD patients. These findings suggest that careful consideration for uremic pruritus might be needed in end-stage renal disease patients according to the dialysis modality.

  9. Value of carotid intimal–medial thickness as independent predictor of endothelial dysfunction in uremic patients

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    Hosni A. Younis

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: (1 The study confirmed that carotid IMT and brachial artery FMD can be used in interventional studies in which cardiovascular risk is modified and increased in the uremic patients. (2 There was negative correlation between brachial FMD and C-IMT in the uremic patients.

  10. Synergistic hemolytic reactions between staphylococci and Micrococcus lylae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmler, C; Brückler, J

    1989-06-01

    The primary culture of a clinical specimen obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema revealed three different bacterial species which demonstrated synergistic hemolytic activities on sheep blood agar plates. The three cultures were identified as beta-hemolytic Staphylococcus intermedius, as a coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, producing a delta-like hemolysin and as non-hemolytic Micrococcus lylae. The coagulase-negative staphylococcal species as well as M. lylae produced synergistically with beta-hemolytic S. intermedius zones of complete hemolysis. The occurrence of three different synergistically active bacterial species from one clinical specimen might be of clinical significance.

  11. Acid-Base Balance in Uremic Rats with Vascular Calcification

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    Alan Peralta-Ramírez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vascular calcification (VC, a major complication in humans and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD, is influenced by changes in acid-base balance. The purpose of this study was to describe the acid-base balance in uremic rats with VC and to correlate the parameters that define acid-base equilibrium with VC. Methods: Twenty-two rats with CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx and 10 nonuremic control rats were studied. Results: The 5/6 Nx rats showed extensive VC as evidenced by a high aortic calcium (9.2 ± 1.7 mg/g of tissue and phosphorus (20.6 ± 4.9 mg/g of tissue content. Uremic rats had an increased pH level (7.57 ± 0.03 as a consequence of both respiratory (PaCO2 = 28.4 ± 2.1 mm Hg and, to a lesser degree, metabolic (base excess = 4.1 ± 1 mmol/l derangements. A high positive correlation between both anion gap (AG and strong ion difference (SID with aortic calcium (AG: r = 0.604, p = 0.02; SID: r = 0.647, p = 0.01 and with aortic phosphorus (AG: r = 0.684, p = 0.007; SID: r = 0.785, p = 0.01 was detected. Conclusions: In an experimental model of uremic rats, VC showed high positive correlation with AG and SID.

  12. Cardiac effect of vitamin D receptor modulators in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahide; Ogata, Hiroaki; Yamazaki-Nakazawa, Ai; Hosaka, Nozomu; Kondo, Fumiko; Koiwa, Fumihiko; Kinugasa, Eriko; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) modulators (VDRMs) are commonly used to control secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) associated with chronic kidney disease, and are associated with beneficial outcomes in cardiovascular disease. In this study, we compared the cardiac effect of VS-105, a novel VDRM, with that of paricalcitol in 5/6 nephrectomized uremic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were 5/6 nephrectomized, fed a standard diet for 4 weeks to establish uremia, and then treated (intraperitoneally, 3 times/week) with vehicle (propylene glycol), paricalcitol (0.025 and 0.15μg/kg), or VS-105 (0.05 and 0.3μg/kg) for 4 weeks. In uremic rats, neither VDRM (low and high doses) altered serum creatinine and phosphorus levels. Serum calcium was significantly higher with high dose paricalcitol compared to sham rats. PTH levels were significantly decreased with low dose paricalcitol and VS-105, and were further reduced in the high dose groups. Interestingly, serum FGF23 was significantly higher with high dose paricalcitol compared to sham rats, whereas VS-105 had no significant effect on FGF23 levels. Left ventricle (LV) weight and LV mass index determined by echocardiography were significantly suppressed in both high dose VDRM groups. This suppression was more evident with VS-105. Western blotting showed significant decreases in a fibrosis marker TGF-β1 in both high dose VDRM groups (vs. vehicle) and Masson trichrome staining showed significant decreases in cardiac fibrosis in these groups. These results suggest that VS-105 is less hypercalcemic than paricalcitol and has favorable effects on SHPT and cardiac parameters that are similar to those of paricalcitol in uremic rats. The cardioprotective effect is a noteworthy characteristic of VS-105.

  13. Nicorandil-Induced Hyperkalemia in a Uremic Patient

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    Hung-Hao Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicorandil is an antianginal agent with nitrate-like and ATP-sensitive potassium channel activator properties. After activation of potassium channels, potassium ions are expelled out of the cells, which lead to membrane hyperpolarization, closure of voltage-gated calcium channels, and finally vasodilation. We present a uremic case suffering from repeated junctional bradycardia, especially before hemodialysis. After detailed evaluation, nicorandil was suspected to be the cause of hyperkalemia which induced bradycardia. This case reminds us that physicians should be aware of this potential complication in patients receiving ATP-sensitive potassium channel activator.

  14. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia

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    W. Barcellini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20–40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans’ syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions.

  15. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellini, W; Fattizzo, B

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20-40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans' syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions.

  16. SEVERE IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

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    A. I. Sushkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after liver transplantation is represen- ted in this article. The cause of complication was so-called passenger lymphocyte syndrome (a type of graft- versus-host disease. Two plasmapheresis sessions and Ig (0.5 g/kg in combination with increased maintenance immunosuppression with a short course of oral methylprednisolone in a total dose of 150 mg during 12 days were effective. The patient was discharged from hospital 34 days after transplantation in a satisfactory condition with a stable hemoglobin level. 

  17. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Severe Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Mild Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumonia

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    Zafer Kurugol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of M. pneumoniae infection presenting with severe hemolytic anemia in a 4-year-old girl, with a ten-day history of paleness, weakness, and nonproductive cough. She was very pale and tachycardic. However, she was not tachypneic. Chest examination showed normal breath sounds. No rhoncus or whistling was heard. As the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was excessively elevated, the differential diagnosis primarily comprised hematological malignancies. Direct Coombs' test was positive. Diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection was confirmed by elevated levels of M. pneumoniae IgG and IgM antibodies and a chest X-ray suggestive of atypical pneumonia. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and packed red cell transfusion and showed a favorable recovery within ten days after admission. In conclusion, this case demonstrates that severe hemolytic anemia caused by M. pneumoniae is not always associated with severe pulmonary involvement, even when the respiratory infection is very mild, M. pneumoniae may be the cause of severe anemia.

  19. CNS intravascular large cell lymphoma in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Orengo, James P; Toossi, Shahed; Perry, Arie; Treseler, Patrick; Hess, Christopher; Margeta, Marta

    2015-04-01

    Intravascular large cell lymphoma (IVLCL) is a rare disease characterized by proliferation of malignant lymphocytes within the small blood vessel lumens. The association of IVLCL with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) has been described in a single case report, but the true prevalence of this co-occurrence is not known because of declining autopsy rates. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old woman who carried a diagnosis of AIHA for 2 years, with repeated hemolytic episodes that were initially well controlled with immunomodulatory treatment. At her last presentation, the patient developed rapidly progressive neurologic symptoms and leukoencephalopathy on MRI; she died 4 weeks later with a clinical impression of thrombotic microangiopathy, a known complication of AIHA. At autopsy, the brain showed widespread platelet thrombi and intraparenchymal hemorrhages characteristic of this disorder. In addition, there was evidence of a clinically unsuspected IVLCL, most likely of B-cell lineage. This case illustrates a potential association between IVLCL and AIHA, highlights the need for broad differential diagnosis in cases with atypical disease presentation or progression, and underlines the importance of autopsy in establishing the full cause of morbidity and mortality.

  20. Uremic pruritus in hemodialysis patients: treatment with desloratidine versus gabapentin

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    Diego Marquez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Uremic pruritus is common among dialysis patients. Effective treatments are not readily available. Early evidence with antihistamines and gabapentin indicate variable effects. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and side effects of gabapentin and desloratadine in patients with dialysis pruritus. METHODS: Prospective, open-label, cross-over clinical trial in 22 patients on chronic hemodialysis with sustained pruritus over a period of at least 60 days. After a one-week run-in period, we assigned patients to three weeks of either gabapentin 300 mg thrice weekly or desloratadine 5 mg thrice weekly. After a one-week washout period, each patient crossed-over to the alternate regimen for three more weeks. The primary endpoint of the study was the change in the visual analogue pruritus score (VAS. RESULTS: Nineteen subjects completed the two treatment blocks and were available for analysis. VAS scores decreased with both treatments (5.95 to 4.6 with gabapentin, p = 0.07; 5.89 to 3.4 with desloratadine, p = 0.004, but only desloratadine reached statistical significance. There were no differences when comparing the final pruritus score with gabapentin and desloratadine (4.6 versus 3.4, p = 0.16 Excessive sedation was common with gabapentin. Desloratadine was well tolerated. CONCLUSION: Desloratadine provides significant relief of uremic pruritus compared with no therapy. gabapentin has marginal efficacy. Desloratadine is better tolerated than gabapentin.

  1. FGF23 fails to inhibit uremic parathyroid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalejo, Rocío; Canalejo, Antonio; Martinez-Moreno, Julio Manuel; Rodriguez-Ortiz, M Encarnacion; Estepa, Jose C; Mendoza, Francisco Javier; Munoz-Castaneda, Juan Rafael; Shalhoub, Victoria; Almaden, Yolanda; Rodriguez, Mariano

    2010-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) modulates mineral metabolism by promoting phosphaturia and decreasing the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3). FGF23 decreases parathyroid hormone (PTH) mRNA and secretion, but despite a marked elevation in FGF23 in uremia, PTH production increases. Here, we investigated the effect of FGF23 on parathyroid function in normal and uremic hyperplastic parathyroid glands in rats. In normal parathyroid glands, FGF23 decreased PTH production, increased expression of both the parathyroid calcium-sensing receptor and the vitamin D receptor, and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, FGF23 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, which mediates the action of FGF23. In contrast, in hyperplastic parathyroid glands, FGF23 did not reduce PTH production, did not affect expression of the calcium-sensing receptor or vitamin D receptor, and did not affect cell proliferation. In addition, FGF23 failed to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in hyperplastic parathyroid glands. We observed very low expression of the FGF23 receptor 1 and the co-receptor Klotho in uremic hyperplastic parathyroid glands, which may explain the lack of response to FGF23 in this tissue. In conclusion, in hyperparathyroidism secondary to renal failure, the parathyroid cells resist the inhibitory effects of FGF23, perhaps as a result of the low expression of FGF23 receptor 1 and Klotho in this condition.

  2. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: diagnosis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is diagnosed in the presence of anemia, usually macrocytic and of variable intensity, reticulocytosis, and a positive direct and/or indirect antiglobulin test, after ruling out other types of hemolytic anemia. A positive direct antiglobulin test alone is not sufficient to diagnose AIHA and may be positive in many patients without anemia or negative in some patients with AIHA. AIHA may be classified into two major categories according to the optimal temperature of antibody activity: warm-reacting autoantibodies (usually IgG) optimal around 37 degrees C and cold-reacting autoantibodies, optimal at 4 degrees C (usually IgM). This classification guides the selection of tests and treatment. AIHA is widely reported to be associated with a variety of other diseases, although these associations are often fortuitous. A minimal set of useful investigations is appropriate since AIHA may be secondary to viral infections, lymphoid malignancies, or autoimmune disorders such as lupus. Transfusion should remain rare in AHAI, but close contact with the transfusion service is necessary if it is to succeed. As for many autoimmune and/or systemic diseases, numerous types of treatment have been proposed but have not been validated in controlled multicenter studies. These are necessary to improve the management of these rare disorders.

  3. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

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    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  4. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  5. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Gao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs, the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA on procoagulant activity (PCA of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients. Phosphatidylserine (PS exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+] with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process.

  6. Uremic Solutes in Chronic Kidney Disease and Their Role in Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, Jan A. J. G.; Mutsaers, Henricus A. M.; van Zuilen, Arjan D.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; van den Broek, Petra H.; Russel, Frans G. M.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Wetzels, Jack F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, over 150 possible uremic solutes have been listed, but their role in the progression of CKD is largely unknown. Here, the association between a selected panel of uremic solutes and progression in CKD patients was investigated. Methods Patients from the MASTERPLAN study, a randomized controlled trial in CKD patients with a creatinine clearance between 20 and 70 ml/min per 1.73m2, were selected based on their rate of eGFR decline during the first five years of follow-up. They were categorized as rapid (decline >5 ml/min per year) or slow progressors. Concentrations of eleven uremic solutes were obtained at baseline and after one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds for rapid to slow progression by uremic solute concentrations at baseline. Variability in uremic solute levels was assessed using scatter plots, and limits of variability were calculated. Results In total, 40 rapidly and 40 slowly progressing patients were included. Uremic solutes were elevated in all patients compared to reference values for healthy persons. The serum levels of uremic solutes were not associated with rapid progression. Moreover, we observed substantial variability in solute levels over time. Conclusions Elevated concentrations of uremic solutes measured in this study did not explain differences in rate of eGFR decline in CKD patients, possibly due to lack of power as a result of the small sample size, substantial between patient variability, and variability in solute concentrations over time. The etiology of intra-individual variation in uremic solute levels remains to be elucidated. PMID:28033375

  7. [Atypical presentation of preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditisheim, A; Boulvain, M; Irion, O; Pechère-Bertschi, A

    2015-09-09

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome, which still represents one of the major causes of maternal-fetal mortality and morbidity. Diagnosis can be made difficult due to the complexity of the disorder and its wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. In order to provide an efficient diagnostic tool to the clinician, medical societies regularly rethink the definition criteria. However, there are still clinical presentations of preeclampsia that escape the frame of the definition. The present review will address atypical forms of preeclampsia, such as preeclampsia without proteinuria, normotensive preeclampsia, preeclampsia before 20 weeks of gestation and post-partum preeclampsia.

  8. [Severe hemolytic jaundice and Wilson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, D; Bareiss, P; Jesel, B; Warter, J

    1976-12-01

    The onset of spontaneous hemolytic jaundice in a young subject should lead to the search for Wilson's disease when clinical examination reveals cirrhosis. This hemolysis may evolve in the form of severe jaundice to a stage where the cirrhosis remains usually latent or well tolerated. The intervention of a toxic, allergic of infective factor liable to produce a hepatic lesion which frees a dose of copper sufficient to trigger off hemolysis, is discussed. The mechanism of the latter, that of the coagulation disorders observed, liver cell failure and widespread intravascular coagulation, are analysed in this paper and compared with data in the literature. The dramatic character of the case indicates that it is necessary to treat as a routine with penicillamine all homozygous forms of Wilson's disease.

  9. VDR activation and uremic cardiopathy: myths and paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Brancaccio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of vitamin D receptor (VDR activators for the control of secondary hyperparathyroidism has been clarified during the last few decades; however, their possible activity in conditioning cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality has become of interest more recently. On the basis of experimental studies showing that VDR activating therapy is associated with a reduction of cardiac hypertrophy, the PRIMO Study (an international randomized controlled trial [RCT] was carried out a few years ago, but the results were disappointing, as the group of uremic patients on dialysis treated for 48 weeks with paricalcitol showed no differences in comparison with controls in terms of regression of heart hypertrophy. The aim of this editorial is to analyze the possible reasons for such results, and to help understand the actual role of VDR activators in dialysis patients in controlling cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  10. Isolation and purification of uremic middle molecules by multi-step liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储结根; 何炳林; 刘晓航; 袁直

    2002-01-01

    Isolation and comparison of uremic sera and urine and normal sera and urine were performed by gel permeation chromatography, anion exchange chromatography and re-versed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Two uremic middle molecular fractions (A and B) were obtained from uremic sera and urine and normal urine by gel permeation chromatography, but not from normal sera. The anion exchange chromatographic results of fraction A from different origins demonstrate that subfraction A-3 could be excreted in urine by healthy subject, but accumulated in uremic serum for renal failure of patient with uremia. After desalinization subfraction A-3 was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. The results show that subfraction A-3 consists of six compounds with molecular weight 839, 873, 1007.94, 1106, 1680 and 2015 respectively. Finally, by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, subfraction A-3 was further resolved into six independent fractions. Thus, the isolation and purification of six middle molecular c

  11. The Uremic Toxin Acrolein Promotes Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siyabeldin E. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia is a major complication of end stage renal disease. The anemia is mainly the result of impaired formation of erythrocytes due to lack of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Compelling evidence, however, points to the contribution of accelerated erythrocyte death, which decreases the life span of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Erythrocytes could be sensitized to cytosolic Ca2+ by ceramide. In end stage renal disease, eryptosis may possibly be stimulated by uremic toxins. The present study explored, whether the uremic toxin acrolein could trigger eryptosis. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin-V-binding, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide from fluorescent antibodies. Results: A 48 h exposure to acrolein (30 - 50 µM did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i but significantly decreased forward scatter and increased annexin-V-binding. Acrolein further triggered slight, but significant hemolysis and increased ceramide formation in erythrocytes. Acrolein (50 µM induced annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted in the nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+. Acrolein augmented the annexin-V-binding following treatment with Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM. Conclusion: Acrolein stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of ceramide formation with subsequent sensitisation of the erythrocytes to cytosolic Ca2+.

  12. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  13. A study of median nerve entrapment neuropathy at wrist in uremic patients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy seen in uremic patients. The study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of CTS in uremic patients and to identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic test. Study was conducted on 80 subjects of age 30–60 years. End-stage kidney disease patients were recruited for the clinical evaluation, motor nerve conduction studies (NCS), sensory NCS, F wave study and median-versus-ulnar comparison studies (palm-to-wrist mixed compa...

  14. Effect of Two Different Iron Supplementation on the Quality of Life of Uremic Hemodialysis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪梅; 刘子栋; 朱忠华; 邓安国

    2004-01-01

    UREMIC RENAL FAILURE is a common chronicdisease. Hemodialysis therapy has increased thelifespan of uremic patients significantly. Patientquality of life (QL), however, is also an importantindicator of the effectiveness of the medical carethat patients receive and therapies that prolonglifespan may actually compromise quality of life.1In recent years, intravenous iron has been studiedas an adjunctive therapy for anemia in hemodialysispatients. Based on protocols published previously,we selected hemodialysis ...

  15. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis.

  16. AUTOIMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA IN A PATIENT WITH ENDOBRONCHIAL TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeth Kumar; Prabhudas; Vivekananda M.; Bheemaraya; Chaitra

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT - A 23 year old male presented with severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia in association with constitutional symptoms suggest ive of TB with calcified lesion on X ray chest. A diagnosis of endobronchial TB was c onfirmed with bronchoscopy and sputum for Ziehl Neelsen stain was positive and the patient responded to antituberculosis treatment. There are few case reports of auto immune hemolytic anemia with endobronchial TB.

  17. Candida species exhibit differential in vitro hemolytic activities

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Gang; Lakshman P Samaranayake; Yau, Joyce Y. Y.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 80 Candida isolates representing 14 species were examined for their respective responses to an in vitro hemolytic test. A modification of a previously described plate assay system where the yeasts are incubated on glucose (3%)-enriched sheep blood agar in a carbon dioxide (5%)-rich environment for 48 h was used to evaluate the hemolytic activity. A group of eight Candida species which included Candida albicans (15 isolates), C. dubliniensis (2), C. kefyr (2), C. krusei (4), C. zeyl...

  18. Immune Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient with Tuberculous Lymphadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunath Nandennavar; Sanju Cyriac; Krishnakumar,; T G Sagar

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in tuberculosis is usually anemia of chronic disease. Severe hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare in tuberculosis patients. We report a patient diagnosed with tubercular lymphadenitis complicated by Coomb′s positive hemolytic anemia. Patient responded well to antituberculous treatment. Hematological parameters improved after initiation of antituberculosis treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case from India of an adult patient with tuberculous lymphadenitis presen...

  19. Two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to brucellosis: a review of hemolytic disorders in patients with brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Kaya, Safak; Dal, Tuba; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease associated with hemolytic complications, including thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and hemolytic anemia. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare clinical presentation of this disease. In this report, we describe the cases of two patients with brucellosis who presented with Coombs-positive AIHA. We also include a review of the literature on the hemolytic complications of brucellosis. Both patients were successfully treated with a combination of doxycycline and rifampicin in addition to steroids. In the medical literature, there are several cases of TMA associated with brucellosis, although only a few cases of Coombs test-positive AIHA have been reported. Antibiotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment, and the selection of antibiotics and duration of treatment do not differ between brucellosis patients with and without hemolysis. Although rare, the potential for brucellosis should always be kept in mind in patients who present with hemolysis, especially those living in areas where brucellosis is endemic.

  20. Identification of weakly beta-hemolytic porcine spirochetes by biochemical reactions, PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and species-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Tatsuo; Araki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2008-08-01

    We examined the usefulness of PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and species-specific PCR combined with a newly devised rapid biochemical test using microplates for identifying weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes (WBHIS) isolated from pigs. WBHIS strains showing atypical biochemical characteristics were decisively identified at the species level by PCR-RFLP and species-specific PCR. Identification of WBHIS at the species level in routine diagnostic work will certainly contribute to clarifying the pathogenicity of WBHIS.

  1. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement.

  2. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is ...

  3. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  4. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Osama Hegazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual manifestations of Graves' disease (GD, that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD.

  5. Atypical Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Steenwyk, Steven D; Molnar, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    We have identified some two-hundred new variable stars in a systematic study of a data archive obtained with the Calvin-Rehoboth observatory. Of these, we present five close binaries showing behaviors presumably due to star spots or other magnetic activity. For context, we first present two new RS CVn systems whose behavior can be readily attribute to star spots. Then we present three new close binary systems that are rather atypical, with light curves that are changing over time in ways not easily understood in terms of star spot activity generally associated with magnetically active binary systems called RS CVn systems. Two of these three are contact binaries that exhibit gradual changes in average brightness without noticeable changes in light curve shape. A third system has shown such large changes in light curve morphology that we speculate this may be a rare instance of a system that transitions back and forth between contact and noncontact configurations, perhaps driven by magnetic cycles in at least o...

  6. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmü Sena Sarı; Figen Kaptan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was ...

  7. Adsorption capacity of poly(ether imide) microparticles to uremic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, Sarada D; Jankowski, Vera; Luetzow, Karola; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas; Jankowski, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Uremia is a phenomenon caused by retention of uremic toxins in the plasma due to functional impairment of kidneys in the elimination of urinary waste products. Uremia is presently treated by dialysis techniques like hemofiltration, dialysis or hemodiafiltration. However, these techniques in use are more favorable towards removing hydrophilic than hydrophobic uremic toxins. Hydrophobic uremic toxins, such as hydroxy hipuric acid (OH-HPA), phenylacetic acid (PAA), indoxyl sulfate (IDS) and p-cresylsulfate (pCRS), contribute substantially to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, objective of the present study is to test adsorption capacity of highly porous microparticles prepared from poly(ether imide) (PEI) as an alternative technique for the removal of uremic toxins. Two types of nanoporous, spherically shaped microparticles were prepared from PEI by a spraying/coagulation process.PEI particles were packed into a preparative HPLC column to which a mixture of the four types of uremic toxins was injected and eluted with ethanol. Eluted toxins were quantified by analytical HPLC. PEI particles were able to adsorb all four toxins, with the highest affinity for PAA and pCR. IDS and OH-HPA showed a partially non-reversible binding. In summary, PEI particles are interesting candidates to be explored for future application in CKD.

  8. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  9. Cefotetan-induced hemolytic anemia after perioperative prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Monte E; Laber, Damian A

    2006-03-01

    Cephalosporin-induced hemolytic anemia is an acquired form of hemolytic anemia caused by interaction of drug with the immune system. Drug adsorption, drug-dependent antibody, and autoimmune induction are the three mechanisms of hemolysis. Cefotetan-induced hemolytic anemia (CIHA) has been described to occur through all three mechanisms. We report four cases of CIHA that occurred after appropriate perioperative use of cefotetan. All of our patients developed an acute and severe hemolytic episode that caused significant symptoms and led to hospitalization within 1-2 weeks after exposure to cefotetan. The hemolytic process was self-limited, and all our patients responded to supportive measures and blood transfusion. This report adds to our knowledge of CIHA, a rare complication of cefotetan use. Our cases suggest that cefotetan-induced acute severe hemolysis is caused by membrane modification (nonimmunologic protein adsorption) in addition to immune complex formation. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive supportive measures are essential in minimizing morbidity and mortality from hemolysis. Physicians should warn their patients about this complication. Given that hemolysis occurs when the subject is no longer under direct clinical supervision, patient awareness on how to recognize signs and symptoms of hemolysis is paramount to reducing the likelihood of this potentially lethal side effect. Finally, physicians might consider restricting cefotetan use.

  10. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60–80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic Observation on Morphologic Characteristics of Sperms in Uremic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-gen XU; Shi-fang SHI; Hai-zhen ZHONG; Xiao-feng HUANG; Xiao-ping QI; Qi-zhe SONG; Xin-hong WANG; Li YAN; Zong-fu SHAO

    2004-01-01

    Objective To observe the morphologic characteristics of spermatozoon ultramicro scopic structure in uremic subjects Method Semen sample from 10 patients with uremia and 5 healthy men were observed under light microscope and scanning electronic microscope.Results Abnormalities were found in sperms of uremic patients either in the sperm head (acrosome, acrosomic deficit, nuclear abnormality, pointed head, headless and double head of spermatozoon), neck (rupture, separation and enlargement), or tail (mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial deficit, tailless, double tail, short tail and curled tail); whereas none of the above-mentioned abnormalities was observed in healthy men.Conclusion Sperms of uremic patients had many morphologic and structural abnor malities in the head, neck and tail.

  12. The plasma leptin concentration is closely associated with the body fat mass in nondiabetic uremic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Nielsen, P K; Olgaard, K

    1999-01-01

    Plasma leptin is associated with the body mass index and, more precisely, with the body fat mass. Plasma leptin has been found to be elevated in uremic patients. This study aimed at investigating the plasma leptin concentration and associations between plasma leptin, body fat mass, and glomerular...... filtration rate in nondiabetic predialysis uremic patients and in nondiabetic patients on chronic hemodialysis. Plasma leptin, body fat mass, and creatinine clearance were measured in 22 predialysis uremic patients, 18 hemodialysis patients, and 24 healthy control subjects. The logarithmically transformed...... plasma leptin concentration was closely associated with the body fat mass in all groups (r = 0.93, r = 0.83, and r = 0.72, respectively; p

  13. The reliability and representativity of non-dynamic bone histomorphometry in uremic osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, J G; Pødenphant, J; Gammelgaard, Bente

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate the reliability and representativity of iliac crest bone biopsy in uremic osteodystrophy, non-dynamic bone histomorphometry was performed post-mortem on the right and left iliac crests and the 3rd lumbar vertebra in 20 patients with chronic uremia. High (> 0.8) right-left cor......In order to evaluate the reliability and representativity of iliac crest bone biopsy in uremic osteodystrophy, non-dynamic bone histomorphometry was performed post-mortem on the right and left iliac crests and the 3rd lumbar vertebra in 20 patients with chronic uremia. High (> 0.8) right...... trabecular bone indices are reliable variables and, with the possible exception of bone mass determination, indicative of systemic bone disease. Bone aluminium concentration and cortical bone indices are unreliable measures of uremic bone disease. These reservations apply to the diagnostic use of biopsy...

  14. Chronic kidney disease and fibrosis: the role of uremic retention solutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henricus A.M. Mutsaers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major global health concern, and the uremic state is highly associated with fibrogenesis in several organs and tissues. Fibrosis is characterized by excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins with a detrimental impact on organ function. Another key feature of CKD is the retention and subsequent accumulation of solutes that are normally cleared by the healthy kidney. Several of these uremic retention solutes, including indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate, have been suggested to be CKD-specific triggers for the development and perpetuation of fibrosis. The purpose of this brief review is to gather and discuss the current body of evidence linking uremic retention solutes to the fibrotic response during CKD, with a special emphasis on the pathophysiological mechanisms in the kidney.

  15. Ulcerative Uremic Stomatitis - Review of the Literature and A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uremic Stomatitis (US represents a comparatively uncommon intraoral complication seen, mostly, in cases of end-stage renal disease or undiagnosed or untreated chronic renal failure. Its frequency has diminished due to the advent of renal dialysis. Clinically uremic stomatitis is characterized by the presence of painful plaques and crusts that are usually distributed on the buccal and labial mucosa, dorsal or ventral surface of the tongue, gingiva, and floor of the mouth. Ultimate treatment consists of improvement of blood urea concentration and underlying renal failure is supported by enhancement of oral hygiene with antiseptic mouthwashes and antimicrobial/antifungal agents, if necessary. Here we report a rare case of ulcerative type of uremic stomatitis occurring in a patient of chronic renal failure due to sudden relapse of uremia and reviewed the possible pathophysiology of oral symptoms of chronic renal failure.

  16. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Ya-Ting

    2012-04-01

    Hemolysis is a common feature in patients with β-thalassemia major. As a result, autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicating β-thalassemia is easily overlooked. Here, the authors described the clinical features and management of 7 patients with β-thalassemia major and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. These patients had fever, cough, and tea-colored urine on admission. The laboratory investigations showed a significant drop in hemoglobin and increased serum bilirubin. Coombs' tests revealed that anti-immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-C3 was positive in 7 and 5 cases, respectively, whereas anti-Rh E alloantibody was positive in 3 cases. All the patients received corticosteroids treatments and blood transfusions. Patients with anti-Rh E alloantibodies also received immunoglobulin treatments. Six of the patients responded well to the management, but 1 patient developed recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia that required cyclosporin A treatment. All the patients remained well by following up for more than 6 months.

  18. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  19. Comparative study of hemolytic activity of Bordetella species

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    C N Khobragade

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Bordetella species colonize the respiratory tract of mammals and thereby cause the whooping cough. Most of the species produce adenylate cyclase - a toxin ( hemolysin responsible for increasing intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels in mammalian neutrophils and macrophages and as a consequence their phagocytic function get impaired . This study was carried out to isolate species of Bordetella and to study the hemolytic activity of each species on RBCs of sheep, human and poultry at varied culture conditions by altering the temperature, pH and cell age."nMaterials and Methods: Three pathogenic Bordetella species were isolated from fifty suspected whooping cough patients on Bordet-Gengou agar and identified by their biochemical profiles. The hemolytic activity of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica was investigated in terms of cell bound and cell free hemolysin on human, poultry and sheep RBCs at variable pH, temperature and cell age in Stainer Scholt broth. The hemolysin activity was also determined qualitatively on blood agar containing different blood samples."nResults: All the species revealed optimum hemolytic activity in pH range 7.5-8.0 (in slight alkaline condition, temperature 37°C and cell age up to 20-24 hrs. The cell bound hemolytic activity was found to be maximum than cell free activity and varied with blood samples of different species. B. pertussis showed maximum hemolytic activity on human red blood cells followed by poultry and sheep RBCs. B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica showed maximum hemolytic activity on sheep and poultry RBCs respectively."nConclusion: The findings of our study revealed that different determinants are involved in host interactions and virulence of Bordetella species.

  20. Adult patent ductus arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination.

  1. Giant cell hepatitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia after chickenpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Maşallah; Özgenç, Funda; Berk, Ömer; Gökçe, Demir; Kavakli, Kaan; Yilmaz, Funda; Şen, Sait; Yağci, Raşit Vural

    2010-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia with giant cell hepatitis is a distinct entity in children. It is usually fatal with progressive liver disease. Immunosuppressive treatment with conventional drugs offers some response; however, it is usually only temporary. Alternative therapeutic options with monoclonals have been reported with promising remission of the disease. We report a case with autoimmune hemolytic anemia+giant cell hepatitis after varicella infection. She was resistant to standard immunosuppressive combinations, and rescue therapy with rituximab was used. Remission was not achieved with the drug and the child died with septic complication.

  2. [Hemolytic anemia in adults: Main causes and diagnostic procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, Valentine; Guillaud, Constance; Garcon, Loïc; Godeau, Bertrand; Michel, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) is not an exceptional situation in adults. While establishing the hemolytic mechanism of an anemia is usually rather easy, finding the etiology may be quite difficult as both some hereditary (corpuscular) and acquired causes of HA may occur during adulthood. The diagnosis of HA therefore requires a multiple step procedure taking into account both patient's and family history, a careful analysis of the blood smear and a direct antiglobulin test. Based on these first data, the diagnosis procedure may then require more specific tests whose indications are discussed in this review.

  3. A Case of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with an Ovarian Teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ickkeun; Lee, Jue Yong; Kwon, Jung Hye; Jung, Joo Young; Song, Hun Ho; Park, Young lee; Ro, Eusun; Choi, Kyung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with an ovarian teratoma is a very rare disease. However, treating teratoma is the only method to cure the hemolytic anemia, so it is necessary to include ovarian teratoma in the differential diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We report herein on a case of a young adult patient who had severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia that was induced by an ovarian teratoma. A 25-yr-old woman complained of general weakness and dizziness for 1 week. The hemoglobi...

  4. Detection of alpha- and beta-hemolytic-like activity from Campylobacter jejuni.

    OpenAIRE

    Misawa, N; Hirayama, K.; Itoh, K.; Takahashi, E.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha-hemolytic-like activity from Campylobacter jejuni was clearly apparent when the medium pH ranged from 6.0 to 6.5, but the hemolytic zones disappeared when the pH of the medium increased. Beta-hemolytic-like activity just beneath the bacterial growth appeared after prolonged incubation. The hemolytic activity was not influenced by the species of blood.

  5. [Therapy for atypical facial pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroko

    2009-09-01

    Atypical facial pain is a pain in the head, neck and the face, without organic causes. It is treated at departments of physical medicine, such as dental, oral and maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, cerebral surgery, or head and neck surgery. In primary care, it is considered to be a medically unexplained symptom (MUS), or a somatoform disorder, such as somatization caused by a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) by psychiatrists. Usually, patients consult departments of physical medicine complaining of physical pain. Therefore physicians in these departments should examine the patients from the holistic perspective, and identify organic diseases. As atypical facial pain becomes chronic, other complications, including psychiatric complaints other than physical pain, such as depression may develop. Moreover, physical, psychological, and social factors affect the symptoms by interacting with one another. Therefore, in examining atypical facial pain, doctors specializing in dental, oral and maxillofacial medicine are required to provide psychosomatic treatment that is based on integrated knowledge.

  6. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a teenager: a wolf in sheep's clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbrich, Michelle; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; McCusker, Christine

    2013-09-01

    This case report describes a 14-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with symptoms of severe anemia. He was diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and on further investigation, it was noted that he had no functioning T cells. Despite no antecedent history of severe infection, he was worked up for a severe combined immunodeficiency, and was found to have a compound hypomorphic mutation in an enzyme responsible for recombination of the B- and T-cell receptors. He was subsequently diagnosed with severe combined immunodeficiency, presenting with autoimmunity, and received a bone marrow transplant. As our knowledge of the immune system continues to expand, we are learning that dysregulation can occur in any one of the complex immune pathways, and may have a variety of clinical presentations. A high index of suspicion for immune defects should be maintained in cases of atypical or severe infections, autoimmunity or malignancy, particularly by the general practitioner, who is often the first to encounter these challenging patients.

  7. Complement factor H deficiency and endocapillary glomerulonephritis due to paternal isodisomy and a novel factor H mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Schmidt, I M; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria;

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a regulator of the alternative complement activation pathway. Mutations in the CFH gene are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II and C3 glomerulonephritis. Here, we report a 6-month-old CFH-deficient child...

  8. Genotype/phenotype correlations in complement factor h deficiency arising from uniparental isodisomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Valerie; Darlay, Rebecca; Wong, William;

    2013-01-01

    We report a male infant who presented at 8 months of age with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) responsive to plasma therapy. Investigation showed him to have complement factor H (CFH) deficiency associated with a homozygous CFH mutation (c.2880delT [p.Phe960fs]). Mutation screening of th...

  9. A Waterborne Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Implications for Rural Water Systems1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gayle; Breuer, Thomas; Kennedy, Malinda; Higgins, Charles; Walford, Jim; McKee, Gary; Fox, Kim; Bibb, William; Mead, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In the summer of 1998, a large outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections occurred in Alpine, Wyoming. We identified 157 ill persons; stool from 71 (45%) yielded E. coli O157:H7. In two cohort studies, illness was significantly associated with drinking municipal water (town residents: adjusted odds ratio=10.1, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1.8-56.4; visitors attending family reunion: relative risk=9.0, 95% CI=1.3-63.3). The unchlorinated water supply had microbiologic evidence of fecal organisms and the potential for chronic contamination with surface water. Among persons exposed to water, the attack rate was significantly lower in town residents than in visitors (23% vs. 50%, p<0.01) and decreased with increasing age. The lower attack rate among exposed residents, especially adults, is consistent with the acquisition of partial immunity following long-term exposure. Serologic data, although limited, may support this finding. Contamination of small, unprotected water systems may be an increasing public health risk. PMID:11971769

  10. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

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    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  11. Atypical moles: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Allen; Duffy, R Lamar

    2015-06-01

    Atypical moles are benign pigmented lesions. Although they are benign, they exhibit some of the clinical and histologic features of malignant melanoma. They are more common in fair-skinned individuals and in those with high sun exposure. Atypical moles are characterized by size of 6 mm or more at the greatest dimension, color variegation, border irregularity, and pebbled texture. They are associated with an increased risk of melanoma, warranting enhanced surveillance, especially in patients with more than 50 moles and a family history of melanoma. Because an individual lesion is unlikely to display malignant transformation, biopsy of all atypical moles is neither clinically beneficial nor cost-effective. The ABCDE (asymmetry, border irregularity, color unevenness, diameter of 6 mm or more, evolution) mnemonic is a valuable tool for clinicians and patients to identify lesions that could be melanoma. Also, according to the "ugly duckling" concept, benign moles tend to have a similar appearance, whereas an outlier with a different appearance is more likely to be undergoing malignant change. Atypical moles with changes suggestive of malignant melanoma should be biopsied, using an excisional method, if possible.

  12. Isolation and purification of uremic middle molecules by multi-step liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储结根; 刘晓航; 袁直; 何炳林

    2002-01-01

    Isolation and comparison of uremic sera and urine and normal sera and urine were performed by gel permeation chromatography, anion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Two uremic middle molecular fractions (A and B) were obtained from uremic sera and urine and normal urine by gel permeation chromatography, but not from normal sera. The anion exchange chromatographic results of fraction A from different origins demonstrate that subfraction A-3 could be excreted in urine by healthy subject, but accumulated in uremic serum for renal failure of patient with uremia. After desalinization subfraction A-3 was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. The results show that subfraction A-3 consists of six compounds with molecular weight 839, 873, 1007.94, 1106, 1680 and 2015 respectively. Finally, by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, subfraction A-3 was further resolved into six independent fractions. Thus, the isolation and purification of six middle molecular compounds in subfraction A-3 came true by our method.

  13. Skin Autofluorescence Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction in Uremic Subjects on Hemodialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Cheng Wang

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs within tissues may contribute to endothelial dysfunction, an early indicator of atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether levels of skin AGEs could be a useful marker to predict endothelial dysfunction in uremic subjects on hemodialysis.One hundred and nineteen uremic patients on hemodialysis and 57 control subjects with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk factors and without chronic kidney disease (CKD were enrolled. We used ultrasound to measure flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD. An AGE reader measured skin autoflurorescence (AF. We then compared differences in FMD and skin AF values between the two groups. The uremic subjects had significantly higher levels of skin AF (3.47±0.76 AU vs. 2.21±0.45 arbitrary units; P<0.01 and significantly lower levels of FMD (4.79%±1.88% vs. 7.19%±2.17%; P<0.01 than the non-CKD subjects. After adjusting for all potential covariates, we found that skin AF level independently predicted FMD in both the hemodialysis and the non-CKD groups. In the hemodialysis group, skin AF ≥ 3.05 arbitrary units predicted abnormal FMD at a sensitivity of 87.9% and a specificity of 78.6% (P<0.01.Skin AF could be a useful marker to predict endothelial dysfunction in uremic subjects on hemodialysis.

  14. Separation of uremic toxins from urine with resorcinarene-based ion chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Tayyebeh; Weaver, Douglas J; Lamb, John D; Harrison, Roger G

    2015-01-01

    People with chronic kidney disease suffer from uremic toxins which accumulate in their bodies. Detection and quantification of uremic toxins help diagnose kidney problems and start patient care. The aim of this research was to seek a new method to assist this diagnosis by trace level detection and separation of guanidine containing uremic toxins in water and urine. To detect and quantify the uremic toxins, new stationary phases for ion chromatography (IC) columns based on glutamic acid functionalized resorcinarenes bound to divinylbenzene macroporous resin were prepared. The new column packing material afforded separation of the five compounds: guanidinoacetic acid, guanidine, methylguanidine, creatinine, and guanidinobenzoic acid in 30min. Peak resolutions ranged from 7.6 to 1.3. Gradient elutions at ambient temperature with methanesulfonic acid (MSA) solution as eluent resulted in detection levels in water from 10 to 47ppb and in synthetic urine from 28 to 180ppb. Limits of quantification for the analytes using pulsed amperometric detection were 30-160ppb in water and 93-590ppb in urine. Trace levels of creatinine (1ppm) were detected in the urine of a healthy individual using the columns.

  15. STUDY OF UREMIC TOXIN FLUXES ACROSS NANOFABRICATED HEMODIALYSIS MEMBRANES USING IRREVERSIBLE THERMODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assem Hedayat

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: Nanofabricated hemodialysis membranes with a reduced thickness and an applied electric potential can enhance the effective diffusivity and electro-migration flux of the respective uremic toxins by 3 orders of magnitude as compared to those passing through the high flux hemodialyzer.

  16. Cardiac and Renal Effects of Atrasentan in Combination with Enalapril and Paricalcitol in Uremic Rats

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    Cynthia Ritter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The search for new therapies providing cardiorenal protection in chronic kidney disease (CKD has led to treatments that combine conventional renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibitors with other drugs that exhibit potential in disease management. Methods: In rats made uremic by renal ablation, we examined the effects of addition of the endothelin-A receptor antagonist atrasentan to a previously examined combination of enalapril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and paricalcitol (vitamin D receptor activator on cardiac and renal parameters. The effects of the individual and combined drugs were examined after a 3-month treatment. Results: A decrease in systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine and proteinuria, and improvement of renal histology in uremic rats were attributed to enalapril and/or paricalcitol treatment; atrasentan alone had no effect. In heart tissue, individual treatment with the drugs blunted the increase in cardiomyocyte size, and combined treatment additively decreased cardiomyocyte size to normal levels. Perivascular fibrosis was blunted in uremic control rats with atrasentan or enalapril treatment. Conclusions: We found distinct cardiac and renal effects of atrasentan. Combination treatment with atrasentan, enalapril and paricalcitol provided positive effects on cardiac remodeling in uremic rats, whereas combination treatment did not offer further protective effects on blood pressure, proteinuria or renal histology.

  17. Cerebro-renal interactions: impact of uremic toxins on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kimio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has received attention as an important problem in recent years. Causes of CI with CKD are multifactorial, and include cerebrovascular disease, renal anemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, dialysis disequilibrium, and uremic toxins (UTs). Among these causes, little is known about the role of UTs. We therefore selected 21 uremic compounds, and summarized reports of cerebro-renal interactions associated with UTs. Among the compounds, uric acid, indoxyl sulfate, p-cresyl sulfate, interleukin 1-β, interleukin 6, TNF-α, and PTH were most likely to affect the cerebro-renal interaction dysfunction; however, sufficient data have not been obtained for other UTs. Notably, most of the data were not obtained under uremic conditions; therefore, the impact and mechanism of each UT on cognition and central nervous system in uremic state remains unknown. At present, impacts and mechanisms of UT effects on cognition are poorly understood. Clarifying the mechanisms and establishing novel therapeutic strategies for cerebro-renal interaction dysfunction is expected to be subject of future research.

  18. Clinical heterogeneity and predictors of outcome in primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a GIMEMA study of 308 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellini, Wilma; Fattizzo, Bruno; Zaninoni, Anna; Radice, Tommaso; Nichele, Ilaria; Di Bona, Eros; Lunghi, Monia; Tassinari, Cristina; Alfinito, Fiorella; Ferrari, Antonella; Leporace, Anna Paola; Niscola, Pasquale; Carpenedo, Monica; Boschetti, Carla; Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Consonni, Dario; Scaramucci, Laura; De Fabritiis, Paolo; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Zanella, Alberto

    2014-11-06

    The clinical outcome, response to treatment, and occurrence of acute complications were retrospectively investigated in 308 primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) cases and correlated with serological characteristics and severity of anemia at onset. Patients had been followed up for a median of 33 months (range 12-372); 60% were warm AIHA, 27% cold hemagglutinin disease, 8% mixed, and 5% atypical (mostly direct antiglobulin test negative). The latter 2 categories more frequently showed a severe onset (hemoglobin [Hb] levels ≤6 g/dL) along with reticulocytopenia. The majority of warm AIHA patients received first-line steroid therapy only, whereas patients with mixed and atypical forms were more frequently treated with 2 or more therapy lines, including splenectomy, immunosuppressants, and rituximab. The cumulative incidence of relapse was increased in more severe cases (hazard ratio 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-6.57 for Hb ≤6 g/dL; P < .001). Thrombotic events were associated with Hb levels ≤6 g/dL at onset, intravascular hemolysis, and previous splenectomy. Predictors of a fatal outcome were severe infections, particularly in splenectomized cases, acute renal failure, Evans syndrome, and multitreatment (4 or more lines). The identification of severe and potentially fatal AIHA in a largely heterogeneous disease requires particular experienced attention by clinicians.

  19. Impairment of bone health in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia.

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    Michael M Schündeln

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. STUDY DESIGN: To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients. Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. RESULTS: Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5% in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007. Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001. Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025 influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29, diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05 and age (partial r2 = 0.03 on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. CONCLUSION: Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment.

  20. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  1. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  2. Speckle tracking echocardiography detects uremic cardiomyopathy early and predicts cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramann, Rafael; Erpenbeck, Johanna; Schneider, Rebekka K; Röhl, Anna B; Hein, Marc; Brandenburg, Vincent M; van Diepen, Merel; Dekker, Friedo; Marx, Nicolaus; Floege, Jürgen; Becker, Michael; Schlieper, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular mortality is high in ESRD, partly driven by sudden cardiac death and recurrent heart failure due to uremic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether speckle-tracking echocardiography is superior to routine echocardiography in early detection of uremic cardiomyopathy in animal models and whether it predicts cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Using speckle-tracking echocardiography in two rat models of uremic cardiomyopathy soon (4-6 weeks) after induction of kidney disease, we observed that global radial and circumferential strain parameters decreased significantly in both models compared with controls, whereas standard echocardiographic readouts, including fractional shortening and cardiac output, remained unchanged. Furthermore, strain parameters showed better correlations with histologic hallmarks of uremic cardiomyopathy. We then assessed echocardiographic and clinical characteristics in 171 dialysis patients. During the 2.5-year follow-up period, ejection fraction and various strain parameters were significant risk factors for cardiovascular mortality (primary end point) in a multivariate Cox model (ejection fraction hazard ratio [HR], 0.97 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.95 to 0.99; P=0.012]; peak global longitudinal strain HR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.28; P<0.001]; peak systolic and late diastolic longitudinal strain rates HRs, 4.7 [95% CI, 1.23 to 17.64; P=0.023] and 0.25 [95% CI, 0.08 to 0.79; P=0.02], respectively). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed circumferential early diastolic strain rate, among others, as an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality (secondary end point; HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.74; P=0.002). Together, these data support speckle tracking as a postprocessing echocardiographic technique to detect uremic cardiomyopathy and predict cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

  3. Efficacy of epigallocatechin-3-gallate and Amla (Emblica officinalis) extract for the treatment of diabetic-uremic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tung-Sheng; Liou, Show-Yih; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chang, Yen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Uremic patients with diabetes suffer from high levels of oxidative stress due to regular hemodialysis therapy (neutrophil activation induced by hemo-incompatibility between the hemodialyser and blood) and complications associated with diabetes. Several plasma biomarkers were screened in 13 uremic diabetic patients after receiving the mixture of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea extract, and Amla extract (AE), from Emblica officinalis, the Indian gooseberry, for 3 months. We found that oral administration of a 1:1 mixture of EGCG and AE for 3 months significantly improved antioxidant defense as well as diabetic and atherogenic indices in uremic patients with diabetes. Furthermore, no significant changes in hepatic function, renal function, or inflammatory responses were observed. These results suggest that a 1:1 combination of EGCG and AE is a safe and effective treatment for uremic patients with diabetes.

  4. Atypical Steatocystoma Multiplex with Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Hasibur; Islam, Muhammad Saiful; Ansari, Nazma Parvin

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old male reported to us with an atypical case of giant steatocystoma multiplex in the scrotum with calcification. There was no family history of similar lesions. Yellowish, creamy material was expressed from a nodule during punch biopsy. The diagnosis was based on clinical as well as histological findings. Successful surgical excision was done to cure the case without any complications. PMID:22363850

  5. Atypical Centrioles During Sexual Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer eAvidor-Reiss

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL. We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the zombie centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology.

  6. Atypical Imaging Appearances of Meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Soltani shirazi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Meningiomas are the commonest primary non-glial intracranial tumors. The diagnosis is usually correctly established on characteristic imaging appearances. Atypical meningiomas may be difficult to diagnose because of their similarity to other brain tumors. This paper presents one case of atypical meningioma, misdiagnosed primarily as glioblastoma multiforms (GBM by radiological techniques. "nCase report: A 15-year-old girl presented with a severe intermittent generalized headache that on occasion localized to retro-orbital and vertex. Other manifestations were blurred vision, photophobia, diplopia, weakness and clumsiness of the right hand. The result of systemic and neurological examinations was normal, except for a positive right hand drift test. MRI showed a large lobulated mass with peripheral edema, central necrosis and a heterogenous enhancement at the central part of the parietal lobe inducing to subfalcian herniation. Glioblastoma multiforms (GBM was misdiagnosed for the patient on the basis of MRI appearance. Pathology evaluation was compatible with meningioma (WHO grade I to II. The patient was operated and discharged with minimal right hand weakness. Physiotherapy was recommended to improve the remaining problems. "nConclusion: Atypical meningiomas may mimic other intracranical brain lesions and may cause misdiagnosis. It is important to be aware of these features in order to avoid misdiagnosis. "n"n  

  7. In vitro assessment of recombinant, mutant immunoglobulin G anti-D devoid of hemolytic activity for treatment of ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Leif K; Green, Trine H; Sandlie, Inger;

    2008-01-01

    A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D....

  8. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  9. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Hemolytic Anemia Confusing Serum Bilirubin Levels

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    M Brackstone

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis is observed in more than 50% of patients with cirrhosis. However, there has been little documention of the association of primary biliary cirrhosis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Two cases, found within a single practice, of primary biliary cirrhosis coexisting with autoimmune hemolysis and a third case coexisting with hereditary spherocytosis are presented. Anemia in such patients is commonly attributed to chronic disease, and hyperbilirubinemia is attributed to primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients were considered for liver transplantation until the diagnosis of a comorbid hemolytic process was established. This association may be more prevalent than previously recognized. A diagnosis of comorbid hemolysis must always be considered in context with anemia and serum bilirubin levels that rise out of proportion to the severity of the primary biliary cirrhosis.

  10. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  11. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: An enigma

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    M Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  12. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  13. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  14. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Miguel Gomes; Tereza Oliva; Armando Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin’s disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. W...

  15. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  16. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as hemolytic anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monga, M; Benson, G S; Parisi, V M

    1995-03-01

    A patient presented at 29 weeks' gestation with severe hemolytic anemia. She was subsequently diagnosed as having renal cell carcinoma and had a radical nephrectomy at 31 weeks' gestation, which demonstrated stage I disease. This was followed by a normal vaginal delivery of a healthy infant at term and complete resolution of her anemia. This unusual presentation of renal cell carcinoma in pregnancy is discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski; Vjekoslav Krzelj; Beti Zafirovska-Ivanovska; Todor Gruev; Josko Markic; Natasa Aluloska; Nikolina Zdraveska; Katica Piperkovska

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal jaundice that occurs in ABO or Rhesus issoimunisation has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for development of severe hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin neurotoxicity. AIM: Aim of our study was to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters associated with hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility and compare results with the group of unspecific jaundice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred sixty seven (167) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia cas...

  18. Serratamolide is a hemolytic factor produced by Serratia marcescens.

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    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

  19. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Meat Markets

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    Luisa Zanolli Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  20. Hydropic degeneration of the anterior pituitary gland (adenohypophysis) in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Seymour; Saltzman, Arthur

    2004-03-01

    We observed hydropic degeneration of the anterior pituitary in rats made uremic by nephrotoxic chemicals, especially when the uremic rats were given a pure carbohydrate diet beforehand. The hydropic degeneration caused loss of nuclear and cytoplasmic content of many or most anterior pituitary cells. It was readily visible in paraffin sections by light microscopy. It was exaggerated when water was injected after the nephrotoxin and it was greatly reduced if saline was injected after the nephrotoxin. Low serum sodium levels in affected rats and the response to saline injection suggested that the mechanism for development of hydropic degeneration of the anterior pituitary gland involved hyponatremia. Depletion of total body sodium probably accounts for the enhancement of hydropic degeneration by the pure carbohydrate diet. Morphologic lesions of the anterior pituitary related to hyponatremia and uremia have not been described previously.

  1. Treatment options for atypical optic neuritis

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    Amina Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Optic neuritis (ON is defined as inflammation of the optic nerve and can have various etiologies. The most common presentation in the US is demyelinating, or "typical" ON, usually associated with multiple sclerosis. This is in contrast to "atypical" causes of ON, which differ in their clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. These atypical cases are characterized by lack of eye pain, exudates, and hemorrhages on exam, very severe, bilateral or progressive visual loss, or with failure to recover vision. Aims: The aim was to describe the clinical presentations of atypical ON and their treatments. Settings and Design: Review article. Materials and Methods: Literature review. Results: Types of atypical ON identified include neuromyelitis optica, autoimmune optic neuropathy, chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy, idiopathic recurrent neuroretinitis, and optic neuropathy associated with systemic diseases. Atypical ON usually requires corticosteroid treatment and often will require aggressive immunosuppression. Conclusions: Unlike demyelinating ON, atypical ON requires treatment to preserve vision.

  2. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National Universty Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  3. Response of the growth plate of uremic rats to human growth hormone and corticosteroids

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    A.P.F. Barbosa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with chronic renal failure in general present growth retardation that is aggravated by corticosteroids. We describe here the effects of methylprednisolone (MP and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on the growth plate (GP of uremic rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal nephrectomy in 30-day-old rats, followed by 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH (N = 7 or 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH + 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 treatment for 10 days. Control rats with intact renal function were sham-operated and treated with 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or vehicle (N = 7. Uremic rats (N = 7 were used as untreated control animals. Structural alterations in the GP and the expression of anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and anti-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I by epiphyseal chondrocytes were evaluated. Uremic MP rats displayed a reduction in the proliferative zone height (59.08 ± 4.54 vs 68.07 ± 7.5 µm, P < 0.05 and modifications in the microarchitecture of the GP. MP and uremia had an additive inhibitory effect on the proliferative activity of GP chondrocytes, lowering the expression of PCNA (19.48 ± 11.13 vs 68.64 ± 7.9% in control, P < 0.0005 and IGF-I (58.53 ± 0.96 vs 84.78 ± 2.93% in control, P < 0.0001, that was counteracted by rhGH. These findings suggest that in uremic rats rhGH therapy improves longitudinal growth by increasing IGF-I synthesis in the GP and by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

  4. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mace, Maria L.

    2013-01-01

    High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased......, iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), on plasma levels of FGF23 and phosphate was examined in normal and uremic iron repleted rats....

  5. Molecular mechanisms for uremic toxin-induced oxidative tissue damage via a cardiovascular-renal connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), marked by a progressive loss in renal function, is a leading cause of hemodialysis initiation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). There are currently 13.3 million patients with CKD and 300 thousand patients are currently undergoing hemodialysis in Japan. Therefore, preventing the initiation of dialysis and reducing the risk of cardiovascular death are high-priority issues from the viewpoint of public health and economic implications. Understanding the molecular mechanism responsible for the progression of CKD and cardiovascular damage regarding crosstalk between the kidney and cardiovascular system is an important issue in controlling the pathogenesis of CKD-CVD. However, the mechanisms involved in CKD-CVD are not well understood. This hinders the development of new treatment strategies. We have been investigating the role of protein bound uremic toxins, that are difficult to remove by hemodialysis, on the onset and progression of CKD and CVD. The relationship between their redox properties and the pathogenesis of CKD-CVD was examined. In this review, we focus on two sulfate conjugated uremic toxins, namely, indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (PCS), and summarize recent studies that provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms responsible for uremic toxin-induced oxidative tissue damage via a cardiovascular-renal connection.

  6. Effect of AST-120 on Endothelial Dysfunction in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

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    Yuko Inami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic kidney disease (CKD represents endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte adhesion is recognized as the initial step of arteriosclerosis. Indoxyl sulfate (IS is considered to be a risk factor for arteriosclerosis in CKD. Oral adsorbent AST-120 retards deterioration of renal function, reducing accumulation of IS. In the present study, we determined the monocyte adhesion in the adenine-induced uremic rats in vivo and effects of AST-120 on the adhesion molecules. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into control, control+AST-120, adenine, and adenine+AST-120 groups. The number of monocytes adherent to the endothelium of thoracic aorta by imaging the entire endothelial surface and the mRNA expressions of adhesion and atherosclerosis-related molecules were examined on day 49. The mRNA expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were also examined. Results. Adenine increased the number of adherent monocytes, and AST-120 suppressed the increase. The monocyte adhesion was related to serum creatinine and IS in sera. Overexpression of VCAM-1 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the arterial walls was observed in uremic rats. IS induced increase of the ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions in vitro. Conclusion. It appears that uremic condition introduces the monocyte adhesion to arterial wall and AST-120 might inhibit increasing of the monocyte adherence with CKD progression.

  7. Uremic Toxins and Lipases in Haemodialysis: A Process of Repeated Metabolic Starvation

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    Bernd Stegmayr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe kidney disease results in retention of uremic toxins that inhibit key enzymes for lipid breakdown such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL and hepatic lipase (HL. For patients in haemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD the LPL activity is only about half of that of age and gender matched controls. Angiopoietin, like protein 3 and 4, accumulate in the uremic patients. These factors, therefore, can be considered as uremic toxins. In animal experiments it has been shown that these factors inhibit the LPL activity. To avoid clotting of the dialysis circuit during HD, anticoagulation such as heparin or low molecular weight heparin are added to the patient. Such administration will cause a prompt release of the LPL and HL from its binding sites at the endothelial surface. The liver rapidly degrades the release plasma compound of LPL and HL. This results in a lack of enzyme to degrade triglycerides during the later part of the HD and for another 3–4 h. PD patients have a similar baseline level of lipases but are not exposed to the negative effect of anticoagulation.

  8. Uremic myopathy: Is oxidative stress implicated in muscle dysfunction in uremia?

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    Antonia eKaltsatou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is accompanied by progressive muscle weakness and premature fatigue, in part linked to hypokinesis and in part to uremic toxicity. These changes are associated with various detrimental biochemical and morphological alterations. All of these pathological parameters are collectively termed ureamic myopathy. Various interventions while helpful can’t fully remedy the pathological phenotype. Complex mechanisms that stimulate muscle dysfunction in uremia have been proposed, and oxidative stress could be implicated. Skeletal muscles continuously produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS at rest and more so during contraction. The aim of this mini review is to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how ROS and RNS generation might contribute to muscle dysfunction in uremia. Thus a systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. While few studies met our criteria their findings are discussed making reference to other available literature data. Oxidative stress can direct muscle cells into a catabolic state and chronic exposure to it leads to wasting. Moreover, redox disturbances can significantly affect force production per se. We conclude that oxidative stress can be in part responsible for some aspects of uremic myopathy. Further research is needed to discern clear mechanisms and to help efforts to counteract muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in uremic patients.

  9. The Sulfur Metabolite Lanthionine: Evidence for a Role as a Novel Uremic Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Alessandra F; Zacchia, Miriam; Trepiccione, Francesco; Ingrosso, Diego

    2017-01-10

    Lanthionine is a nonproteinogenic amino acid, composed of two alanine residues that are crosslinked on their β-carbon atoms by a thioether linkage. It is biosynthesized from the condensation of two cysteine molecules, while the related compound homolanthionine is formed from the condensation of two homocysteine molecules. The reactions can be carried out by either cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) or cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) independently, in the alternate reactions of the transsulfuration pathway devoted to hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis. Low plasma total hydrogen sulfide levels, probably due to reduced CSE expression, are present in uremia, while homolanthionine and lanthionine accumulate in blood, the latter several fold. Uremic patients display a derangement of sulfur amino acid metabolism with a high prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia. Uremia is associated with a high cardiovascular mortality, the causes of which are still not completely explained, but are related to uremic toxicity, due to the accumulation of retention products. Lanthionine inhibits hydrogen sulfide production in hepatoma cells, possibly through CBS inhibition, thus providing some basis for the biochemical mechanism, which may significantly contribute to alterations of metabolism sulfur compounds in these subjects (e.g., high homocysteine and low hydrogen sulfide). We therefore suggest that lanthionine is a novel uremic toxin.

  10. The Sulfur Metabolite Lanthionine: Evidence for a Role as a Novel Uremic Toxin

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    Alessandra F. Perna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lanthionine is a nonproteinogenic amino acid, composed of two alanine residues that are crosslinked on their β-carbon atoms by a thioether linkage. It is biosynthesized from the condensation of two cysteine molecules, while the related compound homolanthionine is formed from the condensation of two homocysteine molecules. The reactions can be carried out by either cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS or cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE independently, in the alternate reactions of the transsulfuration pathway devoted to hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis. Low plasma total hydrogen sulfide levels, probably due to reduced CSE expression, are present in uremia, while homolanthionine and lanthionine accumulate in blood, the latter several fold. Uremic patients display a derangement of sulfur amino acid metabolism with a high prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia. Uremia is associated with a high cardiovascular mortality, the causes of which are still not completely explained, but are related to uremic toxicity, due to the accumulation of retention products. Lanthionine inhibits hydrogen sulfide production in hepatoma cells, possibly through CBS inhibition, thus providing some basis for the biochemical mechanism, which may significantly contribute to alterations of metabolism sulfur compounds in these subjects (e.g., high homocysteine and low hydrogen sulfide. We therefore suggest that lanthionine is a novel uremic toxin.

  11. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with sickle cell anemia

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    Antonio Fabron Junior

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA are frequently transfused with red blood cells (RBC. Recently, we reported that the calculated risk of RBC alloimmunization per transfused unit in Brazilian patients with SCA is 1.15%. We describe a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with SCA. CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old Brazilian female with homozygous SCA was admitted for a program of partial exchange transfusion prior to cholecystectomy. Her blood group was O RhD positive and no atypical RBC alloantibody was detected using the indirect antiglobulin technique. Pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb was 8.7 g/dL and isovolumic partial exchange transfusion was performed using 4 units of ABO compatible packed RBC. Five days after the last transfusion she developed generalized joint pain and fever of 39°C. Her Hb level dropped from 12.0 g/dL to 9.3 g/dL and the unconjugated bilirrubin level rose to 27 mmol/L. She was jaundiced and had hemoglobinuria. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 48.7% HbS, 46.6% HbA1, 2.7% HbA2, and 2.0% HbF. The patient’s extended RBC phenotype was CDe, K-k+, Kp(a-b+, Fy(a-b-, M+N+s+, Le(a+b-, Di(a-. An RBC alloantibody with specificity to the Rh system (anti-c, titer 1:16.384 was identified by the indirect antiglobulin test. The Rh phenotype of the RBC used in the last packed RBC transfusion was CcDEe. The patient was discharged, asymptomatic, 7 days after admission.

  12. The role of rituximab in adults with warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, Daan; Kentos, Alain; Delannoy, André

    2015-05-21

    Warm antibody hemolytic anemia is the most common form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. When therapy is needed, corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of initial treatment but are able to cure only a minority of patients (hemolytic anemia in adults, although no prospective study convincingly supports this attitude. A recent randomized study strongly suggests that in first-line treatment, rituximab combined with steroids is superior to monotherapy with steroids. If this finding is confirmed, rituximab will emerge as a major component of the management of warm antibody hemolytic anemia not only after relapse but as soon as treatment is needed.

  13. Does the adequacy parameter Kt/V(urea reflect uremic toxin concentrations in hemodialysis patients?

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    Sunny Eloot

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis aims at removing uremic toxins thus decreasing their concentrations. The present study investigated whether Kt/V(urea, used as marker of dialysis adequacy, is correlated with these concentrations. Predialysis blood samples were taken before a midweek session in 71 chronic HD patients. Samples were analyzed by colorimetry, HPLC, or ELISA for a broad range of uremic solutes. Solute concentrations were divided into four groups according to quartiles of Kt/V(urea, and also of different other parameters with potential impact, such as age, body weight (BW, Protein equivalent of Nitrogen Appearance (PNA, Residual Renal Function (RRF, and dialysis vintage. Dichotomic concentration comparisons were performed for gender and Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Analysis of Variance in quartiles of Kt/V(urea did not show significant differences for any of the solute concentrations. For PNA, however, concentrations showed significant differences for urea (P<0.001, uric acid (UA, p-cresylsulfate (PCS, and free PCS (all P<0.01, and for creatinine (Crea and hippuric acid (HA (both P<0.05. For RRF, concentrations varied for β₂-microglobulin (P<0.001, HA, free HA, free indoxyl sulfate, and free indole acetic acid (all P<0.01, and for p-cresylglucuronide (PCG, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF, free PCS, and free PCG (all P<0.05. Gender and body weight only showed differences for Crea and UA, while age, vintage, and diabetes mellitus only showed differences for one solute concentration (UA, UA, and free PCS, respectively. Multifactor analyses indicated a predominant association of concentration with protein intake and residual renal function. In conclusion, predialysis concentrations of uremic toxins seem to be dependent on protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance and residual renal function, and not on dialysis adequacy as assessed by Kt/V(urea. Efforts to control intestinal load of uremic toxin precursors by dietary or other

  14. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  15. Atypical Presentation of Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor in a Child

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    Y. T. Udaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor (ATRT is a rare malignant intracranial neoplasm more commonly diagnosed in young children. The authors report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a long standing history of slowly progressive weight loss, fatigue, and weakness over 1.5 years whose magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large heterogeneous enhancing dorsally exophytic lower brainstem mass. Examination revealed extreme cachexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, dysphagia, dysarthria, bilateral dysmetria, and global weakness without ambulation. The protracted history and neuroimaging features were most suggestive of a low grade glioma. However, pathology revealed a hypercellular tumor with large hyperchromatic nucleoli and loss of INI-1 staining on immunohistochemistry consistent with a diagnosis of an ATRT. The child died shortly after surgery due to complications from his brainstem infiltrative disease. This case illustrates the diverse presentation of ATRT in childhood that can clinically and radiographically mimic that of low grade glioma.

  16. Fatal hemolytic anemia associated with metformin: A case report

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    Packer Clifford D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Metformin is a widely prescribed biguanide antidiabetic drug that has been implicated as a cause of hemolytic anemia in three previous case reports. We report a case of rapidly fatal hemolysis that was temporally associated with the initiation of metformin treatment for diabetes. Clinicians need to be aware of this rare but potentially serious side effect of metformin. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian man with type 2 diabetes mellitus was started on metformin to improve glycemic control. Shortly afterwards, he developed progressive fatigue, exertional dyspnea, cranberry-colored urine and jaundice. Laboratory studies showed severe hemolysis, with a drop in hemoglobin from 14.7 to 6.6 g/dl over 4 days, markedly elevated lactate dehydrogenase, bilirubin and reticulocyte counts, and a low haptoglobin level. A peripheral blood smear showed no schistocytes, and a direct Coombs test was positive for anti-IgG and negative for anti-C3. Despite corticosteroid treatment and transfusion of packed red blood cells, the patient developed increasing dyspnea, hypotension, further decline in hemoglobin to 3.3 g/dl, and fatal cardiorespiratory arrest 12 hours after admission. Conclusion The serologic findings in this case suggest an autoimmune hemolytic anemia, caused either by a drug-induced autoantibody or a warm autoantibody. Based on the temporal association with metformin and the lack of other clear precipitating causes, we propose that metformin-induced hemolysis with a drug-induced autoantibody is a strong possibility. This mechanism differs from a previously described case with a possible antibody to the erythrocyte-drug complex. It has been shown, however, that hemolysis may occur via multiple mechanisms from the same drug. Clinicians should consider the possibility of metformin-associated immune hemolytic anemia in patients with otherwise unexplained hemolysis.

  17. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

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    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  18. Etiopathogenesis of hemolytic reactions in total artificial heart recipients.

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    Vasků, J; Urbánek, P

    1997-12-01

    Hemolysis in total artificial heart (TAH) recipients was analyzed. From a total of 66 long-term experiments lasting from 30-314 days performed in the Brno Research Center, in 53 animals, the total red blood cell (RBC) count, hematocrit, total hemoglobin, and free plasma hemoglobin were investigated. We could essentially divide the whole group of calves in 2 subgroups. The first subgroup was calves with hemolytic reactions, and the second subgroup was calves without any hemolytic reaction at all. In the first subgroup, hemolysis occurred in 47% of the overall number of animals during extracorporeal circulation (ECC), in 15% during ECC and later periodically during the experiment, in 8% during ECC and then continuously during the experiment, and finally in 10% not during ECC but repeatedly during the experiment. In 20% of the animals from the overall number, hemolysis did not occur at all (second subgroup). These results testify to the great individual differences within 1 breed (Bohemian with a substantial component of Holstein). These differences are further modified by exogenous and endogenous factors. First, the inborn resistance of the RBC membrane and also thrombi formation and the mineralization of the driving diaphragm are very important. The extreme situation of decreased RBC membrane resistance was proved using a calf from another breed, the slow growing Scottish Highland breed, which did not survive 22 days of pumping due to intractable lethal hemolysis. These factors are also indicated by the hemolytic action of some drugs (e.g., Dopegyt) used during the experiment for another reason. Also important are the mechanical forces of pumping, surface moieties of the biomaterial, mineralization of the driving diaphragms, thrombi formation, infection, etc. Essentially, the hemolytic reaction in the TAH recipient has a multifactorial character. Hemolysis is undoubtedly an important factor, which can have a profound impact on the length of survival. The

  19. Primary biliary cholangitis associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

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    Gonzalez-Moreno, Emmanuel I; Martinez-Cabriales, Sylvia A; Cruz-Moreno, Miguel A; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar D; Cortez-Hernandez, Carlos A; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco J; Garza, Aldo A; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Jose A; Garcia-Compean, Diego; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2016-02-01

    There are many autoimmune diseases associated with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), known as primary biliary cirrhosis; however, the association between PBC and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) has rarely been reported. It is documented that hemolysis is present in over 50% of the patients with chronic liver disease, regardless of the etiologies. Due to the clear and frequent relationship between PBC and many autoimmune diseases, it is reasonable to suppose that wAIHA may be another autoimmune disorder seen in association with PBC. Here we reported a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with wAIHA associated with PBC.

  20. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

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    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  1. Trimethoprim-induced immune hemolytic anemia in a pediatric oncology patient presenting as an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sweta; Piefer, Cindy L; Fueger, Judy T; Johnson, Susan T; Punzalan, Rowena C

    2010-12-01

    A 10-year-old male with acute leukemia presented with post-chemotherapy anemia. During red cell transfusion, he developed hemoglobinuria. Transfusion reaction workup was negative. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia was suspected because of positive direct antiglobulin test, negative eluate, and microspherocytes on smear pre- and post-transfusion. Drug studies using the indirect antiglobulin test were strongly positive with trimethoprim and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole but negative with sulfamethoxazole. The patient recovered after discontinuing the drug, with no recurrence in 2 years. Other causes of anemia should be considered in patients with worse-than-expected anemia after chemotherapy. Furthermore, hemolysis during transfusion is not always a transfusion reaction.

  2. Anti-Kpa-induced severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, R; Patel, B; Harrison, J S

    2009-01-01

    Kpa is a low-frequency antigen occurring in less than 2 percent of the Caucasian population. Mild to moderate delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR) and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn attributable to anti-Kpa have been reported. Severe overt DHTR has not been reported with anti-Kpa. A case of a severe DHTR attributed to anti-Kpa after multiple RBC transfusions is being reported. A 52-year-old Caucasian woman received multiple units of RBCs for a lower gastrointestinal bleed. She was referred to our institution for hepatic and renal failure, which was supported by laboratory findings of peak LDH, bilirubin, BUN, and creatinine elevations. Hemoglobin had dropped on Day 10 after transfusion. The DAT and antibody screen (ABS) were negative. Initial workup and subsequent ABS were negative. Anti-Kpa was identified when an additional RBC panel was tested. One of the RBC units transfused was incompatible by antihuman globulin (AHG) crossmatch with the patient's plasma and typed positive for Kpa. DHTR was confirmed after extensive workup. The patient responded to supportive therapy and experienced an uneventful recovery. DHTR may not be considered when DAT and ABS are negative. However, correlation of recent transfusion with signs and symptoms should alert the clinician to entertain and investigate a DHTR that should include the AHG crossmatch of all implicated RBC units. The severity of the reaction also raises concerns as to when and what antigen specificity should be considered for inclusion in the antibody screening cells.

  3. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes and hemolytic Listeria innocua in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, S R; Stout, J C; Hanning, I B; Clement, A; Fortes, E D; den Bakker, H C; Wiedmann, M; Ricke, S C

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, saprophytic, Gram-positive bacterium and occasional food-borne pathogen, often associated with ready-to-eat meat products. Because of the increased consumer interest in organic, all natural, and free range poultry products, it is important to understand L. monocytogenes in the context of such systems. Pasture-reared poultry were surveyed over the course of two 8-wk rearing periods. Cecal, soil, and grass samples were collected for Listeria isolation and characterization. Seven of 399 cecal samples (or 1.75%) were Listeria-positive. All positive cecal samples were obtained from broilers sampled at 2 wk of age. Grass and soil samples were collected from the pasture both before and after introduction of the poultry. Environmental samples collected after introduction of poultry were significantly more likely to contain Listeria (P Listeria, sigB allelic typing, and hlyA PCR tests found that both L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, including hemolytic L. innocua, were recovered from the cecal and environmental (grass/soil) samples. The sigB allelic typing also revealed that (1) positive samples could be composed of 2 or more allelic types; (2) allelic types found in cecal samples could also be found in the environment; and (3) allelic types could persist through the 2 rearing periods. Our data indicate that both pasture-reared poultry and their environment can be contaminated with L. monocytogenes and hemolytic L. innocua.

  5. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome.

  6. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses.

  7. [Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia after ABO match living donor liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohata, Katsura; Fujiwarw, Tohru; Yamamoto, Joji; Yamada, Minami; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Satoh, Kazushige; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kameoka, Junichi; Satomi, Susumu; Harigae, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    A case of severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia after ABO matched living donor liver transplantation. We present here a case of severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia after ABO matched living donor liver transplantation. The patient is 56 y.o male. He received living donor liver transplantation from his ABO matched son in May 2007. In July, he was suffered from a progressive anemia, and diagnosed as autoimmune hemolytic anemia by the laboratory examinations. Intensive treatment including predonisolone, azathiopurine, rituximab, plasma exchange, was given, however, the disease was resistant to the treatment. By the administration of cyclophosphamide combined with rituximab, remission was finally achieved. To date, immune mediated hemolytic anemia after ABO matched living donor liver transplantation has not been reported, although several cases of ABO mismatched living donor liver transplantation have been reported. His severe but transient clinical course of anemia suggests that the transient emergence of donor lymphocytes may be responsible for onset of hemolytic anemia.

  8. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves' disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Packer, Clifford D

    2009-08-13

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves' disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves' disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert's disease presented with a one month history of jaundice, fatigue, and black stools. After diagnosis of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the patient was started on prednisone 1 mg/kg with rapid improvement in his anemia and jaundice. Our subject's mother and possibly his maternal grandmother also had autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which raises the possibility of hereditary autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a rarely reported condition.

  9. Pseudoarthrosis in atypical femoral fracture: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, S; Bottai, V; Dell'Osso, G; De Paola, G; Ghilardi, M; Guido, G

    2013-11-01

    Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment; they have a high frequency of delayed healing. The authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy. Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment even if, in the literature, there is no clarity on the exact pathogenetic mechanism. The Task Force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research described the major and minor features to define atypical fractures and recommends that all the five major features must be present while minor features are not necessary. Another controversial aspect regarding the atypical femoral fractures is the higher frequency of the delayed healing that can be probably related to a suppressed bone turnover caused by a prolonged period of bisphosphonates treatment. This concept could be corroborated by the Spet Tc exam. In the case of a pseudoarthrosis, there is not a standardization of the treatment. In this report, the authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy; the patient was studied with clinical, bioumoral end SPECT-Tc exam of both femurs. Many studies show the relationship between bisphosphonates and the presence of atypical fractures. These fractures should be monitored more closely due to the risk of nonunion and they require considering an initial treatment with pharmacological augmentation to reduce the complications for the patient and the health care costs.

  10. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs) of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias registered in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients and methods All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion. Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. Results We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all, hemolysis was confirmed in 359 patients, yielding an overall PPV of 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.5%–90.2%). A diagnosis could be established in 392 patients of whom 355 patients had a hemolytic diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed in 197 of the 249 patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, yielding a PPV of 79.1% (95% CI: 73.5%–84.0%). Diagnosis of acquired hemolytic anemia could be confirmed in 136 of the 163 patients, resulting in a PPV of 83.4% (95% CI: 76.8%–88.8%). For hemoglobinopathy PPV was 84.1% (95% CI: 77.4%–89.4%), for hereditary spherocytosis PPV was 80.6% (95% CI: 69.5%–88.9%), and for autoimmune hemolytic anemia PPV was 78.4% (95% CI: 70.4%–85.0%). Conclusion The PPV of hemolytic anemias was moderately high. The PPVs were comparable in the three main categories of overall hemolysis, and congenital and acquired hemolytic anemia. PMID:27445504

  11. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu-Qun; Dai, Zhenhua; Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-04-05

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury.

  12. Effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on the heart in a rat model of uremic cardiomyopathy.

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    Lyubov Chaykovska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uremic cardiomyopathy contributes substantially to mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 may improve cardiac function, but is mainly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a rat model of chronic renal failure, 5/6-nephrectomized [5/6N] rats were treated orally with DPP-4 inhibitors (linagliptin, sitagliptin, alogliptin or placebo once daily for 4 days from 8 weeks after surgery, to identify the most appropriate treatment for cardiac dysfunction associated with CKD. Linagliptin showed no significant change in blood level AUC(0-∞ in 5/6N rats, but sitagliptin and alogliptin had significantly higher AUC(0-∞ values; 41% and 28% (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0324, respectively. No correlation of markers of renal tubular and glomerular function with AUC was observed for linagliptin, which required no dose adjustment in uremic rats. Linagliptin 7 µmol/kg caused a 2-fold increase in GLP-1 (AUC 201.0 ng/l*h in 5/6N rats compared with sham-treated rats (AUC 108.6 ng/l*h (p = 0.01. The mRNA levels of heart tissue fibrosis markers were all significantly increased in 5/6N vs control rats and reduced/normalized by linagliptin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DPP-4 inhibition increases plasma GLP-1 levels, particularly in uremia, and reduces expression of cardiac mRNA levels of matrix proteins and B-type natriuretic peptides (BNP. Linagliptin may offer a unique approach for treating uremic cardiomyopathy in CKD patients, with no need for dose-adjustment.

  13. Bisphosphonate-associated atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Ely A; Banks, Kevin P; Vroman, Penny J

    2015-03-01

    Bisphosphonates help prevent progressive bone mineralization loss and subsequent osteoporotic fractures. However, long-term bisphosphonate therapy paradoxically increases the risk of a unique injury called an atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture. Despite this, the benefits of bisphosphonates outweigh the risks, because far more pathologic fractures are prevented than induced. The early identification of atypical subtrochanteric femur fractures is important as there is high associated morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of a 76-y-old woman with a completed bisphosphonate-associated atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture.

  14. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  15. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...

  16. Atypical presentations of Wolframs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary or sporadic neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD. The classically described presentation is of insulin-dependent diabetes, followed by optic atrophy, central diabetes insipidus, and sensory neural deafness. Also included are less well-described presentations of Wolframs syndrome. We here present three cases of atypical presentation of this syndrome. Case 1: A 15-year-old boy with insulin-dependent diabetes was presented for evaluation of depressive symptoms associated with suicidal tendency. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are described with Wolframs syndrome, and wolframin gene, in recessive inheritance, is associated with psychiatric illnesses without other manifestations of Wolframs syndrome. Case 2: A 17-year-old diabetic boy on insulin with good control of blood sugar presented for evaluation of delayed puberty. Central hypogonadism and other anterior pituitary hormone dysfunctions are the less publicized hormone dysfunctions in Wolframs syndrome. Case 3: A 23-year-old female who was on insulin for diabetes for the past 14 years, got admitted for evaluation of sudden loss of vision. This patient had developed a vitreous hemorrhage and, on evaluation, was found to have optic atrophy, sensory neural hearing loss, and diabetes insipidus, and presented differently from the gradual loss of vision described in Wolframs syndrome. Conclusion: Wolframs syndrome being a multisystem degenerative disorder can have myriad other manifestations than the classically described features. Neuropsychiatric manifestations, depression with suicidal risk, central hypogonadism, and secondary adrenal insufficiency are among the less well-described manifestations of this syndrome.

  17. Atypical presentations of neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system classically characterized by acute, severe episodes of optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. The identification of an autoantibody exclusively detected in NMO patients against aquaporin-4 (AQP-4 has allowed identification of cases beyond the classical phenotype. Brain lesions, once thought as infrequent, can be observed in NMO patients, but lesions have different characteristics from the ones seen in multiple sclerosis. Additionally, some AQP-4 antibody positive patients may present with a variety of symptoms not being restricted to optic neuritis and acute myelitis during the first attack or in a relapse. Examples are not limited to, but may include patients only with brain and/or brainstem lesions, narcolepsy with hypothalamic lesions or patients with intractable hiccups, nausea and vomiting. The prompt identification of NMO patients with atypical presentations may benefit these patients with institution of early treatment to reduce disability and prevent further attacks.

  18. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS FROM SCRATCH TO THE PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chauhan*, Amit Mittal, Pradeep Kumar Arora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental illness constitutes the second-largest disease burden in the United States. Psychosis is one of the most common and severe mental illnesses. It is an extremely devastating condition characterised by delusions, hallucinations, distortion of thoughts and deteriorating social functioning experiences. Psychosis in all human societies has approximately same incidence of occurrence as in accordance to “anthropo-parity principle.” It has large economic impact on various aspects of cognition, health, and quality of life which has devastated effects on its sufferers and facing them large economic burden. Psychosis (Schizophrenia is associated with an imbalance of the dopaminergic system, entailing hyper-stimulation of dopamine function in the brain, particularly in the mesolimbic pathway. Consequences of antipsychotic treatment are far reaching and expensive. Detrimental extrapyramidal side effects associated with conventional antipsychotics and non-compliance among patients limits long term treatment with conventional antipsychotics. It gives rise to a new class, atypical antipsychotics owning low propensity to cause EPS, efficacy against refractory cases and better control over negative symptoms, better tolerance and compliance along with lower relapse rate and safer adverse effect profile. Atypical antipsychotics have revolutionized the treatment of psychosis, now being the treatment of choice for patients with psychosis. The positive therapeutic experience with the atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of psychosis and their favourable effects outweighs their unfavourable adverse effects. Though atypical antipsychotics are widely prescribed in the treatment of schizophrenia, however not a single atypical antipsychotic drug having any exceptional efficacy and safety profile. Thus, there is still a lot of research needed to be carried out in the development of novel atypical antipsychotics. This review is comprehensive appraisal about

  19. Efficacy and safety of splenectomy in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Valentina; Rosamilio, Rosa; Ferrara, Idalucia; Seneca, Elisa; Serio, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare hematologic disease, primarily affecting adults or children with immunodeficiency disease. First-line therapy consists of long course of steroids administration, with an early complete response rate (CRr) of 75-80%, but up to 20-30% of patients requires a second-line therapy. Rituximab is the first choice in refractory old AIHA patients, because of its safety and efficacy (early CRr at 80-90% and at 68% at 2-3 years). For this reason, splenectomy is even less chosen as second-line therapy in elderly, even though laparoscopic technique decreased complication and mortality rates. However, splenectomy can be still considered a good therapeutic option with a CRr of 81% at 35.6 months in patients older than 60 year-old, when rituximab administration cannot be performed. PMID:28352823

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of cold agglutinin mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2012-05-01

    Exact diagnosis of the subtype has essential therapeutic consequences in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Cold-antibody types include primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) and rare cases of cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to cancer or acute infection. Primary CAD is a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Not all patients require pharmacological therapy, but treatment seems indicated more often than previously thought. Corticosteroids should not be used to treat primary CAD. Half of the patients respond to rituximab monotherapy; median response duration is 11 months. The most efficient treatment to date is fludarabine and rituximab in combination, resulting in responses in 75%, complete responses in 20% and median response duration of more than 66 months. Toxicity may be a concern, and an individualized approach is discussed. Erythrocyte transfusions can be given provided specific precautions are undertaken. No evidence-based therapy exists in secondary CAS, but optimal treatment of the underlying disorder is essential when feasible.

  1. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM.

  2. Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to isoimmunization with anti-E antibodies: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarici, S Umit; Alpay, Faruk; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Ozcan, Okan; Gökçay, Erdal

    2002-01-01

    Minor blood group hemolytic disease is extremely rare, since the overall potency of minor blood groups in inducing antibodies is significantly lower when compared with that of Rh (D) antigen. We hereby report a very rare case of severe neonatal anti-E hemolytic disease due to E minor blood group incompatibility. A term newborn born to a 27-year-old, gravida 3, para 3 mother was referred due to a high and increasing serum bilirubin level despite phototherapy on the 4th day of life. On admission physical examination was normal except for the jaundice, and results of the laboratory investigation demonstrated a moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin 7.8 g/dl) and a severe hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia (serum total and indirect bilirubin levels 36 mg/ dl and 32.8 mg/dl, respectively; reticulocyte count 15%; and a positive direct antiglobulin test). As there was no apparent cause of the hemolytic disease such as Rh or ABO incompatibilities, further investigation (a positive indirect antiglobulin test and a positive irregular anti-E antibody in both the patient and mother, and minor blood group antigen profiles in family members compatible with E minor blood group isoimmunization) revealed the presence of anti-E hemolytic disease due to E minor blood group incompatibility. Two exchange transfusions with a 12-hour-interval were performed with minor blood group compatible fresh whole blood, and the patient was discharged in a healthy condition on the 10th postnatal day. If the most common causes of severe neonatal hemolytic disease such as Rh and ABO incompatibilities cannot be demonstrated in a newborn with significant hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia, anti-E hemolytic disease should strongly be considered in differential diagnosis. It should be kept in mind that a very severe from of minor group antibody hemolytic disease characterized by anemia and severe hyperbilirubinemia many exchange transfusions may be encountered during the course of the disease.

  3. A study of median nerve entrapment neuropathy at wrist in uremic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, V S; Sharma, R D; Pawar, S M; Waghmare, S N

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy seen in uremic patients. The study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of CTS in uremic patients and to identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic test. Study was conducted on 80 subjects of age 30-60 years. End-stage kidney disease patients were recruited for the clinical evaluation, motor nerve conduction studies (NCS), sensory NCS, F wave study and median-versus-ulnar comparison studies (palm-to-wrist mixed comparison study, digit 4 sensory latencies study and lumbrical-interossei comparison study). Among three different diagnostic modalities, frequency of CTS was found to be 17.5% with clinical evaluation, 15% with routine NCS studies and 25% with median-versus-ulnar comparison studies. Among the median-versus-ulnar comparison studies, lumbrical-interossei comparison study was found to be most sensitive (90%). The comparative tests for CTS are more sensitive compared to routine NCS and clinical examination. Among the comparative tests, lumbrical-interossei comparison study is the most sensitive. Early diagnosis of CTS may help patients of uremia to seek proper treatment at an appropriate time.

  4. Association of high-sensitive C-reactive protein and dialysis adequacy with uremic pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekmakan, Leila; Malekmakan, Alireza; Sayadi, Mehrab; Pakfetrat, Maryam; Sepaskhah, Mozhdeh; Roozbeh, Jamshid

    2015-09-01

    Uremic pruritus is a difficult symptom in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients, and its patho-physiological mechanism remains unknown. To determine the relationship between pruritus and C-reactive protein as well as dialysis adequacy among the HD patients, we studied 241 chronic HD patients in Shiraz dialysis centers, Iran. The patients were selected by convenient sampling and the data were collected using a checklist, interview and lab tests. The mean age of our patients was 53.9 ± 16.3 years and 128 (53.1%) of them were male. There were 97 (40.2%) patients who complained of pruritus. A significant association was found between high-sensitive C-reactive protein and pruritus (P = 0.004). Also, a significant positive relationship was observed between pruritus and dialysis adequacy (P dialysis adequacy and pruritus. A better understanding of the factors implicated in the cause of uremic pruritus is essential in the development of more-effective treatments and improved quality of life in HD patients.

  5. Modified Lipids and Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Class of Uremic Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nans Florens

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with an enhanced oxidative stress and deep modifications in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. First, many oxidized lipids accumulate in CKD and were shown to exert toxic effects on cells and tissues. These lipids are known to interfere with many cell functions and to be pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory, especially in the cardiovascular system. Some, like F2-isoprostanes, are directly correlated with CKD progression. Their accumulation, added to their noxious effects, rendered their nomination as uremic toxins credible. Similarly, lipoproteins are deeply altered by CKD modifications, either in their metabolism or composition. These impairments lead to impaired effects of HDL on their normal effectors and may strongly participate in accelerated atherosclerosis and failure of statins in end-stage renal disease patients. This review describes the impact of oxidized lipids and other modifications in the natural history of CKD and its complications. Moreover, this review focuses on the modifications of lipoproteins and their impact on the emergence of cardiovascular diseases in CKD as well as the appropriateness of considering them as actual mediators of uremic toxicity.

  6. Supplementation of Emblica officinalis (Amla) extract reduces oxidative stress in uremic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tung-Sheng; Liou, Show-Yih; Chang, Yen-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Emblica Officinalis (also known as Amla or Indian Gooseberry), a natural, traditional and functional food in Asia, has physiological benefits such as hepato-, cyto- and radio- protection, as well as hypolipidemic effects. In addition, Amla often functions as a potent antioxidant due to the high level of ascorbic acid (ranging from 1,100 to 1,700 mg/100 g of fruit) in its fruit. The aim of this study was to determine whether supplementation with Amla extract could reduce oxidative stress in patients with uremia. The findings show that supplementation with Amla extract for 4 months reduced the plasma oxidative marker, 8-iso-prostaglandin, (M0 vs. M4 = 1415 +/- 1234 pg/ml vs. 750 +/- 496 pg/ml, p Amla for 4 months. Our data suggest that Amla supplementation may increase plasma antioxidant power and decrease oxidative stress in uremic patients. However, Amla extract did not influence hepatic or renal function, or diabetic and atherogenic indices in uremic patients.

  7. Evidence that histidine is an essential amino acid in normal and chronically uremic man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopple, J D; Swendseid, M E

    1975-05-01

    The requirement for dietary histidine was investigated in four normal and three chronically uremic men. Subjects lived in a metabolic unit where they were fed three isonitrogenous diets in the following order: a 40-g protein diet (28 plus or minus SD 8 days), a semi-synthetic amino acid diet deficient in histidine (35 plus or minus 2 days), and an amino acid diet which contained histidine (31 plus or minus 5 days). With ingestion of the histidine-deficient diet, nitrogen balance gradually became negative, and serum albumin decreased in six subjects. Plasma histidine fell by 82 plus or minus 6 per cent; muscle histidine decreased by 62 plus or minus 19 per cent; the hematocrit fell by 25 plus or minus 9 per cent; and serum iron rose. Subjects felt unwell, and in five cases a skin lesion consisting of fine scales, dry skin, and mild erythema developed. After administration of the histidine-repletion diet, nitrogen balance became positive in six subjects; serum albumin increased in five cases; plasma and muscle histidine rose; serum iron fell abruptly; a reticulocytosis ensued; and the hematocrit rose. The clinical symptoms and skin lesions disappeared. These observations indicate that histidine is an essential amino acid in normal and chronically uremic man. The absence of dietary histidine is associated with failure of normal erythropoiesis.

  8. Environmental NO2 and CO Exposure: Ignored Factors Associated with Uremic Pruritus in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-08-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP), also known as chronic kidney disease–associated pruritus, is a common and disabling symptom in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). The pathogenesis of UP is multifactorial and poorly understood. Outdoor air pollution has well-known effects on the health of patients with allergic diseases through an inflammatory process. Air pollution–induced inflammation could occur in the skin and aggravate skin symptoms such as pruritus or impair epidermal barrier function. To assess the role of air pollutants, and other clinical variables on uremic pruritus (UP) in HD patients, we recruited 866 patients on maintenance HD. We analyzed the following variables for association with UP: average previous 12-month and 24-month background concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), and suspended particulate matter of serum ferritin levels, low-density lipoprotein levels, and environmental NO2/CO levels were positively associated with UP, and serum albumin levels were negatively associated with UP. This cross-sectional study showed that air pollutants such as NO2 and CO might be associated with UP in patients with MHD.

  9. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Line S; Bosteen, Markus H; Fink, Lisbeth N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosc......Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis...... and atherosclerosis in uremic settings, insight into new treatment options with effects on both parameters is warranted. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves glucose homeostasis, and is approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that GLP-1 also dampens inflammation and atherosclerosis. Our...... aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX)). Uremic (n = 29) and sham-operated (n = 14) atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s...

  10. [A case of steroid resistant autoimmune hemolytic anemia in ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Jong; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Young Jee; Ko, Bong Min; Lee, Moon Sung; Shim, Chan Sup; Kim, Hyun Jung; Hong, Dae Sik

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmunity is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and associated extraintestinal manifestations. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with ulcerative colitis is a rare occurrence. No more than 50 cases have been described in the international literatures, and only 2 cases reported in Korea. A 29-year-old woman who was diagnosed as ulcerative colitis two years ago was complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and did not respond to steroid therapy. Ultimately, total colectomy and splenectomy were carried out for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and hemolytic anemia. After the operation, anemia was resolved. We present the case with a review of literature.

  11. Do all hemolytic anemias that occur after mitral valve repair require surgical treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungunes, Askin; Akpinar, Ibrahim; Dogan, Mehmet; Baser, Kazim; Yildirim, Ismail Safa; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C

    2010-12-01

    We report on a 29-year-old woman with severe hemolytic anemia following mitral valve annuloplasty. Although hemolysis due to mechanical prosthetic mitral valve is well recognized, hemolytic anemia associated with mitral valve repair is an uncommon condition. Reoperation may be considered if the patient has serious and persistent anemia. Although valve replacement is suggested to be a unique intervention, it may not be the solution every time because of mechanical effects. Various mechanisms of hemolysis related to mitral valve repair were suggested, but sufficient and precise data is not available. In this case, we tried to emphasize whether all hemolytic anemias that occur after mitral valve repair require surgical treatment.

  12. Hemolytic activity of venom from crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci spines

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chi-Chiu; Tsai, Wann-Sheng; Hsieh, Hernyi Justin; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2013-01-01

    Background The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a venomous species from Taiwan whose venom provokes strong hemolytic activity. To understand the hemolytic properties of A. planci venom, samples were collected from A. planci spines in the Penghu Islands, dialyzed with distilled water, and lyophilized into A. planci spine venom (ASV) powder. Results Both crude venom and ASV cause 50% hemolysis at a concentration of 20 μg/mL. The highest hemolytic activity of ASV was measured at pH...

  13. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen DL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Lund Hansen,1 Ulrik Malthe Overgaard,2 Lars Pedersen,3 Henrik Frederiksen1,3 1Department of Haematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 2Department of Haematology, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Purpose: The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias registered in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients and methods: All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion. Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. Results: We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all, hemolysis was confirmed in 359 patients, yielding an overall PPV of 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.5%–90.2%. A diagnosis could be established in 392 patients of whom 355 patients had a hemolytic diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed in 197 of the 249 patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, yielding a PPV of 79.1% (95% CI: 73.5%–84.0%. Diagnosis of acquired hemolytic anemia could be confirmed in 136 of the 163 patients, resulting in a PPV of 83.4% (95% CI: 76.8%–88.8%. For hemoglobinopathy PPV was 84.1% (95% CI: 77.4%–89.4%, for hereditary spherocytosis PPV was 80.6% (95% CI: 69.5%–88.9%, and for autoimmune hemolytic anemia PPV was 78.4% (95% CI: 70.4%–85.0%. Conclusion: The PPV of hemolytic anemias was moderately high. The PPVs were comparable in the three main

  14. Hemolytic anemia as first presentation of Wilson's disease with uncommon ATP7B mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xing-Nong; Mao, Li-Ping; Lou, Yin-Jun; Tong, Hong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism and the main manifestations are liver and brain disorders. Hemolytic anemia is an unusual complication of WD. We describe a 15-year-old girl who developed hemolytic anemia as the first manifestation of Wilson's disease. An Arg952Lys mutation was found in exon 12 of the ATP7B gene, which is uncommon among Chinese Han individuals. From this case and reviews, we can achieve a better understanding of WD. Besides, we may conclude that the probable diagnosis of WD should be considered in young patients with unexplained hemolytic anemia, especially in patients with hepatic and/or neurologic disorder.

  15. Divergent behavior of hydrogen sulfide pools and of the sulfur metabolite lanthionine, a novel uremic toxin, in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Alessandra F; Di Nunzio, Annarita; Amoresano, Angela; Pane, Francesca; Fontanarosa, Carolina; Pucci, Piero; Vigorito, Carmela; Cirillo, Giovanni; Zacchia, Miriam; Trepiccione, Francesco; Ingrosso, Diego

    2016-07-01

    Dialysis patients display a high cardiovascular mortality, the causes of which are still not completely explained, but are related to uremic toxicity. Among uremic toxins, homocysteine and cysteine are both substrates of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase in hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis, leading to the formation of two sulfur metabolites, lanthionine and homolanthionine, considered stable indirect biomarkers of its production. Hydrogen sulfide is involved in the modulation of multiple pathophysiological responses. In uremia, we have demonstrated low plasma total hydrogen sulfide levels, due to reduced cystathionine γ-lyase expression. Plasma hydrogen sulfide levels were measured in hemodialysis patients and healthy controls with three different techniques in comparison, allowing to discern the different pools of this gas. The protein-bound (the one thought to be the most active) and acid-labile forms are significantly decreased, while homolanthionine, but especially lanthionine, accumulate in the blood of uremic patients. The hemodialysis regimen plays a role in determining sulfur compounds levels, and lanthionine is partially removed by a single dialysis session. Lanthionine inhibits hydrogen sulfide production in cell cultures under conditions comparable to in vivo ones. We therefore propose that lanthionine is a novel uremic toxin. The possible role of high lanthionine as a contributor to the genesis of hyperhomocysteinemia in uremia is discussed.

  16. A comparison of oral and dental manifestations in diabetic and non-diabetic uremic patients receiving hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Murali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the oral and dental findings of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis and to compare the Results between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients undergoing hemodialysis were classified into diabetic and non-diabetic groups and examined for uremic oral manifestations, dental caries (DMFT, and periodontal status (CPITN. Mann-Whitney test of significance has been applied for analyzing DMFT score and chi-square test is used for analyzing CPITN score. Results: Of the study group, 46% were diabetic and only 11% of them did not have any oral manifestation. Oral manifestations observed were xerostomia and uremic odor, which contributed to 47 (23% and 37 (17%, respectively. Hyperpigmentation was present in 26 (12%, macroglossia in 23 (11%, and uremic tongue coating in 24 (11%. Mucosal petechiae were seen in 17 patients contributing to 8% of total patients. Eleven patients had tongue pallor (5%, 9 patients had glossitis with depapillation (4%, and 7 patients had dysgeusia (3%. Angular cheilitis and gingival swelling were seen in 5 patients (2%. Conclusion: The oral and dental manifestations were higher in prevalence in the study group. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups.

  17. Effect of treatment with human apolipoprotein A-I on atherosclerosis in uremic apolipoprotein-E deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja Xenia; Bro, Susanne; Andersen, Mikkel H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Uremia markedly increases the risk of atherosclerosis. Thus, effective anti-atherogenic treatments are needed for uremic patients. This study examined effects of non-lipidated recombinant human apoA-I (h-apoA-I) and a recombinant trimeric apoA-I molecule (TripA-I) on lipid metabolism a...

  18. Glucose intolerance in uremic patients: the relative contributions of impaired beta-cell function and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvestrand, A; Mujagic, M; Wajngot, A; Efendic, S

    1989-04-01

    Glucose tolerance and tissue sensitivity to insulin were examined in 19 renal failure patients on chronic regular hemodialysis (group U) and in 6 matched control subjects with normal renal function (group A). Based on glucose tolerance as assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), glucose tolerance was normal in 5 (group U:N), borderline in 5 (group U:BL) and decreased in 9 uremic subjects (group U:D). Compared with group A the uremics demonstrated significantly (p less than 0.01) impaired insulin sensitivity as assessed by a continuous mixed infusion of somatostatin, insulin and glucose (SIGIT). In addition 19 non-diabetic subjects with normal fasting blood glucose and normal renal function, matching the uremic patients with respect to glucose tolerance as assessed by OGTT, were studied (group B). In group B impairments in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity tended to be more pronounced in subjects with decreased OGTT as compared with those with borderline OGTT. In contrast, insulin resistance was present to a similar degree in uremic subjects of group U:N, U:BL and U:D. During SIGIT endogenous insulin, glucagon and growth hormone (GH) were suppressed in both uremic and control subjects. This implies that insulin resistance in uremia is most likely not due to hyperglucagonemia or abnormal GH metabolism. During OGTT subjects of group U:N had significantly higher insulin response than subjects of group U:BL (p less than 0.02) and group U:D (p less than 0.01). Insulinogenic index was significantly higher in group U:N than in group U:BL (p less than 0.02) and group U:D (p = 0.01) and was higher in group U:BL than in group U:D (p less than 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline.

  20. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs) of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias...... registered in the Danish National Patient Register. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion....... Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. RESULTS: We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all...

  1. Hemolytic Anemia as a Presenting Feature of Wilson’s Disease: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sunita; Toppo, Anupa; B Rath; Harbhajanka, Aparna; P Lalita Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    Wilson’s disease is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism causing severe damage to vital organs. Liver and brain disorders are the main manifestations. Severe hemolytic anemia is an unusual complication of Wilson’s disease. We present a case who developed spherocytic acute hemolytic anemia (Coomb’s negative) as the initial manifestation of Wilson’s disease. On examination Kayser- Fleischer ring was found. Laboratory data supported a diagnosis of Wilson’s disease.

  2. Effect of Intrauterine Transfusion on Neonatal Outcomes in Rh Hemolytic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Akkuş

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the neonates with Rh hemolytic disease according to the severity of hemolytic disease (slight, moderate and severe and the presence of intrauterine transfusion (IUT for necessity of postnatal exchange transfusion or phototherapy application and severity of neonatal anemia. Materials and Method: The neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with Rhesus hemolytic disease between January 2000 and November 2008 were included in this retrospective study. Cord blood hemoglobine and bilirubin levels, reticulocyte count, maximum bilirubin level, number of intrauterine transfusion, duration of phototherapy, requirement of postnatal exchange transfusion or redblood cell transfusions were all recorded. Results: A total of 44 neonates were included in the study. The mean gestational age and birth weight of infants were 37.6±0.3 week and 3031±53 g, respectively. Slight, moderate and severe hemolytic disease was determined in 13 (29.5%, 13 (29.5% and 18 (41% of infants, respectively. IUT was performed in 12 infants (27% and 9 of them (75% had severe hemolytic disease and this ratio was significantly higher compared with the infants without IUT. Similarly, requirement of postnatal exchange transfusion was also higher in infants who had IUT compared with the infants who did not have IUT. No significant difference was determined between infants with and without IUT in terms of duration of phototherapy, maximum bilirubin levels and transfusion requirement.Conclusion: The incidence of severe hemolytic disease and postnatal exchange requirement were significantly higher in infants with IUT compared with the infants without IUT. Therefore, it is concluded that if Rhesus hemolytic disease is severe in utero, it may present as severe hemolytic disease in the postnatal period. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 1-6

  3. Hemolytic Activity and Siderophore Production in Different Aeromonas Species Isolated from Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Jesús A.; González, César J.; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa

    1999-01-01

    The hemolytic activity and siderophore production of several strains of motile aeromonads were determined. The hemolytic activity of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas eucrenophila was enhanced after trypsinization of the samples. The enhancement of hemolysis was observed in strains that carried an aerolysin-like gene, detected by a PCR procedure. Siderophore production was demonstrated in all but one strain of Aeromonas jandaei. No apparent relationship was observed between the presence of plasm...

  4. Hemolytic anemia following mitral valve repair: A case presentation and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    AbouRjaili, Georges; Torbey, Estelle; Alsaghir, Taher; Olkovski, Yefim; Costantino, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a known complication after valve replacement, but the incidence of hemolysis following valve repair is unknown. A case involving mitral annuloplasty complicated by hemolytic anemia, which resolved after replacement of the valve, is presented. Only 70 cases of hemolysis after mitral valve repair have been reported in the literature. In nearly all of these cases, replacement or rerepair of the valve was the definitive treatment for hemolysis.

  5. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  6. Comparative characterization of the leukocidic and hemolytic activity of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoien-Dalen, P S; Rosenbusch, R F; Roth, J A

    1990-02-01

    The cytotoxic effect of Moraxella bovis 118F on bovine neutrophils was evaluated and characterized by use of a 51Cr release assay. Neutrophils harvested from healthy adult cattle were labeled with 51Cr. The leukocidic activity produced by M bovis 118F, a hemolytic strain of M bovis, was heat-labile. A live culture of strain 118F, at a ratio of 100 bacteria/neutrophil, released 97.7% of the 51Cr from labeled neutrophils. Neither a heat-killed preparation of M bovis 118F nor a live or heat-killed preparation of M bovis IBH63 (a nonhemolytic and nonpathogenic strain) induced significant (P greater than 0.05) release of 51Cr. Moraxella bovis 118F broth culture filtrates prepared for evaluation of leukocidic activity also were evaluated for hemolytic activity. These 2 toxic activities had several characteristics in common. Both were filterable, heat-labile, produced by a hemolytic strain, and were released during early logarithmic phase growth from broth cultures. Leukocidic and hemolytic activities were protected from degradation by phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor. Leukocidic and hemolytic activities were dependent on calcium ions. Filtrate resulted in 54.1% 51Cr release from labeled neutrophils and contained 646.7 hemolytic U/ml, respectively, when saline (0.85% NaCl) + 10 mM CaCl2 solution was used as diluent. Neither saline solution nor saline + 10 mM MgCl2 solution supported leukocidic or hemolytic activity. Serum, obtained from several calves 10 to 38 days after M bovis inoculation, substantially neutralized leukocidic and hemolytic activities, compared with paired preinoculation serum samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Tubercular lymphadenitis and abdominal tuberculosis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and severe intravascular hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh M Somalwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, a common disease in the developing world and a resurging problem in the developed world, is associated with numerous hematological manifestations. The most common manifestation is normochromic normocytic anemia of chronic disease. Hemolytic anemia is rare, and there are only a few previously reported cases. We report a case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with severe intravascular hemolysis in a case of abdominal tuberculosis. To our knowledge, this is one of the few cases reported in the literature.

  8. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Packer, Clifford D

    2009-01-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert’s disease presented with a one month history of jaund...

  9. Mecanismos básicos da encefalopatia urêmica Mechanisms underlying uremic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselli Scaini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Em pacientes com insuficiência renal, a encefalopatia é um problema comum que pode ser provocado pela uremia, deficiência de tiamina, diálise, rejeição de transplante, hipertensão, desequilíbrios hidroeletrolíticos e toxicidades medicamentosas. Em geral a encefalopatia se apresenta como um complexo de sintomas que progride de uma leve obnubilação sensitiva até delírio e coma. Esta revisão discute questões importantes com relação aos mecanismos de base da fisiopatologia da encefalopatia urêmica. A fisiopatologia da encefalopatia urêmica é até hoje incerta, mas postula-se o envolvimento de diversos fatores; trata-se de um processo complexo e provavelmente multifatorial. Distúrbios hormonais, estresse oxidativo, acúmulo de metabólitos, desequilíbrio entre os neurotransmissores excitatórios e inibitórios, e distúrbio do metabolismo intermediário foram identificados como fatores contribuintes. A despeito do progresso continuado na terapêutica, a maior parte das complicações neurológicas da uremia, como a encefalopatia urêmica, não respondem plenamente à diálise e muitas delas são desencadeadas ou agravadas pela diálise ou transplante renal. Por outro lado, estudos prévios demonstraram que a terapia antioxidante pode ser utilizada como terapia coadjuvante para o tratamento destas complicações neurológicas.In patients with renal failure, encephalopathy is a common problem that may be caused by uremia, thiamine deficiency, dialysis, transplant rejection, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances or drug toxicity. In general, encephalopathy presents with a symptom complex progressing from mild sensorial clouding to delirium and coma. This review discusses important issues regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy. The pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy up to now is uncertain, but several factors have been postulated to be involved; it is a complex and probably

  10. Clinical Presentation of Atypical Genital Herpes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 梁沛杨; 罗北京

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To make a clinical analysis on the basis of 36cases of atypical genital herpes (GH) patients. Methods: Thirty-six cases of atypical GH were diagnosedclinically, and their case histories, symptoms and signs wererecorded in detail and followed up. Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was adopted for testing HSV2-DNA with cotton-tippedswabs. Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) forserum anti-HSV2-IgM was done to establish a definfiivediagnosis. Other diagnoses were excluded at the same time bytesting for related pathogens including fungi, Chlamydia,Mycoplasma, Treponema pallidum, gonococci, Trichomonas,etc. Results: The main clinical manifestations of atypical GHwere: (1) small genital ulcers; (2) inflammation of urethralmeatus; (3) nonspecific genital erythema; (4) papuloid noduleson the glands; (5) nonspecific vaginitis. Twenty-three cases(64%) tested by PCR were HSV2-DNA sera-positive, and 36cases (100 %) anti-HSV2-IgM sera-positive by ELISA. Conclusion: atypical HSV is difficult to be diagnosed. Butthe combination of PCR and ELIAS will be helpful to thediagnosis of atypical HSV.

  11. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Weidong; ZHANG Naisheng; CUI Weimin; XU Yanyan; LI Hongye; LIU Jiesheng

    2011-01-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world.The hemolytic substances produced by K.mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates.We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K.mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography.In addition,we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae (Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K.mikimotoi.The hemolytic toxins from K.mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and I lipid.Waterbome clues from P.donghaiense and A.tamarense inhibited the growth of K.mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins.Conversely,K.mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P.donghaiense and A.tamarense.In addition,the ingestion of K.mikimotoi by M.mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K.mikimotoi.Taken together,our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances.K.mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity.The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability,but also on the risk of predation.Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K.mikimotoi.

  12. Atypical aging in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Warren B

    2013-01-01

    divided into two sections. The first section will review typical and atypical aging patterns in somatic issues in elder adults with DS; the second section will review the multifaceted relationship between AD and DS.

  13. Effect of α-lipoic Acid on Hemolytic Activity of Iranian Vipera Lebetina Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoozgari, Z. (MSc

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Snake venom is a complex of several toxic elements and enzymes. It has the agents with the ability to destroy cellular and subcellular membrane and to bring about hemolysis of red blood cells (RBC. Two types of direct and indirect hemolytic activity are known in snake venom in that phospholipase A2 is responsible for the indirect lysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of α-lipoic acid on hemolytic activity of Iranian Vipera Lebetina venom. Material and Methods: Protein concentration of the crude venom of Vipera Lebetina was determined using bovine serum albumin as a standard. Direct hemolytic activity of venom was determined by using the Human RBC and Indirect hemolytic activity was assayed on RBC in the presence of egg yolk. Then, α-lipoic acid with different concentrations in 100 mM Tris-HCL buffer was applied and its effect on hemolysis of RBC was studied. Results: direct hemolytic activity on RBC was not observed while its indirect activity was detected to be increased proportional to different concentration of α-lipoic acid. The range of indirect hemolysis was increased up to 60% by 60µm α-lipoic acid. Conclusion: Not only has α-lipoic acid no inhibitory effects on the hemolytic activity of Iranian Vipera Lebetina venom but also has the positive effects on it.

  14. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, Debra K

    2003-01-01

    A review of the English literature confirms that neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) occurs with both traditional and atypical antipsychotic medications. Published reports of NMS induced by the traditional antipsychotics have given the practitioner valuable information on the prevention and treatment of this adverse effect. Case reports have also been published concerning NMS and clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. By evaluating the case reports of atypical antipsychotic-induced NMS, valuable information may be obtained concerning similarities or differences from that induced by the traditional antipsychotics. The case reports of NMS with atypical antipsychotics were evaluated for diagnosis, age/sex of patient, risk factors, antipsychotic doses and duration of use, symptoms of NMS, and clinical course.

  15. [Atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Beata R; Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Marmurowska-Michałowska, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Introduction of a new group of antipsychotic drugs, called atypical because of the proprieties differing them from classical neuroleptics, gave hope for the beginning of a new era in treatment of psychoses, including schizophrenia. Different mechanisms of action not only resulted in a broader spectrum of action and high efficacy but also in a relative lack of extrapiramidal symptoms. However, atypical neuroleptics are not totally free from adverse effects. Symptoms such as sedation, metabolic changes and weight gain, often very quick and severe - present also in the case of classical drugs, but put to the background by extrapiramidal symptoms--have become prominent. Weight gain is important both from the clinical and subjective point of view--as associated with serious somatic consequences and as a source of enormous mental distress. These problems are addressed in this review, with the focus on weight gain associated with the use of specific atypical neuroleptics.

  16. Genomic Damage in Endstage Renal Disease—Contribution of Uremic Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Stopper

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-a. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation.

  17. Attenuation of uremia by orally feeding alpha-lipoic acid on acetaminophen induced uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Shrabani; Mandal, Shreya; Roy, Suchismita; Mandal, Arpita; Das, Koushik; Nandi, Dilip K

    2013-04-01

    Uremia means excess nitrogenous waste products in the blood & their toxic effects. An acute acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl p-aminophenol; APAP) overdose may result into potentially fatal hepatic and renal necrosis in humans and experimental animals. The aims of this present study were to investigate the protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) on oxidative stress & uremia on male albino rats induced by acetaminophen. The study was performed by 24 albino male Wister strain rats which were randomly divided into four groups: Group I, control - receives normal food and water, Groups II, III & IV receive acetaminophen interperitoneally at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day for 10 days, from 11th day Groups III & IV were treated with ALA at the dose of 5 mg & 10 mg/100 g/day for 15 days, respectively. After 25 days of treatment, it was observed that there was a significant increase in plasma urea, creatinine, sodium and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (p < 0.05) but a significant decrease in super oxide dismutase (SOD) & catalase activity & potassium level in uremic group is compared with control group & there was a significant increase in SOD & catalase (p < 0.05) & a significant decrease in serum urea, creatinine & Na and MDA (p < 0.05) in Group III & Group IV is compared with Group II & significant changes were observed in high ALA dose group. In conclusion it was observed that the ALA has nephroprotective activities by biochemical observations against acetaminophen induced uremic rats.

  18. Atypical RNAs in the coelacanth transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Anne; Doose, Gero; Tafer, Hakim; Robinson, Mark; Saha, Nil Ratan; Gerdol, Marco; Canapa, Adriana; Hoffmann, Steve; Amemiya, Chris T; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-09-01

    Circular and apparently trans-spliced RNAs have recently been reported as abundant types of transcripts in mammalian transcriptome data. Both types of non-colinear RNAs are also abundant in RNA-seq of different tissue from both the African and the Indonesian coelacanth. We observe more than 8,000 lincRNAs with normal gene structure and several thousands of circularized and trans-spliced products, showing that such atypical RNAs form a substantial contribution to the transcriptome. Surprisingly, the majority of the circularizing and trans-connecting splice junctions are unique to atypical forms, that is, are not used in normal isoforms.

  19. Cholesterol-dependent hemolytic activity of Passiflora quadrangularis leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Yuldasheva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants used in traditional medicine are rich sources of hemolysins and cytolysins, which are potential bactericidal and anticancer drugs. The present study demonstrates for the first time the presence of a hemolysin in the leaves of Passiflora quadrangularis L. This hemolysin is heat stable, resistant to trypsin treatment, has the capacity to froth, and acts very rapidly. The hemolysin activity is dose-dependent, with a slope greater than 1 in a double-logarithmic plot. Polyethylene glycols of high molecular weight were able to reduce the rate of hemolysis, while liposomes containing cholesterol completely inhibited it. In contrast, liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine were ineffective. The Passiflora hemolysin markedly increased the conductance of planar lipid bilayers containing cholesterol but was ineffective in cholesterol-free bilayers. Successive extraction of the crude hemolysin with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol resulted in a 10-fold purification, with the hemolytic activity being recovered in the n-butanol fraction. The data suggest that membrane cholesterol is the primary target for this hemolysin and that several hemolysin molecules form a large transmembrane water pore. The properties of the Passiflora hemolysin, such as its frothing ability, positive color reaction with vanillin, selective extraction with n-butanol, HPLC profile, cholesterol-dependent membrane susceptibility, formation of a stable complex with cholesterol, and rapid erythrocyte lysis kinetics indicate that it is probably a saponin.

  20. Neonatal Sulfhemoglobinemia and Hemolytic Anemia Associated With Intestinal Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kiera; Ryan, Clodagh; Dempsey, Eugene M; O'Toole, Paul W; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Sulfhemoglobinemia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood. It is typically drug-induced and may cause hypoxia, end-organ damage, and death through oxygen deprivation. We present here a case of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia in a 7-day-old preterm infant complicated by hemolytic anemia. Microbiota compositional analysis of fecal samples to investigate the origin of hydrogen sulphide revealed the presence of Morganella morganii at a relative abundance of 38% of the total fecal microbiota at the time of diagnosis. M morganii was not detected in the fecal samples of 40 age-matched control preterm infants. M morganii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause serious infection, particularly in immunocompromised hosts such as neonates. Strains of M morganii are capable of producing hydrogen sulphide, and virulence factors include the production of a diffusible α-hemolysin. The infant in this case survived intact through empirical oral and intravenous antibiotic therapy, probiotic administration, and red blood cell transfusions. This coincided with a reduction in the relative abundance of M morganii to 3%. Neonatologists should have a high index of suspicion for intestinal pathogens in cases of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia and consider empirical treatment of the intestinal microbiota in this potentially lethal condition.

  1. Alloimmunization in autoimmune hemolytic anemia patient: The differential adsorption approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C Dara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients of β-thalassemia major are dependent on regular blood transfusions for their entire lifetime. Development of antibodies against red blood cell (RBC antigen which may be alloantibody or autoantibody, several times as a result of frequent red cell component transfusions, further complicates the subsequent transfusion therapy. Among the autoantibodies, warm-reactive autoantibodies are commoner and interfere in the pretransfusion testing. These RBC autoantibodies present in patient's serum potentially react with all the cells of antibody identification panel giving “pan-reactive” picture and making alloantibody identification complex. In this report, we present our approach in a thalassemia patient who presented with warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia, low hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl, and three significant alloantibodies (anti-D, anti-S, and anti-Jk b which were masked by pan-reactive warm autoantibody(s. Differential adsorption was used to unmask underlying alloantibodies. We suggest that differential adsorption procedure is an effective and efficient method for autoantibody adsorption, detection, and identification of masked alloantibody(s, especially in patients with low hemoglobin and history of recent blood transfusion.

  2. Alloimmunization in autoimmune hemolytic anemia patient: The differential adsorption approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dara, Ravi C.; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Arora, Dinesh; Mitra, Subhasis; Acharya, Devi Prasad; Aggarwal, Geet; Sharma, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Patients of β-thalassemia major are dependent on regular blood transfusions for their entire lifetime. Development of antibodies against red blood cell (RBC) antigen which may be alloantibody or autoantibody, several times as a result of frequent red cell component transfusions, further complicates the subsequent transfusion therapy. Among the autoantibodies, warm-reactive autoantibodies are commoner and interfere in the pretransfusion testing. These RBC autoantibodies present in patient's serum potentially react with all the cells of antibody identification panel giving “pan-reactive” picture and making alloantibody identification complex. In this report, we present our approach in a thalassemia patient who presented with warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia, low hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl, and three significant alloantibodies (anti-D, anti-S, and anti-Jkb) which were masked by pan-reactive warm autoantibody(s). Differential adsorption was used to unmask underlying alloantibodies. We suggest that differential adsorption procedure is an effective and efficient method for autoantibody adsorption, detection, and identification of masked alloantibody(s), especially in patients with low hemoglobin and history of recent blood transfusion. PMID:28316442

  3. Effect of 16% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel and Dentin Surface Micromorphology and Roughness of Uremic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscopic Study

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on surface micromorphology and roughness of enamel and root dentin of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: A total of 20 sound molars were collected from healthy individuals (n=10) and uremic patients (n=10). The roots were separated from their crowns at the cemento-enamel junction. Dental slabs (3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) were obtained from the buccal surface for enamel slab...

  4. Epidemiological usefulness of changes in hemolytic activity of Vibrio cholerae biotype El Tor during the seventh pandemic.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, T J; Blake, P A

    1981-01-01

    Hemolytic Vibrio cholerae biotype El Tor strains were isolated in the United States in 1973 and 1978 after they had supposedly disappeared worldwide during the 1960s and 1970s. We decided to examine the change in prevalence of hemolytic El Tor strains since the beginning of the seventh pandemic and evaluate the usefulness of hemolytic activity as an epidemiological marker. A total of 48 isolates of V. cholerae biotype El Tor isolated in the Eastern Hemisphere between 1960 and 1979, along with...

  5. Biochemical and molecular studies of atypical nevi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwpoort, Arno Frans van

    2011-01-01

    The results obtained in this thesis suggest that the most explicit differences between normal and atypical melanocytes are subtle changes in pigment biosynthesis and the functioning of the antioxidant system. Impairment of the antioxidant system and increased levels of pheomelanin result in increase

  6. Non-diabetic atypical necrobiosis lipoidica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One 8 year female child had asymptomatic, anaesthetic, hypohidrotic, atrophic, yellowish, waxy plaque on the front of left thigh since 2 months. No nerve thickening was observed clinically or histopathologically. Hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, epidermal atrophy, degeneration of collagen, mononuclear granulomas and perivascular mononuclear infiltrate confirmed the clinical diagnosis of atypical necrobiosis lipoidica.

  7. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  8. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  9. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  10. Atypical fractures on long term bisphosphonates therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussein, W

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates reduce fractures risk in patients with osteoporosis. A new pattern of fractures is now being noted in patients on prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. We report a case of an atypical femoral fracture with preceding pain and highlight the characteristics of these fractures.

  11. Atypical visuomotor performance in children with PDD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlooz, W.A.J.M.; Hulstijn, W.

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9–12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome), a

  12. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  13. Expansion of CD8+ cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, S Ju; Sidorova, Ju V; Tsvetaeva, N V; Nikulina, O F; Biderman, B V; Nikulina, E E; Kulikov, S M; Sudarikov, A B

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare blood disease associated with the production of auto-antibodies and autoimmune hemolysis. A critical role of B-cells in the development of AIHA has been demonstrated before. Here, we present the analysis of the clonal T-cell populations in patients with AIHA. Thirty-three patients with AIHA were included in this study. Thirteen patients with other anemias, 14 patients with other autoimmune conditions (SLE - 6, RA - 8) and 20 healthy donors were included in the study as a control group. The clonality of T-cell was evaluated by the assessment of the T-cell receptor gamma and beta chain gene rearrangements (TCRG and TCRB). The incidence of T-cell monoclonality detected in patients with AIHA was significantly higher compared to the control group. The persistence of T-cell clones did not correlate with the level of hemoglobin and other signs of remission or relapse and did not disappear after the therapy and clinical improvement (observation period was between 1 and 10 years). There was no correlation between the T-cell clonality and the gender, age, splenectomy, duration or severity of the disease. Fractionation of T-lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD4+25+) revealed that the monoclonal T-cells belonged to the CD8+ sub-population. We assume that besides a possible causative role of the T-cell clones in AIHA to autoimmune process, these clones do not directly participate in the development and maintenance of hemolysis. Most of the AIHA patients (48.5%) demonstrated a T-cell monoclonality, which requires monitoring and should be distinguished from T-cell tumors.

  14. The Lbw2 locus promotes autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatizzi, John C; Haraldsson, Maria K; Pollard, K Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Kono, Dwight H

    2012-04-01

    The lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4; however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. In this study, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of New Zealand White (NZW) on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate its role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants.

  15. cblE-Type Homocystinuria Presenting with Features of Haemolytic-Uremic Syndrome in the Newborn Period

    OpenAIRE

    Palanca, Daniel; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Ortiz, Jessica; Jou, Cristina; Cusí, Victoria; Suñol, Mariona; Toll, Teresa; Perez, Belén; Ormazabal, Aida; Fowler, Brian; Artuch, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a cblE type of homocystinuria associated with haemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) features. We report on a male infant aged 43 days presenting with failure to thrive, hypotonia, pancytopaenia, HUS symptoms (microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopaenia with signs of renal involvement) and fatal evolution. An underlying cobalamin disorder was diagnosed after a bone marrow examination revealed megaloblastic changes associated with hyperhomocysteinaemia. An urinary ...

  16. Reduced immunostaining for the extracellular Ca{sup 2+} - sensing receptor in primary and uremic secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kifor, O.; Moore, F.D. Jr.; Wang, P. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Most parathyroid adenomas and some pathological parathyroid glands from patients with primary parathyroid hyperplasia or severe uremic secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism show an elevated set-point. In the present study, we investigated whether expression of the Ca{sup 2+}{sub o}-sensing receptor protein recently cloned from bovine parathyroid, a key component in Ca{sup 2+}{sub o}-regulated PTH release, is altered in primary and uremic hyperparathyroidism. Using immunohistochemistry with specific antireceptor antibodies, we compared immunoreactivity of the receptor protein in 14 adenomas, biopsies of 24 normal glands from this same group of patients, and 8 hyperplastic parathyroid glands from 2 individuals with uremic hyparathyroidism. The results show a substantial reduction in the intensity of immunostaining for the receptor protein that averaged nearly 60% for both adenomas and hyperplastic glands, as quantitated by image analysis. There was considerable variation in staining intensity among different pathological parathyroid glands, even in those from the same patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism. In addition, both adenomas and hyperplastic glands had, in some cases, isolated chief cells and groups of cells, sometimes around the periphery of an abnormal gland, with receptor staining equivalent to that of normal parathyroid cells, whereas the bulk of the cells in the same gland showed a marked decrease in staining. Thus, there is a variable, but substantial, reduction in the immunoreactivity of the Ca{sup 2+}{sub o}-sensing receptor protein in both parathyroid adenomas and uremic hyperparathyroidism, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, that probably results from reduced expression of the receptor protein and may contribute to the increase in the set-point often observed in these patients. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with an ovarian teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ickkeun; Lee, Jue Yong; Kwon, Jung Hye; Jung, Joo Young; Song, Hun Ho; Park, Young Iee; Ro, Eusun; Choi, Kyung Chan

    2006-04-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with an ovarian teratoma is a very rare disease. However, treating teratoma is the only method to cure the hemolytic anemia, so it is necessary to include ovarian teratoma in the differential diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We report herein on a case of a young adult patient who had severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia that was induced by an ovarian teratoma. A 25-yr-old woman complained of general weakness and dizziness for 1 week. The hemoglobin level was 4.2 g/dL, and the direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were all positive. The abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a huge left ovarian mass, and this indicated a teratoma. She was refractory to corticosteroid therapy; however, after surgical resection of the ovarian mass, the hemoglobin level and the reticulocyte count were gradually normalized. The mass was well encapsulated and contained hair and teeth. She was diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with an ovarian teratoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such a case to be reported in Korea.

  18. Hemolytic toxin from the soft coral Sarcophyton trocheliophorum: isolation and physiological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karthikayalu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The unifying characteristic of cnidarians is the production of protein and polypeptide toxins. The present study describes the identification of a hemolytic toxin from the soft coral Sarcophyton trocheliophorum. The crude extract was highly cytotoxic (EC50 = 50 ng/mL against human erythrocytes. It was also tested for hemolytic activity by the blood agar plate method, resulting in a hemolytic halo of 12 mm with 50 µg of protein. The stability of the venom under different physiological conditions was analyzed. The venom hemolytic activity was augmented by alkaline and neutral pH whereas it was reduced in acidic pH. The activity was stable up to 60º C. The hemolytic activity was completely abolished by the addition of serum and reduced significantly during frequent freezing-thawing cycles. Toxin purification was performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently desalted by dialysis against 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2, followed by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE cellulose column and gel filtration chromatography using Sephadex G-50 matrix. The purified active fractions possessed a prominent protein of approximately 45 kDa, as revealed by SDS-PAGE.

  19. Insufficiency of the Kanagawa hemolytic test for detecting pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongping, Wang; Jilun, Zhang; Ting, Jiang; Yixi, Bao; Xiaoming, Zhou

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the Kanagawa hemolytic test and tdh gene test for accuracy in identifying pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates in Shanghai. One hundred and seventy-two V. parahaemolyticus isolates were collected from diarrhea patients, freshly harvested sea fish, or fresh water samples. Statistical data for the Kanagawa hemolytic test and tdh gene test were compared. There were 83.51% isolates (81/97) from patients and 22.22% isolates (10/45) from sea-fish positive for the tdh gene. However, none of 30 isolates from fresh water samples were tdh-positive. Positive Kanagawa hemolytic tests were obtained in 88.66%, 46.67%, and 76.67% of isolates, which were from patients, sea fish, and fresh water samples, respectively. Positive rates of the Kanagawa hemolytic tests and the tdh gene tests were significantly different in isolates from those 3 sources (P tdh gene test showed higher specificity than the Kanagawa hemolytic test on identifying pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates in Shanghai, China.

  20. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Sonani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct were high. This patient′s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT, antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2 nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4 th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  2. Isolation and in vitro partial characterization of hemolytic proteins from the nematocyst venom of the jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongfeng; Yu, Huahua; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Qing, Yukun; Li, Kecheng; Li, Bing; Meng, Xiangtao; Cui, Jinhui; Li, Pengcheng

    2013-09-01

    Jellyfish venom contains various toxins and can cause itching, edema, muscle aches, shortness of breath, blood pressure depression, shock or even death after being stung. Hemolytic protein is one of the most hazardous components in the venom. The present study investigated the hemolytic activity of the nematocyst venom from jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris. Anion exchange chromatography, DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, and gel filtration chromatography, Superdex200 had been employed to isolate hemolytic proteins from the nematocyst venom of jellyfish S. meleagris. Hemolysis of chicken red blood cells was used to quantify hemolytic potency of crude nematocyst venom and chromatography fractions during the purification process. Native-PAGE profile displayed one protein band in the purified hemolytic protein (SmTX); however, two protein bands with apparent molecular weights of ≈ 45 kDa and 52 kDa were observed in the reducing SDS-PAGE analysis. Approximately 70 μg/mL of SmTX caused 50% hemolysis (HU50) of the erythrocyte suspension. The hemolytic activity of SmTX was shown to be temperature and pH dependent, with the optimum temperature and pH being 37°C and pH 5.0. The present study is the first report of isolation and partial characterization of hemolytic proteins from the nematocyst venom of the jellyfish S. meleagris. The mechanism of the hemolytic activity of SmTX is not clear and deserves further investigation.

  3. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  4. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Deepti; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Bhat, M Ramesh; Srinath, M K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  5. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti D′Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  6. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  7. Atypical reactive histiocytosis. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Barleta del Castillo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the case of a 50 year old chronic alcoholic and heavy smoker female that was assisted at the provincial university hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ in Cienfuegos city due to a severe adenic syndrome and who was diagnosed as a case of atypical reactive histiocytosis , problem which disappeared with the abstinence of toxic habits, improving her health.

  8. Bisphosphonate-induced atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The use of bisphosphonates (BPs) is universally accepted in the management of osteoporosis. However, a small percentage of patients have been recognised to develop atypical subtrochanteric fractures of the femur with the prolonged use of BPs. We report a rare case of bilateral insufficiency lesions in the proximal femora, where a major subtrochanteric fracture developed with a minor fall. This was successfully treated with internal fixation using proximal femoral nail.

  9. An atypical case of segmental spinal dysgenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zana, Elodie; Chalard, Francois; Sebag, Guy [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France); Mazda, Keyvan [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Paris (France)

    2005-09-01

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a complex closed dysraphism. The diagnostic criteria are: lumbar or thoracolumbar vertebral dysgenesis causing kyphosis, focal spinal cord narrowing without exiting roots, deformity of the lower limbs and paraplegia or paraparesis. We present a newborn who showed atypical features of bifocal spinal cord narrowing, without any vertebral abnormality at the proximal level. This seems to be a variant of this rare entity, whose early diagnosis is important, as surgical stabilisation of the spine is required. (orig.)

  10. Atypical presentations of methemoglobinemia from benzocaine spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantisattamo, Ekamol; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Vierra, Joseph R; Evans, Samuel J

    2011-06-01

    Widely used for local anesthesia, especially prior to endoscopic procedures, benzocaine spray is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic methemoglobinemia. The authors report an atypical case of methemoglobinemia in a woman presenting with pale skin and severe hypoxemia, after a delayed repeat exposure to benzocaine spray. Early recognition and prompt management of methemoglobinemia is needed in order to lessen morbidity and mortality from this entity.

  11. An atypical mycobacterial infection of the shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium malmoense is an acid-fast non-tuberculous organism that most commonly causes pulmonary infection. Extrapulmonary infection has also been reported. With an increased emphasis being placed on the clinical importance of this organism, especially within Europe, we report the first case of septic arthritis of the shoulder caused by this organism. We also highlight the importance of considering atypical mycobacterium infection in the differential diagnosis of shoulder infection and issues surrounding the management of this entity.

  12. Atypical manifestations of multiple myeloma: Radiological appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Thomas [Department of Radiology, St-Vincenz Hospital, Auf dem Schafsberg, D-65549 Limburg (Germany)]. E-mail: t.hess@st-vincenz.de; Egerer, Gerlinde [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kasper, Bernd [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasul, Kakil Ibrahim [Hamad Medical Center, Moha (Qatar); Goldschmidt, Hartmut [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauffmann, G.W. [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic procedures performed on patients with multiple myeloma typically reveal lytic bone lesions, osteopenia or osteoporosis, bone marrow infiltration by plasma cells as well as overproduction of immunoglobulin or light chains in the serum or urine. Skeletal manifestations are extremely variable and the unusual forms have been described extensively. Extramedullary plasma-cell tumours (plasmocytoma) are found in about 5% of newly diagnosed patients with multiple myelomas. In this paper we present eight patients with atypical forms of multiple myeloma.

  13. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  14. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and hemolytic anemia in a patient with hemoglobin SC disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, G M; Barrera, E; Martin, R R

    1980-08-01

    A patient with hemoglobin SC disease and cholelithiasis was found to have Bacillus cereus bacteremia. Hemolytic anemia developed, for which common causes of hemolysis were excluded, suggesting a relationship with the bacteremia. Following in vitro incubation, type O erythrocytes were hemolyzed by the culture, but not by a bacteria-free filtrate. This case confirms the association between sickle cell disorders and cholelithiasis with B cereus infections. In addition, it provides evidence for in vivo hemolysis with B cereus bacteremia, an organism not previously associated with hemolytic anemia.

  15. Uncommon neurological manifestations of hemolytic anemia: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu Chitela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological complications of hemolytic anemias are rather uncommon. We are reporting two cases of hemolytic anemia presenting as chorea and recurrent ischemic stroke. The first one is a case of chorea in a patient with sickle cell trait. Reviewing the literature we could find only one case report of chorea in sickle cell disease disease. The second is a case of recurrent ischemic stroke in hereditary spherocytosis. We could trace two reports on a Medline search, though their association was less certain.

  16. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, C S; Suchitha, S; Manjunath, G V; Murthy, Srinivas

    2013-09-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive mother.

  17. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive ...

  18. Case of cytomegalovirus-associated direct anti-globulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Saeko; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Goro; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Oishi, Tsutomu; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    A 1-year-old boy developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia after a negative direct anti-globulin test. The concentration of erythrocyte membrane-associated immunoglobulin G, determined using an immunoradiometric assay, correlated with disease activity. He was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) both serologically and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, indicating that his autoimmune hemolytic anemia was directly caused by CMV infection. Since anti-CMV immunoglobulin G was not absorbed by the patient's erythrocytes, cross-reaction between erythrocyte antigens and CMV was not likely a causative factor for hemolysis.

  19. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  20. HUS and the case for complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Edward M

    2015-10-29

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy that is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Excess complement activation underlies atypical HUS and is evident in Shiga toxin-induced HUS (STEC-HUS). This Spotlight focuses on new knowledge of the role of Escherichia coli-derived toxins and polyphosphate in modulating complement and coagulation, and how they affect disease progression and response to treatment. Such new insights may impact on current and future choices of therapies for STEC-HUS.

  1. Prophylactic Nailing of Incomplete Atypical Femoral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wug Oh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent reports have described the occurrence of low-energy subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures associated with long-term bisphosphonate use. Although information regarding the surgical treatment of these atypical femoral fractures is increasing, it is unclear if the preventive operation is useful in incomplete fractures. This study examined the results of preventive intramedullary nailing for incomplete atypical femoral fractures. Material and Methods. A retrospective search was conducted for patients older than 50 years receiving bisphosphonate therapy, with incomplete, nondisplaced fractures in either the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal area of the femur. Seventeen patients with a total of 20 incomplete, non-displaced lesions were included. The mean duration of bisphosphonate use was 50.5 months. Eleven of the 17 (64.7% patients had complete or incomplete fractures on the contralateral femur. All were treated with prophylactic fixation of an intramedullary (IM nail. The minimum followup was 12 months. Results. All cases healed with a mean period of 14.3 weeks. Nineteen of the 20 cases healed with the dissolution of incomplete fractures of the lateral aspect. A complete fracture developed at the time of nailing in one patient, but it healed with callus bridging. Conclusion. IM nailing appears to be a reliable way of preventing the progress of incomplete atypical femoral fractures.

  2. Primary Sjögren syndrome presenting with hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia following delivery due to Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and hemophagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaru, Yohei; Higuchi, Takakazu; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Haji, Youichiro; Okada, Masato; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Okada, Sadamu

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with hemolytic anemia without a reticulocyte response 38 days after delivery. A marked reduction in erythroid cells and an increase in macrophages with active hemophagocytosis were noted in the bone marrow. While conventional Coombs' tests were negative, the level of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) was increased. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) based on her symptoms, positive anti-SS-A antibodies, Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia associated with RBC-bound IgG and hemophagocytosis. The unique presentation was considered to be a consequence of immunological derangement associated with pSS, pregnancy and delivery.

  3. Uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate level is associated with prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Chao-Ping; Chung, Fu-Mei; Huang, Lynn L H; Yu, Teng-Hung; Hung, Wei-Chin; Lu, Li-Fen; Chen, Po-Yuan; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-01-01

    Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS) is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc) prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK) was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD) and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients.

  4. Leptin as an uremic toxin: Deleterious role of leptin in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix, Pascaline M; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Soulage, Christophe O

    2014-10-01

    White adipose tissue secretes a large variety of compounds named adipokines amongst which, leptin exhibits pleiotropic metabolic actions. Leptin is an anorexigenic hormone, secreted in proportion of fat mass, with additional effects on the regulation of inflammation, cardiovascular system, immunity, hematopoiesis and bone metabolism. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an increase of plasma leptin concentration that may be explained by a lack of renal clearance. Hyperleptinemia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of complications associated with CKD such as cachexia, protein energy wasting, chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular damages and bone complications. Leptin is also involved in the progression of renal disease through its pro-fibrotic and pro-hypertensive actions. Most of the adverse effects of leptin have been documented both experimentally and clinically. Leptin may therefore be considered as an uremic toxin in CKD. The aim of this review is to summarize the pathophysiological and clinical role of leptin in in vitro studies, experimental models, as well as in patients suffering from CKD.

  5. Improvement of autonomic neuropathy after mecobalamin treatment in uremic patients on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, H; Ejiri, K; Baba, S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of mecobalamin on autonomic neuropathy was evaluated in 20 hemodialyzed uremic patients; their mean age was 53 years and the duration of hemodialysis was 6.5 years; 14 were women. The cardiac beat-to-beat variation (BBV) was used as the measure of autonomic neuropathy. Twelve patients with normal BBV test results were either given 1,500 micrograms of mecobalamin daily for three months (six patients) or were untreated (six patients). The BBV test results did not change significantly over the three months in either the treated or untreated group, nor were there any significant between-group differences. Eight patients with abnormal results on the BBV test were given 1,500 micrograms of mecobalamin daily for six months. The mean BBV values increased significantly from 3.3 beats/min before treatment to 5.8 beats/min at six months (P less than 0.005); five of these patients (including three of the four patients with diabetes) showed normal BBV values by three months. It is concluded that mecobalamin can be used in the treatment of autonomic and peripheral neuropathy in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic renal failure.

  6. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO): more than just the correction of uremic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Michele; Aloisi, Carmela; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Corica, Francesco; Floccari, Fulvio; Grasso, Giovanni; Lasco, Antonino; Pettinato, Giuseppina; Ruello, Antonella; Sturiale, Alessio; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is controlled by numerous interdependent humoral and endocrine factors. Erythropoietin (EPO), a hydrophobic sialoglycoproteic hormone, plays a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, and induces proliferation, maturation and differentiation of the erythroid cell line precursors. Thanks to recombinant DNA techniques, different recombinant hormones can now be produced at low cost and in large amounts. This has led to greater understanding of the pathophysiological factors regulating hematopoiesis. This in turn, hasprompted the search for new therapeutic approaches. EPO might also be used to treat patients with different types of anemia: uremics, newborns, patients with anemia from cancer or myeloproliferative disease, thalassemia, bone marrow transplants, chronic infectious diseases. Besides erythroid cells, EPO affects other blood cell lines, such as myeloid cells, lymphocytes and megakaryocytes. It can also enhance polymorphonuclear cell phagocytosis and reduce macrophage activation, thus modulating the inflammatory process. Hematopoietic and endothelial cells probably have the same origin, and the discovery of eyrthropoietin receptors also on mesangial, myocardial and smooth muscle cells has prompted research into the non-erythropoietic function of the hormone. EPO has an important, direct, hemodynamic and vasoactive effect, which does not depend only on an increase in hematocrit and viscosity. Moreover, EPO and its receptors have been found in the brain, suggesting a role in preventing neuronal death. Finally, the recently discovered interaction between EPO and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the ability of EPO to stimulate endothelial cell mitosis and motility may be of importance in neovascularization and wound healing.

  7. Cell-associated hemolytic activity in environmental strains of Plesiomonas shigelloides expressing cell-free, iron-influenced extracellular hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Nieves; Santos, Jesús A; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa

    2007-04-01

    Hemolysis is a means of providing pathogenic bacteria with heme iron in vivo. In a previous work, iron-influenced hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes was detected in cell-free supernatants, but not in the cell fraction of two environmental Plesiomonas shigelloides strains incubated without shaking. Both strains have the hugA gene, which encodes an outer membrane receptor required for heme iron utilization. The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of a second hemolytic activity detected during aerated incubation in normal and iron-depleted tryptone soya broth (id-TSB). An agar overlay procedure and doubling dilution titrations were employed to detect the hemolytic activity against several erythrocyte species. The kinetics of growth and hemolytic activity were assayed at 35 degrees C in aerated normal and id-TSB and salmon extract. Overlaid colonies showed a cell-associated beta-hemolytic activity within 4 h. For aerated cell-free supernatants, titers above 16 were not attained until 30 to 48 h of incubation; the best activity was noted with dog and mouse erythrocytes. After 24 h of aerated incubation, sonicated cells yielded high hemolytic activity against dog erythrocytes without activity in supernatants, but after 48 h, only 28 to 30% of the total activity remained cell associated. The hemolytic factor was released in broths during the death phase. Hemolytic activity was not detected in fish extract. This and other studies suggest that P. shigelloides may produce at least two hemolytic factors, their expression and detection being influenced by environmental growth conditions and testing procedures. The overlay assay appears to be the best routine method for detecting hemolytic activity in P. shigelloides.

  8. Transpupillary thermotherapy for atypical central serous chorioretinopathy

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    Kawamura R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ryosuke Kawamura1,2, Hidenao Ideta1, Hideyuki Hori1, Kenya Yuki2, Tsuyoshi Uno1, Tatsurou Tanabe1, Kazuo Tsubota2, Tsutomu Kawasaki11Ideta Eye Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan; 2Keio University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC has been traditionally treated with laser photocoagulation. We thought that transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT utilizing a lower temperature than that of conventional laser photocoagulation might minimize permanent retinal and choroidal damage. Studies suggest that undesirable effects on vision due to TTT are minimal even if it is applied to foveal and/or parafoveal lesions when TTT requires a larger irradiation spot. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of TTT in the management of atypical CSC.Methods: We defined atypical CSC as bullous retinal detachment with diffuse or several leakages, severe leakage with fibrin formation under serous retinal detachment, or leakage within a pigment epithelium detachment. Eight consecutive patients with atypical CSC underwent visual acuity testing, ophthalmic examination, color photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography to evaluate the results of transpupillary thermotherapy. Retreatment of atypical CSC was based on ophthalmic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. TTT was performed on the leaking spots shown in fluorescein angiography, with a power of 50–250 mW, spot size of 500–1200 µm, and exposure time of 13–60 seconds to minimize retinal damage.Results: In five of eight affected eyes, serous detachments completely resolved within 1 month after the initial TTT. One eye had persistent subretinal fluid and required a second TTT treatment. Two eyes showed no resolution of CSC and were treated by conventional photocoagulation. Initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/600 to 20/20 (mean, 20/40; median, 20/30. Final BCVA

  9. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalyan, Z. A.; Ter-Pogossyan, Z. R.; Abroyan, L. O.; Hakobyan, L. H.; Avetisyan, A. S.; Karalyan, N. Yu; Karalova, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection. PMID:27536044

  10. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Karalyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection.

  11. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia associated with trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole administration in a horse.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, H L; Livesey, M A

    1998-01-01

    A 10-year-old, thoroughbred gelding was administered sulphonamide drugs during surgical treatment of guttural pouch mycosis. The horse became anemic and a diagnosis of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia was made after other causes of anemia had been ruled out. The anemia resolved after the drugs were withdrawn.

  12. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Christiansen, Ingelise; Harbo, T

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...

  13. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfraz Saleemi

    2014-01-01

    Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

  14. Biochemical characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies on skin mucus of fresh water spiny eel Mastacembelus armatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Venkatachalam Uthayakumar; Venkatachalam Ramasubramanian; Dhanabalan Senthilkumar; Ramasamy Harikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the biochemical, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of Mastacembalus armatus skin mucus. Methods: Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of mucus extractions against human and fish pathogens were tested along with ampicillin as control. Hemolytic activity of the extraction was evaluated against sheep and cow blood cells. Amino acid and fatty acid profiles were analyzed by HPLC and gas chromatography in the mucus of fish. SDS-PAGE analysis of mucus and muscle tissue was done. Oneway-ANOVA was performed against all extraction and pathogens, amino acids and fatty acids. Result: All the mucus extracts exhibited higher inhibitory activity than antibiotic ampicillin against bacterial and fungal pathogens. The hemolytic activity was increased with higher mucus concentrations in both sheep and cow blood cells. The protein content soluble and insoluble fractions of mucus were 63.22 μg/g and 55.79μg/g, respectively. Out of 17 amino acids leucine was higher (8.54 mole %) in soluble gel, and glutamic acid was higher (6.92 mole %) in the insoluble gel, Histidine was very low (i.e. 0.20 mole%) both in soluble and (0.30 mole %) insoluble gel. In SDS-PAGE analysis, 6 bands of mucus and 9 bands of muscle were observed. Conclusions: The soluble and insoluble proteins are responsible for antimicrobial and hemolytic activity, these results indicate that mucus gel was prospective applications in fish and human therapeutics.

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies. Tre

  16. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, Enver [Department of Paediatrics, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Yavuz, Cevdet [Department of Neurosurgery, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Ustundag, Nil [Department of Pathology, Abant Izzet Baysal University School of Medicine, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey)

    2003-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  17. Sigma E regulators control hemolytic activity and virulence in a shrimp pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimonsri Rattanama

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Vibrio are important marine and aquaculture pathogens. Hemolytic activity has been identified as a virulence factor in many pathogenic vibrios including V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi and V. vulnificus. We have used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the hemolytic activity of shrimp-pathogenic V. harveyi strain PSU3316. Out of 1,764 mutants screened, five mutants showed reduced hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar and exhibited virulence attenuation in shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei. Mutants were identified by comparing transposon junction sequences to a draft of assembly of the PSU3316 genome. Surprisingly none of the disrupted open reading frames or gene neighborhoods contained genes annotated as hemolysins. The gene encoding RseB, a negative regulator of the sigma factor (σ(E, was interrupted in 2 out of 5 transposon mutants, in addition, the transcription factor CytR, a threonine synthetase, and an efflux-associated cytoplasmic protein were also identified. Knockout mutations introduced into the rpoE operon at the rseB gene exhibited low hemolytic activity in sheep blood agar, and were 3-to 7-fold attenuated for colonization in shrimp. Comparison of whole cell extracted proteins in the rseB mutant (PSU4030 to the wild-type by 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed 6 differentially expressed proteins, including two down-regulated porins (OmpC-like and OmpN and an upregulated protease (DegQ which have been associated with σ(E in other organisms. Our study is the first report linking hemolytic activity to the σ(E regulators in pathogenic Vibrio species and suggests expression of this virulence-linked phenotype is governed by multiple regulatory pathways within the V. harveyi.

  18. Hematological Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

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    Serap Erdogan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics cause less frequently extrapyramidal system symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and hyperprolactinemia than typical antipsychotics. However hematological side effects such as leukopenia and neutropenia could occur during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. These side effects could lead to life threatening situations and the mortality rate due to drug related agranulocytosis is about 5-10%. There are several hypothesis describing the mechanisms underlying drug induced leukopenia and/or neutropenia such as direct toxic effects of these drugs upon the bone marrow or myeloid precursors, immunologic destruction of the granulocytes or supression of the granulopoiesis. Clozapine is the antipsychotic agent which has been most commonly associated with agranulocytosis. A nitrenium ion which is formed by the bioactivation of clozapine is thought to have an important role in the pathophysiogy of this adverse effect. Aside from clozapine, there are several case reports reporting an association between olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and leukopenia. We did not find any study or case report presenting amisulpride or sulpride related hematological side effects in our literature search. Patients who had hematological side effects during their previous antipsychotic drug treatments and who had lower baseline blood leukocyte counts, have higher risk to develop leukopenia or neutropenia during their current antipsychotic treatment. Once leukopenia and neutropenia develops, drugs thought to be responsible for this side effect should be discontinued or dosages should be lowered. In some cases iniatition of lithium or G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy may be helpful in normalizing blood cell counts. Clinicans should avoid any combination of drugs known to cause hematological side effects. Besides during antipsychotic treatment, infection symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat or

  19. Uremic Toxins Induce ET-1 Release by Human Proximal Tubule Cells, which Regulates Organic Cation Uptake Time-Dependently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M. S. Schophuizen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal failure, the systemic accumulation of uremic waste products is strongly associated with the development of a chronic inflammatory state. Here, the effect of cationic uremic toxins on the release of inflammatory cytokines and endothelin-1 (ET-1 was investigated in conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC. Additionally, we examined the effects of ET-1 on the cellular uptake mediated by organic cation transporters (OCTs. Exposure of ciPTEC to cationic uremic toxins initiated production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (117 ± 3%, p < 0.001, IL-8 (122 ± 3%, p < 0.001, and ET-1 (134 ± 5%, p < 0.001. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of OCT mediated 4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methylpyridinium-iodide (ASP+ uptake in ciPTEC at 30 min (23 ± 4%, p < 0.001, which restored within 60 min of incubation. Exposure to ET-1 for 24 h increased the ASP+ uptake significantly (20 ± 5%, p < 0.001. These effects could be blocked by BQ-788, indicating activation of an ET-B-receptor-mediated signaling pathway. Downstream the receptor, iNOS inhibition by (N(G‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine l-NMMA acetate or aminoguanidine, as well as protein kinase C activation, ameliorated the short-term effects. These results indicate that uremia results in the release of cytokines and ET-1 from human proximal tubule cells, in vitro. Furthermore, ET-1 exposure was found to regulate proximal tubular OCT transport activity in a differential, time-dependent, fashion.

  20. Atypical And Severe Enlargement Of Right Atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Carmine; Rossetti, Pietro; Rocci, Anna; Rubino, Pasquale; Basaglia, Manuela; Gaibazzi, Nicola; Quintavalla, Roberto

    2016-09-13

    A 76 year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department for recent-onset dyspnea and cough. The electrocardiogram was considered inconclusive. A thoracic X-ray showed global cardiac profile enlargement. Computed tomography, acutely performed in the clinical suspicion of atypical pneumonia/myocarditis or pericardial effusion, showed cardiac enlargement especially of the right chambers. In order to investigate Ebstein's anomaly, pericardial cysts, tumors or other conditions of the right heart a simple trans-thoracic echocardiogram was performed. Four chambers view showed a giant right atrium aneurysm with moderate tricuspid regurgitation without stenosis or typical Ebstein's echocardiographic pattern.

  1. Wilson’s disease: Atypical imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a genetic movement disorder with characteristic clinical and imaging features. We report a 17- year-old boy who presented with sialorrhea, hypophonic speech, paraparesis with repeated falls and recurrent seizures along with cognitive decline. He had bilateral Kayser Flescher rings. Other than the typical features of Wilson’s disease in cranial MRI, there were extensive white matter signal abnormalities (T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities and gyriform contrast enhancement which are rare imaging features in Wilson's disease. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose Wilson’s disease when atypical imaging features are present.

  2. Atypical outcome in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Freidson, S

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the course of psychiatric illness in two boys. Both presented with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in midchildhood; after puberty, one boy developed a schizophrenic illness while the other boy developed a major affective illness. Although the major ADHD outcome studies have found no link between the childhood occurrence of ADHD and psychosis in adulthood, occasionally such a link may exist. The theoretical and practical implications of this finding are discussed. It should be noted, however, that such outcome is highly atypical and very rare.

  3. Atypical Log D profile of rifampicin

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    Mariappan T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution coefficient (log D values of rifampicin, an essential first-line antitubercular drug, at gastrointestinal pH conditions are not reported in literature. Hence determinations were made using n-octanol and buffers ranging between pH 1-7. Also, log D values were predicted using Prolog D. Both the determinations showed opposite behaviour. The atypical experimental log D profile of rifampicin could be attributed to its surface-active properties, which also explained the reported permeability behaviour of the drug in various gastrointestinal tract segments.

  4. Atypical giant chondroblastoma mimicking a chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, Sunita; Menon, Santosh; Gulia, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign tumor derived from chondroblasts, commonly presenting in the second decade of life. It is usually found in the epiphysis or apophysis of long bones; however, it may rarely affect flat bones like scapula. Occasionally a histologically typical chondroblastoma may exhibit an aggressive behavior that is not normally associated with benign tumors such as a large size, pulmonary metastases, joint and soft-tissue infiltration and local recurrence. We present a case report of a patient with chondroblastoma showing atypical radiological presentation and non-concordance with age.

  5. Bisphosphonates and Atypical Fractures of Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Yli-Kyyny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed medicines for the treatment of osteoporosis and have generally been regarded as well-tolerated and safe drugs. Since 2005, there have been numerous case reports about atypical fractures of the femur linked to long-term treatment of osteoporosis with bisphosphonates. Some attempts to characterize pathophysiology and epidemiology of these fractures have been published as well. However, as the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR concluded in their task force report, the subject warrants further studies.

  6. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  7. Gorlin’s syndrome: Atypical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay N. Agrawal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. The condition appears to have complete penetrance and variable expressivity, which makes clinilcal presentation among families variable. All known BCNS carry mutations in PATCHED gene. A 65 years old male patient presented with complaints of characteristic skin lesions on his face, back, palms since early adulthood. The lesions were pigmented nodules with characteristic border. The histopathology showed characteristic features suggestive of Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC. This case was atypical due to appearance of lesions quite later in life.

  8. Atypical presentation of childhood obsessive compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyakam Mohapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. The phenomenology of OCD in children and adolescent is strikingly similar to that of adults. But at times, the presentation of OCD may be so atypical or unusual in children and adolescents that may lead to misdiagnosis or delay in diagnosis. We report a case of 10-year-old child who was initially misdiagnosed with schizophrenia, and treated with antipsychotic for 2 months. But once the core symptoms were recognized as obsessions and compulsions and appropriately treated in the line of OCD, the symptoms resolved significantly.

  9. Serum Hepcidin Predicts Uremic Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Li; Su-Juan Feng; Lu-Lu Su; Wei Wang; Xiao-Dong Zhang; Shi-Xiang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Hepcidin,as a regulator of body iron stores,has been recently discovered to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease.Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most common complication and the leading cause of death in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients.In the current study,we aimed to explore the relationship between serum hepcidin and uremic accelerated atherosclerosis (UAAS) in CHD patients with diabetic nephropathy (CHD/DN).Methods:A total of 78 CHD/DN and 86 chronic hemodialyzed nondiabetic patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CHD/non-DN) were recruited in this study.The level of serum hepcidin-25 was specifically measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results:High serum level ofhepcidin-25 was seen in CHD patients.Serum hepcidin-25 in CHD/DN was significantly higher than that in CHD/non-DN patients.Serum hepcidin-25 was positively correlated with ferritin,high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP),TNF-α,and IL-6 in CHD/DN patients.CHD/DN patients exhibited higher common carotid artery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT),hs-CRP,and hepcidin-25 levels than that in CHD/non-DN patients.Moreover,in CHD/DN patients,CCA-IMT was positively correlated with serum hepcidin,hs-CRP,and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol.On multiple regression analysis,serum hepcidin and hs-CRP level exhibited independent association with IMT in CHD/DN patients.Conclusions:These findings suggest possible linkage between iron metabolism and hepcidin modulation abnormalities that may contribute to the development of UAAS in CHD/DN patients.

  10. Spontaneous splenic rupture due to uremic coagulopathy and mortal sepsis after splenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, Eymen; Açıkgöz, Gazel; Kasap, Yusuf; Yiğman, Metin; Güneş, Zeki Ender

    2015-01-01

    Nontraumatic spontaneous splenic rupture (NSSR) has been encountered much more rarely compared with the traumatic splenic rupture. Although NSSR generally emerges in dialysis patients on account of such causes as the use of heparin during hemodialysis, uremic coagulopathy, infections, and secondary amyloidosis. Herein, we aimed to present a case of spontaneous splenic rupture which had developed soon after the inclusion of the case suffering from end-stage renal disease in routine hemodialysis program in the absence of any trauma or other prespecified risk factors for splenic rupture. A 55-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital to have the ureteral double J stent removed. The operation was completed without any complication. Complaining an abdominal pain more prominent in the left upper abdominal quadrant in the first postoperative day, the patient underwent a through physical examination which disclosed abdominal distension, widespread tenderness, and rebound and defense positivity. The abdominal tomography depicted 122 × 114 × 95 mm lesion compatible with a hematoma. On the basis of these findings, an emergency exploratory operation was decided to be performed. Following clearance of the retroperitoneal hematoma, splenectomy was implemented. Experiencing progressive deterioration in his clinical status despite antibiotherapy, the patient unfortunately died of sepsis with multiorgan failure on the 25(th) postoperative day. In conclusion, NSSR is such an entity that may be missed out, can pursue variable clinical courses, and requires emergency therapy upon definitive diagnosis. The possibility of spontaneous bleedings should be kept in mind in any case with the history of hyperuricemia even in the absence of overt trauma, no matter if they are included in routine hemodialysis or not.

  11. Uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate level is associated with prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hua Tang

    Full Text Available Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients.

  12. Quantitative ultrasound technique at the phalanges in discriminating between uremic and osteoporotic patients

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    Guglielmi, G. [Department of Radiology, Scientific Institute Hospital ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , Viale Cappuccini 1, 71013 San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)]. E-mail: guglielmi_g@hotmail.com; De Terlizzi, F. [IGEA srl, Carpi (Italy); Aucella, F. [Division of Nephrology, Scientific Institute Hospital ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy); Scillitani, A. [Division of Endocrinology, Scientific Institute Hospital ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    This study was conducted to test the ability of quantitative ultrasound technique (QUS) at the phalanges to discriminate between uremic and osteoporotic patients. Three groups of subjects (38 dialytic women, 16 osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures, 19 non-dialytic and non-fractured women) were recruited at the Department of Radiology at 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. The groups were matched for age and body mass index (BMI). On all subjects the following measurements were performed: spinal BMD by QCT and by DXA, Femoral BMD by DXA, phalangeal QUS. For QUS measurements, the DBM Sonic (IGEA, Carpi, Italy) was applied to the metaphysis of the proximal phalanges of the last four fingers of the hand. Osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures showed significantly lower values of spinal BMD by QCT and DXA and Ward's Triangle BMD with respect to hemodialytic patients (p < 0.005). All QUS values, except for BTT and SoS, showed lower values in osteoporotic women with respect to hemodialytic patients (p < 0.05). Control group showed higher values of AD-SoS, BTT and SoS than hemodialytic patients (p < 0.005) while the two groups did not differ for BMD values measured with both QCT and DXA. UBPI and FWA data showed a similar behaviour to DXA and QCT results, whereas BTT and SoS showed a completely different behaviour. AD-SoS was the only parameter that could effectively discriminate among the three groups (ANOVA, p < 0.0001). We conclude that phalangeal QUS can discriminate between hemodialysed patients and controls with similar bone mineral density, and can also discriminate between hemodialysed and osteoporotic subjects with vertebral fractures. Different characteristics of ultrasound signal can be ascribed to each bone tissue condition, enabling a clear differentiation of bone tissue changes occurring in menopause, osteoporosis and renal osteodystrophy.

  13. N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2PY)—Major Metabolite of Nicotinamide: An Update on an Old Uremic Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenglet, Aurélie; Liabeuf, Sophie; Bodeau, Sandra; Louvet, Loïc; Mary, Aurélien; Boullier, Agnès; Lemaire-Hurtel, Anne Sophie; Jonet, Alexia; Sonnet, Pascal; Kamel, Said; Massy, Ziad A.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2PY, a major metabolite of nicotinamide, NAM) was recently identified as a uremic toxin. Recent interventional trials using NAM to treat high levels of phosphorus in end-stage renal disease have highlighted new potential uremic toxicities of 2PY. In the context of uremia, the accumulation of 2PY could be harmful—perhaps by inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity. Here, we review recently published data on 2PY’s metabolism and toxicological profile. PMID:27854278

  14. Nursing Care for One Patient Suffering from Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome After Caesarean Birth%1例剖宫产术后并发TTP-HUS患者的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 张鹏; 刘丽云

    2009-01-01

    对1例剖宫产术后并发血栓性血小板减少性紫癜-溶血性尿毒综合征(TTP-HUS)患者予激素、血浆置换、抗感染、对症支持等治疗,患者好转出院.提出严密观察病情变化,加强心理、基础、饮食、药物不良反应、血浆置换的护理及健康教育,可促进患者康复.

  15. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

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    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  16. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with IgM warm auto-antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

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    Shinoda, Koichiro; Taki, Hirofumi; Hounoki, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Reina; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder involving mainly salivary and lachrymal glands. However, many extraglandular symptoms have also been reported. Although leucocytopenia and lymphocytopenia are frequently observed in hematological disorders, autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rarely reported. We experienced a case of primary Sjögren's syndrome developing severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The patient's red blood cells showed spontaneous agglutination in saline at room temperature, and immunoglobulin M (IgM) was detected on the surface of red blood cells by flow cytometry, indicating that autoimmune hemolytic anemia was caused by warm reactive IgM antibodies. Immediate corticosteroid therapy resulted in a dramatic recovery. We report a first case of severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by warm reactive IgM antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

  17. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

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    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Nardo, Davide [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A. [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gardner, Ann [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  18. The uremic toxin adsorbent AST-120 abrogates cardiorenal injury following myocardial infarction.

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    Suree Lekawanvijit

    Full Text Available An accelerated progressive decline in renal function is a frequent accompaniment of myocardial infarction (MI. Indoxyl sulfate (IS, a uremic toxin that accumulates from the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD, is contributory to both renal and cardiac fibrosis. IS levels can be reduced by administration of the oral adsorbent AST-120, which has been shown to ameliorate pathological renal and cardiac fibrosis in moderate to severe CKD. However, the cardiorenal effect of AST-120 on less severe renal dysfunction in the post-MI setting has not previously been well studied. MI-induced Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive either AST-120 (MI+AST-120 or were untreated (MI+Vehicle for 16 weeks. Serum IS levels were measured at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks. Echocardiography and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were assessed prior to sacrifice. Renal and cardiac tissues were assessed for pathological changes using histological and immunohistochemical methods, Western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Compared with sham, MI+Vehicle animals had a significant reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction (by 42%, p<0.001 and fractional shortening (by 52%, p<0.001 as well as lower GFR (p<0.05 and increased serum IS levels (p<0.05. A significant increase in interstitial fibrosis in the renal cortex was demonstrated in MI+Vehicle animals (p<0.001. Compared with MI+Vehicle, MI+AST-120 animals had increased GFR (by 13.35%, p<0.05 and reduced serum IS (p<0.001, renal interstitial fibrosis (p<0.05, and renal KIM-1, collagen-IV and TIMP-1 expression (p<0.05. Cardiac function did not change with AST-120 treatment, however gene expression of TGF-β1 and TNF-α as well as collagen-I and TIMP-1 protein expression was decreased in the non-infarcted myocardium (p<0.05. In conclusion, reduction of IS attenuates cardio-renal fibrotic processes in the post-MI kidney. KIM-1 appears to be a sensitive renal injury biomarker in this setting and is correlated with

  19. Podocyte injury caused by indoxyl sulfate, a uremic toxin and aryl-hydrocarbon receptor ligand.

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    Osamu Ichii

    Full Text Available Indoxyl sulfate is a uremic toxin and a ligand of the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, a transcriptional regulator. Elevated serum indoxyl sulfate levels may contribute to progressive kidney disease and associated vascular disease. We asked whether indoxyl sulfate injures podocytes in vivo and in vitro. Mice exposed to indoxyl sulfate for 8 w exhibited prominent tubulointerstitial lesions with vascular damage. Indoxyl sulfate-exposed mice with microalbuminuria showed ischemic changes, while more severely affected mice showed increased mesangial matrix, segmental solidification, and mesangiolysis. In normal mouse kidneys, AhR was predominantly localized to the podocyte nuclei. In mice exposed to indoxyl sulfate for 2 h, isolated glomeruli manifested increased Cyp1a1 expression, indicating AhR activation. After 8 w of indoxyl sulfate, podocytes showed foot process effacement, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and a focal granular and wrinkled pattern of podocin and synaptopodin expression. Furthermore, vimentin and AhR expression in the glomerulus was increased in the indoxyl sulfate-exposed glomeruli compared to controls. Glomerular expression of characteristic podocyte mRNAs was decreased, including Actn4, Cd2ap, Myh9, Nphs1, Nphs2, Podxl, Synpo, and Wt1. In vitro, immortalized-mouse podocytes exhibited AhR nuclear translocation beginning 30 min after 1 mM indoxyl sulfate exposure, and there was increased phospho-Rac1/Cdc42 at 2 h. After exposure to indoxyl sulfate for 24 h, mouse podocytes exhibited a pro-inflammatory phenotype, perturbed actin cytoskeleton, decreased expression of podocyte-specific genes, and decreased cell viability. In immortalized human podocytes, indoxyl sulfate treatment caused cell injury, decreased mRNA expression of podocyte-specific proteins, as well as integrins, collagens, cytoskeletal proteins, and bone morphogenetic proteins, and increased cytokine and chemokine expression. We propose that basal levels of AhR activity regulate

  20. COLD AGGLUTININ INDUCED HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA IN A PATIENT WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

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    Lohmror Anurag, Choudhary Richa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemias (AIHA are an uncommon group of disorders characterized by red cell destruction due to autoantibodies. Though usually idiopathic, AIHA is commonly associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, autoimmune disease, and some drugs. This report describes a case of 25 year old female presenting history of fever associated with cough and fatigue. There was a past history of receiving blood transfusion on four occasions. The HRCT thorax demonstrated fine nodular densities in right upper lobe, suggestive of tuberculosis. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly. A bone marrow biopsy performed on the patient revealed erythroid hyperplasia. There was no evidence of any malignancy. Diagnosis of cold autoantibody hemolytic anemia complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis was made. The patient was managed with blood transfusions and treated with anti-tubercular agents. The occurrence of AIHA in pulmonary tuberculosis is rare.

  1. A rare case of concurrent signet-ring carcinoma of breast and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Kelly; Bae, Esther; Park, Hanna; Hussain, Farabi

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) can be an uncommon presentation of an underlying malignancy, most often due to signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC). Additionally, pure SRCC in a breast primary-tumor comprises <2% of all breast cancers (Shin SY, Park H, Chae SW, Woo HY. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia as the first manifestation of metastatic signet-ring cell carcinoma of unknown origin: a case report and review of literature. Kor J Lab Med 2011;31:157–61). To the best of our knowledge, the combination of these two entities, pure breast primary SRCC along with MAHA, has not been reported. Here, we present such a rare case. We also evaluate the current literature regarding this and similar disease processes, of which evidence is scarce and further research is needed. PMID:27587305

  2. Salt induces biosynthesis of hemolytically active compounds in the xerotolerant food-borne fungus Wallemia sebi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botić, Tanja; Kunčič, Marjetka K; Sepčić, Kristina; Knez, Zeljko; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Wallemia sebi is a xerotolerant, ubiquitous, food-borne, mycotoxigenic fungus. An ethanol extract of its mycelium demonstrated a strong hemolytic activity, which was further enhanced at high salt concentrations in the growth medium. Characterization of the extract using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a mixture of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, indicating the latter as responsible for the hemolytic activity. The lytic activity of the extract is here studied using red blood cells and artificial small lipid vesicles with various lipid compositions. This shows concentration-dependent hemolysis and preferential activity toward lipid membranes with greater fluidity. The W. sebi lytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes shows its potential involvement in the formation of lesions in subcutaneous infections, in farmer's lung disease, and in consumption of food and feed that are contaminated with food-borne W. sebi.

  3. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

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    Asmaa Mamoune

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  4. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  5. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Benjamin Y; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo S

    2016-04-01

    We report the occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient receiving the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab, for metastatic melanoma in the presence of known red cell alloantibodies, despite having received prior ipilimumab without evidence of hemolysis. The patient had a history of multiple red cell alloantibodies and a positive direct antiglobulin test, identified at the time of a prior transfusion, which occurred before treatment with ipilimumab. The patient developed symptomatic warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after four cycles of treatment with nivolumab. Clinical improvement was noted following cessation of the drug and treatment with corticosteroids. Given that there was no prior history of hemolysis, even during treatment with ipilimumab, we hypothesize that anti-PD-1 therapy disrupted peripheral tolerance, unmasking an underlying autoimmune predisposition.

  6. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin’s Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

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    Maria Miguel Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin’s disease (HD is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD.

  7. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Togashi, Masaru; Sawada, Ken-Ichi; Wakui, Hideki

    2013-06-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted because of proteinuria. A renal biopsy showed mesangial/endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with IgG2-κ deposits. Electron microscopy showed immune complex-type deposits. She also had Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia, anticardiolipin antibodies, and antinuclear antibodies. Middle-dose steroid therapy led to improvement of proteinuria and hemolytic anemia. Six years later, she developed crescentic glomerulonephritis with IgG2-κ deposits during pregnancy. Middle-dose steroid therapy improved renal dysfunction. This is an exceptional case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID), a recently described rare dysproteinemia-related glomerulonephritis, associated with autoimmune disease. This case also suggests that crescentic glomerulonephritis can be superimposed on PGNMID.

  8. Hemolytic Anemia as an Outcome of Occupational Exposure to Formalin: A Case Report

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    Zohreh Yazdi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational exposure studies indicate that formaldehyde exposure causes temporary and consistent effects on industrial workers exposed to formalin. Case: The case was a 36-year-old man who had developed intravascular hemolytic anemia caused by formalin after inhalation exposure. Formalin is a clear solution of 37% formaldehyde in water. The primary route of exposure to formaldehyde is inhalation. The case was presented with severe Coomb's negative hemolytic anemia with hemoglobinuria and was treated successfully with therapeutic red cell transfusion and exposure removal. Conclusion: All employers must provide a safe and healthy workplace for prevention of harmful effects of formalin. Elimination of formalin from workplace, implementation of local and general ventilation, and using proper protective equipments are the most effective methods in the workplace.

  9. Atypical Cogan's syndrome associated with coronary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivanovic Branislava; Tadic Marijana; Damjanov Nemanja; Simic Dragan; Zlatanovic Maja

    2011-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome (CS) is a rare inflammatory disorder characterized by interstitial keratitis and vestibuloauditory abnormalities often associated with various systemic manifestations. Involvement of cardiovascular system resembling systemic vasculitis may lead to severe complications and death. The present report describes a case of a female patient with atypical Cogan's syndrome presented with systemic manifestations and severe coronary and femoral artery stenosis.Despite the clinical improvement after glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, the patient required double aortocoronal bypass grafting one year letter. During three years follow-up, she was in stable condition, without stenocardial symptoms and claudication and her inflammatory parameters remain normal. This case highlights the rare involvement of coronary arteries without associated large-vessel vasculitis of the aortic arch in CS.

  10. Brugada Syndrome with atypical characteristics: Case report

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    Hatem Ari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada Syndrome (BrS is a heterogeneous genetic disease characterized by persistent or transient ST-segment elevation in the right precordial electrocardiography (ECG leads and a high incidence of sudden death and life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with structurally normal hearts. The syndrome generally manifests in men during adulthood. The ECG manifestations can be overt or concealed. We report a case of BrS whose type 1 ECG pattern during febrile state converted to type 2 ECG after alleviation of fever with atypical characteristics (78-year-old woman with monomorphic ventricular tachycardia on holter monitoring, a history of the sudden infant death of her child, and without inducible ventricular arrhythmia by programed ventricular stimulation [PVS].

  11. Pulmonary Atypical Adenomatous Hyperplasia And Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeilinXu; XiaYang; ZhiyaoZhang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relationship between atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC). METHODS Morphometric, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 4 patients with low grade AAH, 5 with high grade AAH and 7 with BAC. RESULTS The mean nuclear areas of high grade AAH and BAC were greater than those of low grade AAH (P<0.05); p53 protein expression was negative in 4 cases of low grade AAH,while the positive rates in high grade AAH and BAC were 40% (2/5) and 57% (4/7), respectively. CONCLUSION The development of BAC is stepwise. AAH appears to be a lesion closely related with BAC, probably as its genuine precursor.

  12. Indications of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Andrew; Monasterio, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAP) have become some of the most commonly prescribed medications in primary and specialist care settings. Off-label prescribing accounts for much of the expanded use of AAPs. This has become common in the elderly. Marketing by pharmaceutical companies appears to have contributed to the off-label use of AAPs, in situations where their safety and efficacy is far from established. Although evidence provides varying degrees of support for their use for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, augmentation of antidepressants in depression, anxiety, insomnia and in the management of psychosis in Parkinson's Disease, there are a number of potential problems with their expanded use in the elderly. These include weight gain, type two diabetes mellitus, sudden cardiac death and increased mortality rates in the elderly with dementia. It is recommended that whenever AAPs are used off-label, a review date is identified, informed consent is obtained and treatment and side-effects are closely monitored.

  13. Atypical parakeratosis: a marker of dysplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, T M; Kannan, V; Kline, T S

    1996-11-01

    The Bethesda System categorizes atypical parakeratosis (APK) as "ASCUS or SIL depending on the degree of cellular abnormalities." APK, however, is not well-defined. We retrospectively reviewed 68 cervicovaginal specimens with follow-up material to identify specific criteria and clinical significance of APK. APK cells were small cells, 2-3 times the diameter of neutrophil, with dense, orangeophilic cytoplasm, high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, dense, often uneven chromatin, and irregular nuclear contour. Of 62 cases with APK, 37 had accompanying dysplastic cells. Of 25 cases with APK alone, follow-up revealed 12 with squamous intraepithelial lesion (5 HSIL and 7 LSIL) and 13 with benign changes. A major diagnostic pitfall of APK was inflammation with degeneration. Abundant APK cells, minimal inflammation and degeneration, and previous history of dysplasia frequently were associated with follow-up SIL. The findings of this study identify APK as an important marker for dysplasia that warrants careful evaluation and follow-up.

  14. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  15. Emphysematous Cystitis: Report of an Atypical Case

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    Karen De Baets

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the atypical case of a nondiabetic 66-year old male with severe abdominal pain and vomiting who was found to have emphysematous cystitis. Of all gas-forming infections of the urinary tract emphysematous cystitis is the most common and the least severe. The major risk factors are diabetes mellitus and urinary tract obstruction. Most frequent causative pathogens are Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The clinical presentation is nonspecific and ranges from asymptomatic urinary tract infection to urosepsis and septic shock. The diagnosis is made by abdominal imaging. Treatment consists of broad-spectrum antibiotics, bladder drainage, and management of the risk factors. Surgery is reserved for severe cases. Overall mortality rate of emphysematous cystitis is 7%. Immediate diagnosis and treatment is necessary because of the rapid progression to bladder necrosis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, urosepsis, and possibly fatal evolution.

  16. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simona Spaccavento, Marina Del Prete, Angela Craca, Anna Loverre IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Cassano Murge, Bari, Italy Background: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS and aphasia. Aim: We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods: A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results: Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20, low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall, and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion: Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in

  17. A surgical case for severe hemolytic anemia after mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingu, Yasushige; Aoki, Hidetoshi; Ebuoka, Noriyoshi; Eya, Kazuhiro; Takigami, Ko; Oba, Junichi; Fukuhara, Takashi

    2005-06-01

    We report a rare case of severe hemolytic anemia accompanied by moderate renal insufficiency after mitral valve repair. Although the degree of the residual mitral regurgitation was less than 1+ during the first three weeks after the operation, the maximum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was up to 7,430 U/l and the minimum hemoglobin was 4.9 g/dl. The mitral valve replacement successfully resolved the hemolysis, but the renal function did not completely recover.

  18. Hemolytic anemia after operation for aortic dissection using teflon felt strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Ogino, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Minatoya, Kenji; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2008-05-01

    We report three cases of hemolytic anemia caused by anastomotic stenosis after surgical treatment for aortic dissection in which internal and external Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) felt strips were used for reinforcement of the aortic stump. To detect this complication, laboratory findings typical of red cell fragmentation syndrome as well as appropriate imaging modalities are necessary. As a precaution, it is necessary to be meticulous when stitching the internal felt strip.

  19. [Phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolates obtained from clinical specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Bulut, Yunus; Tunçoglu, Ebru

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans strains isolated from clinical specimens. A total of 147 C. albicans strains isolated from blood (n = 29), respiratory specimens (n = 44), urine (n = 52), pus (n = 17) and stool (n = 5) were included in the study. Proteinase and phospholipase activities were determined in 81% and 76% of C. albicans isolates, respectively. All C. albicans isolates revealed beta-hemolytic activity on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 7% fresh sheep blood and 3% glucose. Phospholipase and proteinase positivity were highest among the respiratory isolates. Proteinase activity of respiratory (93%) and blood (83%) isolates were statistically significantly higher than that of urine (77%; p = 0.032), pus (65%; p = 0.007) and stool isolates (60%; p = 0.026). While phospholipase activity showed statistically significant difference between respiratory (84%) and pus (53%) isolates (p = 0.014), no statistically significant difference was determined for blood (79%), urine (75%) and stool (80%) isolates (p > 0.05). Two blood isolates with 4+ proteinase activity and 3 urine isolates with 3+ proteinase activity were phospholipase negative. One urine isolate with 4+ phospholipase activity and 4 with 3+ phospholipase activity were proteinase negative. Phospholipase and proteinase negative 1 isolate from stool and 1 isolate from pus were found to have 4+ hemolytic activity. In conclusion, besides proteinase and phospholipase enzyme activities, hemolytic activity may play an important role for the C.albicans infections. The pathogenetic role of these virulence factors should be evaluated by further clinical studies.

  20. Paravertebral Mass in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia: Computed Tomographic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana França Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extramedullary hematopoiesis is characterized by the presence of hematopoietic tissue outside of the bone marrow and is typically associated with chronic hemolytic anemias. Intrathoracic extramedullary hematopoiesis is a rare and usually asymptomatic condition. The authors report a case of a 57-year-old man with intrathoracic extramedullary hematopoiesis and hereditary spherocytosis. Clinical and laboratory evaluation, together with radiological findings, are described. The diagnosis of the disease was confirmed by tissue biopsy.

  1. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva; Raj Pal Manchandani; Patricia Oneal

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare.

  2. Hemolytic and cytotoxic effects of saponin like compounds isolated from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocoma erinaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elaheh Amini; Mohammad Nabiuni; Javad Baharara; Kazem Parivar; Javad Asili

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and characterize the saponin from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocomaerinaceus Methods: In an attempt to prepare saponin from brittle star, collected samples were minced and extracted with ethanol, dichloromethane, n-buthanol. Then, concentrated n-butanol extract were loaded on HP-20 resin and washed with dionized water, 80% ethanol and 100%ethanol respectively. Subsequently, detection of saponin was performed by foaming property, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hemolytic analysis on thin layer chromatography. The cytotoxic activity on HeLa cells was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay and under invert microscopy.Results:) and to evaluate its hemolytic and cytotoxic potential. method. The presence of C-H bond, C-O-C and OH in fourier transform infrared spectrum of fraction 80% ethanol is characteristic feature in the many of saponin compounds. Hemolytic assay revealed HD50 value was 500 µg/mL. MTT assay exhibited that saponin extracted in IC50 value of 25 µg/mL inducsd potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cells in 24 h and 12.5 µg/mL in 48 h, meanwhile in lower concentration did not have considerable effect against HeLa cells.Conclusions:The existence of saponin in Ophiocoma erinaceus were approved by phytochemical These findings showed that only 80% ethanol fraction Persian Gulf brittle star contained saponin like compounds with hemolytic activity which can be detected simply by phytochemical that can be appreciable for future anticancer research.

  3. Could β-hemolytic, group B Enterococcus faecalis be mistaken for Streptococcus agalactiae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Gherardi, Giovanni; Marrollo, Roberta; Franco, Alessia; Pimentel De Araujo, Fernanda; Dottarelli, Samuele; Fazii, Paolo; Battisti, Antonio; Carretto, Edoardo

    2015-05-01

    A β-hemolytic Enterococcus faecalis strain agglutinating Lancefield group A, B, C, D, F, and G antisera was observed from a rectovaginal swab, in the context of antenatal screening for Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]). This is the first multi-Lancefield antisera-agglutinating isolate of this species, and it raised particular concern, as it may mimic GBS, leading to false reporting and useless receipt of intrapartum antibiotics.

  4. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare.

  5. Hemolytic and pharmacokinetic studies of liposomal and particulate amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Dolores R; Hernández, Leticia; Fleire, Laura; González-Alvarez, Iban; Montoya, Ana; Ballesteros, María P; Dea-Ayuela, María A; Miró, Guadalupe; Bolás-Fernández, Francisco; Torrado, Juan J

    2013-04-15

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a very effective antifungal and antiparasitic drug with a narrow therapeutic window. To improve its efficacy/toxicity balance, new controlled release formulations have been developed based on different encapsulation systems, aggregation states and particle sizes modifications. The kinetics of the hemolytic process was studied not only to characterize the toxicity of different formulations but also as an indicator of drug release. Pharmacokinetic studies in beagle dogs were carried out with those formulations that exhibited the least hemolytic toxicity: liposomal formulation (AmBisome), poly-aggregated AmB and encapsulated particulate AmB formulation. A novel poly-aggregated AmB formulation proved to be comparable in terms of low hemolytic activity with the marketed gold standard formulation: AmBisome. Its pharmacokinetic profile, characterized by a smaller area under the curve and larger volume of distribution, was markedly different from AmBisome, resulting in a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of leishmaniasis which can enhance the AmB passive target by the uptake by the cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. Effects of different variables such as type of formulation, dose, microencapsulation, anesthesia and dog's healthy state on AmB pharmacokinetics were studied.

  6. The simulation of multiphase flow field in implantable blood pump and analysis of hemolytic capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tie-yan; YE Liang; HONG Fang-wen; LIU Deng-cheng; FAN Hui-min; LIU Zhong-min

    2013-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the axial flow impeller blood pump NIVADIII is carried out by using a CFD multiphase flow model.The hydrodynamic performance of the pump and the flow field in the pump are analyzed,and the shear stress distribution is obtained.A hemolytic prediction model based on the shear stress is built based on the calculation results,and it can be used for quantitative predictions of the hemolytic behavior of a blood pump.Hemolysis tests in vitro were performed 6 times with fresh bovine blood.At each time,the flow of the pump NIVADIII is 5 L/min and the outflow tract pressure is 100 mmHg.According to the tests,the plasma free hemoglobin (FHB) content and the hematocrit (HCT) are measured after 0 s,0.5 s,1 s,1.5 s,...4 s.At the end of each experiment Normal Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of NIVADIII is calculated.The average of NIH is 0.0055 g/100L,almost identical with that obtained from the hemolytic prediction model.This method can be applied in the selection stage of a blood pump.

  7. Antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of fish epidermal mucus Cynoglossus arel andArius caelatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subramanian Bragadeeswaran; Selvam Priyadharshini; Kolandhasamy Prabhu; Solomon Raj Sophia Rani

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the antimicrobial, hemolytic activity and immunomodulatory activity of fish epidermal mucus and their chemical constituents fromCynoglossus arel (C. arel) and Arius caelatus (A. caelatus). Mucus plays an important role in the prevention of colonization by parasites, bacteria and fungi.Methods: Epidermal mucus was obtained from two marine fishes, lyophilized and the chemical composition of epidermal mucus was analysed byFT-IR analysis. Thein vitro antimicrobial activity against human pathogens (fungi, gram positive and gram-negative bacteria) and also the hemolytic activity and immunomodulatory activity were determined.Results:Totally ten human pathogens were tested against the fish mucus. Out of the ten pathogens, five pathogens have proved to be sensitive to the mucus. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed againstVibrio cholera (V. cholera) (9 mm and2 mm in diameter), followed byStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with a inhibition zone of (6 mm and3 mm),Streptococcus areus (S. areus) (5 mm and4 mm),Vibrio parahemolyticus (V. parahemolyticus) (4mm and5 mm) respectively.Conclusions: The present investigation has revealed that positive progresses in the fish mucus extracts against human pathogens and hemolytic activity. But further efforts are required for the purification and isolation of the active antimicrobial compounds in order to establish their possible applications.

  8. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  9. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3 years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3 months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level.

  10. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting with severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, while the other had moderate anemia and unconjugated hyperbilrubinemia. Although both the neonates were treated by phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin, one of them received double volume exchange transfusion. Conclusion: There appeared to be an increase in the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by Rh antibodies other than anti-D. In this case report, both patients presented with anemia and hyperbilirubinemia but were successfully treated, with a favorable outcome.

  11. Streptolysin S of Streptococcus anginosus exhibits broad-range hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, Daniela; Mauerer, Stefanie; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a commensal of mucous membranes and an emerging human pathogen. Some strains, including the type strain, display a prominent β-hemolytic phenotype. A gene cluster (sag), encoding a variant of streptolysin S (SLS) has recently been identified as the genetic background for β-hemolysin production in S. anginosus. In this study, we further characterized the hemolytic and cytolytic activity of the S. anginosus hemolysin in comparison with other streptococcal hemolysins. The results indicate that SLS of S. anginosus is a broad-range hemolysin able to lyse erythrocytes of different species, including horse, bovine, rabbit and even chicken. The hemolytic activity is temperature dependent, and a down-regulation of the hemolysin expression is induced in the presence of high glucose levels. Survival assays indicate that in contrast to other streptococcal species, S. anginosus does not require SLS for survival in the presence of human granulocytes. Cross-complementation studies using the sagB and sagD genes of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis demonstrated functional similarities to the S. anginosus SLS. Nevertheless, distinct differences to other streptolysin S variants were noted and provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms of SLS pathogen host interactions.

  12. Iatrogenic hemolytic anemia and endocarditis in New Zealand white rabbits secondary to Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sarah O; Artwoh, James E; Fortman, Jeffrey D; Pogwizd, Steven; Jeanes, Jodi; Koske, Sarah; Pinkerton, Marie E; Haschek, Wanda M; Messick, Joanne

    2007-11-01

    During a 3-mo period, 9 of the 15 New Zealand White rabbits used in a heart failure study developed a hemolytic anemia. The heart failure model involved the creation of an aortic insufficiency (AI) followed 2 to 6 wk later by the creation of an aortic stenosis (AS). None of the 9 animals that developed hemolytic anemia responded to medical management, and 6 of the 9 were euthanized for humane concerns. Necropsies and blood cultures were performed on all anemic animals; 7 of these cultures yielded growth of Achromobacter xylosoxidans. In addition, cultures from the heart valves of 2 rabbits yielded growth of Achromobacter xylosoxidans. We presume that the endocarditis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans led to the mechanical damage of red blood cells (RBCs) and subsequent intravascular hemolysis or splenic destruction of damaged RBCs, resulting in a severe, regenerative hemolytic anemia. Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, catalase-positive, oxidase-positive, gram-negative bacillus. This organism is an environmentally resistant and opportunistic bacterium that typically inhabits aqueous environments. Microbial samples from the investigator's laboratory and equipment were collected to identify the source of the bacteria. A pressure transducer and bag of intravenous fluid were identified as sources of contamination.

  13. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  14. Effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field on production of mannatide by α-hemolytic Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialan; Xu, Cui; Wan, Yunlei; Gao, Mengxiang

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) on biomass and mannatide production by α-hemolytic Streptococcus in liquid-state fermentation culture medium was studied during shake flask culture. Magnetic field (MF) inductions, exposure times, and exposure periods varied in a range of 0-1.5 mT, 0-16 h, and six periods of incubation time, respectively. Results showed both biomass and mannatide production increased significantly at MF induction 0.4, 0.6, and 0.9 mT and decreased at both 1.2 and 1.5 mT. Biomass increased by exposure for initial and middle stages of fermentation. Mannatide production increased significantly at 4-8, 8-12, and 17-21 h. Peak yield of biomass and mannatide production increased by 10.7% and 14.0% at 25 and 27 h of incubation at 0.6 mT MF induction and exposure to 8-12 h of incubation time, compared with the control experiment, respectively. ELF-MF could also enhance the growth rate and mannatide production rate of α-hemolytic Streptococcus. However, ELF-MF did not alter α-hemolytic Streptococcus cell growth and mannatide metabolizing regulation or fermentation pattern. Mannatide production was not associated with cellular growth but rather only partially associated. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:331-337, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  16. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweidan AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander J Sweidan,1,2 Adam K Brys,3 David D Sohn,1,2 Milan R Sheth4 1University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, St Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, USA; 3School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Long Beach Memorial Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. Keywords: hypereosinophilia, eosinophils, myeloproliferative disorder, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leukemia

  17. Vitamin D receptor and PCNA expression in severe parathyroid hyperplasia of uremic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王笑云; 孙彬; 周富华; 胡建明; 俞香宝; 彭韬

    2001-01-01

    目的研究维生素D受体(VDR)在继发性甲旁亢(SHPT)患者甲状旁腺(PT)中的表达,探讨严重继发性甲旁亢患者对钙三醇抵抗的机制以及与PT增生的关系。 方法7例严重SHPT病人的PT19枚,正常人6枚,用免疫组化ABC法检测细胞增殖核抗原(PCNA)、维生 素D受体表达,计算阳性细胞率。 结果SHPT组PT总重比正常人增加16.1倍,PCNA表达明显增加,分别为(6.35±3.36)‰和(1.73± 1.31)‰(P<0.001)。结节性增生区(NH)增加更为显著(P<0.001),PCNA表达与腺体重量呈正相关(r= 0.58,P<0.01)。SHPT组VDR阳性率(40.28±13.13)%比对照组(83.79±3.77)%明显减少(P<0.001)。 结节性较弥漫性增生减少更显著,为(27.14±4.12)%和(49.84±7.33)%(P<0.001)。VDR表达与腺体 重量、PCNA阳性率均呈负相关(r=-0.46,P<0.05与r=-0.75,P<0.001)。 结论SHPT甲旁腺VDR表达明显减少,结节性较弥漫性增生更甚,与PCNA阳性率呈负相关。提示严重 SHPT患者PT细胞VDR明显减少可能是导致对钙三醇抵抗的重要原因,且与细胞增殖有关。%Objective To clarify the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR)expression in parathyroid proliferation and resistance of parathyroid glands to 1,25(OH)2D3 with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). Methods This study used archive parathyroid with 7 uremic patients. The expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and VDR was evaluated in nineteen-surgically excised parathyroid tissues, including 11 diffuse hyperplasia (DH-type) and 8 nodular hyperplasia (NH-type) of parathyroid glands, by immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin complex method). Results The weight of parathyroid in SHPT was remarkably increased by 16.1 times. The numbers of parathyroid cells were increased by 1.86 times. The rate of PCNA was remarkably increased in parathyroid hyperplasia with SHPT compared with that in control group [(6.35±3.36)‰ vs (1.73±1.31)‰, P<0.001]. The number of

  18. Integrated genomic analyses of de novo pathways underlying atypical meningiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Youngblood, Mark W.; Clark, Victoria E.; Coşkun, Süleyman; Henegariu, Octavian; Duran, Daniel; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Kaulen, Leon D.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Abraham, Brian J.; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Timmer, Marco; Goldbrunner, Roland; Omay, S. Bülent; Baranoski, Jacob; Baran, Burçin; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Bai, Hanwen; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Schramm, Johannes; Moliterno, Jennifer; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A.; Günel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign brain tumours, with a potential for becoming atypical or malignant. On the basis of comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses, we compared benign meningiomas to atypical ones. Here, we show that the majority of primary (de novo) atypical meningiomas display loss of NF2, which co-occurs either with genomic instability or recurrent SMARCB1 mutations. These tumours harbour increased H3K27me3 signal and a hypermethylated phenotype, mainly occupying the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding sites in human embryonic stem cells, thereby phenocopying a more primitive cellular state. Consistent with this observation, atypical meningiomas exhibit upregulation of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of the PRC2 complex, as well as the E2F2 and FOXM1 transcriptional networks. Importantly, these primary atypical meningiomas do not harbour TERT promoter mutations, which have been reported in atypical tumours that progressed from benign ones. Our results establish the genomic landscape of primary atypical meningiomas and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28195122

  19. Malignant atypical cell in urine cytology: a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakkar Nandita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to find out the characteristic morphology of malignant atypical cells which were missed on routine cytology of urine. Materials and methods In this retrospective study, we examined detailed cytomorphology of 18 cases of atypical urinary cytology which were missed on routine examination and were further proved on histopathology as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of bladder. The cytological features of these cases were compared with 10 cases of benign urine samples. Results There were 11 cases of high grade TCC and 7 cases of low grade TCC on histopathology of the atypical urine samples. Necrosis in the background and necrosed papillae were mostly seen in malignant atypical cells. The comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei (single cells with deep black structure-less nuclei were only observed in malignant atypical cells. The most consistent features in malignant atypical cells were: i high nuclear and cytoplasmic (N/C ratio ii nuclear pleomorphism iii nuclear margin irregularity iv hyperchromasia and v chromatin abnormalities Conclusion The present study emphasizes that nuclear features such as high N/C ratio, hyperchromasia and chromatin abnormalities are particularly useful for assessing the malignant atypical cells. Other cytological features such as comet cells and cells with India ink nuclei are also helpful for diagnosis but have limited value because they are less frequently seen.

  20. Atypical antipsychotics in first admission schizophrenia: medication continuation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtabai, Ramin; Lavelle, Janet; Gibson, P Joseph; Bromet, Evelyn J

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic medications on treatment continuation and outcomes in a first admission sample of patients with schizophrenia treated in usual practice settings. In a sample of 189 participants with a research diagnosis of DSM-IV schizophrenia drawn from the Suffolk County Mental Health Project, we compared the effects of atypical and conventional agents on change of medication, medication gaps, and rehospitalization. For these analyses we used the method of survival analysis for recurrent events, in which the episodes of treatment rather than individual subjects are the units of analysis. In addition, we compared improvement in positive and negative symptoms from intake to 24- or 48-month followups for subjects who stayed on one type of medication or changed to atypicals from conventional antipsychotics. Atypical agents were associated with lower risk of medication change, medication gaps, and rehospitalization. Both conventional and atypical agents were associated with improvement of positive symptoms at followup, but only subjects on atypical agents at followup experienced a significant improvement in negative symptoms. We conclude that in usual practice settings, as in randomized clinical trials, atypical agents are associated with improved treatment continuation and outcomes.