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Sample records for atypical antipsychotic medication

  1. Atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia in older adults: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Sonja; McArthur, Eric; Reiss, Jeffrey P.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Hackam, Daniel G.; Weir, Matthew A.; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of case reports have suggested a possible association between atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia. Currently, there are no reliable estimates of hyponatremia risk from atypical antipsychotic drugs. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the 30-day risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia in older adults dispensed an atypical antipsychotic drug relative to no antipsychotic use. Design The design of this study was a retrospective, population-ba...

  2. The Impact of Open Access to Atypical Antipsychotics on Treatment Costs for Medi-Cal Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Narayan; Kimberly L. Sterling; McCombs, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The California Medicaid Program (Medi-Cal) provided open access to atypical antipsychotics in October 1997. This study investigated the impact of open access to atypical antipsychotics on the costs and duration of therapy for patients with bipolar disorders. Methods: Paid claims data from Medi-Cal were used to identify episodes of treatment using antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, or selected anticonvulsants initiated by patients with bipolar disorders. Episodes of...

  3. Stimulant and atypical antipsychotic medications for children placed in foster homes.

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    L Oriana Linares

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to examine the use of prescribed psychoactive medications in a prospective cohort of children shortly after they entered foster homes; and to identify demographics, maltreatment history, psychiatric diagnoses including ADHD comorbidity, and level of aggression that contribute to prescribed use of stimulant and atypical antipsychotic medication over time. METHODS: The sample included N = 252 children (nested in 95 sibling groups followed for three years up to 4 yearly waves. RESULTS: Nearly all (89% met criteria for at least one of eight psychiatric diagnoses and 31% (75/252 used one or more prescribed psychoactive medications. Over half (55% were diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; of these 38% used stimulants and 36% used atypical antipsychotics. Of the 75 medicated children, 19% received ≥3 different classes of drugs over the course of the study. Stimulants (69% and atypical antipsychotics (65% were the most frequently used drugs among medicated children. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR showed that male gender (AOR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5-9.3, African American vs Latino ethnicity (AOR = 5.4; 95% CI = 2.1-14.2, ADHD regardless of Oppositional Defiant (ODD or Conduct (CD comorbidity (AOR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.3-27.5, ODD or CD (AOR = 11.1, 95% CI = 2.1-58.6, and Separation Anxiety (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0-4.0 psychiatric disorders were associated with the use of prescribed stimulants; while male gender (AOR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-9.3, African American vs Latino (AOR = 5.1, 95% CI = 1.2-9.2 or Mixed/Other ethnicity (AOR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.9-13.7, ADHD regardless of ODD or CD comorbidity (AOR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.2-28.7, ODD or CD (AOR = 13.9, 95% CI = 3.3-58.5, Major Depression/Dysthymia (AOR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.1-6.7 psychiatric disorders, and history of sexual abuse (AOR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.3-18.4 were

  4. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS FROM SCRATCH TO THE PRESENT

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    Ashish Chauhan*, Amit Mittal, Pradeep Kumar Arora

    2013-01-01

    history and development, epidemiology, etiology of psychosis along with treatment with antipsychotics (especially on atypical antipsychotics, their global market, pharmaco-economics, mechanism of action and recent advancements in atypical antipsychotic medications, antipsychotic drugs which are currently under clinical development along with Ayurvedic, Homeopathic, Chinese, Unani treatment for psychosis.

  5. Association between LEP and LEPR gene polymorphisms and dyslipidemia in patients using atypical antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregoor, Jochem G.; van der Weide, Jan; Loovers, Harriet M.; van Megen, Harold J.; Egberts, Toine C.; Heerdink, Eibert R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment with atypical antipsychotic agents is often complicated by dyslipidemia, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Objectives To determine whether the LEPR Q223R, the LEP -2548G/A, and the HTR2C -759C/T polymorphisms are associated with dyslipidemia in patients using at

  6. Benzisoxazole derivatives as Atypical Antipsychotic drugs: A Review

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    Sharath Chandra S P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic medications constitute a diverse series of heterocyclic compounds that are used to treat psychotic problems, particularly schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorders. Heterocyclic molecules such as benzisoxazole derivatives, especially 3-(piperidin-4-yl-1,2-benzisoxazole have been widely used as antipsychotic drugs. Atypical antipsychotic drugs which are derived from benzisoxazole include risperidone, iloperidone and paliperidone.

  7. Efficacy of Atypical Antipsychotic Medication in the Management of Behaviour Problems in Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Borderline Intelligence: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Gemma L.; Deb, Shoumitro

    2011-01-01

    The use of medications to manage problem behaviours is widespread. However, robust evidence to support their use seems to be lacking. The aim was to review research evidence into the efficacy of atypical antipsychotic medication in managing problem behaviour in children with intellectual disabilities and borderline intelligence. A systematic…

  8. Healthcare Costs of Atypical Antipsychotic Use for Patients with Bipolar Disorder in a Medicaid Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Qiu; Fu, Alex Z; Gordon G. Liu; Christensen, Dale B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A large body of clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of atypical antipsychotic use in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Facing increasing budget pressure, third-party payers, such as state Medicaid programmes in the US, are demanding better understanding of the medical costs beyond atypical antipsychotic drug costs alone in treating bipolar disorder. Objective: To examine healthcare costs associated with the atypical antipsychotic treatments for bipolar disorder from a...

  9. Pedal edema associated with atypical antipsychotics

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    Santanu Munshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a patient diagnosed as a case of bipolar affective disorder complaining of bothersome incidence of pedal edema 1 month after the initiation of atypical antipsychotic regimen with risperidone and quetiapine. All hematological and biochemical profiles were found to be normal. On discontinuation of risperidone, the condition remained unresolved even after 2 weeks, and the edema progressed reaching her calves. On tapering the dose of quetiapine, she started showing gradual improvement in edematous condition. Quetiapine was slowly discontinued. No further recurrence of edema occurred, and hence, no further medication changes were implemented. Pedal edema was found to be resolved within weeks of dechallenge of the regimen. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale gave a score of 7 which denotes "probable" adverse drug reaction with quetiapine.

  10. Hematological Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

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    Serap Erdogan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics cause less frequently extrapyramidal system symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and hyperprolactinemia than typical antipsychotics. However hematological side effects such as leukopenia and neutropenia could occur during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. These side effects could lead to life threatening situations and the mortality rate due to drug related agranulocytosis is about 5-10%. There are several hypothesis describing the mechanisms underlying drug induced leukopenia and/or neutropenia such as direct toxic effects of these drugs upon the bone marrow or myeloid precursors, immunologic destruction of the granulocytes or supression of the granulopoiesis. Clozapine is the antipsychotic agent which has been most commonly associated with agranulocytosis. A nitrenium ion which is formed by the bioactivation of clozapine is thought to have an important role in the pathophysiogy of this adverse effect. Aside from clozapine, there are several case reports reporting an association between olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and leukopenia. We did not find any study or case report presenting amisulpride or sulpride related hematological side effects in our literature search. Patients who had hematological side effects during their previous antipsychotic drug treatments and who had lower baseline blood leukocyte counts, have higher risk to develop leukopenia or neutropenia during their current antipsychotic treatment. Once leukopenia and neutropenia develops, drugs thought to be responsible for this side effect should be discontinued or dosages should be lowered. In some cases iniatition of lithium or G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy may be helpful in normalizing blood cell counts. Clinicans should avoid any combination of drugs known to cause hematological side effects. Besides during antipsychotic treatment, infection symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat or

  11. Effects of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs on gene expression profiles in the liver of schizophrenia subjects

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    Song Jonathan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although much progress has been made on antipsychotic drug development, precise mechanisms behind the action of typical and atypical antipsychotics are poorly understood. Methods We performed genome-wide expression profiling to study effects of typical antipsychotics and atypical antipsychotics in the postmortem liver of schizophrenia patients using microarrays (Affymetrix U133 plus2.0. We classified the subjects into typical antipsychotics (n = 24 or atypical antipsychotics (n = 26 based on their medication history, and compared gene expression profiles with unaffected controls (n = 34. We further analyzed individual antipsychotic effects on gene expression by sub-classifying the subjects into four major antipsychotic groups including haloperidol, phenothiazines, olanzapine and risperidone. Results Typical antipsychotics affected genes associated with nuclear protein, stress responses and phosphorylation, whereas atypical antipsychotics affected genes associated with golgi/endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm transport. Comparison between typical antipsychotics and atypical antipsychotics further identified genes associated with lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function. Analyses on individual antipsychotics revealed a set of genes (151 transcripts, FDR adjusted p Conclusion Typical antipsychotics and atypical antipsychotics affect different genes and biological function in the liver. Typical antipsychotic phenothiazines exert robust effects on gene expression in the liver that may lead to liver toxicity. The genes found in the current study may benefit antipsychotic drug development with better therapeutic and side effect profiles.

  12. Antipsychotic monotherapy and polypharmacy in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia with atypical antipsychotics

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    Correll Christoph

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antipsychotic monotherapy is recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with schizophrenia. Simultaneous treatment with multiple antipsychotics (polypharmacy is suggested by some expert consensus guidelines as the last resort after exhausting monotherapy alternatives. This study assessed the annual rate and duration of antipsychotic monotherapy and its inverse, antipsychotic polypharmacy, among schizophrenia patients initiated on commonly used atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods Data were drawn from a large prospective naturalistic study of patients treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, conducted 7/1997–9/2003. Analyses focused on patients (N = 796 who were initiated during the study on olanzapine (N = 405, quetiapine (N = 115, or risperidone (N = 276. The percentage of patients with monotherapy on the index antipsychotic over the 1-year post initiation, and the cumulative number of days on monotherapy were calculated for all patients and for each of the 3 atypical antipsychotic treatment groups. Analyses employed repeated measures generalized linear models and non-parametric bootstrap re-sampling, controlling for patient characteristics. Results During the 1-year period, only a third (35.7% of the patients were treated predominately with monotherapy (>300 days. Most patients (57.7% had at least one prolonged period of antipsychotic polypharmacy (>60 consecutive days. Patients averaged 195.5 days on monotherapy, 155.7 days on polypharmacy, and 13.9 days without antipsychotic therapy. Olanzapine-initiated patients were significantly more likely to be on monotherapy with the initiating antipsychotic during the 1-year post initiation compared to risperidone (p = .043 or quetiapine (p = .002. The number of monotherapy days was significantly greater for olanzapine than quetiapine (p Conclusion Despite guidelines recommending the use of polypharmacy only as a last resort, the use of antipsychotic

  13. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Nursing Homes and Pharmaceutical Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Camilla B.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Field, Terry S.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Kanaan, Abir O.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many nursing home (NH) residents are prescribed atypical antipsychotics despite US Food and Drug Administration warnings of increased risk of death in older adults with dementia. Aggressive pharmaceutical marketing has been cited as a potential cause, although data are scarce. The objectives of this study were to describe the current extent and type of pharmaceutical marketing in NHs in one state, and to provide preliminary evidence for the potential influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in NHs. DESIGN Nested mixed-methods, cross-sectional study of NHs in a cluster randomized trial. SETTING 41 NHs in Connecticut. PARTICIPANTS NH administrators, directors of nursing and medical directors (n = 93, response rate 75.6%). MEASUREMENTS Quantitative data, including prescription drug dispensing data (September 2009–August 2010) linked with Nursing Home Compare data (April 2011), were used to determine facility-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use, facility-level characteristics, NH staffing and NH quality. Qualitative data, including semi-structured interviews and surveys of NH leaders conducted in the first quarter of 2011, were used to determine encounters with pharmaceutical marketing. RESULTS Leadership at 46.3% of NHs (19/41) reported pharmaceutical marketing encounters, consisting of educational training, written/Internet-based materials and/or sponsored training. No association was detected between the level of atypical antipsychotic prescribing and reports of any pharmaceutical marketing by at least one NH leader. CONCLUSION NH leaders frequently encounter pharmaceutical marketing through a variety of ways, although the impact on atypical antipsychotic prescribing is unclear. PMID:25688605

  14. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

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    Just MJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marek J Just Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, Piekary Medical Centre, Piekary Slaskie, Poland Abstract: Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido, physiological arousal (lubrication/erection, orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders’ treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (α-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic. Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. Keywords: schizophrenia, galactorrhea, hyperprolactinemia, mood disorders, anorgasmia

  15. Time to discontinuation of atypical versus typical antipsychotics in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia

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    Swartz Marvin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an ongoing debate over whether atypical antipsychotics are more effective than typical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. This naturalistic study compares atypical and typical antipsychotics on time to all-cause medication discontinuation, a recognized index of medication effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods We used data from a large, 3-year, observational, non-randomized, multisite study of schizophrenia, conducted in the U.S. between 7/1997 and 9/2003. Patients who were initiated on oral atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, or ziprasidone or oral typical antipsychotics (low, medium, or high potency were compared on time to all-cause medication discontinuation for 1 year following initiation. Treatment group comparisons were based on treatment episodes using 3 statistical approaches (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox Proportional Hazards regression model, and propensity score-adjusted bootstrap resampling methods. To further assess the robustness of the findings, sensitivity analyses were performed, including the use of (a only 1 medication episode for each patient, the one with which the patient was treated first, and (b all medication episodes, including those simultaneously initiated on more than 1 antipsychotic. Results Mean time to all-cause medication discontinuation was longer on atypical (N = 1132, 256.3 days compared to typical antipsychotics (N = 534, 197.2 days; p Conclusion In the usual care of schizophrenia patients, time to medication discontinuation for any cause appears significantly longer for atypical than typical antipsychotics regardless of the typical antipsychotic potency level. Findings were primarily driven by clozapine and olanzapine, and to a lesser extent by risperidone. Furthermore, only clozapine and olanzapine therapy showed consistently and significantly longer treatment duration compared to perphenazine, a medium

  16. Both typical and atypical long-acting injectable antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: a retrospective chart review

    OpenAIRE

    Alpak, Gokay; Demir, Bahadir; Aksoy, Ihsan; Kaya, Hilal; Unal, Ahmet; Bulbul, Feridun; Savas, Haluk A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder which shows difficulties in the process of diagnosis and treatment. One of the biggest problems in BD maintenance therapy is to ensure medication compliance. Long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotic medications have important advantages in such cases. In this study we aimed to include both LAI atypical and typical antipsychotics and to compare the clinical status, number of hospitalization, and side effects of pre and post-t...

  17. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

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    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  18. Trends in Scientific Literature on Atypical Antipsychotics in South Korea: A Bibliometric Study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Shen, Winston W.; Pae, Chi-un; Moreno, Raquel; Rubio, Gabriel; Molina, Juan D.; Noriega, Concha; Pérez-Nieto, Miguel A.; Huelves, Lorena; Álamo, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    Objective We have carried out a bibliometric study on the scientific publications in relation to atypical or second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) in South Korea. Methods With the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, we selected those publications made in South Korea whose title included the descriptors atypic* (atypical*) antipsychotic*, second-generation antipsychotic*, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine, sertindole, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride, zotepine...

  19. Use of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly: a clinical review

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    Gareri P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Gareri,1 Cristina Segura-García,2 Valeria Graziella Laura Manfredi,1 Antonella Bruni,2 Paola Ciambrone,2 Gregorio Cerminara,2 Giovambattista De Sarro,2 Pasquale De Fazio2 1Elderly Health Care, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Department of Health Sciences, University “Magna Græcia” of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: The use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in the elderly has become wider and wider in recent years; in fact, these agents have novel receptor binding profiles, good efficacy with regard to negative symptoms, and reduced extrapyramidal symptoms. However, in recent years, the use of both conventional and atypical antipsychotics has been widely debated for concerns about their safety in elderly patients affected with dementia and the possible risks for stroke and sudden death. A MEDLINE search was made using the words elderly, atypical antipsychotics, use, schizophrenia, psychosis, mood disorders, dementia, behavioral disorders, and adverse events. Some personal studies were also considered. This paper reports the receptor binding profiles and the main mechanism of action of these drugs, together with their main use in psychiatry and the possible adverse events in elderly people. Keywords: atypical antipsychotics, dementia, elderly, psychosis, mood disorders, side effects

  20. Off-label indications for atypical antipsychotics: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Nimatoudis, Ioannis; Iacovides, Apostolos; Kaprinis, George

    2004-01-01

    Introduction With the introduction of newer atypical antipsychotic agents, a question emerged, concerning their use as complementary pharmacotherapy or even as monotherapy in mental disorders other than psychosis. Material and method MEDLINE was searched with the combination of each one of the key words: risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine with key words that refered to every DSM-IV diagnosis other than schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and dementia and memory d...

  1. New atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia: iloperidone

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    Silvio Caccia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Silvio Caccia,1 Luca Pasina,2 Alessandro Nobili21Laboratory of Drug Metabolism, “Mario Negri” Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy; 2Laboratory of Quality, Assessment of Geriatric Therapies and Services, “Mario Negri” Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The optimal treatment of schizophrenia poses a challenge to develop more effective treatments and safer drugs, to overcome poor compliance, discontinuation and frequent switching with available antipsychotics. Iloperidone is a new dopamine type 2/serotonin type 2A (D2/5-HT2A antagonist structurally related to risperidone, expected to give better efficacy with less extrapyramidal symptoms than D2 receptor antagonist antipsychotics. In double-blind phase III trials iloperidone reduced the symptoms of schizophrenia at oral doses from 12 to 24 mg. It was more effective than placebo in reducing positive and negative syndrome total score and Brief Psychiatric Rating scale scores; it was as effective as haloperidol and risperidone in post-hoc analysis. Its long-term efficacy was equivalent to that of haloperidol. The most common adverse events were dizziness, dry mouth, dyspepsia and somnolence, with few extrapyramidal symptoms and metabolic changes in short- and long-term studies in adults. Akathisia was rare, but prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc interval was comparable to haloperidol and ziprasidone, which is of particular concern. Further comparative studies are needed to clarify the benefit/risk profile of iloperidone and its role in the treatment of schizophrenia.Keywords: iloperidone, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety

  2. Deep venous thrombosis and atypical antipsychotics: three cases report

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    Sheikhmoonesi Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep venous Thrombosis is a serious, possible life threatening event which is often ignored in psychiatric Settings. Purpose In this paper three cases of deep venous Thrombosis (DVT following the use of olanzapine and risperidone are presented. Methods The data of Three patients was collected from hospital records. Results The patients were in good general physical health and had no personal or familial history of DVT. The patients were not overweight (BMI  Conclusion Risk of DVT exists in patients under treatment with atypical antipsychotics in spite of no pre existing risk factor.

  3. Basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after short-term treatment with either a typical or an atypical antipsychotic drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthoj, Andreas; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Mackeprang, Torben; Pagsberg, Anne K; Hemmingsen, Ralf; Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William Frans Christian

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients before and after treatment with either a specific typical or atypical antipsychotic compound. Sixteen antipsychotic drug-naive and three minimally medicated first-episode schizophrenic patients and...... altered asymmetry in caudate volume in patients suggests intrinsic basal ganglia pathology in schizophrenia, most likely of neurodevelopmental origin.......The present study examined basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients before and after treatment with either a specific typical or atypical antipsychotic compound. Sixteen antipsychotic drug-naive and three minimally medicated first-episode schizophrenic patients and...... 19 matched controls participated. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either low doses of the typical antipsychotic drug, zuclopenthixol, or the atypical compound, risperidone. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained in patients before and after 12 weeks of...

  4. New users of antipsychotic medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, L; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    patterns and labor market affiliation, considering both authority approved and off-label prescriptions and the relation to polypharmacy. METHODS: Register-based cohort study using a dataset of 71,254 new antipsychotic users with a psychiatric diagnosis. Labor market affiliation and duration of welfare...... received welfare payments for prolonged periods of time during the observation period, even more so for individuals treated with antipsychotic polypharmacy or other antipsychotic combination regimens. The risk of permanently leaving the labor market was also associated with antipsychotic combination...

  5. Cognitive Function and Depression in Symptom Resolution in Schizophrenia Patients Treated with an Atypical Antipsychotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stip, Emmanuel; Mancini-Marie, Adham

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate which cognitive and affective features contribute most to responder/non-responder group separation during a switching trial with atypical antipsychotic. Design: A prospective open trial with an atypical antipsychotic (olanzapine). Patients: One hundred and thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for…

  6. Diabetic control and atypical antipsychotics: a case report

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    Gaston Romina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction People with schizophrenia are at increased risk of developing metabolic disturbances. This risk may be further exacerbated by the use of antipsychotic agents. Research is still ongoing to determine the metabolic impact of antipsychotics on glucose regulation. In this case report we review some of the possible mechanisms of action of antipsychotic medication on glucose regulation. Case presentation We present the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia who developed type 2 diabetes mellitus whilst on treatment with second generation antipsychotics (SGA. His diabetes was controlled by a combination of antidiabetic drugs that were associated with his psychotropic treatment. Due to deterioration in his mental state, the patient was admitted on two occasions to a psychiatric unit during which his prescribed medication (olanzapine and risperidone was discontinued and changed to aripiprazole. On both occasions, the patient suffered hypoglycaemic episodes and his antidiabetic treatment had to be adjusted accordingly. The patient did not require any antidiabetic treatment whilst on aripiprazole during the follow up period. Conclusion Clinicians face regular dilemmas in trying to find the right balance between achieving control over a patient's mental illness and reducing any adverse effects associated with the prescribed medication. In patients receiving concomitant antidiabetic therapy, caution should be exercised when changing from one SGA to another. Whilst more longitudinal data are required, a trial of alternative SGAs, including aripiprazole in those developing type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance may be a worthwhile therapeutic option.

  7. Long-term cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of adults with schizophrenia in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Day K

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ken O'Day,1 Krithika Rajagopalan,2 Kellie Meyer,1 Andrei Pikalov,2 Antony Loebel21Xcenda, Palm Harbor, FL, 2Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, Marlborough, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness (including hospitalizations and cardiometabolic consequences of atypical antipsychotics among adults with schizophrenia.Methods: A 5-year Markov cohort cost-effectiveness model, from a US payer perspective, was developed to compare lurasidone, generic risperidone, generic olanzapine, generic ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and quetiapine extended-release. Health states included in the model were patients: on an initial atypical antipsychotic; switched to a second atypical antipsychotic; and on clozapine after failing a second atypical antipsychotic. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs assessed incremental cost/hospitalization avoided. Effectiveness inputs included discontinuations, hospitalizations, weight change, and cholesterol change from comparative clinical trials for lurasidone and for aripiprazole, and the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness for other comparators. Atypical antipsychotic-specific relative risk of diabetes obtained from a retrospective analysis was used to predict cardiometabolic events per Framingham body mass index risk equation. Mental health costs (relapsing versus nonrelapsing patients and medical costs associated with cardiometabolic consequences (cardiovascular events and diabetes management were obtained from published sources. Atypical antipsychotic costs were estimated from Red Book® prices at dose(s reported in clinical data sources used in the model (weighted average dose of lurasidone and average dose for all other comparators. Costs and outcomes were discounted at 3%, and model robustness was tested using one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses.Results: Ziprasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine extended-release, and aripiprazole were dominated

  8. OBESITY IS AN UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE DRUG REACTION TO ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS

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    Hemlata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics are an important advance in the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illness, and have become widely used as first - line pharmacotherapy for psychosis. This study is a longitudinal prospective observational study of ADRs of Atypical Antipsychotic drugs in patients of psychiatric illness. Information of ADRs was data based and collected from OPD. The noted ADRs were assessed by using Naranjo’s probability assessment scale, and WHO (UMC causality assessment scale. Majority of patients in this study belonged to 21 - 30 years age group which was 24% of the total. According to the severity of ADRs, majority of cases were reported of having weight gain 38. 46% followed by sedation 19. 23%, dry mouth 13. 46% and orthostatic hypote nsion 5. 76%. 88. 47% were reported as type A and 11. 53% were reported as type B. Definite (certain relationship was established in 30. 40% patients while probable in 57. 62% and 11. 53% ADRs were categorized as possible. The ADRs can be prevented by col lecting reliable information about their frequencies and possible risk factors.

  9. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of early-onset schizophrenia

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    Hrdlicka M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Michal Hrdlicka, Iva Dudova Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs have been successfully used in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS. This review summarizes the randomized, double-blind, controlled studies of AAPs in EOS, including clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. No significant differences in efficacy between AAPs were found, with the exception of clozapine and ziprasidone. Clozapine demonstrated superior efficacy in treatment-resistant patients with EOS, whereas ziprasidone failed to demonstrate efficacy in the treatment of EOS. Our review also focuses on the onset of action and weight gain associated with AAPs. The data on onset of action of AAPs in pediatric psychiatry are scanty and inconsistent. Olanzapine appears to cause the most significant weight gain in patients with EOS, while ziprasidone and aripiprazole seem to cause the least. Keywords: early-onset schizophrenia, atypical antipsychotics, efficacy, onset of action, weight gain

  10. Metformin for the Prevention of Weight Gain due to Atypical Antipsychotics

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    Nazmiye Kaya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive weight gain, hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia are significant clinical adverse effects that appear as a result of the treatment with second generation atypical antipsychotic drugs. These drugs possibly cause weight gain by stimulating appetite and increasing insulin resistance. Amantadine, nizatidine, ranitidine, famotidine, topiramate, reboxetine and metformin are notified as the effective drugs which were used in order to prevent the weight gain due to atypical antipsychotic drugs. As an antidiabetic agent, metformin draws attention due to reducing weight gain and correcting insulin resistance. The aim of this paper was to evaluate studies searching fort he effect of metformin on weight-gain due to atypical antipsychotics.

  11. Depot Typical Antipsychotics versus Oral Atypical Antipsychotics in Relapse Rate Among Patients with Schizophrenia: A Five -Year Historical Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadkhaniha, Hamid-Reza; Bani-Hashem, Shahab; Ahmadzad-Asl, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the relapse rate in patients with schizophrenia treated with orally taken atypical agents (serotonin dopamine antagonists, SDAs) and depot preparation of conventional (typical) antipsychotics. Methods: In this historical cohort study, mean relapse per month (MRM) index, duration between initiation of antipsychotic treatment and the first relapse episode, and the time gap between successive relapses were compared between 84 patients on SDAs-except c...

  12. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of pathological aggression in children and adolescents: literature review and clinical recommendations

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    Eduardo Henrique Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature about the use of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of pathological aggression in children and adolescents. Method: The databases MEDLINE, SciELO, and LILACS were searched for publications in Portuguese or English from 1992 to August 2011 using the following keywords: mental disease, child, adolescent, treatment, atypical antipsychotic, aggressive behavior, aggression, and violent behavior. Results: Sixty-seven studies of good methodological quality and clinical interest and relevance were identified. Studies including children and adolescents were relatively limited, because few atypical antipsychotics have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. All the medications included in this review (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and clozapine have some effectiveness in treating aggression in children and adolescents, and choices should be based on clinical indications and side effects. Conclusions: There are few studies about the effectiveness and safety of atypical antipsychotics for the pediatric population, and further randomized controlled studies with larger groups of patients and more diagnostic categories, such as severe conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, should be conducted to confirm the results reported up to date and to evaluate the impact of long-term use.

  13. The reproductive safety profile of mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and broad-spectrum psychotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Carrie L; Goldberg, Joseph F

    2002-01-01

    There has been growing concern about the potential iatrogenic effects of several newer psychotropic drugs on reproductive health safety in women. Areas of particular concern in this regard include (1) controversies about a potential association between the use of valproate and development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), (2) the safety of use of newer psychotropic medications during pregnancy, and (3) safety issues with these medications in women while breastfeeding. This review summarizes current information about each of these areas. In particular, existing data suggest that (1) PCOS very likely represents a complex neuroendocrine disorder with multiple determinants; (2) menstrual irregularities may be a frequently seen phenomenon in women with bipolar illness, at least partially independent of psychotropic drug therapy; (3) potential central nervous system teratogenicity remains substantial during first-trimester exposure to valproate or carbamazepine; (4) with newer agents used for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, safety data during pregnancy, while not definitive, are most abundant with olanzapine and with lamotrigine; relatively less is known about systematic pregnancy outcomes with other atypical antipsychotics or newer anticonvulsants; and (5) risks for neonatal safety during lactation continue to appear substantial with lithium, are of potential concern with lamotrigine and clozapine, are quite likely minimal with valproate or carbamazepine, and are indeterminate with most other new anticonvulsants or atypical antipsychotics. Recommendations are presented for clinical management in each of these instances. PMID:11913676

  14. CHALLENGE WITH ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC DRUGS IN RISPERIDONE INDUCED NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Mendhekar, D.N.; Jiloha, R.C.; M M Mehndiratta; War, L.

    2002-01-01

    There are several reports available on neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) associated with risperidone but when a more stringent criterion is applied there are only a few. Report on challenge and rechallenge with various atypical antipsychotic drugs in re-emergence of post NMS psychosis is scanty. Our aim of presenting this is to highlight the differential response of various atypical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of post NMS psychosis. This paper reports a young male with mild mental...

  15. Adverse Effects and Toxicity of the Atypical Antipsychotics: What is Important for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasimas, J.J.; Liebelt, Erica L.

    2012-01-01

    Medications are being used with greater frequency to address pediatric mental health problems, and in recent years atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescriptions have increased more than any other class. Acute care practitioners must be aware of the pharmacology of AAPs and the conditions, on- and off-label, for which they are prescribed. This involves identifying and managing side effects that manifest both mentally and physically. Although “atypicality” confers a lower risk of movement side effects compared to conventional agents, children are more sensitive than adults to extrapyramidal reactions. Like adults, they also may present with toxic sedation, confusion, cardiovascular dysfunction, and metabolic derangements. Evaluation and management of these toxicities requires an index of suspicion, a careful symptom and medication history, physical examination, and targeted interventions. This review is designed to orient the emergency practitioner to the challenging task of recognizing and treating adverse effects related to acute and chronic atypical antipsychotic exposure in children. PMID:23471213

  16. Do we need to consider ethno-cultural variation in the use of atypical antipsychotics for Asian patients with major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changsu; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-05-01

    Asian and western countries differ in the prevalence, symptom manifestation, diagnostic procedures, patient recognition and treatments of major depressive disorder (MDD), according to a number of studies. Ethnic differences in pharmacological profiles are also important in the prescription of certain antipsychotic medications because they may impact treatment outcomes and adverse events. Differential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of antipsychotics may be practically useful in the control of specific depressive symptoms. Furthermore, patient compliance with prescribed medications has been found to be different across races and ethnicities. Therefore, this article explores practical clinical issues for the use of atypical antipsychotics in patients with MDD, focusing on ethno-cultural differences. PMID:23709361

  17. The effect of verbalization strategy on wisconsin card sorting test performance in schizophrenic patients receiving classical or atypical antipsychotics

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    Cavallaro Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of reports showed en encouraging remediation in some patients' executive deficits thanks to the use of 'information processing strategies'. Moreover the impact of antipsychotics on cognitive functions of the schizophrenics is an important issue, especially if an integrated psychosocial treatment is needed. The aim of this paper is to evaluate different executive performance and response to verbalization, a strategy of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST remediation, in subjects on classical vs atypical antipsychotic (AP treatment. Methods Sixty-three schizophrenic subjects undertook the WCST under standard and modified (verbalization administration. Subjects were stratified by the kind of WCST response (i.e. good, poor and remediable and AP treatment (i.e. atypical vs. classical. Results Subjects on atypical APs showed a better performance than those on classical ones. More poor performers who did not remediate were seen in the sample with classical Aps while subjects who remediated the performance were seen in the subgroup with atypical APs only. An increase of perseverative and total errors was seen in poor performers subjects on classical APs. Conclusion Subjects on atypicals showed a better cognitive pattern in terms of WCST performance. Since the naturalistic assignment of medication we cannot draw conclusions about its effect on cognitive performance and its interaction with cognitive remediation potential. However the data lead us to hypothesize that subjects with potential room for remediation did so with the atypical APs.

  18. Pharmacoeconomic comparison of ziprasidone with other atypical oral antipsychotic agents in schizophrenia

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    Andrea Fagiolini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comparatively investigate – by means of computer simulations – the economic cost and clinical outcomes of five atypical oral antipsychotic agents (ziprasidone, olanzapina, risperidone, paliperidone and aripiprazolo.Methods: a cyclical stochastic model representing patient evolution, taking into account main adverse reactions (akathisia, weight gain and extra-pyramidal ARs, drug efficacy on psychosis stabilization and probability of relapse, was developed. Ten different scenarios were compared, each starting with one of the considered antipsychotics, prescribed either at home or in a hospital setting. Switching to another medication was allowed until no untried drugs were available, in which case clozapine treatment or admission to a Psychiatric Therapeutic Rehabilitation Center were irreversibly assigned. Model inputs were probabilities of ARs, probabilities of stabilization and probabilities of destabilization (assumed equal for all; as well as costs attributable to drugs, hospitalization, outpatient care and costs adverse reactions in terms of concomitant medications. Sources for the inputs were the trials reported in the most recent literature (from the year 2000, selected based on the homogeneity of the observational period and antipsychotic dosage used.Results: in each scenario, the hospitalization cost represented the highest component of the overall cost (approximately 67%. Assuming equal drug effectiveness, ziprasidone fared better than all other considered competitors, showing the lowest average annual costs per patient (and also the lowest average annual hospitalization costs as well as the largest numbers of controlled months without adverse reactions, independently of the initial setting. Conclusions: the most important determinant of total cost appears to be hospitalization, whose cost is about 600% higher than the medications cost. Medication effectiveness and tolerability remain however of utmost importance for

  19. Satisfaction of immediate or delayed switch to paliperidone palmitate in patients unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Jaewook; Lee, Sang Ick; Chang, Jae Seung; Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Seong Jin; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Han, Changsu; Lee, Kyoung-Uk; Lee, Kyung Kyu; Lee, EunJung

    2015-11-01

    Patient satisfaction with treatment is an important clinical index associated with the efficacy and adherence of treatment in schizophrenia. Although switching from oral antipsychotics to the long-acting injectable formulation may improve convenience, patient satisfaction has not been studied extensively. We carried out a 21-week, multicenter, randomized, open-label comparative study. A total of 154 patients with schizophrenia unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics were assigned randomly to either immediate or delayed switching to paliperidone palmitate, the long-acting injectable formulation of paliperidone. The Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM) were used to evaluate patient satisfaction with treatment, whereas the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) scale were used to evaluate efficacy. From baseline to the final assessment, the MSQ score increased significantly in both groups, and the increase was greatest after the first administration of paliperidone palmitate in the immediate switch group. The scores of TSQM effectiveness, convenience, and global satisfaction as well as the PSP total score increased significantly, whereas the PANSS total score decreased significantly in both groups. The immediate switch group showed a significant improvement in the TSQM convenience score compared with the delayed switch group on oral antipsychotics during the comparison period. Most adverse events were minor and tolerable. In short, switching from oral atypical antipsychotics to paliperidone palmitate because of poor satisfaction significantly improved patient satisfaction, with comparable efficacy and tolerability. PMID:26196188

  20. Hospitalization and cost after switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand

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    Boonlue T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuanthon Boonlue,1,2 Suphat Subongkot,1,2 Piyameth Dilokthornsakul,3,4 Ronnachai Kongsakon,5 Oraluck Pattanaprateep,6 Orabhorn Suanchang,7 Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk3,8–10 1Clinical Pharmacy Division, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 2The College of Pharmacotherapy of Thailand, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 3Center of Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand; 4Center for Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, CO, USA; 5Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 6Department of Health Informatics, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, 7Department of Pharmacy, Somdet Chaopraya Institute of Psychiatry, Bangkok, Thailand; 8School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 9School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 10School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Background: Several clinical practice guidelines suggest using atypical over typical antipsychotics in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, cost-containment policy urged restricting usage of atypical antipsychotics and switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate clinical and economic impacts of switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand. Methods: From October 2010 through September 2013, a retrospective cohort study was performed utilizing electronic database of two tertiary hospitals. Schizophrenia patients aged 18 years or older and being treated with atypical antipsychotics were included. Patients were classified as atypical antipsychotic switching group if they switched to typical antipsychotics after 180 days of continual

  1. Atypical antipsychotics are not all alike: side effects and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Robert H

    2014-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs are not all alike with respect to their pharmacologies, therapeutic uses, and side eff ects, although many clinicians lump them together and do not distinguish among them. Risk assessment for the potential use of a drug, such as aripiprazole (Abilify), should not focus on any particular adverse effect, but rather should consider risk assessment in a broader context. Specifically, what are the alternatives, and what are their inherent risk profiles? What is the risk of no treatment? Side eff ects commonly associated with a particular drug or class of drugs can also occur with other drugs. For any drug prescribed for any reason, prescribers should document discussion about common and potentially serious adverse effects, as well as document clinical monitoring. Alternative treatments and their inherent risks, along with the risks of not taking medication for a particular condition, should also be discussed with patients and documented. PMID:25346958

  2. Atypical Antipsychotics and Other Therapeutic Options for Treatment of Resistant Major Depressive Disorder

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    Allan H. Young

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antidepressant therapies, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, are current first-line treatments for Major Depressive Disorder. However, over 50% of treated patients show an inadequate response to initial antidepressant therapy. If the therapeutic outcomes from two antidepressant therapies are suboptimal, potentially resulting in Treatment Resistant Depression, subsequent strategies include switching to another antidepressant or augmenting treatment by combining with other agents. When combined with SSRIs, atypical antipsychotics have supplementary action on dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems. Studies on combined treatment with atypical antipsychotics have shown significantly increased remission rates, shortened response times, and favorable side effects. Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics is now an acceptable treatment strategy which leads to increased remission rates and better outcomes for patients.

  3. Asenapine in the treatment of borderline personality disorder: an atypical antipsychotic alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Blanco, Ana; Patrizi, Barbara; Villalta, Laia; Gasol, Xero; Soler, Joaquim; Gasol, Miquel; Pascual, Juan C

    2014-03-01

    Many individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) receive medical treatment in clinical practice, although to date, there are no drugs specifically available for BPD. The recent Cochrane guideline suggests a benefit from using second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine or aripiprazole; nevertheless, side effects limit their use. Asenapine is a novel FDA-approved atypical antipsychotic for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, it has not yet been tested for BPD. The goal of this observational open-label study was to assess the safety, tolerability and efficacy of asenapine in a series of cases of patients with BPD. Twelve individuals with BPD were recruited and treated with asenapine during an 8-week period. Eight individuals completed the study; a significant improvement was observed in the CGI-BPD (P<0.001) and BSL-23 (P<0.048) scales for BPD symptomatology. Besides, there was a significant improvement in the general psychopathology domains (BPRS, P<0.004), whereas no significant differences were observed in depressive symptoms. No serious adverse effects were reported and a significant weight reduction was observed (P=0.002). Asenapine appears to be a safe and effective agent in the treatment of patients with BPD, especially when other alternatives are not tolerated. These preliminary findings should be replicated in a controlled clinical trial. PMID:23962963

  4. Analysis of adverse drug reactions of atypical antipsychotic drugs in psychiatry OPD

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    Kiran G Piparva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Novel atypical antipsychotics are superior to conventional antipsychotics as they significantly reduce both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and have lower risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS. However, these drugs have separate set of adverse drug reactions (ADRs. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess these ADRs, which can have impact on long-term compliance and achieving successful treatment. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of analysis of ADR of atypical antipsychotic drugs was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department. Patients of psychotic disorder (any age, either sex, who were prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs, were included. Those who were prescribed conventional antipsychotics or combinations of antipsychotics were excluded from the study. Apart from spontaneously reported ADRs, a questionnaire related to the likely ADR was used and patients′ responses were recorded in the case record form. Results: Totally 93 ADRs were recorded from 84 prescriptions. Majority of the ADRs (82 out of 93 were seen with risperidone and olanzepine, as they were the commonly prescribed drugs. Weight gain, dizziness, sleep disturbance and appetite disturbance accounted for nearly 78% of the total events. With risperidone (at 4-6 mg/day and olanzepine (at 10-15 mg/day, gastrointestinal and sleep disturbance were observed in the initial (within 7 days to 2-3 months after treatment course of treatment, while EPS, fatigue, seizure, increased frequency of micturition and dizziness were observed after long-term (3-9 months use. Conclusion: The present study adds to the existing information on the prevalence of adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Role of active surveillance in post-marketing phase is also emphasized.

  5. Atypical antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Ayaka; Shimizu, Saki; Masui, Atsushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Minamimoto, Shoko; Mizuguchi, Yuto; Ochiai, Midori; Mizobe, Yusuke; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a new atypical antipsychotic drug that shows high affinities to dopamine D2 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, the mechanisms underlying its atypicality are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin, to determine if it contributes to the atypicality of blonanserin. Subcutaneous administration of AD-6048 (0.3-1mg/kg) significantly inhibited apomorphine (APO)-induced climbing behavior with an ED50 value of 0.200mg/kg, the potency being 1/3-1/5 times that of haloperidol (HAL). AD-6048 did not cause extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) even at high doses (up to 10mg/kg, s.c.), whereas HAL at doses of 0.1-3mg/kg (s.c.) significantly induced bradykinesia and catalepsy in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the therapeutic index (potency ratios of anti-APO action to that of EPS induction) of AD-6048 was much higher than that of haloperidol, illustrating that AD-6048 per se possesses atypical antipsychotic properties. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of Fos protein expression revealed that both AD-6048 and HAL significantly increased Fos expression in the shell part of the nucleus accumbens and the striatum. However, in contrast to HAL which preferentially enhanced striatal Fos expression, AD-6048 showed a preferential action to the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that AD-6048 acts as an atypical antipsychotic, which seems to at least partly contribute to the atypicality of blonanserin. PMID:26363311

  6. Predicting Pharmacokinetic Stability by Multiple Oral Administration of Atypical Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamatsu, Akihide; Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Makoto SUGITA

    2013-01-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simu...

  7. Polymorphisms of the LEP- and LEPR gene and obesity in patients using antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoor, Jochem G; van der Weide, Jan; Mulder, Hans; Cohen, Dan; van Megen, Harold J G M; Egberts, Antoine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2009-02-01

    Weight gain is one of the most serious adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic agents. Genetic factors influence the risk of an individual to gain weight. The objective of our study was to determine whether the LEPR Q223R polymorphism and the LEP promoter 2548G/A polymorphism are associated with obesity in a group of male and female patients using atypical antipsychotic drugs. A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of 200 patients aged between 18 and 65 years, diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, all of whom had been using an atypical antipsychotic for at least 3 months. The primary outcome measure was the presence of obesity. Determinants were the LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) polymorphism and the LEP promoter 2548G/A single nucleotide polymorphism ([SNP] rs7799039). Of the 200 included patients, 61 (31%) were obese. In females, the LEPR 223QR (adjusted odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.54) and LEPR 223RR (adjusted odds ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.63) genotypes were associated with a lower risk of obesity. In males, this association was not found. In females, the average body weight was 13.6 kg more (95% CI, 1.11-26.1) in the LEPR 223QQ group compared with the LEPR 223RR group. No significant association was found between the LEP promoter 2548G/A polymorphism and obesity. Taken together, the results of our study show that the LEPR Q223R polymorphism may be associated with obesity in women with a psychotic disorder treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs and stress the importance of stratification for gender when investigating the role of variations of the LEP- and LEPR genes on the metabolic side effects of antipsychotic medications. PMID:19142102

  8. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with atypical antipsychotic drug, clozapine treatment: Report of a case and review of literature

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    Pillai L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotic drugs are associated with metabolic disturbances like weight gain, type 2 diabetes hyperglycaemia and dyslipedemia, which can result in serious health risk in patients. Diabetic ketoacidosis resulting in serious metabolic acidosis, occurring in a schizophrenic patient on treatment with clozapine is being reported to draw attention this association. Frequent monitoring of the blood sugar and lipids is advised before and during therapy with atypical antipsychotic drugs.

  9. Efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drug treatment for dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Lin; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Wang, Jun; Tan, Chen-Chen; Tan, Meng-Shan; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Wang, Chong; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A wide variety of atypical antipsychotic drugs (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone and clozapine) are widely used in the management of neuropsychiatric symptoms, which are commonly seen in dementia, but results from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy and safety of these agents are conflicting. We aimed to quantify the efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs on neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia patients. Methods PubMed, ...

  10. Cholinesterase inhibitors for Parkinson’s disease-related visual hallucinations unresponsive to atypical antipsychotics

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    Tomasz Sobow

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Considering lack of accepted guideline in cases of Parkinson’s disease-related visual hallucinations with poor response or intolerance to antipsychotics, and their possible cholinergic pathogenesis, the trial with cholinesterase inhibitors seems to be legitimated. Material and methods: Five patients with PD (with or without dementia complicated by VH and unresponsive to atypical antipsychotics were offered a 12-week, open-label trial of a cholinesterase inhibitor. Results: All 5 subjects completed the trial with no major adverse effects and, noteworthy, no discontinuations due to adverse events. VH resolved in 4 subjects and were markedly diminished in one person. Neither changes in UPDRS scores nor exaggeration of subjective complaints about extrapyramidal symptoms were noted during treatment. Conclusions: Cholinesterase inhibitors, rivastigmine or donepezil, might represent a useful alternative to antipsychotics for patients with PD accompanied by VH even in the absence of dementia.

  11. Diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia as a consequence of an atypical antipsychotic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Kirsten; Brzozowska, Malgorzata Monika

    2016-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotic agent clozapine, although an effective treatment for schizophrenia, is linked with metabolic adverse effects. We report a case of diabetic ketoacidosis and very severe hypertriglyceridaemia associated with clozapine use, in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who was successfully treated with continuous insulin infusion and fluids. As clozapine proved to be the most efficacious in controlling the patient's psychotic symptoms, the patient has been continued on clozapine despite its known metabolic side effects. Importantly the patient has achieved satisfactory long-term lipid and glycaemic control. The current recommendations related to the metabolic care for patients treated with atypical antipsychotic agents as well as the mechanisms behind abnormal glucose and lipid regulation with clozapine therapy are discussed. PMID:27507689

  12. [Guidelines on long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics for first-episode schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin, J-M

    2013-09-01

    The current review raises the question of the place of long-acting injectable (LAI) atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia in current and future guidelines. After exposing the different points of view adopted in the former, the author presents the clinical trials conducted with LAI atypicals in this indication, as well as the surveys related to psychiatrists'opinion regarding the use of these drugs in early schizophrenia. Pros and cons of this therapeutic option are discussed and suggestions are made for further guidelines. PMID:24084422

  13. Prolactin and macroprolactin levels in psychiatric patients receiving atypical antipsychotics: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Bun-Hee; Lee, Kyu Young; Lee, Kye-Seong; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Won

    2016-05-30

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether atypical antipsychotics can elevate serum levels of both macroprolactin and prolactin, and whether the macroprolactin levels differ according to the type of atypical antipsychotic being taken. In total, 245 subjects were enrolled consecutively in 6 hospitals. Serum prolactin and macroprolactin levels were measured at a single time point during maintenance antipsychotic monotherapy. The mean total serum prolactin levels including macroprolactin were 11.91, 20.73, 16.41, 50.83, 12.84, and 59.1ng/mL for patients taking aripiprazole, blonanserin, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, and risperidone, respectively, while those for macroprolactin were 1.71, 3.86, 3.73, 7.28, 2.77, and 8.0ng/mL. The total prolactin and macroprolactin levels were significantly higher among those taking paliperidone and risperidone than among those taking any of the other antipsychotics (phyperprolactinemia and macroprolactinemia in psychiatric patients. PMID:27010188

  14. Effect of Atypical Antipsychotics on Fetal Growth: Is the Placenta Involved?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Raha; Taylor, Valerie H.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently considerable uncertainty regarding prescribing practices for pregnant women with severe and persistent psychiatric disorders. The physician and the mother have to balance the risks of untreated psychiatric illness against the potential fetal toxicity associated with pharmacological exposure. This is especially true for women taking atypical antipsychotics. Although these drugs have limited evidence for teratological risk, there are reports of altered fetal growth, both incr...

  15. Anti-atherogenic properties of high-density lipoproteins in psychiatric patients before and after two months of atypical anti-psychotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Osamah; Izikson, Lidia; Bathish, Yunis; Dabur, Enas; Hanna, Alaa; Zidan, Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Some of the medications used for the management of schizophrenia are associated with clinically significant increases in weight and adverse alterations in serum lipid levels. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of short-term (two months) treatment with atypical anti-psychotics on coronary heart disease risk factors, including the functional properties of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in psychiatric patients. Nineteen patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder and ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. In the present study blood was drawn at baseline and after two months of atypical anti-psychotic treatment. Wilcoxon non-parametric-test was used to examine differences in the psychotic group before and two months after treatment.Waist circumference and oxidative stress in psychiatric patients were higher compared with the control group. Serum-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity was lower in psychotic patients compared to controls. Two months of anti-psychotic therapy was associated with increased abdominal obesity, decreased paraoxonase lactonase activity, but with no further change in serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Psychotic patients have low serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages as a parameter of HDL functionality. Atypical anti-psychotic treatment for two months increased metabolic derangements in these patients but without further decrement in serum-mediated cholesterol efflux. PMID:26253619

  16. Costs, Control or Just Good Clinical Practice? The Use of Antipsychotic Medications and Formulary Decision-Making in Large U.S. Prisons and Jails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysey, Bonita M.; Stenius, Vanja; Mazade, Noel; Schacht, Lucille

    2007-01-01

    Medications are central to the psychiatric armamentorium in U.S. jails and prisons. Psychiatric medications are used both to stabilize acute symptoms as well as maintain mental health once symptoms are reduced. Both jails and prisons rely heavily on traditional antipsychotics, but both have a full array of atypical medications in their…

  17. The effect of atypical antipsychotics on brain N-acetylaspartate levels in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grošić V

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Grošić,1 Petra Folnegovic Grošić,2 Petra Kalember,3,4 Maja Bajs Janović,2 Marko Radoš,3,4 Mate Mihanović,1 Neven Henigsberg3,51Psychiatric Hospital Sveti Ivan, Zagreb, 2University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, 3Polyclinic Neuron, Croatian Institute for Brain Research, Zagreb, 4Department of Neuropharmacology and Behavioral Pharmacology, Croatian Institute for Brain Research, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, 5Vrapče University Hospital, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, CroatiaPurpose: To investigate the correlates of a clinical therapeutic response by using the parameters measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy after the administration of atypical antipsychotics.Patients and methods: Twenty-five antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia were monitored for 12 months. The patients were evaluated using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression Scale of Severity, Tower of London – Drexel University, Letter–Number Span Test, Trail Making Test A, and Personal and Social Performance Scale. They were administered atypical antipsychotics, starting with quetiapine. In the absence of a therapeutic response, another antipsychotic was introduced.Results: After 12 study months, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr level did not significantly change at the whole-group level. Additional analysis revealed a significant rise in the NAA/Cr level in the study group that stayed on the same antipsychotic throughout the study course (P=0.008 and a significant drop in NAA/Cr in the study group that switched antipsychotics (P=0.005. On the whole-group level, no significant correlations between NAA/Cr values and other scores were found at either baseline or after 12 study months.Conclusion: One-year treatment with atypical antipsychotics administered to antipsychotic-naïve patients didn’t result

  18. Comparison between risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic agent and haloperidol, a conventional agent used to treat schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An observational and comparative study was conducted to compare the functional outcome between the patients treated with conventional antipsychotic agent haloperidol and typical antipsychotic agent, Risperidone (Risperidal). A total of 32 patients were included in the study with established schizophrenia according to (DSM iv). The data was processed on SSPE 10th version. The primary outcome measure was the improvement of negative symptoms of schizophrenia and secondary outcome measure was to observe the superiority of the atypical drug Risperid one over conventional agent haloperidol regarding side effects. Patients were assessed at baseline, 2nd and 8th week, using four tools of assessment. For treatment group receiving haloperidol mean was 47.2+-11.50 at 8th week and for Risperidone treatment group mean was 43+-14.68. The P values for all the parameters in the Clozapine group were significant as compared to haloperidol. (author)

  19. Costs and Resource Utilization Among Medicaid Patients with Schizophrenia Treated with Paliperidone Palmitate or Oral Atypical Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Pesa, Jacqueline A.; Muser, Erik; Montejano, Leslie B.; Smith, David M.; Meyers, Oren I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to antipsychotic therapy among patients with schizophrenia is a key driver of relapse, which can lead to costly inpatient stays. Long-acting injectables (LAIs) may improve adherence, thus reducing hospitalizations, but inpatient cost reductions need to be balanced against higher drug acquisition costs of LAIs. Real-world evidence is needed to help quantify the economic value of oral atypical antipsychotics compared with LAIs. Objective The objective of this study was ...

  20. Satisfaction of immediate or delayed switch to paliperidone palmitate in patients unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Jaewook; Lee, Sang Ick; Chang, Jae Seung; Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Seong Jin; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Han, Changsu; Lee, Kyoung-Uk; Lee, Kyung Kyu; Lee, Eunjung

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with treatment is an important clinical index associated with the efficacy and adherence of treatment in schizophrenia. Although switching from oral antipsychotics to the long-acting injectable formulation may improve convenience, patient satisfaction has not been studied extensively. We carried out a 21-week, multicenter, randomized, open-label comparative study. A total of 154 patients with schizophrenia unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics were assigne...

  1. Atypical Antipsychotics as Augmentation Therapy in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Enrica; Desedime, Nadia; Giovannone, Cristina; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings. PMID:25922939

  2. Atypical antipsychotics as augmentation therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Marzola

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings.

  3. A longitudinal study of alterations of hippocampal volumes and serum BDNF levels in association to atypical antipsychotics in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Rizos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus, which have been suggested to play an important role in the formation and emergence of schizophrenia syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit significant bilateral hippocampal volume reduction and progressive hippocampal volume decrease in first-episode patients with schizophrenia has been shown in many neuroimaging studies. Dysfunction of the neurotrophic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The initiation of antipsychotic medication alters the levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF levels. However it is unclear whether treatment with antipsychotics is associated with alterations of hippocampal volume and BDNF levels. METHODS: In the present longitudinal study we investigated the association between serum BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes in a sample of fourteen first-episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FEP. MRI scans, BDNF and clinical measurements were performed twice: at baseline before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment and 8 months later, while the patients were receiving monotherapy with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs. RESULTS: We found that left hippocampal volume was decreased (corrected left HV [t = 2.977, df = 13, p = .011] at follow-up; We also found that the higher the BDNF levels change the higher were the differences of corrected left hippocampus after 8 months of treatment with atypical antipsychotics (Pearson r = 0.597, p = 0.024. CONCLUSIONS: The association of BDNF with hippocampal volume alterations in schizophrenia merits further investigation and replication in larger longitudinal studies.

  4. Recent evidence and potential mechanisms underlying weight gain and insulin resistance due to atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Volpato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs promote obesity and insulin resistance. In this regard, the main objective of this study was to present potential mechanisms and evidence concerning side effects of atypical antipsychotics in humans and rodents. Method: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the MEDLINE database. We checked the references of selected articles, review articles, and books on the subject. Results: This review provides consistent results concerning the side effects of olanzapine (OL and clozapine (CLZ, whereas we found conflicting results related to other AAPs. Most studies involving humans describe the effects on body weight, adiposity, lipid profile, and blood glucose levels. However, it seems difficult to identify an animal model replicating the wide range of changes observed in humans. Animal lineage, route of administration, dose, and duration of treatment should be carefully chosen for the replication of the findings in humans. Conclusions: Patients undergoing treatment with AAPs are at higher risk of developing adverse metabolic changes. This increased risk must be taken into account when making decisions about treatment. The influence of AAPs on multiple systems is certainly the cause of such effects. Specifically, muscarinic and histaminergic pathways seem to play important roles.

  5. Behavioral and metabolic effects of the atypical antipsychotic ziprasidone on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Gubert

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics are associated with metabolic syndrome, primarily associated with weight gain. The effects of Ziprasidone, an atypical antipsychotic, on metabolic syndrome has yet to be evaluated. Here in, we evaluated lipid accumulation and behavioral changes in a new experimental model, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans. Behavioral parameters in the worms were evaluated 24 h after Ziprasidone treatment. Subsequently, lipid accumulation was examined using Nile red, LipidTox green and BODIPY labeling. Ziprasidone at 40 µM for 24 h effectively decreased the fluorescence labeling of all markers in intestinal cells of C. elegans compared to control (0.16% dimethyl sulfoxide. Ziprasidone did not alter behaviors related to energetic balance, such as pharynx pumping, defecation cycles and movement. There was, however, a reduction in egg-production, egg-laying and body-length in nematodes exposed to Ziprasidone without any changes in the progression of larval stages. The serotoninergic pathway did not appear to modulate Ziprasidone's effects on Nile red fluorescence. Additionally, Ziprasidone did not alter lipid accumulation in daf-16 or crh-1 deletion mutants (orthologous of the transcription factors DAF-16 and CREB, respectively. These results suggest that Ziprasidone alters reproductive behavior, morphology and lipid reserves in the intestinal cells of C. elegans. Our results highlight that the DAF-16 and CREB transcription factors are essential for Ziprasidone-induced fat store reduction.

  6. Fracture Risk among Nursing Home Residents Initiating Antipsychotic Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigler, Sally K.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Cook-Wiens, Galen J.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Whittle, Jeffrey C.; Mehr, David R.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives to determine whether antipsychotic medication initiation is associated with subsequent fracture in nursing home residents, whether fracture rates differ between first-generation versus second-generation antipsychotic use, and whether fracture rates differ among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. Design time-to-event analyses were conducted in a retrospective cohort using linked Medicaid, Medicare, Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data sets. Setting and Participants nursing home residents aged ≥ 65 years in CA, FL, MO, NJ and PA. Measurements fracture outcomes (any fracture; hip fracture) in first-versus second-generation antipsychotic users, and specifically among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. Comparisons incorporated propensity scores that included patient-level variables (demographics, comorbidity, diagnoses, weight, fall history, concomitant medications, cognitive performance, physical function, aggressivebehavior) and facility-level variables (nursing home size, ownership factors, staffing levels). Results Among 8,262 subjects (within 4,131 pairs), 4.3% suffered any fracture during observation with 1% having a hip fracture during an average follow up period of 93 ± 71 days; range 1 to 293 days). Antipsychotic initiation was associated with any fracture (hazard ratio (HR) 1.39, p=0.004) and with hip fracture (HR 1.76, p=0.024). The highest risk was found for hip fracture when antipsychotic use was adjusted for dose(HR=2.96; p=0.008). However, no differences in time-to-fracture were found in first-versus second-generation agents or across competing individual drugs. Conclusion Antipsychotic initiation is associated with fracture in nursing home residents, but risk does not differ across commonly used antipsychotics. PMID:23590366

  7. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  8. Structural effects of atypical antipsychotics: Implications for the meaning of cortical volume deficit in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Molina

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia have a smaller volume of cortex than healthy controls. Nevertheless, the substrate of such deficit is not well understood A progressive loss of cortical GM in schizophrenia seemed supported by early studies with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in which patients received typical drugs between the baseline and final scans. However, recent MRI results challenge this notion and suggest that structural changes may depend, at least in part, on the type of treatment received. These data may be relevant for a correct interpretation of the substrate of cortical volume deficit in schizophrenia. If that deficit can be even reversed by treatment, as suggested by recent studies, a neuronal substrate seems unlikely. Several lines of evidence instead support that glia cells may have a role in cortical structural and functional deficits in schizophrenia, which would be also in agreement with recent longitudinal results with MRI in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. These evidences are reviewed in this paper.

  9. Asymmetric dimethylarginine in somatically healthy schizophrenia patients treated with atypical antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders; Knorr, Ulla Benedichte Søsted; Soendergaard, Mia Greisen;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase, and the L-arginine:ADMA ratio are markers of endothelial dysfunction that predict mortality and adverse outcome in...... a range of cardiovascular disorders. Increased ADMA levels may also lead to increased oxidative stress. We hypothesized that ADMA and the L-arginine:ADMA ratio are increased in somatically healthy schizophrenia patients treated with atypical antipsychotics (AAP), and that the ADMA and the L......-arginine: ADMA ratio are positively correlated to measures of oxidative stress. METHODS: We included 40 schizophrenia patients treated with AAP, but without somatic disease or drug abuse, and 40 healthy controls. Plasma concentrations of ADMA and L-arginine were determined by high-performance liquid...

  10. Neural basis for the ability of atypical antipsychotic drugs to improve cognition in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomiki eSumiyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia.It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs, e.g. clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone, have variable affinities for these receptors. Among the 5-HT receptor subtypes, the 5-HT1A receptor is attracting particular interests as a potential target for enhancing cognition, based on preclinical and clinical evidence.The neural network underlying the ability of 5-HT1A agonists to treat cognitive impairments of schizophrenia likely includes dopamine, glutamate, and GABA neurons. A novel strategy for cognitive enhancement in psychosis may be benefitted by focusing on energy metabolism in the brain. In this context, lactate plays a major role, and has been shown to protect neurons against oxidative and other stressors. In particular, our data indicate chronic treatment with tandospirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, recover stress-induced lactate production in the prefrontal cortex of a rat model of schizophrenia. Recent advances of electrophysiological measures, e.g. event-related potentials, and their imaging have provided insights into facilitative effects on cognition of some atypical antipsychotic drugs acting directly or indirectly on 5-HT1A receptors.These findings are expected to promote the development of novel therapeutics for the improvement of functional outcome in people with schizophrenia.

  11. First Episode Schizophrenia Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Assessment after Atypical Antipsychotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim: Since regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings in schizophrenic patients are inconsistent, the aim of our study was to evaluate and compare rCBF in the first episode of schizophrenia, before and after atypical antipsychotic treatment. Method: 21 patients who met criteria for schizophrenia were assessed PANSS score and tomographic brain perfusion (SPECT). The treatment was administered for 10-12 weeks and the dose was 4.8mg/day Risperidone, 11.6mg/day Olanzepine, 440mg/day Quetiapine. After finishing treatment all patients underwent a control SPECT study. Results: PANSS scores revealed two groups: group A-14 patients with predominant positive symptoms; 9 received Olanzapine and 5 Quetiapine. In group B -7 patients with predominant negative symptoms received Risperidone. Positive symptoms were associated with hypoperfusion in posterior parietal regions and superior temporal gyrus, bilaterally; for negative symptoms we found hypoperfusion in prefrontal cortex, predominantly in left side and a hyper perfusion in left basal ganglia. All patients that received atypical antipsychotic drugs had clinical improvement and decreases in PANSS scores; the control SPECT analysis revealed the same cortical changes as first studies in 15 patients and an increase of the rCBF in frontal lobes for 4 patients. 14 patients we noticed an increased rCBF at subcortical level, especially in left caudate nuclei. Conclusions: We found nonspecific features of rCBF in patients with first episode of schizophrenia, suggesting a perfusion dynamic balance rather than a fixed model. Those aspects are much more related to clinical symptoms, than to the therapeutical response. The rCBF changes in subcortical level after treatment (64.4% increase of rCBF; 35.6% not modified), can have a good prognostic value for therapeutic response. (author)

  12. Attitudes Towards Antipsychotics Among Patients with Schizophrenia on First- or Second-Generation Medications

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, M. S.; Nisha Warikoo; Subho Chakrabarti; Sandeep Grover; Parmanand Kulhara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Given the paucity of research in this area, this study attempted to assess attitudes toward antipsychotic medications and its correlates among patients with schizophrenia, either on first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) or second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) medications. Materials and Methods: Structured assessments of attitudes to antipsychotics, psychopathology, insight and side-effects were carried out in 120 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia; 89 of these were on SGAs and...

  13. The effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics on the electrical activity of the brain in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oytun Erbaş

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antipsychotic drugs are known to have strongeffect on the bioelectric activity in the brain. However,some studies addressing the changes on electroencephalography(EEG caused by typical and atypical antipsychoticdrugs are conflicting. We aimed to compare the effectsof typical and atypical antipsychotics on the electricalactivity in the brain via EEG recordings in a rat model.Methods: Thirty-two Sprague Dawley adult male ratswere used in the study. The rats were divided into fivegroups, randomly (n=7, for each group. The first groupwas used as control group and administered 1 ml/kg salineintraperitoneally (IP. Haloperidol (1 mg/kg (group 2,chlorpromazine (5 mg/kg (group 3, olanzapine (1 mg/kg(group 4, ziprasidone (1 mg/ kg (group 5 were injectedIP for five consecutive days. Then, EEG recordings ofeach group were taken for 30 minutes.Results: The percentages of delta and theta waves inhaloperidol, chlorpromazine, olanzapine and ziprasidonegroups were found to have a highly significant differencecompared with the saline administration group (p<0.001.The theta waves in the olanzapine and ziprasidonegroups were increased compared with haloperidol andchlorpromazine groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: The typical and atypical antipsychotic drugsmay be risk factor for EEG abnormalities. This studyshows that antipsychotic drugs should be used with caution.J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3: 279-284Key words: Haloperidol, chlorpromazine, olanzapine,ziprasidone, EEG, rat

  14. Valproic acid potentiates both typical and atypical antipsychotic-induced prefrontal cortical dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Junji; Chung, Young-Chul; Dai, Jin; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2005-08-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APD)s and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers are now frequently used in combination with one another in treating both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have recently reported that the atypical APDs, e.g. clozapine and risperidone, as well as the anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers, valproic acid (VPA), zonisamide, and carbamazepine, but not the typical APD haloperidol, increase dopamine (DA) release in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The increased DA release was partially (atypical APDs) or completely (mood-stabilizers) blocked by the serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. Diminished prefrontal cortical DA activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in virtually all the patients with schizophrenia and, perhaps, bipolar disorder. Thus, the enhanced release of cortical DA by these agents may be beneficial in this regard. It is, therefore, of considerable interest to determine whether combined administration of these agents augments prefrontal cortical DA release, and if so, whether the increase is dependent upon 5-HT1A receptor activation. VPA (50 mg/kg), which was insufficient by itself to increase prefrontal cortical DA release, potentiated the ability of clozapine (20 mg/kg) and risperidone (1 mg/kg) to increase DA release in the mPFC, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAC). VPA (50 mg/kg) also potentiated haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg)-induced DA release in the mPFC; this increase was completely abolished by WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg). These results suggest that, in combination with VPA, both typical and atypical APDs produce greater increases in prefrontal cortical DA release than either type of drug alone via a mechanism dependent upon 5-HT(1A) receptor activation. Furthermore, they provide a strong rationale for testing for possible clinical synergism of an APD and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizer in improving the cognitive deficits present in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:16061211

  15. Exposure-response relationship of typical and atypical antipsychotics assessed by the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) and its subscales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilla Reddy, Venkatesh; Suleiman, Ahmed; Kozielska, Magdalena; Johnson, Martin; Vermeulen, An; Liu, Jing; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Genoveva; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: It has been suggested that atypical antipsychotics (ATAPs), are more effective towards negative symptoms than typical antipsychotics (TAPs) in schizophrenic patients.[1,2] To quantify the above statement, we aimed i) to develop a PK-PD model that characterizes the time course of PANSS sc

  16. The Effect of Concurrent Administration of Typical or Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs and Lithium on Lithium Ratio in Acute Manic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Sina Ahmadi abhari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: "n The lithium concentration in the plasma is assumed to give someindication as to the concentration of this ion in different organ cells especially incentral nervous system. While the practical value of intracellular lithium measurement is controversial however, erythrocytes have proved to be useful for studying lithium concentration and its transport across the membrane. There are some reports suggesting that neuroleptic drugs are able to affect the erythrocyte lithium concentration (ELCs, although these studies have yielded inconsistent results. "nMethod: In the present study the effect of risperidone and olanzapine as atypical antipsychotic and haloperidol as standard typical antipsychotic on lithium ratio in 46 acute manic patients was studied. ELCs were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Clinical response was evaluated by using Young mania rating scale (YMRS. "nResults: No significant difference was found between LRs and dose or type of antipsychotics. Also there were no significant differences between LRs and clinical response or remission. "nConclusion: The concurrent use of an atypical antipsychotics and lithium may not significantly alter the lithium transport in the erythrocyte and presumably in the nerve cells. A more comprehensive study is warranted to confirm the results of this study.

  17. Effects of switching to aripiprazole from current atypical antipsychotics on subsyndromal symptoms and tolerability in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong; Park, Young-Min; Chung, Sangkeun; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Won, Seunghee; Lee, Jeong Goo; Lee, Hwang-Bin; Kim, Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kwanghun; Kim, Moon-Doo

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of aripiprazole among bipolar patients who had switched to this medication as a result of difficulty maintaining on their prestudy atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) because of subsyndromal mood symptoms or intolerance. This study included 77 bipolar patients who were in syndromal remission with an AAP as monotherapy or with an AAP combined with a mood stabilizer(s) who needed to switch from their present AAP because of subsyndromal symptoms or intolerance. At 24 weeks after switching to aripiprazole, the remission rates on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and on both the MADRS and the Young Mania Rating Scale were increased significantly in the full sample and in the inefficacy subgroup. In the inefficacy subgroup, the MADRS score change was significant during the 24 weeks of study. Total cholesterol and prolactin decreased significantly after switching to aripiprazole. The proportion of patients who had abnormal values for central obesity and hypercholesterolemia decreased significantly from baseline to week 24. These findings suggest that a change from the current AAP to aripiprazole was associated with improvement in subsyndromal mood symptoms and several lipid/metabolic or safety profile parameters in patients with bipolar disorder with tolerability concerns or subsyndromal mood symptoms. PMID:27487259

  18. Long-term cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of adults with schizophrenia in the US

    OpenAIRE

    O'Day K; Rajagopalan K; Meyer K; Pikalov A; Loebel A

    2013-01-01

    Ken O'Day,1 Krithika Rajagopalan,2 Kellie Meyer,1 Andrei Pikalov,2 Antony Loebel21Xcenda, Palm Harbor, FL, 2Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, Marlborough, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness (including hospitalizations and cardiometabolic consequences) of atypical antipsychotics among adults with schizophrenia.Methods: A 5-year Markov cohort cost-effectiveness model, from a US payer perspective, was developed to compare lurasidone, generic...

  19. Long-term cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of adults with schizophrenia in the US

    OpenAIRE

    O'Day, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Ken O'Day,1 Krithika Rajagopalan,2 Kellie Meyer,1 Andrei Pikalov,2 Antony Loebel21Xcenda, Palm Harbor, FL, 2Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, Marlborough, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness (including hospitalizations and cardiometabolic consequences) of atypical antipsychotics among adults with schizophrenia.Methods: A 5-year Markov cohort cost-effectiveness model, from a US payer perspective, was developed to compare lurasidone, gen...

  20. Long-term cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of adults with schizophrenia in the US

    OpenAIRE

    O’Day, Ken; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Meyer, Kellie; Pikalov, Andrei; Loebel, Antony

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness (including hospitalizations and cardiometabolic consequences) of atypical antipsychotics among adults with schizophrenia. Methods A 5-year Markov cohort cost-effectiveness model, from a US payer perspective, was developed to compare lurasidone, generic risperidone, generic olanzapine, generic ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and quetiapine extended-release. Health states included in the model were patients: on an ...

  1. Comparison of Medicaid spending in schizoaffective patients treated with once monthly paliperidone palmitate or oral atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongling; Muser, Erik; Fu, Dong-Jing; Lafeuille, Marie-Hélène; Pilon, Dominic; Emond, Bruno; Wu, Allen; Duh, Mei Sheng; Lefebvre, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Background Compared to oral atypical antipsychotics (OAAs), long-acting injectable antipsychotics require less frequent administration, and thus may improve adherence and reduce risk of relapse in schizoaffective disorder (SAD) patients. Objective To evaluate the impact of once monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP) versus OAAs on healthcare resource utilization, Medicaid spending, and hospital readmission among SAD patients. Methods Using FL, IA, KS, MS, MO, and NJ Medicaid data (January 2009-December 2013), adults with ≥2 SAD diagnoses initiated on PP or OAA (index date) were identified. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were assessed during the 12month pre- and post-index periods, respectively. Propensity score matching (PSM) and inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) were used to reduce confounding and compare the estimated treatment effect for PP versus OAA. Results A total of 10,778 OAA-treated patients and 876 PP-treated patients were selected. Compared to OAAs, PP was associated with significantly lower medical costs (PSM: mean monthly cost difference [MMCD] = -$383, p < 0.001; IPTW: MMCD = -$403, p = 0.016), which offset the higher pharmacy costs associated with PP (PSM: MMCD = $270, p < 0.001; IPTW: MMCD = $350, p < 0.001) and resulted in similar total healthcare cost (PSM: MMCD = -$113, p = 0.414; IPTW: MMCD = -$53, p = 0.697) for PP versus OAA. Reduced risk of hospitalization (PSM: incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.85, p = 0.128; IPTW: IRR = 0.96, p = 0.004) and fewer hospitalization days (PSM: IRR = 0.74, p = 0.008; IPTW: IRR = 0.85, p < 0.001) were observed in PP versus OAA patients. Among hospitalized patients, PP was associated with a lower risk of 30 day hospital readmission compared to OAA (IPTW: odds ratio = 0.89, p = 0.041). Limitations The Medicaid data may not be representative of the nation or other states, and includes pre-rebate pharmacy costs

  2. The therapeutic relationship and adherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie McCabe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous research has shown that a better therapeutic relationship (TR predicts more positive attitudes towards antipsychotic medication, but did not address whether it is also linked with actual adherence. This study investigated whether the TR is associated with adherence to antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: 134 clinicians and 507 of their patients with schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder participated in a European multi-centre study. A logistic regression model examined how the TR as rated by patients and by clinicians is associated with medication adherence, adjusting for clinician clustering and symptom severity. RESULTS: Patient and clinician ratings of the TR were weakly inter-correlated (r(s = 0.13, p = 0.004, but each was independently linked with better adherence. After adjusting for patient rated TR and symptom severity, each unit increase in clinician rated TR was associated with an increase of the odds ratio of good compliance by 65.9% (95% CI: 34.6% to 104.5%. After adjusting for clinician rated TR and symptom severity, for each unit increase in patient rated TR the odds ratio of good compliance was increased by 20.8% (95% CI: 4.4% to 39.8%. CONCLUSIONS: A better TR is associated with better adherence to medication among patients with schizophrenia. Patients' and clinicians' perspectives of the TR are both important, but may reflect distinct aspects.

  3. Quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: the impact of socio-economic factors and adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; de Araújo Dantas, Diego; do Nascimento, Gemma Galgani; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Chaves, Katarina Melo; de Lima Silva, Vanessa; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2014-09-01

    This cross-sectional study compared the effects of treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs on quality of life (QoL) and side effects in 218 patients with schizophrenia attending the ambulatory services of psychiatric in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Socio-economic variables were compared. The five-dimension EuroQoL (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate QoL, and side effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale. Data were analysed using the χ (2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %. Average monthly household incomes in the medication groups were 1.1-2.1 minimum wages ($339-$678). UKU Scale scores showed significant differences in side effects, mainly, clozapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone (p < 0.05). EQ-5D scores showed that all drugs except olanzapine significantly impacted mobility (p < 0.05), and proportions of individuals reporting problems in other dimensions were high: 63.6 % of clozapine users reported mobility problems, 63.7 and 56.3 % of clozapine and ziprasidone users, respectively, had difficulties with usual activities, 68.8 and 54.5 % of ziprasidone and clozapine users, respectively, experienced pain and/or discomfort, and 72.8 % of clozapine users reported anxiety and/or depression. Psychiatric, neurological, and autonomous adverse effects, as well as other side effects, were prevalent in users of atypical antipsychotic drugs, especially clozapine and ziprasidone. Olanzapine had the least side effects. QoL was impacted by side effects and economic conditions in all groups. Thus, the effects of these antipsychotic agents appear to have been masked by aggravating social and economic situations. PMID:24789610

  4. National trends in off-label use of atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Minji; Moga, Daniela C; Blumenschein, Karen; Talbert, Jeffery

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of the study were as follows: to examine the national trend of pediatric atypical antipsychotic (AAP) use in the United States; to identify primary mental disorders associated with AAPs; to estimate the strength of independent associations between patient/provider characteristics and AAP use. Data are from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. First, average AAP prescription rates among 4 and 18-year-old patients between 1993 and 2010 were estimated. Second, data from 2007 to 2010 were combined and analyzed to identify primary mental disorders related to AAP prescription. Third, a multivariate logistic regression model was developed having the presence of AAP prescription as the dependent variable and patient/provider characteristics as explanatory variables. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Outpatient visits including an AAP prescription among 4 to 18-year-old patients significantly increased between 1993 and 2010 in the United States, and over 65% of those visits did not have diagnoses for US Food and Drug Administration-approved AAP indications. During 2007 to 2010, the most common mental disorder was attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, accounting for 24% of total pediatric AAP visits. Among visits with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder diagnosis, those with Medicaid as payer (AOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.01-2.75), comorbid mental disorders (e.g., psychoses AOR 3.34, 95% CI 1.35-8.26), and multiple prescriptions (4 or more prescriptions AOR 4.48, 95% CI 2.08-9.64) were more likely to have an AAP prescription. The off-label use of AAPs in children and adolescents is prevalent in the United States. Our study raises questions about the potential misuse of AAPs in the population. PMID:27281081

  5. Prescribing pattern of antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Sushma

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Schizophrenia is mostly seen in males, middle age group and unemployed people. The present study showed that combination therapy is preferred for the treatment of Schizophrenia. Despite several side-effects, typical antipsychotics, especially trifluoperazine was the most commonly used drug, followed by chlorpromazine either alone or in combination. Among atypical antipsychotics, risperidone was commonly used followed by quetiapine and asenapine. Most of the patients received trihexyphenidyl, an anticholinergic drug along with antipsychotics to reduce extra pyramidal side-effects. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 134-138

  6. Nonadherence with antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia: challenges and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad PM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter M Haddad,1,2 Cecilia Brain,3,4 Jan Scott5,6 1Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, University of Manchester, Manchester, 2Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK; 3Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 4Nå Ut-teamet, Psychosis Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; 5Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, 6Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK Abstract: Nonadherence with medication occurs in all chronic medical disorders. It is a particular challenge in schizophrenia due to the illness's association with social isolation, stigma, and comorbid substance misuse, plus the effect of symptom domains on adherence, including positive and negative symptoms, lack of insight, depression, and cognitive impairment. Nonadherence lies on a spectrum, is often covert, and is underestimated by clinicians, but affects more than one third of patients with schizophrenia per annum. It increases the risk of relapse, rehospitalization, and self-harm, increases inpatient costs, and lowers quality of life. It results from multiple patient, clinician, illness, medication, and service factors, but a useful distinction is between intentional and unintentional nonadherence. There is no gold standard approach to the measurement of adherence as all methods have pros and cons. Interventions to improve adherence include psychoeducation and other psychosocial interventions, antipsychotic long-acting injections, electronic reminders, service-based interventions, and financial incentives. These overlap, all have some evidence of effectiveness, and the intervention adopted should be tailored to the individual. Psychosocial interventions that utilize combined approaches seem more effective than unidimensional approaches. There is increasing interest in electronic reminders

  7. Early Resolution of Convergence Spasms Following the Addition of Antipsychotic Medications

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Hyo Jin; Chung, Un Sun; Chun, Bo Young

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of early resolution of convergence spasms following the addition of antipsychotic medications and present it as a possible alternative to the conventional treatment for convergence spasms. The cessation of atropinization of the eyes and the use of reading glasses was achieved after only 2 months following the initiation of antipsychotic medications for childhood emotional disorder.

  8. Differential regulation of dopamine receptors after chronic typical and atypical antipsychotic drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in dopamine receptor subtype binding in different brain regions were examined after 28 days treatment of rats with haloperidol, raclopride, clozapine or SCH23390 using in vitro receptor autoradiography. [3H]7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin binding to dopamine D3 receptors was not changed in any brain region by any of the drug treatments. [3H]SCH23390 was only increased by chronic SCH23390 treatment. Haloperidol significantly increased [3H]nemonapride and [3H]spiperone binding to dopamine D2-like receptors in the caudate-putamen. In contrast, haloperidol caused a small, significant increase in [3H]raclopride binding in the lateral caudate-putamen only. Raclopride also elevated, but to a lesser extent [3H]nemonapride and [3H]spiperone binding in caudate-putamen, whereas it did not affect [3H]raclopride binding. Clozapine did not significantly change D2-like striatal binding of [3H]nemonapride, [3H]spiperone or [3H]raclopride. The differences in radioligand binding suggest that [3H]nemonapride and [3H]spiperone may be binding to additional subsets of dopamine D2-like receptors (including D4-like receptors) that are not recognized by [3H]raclopride, which has high affinity for D2 and D3 receptors only.Quantification of [3H]nemonapride or [3H]spiperone binding in the presence of 300 nM raclopride (to block D2 and D3 receptors) revealed that haloperidol, raclopride and clozapine up-regulated D4-like receptors in the caudate-putamen using either radioligand. These results suggest that D4-like receptors may be a common site of action of both typical and atypical antipsychotics. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Metabolic Disturbances Independent of Body Mass in Patients with Schizophrenia Taking Atypical Antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Il

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) treatment is associated with weight gain and metabolic disturbances such as dyslipidemia and dysglycemia. The metabolic disturbances are usually considered to develop secondary to weight gain. We performed the comparison of metabolic disturbances of three AAP group with different risk of metabolic side effect after adjusting for body mass to investigate whether any metabolic disturbances develop independently from body mass index (BMI). Methods This cross-sectional study included 174 subjects with schizophrenia who were on 1) monotherapy with clozapine (CL), olanzapine (OL), or quetiapine (QT) (n=61), 2) monotherapy with risperidone (RSP) (n=89), or 3) monotherapy with aripiprizole (ARP), or ziprasidone (ZPS) (n=24) more than 1 year. Association between the prevalence of metabolic disturbances and groups were analysed using logistic regression after adjusting confounding variables including BMI. Analysese of covariance were used to compare the AAP groups in terms of the levels of metabolic parameters. Results There were significant differences among groups in terms of the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia (p=0.015), low HDL-cholesterol (p=0.017), and hyperglycemia (p=0.022) after adjusting for BMI. Triglyceride level (p=0.014) and the ratio of triglyceride to HDL-cholesterol (p=0.004) were significantly different among groups after adjusting for BMI. Conclusion In conclusion, metabolic disturbances are significantly different in AAP groups even after adjusting BMI. AAPs may have direct effect on metabolic parameters. Blood lipid and glucose levels should be monitored regularly regardless of whether patients tend to gain weight. PMID:25866526

  10. Antipsicóticos atípicos e comportamento suicida em pacientes esquizofrênicos ou esquizoafetivos Atypical antipsychotics and suicidal behavior in esquizophrenic or schizo-affective patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Filardi da Rocha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Os estudos a respeito da ação dos antipsicóticos atípicos no comportamento suicida são controversos e pouco explorados. OBJETIVOS: Análise discursiva da ação dos antipsicóticos atípicos no comportamento suicida de pacientes esquizofrênicos ou esquizoafetivos. MÉTODOS: Revisão de artigos nas bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS e da Biblioteca Cochrane, entre o período de 1964 e 2009, usando as palavras-chave: "suicidal behavior" e/ou "suicide" e "atypical antipsychotics" e/ou "antipsychotics" e/ou "clozapine". RESULTADOS: As únicas evidências significativas positivas apontam para a clozapina, que apresenta uma relevância superior aos outros antipsicóticos de segunda geração na redução das taxas de autoextermínio. CONCLUSÕES: A clozapina é o único fármaco que pode alterar o comportamento suicida. Esse efeito não está associado à melhora clínica dos pacientes. Ela é a única droga aprovada pelo Food and Drug Administration (FDA para prevenir suicídio em pacientes esquizofrênicos, mas os critérios para esse fim são incertos.BACKGROUND: The literature concerning the net effect of atypical antipsychotic medication on suicidality is not consistent. OBJECTIVES: The empirical literature relating to the efficacy of pharmacological intervention with atypical antipsychotics in esquizophrenic or schizo-affective patients is comprehensively reviewed. METHODS: MEDLINE, LILACS and Cochrane Library were used to search for articles from 1964 to 2009 using these key-words: "suicidal behavior" e/ou "suicide" e "atypical antipsychotics" e/ou "antipsychotics" e/ou "clozapine". RESULTS: The strongest and perhaps unique evidence has been shown for clozapine, which seems to have a clinically relevant advantage over other second-generation antipsychotics for reducing suicidality temptation. DISCUSSION: Clozapine is the unique medication that modulates suicidal behavior. Its action is unknown but is not related do clinical

  11. Atypical antipsychotics olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone and risk of acute major cardiovascular events in young and middle-aged adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Björn; Svanström, Henrik; Ranthe, Mattis F;

    2014-01-01

    risperidone (n = 14,134). The primary outcome was any major cardiovascular event (composite of cardiovascular mortality, acute coronary syndrome, or ischemic stroke) within 1 year following treatment initiation. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) while on current antipsychotic monotherapy......BACKGROUND: A number of serious cardiovascular safety concerns related to the use of atypical antipsychotics, compared with no use, have emerged, but nearly all reports are from studies of older patients. We aimed to compare the risk of cardiovascular events between the three most commonly used...... in the outpatient setting, adjusting for an outcome-specific disease risk score. RESULTS: The crude rate of any major cardiovascular event was 5.3 per 1,000 person-years among olanzapine users, 3.4 in quetiapine users, and 5.2 in risperidone users. Compared with risperidone, the risk of any major cardiovascular...

  12. Relationship between Dose, Drug Levels, and D2 Receptor Occupancy for the Atypical Antipsychotics Risperidone and Paliperidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votaw, J. R.; Ritchie, J.; Howell, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    Blockade of D2 family dopamine receptors (D2Rs) is a fundamental property of antipsychotics, and the degree of striatal D2R occupancy has been related to antipsychotic and motor effects of these drugs. Recent studies suggest the D2R occupancy of antipsychotics may differ in extrastriatal regions compared with the dorsal striatum. We studied this issue in macaque monkeys by using a within-subjects design. [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography scans were obtained on four different doses of risperidone and paliperidone (the 9-OH metabolite of risperidone) and compared with multiple off-drug scans in each animal. The half-life of the two drugs in these monkeys was determined to be between 3 and 4 h, and drug was administered by a constant infusion through an intragastric catheter. The D2R occupancy of antipsychotic was determined in the caudate, putamen, ventral striatum, and four prefrontal and temporal cortical regions and was related to serum and cerebrospinal fluid drug levels. Repeated 2-week treatment with risperidone or paliperidone did not produce lasting changes in D2R binding potential in any region examined. As expected, D2R binding potential was highest in the caudate and putamen and was approximately one-third that level in the ventral striatum and 2% of that level in the cortical regions. We found dose-dependent D2R occupancy for both risperidone and paliperidone in both basal ganglia and cortical regions of interest. We could not find evidence of regional variation in D2R occupancy of either drug. Comparison of D2R occupancy and serum drug levels supports a target of 40 to 80 ng/ml active drug for these two atypical antipsychotics. PMID:22214649

  13. Metabolic syndrome and psychiatrists' choice of follow-up interventions in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics in Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J. T.; Fagerquist, M.; Holdrup, M.;

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to obtain point prevalence estimates of the metabolic syndrome according to the NCEP III criteria in a sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs in Denmark and Sweden, and to assess...... population of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, metabolic syndrome remains underdiagnosed and undertreated....... the psychiatrists' choice of recommendations for follow-up interventions based on the patients' laboratory results. Method: This was a cross-sectional, observational multi-center study in Denmark and Sweden, in consecutively screened in- and outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and continuously treated...

  14. Metabolic and Endocrine Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Tahiroglu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available omorbid psychiatric disorders, frequent hospitalization, multiple outpatient treatment, prior history of hypertension, obesity and lipid dysregulation are associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome in children. Side effects of antipsychotic drugs and their management have recently become a major subject of research due to enhanced antipsychotic drug usage in child and adolescents. Prevention strategies are usually preferred to secondary or tertiary strategies in the management of metabolic syndrome associated with antipsychotic drugs. Clinicians should present multidisciplinary approach to endocrine and metabolic side effects due to antipsychotic use in pediatric patient groups and avoid multiple drug use in such patients. In this paper, we briefly reviewed metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotic drugs in child and adolescent population, possible mechanisms of susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and pharmacological and non pharmacological treatment approach to prevention of weight gain.

  15. Impact of antipsychotic medication on physical activity and physical fitness in adolescents: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Probst, Michel; Daenen, Anne; Damme, Tine Van; De Hert, Marc; Rosenbaum, Simon; Bruyninckx, David

    2016-08-30

    Antipsychotics are used increasingly in adolescents for a range of psychiatric disorders. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether physical activity levels and physical fitness of adolescent inpatients treated with antipsychotic medication, differs from either (i) antipsychotic naïve adolescents with mental health problems and, (ii) healthy controls. All participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents, the Positive-and-Negative-Affect-Schedule and performed the Eurofit test battery. Adolescents with mental health problems (irrespective of antipsychotic medication) were significantly (Prunning speed and cardiovascular endurance compared to healthy controls (n=15, 8♂, 15.9±1.3 years). Adolescents treated with antipsychotic medication (n=15, 8♂, 15.5±1.3 years) were less physically active and had an impaired whole body balance compared with antipsychotic naïve adolescents (n=15, 8♂, 15.7±1.4 years). Given the overwhelming deleterious impact of physical inactivity and low physical fitness on physical and mental health outcomes, interventions specifically targeting physical activity and physical fitness among adolescents experiencing mental illness, both treated with, and not treated with antipsychotic medication are warranted as a priority. Antipsychotic medication should be considered as a risk factor for physical inactivity and poor physical fitness. PMID:27288738

  16. Risk of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis associated with conventional and atypical antipsychotics: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasse, Christiane; Jacobsen, Jacob; Pedersen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of atypical and conventional antipsychotics with the risk of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis. DESIGN: Population-based, case-control study. DATA SOURCE: Health care databases of Northern Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 3083 adults hospitalized with...... acute pancreatitis (case patients) and 30,830 control subjects. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Controls were selected from the general population by using risk-set sampling and were matched to case patients by age and sex. The date of the case patients' admission for acute pancreatitis was used as the...... index date for the matched control subjects. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate rate ratios (RRs) for hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis in current users (0-90 days before admission or index date) and former users (> 90 days before admission or index date) of atypical...

  17. Polymorphisms of the LEP- and LEPR Gene and Obesity in Patients Using Antipsychotic Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregoor, Jochem G.; van der Weide, Jan; Mulder, Hans; Cohen, Dan; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Heerdink, Eibert R.

    2009-01-01

    Weight gain is one of the most serious adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic agents. Genetic factors influence the risk of an individual to gain weight. The objective of our study was to determine whether the LEPR Q223R polymorphism and the LEP promoter 2548G/ A polymorphism are associated with

  18. Supplement use by women during pregnancy: data from the Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Marlene P; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z; Moustafa, Danna; Viguera, Adele C; Cohen, Lee S

    2016-06-01

    Women of reproductive age commonly use integrative treatments. However, the reproductive safety for most complementary products lacks systematic study. We aimed to study the use of supplements by women in a prospective pregnancy registry. The Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics was established to evaluate the reproductive safety of atypical antipsychotics. Exposed and control participants were systematically queried about the use of vitamins and supplements. Slightly greater than half (53.2 %) of the participants eligible for analysis (N = 534) were using at least one vitamin or supplement at the time of enrollment, not including prenatal vitamins or folic acid. The most common supplements used were omega-3 fatty acids (38.0 %), vitamin D (11.0 %), calcium (8.2 %), and iron (4.7 %). Probiotics and melatonin were used by 2.6 and 0.9 %, respectively. In this prospective pregnancy registry, we found that over half of the participants were taking supplements or vitamins other than prenatal vitamins and folic acid. These findings underscore the need for active query on the part of health care providers about the use of supplements during pregnancy, and the need to obtain rigorous reproductive safety and efficacy data for supplements used by pregnant women and reproductive aged women. PMID:26472040

  19. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  20. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sárvári, Anitta K., E-mail: anittasarvari@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Veréb, Zoltán, E-mail: jzvereb@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Uray, Iván P., E-mail: ipuray@mdanderson.org [Clinical Cancer Prevention Department, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fésüs, László, E-mail: fesus@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); MTA DE Apoptosis, Genomics and Stem Cell Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Balajthy, Zoltán, E-mail: balajthy@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  1. Lack of effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics in DARPP-32 and NCS-1 levels in PC12 cells overexpressing NCS-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Helton J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is the major psychiatry disorder, which the exact cause remains unknown. However, it is well known that dopamine-mediated neurotransmission imbalance is associated with this pathology and the main target of antipsychotics is the dopamine receptor D2. Recently, it was described alteration in levels of two dopamine signaling related proteins in schizophrenic prefrontal cortex (PFC: Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1 and DARPP-32. NCS-1, which is upregulated in PFC of schizophrenics, inhibits D2 internalization. DARPP-32, which is decreased in PFC of schizophrenics, is a key downstream effector in transducing dopamine signaling. We previously demonstrated that antipsychotics do not change levels of both proteins in rat's brain. However, since NCS-1 and DARPP-32 levels are not altered in wild type rats, we treated wild type PC12 cells (PC12 WT and PC12 cells stably overexpressing NCS-1 (PC12 Clone with antipsychotics to investigate if NCS-1 upregulation modulates DARPP-32 expression in response to antipsychotics treatment. Results We chronically treated both PC12 WT and PC12 Clone cells with typical (Haloperidol or atypical (Clozapine and Risperidone antipsychotics for 14 days. Using western blot technique we observed that there is no change in NCS-1 and DARPP-32 protein levels in both PC12 WT and PC12 Clone cells after typical and atypical antipsychotic treatments. Conclusions Because we observed no alteration in NCS-1 and DARPP-32 levels in both PC12 WT and Clone cells treated with typical or atypical antipsychotics, we suggest that the alteration in levels of both proteins in schizophrenic's PFC is related to psychopathology but not with antipsychotic treatment.

  2. Onset of action of atypical and typical antipsychotics in the treatment of adolescent schizophrenic psychoses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zedková, I.; Dudová, I.; Urbánek, Tomáš; Hrdlička, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 5 (2011), s. 667-670. ISSN 0172-780X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : schizophrenia * antipsychotics * onset of action Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 1.296, year: 2011

  3. Risk of mortality (including sudden cardiac death) and major cardiovascular events in atypical and typical antipsychotic users: a study with the general practice research database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Thomas, Tarita; Jones, Meghan E; Patel, Deven; Brunner, Elizabeth; Shatapathy, Chetan C; Motsko, Stephen; Van Staa, Tjeerd P

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased cardiac events including mortality. This study assessed cardiac events including mortality among antipsychotic users relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was used to identify antipsychotic users, matched general population controls, and psychiatric diseased nonusers. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD), all-cause mortality (excluding suicide), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ventricular arrhythmias (VA). Sensitivity analyses were conducted for age, dose, duration, antipsychotic type, and psychiatric disease. Results. 183,392 antipsychotic users (115,491 typical and 67,901 atypical), 544,726 general population controls, and 193,920 psychiatric nonusers were identified. Nonusers with schizophrenia, dementia, or bipolar disorder had increased risks of all-cause mortality compared to general population controls, while nonusers with major depression had comparable risks. Relative to psychiatric nonusers, the adjusted relative ratios (aRR) of all-cause mortality in antipsychotic users was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.64-1.87); cardiac mortality 1.72 (95% CI: 1.42-2.07); SCD primary definition 5.76 (95% CI: 2.90-11.45); SCD secondary definition 2.15 (95% CI: 1.64-2.81); CHD 1.16 (95% CI: 0.94-1.44); and VA 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.31). aRRs of the various outcomes were lower for atypical versus typical antipsychotics (all-cause mortality 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80-0.85); cardiac mortality 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.97); and SCD secondary definition 0.76 (95% CI: 0.55-1.04). Conclusions. Antipsychotic users had an increased risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and SCD compared to a psychiatric nonuser cohort. PMID:24455199

  4. Risk of Mortality (Including Sudden Cardiac Death and Major Cardiovascular Events in Atypical and Typical Antipsychotic Users: A Study with the General Practice Research Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarita Murray-Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased cardiac events including mortality. This study assessed cardiac events including mortality among antipsychotic users relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD was used to identify antipsychotic users, matched general population controls, and psychiatric diseased nonusers. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD, all-cause mortality (excluding suicide, coronary heart disease (CHD, and ventricular arrhythmias (VA. Sensitivity analyses were conducted for age, dose, duration, antipsychotic type, and psychiatric disease. Results. 183,392 antipsychotic users (115,491 typical and 67,901 atypical, 544,726 general population controls, and 193,920 psychiatric nonusers were identified. Nonusers with schizophrenia, dementia, or bipolar disorder had increased risks of all-cause mortality compared to general population controls, while nonusers with major depression had comparable risks. Relative to psychiatric nonusers, the adjusted relative ratios (aRR of all-cause mortality in antipsychotic users was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.64–1.87; cardiac mortality 1.72 (95% CI: 1.42–2.07; SCD primary definition 5.76 (95% CI: 2.90–11.45; SCD secondary definition 2.15 (95% CI: 1.64–2.81; CHD 1.16 (95% CI: 0.94–1.44; and VA 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.31. aRRs of the various outcomes were lower for atypical versus typical antipsychotics (all-cause mortality 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80–0.85; cardiac mortality 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82–0.97; and SCD secondary definition 0.76 (95% CI: 0.55–1.04. Conclusions. Antipsychotic users had an increased risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and SCD compared to a psychiatric nonuser cohort.

  5. Schizophrenia Gene Expression Profile Reverted to Normal Levels by Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Facorro, Benedicto; Prieto Sánchez, Carlos; Sainz Maza, Jesús Vicente

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the widespread use of antipsychotics, little is known of the molecular bases behind the action of antipsychotic drugs. A genome-wide study is needed to characterize the genes that affect the clinical response and their adverse effects. METHODS: Here we show the analysis of the blood transcriptome of 22 schizophrenia patients before and after medication with atypical antipsychotics by next-generation sequencing. RESULTS: We found that 17 genes, among the 21 495 genes analyz...

  6. Attitudes towards antipsychotics among patients with schizophrenia on first- or second-generation medications

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    M S Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the paucity of research in this area, this study attempted to assess attitudes toward antipsychotic medications and its correlates among patients with schizophrenia, either on first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs or second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs medications. Materials and Methods: Structured assessments of attitudes to antipsychotics, psychopathology, insight and side-effects were carried out in 120 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia; 89 of these were on SGAs and 31 on FGAs. Results: Patients had predominantly positive attitudes toward antipsychotics. Severity of side-effects was the principal correlate of attitudes, explaining 19.5% of the variance, followed by greater insight (4.2% of the variance. Other factors such as younger age, male gender, employment, higher family income, urban residence and lower symptom-severity explained only a negligible proportion of the variance (0.2% in attitudes. Patients on SGAs had more positive views of their medications than those on FGAs. They felt more normal on their medications, believed that their thoughts were clearer on medications, felt that good things about their medications outweighed the bad and believed that their medications helped them from falling ill again. In addition, they did not feel as tired and sluggish on their medications and did not believe that medications were unnatural or controlled their bodies. Conclusions: Positive attitudes toward antipsychotics were common among patients with schizophrenia. Attitudes were principally determined by severity of side-effects and insight levels. Patients on SGAs had better attitudes, possibly because of less severe side-effects and greater insight among them. The importance of exploring patients′ attitudes toward their antipsychotics is highlighted by this study.

  7. Could Reward-Disturbances Caused by Antipsychotic Medication Lead to Weight Gain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Nørbak, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Disturbances of the brain reward system are suggested to play an important role in the development of central psychopathological symptoms in schizophrenia, and antipsychotic medication partly acts by modulating the reward system. Further, the reward system is known to be central to the...... antipsychotic treatment on the reward system relate to weight gain in patients. METHODS 50 antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy controls were included in the study at baseline. 38 patients and 31 healthy controls were re-examined after six weeks where patients were...... assume that it is related to changes in dopamine transmission. Thus our results suggest that by altering the dopaminergic transmission in putamen, antipsychotic medication might through the influence on reward system affect appetite regulation and thereby, together with other mechanisms, lead to weight...

  8. Use of antipsychotics in the treatment of depressive disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Tianmei SI

    2013-01-01

    There is a long history of using antipsychotic medications in the treatment of depressive disorders. Atypical antipsychotics, which have fewer side effects than traditional antipsychotics, have been used as monotherapy or adjunctively with antidepressants to treat depressive disorders with or without psychotic symptoms. The antidepressant effect of atypical antipsychotics involves regulation of monoamine, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), cortisol, and neurotrophic factors. To date, the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has approved aripiprazole and quetiapine slow-release tablets as adjunctive treatment for depressive disorders, and the combination of olanzapine and fluoxetine for the treatment of treatment-resistant depression. When using atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of depressed patients, clinicians need to monitor patients for the emergence of adverse effects including extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), weight gain, and hyperglycemia.

  9. The atypical antipsychotic blonanserin reverses (+)-PD-128907- and ketamine-induced deficit in executive function in common marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Manato; Enomoto, Takeshi; Murai, Takeshi; Nakako, Tomokazu; Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Kiyoshi, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Ikejiri, Masaru; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Ogi, Yuji; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2016-05-15

    Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. We have previously reported that the atypical antipsychotic blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, highly occupies dopamine D3 receptors at its antipsychotic dose range in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of blonanserin on executive function in common marmosets using the object retrieval with detour (ORD) task. The dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist (+)-PD-128907 at 1mg/kg decreased success rate in the difficult trial, but not in the easy trial. Since the difference between the two trials is only cognitive demand, our findings indicate that excess activation of dopamine D3 receptors impairs executive function in common marmosets. Blonanserin at 0.1mg/kg reversed the decrease in success rate induced by (+)-PD-128907 in the difficult trial. This finding indicates that blonanserin has beneficial effect on executive function deficit induced by activation of the dopamine D3 receptor in common marmosets. Next, and based on the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia, the common marmosets were treated with the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. Ketamine at sub-anesthetic doses decreased success rate in the difficult trial, but not in the easy trial. Blonanserin at 0.1mg/kg reversed the decrease in success rate induced by ketamine in the difficult trial. The findings of this study suggest that blonanserin might have beneficial effect on executive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26970575

  10. One-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and associated treatment costs in bipolar disorder treated with atypical antipsychotics: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikalov Andrei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared 1-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and treatment costs in commercially insured patients with bipolar disorder, treated with aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone. Methods This was a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study using the Ingenix Lab/Rx integrated insurance claims dataset. Patients with bipolar disorder and 180 days of pre-index enrollment without antipsychotic exposure who received atypical antipsychotic agents were followed for up to 12 months following the initial antipsychotic prescription. The primary analysis used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate time-dependent risk of hospitalization, adjusting for age, sex and pre-index hospitalization. Generalized gamma regression compared post-index costs between treatment groups. Results Compared to aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine and quetiapine had higher risks for hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.96, 1.55 and 1.56, respectively; p Conclusions In commercially insured adults with bipolar disorder followed for 1 year after initiation of atypical antipsychotics, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with a lower risk of psychiatric hospitalization than ziprasidone, quetiapine, olanzapine and risperidone, although this did not reach significance with the latter. Aripiprazole was also associated with significantly lower total healthcare costs than quetiapine, but not the other comparators.

  11. Unremitting Impulsive Aggression in a Child with Childhood Onset Schizophrenia and Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified: The Role of Stimulants, Atypical Antipsychotics and Mood Stabilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Taşkıran, Sarper; Coffey, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unremitting Impulsive Aggression in a Child with Childhood Onset Schizophrenia and Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified: The Role of Stimulants, Atypical Antipsychotics and Mood Stabilizers Presenter: Sarper Taskiran, MD1 Discussant: Barbara J. Coffey, MD, MS2 Chief Complaint and Presenting Problem C. is a 7 ½-year-old, right-handed, elementary school student in a special education class, who carries a...

  12. 非典型抗精神病药物用于治疗双相情感障碍%Atypical antipsychotic drugs used to treat bipolar disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷好贵

    2015-01-01

    As the clinical application of universal, atypical antipsychotics have not just as the treatment of schizophrenia, in bipolar disorder treatment, its application is becoming more and more attention by clinical workers. Atypical antipsychotics for bipolar mania and depression phase in the acute phase of treatment, curative effect and adverse reaction of rare, safety tolerance. This paper mainly introduces the atypical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of bipolar disorder, provide reference for clinical rational drug use.%随着临床应用的普遍,非典型抗精神病药物已不单纯作为精神分裂症的治疗,在双相障碍治疗中,其应用也越来越受到临床工作者的关注。非典型抗精神病药物对于双相障碍躁狂相和抑郁相的急性发作期的治疗,疗效肯定,不良反应少见,安全耐受。本文主要介绍非典型抗精神病药物在双相障碍治疗中的应用,为临床合理用药提供参考。

  13. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness undergoing psychiatric rehabilitation receiving high dose antipsychotic medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapu V Ravindranath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To review evidence of chronic antipsychotic medication and the association with metabolic syndrome in mentally ill patients. This evidence was used to analyse a cohort of patients with severe mental illness and to deduce a correlation between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and their dose regimens. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four male patients undergoing Psychiatric rehabilitation underwent a review of current medication and assessment of risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Assessment criteria was based upon National Cholesterol Education Programme expert panel on detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III criteria, incorporating waist circumference, raised triglycerides, reduced high density lipoprotein, raised blood pressure and fasting blood glucose. PubMed, Nature and Science Direct databases have been used to compile the medical and scientific background on metabolic syndrome and antipsychotic medication and the effect on patients particularly on high dose. Results: Out of 24 patients, 10 patients (41.7% were receiving high dose antipsychotics (HDA and four were on maximum dosage limits of 100%. 8.3% (2/24 patients were receiving only one first generation antipsychotics (FGA, 37.5% (9/24 patients were receiving only one second generation antipsychotic (SGA, 45.8% patients (11/24 were receiving two or more SGA only, and only one patient was receiving two or more FGA. One patient was receiving a combination of FGA and SGA. PRN ("as needed" therapy was not included in this study as their usage was limited. Clozapine was mostly prescribed in these patients (10/24, 41.6%. Four out of the 24 patients refused blood tests therefore were excluded from the following results. In the patients evaluated, 55% (11/20 had confirmed metabolic syndrome. In these patients with metabolic syndrome, 45.4% (5/11 were on HDA and 27.3% (3/11 were on maximum British National

  14. Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is protective against autoimmune-mediated demyelination by inhibiting effector T cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mei

    Full Text Available Quetiapine (Que, a commonly used atypical antipsychotic drug (APD, can prevent myelin from breakdown without immune attack. Multiple sclerosis (MS, an autoimmune reactive inflammation demyelinating disease, is triggered by activated myelin-specific T lymphocytes (T cells. In this study, we investigated the potential efficacy of Que as an immune-modulating therapeutic agent for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model for MS. Que treatment was initiated on the onset of MOG(35-55 peptide induced EAE mice and the efficacy of Que on modulating the immune response was determined by Flow Cytometry through analyzing CD4(+/CD8(+ populations and the proliferation of effector T cells (CD4(+CD25(- in peripheral immune organs. Our results show that Que dramatically attenuates the severity of EAE symptoms. Que treatment decreases the extent of CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell infiltration into the spinal cord and suppresses local glial activation, thereby diminishing the loss of mature oligodendrocytes and myelin breakdown in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Our results further demonstrate that Que treatment decreases the CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell populations in lymph nodes and spleens of EAE mice and inhibits either MOG(35-55 or anti-CD3 induced proliferation as well as IL-2 production of effector T cells (CD4(+CD25(- isolated from EAE mice spleen. Together, these findings suggest that Que displays an immune-modulating role during the course of EAE, and thus may be a promising candidate for treatment of MS.

  15. The tyrosine phosphatase STEP: implications in schizophrenia and the molecular mechanism underlying antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, N C; Xu, J; Kurup, P; Brouillette, J; Goebel-Goody, S M; Austin, D R; Yuan, P; Chen, G; Correa, P R; Haroutunian, V; Pittenger, C; Lombroso, P J

    2012-01-01

    Glutamatergic signaling through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is required for synaptic plasticity. Disruptions in glutamatergic signaling are proposed to contribute to the behavioral and cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia (SZ). One possible source of compromised glutamatergic function in SZ is decreased surface expression of GluN2B-containing NMDARs. STEP(61) is a brain-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase that dephosphorylates a regulatory tyrosine on GluN2B, thereby promoting its internalization. Here, we report that STEP(61) levels are significantly higher in the postmortem anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of SZ patients, as well as in mice treated with the psychotomimetics MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP). Accumulation of STEP(61) after MK-801 treatment is due to a disruption in the ubiquitin proteasome system that normally degrades STEP(61). STEP knockout mice are less sensitive to both the locomotor and cognitive effects of acute and chronic administration of PCP, supporting the functional relevance of increased STEP(61) levels in SZ. In addition, chronic treatment of mice with both typical and atypical antipsychotic medications results in a protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of STEP(61) and, consequently, increased surface expression of GluN1/GluN2B receptors. Taken together, our findings suggest that STEP(61) accumulation may contribute to the pathophysiology of SZ. Moreover, we show a mechanistic link between neuroleptic treatment, STEP(61) inactivation and increased surface expression of NMDARs, consistent with the glutamate hypothesis of SZ. PMID:22781170

  16. Cost-effectiveness model comparing olanzapine and other oral atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolen Lee J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is often a persistent and costly illness that requires continued treatment with antipsychotics. Differences among antipsychotics on efficacy, safety, tolerability, adherence, and cost have cost-effectiveness implications for treating schizophrenia. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of oral olanzapine, oral risperidone (at generic cost, primary comparator, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia from the perspective of third-party payers in the U.S. health care system. Methods A 1-year microsimulation economic decision model, with quarterly cycles, was developed to simulate the dynamic nature of usual care of schizophrenia patients who switch, continue, discontinue, and restart their medications. The model captures clinical and cost parameters including adherence levels, relapse with and without hospitalization, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, treatment discontinuation by reason, treatment-emergent adverse events, suicide, health care resource utilization, and direct medical care costs. Published medical literature and a clinical expert panel were used to develop baseline model assumptions. Key model outcomes included mean annual total direct cost per treatment, cost per stable patient, and incremental cost-effectiveness values per QALY gained. Results The results of the microsimulation model indicated that olanzapine had the lowest mean annual direct health care cost ($8,544 followed by generic risperidone ($9,080. In addition, olanzapine resulted in more QALYs than risperidone (0.733 vs. 0.719. The base case and multiple sensitivity analyses found olanzapine to be the dominant choice in terms of incremental cost-effectiveness per QALY gained. Conclusion The utilization of olanzapine is predicted in this model to result in better clinical outcomes and lower total direct health care costs compared to generic risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and

  17. Effects of divalproex and atypical antipsychotic drugs on dopamine and acetylcholine efflux in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Li, Zhu; Ichikawa, Junji; Dai, Jin; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2006-07-12

    Mood stabilizers (e.g., valproic acid) and antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are commonly co-administered in the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The basis for any synergism between these classes of drugs in either group of disorders has been little studied. Previous studies have shown that atypical APDs (e.g., clozapine) preferentially increases dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) efflux in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HIP), both of which have been suggested to contribute to their ability to improve cognition in patients with schizophrenia. We have recently reported that the anticonvulsant mood stabilizers (AMS), valproic acid, carbamazepine, and zonisamide, but not lithium, also preferentially increase DA efflux in the rat mPFC, and that, at subthreshold doses, the AMS also augment the ability of the atypical APDs clozapine and risperidone to increase DA but not ACh efflux in the mPFC. The present study examined the ability of divalproex (DVX), which is chemically related to valproic acid, to enhance DA and ACh efflux in the HIP and to augment the effect of atypical APDs on ACh efflux in the HIP and mPFC. DVX, 500 mg/kg, significantly increased DA and ACh efflux in the HIP, and DA, but not ACh, efflux in the mPFC, whereas a lower dose of DVX, 50 mg/kg, had no effect on DA or ACh in either region. However, DVX, 50 mg/kg, combined with the atypical APDs olanzapine (1.0 mg/kg) or aripiprazole (0.3 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the effect of both APDs on DA, but not ACh efflux in the HIP and mPFC. Pretreatment of olanzapine or aripiprazole with the selective serotonin 5-HT(1A) antagonist, WAY100635 (1.0 mg/kg) partially but significantly blocked the effect of the combination of DVX, 50 mg/kg, and olanzapine or aripiprazole, on DA efflux in both the HIP and mPFC. WAY100635 did not affect the ability of the combination of olanzapine or aripiprazole and DVX to enhance ACh efflux in the HIP or mPFC. Subchronic administration of the

  18. Atypicality in presentation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome caused by olanzapine

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra Biswaranjan; Mishra Baikunthanath; Sahoo Saddichha; Arora Manu; Khess C.R.J

    2007-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is the most serious of acute neurological side effects produced by antipsychotic medication, characterized by hyperthermia, rigidity, altered consciousness and autonomic dysfunction, the prevalence of which varies from 0.4-1.4%. NMS is usually seen in treatment with high potency typical antipsychotics and very rarely with atypical antipsychotics. However, NMS cases have been reported with risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine. The presen...

  19. Effect of in utero exposure to the atypical anti-psychotic risperidone on histopathological features of the rat placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K P; Singh, Manoj K; Gautam, Shrikant

    2016-04-01

    For clinical management of different forms of psychosis, both classical and atypical anti-psychotic drugs (APDs) are available. These drugs are widely prescribed, even during pregnancy considering their minimal extra-pyramidal side effects and teratogenic potential compared to classical APDs. Among AAPDs, risperidone (RIS) is a first-line drug of choice by physicians. The molecular weight of RIS is 410.49 g/mol; hence, it can easily cross the placental barrier and enter the foetal bloodstream. It is not known whether or not AAPDs like RIS may affect the developing placenta and foetus adversely. Reports on this issue are limited and sketchy. Therefore, this study has evaluated the effects of maternal exposure to equivalent therapeutic doses of RIS on placental growth, histopathological and cytoarchitectural changes, and to establish a relationship between placental dysfunction and foetal outcomes. Pregnant rats (n = 24) were exposed to selected doses (0.8, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) of RIS from gestation days 6-21. These dams were sacrificed; their placentas and foetuses were collected, morphometrically examined and further processed for histopathological examination. This study revealed that in utero exposure to equivalent therapeutic doses of RIS during organogenesis-induced placental dystrophy (size and weight), disturbed cytoarchitectural organization (thickness of different placental layers), histopathological lesions (necrosis in trophoblast with disruption of trophoblastic septa and rupturing of maternal-foetal interface) and intrauterine growth restriction of the foetuses. It may be concluded that multifactorial mechanisms might be involved in the dysregulation of structure and function of the placenta and of poor foetal growth and development. PMID:27256515

  20. Cost prediction of antipsychotic medication of psychiatric disorder using artificial neural network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mirabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antipsychotic monotherapy or polypharmacy (concurrent use of two or more antipsychotics are used for treating patients with psychiatric disorders (PDs. Usually, antipsychotic monotherapy has a lower cost than polypharmacy. This study aimed to predict the cost of antipsychotic medications (AM of psychiatric patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 790 patients with PDs who were discharged between June and September 2010 were selected from Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. For cost prediction of AM of PD, neural network (NN and multiple linear regression (MLR models were used. Analysis of data was performed with R 2.15.1 software. Results: Mean ± standard deviation (SD of the duration of hospitalization (days in patients who were on monotherapy and polypharmacy was 31.19 ± 15.55 and 36.69 ± 15.93, respectively (P < 0.001. Mean and median costs of medication for monotherapy (n = 507 were $8.25 and $6.23 and for polypharmacy (n =192 were $13.30 and $9.48, respectively (P = 0.001. The important variables for cost prediction of AM were duration of hospitalization, type of treatment, and type of psychiatric ward in the MLR model, and duration of hospitalization, type of diagnosed disorder, type of treatment, age, Chlorpromazine dosage, and duration of disorder in the NN model. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the artificial NN (ANN model can be used as a flexible model for cost prediction of AM.

  1. Comparison of patients undergoing switching versus augmentation of antipsychotic medications during treatment for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascher-Svanum H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Haya Ascher-Svanum, Alan JM Brnabic, Anthony H Lawson, Bruce J Kinon, Virginia L Stauffer, Peter D Feldman, Katarina KelinLilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAAbstract: It is often difficult to determine whether a patient may best benefit by augmenting their current medication or switching them to another. This post-hoc analysis compares patients’ clinical and functional profiles at the time their antipsychotic medications were either switched or augmented. Adult outpatients receiving oral antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia were assessed during a 12-month international observational study. Clinical and functional measures were assessed at the time of first treatment switch/augmentation (0–14 days prior and compared between Switched and Augmented patient groups. Due to low numbers of patients providing such data, interpretations are based on effect sizes. Data at the time of change were available for 87 patients: 53 Switched and 34 Augmented. Inadequate response was the primary reason for treatment change in both groups, whereas lack of adherence was more prevalent in the Switched group (26.4% vs 8.8%. Changes in clinical severity from study initiation to medication change were similar, as indicated by Clinical Global Impressions–Severity scores. However, physical and mental component scores of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey improved in the Augmented group, but worsened in the Switched group. These findings suggest that the patient’s worsening or lack of meaningful improvement prompts clinicians to switch antipsychotic medications, whereas when patients show some improvement, clinicians may be more likely to try bolstering the improvements through augmentation. Current findings are consistent with physicians’ stated reasons for switching versus augmenting antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. Confirmation of these findings requires further research

  2. Longitudinal changes in total brain volume in schizophrenia: relation to symptom severity, cognition and antipsychotic medication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Veijola

    Full Text Available Studies show evidence of longitudinal brain volume decreases in schizophrenia. We studied brain volume changes and their relation to symptom severity, level of function, cognition, and antipsychotic medication in participants with schizophrenia and control participants from a general population based birth cohort sample in a relatively long follow-up period of almost a decade. All members of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 with any psychotic disorder and a random sample not having psychosis were invited for a MRI brain scan, and clinical and cognitive assessment during 1999-2001 at the age of 33-35 years. A follow-up was conducted 9 years later during 2008-2010. Brain scans at both time points were obtained from 33 participants with schizophrenia and 71 control participants. Regression models were used to examine whether brain volume changes predicted clinical and cognitive changes over time, and whether antipsychotic medication predicted brain volume changes. The mean annual whole brain volume reduction was 0.69% in schizophrenia, and 0.49% in controls (p = 0.003, adjusted for gender, educational level, alcohol use and weight gain. The brain volume reduction in schizophrenia patients was found especially in the temporal lobe and periventricular area. Symptom severity, functioning level, and decline in cognition were not associated with brain volume reduction in schizophrenia. The amount of antipsychotic medication (dose years of equivalent to 100 mg daily chlorpromazine over the follow-up period predicted brain volume loss (p = 0.003 adjusted for symptom level, alcohol use and weight gain. In this population based sample, brain volume reduction continues in schizophrenia patients after the onset of illness, and antipsychotic medications may contribute to these reductions.

  3. Longitudinal Changes in Total Brain Volume in Schizophrenia: Relation to Symptom Severity, Cognition and Antipsychotic Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijola, Juha; Guo, Joyce Y.; Moilanen, Jani S.; Jääskeläinen, Erika; Miettunen, Jouko; Kyllönen, Merja; Haapea, Marianne; Huhtaniska, Sanna; Alaräisänen, Antti; Mäki, Pirjo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Nikkinen, Juha; Starck, Tuomo; Remes, Jukka J.; Tanskanen, Päivikki; Tervonen, Osmo; Wink, Alle-Meije; Kehagia, Angie; Suckling, John; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Barnett, Jennifer H.; Barnes, Anna; Koponen, Hannu J.; Jones, Peter B.; Isohanni, Matti; Murray, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Studies show evidence of longitudinal brain volume decreases in schizophrenia. We studied brain volume changes and their relation to symptom severity, level of function, cognition, and antipsychotic medication in participants with schizophrenia and control participants from a general population based birth cohort sample in a relatively long follow-up period of almost a decade. All members of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 with any psychotic disorder and a random sample not having psychosis were invited for a MRI brain scan, and clinical and cognitive assessment during 1999–2001 at the age of 33–35 years. A follow-up was conducted 9 years later during 2008–2010. Brain scans at both time points were obtained from 33 participants with schizophrenia and 71 control participants. Regression models were used to examine whether brain volume changes predicted clinical and cognitive changes over time, and whether antipsychotic medication predicted brain volume changes. The mean annual whole brain volume reduction was 0.69% in schizophrenia, and 0.49% in controls (p = 0.003, adjusted for gender, educational level, alcohol use and weight gain). The brain volume reduction in schizophrenia patients was found especially in the temporal lobe and periventricular area. Symptom severity, functioning level, and decline in cognition were not associated with brain volume reduction in schizophrenia. The amount of antipsychotic medication (dose years of equivalent to 100 mg daily chlorpromazine) over the follow-up period predicted brain volume loss (p = 0.003 adjusted for symptom level, alcohol use and weight gain). In this population based sample, brain volume reduction continues in schizophrenia patients after the onset of illness, and antipsychotic medications may contribute to these reductions. PMID:25036617

  4. Tobacco smoking is causally associated with antipsychotic medication use and schizophrenia, but not with antidepressant medication use or depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is more common among patients with schizophrenia and depression than among healthy individuals. We tested the hypothesis that high tobacco smoking intensity is causally associated with antipsychotic medication use, schizophrenia, antidepressant medication use and....../or depression in the general population, and compared results with those for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: We used self-reported smoking intensity in cigarettes/day and a polymorphism in the CHRNA3 gene cluster (rs1051730) associated with smoking intensity, on 63,296 20-100-year...... compared with non-carriers (CC). Furthermore, in ever-smokers homozygotes had increased risk of antipsychotic medication with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.31] compared with non-carriers, whereas in never-smokers the corresponding OR was 1.07 (0.87-1.31) (P-interaction: 0...

  5. Relationship between Dose, Drug Levels, and D2 Receptor Occupancy for the Atypical Antipsychotics Risperidone and Paliperidone

    OpenAIRE

    Muly, E.C.; Votaw, J. R.; Ritchie, J.; Howell, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    Blockade of D2 family dopamine receptors (D2Rs) is a fundamental property of antipsychotics, and the degree of striatal D2R occupancy has been related to antipsychotic and motor effects of these drugs. Recent studies suggest the D2R occupancy of antipsychotics may differ in extrastriatal regions compared with the dorsal striatum. We studied this issue in macaque monkeys by using a within-subjects design. [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography scans were obtained on four different doses ...

  6. Metacognitive Therapy (MCT+ in patients with psychosis not receiving antipsychotic medication: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Balzan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychotherapies for psychosis typically aim to develop an awareness of the implausible content of a delusion or target the underlying cognitive biases (i.e., problematic thinking styles, such as hasty decisions and illusory control that foster and maintain delusional beliefs. A recently designed individual-based treatment entitled metacognitive therapy (MCT+ combines these two approaches. Emerging evidence suggests individualised MCT+, when used concurrently with antipsychotic medication, may be an effective psychological treatment for reducing delusional symptoms. However, it remains to be tested whether MCT+ can be effective in patients with active delusions who are not currently receiving psychotropic drugs. Method: We present two cases (one patient with schizophrenia and the other with delusional disorder experiencing active delusions who underwent four-weeks of intensive MCT+, without concurrent antipsychotic medication (minimum 6-months unmedicated. Baseline and 6-week follow-up data are presented on a variety of measures assessing delusion symptom severity (i.e., PANSS, PSYRATS, SAPS, clinical insight, and cognitive bias propensity. Results: After 4-weeks of MCT+, both patients showed substantial reduction in delusional symptoms, reported improved clinical insight, and were less prone to making illusory correlations. Conclusions: The presented case studies provide preliminary evidence for the feasibility of MCT+ in treating patients not taking, or resistant to, antipsychotic medication.

  7. A review of the adverse side effects associated with antipsychotics as related to their efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpoor, Jina; Agius, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Since the introduction of antipsychotic medication for the treatment of psychosis, a wide range of different types of antipsychotic drugs have been developed while their side effects have become evident. The side effects of both the typical and atypical generation of antipsychotics have important consequences for the quality of life of recipients, stigma experienced and also the level of care of patients. It is well acknowledged that the side effects of antipsychotics reduce compliance with the medication. In this review the data for an association between typical and atypical antipsychotics and the main side effects that are well-supported in the literature was explored: weight gain and associated metabolic effects; extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia; prolactin elevation and associated sexual effects; QTc elongation; and a group of miscellaneous side effects. It has been demonstrated that the production of adverse effects following the use of antipsychotic medication differs widely both between atypical and typical drugs but also within these subgroups. Considering the wide range of antipsychotics available amongst both groups and the differing effects they have on patients in terms of side effects, there is reason to believe that a more personalised approach to antipsychotic treatment should be considered. Additionally, screening for risk factors, screening for the appearance of side effects, as well as good communication with patients about the side effects and other options available are important tasks for clinicians in order to optimise concordance with medication. PMID:25413553

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of a series of 2-substituted-5-thiopropylpiperazine (piperidine-1,3,4-oxadiazoles derivatives as atypical antipsychotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is important to develop novel antipsychotics that can effectively treat schizophrenia with minor side-effects. The aim of our work is to develop novel antipsychotics that act on dopamine D(2 and D(3, serotonin 5-HT(1A and 5-HT(2A receptors with low affinity for the serotonin 5-HT(2C and H(1 receptors, which can effectively cure positive symptoms, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment without the weight gain side-effect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A series of 2-substituted-5-thiopropylpiperazine (piperidine -1,3,4-oxadiazoles derivatives have been synthesized and the target compounds were evaluated for binding affinities to D(2, 5-HT(1A and 5-HT(2A receptors. Preliminary results indicated that compounds 14, 16 and 22 exhibited high affinities to D(2, 5-HT(1A and 5-HT(2A receptors among these compounds. Further binding tests showed that compound 22 had high affinity for D(3 receptor, and low affinity for serotonin 5-HT(2C and H(1 receptors. In addition, compound 22 inhibited apomorphine-induced climbing behavior and MK-801-induced hyperactivity with no extrapyramidal symptoms liability in mice. Moreover, compound 22 exhibited acceptable pharmacokinetic properties. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compound 22 showed an atypical antipsychotic activity without liability for extrapyramidal symptoms. We anticipate compound 22 to be useful for developing a novel class of drug for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  9. Estimated economic benefits from low-frequency administration of atypical antipsychotics in treatment of schizophrenia: a decision model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furiak Nicolas M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to quantify the direct medical resources used and the corresponding burden of disease in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. Because low-frequency administration (LFA of risperidone guarantees adherence during treatment intervals and offers fewer opportunities to discontinue, adherence and persistence were assumed to improve, thereby reducing relapses of major symptoms. A decision tree model including Markov processes with monthly cycles and a five-year maximum timeframe was constructed. Costs were adapted from the literature and discounted at a 3% annual rate. The population is a demographically homogeneous cohort of patients with schizophrenia, differentiated by initial disease severity (mildly ill, moderately ill, and severely ill. Treatment parameters are estimated using published information for once-daily risperidone standard oral therapy (RIS-SOT and once-monthly risperidone long-acting injection (RIS-LAI with LFA therapy characteristics derived from observed study trends. One-year and five-year results are expressed as discounted direct medical costs and mean number of relapses per patient (inpatient, outpatient, total and are estimated for LFA therapies given at three, six, and nine month intervals. The one-year results show that LFA therapy every 3 months (LFA-3 ($6,088 is less costly than either RIS-SOT ($10,721 or RIS-LAI ($9,450 with similar trends in the 5-year results. Moreover, the model predicts that LFA-3 vs. RIS-SOT vs. RIS LAI therapy will reduce costly inpatient relapses (0.16 vs. 0.51 vs. 0.41. Extending the interval to six (LFA-6 and nine (LFA-9 months resulted in further reductions in relapse and costs. Limitations include the fact that LFA therapeutic options are hypothetical and do not yet exist and limited applicability to compare one antipsychotic agent versus another as only risperidone therapy is evaluated. However, study results have quantified the potential health

  10. Antipsychotic Use and Metabolic Monitoring in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Served in a Medicaid Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lisa M; Damron, Mackenzie; Jones, Kyle B; Weedon, Dean; Carbone, Paul S; Bakian, Amanda V; Bilder, Deborah A

    2016-06-01

    This study describes antipsychotic use and metabolic monitoring rates among individuals with developmental disabilities enrolled in a subspecialty medical home (N = 826). Four hundred ninety-nine participants (60.4 %) were taking antipsychotics, which was associated with male gender (p = 0.01), intellectual disability with and without autism spectrum disorder (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively), and inversely associated with the youngest and oldest age categories (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Among those taking antipsychotics, annual metabolic monitoring rates ranged from 89 % (lipids) to 99 % (weight). Age was positively associated with glucose (p < 0.001) and lipid monitoring (p < 0.001). Adult participants with dyslipidemia (p < 0.01), prediabetes/diabetes (p = 0.04), and hypertension (p = 0.02) were significantly more likely to obtain lipid monitoring. These values exceeded previously reported rates suggesting the importance of an integrated care model. PMID:26818535

  11. Antipsychotics-induced metabolic alterations: focus on adipose tissue and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Araújo, João Ricardo; Martel, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic drugs for the treatment of mood disorders and psychosis has increased dramatically over the last decade. Despite its consumption being associated with beneficial neuropsychiatric effects in patients, atypical antipsychotics (which are the most frequently prescribed antipsychotics) use is accompanied by some secondary adverse metabolic effects such as weight gain, dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adverse effects are not fully understood but have been suggested to involve a dysregulation of adipose tissue homeostasis. As such, the aim of this paper is to review and discuss the role of adipose tissue in the development of secondary adverse metabolic effects induced by atypical antipsychotics. Data analyzed in this article suggest that atypical antipsychotics may increase adipose tissue (particularly visceral adipose tissue) lipogenesis, differentiation/hyperplasia, pro-inflammatory mediator secretion and insulin resistance and decrease adipose tissue lipolysis. Consequently, patients receiving antipsychotic medication could be at risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A better knowledge of the impact of these drugs on adipose tissue homeostasis may unveil strategies to develop novel antipsychotic drugs with less adverse metabolic effects and to develop adjuvant therapies (e.g. behavioral and nutritional therapies) to neuropsychiatric patients receiving antipsychotic medication. PMID:25523882

  12. Weight gain associated with atypical and typical antipsychotics during treatment of adolescent schizophrenic psychoses: A retrospective study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdlička, M.; Zedková, I.; Blatný, Marek; Urbánek, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2 (2009), s. 256-261. ISSN 0172-780X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : schizophrenia * antipsychotics * weight gain Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 1.047, year: 2009

  13. Blonanserin Augmentation of Atypical Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia-Who Benefits from Blonanserin Augmentation?: An Open-Label, Prospective, Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Park, Joo Eon; Kim, Do-Hoon; Sohn, Inki; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Park, Young-Min; Jon, Duk-In; Jeong, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) with augmentation by blonanserin in schizophrenic patients. Methods aA total of 100 patients with schizophrenia who were partially or completely unresponsive to treatment with an AAP were recruited in this 12-week, open-label, non-comparative, multicenter study. Blonanserin was added to their existing AAP regimen, which was maintained during the study period. Efficacy was primarily evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12. Predictors for PANSS response (≥20% reduction) were investigated. Results The PANSS total score was significantly decreased at 12 weeks of blonanserin augmentation (-21.0±18.1, F=105.849, pschizophrenia who were partially or completely unresponsive to treatment with an AAP.

  14. Parent Report of Antidepressant, Anxiolytic, and Antipsychotic Medication Use in Individuals with Williams Syndrome: Effectiveness and Adverse Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A.; Seyfer, Daisha L.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Foster, Jessica E. A.; Chowdhury, Monali; McClure, Kelsey E.; Coury, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterized in part by anxiety and behavioral difficulties. We examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of antidepressant, anxiolytic, and antipsychotic medications in individuals with WS. A total of 513 parents/caregivers completed a survey of psychotropic medication usage…

  15. Longitudinal regional brain volume loss in schizophrenia: Relationship to antipsychotic medication and change in social function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Joyce Y.; Huhtaniska, Sanna; Miettunen, Jouko; Jääskeläinen, Erika; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Nikkinen, Juha; Moilanen, Jani; Haapea, Marianne; Mäki, Pirjo; Jones, Peter B.; Veijola, Juha; Isohanni, Matti; Murray, Graham K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Progressive brain volume loss in schizophrenia has been reported in previous studies but its cause and regional distribution remains unclear. We investigated progressive regional brain reductions in schizophrenia and correlations with potential mediators. Method Participants were drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. A total of 33 schizophrenia individuals and 71 controls were MRI scanned at baseline (mean age = 34.7, SD = 0.77) and at follow-up (mean age = 43.4, SD = 0.44). Regional brain change differences and associations with clinical mediators were examined using FSL voxelwise SIENA. Results Schizophrenia cases exhibited greater progressive brain reductions than controls, mainly in the frontal and temporal lobes. The degree of periventricular brain volume reductions were predicted by antipsychotic medication exposure at the fourth ventricular edge and by the number of days in hospital between the scans (a proxy measure of relapse duration) at the thalamic ventricular border. Decline in social and occupational functioning was associated with right supramarginal gyrus reduction. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the possibility that antipsychotic medication exposure and time spent in relapse partially explain progressive brain reductions in schizophrenia. However, residual confounding could also account for the findings and caution must be applied before drawing causal inferences from associations demonstrated in observational studies of modest size. Less progressive brain volume loss in schizophrenia may indicate better preserved social and occupational functions. PMID:26189075

  16. Antipsychotic medication and prefrontal cortex activation : A review of neuroimaging findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg, Edith J.; Knegtering, Henderikus; Klein, Hans C.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Aleman, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Decreased prefrontal activation (hypofrontality) in schizophrenia is thought to underlie negative symptoms and cognitive impairments, and may contribute to poor social outcome. Hypofrontality does not always improve during treatment with antipsychotics. We hypothesized that antipsychotics, which sha

  17. Newer antipsychotics and the rabbit syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masalehdan Azadeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rabbit syndrome is a movement disorder that is associated with long-term exposure to neuroleptic medications. Of particular interest and importance is the risk of rabbit syndrome with exposure to the newer atypical antipsychotics. Our recent experience with such a case brought to light the importance of exploring this risk. Methods MEDLINE and PubMed (1972–2006 databases were searched for English language articles using the keywords rabbit syndrome, tardive dyskinesia, antipsychotic, extrapyramidal symptoms and side effects. A recent case study is used to expand upon the literature available on newer antipsychotics and rabbit syndrome. Results We reviewed papers that addressed the following aspects of rabbit syndrome 1 the clinical manifestations 2 prevalence and risk factors, 3 etiopathogenesis 4 older antipsychotics and rabbit syndrome 5 newer antipsychotics, 6 treatment options. Moreover, we report a case of RS in a 50 year old white female, diagnosed with bipolar I disorder, that, after the discontinuation of risperidone, developed involuntary movements of the mouth that were fine, rhythmic and rapid, along the vertical axis, and without involvement of the tongue. After the re-introduction of risperidone, the symptoms decreased in a few hours and disappeared after 3 days. Conclusion Eleven cases of rabbit syndrome have been documented since the implementation of newer antipsychotics. Future research is needed to better understand the etiopathogenesis of rabbit syndrome in psychiatric populations treated with the atypical antipsychotics. Understanding the differences and similarities of rabbit syndrome and tardive dyskinesia is crucial to the creation of a successful treatment paradigm.

  18. Impact of long-acting injectable antipsychotics on medication adherence and clinical, functional, and economic outcomes of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Kaplan,1,2 Julio Casoy,3 Jacqueline Zummo3 1Behavioral Health Services, Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus, NJ, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Medical Affairs, Alkermes, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA Abstract: Schizophrenia is a debilitating chronic disease that requires lifelong medical care and supervision. Even with treatment, the majority of patients relapse within 5 years, and suicide may occur in up to 10% of patients. Poor adherence to oral antipsychotics is the most common cause of relapse. The discontinuation rate for oral antipsychotics in schizophrenia ranges from 26% to 44%, and as many as two-thirds of patients are at least partially nonadherent, resulting in increased risk of hospitalization. A very helpful approach to improve adherence in schizophrenia is the use of long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics, although only a minority of patients receive these. Reasons for underutilization may include negative attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of both patients and health care professionals. Research shows, however, significant improvements in adherence with LAIs compared with oral drugs, and this is accompanied by lower rates of discontinuation, relapse, and hospitalization. In addition, LAIs are associated with better functioning, quality of life, and patient satisfaction. A need exists to encourage broader LAI use, especially among patients with a history of nonadherence with oral antipsychotics. This paper reviews the impact of nonadherence with antipsychotic drug therapy overall, as well as specific outcomes of the schizophrenia patient, and highlights the potential benefits of LAIs. Keywords: adherence, long-acting injectable, antipsychotics, schizophrenia, discontinuation, relapse

  19. Risk of Mortality Among Patients Treated With Antipsychotic Medications: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Yuan, Shin-Sheng; Yang, Kang-Chung; Yang, Chun-Ju; Lee, Tung-Liang; Shyu, Yu-Chiau

    2016-02-01

    In this nationwide population-based study, we examined whether haloperidol exposure is associated with a higher risk of mortality than are other antipsychotic medications. Patients who newly received monotherapy with chlorpromazine (n = 2133), haloperidol (n = 4454), quetiapine (n = 1513), and risperidone (n = 1046) between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2011, were selected from a random sample of the 1 million enrollees of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The association between antipsychotic prescription and mortality was estimated through Cox proportional hazard regression. To examine the mortality rates of antipsychotics at different exposure durations, we compared the differences among short-term (≤30 days), midterm (31-90 days), and long-term (>90 days) antipsychotic use. The mortality rates during the follow-up among the chlorpromazine, haloperidol, quetiapine, and risperidone groups were 17.4%, 45.5%, 26.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. The mortality risk among patients receiving haloperidol was the highest within 30 days of the prescription, after which the risk reduced rapidly. Compared with the patients receiving chlorpromazine, the mortality risk was higher in short-term (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.87-2.39) and midterm haloperidol users (1.86; 1.54-2.25) than in long-term users (0.99; 0.61-1.61). In conclusion, haloperidol use is associated with higher mortality risk than other antipsychotic medications. The mortality risk varies according to the duration of drug exposure. Underlying characteristics and medical conditions may influence the estimation of the mortality risk. Clinicians should pay attention to the mortality risk when prescribing antipsychotic medications, particularly for the elderly and critically ill patients. PMID:26658260

  20. Abnormalities in the fatty acid composition of the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients: gender differences and partial normalization with antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert K; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Richtand, Neil M; Stanford, Kevin E

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies have observed significant abnormalities in the fatty acid composition of peripheral tissues from drug-naïve first-episode schizophrenic (SZ) patients relative to normal controls, including deficits in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are partially normalized following chronic antipsychotic treatment. We hypothesized that postmortem cortical tissue from patients with SZ would also exhibit deficits in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) relative to normal controls, and that these deficits would be greater in drug-free SZ patients. We determined the total fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) (Brodmann area 10) from drug-free and antipsychotic-treated SZ patients (n=21) and age-matched normal controls (n=26) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, significantly lower DHA (-20%) concentrations, and significantly greater vaccenic acid (VA) (+12.5) concentrations, were found in the OFC of SZ patients relative to normal controls. Relative to age-matched same-gender controls, OFC DHA deficits, and elevated AA:DHA, oleic acid:DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6):DHA ratios, were found in male but not female SZ patients. SZ patients that died of cardiovascular-related disease exhibited lower DHA (-31%) and AA (-19%) concentrations, and greater OA (+20%) and VA (+17%) concentrations, relative to normal controls that also died of cardiovascular-related disease. OFC DHA and AA deficits, and elevations in oleic acid and vaccenic acid, were numerically greater in drug-free SZ patients and were partially normalized in SZ patients treated with antipsychotic medications (atypical>typical). Fatty acid abnormalities could not be wholly attributed to lifestyle or postmortem tissue variables. These findings add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of SZ, and suggest that

  1. Strošek in učinkovitost zdravljenja shizofrenije z atipičnimi antipsihotiki v Sloveniji: a cost effectiveness study: raziskava stroškovne učinkovitosti: The cost and effects of atypical antipsychotic agents in patients with schizophrenia in Slovenia:

    OpenAIRE

    Petrica, Demetrij; Štuhec, Matej; Toni, Janez

    2013-01-01

    Background: Treatment with atypical antipsychotics is the most important treatment for patients with acute schizophrenia and represents a significant cost. In Slovenia there is lack of studies of cost-effectiveness that can be used in clinical practice. Objective: The primary purpose of the study was to compare the costs and effectiveness of five atypical antipsychotic with the largest market share in 2011 in Slovenia. The study included aripiprazole, quetiapine, paliperidone, risperidone and...

  2. Incident users of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...... polypharmacy (HR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.32-1.45), whereas antipsychotic discontinuation was associated with decreased hospitalization risk in most off-label conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The brief duration of most antipsychotic prescriptions suggests that antipsychotics are prescribed more liberally than recommended. As a...

  3. Antipsychotic medications and cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder: moderating effects of COMT Val108/158 Met genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arts Baer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a negative association between the use of antipsychotics and cognitive functioning in bipolar patients, which may be mediated by altered dopamine signaling in selected brain areas, and moderation thereof by genetic sequence variation such as COMT Val108/158Met. The interaction between antipsychotic drug use and the COMT Val108/158Met genotype on two-year cognitive functioning in bipolar patients was examined. Methods Interaction between the COMT Val108/158Met and antipsychotics on a composite cognitive measure was examined in 51 bipolar patients who were assessed 12 times at two-monthly intervals over a period of two years (379 observations. Results There was a significant negative effect of the interaction between antipsychotic medications and Val allele load on the composite cognitive measure in bipolar patients (p  Conclusions The negative effects of antipsychotics on cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder may be moderated by the COMT Val 108/158 Met genotype, with a negative effect of Val allele load. If replicated, the results may be indicative of pharmacogenetic interactions in bipolar disorder.

  4. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Ungvari, Gabor S; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Guo, Tong; Liu, Zheng-Rong; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Forester, Brent P; Seiner, Stephen J; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine) versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD), risk ratio (RR) ±95% confidence intervals (CIs), number needed to treat (NNT), and number needed to harm (NNH) were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks) were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1) symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (pECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02) with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4-11) and memory impairment (p = 0.001) with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2-5). The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted) can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache. PMID:27285996

  5. The Efficacy and Safety of Antipsychotic Medications in the Treatment of Psychosis in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Radan; Damjanović, Aleksandar; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are present in up to 50% of patients with Parkinson's disease. These symptoms have detrimental effects on patients' and caregivers' quality of life and may predict mortality. The pathogenesis of psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease is complex, but the use of dopaminergic medications is one of the risk factors. The treatment of psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease is complicated due to the ability of antipsychotic medications to worsen motor symptoms. The efficacy of clozapine in the treatment of psychosis in patients with Parkinson's disease has been confirmed in several clinical trials; however, the adverse effects and the necessity of blood count monitoring are the reasons why the use of this drug is challenging. The studies on safety and efficacy of other antipsychotics conflicting results. The use of antipsychotics in these patients is also associated with increased mortality. Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease per se are also proven predictors of mortality. Thus it is necessary to treat psychotic symptoms but the choice of an antipsychotic should be based on careful risk/benefit assessment. Pimavanserin as a novel therapeutic option with more favorable adverse effects profile is now available for this indication, but careful postmarketing monitoring is necessary to establish the true picture of this drug's long-term safety and efficacy. PMID:27504054

  6. Risk of Mortality (Including Sudden Cardiac Death) and Major Cardiovascular Events in Atypical and Typical Antipsychotic Users: A Study with the General Practice Research Database

    OpenAIRE

    Tarita Murray-Thomas; Jones, Meghan E; Deven Patel; Elizabeth Brunner; Shatapathy, Chetan C.; Stephen Motsko; van Staa, Tjeerd P

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased cardiac events including mortality. This study assessed cardiac events including mortality among antipsychotic users relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was used to identify antipsychotic users, matched general population controls, and psychiatric diseased nonusers. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD), all-cause mortality (excluding suicide), coronary heart diseas...

  7. Development and validation of a stability-indicating gas chromatographic method for quality control of residual solvents in blonanserin: a novel atypical antipsychotic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ming; Liu, Jin; Lu, Dan; Yang, Yong-Jian

    2012-09-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic agent for the treatment of schizophrenia. Ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and toluene are utilized in the synthesis route of this bulk drug. A new validated gas chromatographic (GC) method for the simultaneous determination of residual solvents in blonanserin is described in this paper. Blonanserin was dissolved in N, N-dimethylformamide to make a sample solution that was directly injected into a DB-624 column. A postrun oven temperature at 240°C for approximately 2 h after the analysis cycle was performed to wash out blonanserin residue in the GC column. Quantitation was performed by external standard analyses and the validation was carried out according to International Conference on Harmonization validation guidelines Q2A and Q2B. The method was shown to be specific (no interference in the blank solution), linear (correlation coefficients ≥0.99998, n = 10), accurate (average recoveries between 94.1 and 101.7%), precise (intra-day and inter-day precision ≤2.6%), sensitive (limit of detection ≤0.2 ng, and limit of quantitation ≤0.7 ng), robust (small variations of carrier gas flow, initial oven temperature, temperature ramping rate, injector and detector temperatures did not significantly affect the system suitability test parameters and peak areas) and stable (reference standard and sample solutions were stable over 48 h). This extensively validated method is ready to be used for the quality control of blonanserin. PMID:22595261

  8. Antipsychotic discontinuation syndrome following risperidone withdrawal: a case report from rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sravanti L. Sanivarapu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Risperidone is an atypical antipsychotic agent used primarily to treat schizophrenia. It is a dopamine antagonist with antiserotonergic, antihistaminergic and antiadrenergic properties. Antipsychotic discontinuation symptoms have been described in the literature following abrupt or rapid reduction in the dose. This unusual case demonstrates that sudden withdrawal of even a modest dose of risperidone may cause significant discontinuation symptoms in susceptible individuals. Hence, there is a need for caution while taking a patient off antipsychotic medications in view of the vulnerable subgroup. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 233-234

  9. Improving physical health for people taking antipsychotic medication in the Community Learning Disabilities Service

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Ian; Shah, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Adherence with antipsychotic monitoring guidelines is notoriously low nationally. Without active monitoring and measures to improve metabolic abnormalities, more patients may develop related morbidity and mortality. An audit highlighted antipsychotic monitoring in this learning disability service in London did not match guideline recommendations. People with intellectual disability also experience health inequalities. Psychiatrists are well placed to provide advice and assistance that is suit...

  10. An Economic Evaluation of a Weight Loss Intervention Program for People with Serious Mental Illnesses Taking Antipsychotic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenan, Richard T; Stumbo, Scott P; Yarborough, Micah T; Leo, Michael C; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Green, Carla A

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with serious mental illnesses suffer from obesity and cardiometabolic diseases at high rates, and antipsychotic medications exacerbate these conditions. While studies have shown weight loss and lifestyle interventions can be effective in this population, few have assessed intervention cost-effectiveness. We present results from a 12-month randomized controlled trial that reduced weight, fasting glucose, and medical hospitalizations in intervention participants. Costs per participant ranged from $4365 to $5687. Costs to reduce weight by one kilogram ranged from $1623 to $2114; costs to reduce fasting glucose by 1 mg/dL ranged from $467 to $608. Medical hospitalization costs were reduced by $137,500. PMID:26149243

  11. [Antipsychotics in bipolar disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheron-Trystram, M-N; Braitman, A; Cheref, S; Auffray, L

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of the various treatments that are currently available, in particular in France, for the treatment of bipolar disorders. This article specifically addresses the use of novel antipsychotic agents as alternative therapy to a lithium therapy and/or the use of conventional antipsychotics. The prevalence of bipolar disorder over a lifetime is around 1% of the general population. Bipolar disorder consists of alternating depressive and manic episodes. It mainly affects younger subjects, and is often associated with alcohol and drug addictions. There are two main subtypes of bipolar disorder. According to the DSM IV-R, type 1 of bipolar disorder is characterised when at least one manic episode (or a mixed episode) has been diagnosed. Type 2 of bipolar disorder is related to patients enduring recurrent depressive episodes but no manic episode. Type 2 affects women more frequently as opposed to type 1 affecting individuals of both sexes. Manic-depressive disorder (or cyclo-thymic disorder) appears in relation to patients who has never suffered manic episode, mixed episode or severe depressive episode but have undergone numerous periods with some symptoms of depression and hypomanic symptoms over a two-year period during which any asymptomatic periods last no longer than two months. The average age of the person going through a first episode (often a depressive one) is 20 years-old. Untreated bipolar patients may endure more than ten manic or depressive episodes. Finally, in relation to 10 to 20% of patients, the bipolar disorder will turn into a fast cycle form, either spontaneously or as a result of certain medical treatments. Psychiatrists are now able to initiate various treating strategies which are most likely to be effective as a result of the identification of clinical subtypes of the bipolar disorder. Lithium therapy has been effectively and acutely used for patients with pure or elated mania and its prophylaxis. However, lithium medication

  12. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  13. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS. Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD, risk ratio (RR ±95% confidence intervals (CIs, number needed to treat (NNT, and number needed to harm (NNH were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1 symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (p<0.00001; I(2 = 62%, separating the two groups as early as weeks 1-2 with an SMD of -0.58 (p<0.00001; I(2 = 0%; (2 study-defined response (RR = 1.48, p<0.0001 with an NNT of 6 (CI = 4-9 and remission rate (RR = 2.18, p = 0.0002 with an NNT of 8 (CI = 6-16; (3 PANSS positive and general symptom sub-scores at endpoint with a WMD between -3.48 to -1.32 (P = 0.01 to 0.009. Subgroup analyses were conducted comparing double blind/rater-masked vs. open RCTs, those with and without randomization details, and high quality (Jadad≥adadup analyses were Jadad<3 studies. The ECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02 with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4-11 and memory impairment (p = 0.001 with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2-5. The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache.

  14. Role and clinical implications of atypical antipsychotics in anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trauma-related, and somatic symptom disorders: a systematized review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Umberto; Carmassi, Claudia; Cosci, Fiammetta; De Cori, David; Di Nicola, Marco; Ferrari, Silvia; Poloni, Nicola; Tarricone, Ilaria; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAs) may play a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and trauma-related disorders. No reviews on their differential use in these different disorders have been performed recently. The aim of this systematized review was to obtain data on efficacy and comparative effectiveness of AAs as a treatment of anxiety disorders, OCD, and trauma-related disorders to provide guidance for clinicians on when and which AA to use. We searched on PubMed, Psychnet, and Cochrane Libraries from inception to July 2015. Search results were limited to randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adult patients. Evidence of efficacy was considered the presence of positive results in two or more double-blind placebo-controlled studies. Our systematized search identified 1298 papers, of which 191 were subjected to a full-text review and 56 were included. Quetiapine extended-release showed a role in both acute and maintenance treatment of uncomplicated generalized anxiety disorder, whereas more studies are needed before drawing practical recommendations on the use of olanzapine and risperidone; aripiprazole and risperidone are effective in resistant OCD as augmentation treatments. Risperidone and olanzapine add-on may have a role in resistant or chronic post-traumatic stress disorder patients, although only risperidone addition can be recommended on the basis of the criterion of two or more positive placebo-controlled trials. This systematized review supports the evidence that only a few AAs are effective in only a minority of the off-label conditions in which they are currently used and confirms that AAs are not all the same. Their use should be on the basis of a balance between efficacy and side effects, and the characteristics as well as the preference of the patient. PMID:26974213

  15. Antipsychotic-induced Hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheyla Dogan Bulut

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin provides the growth of the mammary gland during pregnancy and synthesis and preparation of breast milk for lactation. Antipsychotics and antidepressants that are frequently used in psychiatry, cause hyperprolactinemia. The prevalent opinion is that especially typical antipsychotics increase prolactin levels primarily by blocking D2 receptors in the anterior pituitary. The effects of atypical antipsychotics on hyperprolactinemia vary. Hyperprolactinemia causes galactorrhea, gynecomastia, sexual dysfunction, infertility, acne, hirsutism in women, weight gain, obesity and mood changes in addition to menstrual irregularities such as oligomenorrhea, polymenorrhea and amenorrhea. In the long term, hyperprolactinemia may cause reduction in bone density and osteoporosis. Hyperprolactinemia as a side effect of antipsychotics drugs and its treatment will be reviewed in this article. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 109-124

  16. Development of antipsychotic medications with novel mechanisms of action based on computational modeling of hippocampal neuropathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Siekmeier

    Full Text Available A large number of cellular level abnormalities have been identified in the hippocampus of schizophrenic subjects. Nonetheless, it remains uncertain how these pathologies interact at a system level to create clinical symptoms, and this has hindered the development of more effective antipsychotic medications. Using a 72-processor supercomputer, we created a tissue level hippocampal simulation, featuring multicompartmental neuron models with multiple ion channel subtypes and synaptic channels with realistic temporal dynamics. As an index of the schizophrenic phenotype, we used the specific inability of the model to attune to 40 Hz (gamma band stimulation, a well-characterized abnormality in schizophrenia. We examined several possible combinations of putatively schizophrenogenic cellular lesions by systematically varying model parameters representing NMDA channel function, dendritic spine density, and GABA system integrity, conducting 910 trials in total. Two discrete "clusters" of neuropathological changes were identified. The most robust was characterized by co-occurring modest reductions in NMDA system function (-30% and dendritic spine density (-30%. Another set of lesions had greater NMDA hypofunction along with low level GABA system dysregulation. To the schizophrenic model, we applied the effects of 1,500 virtual medications, which were implemented by varying five model parameters, independently, in a graded manner; the effects of known drugs were also applied. The simulation accurately distinguished agents that are known to lack clinical efficacy, and identified novel mechanisms (e.g., decrease in AMPA conductance decay time constant, increase in projection strength of calretinin-positive interneurons and combinations of mechanisms that could re-equilibrate model behavior. These findings shed light on the mechanistic links between schizophrenic neuropathology and the gamma band oscillatory abnormalities observed in the illness. As such, they

  17. VALID GROUNDS FOR THE SWITCH OF ORIGINAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS WITH GENERICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ružić, Klementina; Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Knez, Rajna; Medved, Paola; Graovac, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Patients' non-compliance in treatments, such as irregular taking of medication, represents an enormous problem with psychiatric patients in general. This difficulty occurs especially in patients suffering from chronic mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. There are not any significant differences in the efficacy of reducing the positive symptoms in schizophrenia between the conventional and the atypical antipsychotics. However, the effects which are manifested in negative schizophr...

  18. Atypical antipsychotic drug treatment for 6 months restores N-acetylaspartate in left prefrontal cortex and left thalamus of first-episode patients with early onset schizophrenia: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jing-Li; Cheng, Zheng-Xiang; Duan, Hui-Feng; Yang, Jia-Ming; Zhu, Xi-Quan; Gao, Cun-You

    2014-07-30

    Early onset schizophrenia (EOS) is often associated with poorer outcomes, including lack of school education, higher risk of mental disability and resistance to treatment. But the knowledge of the neurobiological mechanism of EOS is limited. Here, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we investigated the possible neurochemical abnormalities in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and thalamus of first-episode drug-naïve patients with EOS, and followed up the effects of atypical antipsychotic treatment for 6 months on neurochemical metabolites and clinical symptoms. We measured the ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) to creatine (Cr) in 41 adolescents with first episode of EOS and in 28 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and years of education. The EOS patients presented with abnormally low NAA/Cr values in the left PFC and left thalamus with a reduced tendency in the right PFC compared with healthy controls. No significant differences were detected between groups for Cho/Cr in PFC and thalamus in any hemisphere. After atypical antipsychotic treatment for 6 months, the reduced NAA/Cr in the left PFC and left thalamus in EOS patients was elevated to the normal level in healthy controls, without any alteration in Cho/Cr. We also found that there was no significant correlation between the neurochemical metabolite ratios in the PFC and thalamus in patients with EOS, and clinical characteristics. Our results suggest that there was neurochemical metabolite abnormalities in PFC and thalamus in EOS patients, atypical antipsychotic treatment can effectively relieve the symptoms and restore the reduced NAA in PFC and thalamus. PMID:24831926

  19. A cross-sectional observational study of healthcare professional views of factors affecting teenage adherence with antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdour, S; Duxbury, J A; Becket, G; Wilson, S

    2015-09-01

    Delays in effective treatment of a first episode psychosis can result in more severe symptoms, a longer time to achieve symptom control and a poorer quality of life; yet around 40% do not take antipsychotic medication as prescribed. There is evidence that patients and staff have different perceptions of what affects adherence with medication. Research in adults suggests healthcare professionals and patients understand the importance of good insight in promoting adherence with medication for schizophrenia; however, healthcare staff may overestimate the impact of side effects and underestimate the importance of medication effectiveness. There is also some evidence to suggest that motivations to take prescribed medication may differ in first and multi-episode psychosis. This research therefore sought views of staff working with adolescents diagnosed with first episode psychosis about what factors affected adherence with antipsychotic medication. Staff responding to the survey felt that young people were more likely to take medication if they felt it would make them better, prevent relapse and if they had a positive rapport with staff. As in an adult population, side effects, particularly weight gain, sedation and muscular side effects, were expressed as a common reason for poor adherence. Doctors and nurses assigned differing importance to parameters such as family views of medication, fear of admission and a preference for cannabis over medication suggesting that views may differ between professional groups Views of young people will be obtained in the next phase of the research study to enable comparison with staff views and consideration of staff interventions to better promote medication adherence. Antipsychotic medication is an effective treatment for first episode psychosis; yet 40% of patients do not take medication as prescribed. Previous research in adults with schizophrenia comparing healthcare professional and patient views suggests that while healthcare

  20. Prescripción de antipsicóticos atípicos en pacientes hospitalizados de la Clínica Psiquiátrica Universitaria Prescription of atypical antipsychotic drugs for inpatients at a university psychiatric clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Nieto R

    2008-03-01

    Psychiatric Clinic between May and September 2005. We registered every antipsychotic drug used and its dosagefor every diagnosis, including whether it was prescribed as permanent or as PRN. Results: During this period there were 246 hospital discharges and some kind of antipsychotic drug was used in 80% of cases. The main diagnoses associated with the use of antipsychotic drugs were schizophrenia, exogenous psychosis and bipolar disorder, but they were also used frequently in other diseases such as eating disorders, personality disorders, and unipolar depression. Atypical antipsychotic drugs were the most frequently used, whether alone or in PRN combination with a neuroleptic drug. Among atypical antipsychotics, the most frequently prescribed were risperidone (41% and quetiapine (34%. The dosage used was widely different depending on the diagnosis. Conclusión: Antipsychotic drugs, particularly atypical ones, are broadly used in the treatment of inpatients with several psychiatric disorders

  1. Study on effects of an atypical antipsychotic, risperidone on regional cerebral blood flow with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in drug-naive and unmedicated schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the underlying mechanisms of intracerebral or clinical actions of the atypical antipsychotic, risperidone (RIS), the effects of RIS on absolute regional cerebral blood flows (rCBFs) measured with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT and correlations between the rCBFs and psychotic symptoms assessed with positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) were investigated in 10 drug-naive and unmedicated schizophrenic patients with acute hallucinatory and delusional state. Both the SPECT and PANSS were repeated before and after oral 2-week administration of RIS 3 mg/day in all of the 10 patients and after subsequent 2-week administration of RIS 4-6 mg/day in half of the patients. The rCBF values were significantly decreased in the left precentral gyrus alone after the low dose of RIS 3 mg/day in comparison with before the RIS dose. The rCBF values were significantly decreased in the right cingulate, postcentral, inferior parietal gyri and the left inferior temporal gyrus after the high dose of RIS 4-6 mg/day in comparison with before the low dose of RIS 3 mg/day. The psychiatric assessment with PANSS showed an improvement of positive and negative symptoms after the low RIS dose and still more after the high RIS dose. Statistical analyses on relationships between the rCBF values and PANSS scores before and after the low RIS dose showed a positive correlation between the rCBF values in the right middle temporal gyrus and hallucinations (mainly auditory hallucination). These results suggest that chronic RIS administration dose-dependently produces a decrease of rCBF in the cerebral cortex in the manner that the low dose decreases rCBF in a few restricted cortical regions, while the high dose induces the rCBF reduction in more widespread cortical regions. The RIS-induced rCBF decrease in the cerebral cortex is considered to be attributable to a secondary inactivation in the cerebral cortex due to D2 dopamine receptor blockade of RIS in the striatum through the cortico

  2. Psychiatrists' awareness of partial and nonadherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia: results from an Asia–Pacific survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares JM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jose Manuel Olivares,1 Manickam Thirunavukarasu,2 Jayashri Kulkarni,3 Hong Yan Zhang,4 Mingyuan Zhang,5 Fan Zhang61Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Meixoeiro, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain; 2Department of Psychiatry, SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Center, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Department of Psychiatry, Monash University and the Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Vic, Australia; 4Department of Psychiatry, Peking University Institute of Mental Health, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 5Department of Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 6Medical Affairs, Xian Janssen Pharmaceutical, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Nonadherence is a well-known problem among schizophrenia patients, among whom relapse is fivefold more likely, adversely affecting health, employment, and social functioning. The Spanish Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES survey was developed to determine the scope and causes of medication nonadherence in schizophrenia.Methods: The 20-question ADHES survey was distributed to 19,370 psychiatrists in 13 Asia–Pacific countries in January–April 2012, to ascertain psychiatrists' perceptions of antipsychotic medication adherence levels among their schizophrenia patients, reasons for partial/nonadherence, their preferred methods of assessing adherence, and strategies to improve adherence. Responses are reported as mean and range across countries.Results: Four thousand, six hundred sixty one psychiatrists (24% of recipients completed the survey (highest contributors: People's Republic of China, 1854; India, 1616. Psychiatrists perceived that 56% (range, 30%-71% of schizophrenia patients were non- or partially adherent to medication. Patients discontinue medication primarily due to lack of insight into their condition (mean, 37%; 1%–65% and because patients consider medication unnecessary when feeling better (mean, 27%; 15%–68%. Over

  3. Differential Effects of Antipsychotic Medications on Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Rats: Relationship with Liver Delta6-Desaturase Expression

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Robert K.; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Lipton, Jack W

    2011-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), a lipid family comprised of omega-3 (n-3) and n-6 fatty acids, are a critical component of cellular membranes, and recent in vitro studies have found that antipsychotic medications up-regulate genes responsible for PUFA biosynthesis. To evaluate this effect in vivo, rats were treated with risperidone (1.5, 3, 6 mg/kg/d), paliperidone (1.5, 3, 6 mg/kg/d), olanzapine (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg/d), quetiapine (5, 10, 20 mg/kg/d), haloperidol (1, 3 mg/kg/d) or vehicle t...

  4. Application of atypical antipsychotic agents in the treatment of bipolar disorder%非典型抗精神病药物在双相情感障碍治疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡亦蕴; 徐理; 吴彦

    2014-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic agents in the treatment of bipolar disorder remain a hot issue in clinic. Their efifcacy in acute manic and depression episodes has been veriifed. However, the long-term preventive efifcacy has not yet been demonstrated. This paper reviews the application of atypical antipsychotic agents in the treatment of bipolar disorder so as to provide a guideline for pharmacotherapy in clinic.%非典型抗精神病药物在双相情感障碍治疗中的应用备受关注。非典型抗精神病药物用于双相情感障碍躁狂相和抑郁相的急性发作期治疗有较为肯定的疗效,但用于稳定期维持治疗的疗效不确定。本文介绍非典型抗精神病药物在双相情感障碍治疗中的应用,为临床合理用药提供参考。

  5. Could Reward-disturbances caused by antipsychotic medication lead to weight gain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Nørbak-Emig, Henrik;

    mechanisms, lead to weight gain. . Reference List (1) Mathews J, Newcomer JW, Mathews JR et al. Neural correlates of weight gain with olanzapine. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2012;69:1226-1237. (2) Nielsen MO, Rostrup E, Wulff S et al. Improvement of brain reward abnormalities by antipsychotic monotherapy...

  6. Psychiatrists’ awareness of partial and nonadherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia: results from an Asia–Pacific survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Jose Manuel; Thirunavukarasu, Manickam; Kulkarni, Jayashri; Zhang, Hong Yan; Zhang, Mingyuan; Zhang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonadherence is a well-known problem among schizophrenia patients, among whom relapse is fivefold more likely, adversely affecting health, employment, and social functioning. The Spanish Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) survey was developed to determine the scope and causes of medication nonadherence in schizophrenia. Methods The 20-question ADHES survey was distributed to 19,370 psychiatrists in 13 Asia–Pacific countries in January–April 2012, to ascertain psychiatrists’ perceptions of antipsychotic medication adherence levels among their schizophrenia patients, reasons for partial/nonadherence, their preferred methods of assessing adherence, and strategies to improve adherence. Responses are reported as mean and range across countries. Results Four thousand, six hundred sixty one psychiatrists (24% of recipients) completed the survey (highest contributors: People’s Republic of China, 1854; India, 1616). Psychiatrists perceived that 56% (range, 30%–71%) of schizophrenia patients were non- or partially adherent to medication. Patients discontinue medication primarily due to lack of insight into their condition (mean, 37%; 1%–65%) and because patients consider medication unnecessary when feeling better (mean, 27%; 15%–68%). Over half of psychiatrists (mean, 55%; 42%–99%) assess medication adherence at every visit, almost exclusively (81%) by asking their patients, versus quantitative measures. One in three psychiatrists expressed their preference to switch to or add a long-acting antipsychotic to improve adherence (15%–82%). Conclusions The substantial prevalence of partial/nonadherence to medication demonstrates that more proactive management of patients with schizophrenia is needed to improve adherence and thereby treatment outcomes. Registration Registration of this study was not required. PMID:23976858

  7. Study on effects of an atypical antipsychotic agent, quetiapine, on regional cerebral blood flow with 99mTc-ECD SPECT in drug-naive or unmedicated schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of intracerebral actions or clinical efficacies of quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent and a multi-action receptor targeting agent (MARTA), and the influences of quetiapine on absolute regional cerebral blood flows (rCBFs) of schizophrenic patients. Correlations between rCBFs and psychotic symptoms were also examined. Subjects comprised 12 patients who met the ICD-10 criteria for schizophrenia. All patients were drug-naive or unmedicated. Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD), rCBFs were measured. Psychotic symptoms were evaluated with positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). The evaluations of SPECT and PANSS were repeated before and after oral 2-week administration of quetiapine 300 mg/day in all patients and after subsequent 2-week administration of quetiapine 600 mg/day in 6 patients. Administration of quetiapine yielded no significant changes in rCBFs at any dose. And there were no significant correlations between the scores of PANSS and the values of rCBFs in any region, though the scores of PANSS decreased after qutiapine administration. It has been reported that, a typical antipsychotic agent, haloperidol, and an atypical antipsychotic agent, risperidone, decrease rCBFs in the cerebral cortex in dose-dependently in drug-naive or unmedicated schizophrenic patients. This phenomenon is considered to be attributable to a secondary inactivation of the cerebral cortex due to D2 receptor blockade of haloperidol or risperidone in the striatum through the cortico-striatal-thalamic pathway. In the frame of this hypothesis, results of this study may relate to the lower degree of D2 blockade induced by quetiapine than that produced by haloperidol and risperidone. (author)

  8. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Guo, Tong; Liu, Zheng-Rong; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Forester, Brent P.; Seiner, Stephen J.; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine) versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD), risk ratio (RR) ±95% confidence intervals (CIs), number needed to treat (NNT), and number needed to harm (NNH) were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks) were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1) symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (p<0.00001; I2 = 62%), separating the two groups as early as weeks 1–2 with an SMD of -0.58 (p<0.00001; I2 = 0%); (2) study-defined response (RR = 1.48, p<0.0001) with an NNT of 6 (CI = 4–9) and remission rate (RR = 2.18, p = 0.0002) with an NNT of 8 (CI = 6–16); (3) PANSS positive and general symptom sub-scores at endpoint with a WMD between -3.48 to -1.32 (P = 0.01 to 0.009). Subgroup analyses were conducted comparing double blind/rater-masked vs. open RCTs, those with and without randomization details, and high quality (Jadad≥adadup analyses were Jadad<3) studies. The ECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02) with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4–11) and memory impairment (p = 0.001) with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2–5). The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted) can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache. Trial registration CRD42014006689 (PROSPERO). PMID:27285996

  9. Improving physical health for people taking antipsychotic medication in the Community Learning Disabilities Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ian; Shah, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Adherence with antipsychotic monitoring guidelines is notoriously low nationally. Without active monitoring and measures to improve metabolic abnormalities, more patients may develop related morbidity and mortality. An audit highlighted antipsychotic monitoring in this learning disability service in London did not match guideline recommendations. People with intellectual disability also experience health inequalities. Psychiatrists are well placed to provide advice and assistance that is suitable for those with complex communication, behaviour, and social needs. The QI team tested ideas to increase rates of antipsychotic reviews. The focus was the follow up monitoring of all universal measures recommended by NICE 2014, collected at 2-weekly intervals. We trialled interventions in four broad categories; Intervention 1: to make monitoring more structured and planned; Intervention 2: to increase staff and patient awareness of healthy eating and exercise programs; Intervention 3: to increase the collection of diet and exercise histories from patients; Intervention 4: to improve the uptake of blood tests. The interventions created an improvement in monitoring. There are lessons in the methodology for others carrying out similar projects.

  10. Improving physical health for people taking antipsychotic medication in the Community Learning Disabilities Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ian; Shah, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Adherence with antipsychotic monitoring guidelines is notoriously low nationally. Without active monitoring and measures to improve metabolic abnormalities, more patients may develop related morbidity and mortality. An audit highlighted antipsychotic monitoring in this learning disability service in London did not match guideline recommendations. People with intellectual disability also experience health inequalities. Psychiatrists are well placed to provide advice and assistance that is suitable for those with complex communication, behaviour, and social needs. The QI team tested ideas to increase rates of antipsychotic reviews. The focus was the follow up monitoring of all universal measures recommended by NICE 2014, collected at 2-weekly intervals. We trialled interventions in four broad categories; Intervention 1: to make monitoring more structured and planned; Intervention 2: to increase staff and patient awareness of healthy eating and exercise programs; Intervention 3: to increase the collection of diet and exercise histories from patients; Intervention 4: to improve the uptake of blood tests. The interventions created an improvement in monitoring. There are lessons in the methodology for others carrying out similar projects. PMID:27335645

  11. Sex differences in concomitant medication with benzodiazepines or antidepressants in first-break schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, C.A.W.; Knegtering, H; Bruggeman, R; Tobi, H; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    2005-01-01

    During a first episode of psychosis, treatment with antipsychotic drugs can improve both positive and negative symptoms. If sufficient amelioration does not occur, adding psychotropic comedication may result in a favorable outcome. To establish sex differences in psychotropic comedication use, we co

  12. The use of antipsychotic medication in child and adolescent psychiatric treatment in Denmark. A cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deurell, Maria; Weischer, Merete; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine;

    2008-01-01

    patients in antipsychotic treatment were: schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, autism spectrum disorders and personality disorders. Monotherapy was used in 87% of cases. Sixty-four per cent of patients treated with antipsychotics, received a second-generation antipsychotic as the main treatment. All 244...

  13. Extrapyramidal syndromes caused by antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Extrapyramidal syndromes are significant side effects of antipsychotic therapy due to their severity, frequent occurrence and complications. This paper gives a brief summary of the literature with the emphasis on epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, as well as the treatment of extrapyramidal disorders induced by antipsychotics. Dystonia. Sustained muscle contractions cause twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. It may appear either as an acute or delayed, i.e. tardive sign. The incidence of dystonia is 2-3% among the patients treated with antipsychotics, and 50% among the ones cured with conventional antipsychotics. Akathisia. The main feature of this curious adverse effect is the psychomotor restlessness and the inability to remain motionless. Although akathisia is not very frequent, its incidence and prevalence ranges from 5 to 50% among the treated patients. It is most probably a result of the blockage of dopaminergic receptors. Parkinsonism. The most frequent secondary Parkinsonism is the one caused by drugs. The characteristic parkinsonian signs regress 4 to 16 weeks after the discontinuation of antipsychotic therapy. In the era of atypical antipsychotics this adverse effect appears less frequently. Tardive dyskinesia. Involuntary choreatic movements may appear days and months after the introduction of continuous use of antipsychotics. The individual susceptibility may play the major role in the development of this side effect. Conclusion. Numerous studies have compared conventional and atypical antipsychotics as well as atypical ones with one another in order to decrease the risk of development of extrapyramical side effects as well as to prevent their occurrence and improve their treatment.

  14. Are Clozapine Blood Dyscrasias Associated with Concomitant Medications?

    OpenAIRE

    Demler, Tammie Lee; Trigoboff, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent used for refractory schizophrenia. It has a relatively low affinity for D2 receptors and thus is associated with a lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects when compared with typical antipsychotics. Clozapine as monotherapy can induce a rare, but serious, blood dyscrasia called agranulocytosis; however, some concomitant medications may contribute to the risk. Examples of these medications are mood-stabilizing antiepileptic drugs, such as carb...

  15. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Fornaro; Brendon Stubbs; Domenico De Berardis; Giampaolo Perna; Alessandro Valchera; Nicola Veronese; Marco Solmi; Licínia Ganança

    2016-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs) associated with bipolar disorder (BD) is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo-) controlled trials (RCTs) or open-label...

  16. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  17. Predictors of antipsychotic monotherapy with olanzapine during a 1-year naturalistic study of schizophrenia patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wenyu Ye1, Haya Ascher-Svanum2, Jennifer A Flynn3, Yuka Tanji3, Michihiro Takahashi3,41Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories Japan, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, 4Terauchi-Takahashi Psychiatric Clinic, Ashiya, JapanPurpose: Although expert guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia recommend antipsychotic monotherapy, the use of antipsychotic polypharmacy is common. This study identified characteristics that differentiate patients with schizophrenia who are treated with olanzapine monotherapy versus polypharmacy in usual care in Japan.Patients and methods: In a large (N = 1850 prospective, observational study, Japanese patients with schizophrenia who initiated treatment with olanzapine were followed for 1 year. Consistent with past research, antipsychotic polypharmacy was defined as the concurrent use of olanzapine and another antipsychotic for at least 60 days. Switching was defined as discontinuing a prior antipsychotic therapy rather than augmenting the medication regimen. Predictors of antipsychotic monotherapy were based on information available at the time of olanzapine initiation. Baseline characteristics were compared using t-tests and Χ2 tests. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of monotherapy.Results: Patients treated with olanzapine monotherapy (43.2% differed from those treated with antipsychotic polypharmacy (56.8% on demographics, treatment history, baseline symptom levels, functional levels, and treatment-emergent adverse events. Stepwise logistic regression identified multiple variables that significantly predicted monotherapy: older age, shorter duration of schizophrenia, outpatient status, comorbid medical conditions, lower body mass index, no prior anticholinergic use, no prior mood stabilizer use, and switching from a previous antipsychotic (typical or atypical

  18. Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Polymorphisms and Metabolic Measures in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Patients Taking Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Burghardt, Kyle J.; Kristen N. Gardner; Johnson, Joshua W.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have become a common therapeutic option in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, these medications come with a high risk of metabolic side effects, particularly dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Therefore, identification of patients who are at increased risk for metabolic side effects is of great importance. The genetics of fatty acid metabolism is one area of research that may help identify such patients. Therefore, in this present study, we aimed to de...

  19. Trends in the access to and the use of antipsychotic medications and psychotropic co-treatments in Asian patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y-T; Ungvari, G S; Correll, C U; Chiu, H F K; Shinfuku, N

    2016-02-01

    To date, antipsychotics remain the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and related disorders although other psychotropic medications and non-pharmaceutical interventions have been used adjunctively in some patients and settings. Regular surveys on access to and prescription patterns of psychotropic medications in clinical practice are an important and efficient way of examining the use and time trends of treatments in a given population and region. Unlike developed Western countries, Asian countries have not fully undergone deinstitutionalisation of the severely and chronically mentally ill, and community-based mental health services are still under-developed. As a result, a large number of psychiatric patients still receive treatments in psychiatric hospitals. Moreover, there have been very limited studies examining access to and prescription patterns of psychotropic medications for schizophrenia patients in Asian countries. In this paper, we focus on the only international project on the use of psychotropic medications in schizophrenia patients in selected East and Southeast Asian countries/territories summarising its major findings. Most of the first- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs) are available in Asian countries, but the access to psychotropic medications is largely affected by socio-cultural and historical contexts, health insurance schemes, health care policy, medication cost and consumers' preference across different countries/territories. Overall, the proportional use of FGAs, high dose antipsychotic treatment and antipsychotic polypharmacy have decreased, while the use of SGAs and antidepressants have increased and the utilisation of benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers has remained relatively stable over time. However, within these general trends, there is great inter-country variation regarding the psychotropic prescribing patterns and trends in Asian schizophrenia patients that also seems to differ from data in many Western

  20. How pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication: a conversation analytic study of psychiatric outpatient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Alan; Chaplin, Rob; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The professional identity of psychiatry depends on it being regarded as one amongst many medical specialties and sharing ideals of good practice with other specialties, an important marker of which is the achievement of shared decision-making and avoiding a reputation for being purely agents of social control. Yet the interactions involved in trying to achieve shared decision-making are relatively unexplored in psychiatry. This study analyses audiotapes of 92 outpatient consultations involving nine consultant psychiatrists focusing on how pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication. Detailed conversation analysis reveals that some shared decisions are considerably more pressured than others. At one end of a spectrum of pressure are pressured shared decisions, characterised by an escalating cycle of pressure and resistance from which it is difficult to exit without someone losing face. In the middle are directed decisions, where the patient cooperates with being diplomatically steered by the psychiatrist. At the other extreme are open decisions where the patient is allowed to decide, with the psychiatrist exerting little or no pressure. Directed and open decisions occurred most frequently; pressured decisions were rarer. Patient risk did not appear to influence the degree of pressure applied in these outpatient consultations. PMID:21812791

  1. Trends in the use of antipsychotics in the Israeli inpatient population, 2004–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ponizovsky, Alexander M.; Marom, Eli; Ben-Laish, Michal; Barash, Igor; Weizman, Abraham; Schwartzberg, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Background Although serious mental illneses are treated with both typical and atypical antipsychotic grugs, trends in their use in psychiatric inpatient population in Israel are unrecognized. The aim of this study was to detect trends in the use of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs in the Israeli inpatient psychiatric population throughout the last decade. Methods Data regarding allocation of typical and atypical antipsychotics, over the period 2004 to 2013, were extracted from the ele...

  2. [Anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in the treatment of bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ricardo Alberto; Moreno, Doris Hupfeld; Soares, Márcia Britto de Macedo; Ratzke, Roberto

    2004-10-01

    Bipolar disorder is a complex medical condition, and up to the date there is no single treatment with proven efficacy in the control of all aspects of the illness. The available literature on the use of anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, clonazepam) and atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole) for acute and prophylactic treatment of bipolar disorder was reviewed. There is a large amount of evidence that lithium is efficacious in the prophylaxis of episodes and better for acute mania than for depressive episodes. Other data show that carbamazepine and valproate are effective in acute manic episodes. Lamotrigine has been shown to reduce cycling and effective in depressive episodes. Based on the available data, olanzapine was found to be the most appropriate atypical antipsychotic agent for the treatment of manic bipolar patients, although there are also studies suggesting the efficacy of risperidone, aripiprazole and clozapine. The preliminary data evaluating the efficacy of quetiapine and ziprasidone in bipolar disorder are still very limited. There is no consistent information supporting the prophylactic use of newer antipsychotics. PMID:15597138

  3. Maintenance of response with atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a post-hoc analysis of 5 double-blind, randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How long an antipsychotic is effective in maintaining response is important in choosing the correct treatment for people with schizophrenia. This post-hoc analysis describes maintenance of response over 24 or 28 weeks in people treated for schizophrenia with olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, or aripiprazole. Methods This was a post-hoc analysis using data from 5 double-blind, randomized, comparative trials of 24 or 28 weeks duration in which olanzapine was compared to risperidone (1 study; N = 339, quetiapine (1 study; N = 346, ziprasidone (2 studies; N = 548 and 394 or aripiprazole (1 study; N = 566 for treatment of schizophrenia. For each study, time to loss of response in patients who met criteria for response at Week 8 and the proportion of patients who lost response following Week 8 were compared by treatment group. The number needed to treat (NNT with olanzapine rather than comparator to avoid loss of one additional responder over 24 or 28 weeks of treatment was calculated for each study. Results Time maintained in response was significantly longer (p Conclusion During 24 and 28 weeks of treatment, the antipsychotics studied differed in the time that treated patients with schizophrenia remained in response and the proportion of patients who lost response. Olanzapine treatment resulted in a consistent and statistically significant advantage in maintenance of response compared to treatment with risperidone, quetiapine and ziprasidone; but not compared to treatment with aripiprazole.

  4. Discovery of novel heteroarylazole N-phenylpiperazine prototypes candidates to atypic antipsychotic drugs [Descoberta de novos protótipos N-fenilpiperazínicos heteroarilazólicos candidatos a fármacos antipsicóticos atípicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresa H. Betti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the discovery of new N-phenylpiperazine prototypes belonging to pyrazole series,i.e. LASSBio-579 (10a, or to 1,2,3-triazole series, represented by LASSBio-581 (10c, which were designed fromthe structural simplification of the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine (8. The evaluation of the affinity andintrinsic activity profiles of LASSBio-579 and LASSBio-581 indicate its ability to bind dopamine receptors fromD2-like family, acting as pre-synaptic agonists. Additionally, the investigation of the antipsychotic properties ofthese two prototypes in behavioral models has confirmed its effectiveness, which is also dependent on themodulation of serotoninergic receptors 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A. The pronounced antipsychotic effect evidenced forthese N-phenylpiperazine derivatives through in vivo pharmacological assays confirmed their importance asnew neuroactive drug-candidate prototypes for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  5. Efficacy and safety of blonanserin versus other antipsychotics: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant D. Patil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many atypical antipsychotics are available, there is a need of an atypical antipsychotic effective in all symptom domains of schizophrenia and well tolerated especially for side effects like extrapyramidal side effects, weight gain and blood prolactin elevation. Blonanserin is an atypical antipsychotic which blocks dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptors. Its efficacy and safety has been studied in patients with schizophrenia and delirium. Blonanserin is found to be effective and well tolerated in both conditions. This article has reviewed efficacy and tolerability of blonanserin in these two psychiatry diseases. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 689-692

  6. O papel dos antipsicóticos atípicos no tratamento do transtorno bipolar: revisão da literatura The role of atypical antipsychotic agents in the treatment of bipolar disorder: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acioly LT Lacerda

    2002-03-01

    disorder, especially in the acute manic phase. Recently new alternatives have become available with the development of newer atypical antipsychotic agents. A comprehensive Medline search was conducted, and all available literature concerning the role of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of bipolar patients was retrieved. Olanzapine showed to be quite effective in the treatment of acute mania, and it was found that an average of 63.5% of the patients had a significant improvement in double blind controlled studies, with weight gain as the major side effect. Data was less robust for clozapine and risperidone, mainly due to methodological limitations of the few available studies. It was also found a considerable interest in future investigating the efficacy of these pharmacological agents in refractory cases and in the treatment of the disorder's depressive phase. Additionally, there has been extensive interest in evaluating their potential action as mood stabilizers, for which there will be a need of longer-term longitudinal studies.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Financial Incentives to Promote Adherence to Depot Antipsychotic Medication: Economic Evaluation of a Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Henderson

    Full Text Available Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis can promote adherence to depot antipsychotic medication, but the cost-effectiveness of this approach has not been examined.Economic evaluation within a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial. 141 patients under the care of 73 teams (clusters were randomised to intervention or control; 138 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizo-affective disorder or bipolar disorder participated. Intervention participants received £15 per depot injection over 12 months, additional to usual acute, mental and community primary health services. The control group received usual health services. Main outcome measures: incremental cost per 20% increase in adherence to depot antipsychotic medication; incremental cost of 'good' adherence (defined as taking at least 95% of the prescribed number of depot medications over the intervention period.Economic and outcome data for baseline and 12-month follow-up were available for 117 participants. The adjusted difference in adherence between groups was 12.2% (73.4% control vs. 85.6% intervention; the adjusted costs difference was £598 (95% CI -£4,533, £5,730. The extra cost per patient to increase adherence to depot medications by 20% was £982 (95% CI -£8,020, £14,000. The extra cost per patient of achieving 'good' adherence was £2,950 (CI -£19,400, £27,800. Probability of cost-effectiveness exceeded 97.5% at willingness-to-pay values of £14,000 for a 20% increase in adherence and £27,800 for good adherence.Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis is cost-effective in promoting adherence to depot antipsychotic medication. Direct healthcare costs (including costs of the financial incentive are unlikely to be increased by this intervention.ISRCTN.com 77769281.

  8. Paliperidone palmitate and risperidone long-acting injectable in subjects with schizophrenia recently treated with oral risperidone or other oral antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Alphs L; Bossie CA; Sliwa JK; Fu DJ; Ma YW; Hulihan J

    2013-01-01

    Larry Alphs,1 Cynthia A Bossie,1 Jennifer Kern Sliwa,2 Dong-Jing Fu,1 Yi-Wen Ma,3 Joseph Hulihan11CNS Medical Affairs, 2Medical Information, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 3Biostatistics, B&P, Janssen Research & Development LLC, Titusville, NJ, USABackground: This post hoc subgroup analysis of a randomized, double-blind trial evaluated the response to treatment with two long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics, ie, paliperidone palmitate and risper...

  9. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs associated with bipolar disorder (BD is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo- controlled trials (RCTs or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI. Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS (SMD −0.74, 95% CI −1.20 to −0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652. Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979 experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS scores (SMD −1.08, 95% CI −1.35 to −0.81, p < 0.001 vs. placebo (n = 678. Publication and measurement biases and relative paucity of studies. Overall, SGAs appear to offer favorable improvements in MADRS and YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable

  10. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Stubbs, Brendon; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Valchera, Alessandro; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Ganança, Licínia

    2016-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs) associated with bipolar disorder (BD) is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo-) controlled trials (RCTs) or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports) representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-)manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) (SMD -0.74, 95% CI -1.20 to -0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652). Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979) experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores (SMD -1.08, 95% CI -1.35 to -0.81, p YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable and clinically definitive conclusions. PMID:26891297

  11. The Influence of Cytochrome P450 Pharmacogenetics on Disposition of Common Antidepressant and Antipsychotic Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weide, Jan; Hinrichs, John WJ

    2006-01-01

    Since the identification of all the major drug-metabolising cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and their major gene variants, pharmacogenetics has had a major impact on psychotherapeutic drug therapy. CYP enzymes are responsible for the metabolism of most clinically used drugs. Individual variability in CYP activity is an important reason for drug therapy failure. Variability in CYP activity may be caused by various factors, including endogenous factors such as age, gender and morbidity as well as exogenous factors such as co-medication, food components and smoking habit. However, polymorphisms, present in most CYP genes, are responsible for a substantial part of this variability. Although CYP genotyping has been shown to predict the majority of aberrant phenotypes, it is currently rarely performed in clinical practice. PMID:16886044

  12. Antipsychotic Medications in Major Depression and the Association with Treatment Satisfaction and Quality of Life:Findings of Three National Surveys on Use of Psychotropics in China Between 2002 and 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Xi Wang; Yu-Tao Xian; Yun-Ai Su; Qian Li; Liang Shu; Chee H Ng; Gabor S Ungvari

    2015-01-01

    Background:Optimizing treatment outcomes for depression requires understanding of how evidence-based treatments are utilized in clinical practice.Antipsychotic medications concurrent with antidepressant treatment are frequently used in major depression,but few studies have investigated trends and patterns of their use over time.This study aimed to examine the prescription patterns of antipsychotic medications for major depression in China from 2002 to 2012 and their association with treatment satisfaction and quality of life (QOL).Methods:A total of 3655 subjects with major depression treated in 45 Chinese psychiatric hospitals/centers nationwide were interviewed between 2002 and 2012.Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics including psychopathology,medication side effects,satisfaction with treatment and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection.Results:The frequency ofantipsychotic use was 24.9% in the whole sample;the corresponding figures were 17.1%,20.3%,and 32.8% in 2002,2006,and 2012,respectively (x2 =90.3,df=2,P < 0.001).Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that patients on concurrent antipsychotics had significantly more delusions or hallucinations,longer illness duration,greater side effects,and more likely to be treated as inpatients and in major hospitals (i.e.,Levcl-Ⅲ hospital).Antipsychotic use was associated with lower treatment satisfaction while there was no significant difference with respect to physical and mental QOL between the antipsychotic and nonantipsychotic groups.Conclusions:Concurrent antipsychotic use was found in about one in four treated depressed patients in China,which has increased over a 10-year period.Considering the association of drug-induced side effects and the lack of patients' and relatives' satisfaction with antipsychotic treatment,further examination of the rationale and appropriateness of the use of antipsychotics in depression is needed.

  13. Association between antipsychotics and weight gain among psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Rashid AM

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been known for a long time that use of antipsychotics, particularly atypical antipsychotics, is associated with weight gain and increase in risk of metabolic disturbances. In this study we have tried to find out if use of antipsychotics is associated with increase in weight and body mass index (BMI in the Pakistani population. Methods We performed a case note review of all patients who had been prescribed antipsychotic medication at the psychiatry outpatient clinic of a tertiary care university hospital in Pakistan over a 4-year period. Results A total of 50% of patients had a BMI in the overweight or higher range at baseline. Patients showed a mean weight gain of 1.88 kg from baseline in 3 months and 3.29 kg in 6 months. Both of these values were statistically significant. The increase in mean BMI from baseline was 0.74 and 1.3 in 3 months and 6 months, respectively. In patients for whom we had at least one further weight measurement after baseline, 48% (39/81 showed a clinically significant weight gain. Conclusion Pakistani patients are just as likely to put on weight during antipsychotic treatment as patients from other countries. Considering that this population already has a much higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus compared to the Western countries, the consequences of increased weight may be even more serious in terms of increased morbidity and mortality.

  14. Screening for metabolic syndrome in long-term psychiatric illness: Audit of patients receiving depot antipsychotic medication at a psychiatry clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carminda O'Callaghan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Metabolic syndrome (visceral obesity, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, hypertension is a substantial public health problem, especially amongst individuals receiving antipsychotic medication. Methods: We studied routine screening practices for metabolic syndrome amongst psychiatry outpatients receiving injected depot anti-psychotic medication at a clinic in Dublin, Ireland. Results: Our initial audit (n = 64 demonstrated variable levels of documentation of criteria for metabolic syndrome in outpatient files; e.g. weight was recorded in 1.6% of files, serum high density lipoprotein in 12.5%. As our intervention, we introduced a screening check-list comprising risk factors and criteria for metabolic syndrome, based on the definition of the International Diabetes Federation. Re-audit (n = 54 demonstrated significantly improved levels of documentation; e.g. weight was recorded in 61.1% of files. Notwithstanding these improvements, only 11 (20.4% of 54 patient files examined in the re-audit, contained sufficient information to determine whether or not the patient fulfilled criteria for metabolic syndrome; of these, 3 patients (27.3% fulfilled criteria for metabolic syndrome. There was, however, significant additional morbidity in relation to individual criteria (waist circumference, serum triglyceride level, systolic blood pressure and serum fasting glucose. Conclusions: We recommend enhanced attention be paid to metabolic morbidity in this patient group.

  15. Feedback on SMS reminders to encourage adherence among patients taking antipsychotic medication: a cross-sectional survey nested within a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannisto, Kati Anneli; Adams, Clive E; Koivunen, Marita; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore feedback on tailored SMS reminders to encourage medication adherence and outpatient treatment among patients taking antipsychotic medication, and associations related to the feedback. Design A cross-sectional survey nested within a nationwide randomised clinical trial (“Mobile.Net” ISRCTN27704027). Setting Psychiatric outpatient care in Finland. Participants Between September 2012 and December 2013, 403 of 558 adults with antipsychotic medication responded after 12 months of SMS intervention. Main outcome measure Feedback was gathered with a structured questionnaire based on Technology Acceptance Model theory. Data were analysed by Pearson's χ2 test, binary logistic regression and stepwise multiple regression analyses. Results Almost all participants (98%) found the SMS reminders easy to use and 87% felt that the SMS did not cause harm. About three-quarters (72%) were satisfied with the SMS received, and 61% found it useful. Divorced people were particularly prone to find SMS reminders useful (χ2=13.17, df=6, p=0.04), and people seeking employment were more often ‘fully satisfied’ with the SMS compared with other groups (χ2=10.82, df=4, p=0.029). People who were older at first contact with psychiatric services were more often ‘fully satisfied’ than younger groups (OR=1.02, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.04, p=0.007). Conclusions The feedback of patients taking antipsychotic medication on SMS services was generally positive. Overall, people were quite satisfied despite considerable variation in their sociodemographic background and illness history. Our results endorse that the use of simple easy-to-use existing technology, such as mobile phones and SMS, is acceptable in psychiatric outpatient services. Moreover, people using psychiatric outpatient services are able to use this technology. This acceptable and accessible technology can be easily tailored to each patient's needs and could be customised to the needs of the isolated or jobless

  16. Review of the efficacy of placebo in comparative clinical trials between typical and atypical antipsychotics Revisão da eficácia do placebo nos ensaios clínicos que comparam antipsicóticos típicos e atípicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irismar Reis de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the efficacy of placebo in comparison with atypical and typical antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder and to evaluate the pertinence of using placebo in clinical trials with antipsychotics. METHOD: Trials in which the atypical antipsychotics were compared with typical antipsychotics and placebo were included. A search was conducted using the terms "amisulpride", "aripiprazole", "clozapine", "olanzapine", "quetiapine", "risperidone", "sertindole", "ziprasidone" and "zotepine". Main efficacy parameters were calculated using the proportion of "events" (defined as a deterioration or lack of improvement by at least 20% in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale or Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and the pooled relative risk with random effects, with their respective 95% confidence intervals. We also calculated the necessary sample sizes in studies in which the study drug is compared to a typical antipsychotic or placebo. RESULTS: The pooled efficacy rates observed were 40.8%, 34.9% and 21.3% for the atypical antipsychotics, typical antipsychotics and placebo, respectively. One hundred and sixty six patients would have to be included when a new drug is compared with placebo if calculation is based on a difference of 20% found between the atypical antipsychotic and placebo and 2,054 if the difference sought were that found between the atypical antipsychotic and the typical antipsychotic, i.e. 6%. The estimated therapeutic failures would be 115 of the 166 patients when the study drug is compared with placebo, and 1,274 failures in the 2,054 patients when the study drug is compared to the typical antipsychotic. CONCLUSIONS: Placebo controlled studies may reduce the number of individuals exposed to the harmful effects of ineffective drugs.OBJETIVO: Revisar a eficácia do placebo em comparação com a dos antipsicóticos atípicos e típicos no tratamento da esquizofrenia e do transtorno

  17. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Gaviria

    Full Text Available The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes.To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain.A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized database of 1,765 patients with schizophrenia treated between 2011 and 2013.The most used antipsychotic was risperidone, identified in 463 (26.3% patients, followed by olanzapine in 249 (14.1%, paliperidone in 225 (12.7%, zuclopenthixol in 201 (11.4%, quetiapine in 141 (8%, aripiprazole in 100 (5.7%, and clozapine in 100 (5.7%. Almost 8 out of 10 patients (79.3% were treated with atypical or second-generation antipsychotics. Long-acting injectable (LAI formulations were used in 44.8% of patients. Antipsychotics were generally prescribed in their recommended doses, with clozapine, ziprasidone, LAI paliperidone, and LAI risperidone being prescribed at the higher end of their therapeutic ranges. Almost 7 out of 10 patients (69.6% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy, and 81.4% were on psychiatric medications aside from antipsychotics. Being prescribed quetiapine (OR 14.24, 95% CI 4.94-40.97, LAI (OR 9.99, 95% CI 6.45-15.45, psychiatric co-medications (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.72-6.64, and paliperidone (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.23-7.92 were all associated with an increased likelihood of polypharmacy. Being prescribed risperidone (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.35-0.83 and older age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99 were related to a low polypharmacy probability.Polypharmacy is the most common pattern of antipsychotic use in this region of Spain. Use of atypical antipsychotics is extensive. Most patients receive psychiatric co-medications such as anxiolytics or antidepressants. Polypharmacy is associated with the use of quetiapine or

  18. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: patient perspectives and the clinical utility of paliperidone ER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael; Sharif, Zafar

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic medications provide the foundation for treatment of acute exacerbations as well as relapse prevention in patients with schizophrenia as demonstrated by rigorous placebo-controlled trials. However, despite their proven effectiveness, poor adherence to prescribed antipsychotic regimens remains the most important driver of suboptimal clinical outcomes in this population. This paper reviews the magnitude of the problem of medication non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia and the various factors that contribute to non-adherence, with particular emphasis on factors related to antipsychotic medications. The profile of the latest atypical antipsychotic, paliperidone extended-release (ER) tablets, is then reviewed and the implications of its unique pharmacokinetic profile for adherence in this patient population are discussed. PMID:19920968

  19. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: patient perspectives and the clinical utility of paliperidone ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Birnbaum

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Birnbaum1, Zafar Sharif21St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, 1111 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY, USA; 2Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Antipsychotic medications provide the foundation for treatment of acute exacerbations as well as relapse prevention in patients with schizophrenia as demonstrated by rigorous placebo-controlled trials. However, despite their proven effectiveness, poor adherence to prescribed antipsychotic regimens remains the most important driver of suboptimal clinical outcomes in this population. This paper reviews the magnitude of the problem of medication non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia and the various factors that contribute to nonadherence, with particular emphasis on factors related to antipsychotic medications. The profile of the latest atypical antipsychotic, paliperidone extended-release (ER tablets, is then reviewed and the implications of its unique pharmacokinetic profile for adherence in this patient population are discussed.Keywords: schizophrenia, adherence, paliperidone, pharmacokinetics

  20. Antipsychotic Management of Schizoaffective Disorder: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Kaur, Amandeep

    2016-04-01

    Schizoaffective disorder (SAD) is an incapacitating illness that presents clinicians with challenges in terms of both its diagnosis and its psychopharmacological management. Most studies conducted on the psychopharmacological treatment of SAD also include patients with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses, thereby providing an unspecific view to the clinician as to the best way of treating patients with SAD. The objective of this article is to review studies on evidence-based treatment of patients with SAD. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PubMed for full-text studies in the English language using the terms 'Schizoaffective and treatment' or 'antipsychotic schizoaffective'. Our review found relatively few studies with either an active comparator or placebo that examined the efficacy of antipsychotics for patients with SAD without an admixture of patients with schizophrenia. Only oral paliperidone extended release (ER), paliperidone long-acting injection (LAI), and risperidone have been shown to be effective and safe in reducing psychotic as well as affective components in acutely ill SAD patients in controlled studies. Paliperidone ER and LAI have also been shown to be efficacious in the maintenance treatment phase of SAD patients. While no supportive data exist, it is possible that other atypical antipsychotics may have similar efficacy to the two mentioned above. We conclude with a number of research recommendations for the study of treatment options for patients with SAD. First, there is a need for studies with patients specifically diagnosed with SAD for both the acute and the maintenance phase. The sample size needs to be adequate to allow a primary analysis of efficacy and to allow for analysis of the SAD subtypes: depressed and bipolar. Another recommendation is the need for studies of patients with SAD stratified into patients with and without mood stabilizers or antidepressants to allow the examination of the adjunctive role of

  1. Discovery of a new class of potential multifunctional atypical antipsychotic agents targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors: design, synthesis, and effects on behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Campiani, Giuseppe;

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine D(3) antagonism combined with serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor occupancy may represent a novel paradigm for developing innovative antipsychotics. The unique pharmacological features of 5i are a high affinity for dopamine D(3), serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, together w...

  2. Half a century of antipsychotics and still a central role for dopamine D2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Shitij; Mamo, David

    2003-10-01

    A review of the history of antipsychotics reveals that while the therapeutic effects of chlorpromazine and reserpine were discovered and actively researched almost concurrently, subsequent drug development has been restricted to drugs acting on postsynaptic receptors rather than modulation of dopamine release. The fundamental property of atypical antipsychotics is their ability to produce an antipsychotic effect in the absence of extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) or prolactin elevation. Modulation of the dopamine D2 receptor remains both necessary and sufficient for antipsychotic drug action, with affinity to the D2-receptor being the single most important discriminator between a typical and atypical drug profile. Most antipsychotics, including atypical antipsychotics, show a dose-dependent threshold of D2 receptor occupancy for their therapeutic effects, although the precise threshold is different for different drugs. Some atypical antipsychotics do not appear to reach the threshold for EPS and prolactin elevation, possibly accounting for their atypical nature. To link the biological theories of antipsychotics to their psychological effects, a hypothesis is proposed wherein psychosis is a state of aberrant salience of stimuli and ideas, and antipsychotics, via modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system, dampen the salience of these symptoms. Thus, antipsychotics do not excise psychosis: they provide the neurochemical platform for the resolution of symptoms. Future generations of antipsychotics may need to move away from a "one-size-fits-all polypharmacy-in-a-pill" approach to treat all the different aspects of schizophrenia. At least in theory a preferred approach would be the development of specific treatments for the different dimensions of schizophrenia (e.g., positive, negative, cognitive, and affective) that can be flexibly used and titrated in the service of patients' presenting psychopathology. PMID:14642968

  3. Hyperglycemic adverse events following antipsychotic drug administration in spontaneous adverse event reports

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Yamato; Umetsu, Ryogo; Abe, Junko; Ueda, Natsumi; NAKAYAMA, Yoko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; NAKAMURA, MITSUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics are potent dopamine antagonists used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between antipsychotic drugs and adverse hyperglycemic events using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. In particular, we focused on adverse hyperglycemic events associated with atypical antipsychotic use, which are major concerns. Findings We analyzed reports of adverse hyperglycemic events associated with 26 an...

  4. Safety and efficacy of antipsychotic drugs for the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic drugs are commonly used in the treatment of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Materials and Methods: We present a qualitative review of the data on the efficacy and safety of antipsychotic drugs for BPSD. We more specifically examine safety issues with an especial focus on recent research. We examine two safety studies in detail to provide readers with a critical perspective. Results: Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs both attenuate...

  5. Differences in frontal cortical activation by a working memory task after substitution of risperidone for typical antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Honey, Garry D; Bullmore, Edward T.; Soni, William; Varatheesan, Malini; Williams, Steve C R; Sharma, Tonmoy

    1999-01-01

    Antipsychotic drug treatment of schizophrenia may be complicated by side effects of widespread dopaminergic antagonism, including exacerbation of negative and cognitive symptoms due to frontal cortical hypodopaminergia. Atypical antipsychotics have been shown to enhance frontal dopaminergic activity in animal models. We predicted that substitution of risperidone for typical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia would be associated with enhanced functional activation of frontal...

  6. Calcium Signaling Pathway Is Associated with the Long-Term Clinical Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) and SSRI with Antipsychotics in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Hidehiro; Numata, Shusuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Nishi, Akira; Nakataki, Masahito; Imoto, Issei; Sumitani, Satsuki; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are established first-line pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), while antipsychotics are used as an augmentation strategy for SSRI in OCD patients who have either no response or a partial response to SSRI treatment. The goal of the present study was to identify genetic variants and pathways that are associated with the long-term clinical response of OCD patients to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics. Methods We first performed a genome-wide association study of 96 OCD patients to examine genetic variants contributing to the response to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics. Subsequently, we conducted pathway-based analyses by using Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS) to examine the combined effects of genetic variants on the clinical response in OCD. Results While we failed to detect specific genetic variants associated with clinical responses to SSRI or to SSRI with an atypical antipsychotic at genome-wide levels of significance, we identified 8 enriched pathways for the SSRI treatment response and 5 enriched pathways for the treatment response to SSRI with an antipsychotic medication. Notably, the calcium signaling pathway was identified in both treatment responses. Conclusions Our results provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the variability in clinical response to SSRI and SSRI with antipsychotics in OCD patients. PMID:27281126

  7. Use and safety of antipsychotics in behavioral disorders in elderly people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareri, Pietro; De Fazio, Pasquale; Manfredi, Valeria Graziella Laura; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the use of antipsychotics has been widely debated for reasons concerning their safety in elderly patients affected with dementia. To update the use of antipsychotics in elderly demented people, a MEDLINE search was conducted using the following terms: elderly, conventional and atypical antipsychotics, adverse events, dementia, and behavioral and psychotic symptoms in dementia (BPSD). Owing to the large amounts of studies on antipsychotics, we mostly restricted the field of research to the last 10 years. Conventional antipsychotics have been widely used for BPSD; some studies showed they have an efficacy superior to placebo only at high doses, but they are associated with several and severe adverse effects. Atypical antipsychotics showed an efficacy superior to placebo in randomized studies in BPSD treatment, with a better tolerability profile versus conventional drugs. However, in 2002, trials with risperidone and olanzapine in elderly patients affected with dementia-related psychoses suggested the possible increase in cerebrovascular adverse events. Drug regulatory agencies issued specific recommendations for underlining that treatment of BPSD with atypical antipsychotics is "off-label." Conventional antipsychotics showed the same likelihood to increase the risk of death in the elderly as atypical agents, and they should not replace the atypical agents discontinued by Food and Drug Administration warnings. Before prescribing an antipsychotic drug, the following are factors to be seriously considered: the presence of cardiovascular diseases, QTc interval on electrocardiogram, electrolytic imbalances, familiar history for torsades des pointes, concomitant treatments, and use of drugs able to lengthen QTc. Use of antipsychotics in dementia needs a careful case-by-case assessment, together with the possible drug-drug, drug-disease, and drug-food interactions. PMID:24158020

  8. Monitoring and documentation of side effects from depot antipsychotic medication: an interdisciplinary audit of practice in a regional mental health service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cleary, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this audit was to review current practice within a rural mental health service area on the monitoring and documentation of side effects of antipsychotic depot medication. Following a review of the literature on best practice internationally, an evidence based audit tool was adapted. A sample of 60 case files, care plans and prescriptions were audited between January and May 2010. This represented 31% of the total number of service users receiving depot injections in the mental health service region (n=181). The audit results revealed that most service users had an annual documented medical review and a documented prescription. However, only 5 (8%) case notes examined had documentation recorded describing the condition of the injection site and alternation of the injection site was recorded in only 28 (47%) case notes. No case notes examined had written consent to commence treatment recorded, and only 3 (5%) of case notes had documented that information on the depot injection and side effects was given. In 57 (95%) of case notes no documentation of recorded information on the depot and on side effects was given. Documentation of physical observations and tests revealed that 58% of cases had full blood count, liver function tests, thyroid function tests and fasting lipids recorded. All other tests (i.e. temperature, pulse, respirations, blood pressure, ECG) were recorded in less than 50% of cases. Prolactin levels were not recorded in any case. The lack of written consent was partly attributed to lack of recording of consent. The failure to monitor and record some\\r\

  9. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuardi A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD, a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. The antipsychotic-like properties of CBD have been investigated in animal models using behavioral and neurochemical techniques which suggested that CBD has a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The results of two studies on healthy volunteers using perception of binocular depth inversion and ketamine-induced psychotic symptoms supported the proposal of the antipsychotic-like properties of CBD. In addition, open case reports of schizophrenic patients treated with CBD and a preliminary report of a controlled clinical trial comparing CBD with an atypical antipsychotic drug have confirmed that this cannabinoid can be a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Future studies of CBD in other psychotic conditions such as bipolar disorder and comparative studies of its antipsychotic effects with those produced by clozapine in schizophrenic patients are clearly indicated.

  10. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Margaret E; Albright, Victoria A; Yoon, Joanna; Council, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to have abuse potential, is now being subject to misuse and abuse (MUA; ie, taken when not prescribed for them or used in a way other than instructed by their health professional). Here we present systematic, nationally representative data from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for prevalence of emergency department (ED) visits among the U.S. general population involving quetiapine and related to MUA, suicide attempts, and adverse reactions. Nationally, quetiapine-related ED visits increased 90% between 2005 and 2011, from 35,581 ED visits to 67,497. DAWN data indicate that when used without medical supervision for recreational/self-medication purposes, quetiapine poses health risks for its users, especially among polydrug users and women. These findings suggest that the medical and public health communities should increase vigilance concerning this drug and its potential for MUA. PMID:26056465

  11. Cardiovascular safety of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polcwiartek, Christoffer; Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Schjerning, Ole; Graff, Claus; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2016-01-01

    cardiovascular risk factors. Areas covered: This clinical overview summarizes the cardiovascular safety of antipsychotics by focusing on the wide range of associated adverse effects. In addition, we also discuss current guidelines regarding routine electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. Expert opinion: As SCD in......, as this may increase risk of Torsades de Pointes and eventually SCD. However, other serious cardiovascular complications of antipsychotics also include Brugada syndrome phenotype, myocardial infarction, and myocarditis. Increased awareness of the cardiovascular safety of antipsychotics can allow...

  12. Preliminary examination of microRNA expression profiling in bipolar disorder I patients during antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chor Hong; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Kanagasundram, Sharmilla; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-09-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in research and development of antipsychotic medications for bipolar disorder (BPD), knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder and the action of atypical antipsychotics remains incomplete. The levels of microRNAs (miRNAs)-small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression, including genes involved in neuronal function and plasticity-are frequently altered in psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to examine changes in miRNA expression in bipolar mania patients after treatment with asenapine and risperidone. Using a miRNA microarray, we analyzed miRNA expression in the blood of 10 bipolar mania patients following 12 weeks of treatment with asenapine or risperidone. Selected miRNAs were validated by using real-time PCR. A total of 16 miRNAs were differentially expressed after treatment in the asenapine group, 14 of which were significantly upregulated and the other two significantly downregulated. However, all three differentially expressed miRNAs in the risperidone group were downregulated. MiRNA target gene prediction and gene ontology analysis revealed significant enrichment for pathways associated with immune system response and regulation of programmed cell death and transcription. Our results suggest that candidate miRNAs may be involved in the mechanism of action of both antipsychotics in bipolar mania. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177356

  13. Guidelines for the use of second-generation long-acting antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jarema

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Long-acting injectable antipsychotics constitute a valuable alternative for the treatment of psychotic disorders, mainly schizophrenia. They assure a more stable drug level, improve treatment compliance, and increase the chances for favorable and long-lasting improvement. Additionally, the long-acting second-generation antipsychotics combine the values of long-acting injectable drugs with the values of atypical antipsychotics. Four second generation long-acting antipsychotics have been described: risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole and paliperidone. The indications for their use, treatment strategy, tolerance, and potential interactions are discussed.

  14. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Extrapyramidal Adverse Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovcevski, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest), high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability. PMID:24995318

  15. Eficácia e segurança dos antipsicóticos atípicos nas demências: uma revisão sistemática Efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotics in dementia: a sistematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Guarieiro Ramos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O emprego de antipsicóticos atípicos (AA no tratamento de sintomas psicológicos e comportamentais das demências (SPCD tem sido alvo de discussão em relação à eficácia e à segurança. O objetivo deste artigo é propiciar atualização sobre o tema. MÉTODOS: Revisão da literatura publicada nos últimos dez anos com ênfase em metanálises e ensaios clínicos randomizados (ECR controlados com placebo. RESULTADOS: Três metanálises e nove ensaios clínicos foram analisados. Há evidências de eficácia clínica para risperidona (1mg/dia, olanzapina (5 a 10mg/dia e aripiprazol (2 a 15mg/dia no tratamento de agressividade e/ou SPCD em geral, e para risperidona (1mg/dia no tratamento de sintomas psicóticos associados à demência. Os eventos adversos comuns com o uso de AA foram sonolência, sintomas extrapiramidais (SEP, incontinência ou infecção do trato urinário e alterações de marcha. O tratamento com AA associou-se a maior risco de eventos cerebrovasculares e de mortalidade em idosos com demência. CONCLUSÃO: Baixas dosagens de risperidona, olanzapina e aripiprazol são eficazes na redução de agressividade e/ou SPCD globais; risperidona é eficaz na redução de sintomas psicóticos associados à demência. Em virtude de esses tratamentos associarem-se a pequeno aumento no risco de eventos cerebrovasculares e mortalidade, seu uso deve ser reservado para sintomatologia moderada/grave.OBJECTIVE: Concerns have been raised about efficacy and adverse events of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD. This paper is an update on current evidence of this theme. METHODS: Review of published meta-analysis and randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs in the last ten years. RESULTS: Three meta-analysis and nine RCTs were evaluated. Evidence suggests that risperidone (1mg/day, olanzapine (5 to 10mg/day, and aripiprazole (2 to 15mg/day are effective in treating

  16. Atypical Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Ertekin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypical depression is defined as a specifier of major depressive disorder. Columbia criteria for atypical depression are commonly used to make a diagnosis. Female sex, onset at early age, chronic course, and higher rate of comorbidity (especially anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder is noteworthy in atypical depression. Although, the atypical depression seems to support the familial genetic transition, there is not any specific study supporting these data. In the treatment of atypical depression, monoamine oxidase inhibitors are reported to be more effective than tricyclic antidepressants. In recent studies, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also proven to be efficient.

  17. Targeting Dopamine D3 and Serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptors for Developing Effective Antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brindisi, Margherita; Butini, Stefania; Franceschini, Silvia; Brogi, Simone; Trotta, Francesco; Ros, Sindu; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Salmona, Mario; Casagni, Alice; Andreassi, Marco; Saponara, Simona; Gorelli, Beatrice; Weikop, Pia; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Scheel-Kruger, Jorgen; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Combination of dopamine D3 antagonism, serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonism, and antagonism at 5-HT2A leads to a novel approach to potent atypical antipsychotics. Exploitation of the original structure-activity relationships resulted in the identification of safe and effective antipsychotics devoid of...

  18. Use of antipsychotic drugs in individuals with intellectual disability (ID) in the Netherlands : prevalence and reasons for prescription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kuijper, G.; Hoekstra, P.; Visser, F.; Scholte, F. A.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background We investigated antipsychotic drug prescription practice of Dutch ID physicians, studying prevalence of antipsychotic drug use, reasons for prescription and the relationship between these reasons and patient characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional study of medical and pharmaceutical re

  19. Association of genetic variants of the histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors with BMI and HbA1c values in patients on antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Risselada, Arne J.; Al Hadithy, Asmar F. Y.; Burger, Huibert; Snieder, Harold; Wilffert, Bob; Arends, Johan; Wunderink, Lex; Knegtering, Henrikus; Wiersma, Durk; Cohen, Dan; Mulder, Hans; Bruggeman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antipsychotic affinity for the histamine H1 receptor and the muscarinic M3 receptor have been associated with the side effects weight gain, and development of diabetes, respectively. We investigated polymorphisms of the histamine H1 (HRH1) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) receptor ge

  20. Association of genetic variants of the histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors with BMI and HbA1c values in patients on antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vehof (Jelle); A.J. Risselada (Arne); A.F.Y. Al Hadithy (Asmar); H. Burger (Herman); H. Snieder (Harold); B. Wilffert (Bob); J. Arends (Johan); L. Wunderink (Lex); H. Knegtering (Henrikus); D. Wiersma (Durk); D. Cohen (Daniel); H. Mulder (Hans Sipko); R. Bruggeman (Richard)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Antipsychotic affinity for the histamine H1 receptor and the muscarinic M3 receptor have been associated with the side effects weight gain, and development of diabetes, respectively. Objectives: We investigated polymorphisms of the histamine H1 (HRH1) and muscarinic acetylchol

  1. Antipsychotic drug-induced hematologic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Kyziridis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over half a century after the discovery of chlorpromazine and haloperidol, antipsychotic drugs showed a true evolutionary revolution. The knowledge of their adverse effects is of outmost importance as it may contribute to the prevention of unwanted sequelae, to the decrease of the duration and cost of hospitalization, it may improve the quality of life of patients, minimize the problems and maximize the therapeutic gain. Aim: The aim of this review was the presentation of the hematologic side-effects of antipsychotic drugs, and most particularly their frequency and association with the different classes of these drugs, their clinical picture and their pathophysiologic mechanisms. Material-method: This paper is a review of the literature (mainly articles from journals, PubMed, as well as books and monographs of the period 1978-2012. Key-words used included antipsychotics, hematologic adverse effects, drug-induced adverse effects. Results: Antipsychotic-drug induced hematologic side-effects are not particularly highly prevalent, while many of them are found in case reports. For this reason they have not drawn much of attention. These hematologic dyscrasias may concern all the blood cell series as well as the coagulation mechanism. Excluded from this rule is the case of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis, which demands increased clinical vigilance. In fact, agranulocytosis was the reason why the drug was drawn away from circulation approximately 35 years ago. Conclusions: In any case the appearance of a hematologic disorder in a patient receiving antipsychotic medications should prompt careful evaluation.

  2. Schizophrenia, antipsychotics and risk of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Jensen, Signe O W; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2013-01-01

    (matched to 1:3 to schizophrenia controls without hip fracture), antipsychotic polypharmacy predicted hip fracture. Analyses among antipsychotic monotherapy patients showed no differential effect of individual antipsychotics. A dose-response relationship of hip fracture and lifetime antipsychotics...

  3. Can antipsychotic treatment contribute to drug addiction in schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaha, Anne-Noël

    2014-07-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia are at very high risk for drug abuse and addiction. Patients with a coexisting drug problem fare worse than patients who do not use drugs, and are also more difficult to treat. Current hypotheses cannot adequately account for why patients with schizophrenia so often have a co-morbid drug problem. I present here a complementary hypothesis based on evidence showing that chronic exposure to antipsychotic medications can induce supersensitivity within the brain's dopamine systems, and that this in turn can enhance the rewarding and incentive motivational effects of drugs and reward cues. At the neurobiological level, these effects of antipsychotics are potentially linked to antipsychotic-induced increases in the striatal levels of dopamine D2 receptors and D2 receptors in a high-affinity state for dopamine, particularly at postsynaptic sites. Antipsychotic-induced dopamine supersensitivity and enhanced reward function are not inevitable consequences of prolonged antipsychotic treatment. At least two parameters appear to promote these effects; the use of antipsychotics of the typical class, and continuous rather than intermittent antipsychotic exposure, such that silencing of dopaminergic neurotransmission via D2/3 receptors is unremitting. Thus, by inducing forms of neural plasticity that facilitate the ability of drugs and reward cues to gain control over behaviour, some currently used treatment strategies with typical antipsychotics might contribute to compulsive drug seeking and drug taking behaviours in vulnerable schizophrenia patients. PMID:23793001

  4. A Case of Catatonia and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Probably Associated with Antipsychotic in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ho-Dong; Kim, Kyoung-Keun; Koo, Bon-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reported on catatonia caused by the use of antipsychotic drugs and on the association between catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), but none has reported such a case in Korea. Here, we report the case of a 20-year-old woman whose catatonia and NMS appeared associated with the administration of an atypical antipsychotic drug. We discuss the association between NMS and catatonia due to neuroleptic use.

  5. Antipsychotic discontinuation syndrome following risperidone withdrawal: a case report from rural India

    OpenAIRE

    Sanivarapu, Sravanti L.; Krishnamurthy CN

    2014-01-01

    Risperidone is an atypical antipsychotic agent used primarily to treat schizophrenia. It is a dopamine antagonist with antiserotonergic, antihistaminergic and antiadrenergic properties. Antipsychotic discontinuation symptoms have been described in the literature following abrupt or rapid reduction in the dose. This unusual case demonstrates that sudden withdrawal of even a modest dose of risperidone may cause significant discontinuation symptoms in susceptible individuals. Hence, there is a n...

  6. ACNP White Paper: Update on Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Elderly Persons with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Blazer, Dan; Casey, Daniel; Meeks, Thomas; Salzman, Carl; Schneider, Lon; Tariot, Pierre; Yaffe, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    In elderly persons, antipsychotic drugs are clinically prescribed off-label for a number of disorders outside of their Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder). The largest number of antipsychotic prescriptions in older adults is for behavioral disturbances associated with dementia. In April 2005, the FDA, based on a meta-analysis of 17 double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials among elderly people with dementia, determined that atyp...

  7. Switching antipsychotics: Imaging the differential effect on the topography of postsynaptic density transcripts in antipsychotic-naïve vs. antipsychotic-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Marmo, Federica; Buonaguro, Elisabetta F; Latte, Gianmarco; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice

    2016-10-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) has been regarded as a functional switchboard at the crossroads of a dopamine-glutamate interaction, and it is putatively involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that antipsychotics may modulate several PSD transcripts, such as PSD-95, Shank, and Homer. Despite switching antipsychotics is a frequent strategy to counteract lack of efficacy and/or side effect onset in clinical practice, no information is available on the effects of sequential treatments with different antipsychotics on PSD molecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a previous exposure to a typical antipsychotic and a switch to an atypical one may affect the expression of PSD transcripts, in order to evaluate potential neurobiological correlates of this common clinical practice, with specific regards to putative synaptic plasticity processes. We treated male Sprague-Dawley rats intraperitoneally for 15days with haloperidol or vehicle, then from the sixteenth day we switched the animals to amisulpride or continued to treat them with vehicle or haloperidol for 15 additional days. In this way we got six first treatment/second treatment groups: vehicle/vehicle, vehicle/haloperidol, vehicle/amisulpride, haloperidol/vehicle, haloperidol/haloperidol, haloperidol/amisulpride. In this paradigm, we evaluated the expression of brain transcripts belonging to relevant and interacting PSD proteins, both of the Immediate-Early Gene (Homer1a, Arc) and the constitutive classes (Homer1b/c and PSD-95). The major finding was the differential effect of amisulpride on gene transcripts when administered in naïve vs. antipsychotic-pretreated rats, with modifications of the ratio between Homer1a/Homer1b transcripts and differential effects in cortex and striatum. These results suggest that the neurobiological effects on PSD transcripts of amisulpride, and possibly of other antipsychotics, may be greatly affected by prior antipsychotic

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antipsychotics in reducing schizophrenia relapses

    OpenAIRE

    García-Ruiz, Antonio J; Pérez-Costillas, Lucía; Montesinos, Ana C.; Alcalde, Javier; Oyagüez, Itziar; Casado, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a severe form of mental illness which is associated with significant and long-lasting health, social and financial burdens. The aim of this project is to assess the efficiency of the antipsychotics used in Spain in reducing schizophrenia relapses under the Spanish Health System perspective. Material and methods: A decision-analytic model was developed to explore the relative cost-effectiveness of five antipsychotic medications, amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapin...

  9. First-generation antipsychotics: not gone but forgotten

    OpenAIRE

    Dibben, Claire R. M.; Khandaker, Golam M.; Underwood, Benjamin R.; O'Loughlin, Christopher; Keep, Catherine; Mann, Louisa; Jones, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method To identify training needs of the next generation of psychiatrists and barriers in prescribing first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs). We have surveyed psychiatry trainees in East Anglia with regard to their training experience, knowledge and attitudes to the use of oral FGAs as regular medication. Results Two-thirds of trainees were aware that first- and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) have similar efficacy, and a similar proportion perceived the older drugs to have m...

  10. Antipsychotic efficacy: relationship to optimal D2-receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Luca; Pira, Luigi; Marchese, Giorgio

    2007-07-01

    Clinically important differences exist between antipsychotic agents and formulations in terms of safety and tolerability. Features of the biochemical interaction between the antipsychotic and the D2-receptor may underlie these differences. This article reviews current information on the relationship between antipsychotic receptor occupancy and clinical response. A literature search was performed using the keywords 'antipsychotic or neuroleptic', 'receptor' and 'occupancy' and 'dopamine' and 'D2' supplemented by the authors' knowledge of the literature. Imaging and clinical data have generally supported the hypotheses that optimal D2-receptor occupancy in the striatum lies in a 'therapeutic window' between approximately 65 and approximately 80%, however, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug should also be taken into account to fully evaluate its therapeutic effects. Additional research, perhaps in preclinical models, is needed to establish D2-receptor occupancy in various regions of the brain and the optimal duration of D2-receptor blockade in order to maximise efficacy and tolerability profiles of atypical antipsychotics and thereby improve treatment outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:17419008

  11. Antipsychotics as antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rona Jeannie; Lohano, Kavita K; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-09-01

    Three second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) agents have received FDA approval for adjunctive treatment, to antidepressant, of major depressive disorder: quetiapine, aripiprazole, and olanzapine. Additionally, quetiapine and lurasidone have been approved for the treatment of bipolar depression. There are data suggesting that quetiapine is effective for major depressive disorder as monotherapy. These agents are effective for depression only at subantipsychotic doses. Receptor profiles predict that all SGA will have anxiolytic effects as subantipsychotic doses but that all will be dysphorogenic at full antipsychotic doses (i.e., produce a depression-like clinical picture). The antidepressant effect appears to be unique to some agents, with direct evidence of insignificant antidepressant action for ziprasidone. Three general principles can guide the use of antipsychotics as antidepressants: (i) All SGAs may have anxiolytic effects; (ii) full antipsychotic doses are dysphorogenic, and therefore, subantipsychotic doses are to be used; and (iii) SGAs do not have a general antidepressant effect, rather, this appears to be unique to quetiapine and aripiprazole, and possibly lurasidone. PMID:25963405

  12. Antipsychotic treatments for the elderly: efficacy and safety of aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izchak Kohen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Izchak Kohen1, Paula E Lester2, Sum Lam31Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Zucker-Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY, USA; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA; 3Division of Pharmacy and Geriatrics, St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Queens, NY, USAAbstract: Delusions, hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms can accompany a number of conditions in late life. As such, elderly patients are commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications for the treatment of psychosis in both acute and chronic conditions. Those conditions include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and dementia. Elderly patients are at an increased risk of adverse events from antipsychotic medications because of age-related pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes as well as polypharmacy. Drug selection should be individualized to the patient’s previous history of antipsychotic use, current medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and potential side effects of the antipsychotic. Specifically, metabolic side effects should be closely monitored in this population. This paper provides a review of aripiprazole, a newer second generation antipsychotic agent, for its use in a variety of psychiatric disorders in the elderly including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, dementia, Parkinson’s disease and depression. We will review the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aripiprazole as well as dosing, diagnostic indications, efficacy studies, and tolerability including its metabolic profile. We will also detail patient focused perspectives including quality of life, patient satisfaction and adherence.Keywords: aripiprazole, antipsychotics, elderly, adverse drug reaction

  13. The fast-off hypothesis revisited: A functional kinetic study of antipsychotic antagonism of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Zeberg, Hugo; Nilsson, Johanna; Ögren, Sven Ove; Fuxe, Kjell; Århem, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Newer, "atypical" antipsychotics carry a lower risk of motor side-effects than older, "typical" compounds. It has been proposed that a ~100-fold faster dissociation from the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) distinguishes atypical from typical antipsychotics. Furthermore, differing antipsychotic D2R affinities have been suggested to reflect differences in dissociation rate constants (koff), while association rate constants (kon) were assumed to be similar. However, it was recently demonstrated that lipophilic accumulation of ligand in the cell interior and/or membrane can cause underestimation of koff, and as high-affinity D2R antagonists are frequently lipophilic, this may have been a confounding factor in previous studies. In the present work, a functional electrophysiology assay was used to measure the recovery of dopamine-mediated D2R responsivity from antipsychotic antagonism, using elevated concentrations of dopamine to prevent the potential bias of re-binding of lipophilic ligands. The variability of antipsychotic kon was also reexamined, capitalizing on the temporal resolution of the assay. kon was estimated from the experimental recordings using a simple mathematical model assumed to describe the binding process. The time course of recovery from haloperidol (typical antipsychotic) was only 6.4- to 2.5-fold slower than that of the atypical antipsychotics, amisulpride, clozapine, and quetiapine, while antipsychotic kons were found to vary more widely than previously suggested. Finally, affinities calculated using our kon and koff estimates correlated well with functional potency and with affinities reported from radioligand binding studies. In light of these findings, it appears unlikely that typical and atypical antipsychotics are primarily distinguished by their D2R binding kinetics. PMID:26811292

  14. C-reactive protein is increased in schizophrenia but is not altered by antipsychotics: meta-analysis and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, B S; Steiner, J; Bernstein, H-G; Dodd, S; Pasco, J A; Dean, O M; Nardin, P; Gonçalves, C-A; Berk, M

    2016-04-01

    The inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia (SZ) posits that inflammatory processes and neural-immune interactions are involved in its pathogenesis, and may underpin some of its neurobiological correlates. SZ is the psychiatric disorder causing the most severe burden of illness, not just owing to its psychiatric impairment, but also owing to its significant medical comorbidity. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a commonly used biomarker of systemic inflammation worldwide. There are some conflicting results regarding the behaviour of CRP in SZ. The aims of this study were to verify whether peripheral CRP levels are indeed increased in SZ, whether different classes of antipsychotics divergently modulate CRP levels and whether its levels are correlated with positive and negative symptomatology. With that in mind, we performed a meta-analysis of all cross-sectional studies of serum and plasma CRP levels in SZ compared to healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated longitudinal studies on CRP levels before and after antipsychotic use. Our meta-analyses of CRP in SZ included a total of 26 cross-sectional or longitudinal studies comprising 85 000 participants. CRP levels were moderately increased in persons with SZ regardless of the use of antipsychotics and did not change between the first episode of psychosis and with progression of SZ (g=0.66, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.43 to 0.88, Pbody mass index. Conversely, higher age correlated with a smaller difference in CRP levels between persons with SZ and controls. Furthermore, CRP levels did not increase after initiation of antipsychotic medication notwithstanding whether these were typical or atypical antipsychotics (g=0.01, 95% CI -0.20 to 0.22, P=0.803, 8 within-group comparisons, n=713). In summary, our study provides further evidence of the inflammatory hypothesis of SZ. Whether there is a causal relationship between higher CRP levels and the development of SZ and aggravation of psychotic symptoms, or whether they

  15. A pharmacy led program to review anti-psychotic prescribing for people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Child Anne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-psychotics, prescribed to people with dementia, are associated with approximately 1,800 excess annual deaths in the UK. A key public health objective is to limit such prescribing of anti-psychotics. Methods This project was conducted within primary care in Medway Primary Care Trust (PCT in the UK. There were 2 stages for the intervention. First, primary care information systems including the dementia register were searched by a pharmacy technician to identify people with dementia prescribed anti-psychotics. Second, a trained specialist pharmacist conducted targeted clinical medication reviews in people with dementia initiated on anti-psychotics by primary care, identified by the data search. Results Data were collected from 59 practices. One hundred and sixty-one (15.3% of 1051 people on the dementia register were receiving low-dose anti-psychotics. People with dementia living in residential homes were nearly 3.5 times more likely to receive an anti-psychotic [25.5% of care home residents (118/462 vs. 7.3% of people living at home (43/589] than people living in their own homes (p  Of the 161 people with dementia prescribed low-dose anti-psychotics, 91 were receiving on-going treatment from local secondary care mental health services or Learning Disability Teams. Of the remaining 70 patients the anti-psychotic was either withdrawn, or the dosage was reduced, in 43 instances (61.4% following the pharmacy-led medication review. Conclusions In total 15.3% of people on the dementia register were receiving a low-dose anti-psychotic. However, such data, including the recent national audit may under-estimate the usage of anti-psychotics in people with dementia. Anti-psychotics were used more commonly within care home settings. The pharmacist-led medication review successfully limited the prescribing of anti-psychotics to people with dementia.

  16. Positive predictive value of a case definition for diabetes mellitus using automated administrative health data in children and youth exposed to antipsychotic drugs or control medications: a Tennessee Medicaid study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo William V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed and validated an automated database case definition for diabetes in children and youth to facilitate pharmacoepidemiologic investigations of medications and the risk of diabetes. Methods The present study was part of an in-progress retrospective cohort study of antipsychotics and diabetes in Tennessee Medicaid enrollees aged 6–24 years. Diabetes was identified from diabetes-related medical care encounters: hospitalizations, outpatient visits, and filled prescriptions. The definition required either a primary inpatient diagnosis or at least two other encounters of different types, most commonly an outpatient diagnosis with a prescription. Type 1 diabetes was defined by insulin prescriptions with at most one oral hypoglycemic prescription; other cases were considered type 2 diabetes. The definition was validated for cohort members in the 15 county region geographically proximate to the investigators. Medical records were reviewed and adjudicated for cases that met the automated database definition as well as for a sample of persons with other diabetes-related medical care encounters. Results The study included 64 cases that met the automated database definition. Records were adjudicated for 46 (71.9%, of which 41 (89.1% met clinical criteria for newly diagnosed diabetes. The positive predictive value for type 1 diabetes was 80.0%. For type 2 and unspecified diabetes combined, the positive predictive value was 83.9%. The estimated sensitivity of the definition, based on adjudication for a sample of 30 cases not meeting the automated database definition, was 64.8%. Conclusion These results suggest that the automated database case definition for diabetes may be useful for pharmacoepidemiologic studies of medications and diabetes.

  17. Attitudes towards the administration of long-acting antipsychotics: a survey of physicians and nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Geerts, Paul; Martinez, Guadalupe; Schreiner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Discontinuation of antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia can interrupt improvement and exacerbate the illness. Reasons for discontinuing treatment are multifactorial and include adherence, efficacy and tolerability issues. Poor adherence may be addressed through non-pharmacological approaches as well as through pharmacological ones, ie ensured delivery of medication, such as that achieved with long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics. However, attitudes of healthcare profess...

  18. Endocervical Atypical Polypoid Adenomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapas, Athanasios; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Athanasiou, Stavros; Loutradis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Atypical polypoid adenomyomas (APAMs) are rare uterine tumors that occur predominantly in premenopausal women, with less than 250 cases reported so far, worldwide. They may recur after treatment, and they may coexist with, or precede development of an endometrial adenocarcinoma. For this reason cases managed with conservative surgery or medical therapies require long-term follow-up. We report the case of a 41 years old nulliparous patient who during a diagnostic hysteroscopy was found with an endocervical atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APAM). The patient was desirous of a pregnancy, reported menometrorrhagia, and had a coexistent 5 cm, grade 2, submucous myoma, 3 endometrial polyps, and diffuse adenomyosis. She was treated with hysteroscopic resection of the APAM and polyps, plus laparoscopic myomectomy and wedge resection of adenomyosis. She is on an IVF list and after 4 months she is symptoms-free. PMID:26304721

  19. CARDIOTOXICITY ANTIPSYCHOTICS: MORPHO-ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Volkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the morphological and functional heart disorders in patients with different duration of antipsychotic treatment. Material and methods. Medical documents of 78 deceased schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs were studied. The patients were split into 4 groups depending on duration of neuroleptic treatment: group 1 — <10 years, group 2 — 11-20 years; group 3 — 21-30 years, group 4 — >30 years. ECG-disorders and left ventricular morphometric data were analyzed. Сorrelation analysis of myocardium morphological changes and electrophysiological disorders was performed. Results. The dependence of morphometric myocardium changes on the treatment duration was found: increase in stromal-parenchymal ratio (from 9.9±4.1% to 80.0±10.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of atrophied cardiomyocytes (from 8.0±3.8% to 45.1±12.6% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of degenerative cardiomyocytes (from 5.2±3.1% to 35.2±12.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively. Increased incidence of extrasystole detection (from 2.2% to 11.2% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, as well as left anterior fascicular block (from 1.1% to 25.9% in groups 1 and 2, respectively and left ventricle hypertrophy (from 2.2% to 18.5% in groups 1 and 4, respectively were found. A strong positive correlation (r=0.88–0.99 was revealed between antipsychotic treatment duration and ECG disorders, as well as between morphological myocardium state and ECG disorders. Conclusion. Awareness about the neuroleptic-depended ECG changes is necessary for early diagnosis, secondary prevention and correction of existing heart disorders due to cardiotoxic side effects of antipsychotic drugs.

  20. Investigation into effects of antipsychotics on ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase in zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, Kelly Juliana; Oliveira, Renata da Luz; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Senger, Mario Roberto; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    Antipsychotic agents are used for the treatment of psychotic symptoms in patients with several brain disorders, such as schizophrenia. Atypical and typical antipsychotics differ regarding their clinical and side-effects profile. Haloperidol is a representative typical antipsychotic drug and has potent dopamine receptor antagonistic functions; however, atypical antipsychotics have been developed and characterized an important advance in the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides, such as ATP and adenosine, constitute a ubiquitous class of extracellular signaling molecules crucial for normal functioning of the nervous system. Indirect findings suggest that changes in the purinergic system, more specifically in adenosinergic activity, could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We investigated the effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics on ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities, followed by an analysis of gene expression patterns in zebrafish brain. Haloperidol treatment (9 µM) was able to decrease ATP hydrolysis (35%), whereas there were no changes in hydrolysis of ADP and AMP in brain membranes after antipsychotic exposure. Adenosine deamination in membrane fractions was inhibited (38%) after haloperidol treatment when compared to the control; however, no changes were observed in ADA soluble fractions after haloperidol exposure. Sulpiride (250 µM) and olanzapine (100 µM) did not alter ectonucleotidase and ADA activities. Haloperidol also led to a decrease in entpd2_mq, entpd3 and adal mRNA transcripts. These findings demonstrate that haloperidol is an inhibitor of NTPDase and ADA activities in zebrafish brain, suggesting that purinergic signaling may also be a target of pharmacological effects promoted by this drug. PMID:26156500

  1. Paliperidone palmitate and risperidone long-acting injectable in subjects with schizophrenia recently treated with oral risperidone or other oral antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphs L

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Larry Alphs,1 Cynthia A Bossie,1 Jennifer Kern Sliwa,2 Dong-Jing Fu,1 Yi-Wen Ma,3 Joseph Hulihan11CNS Medical Affairs, 2Medical Information, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 3Biostatistics, B&P, Janssen Research & Development LLC, Titusville, NJ, USABackground: This post hoc subgroup analysis of a randomized, double-blind trial evaluated the response to treatment with two long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics, ie, paliperidone palmitate and risperidone long-acting injectable (RLAI, in subjects with schizophrenia experiencing clinically significant symptoms despite recent treatment with oral risperidone only or other oral antipsychotics.Methods: Adult subjects were eligible for the 13-week, double-blind, double-dummy trial (NCT00589914 if they had an established diagnosis of schizophrenia for at least one year and a Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS total score of 60–120 inclusive at screening. Subjects received either paliperidone palmitate (234 mg, day 1; 156 mg, day 8; then once-monthly flexible dosing or RLAI (25–50 mg biweekly, with oral risperidone supplementation on days 1–28, plus matched placebo injections/tablets.Results: This post hoc analysis reports data on 747 subjects who, within 2 weeks of starting double-blind study medication, had reportedly received oral risperidone only (paliperidone palmitate group, n = 126; RLAI group, n = 107, other oral antipsychotics (paliperidone palmitate group, n = 199; RLAI group, n = 203, or no antipsychotic (paliperidone palmitate group, n = 56; RLAI group, n = 56. Mean PANSS total scores improved significantly at end point across all subgroups (mean change from baseline ranged from −17.5 to −19.5, all P < 0.0001. Clinical Global Impression-Severity and Personal and Social Performance scale measures also significantly improved from baseline (all P < 0.0001.Conclusion: Treatment with paliperidone palmitate or RLAI resulted in a significant reduction

  2. Psychiatrists’ awareness of adherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia: results from a survey conducted across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, José Manuel; Alptekin, Köksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Emsley, Robin; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M; Naber, Dieter; Papageorgiou, George; Roca, Miquel; Thomas, Pierre; Martinez, Guadalupe; Schreiner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia, although the rates vary according to means of assessment and patient population. Failure to adhere to medication can have a major impact on the course of illness and treatment outcomes, including increasing the risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Understanding psychiatrists’ perception of the causes and consequences of nonadherence is crucial to addressing adherence problems effectively. Methods The Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) Spanish Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) survey was conducted by questionnaire during January–March 2010 among psychiatrists treating patients with schizophrenia in 36 countries. The survey comprised 20 questions. In addition to recording the demographic details of the 4722 respondents (~12% response rate), it canvassed their preferred methods of assessing adherence, their perceptions of adherence rates, reasons for nonadherence, and strategies to improve adherence. Results Psychiatrists estimated that 53% of their patients with schizophrenia were partially/nonadherent during the previous month. They estimated only one-third of patients who deteriorated after stopping medication were able to attribute this to nonadherence. Psychiatrists assessed adherence most often by patient interview. Lack of insight was viewed as the most important cause of medication discontinuation, followed by patients feeling better and thinking their medication unnecessary, and experiencing undesirable side effects. Considerably fewer psychiatrists viewed insufficient efficacy, cognitive impairment, or drug/alcohol abuse as the most important reasons for their patients stopping medication. Conclusion Psychiatrists throughout EMEA recognize the impact of partial/nonadherence to medication, with patient enquiry being the most commonly used means of assessment. There remains a need for more proactive management of patients with schizophrenia, particularly in

  3. Beyond Dopamine: Glutamate as a Target for Future Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Kyra-Verena Sendt; Giovanni Giaroli; Tracy, Derek K.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia remains the primary theoretical framework for the pharmacological treatment of the disorder. Despite various lines of evidence of dopaminergic abnormalities and reasonable efficacy of current antipsychotic medication, a significant proportion of patients show suboptimal treatment responses, poor tolerability, and a subsequent lack of treatment concordance. In recent decades, intriguing evidence for the critical involvement of other neurotransmitter sys...

  4. Depression: Should You Consider Antipsychotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask for other treatments, such as talk therapy (psychotherapy). • If you try an antipsychotic, ask for a ... the marketing of the prescription drug Neurontin. This brief should not be viewed as a substitute for ...

  5. Principles of antipsychotic drugs administration and the problem of compliance of the patients

    OpenAIRE

    Theocharis Kyziridis

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of antipsychotic medications in the clinical practice of psychiatric pharmacotherapy that took place half a century ago was a real revolution. Antipsychotic medications reorientated the organic basis of mental disease and gave a clear therapeutic choice in the treatment of psychotic patients. The gradual application of their use made possible the de-institutionalization of patients as well as the 4th revolution of psychiatry, that is community and social psychiatry.Αntipsycho...

  6. Psychiatrists’ awareness of adherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia: results from a survey conducted across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares JM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available José Manuel Olivares,1 Köksal Alptekin,2 Jean-Michel Azorin,3 Fernando Cañas,4 Vincent Dubois,5 Robin Emsley,6 Philip Gorwood,7 Peter M Haddad,8 Dieter Naber,9 George Papageorgiou,10 Miquel Roca,11 Pierre Thomas,12 Guadalupe Martinez,13 Andreas Schreiner141Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Meixoeiro, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain; 2Department of Psychiatry, Dokuz Eylül University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey; 3Department of Psychiatry, Sainte Marguerite Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Dr R Lafora, Madrid, Spain; 5Cliniques Universitaires St-Luc, Bruxelles, Belgium; 6Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa; 7Sainte-Anne Hospital, Paris Descartes University and INSERM U894, Paris, France; 8Greater Manchester West Mental Health National Health Service Foundation Trust and Department of Psychiatry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 9Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Hamburg, Germany; 10Department of Psychiatry, Evangelismos General Hospital, Athens, Greece; 11Unidad de Psiquiatría, Hospital Juan March, Institut Universitari d’Investigació en Ciències de la Salut, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; 12Department of Psychiatry, Fontan Hospital CHRU Lille, UDSL, University North of France, Lille, France; 13Medical Affairs, Janssen, Madrid, Spain; 14Medical Affairs, Janssen, Neuss, GermanyBackground: Nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia, although the rates vary according to means of assessment and patient population. Failure to adhere to medication can have a major impact on the course of illness and treatment outcomes, including increasing the risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Understanding psychiatrists’ perception of the causes and consequences of nonadherence is crucial to addressing adherence problems

  7. [A real-world survey on antipsychotic treatment for BPSD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Heii

    2016-03-01

    Despite US Food and Drug Administration black box warning, antipsychotics are frequently used for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A 24-weeks prospective cohort study of 10,079 Japanese AD patients in. 357 medical sites was done. The mortality rates in the whole exposed group did not differ from those in the non-user control group. However, further analysis disclosed that the exposed group with shorter treatment periods had higher mortality risk. The results confirmed the mortality associated with antipsychotics suggesting that new use of antipsychotics should be avoided. Patients having been maintained on the drugs for long periods may be at less risk. PMID:27025097

  8. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics: focus on olanzapine pamoate

    OpenAIRE

    JP Lindenmayer

    2010-01-01

    JP LindenmayerDepartment of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York NY, USAAbstract: Medication non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia continues to be a significant problem and threatens successful treatment outcomes. Medication non-adherence is often associated with negative consequences, including symptom exacerbation, more frequent emergency room visits, re-hospitalizations and relapse. Long-acting injectable (LAI) forms of antipsychotics allow for rapid identifi...

  9. Anticonvulsivantes e antipsicóticos no tratamento do transtorno bipolar Anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in the treatment of Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alberto Moreno

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O transtorno bipolar é uma condição médica complexa e até o momento não há um tratamento único comprovadamente eficaz no controle de todos aspectos da doença. Foram revisadas a literatura disponível sobre o uso de anticonvulsivantes (valproato, carbamazepina, oxcarbazepina, lamotrigina, gabapentina, topiramato, clonazepam e antipsicóticos atípicos (clozapina, risperidona, olanzapina, quetiapina, ziprasidona e aripiprazole no tratamento agudo e profilático do transtorno bipolar. Existe um acúmulo de evidências acerca da eficácia do lítio na profilaxia e de ser melhor no tratamento da mania aguda do que nos episódios depressivos. Outros dados indicam que a carbamazepina e o valproato são eficazes na mania aguda. A lamotrigina parece reduzir ciclagem e ser eficaz em episódios depressivos. Baseado nas informações disponíveis, as evidências apontam a olanzapina como o antipsicótico atípico mais apropriado no tratamento de pacientes bipolares em mania, embora existam estudos sugerindo a eficácia da risperidona, aripiprazol e da clozapina. Resultados preliminares avaliando a eficácia de ziprasidona e quetiapina no transtorno bipolar ainda são bastante limitadas. Não há dados consistentes apoiando o uso profilático dos novos antipsicóticos.Bipolar disorder is a complex medical condition, and up to the date there is no single treatment with proven efficacy in the control of all aspects of the illness. The available literature on the use of anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, clonazepam and atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole for acute and prophylactic treatment of bipolar disorder was reviewed. There is a large amount of evidence that lithium is efficacious in the prophylaxis of episodes and better for acute mania than for depressive episodes. Other data show that carbamazepine and valproate are

  10. Microglial intracellular Ca2+ signaling as a target of antipsychotic actions for the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshito Mizoguchi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are resident innate immune cells which release many factors including proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO and neurotrophic factors when they are activated in response to immunological stimuli. Recent reports show that pathophysiology of schizophrenia is related to the inflammatory responses mediated by microglia. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling, which is mainly controlled by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, is important for microglial functions such as release of NO and cytokines, migration, ramification and deramification. In addition, alteration of intracellular Ca2+ signaling underlies the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, while it remains unclear how typical or atypical antipsychotics affect intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in microglial cells. This mini-review article summarizes recent findings on cellular mechanisms underlying the characteristic differences in the actions of antipsychotics on microglial intracellular Ca2+ signaling and reinforces the importance of the ER of microglial cells as a target of antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  11. Antipsychotic-like effects of zolpidem in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewski, Pawel; Kolaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Wesolowska, Anna; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Pawlowski, Maciej; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-15

    Aside from their use in the treatment of anxiety disorders and insomnia, benzodiazepines and other GABAA receptor positive modulators are widely used as add-on treatments in schizophrenic and non-schizophrenic psychoses. However, there is relatively little direct clinical or pre-clinical evidence for antipsychotic effects of GABAergic medications. Previous studies have indicated that zolpidem, a GABAergic drug acting preferentially at α1-containing GABAA receptors, may produce catalepsy through interactions with dopaminergic neurotransmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of zolpidem in experimental models of antipsychotic activity and extrapyramidal side effects in Wistar rats. Effects of zolpidem were compared with that of a classic benzodiazepine drug, diazepam and a second-generation antipsychotic medication, risperidone. High doses of risperidone (10.0mg/kg, i.p.) and zolpidem (10.0mg/kg, i.p.), but not diazepam, induced relatively short-lasting cataleptic responses in the bar test. Zolpidem and risperidone, but not diazepam, produced some antipsychotic-like effects at doses, which produced no catalepsy and did not inhibit spontaneous locomotor activity and apomorphine-induced stereotypies. The present results tend to indicate that zolpidem exerts some neuroleptic-like effects at doses, which do not produce motor side effects. Our findings may provide further rationale for the development of new subtype-selective GABAA receptor modulators for the treatment of psychotic symptoms. PMID:26825544

  12. Genetic determinants of antipsychotic drug response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregoor, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Since their introduction, the use of antipsychotic drugs has been complicated by adverse effects. While the first generation of antipsychotic agents mainly caused motor side effects, the newer antipsychotic drugs are also associated with metabolic disturbance such as diabetes and obesity. The introd

  13. A Survey of the Tardive Dyskinesia Induced by Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Naser tabibi; Firouzeh Sajedi; Roshanak Vameghi; Farin Solemani; Ali Nazeri Astaneh; Sahel. Hemmati

    2010-01-01

    "nObjective: Tardive Dyskinesia (TD), is one of the important problems of the patients with schizophrenia. The emergence of these side effects depends on so many factors such as the patients' age and the duration of antipsychotic treatment. By discovering new drugs (Atypical), there has been an outstanding decrease in the emergence of these side effects. The present study investigates the symptoms of TD in the Patients with schizophrenia who were under  treatments for more than 6 mo...

  14. Paliperidone palmitate and risperidone long-acting injectable in subjects with schizophrenia recently treated with oral risperidone or other oral antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphs, Larry; Bossie, Cynthia A; Sliwa, Jennifer Kern; Fu, Dong-Jing; Ma, Yi-Wen; Hulihan, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background This post hoc subgroup analysis of a randomized, double-blind trial evaluated the response to treatment with two long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics, ie, paliperidone palmitate and risperidone long-acting injectable (RLAI), in subjects with schizophrenia experiencing clinically significant symptoms despite recent treatment with oral risperidone only or other oral antipsychotics. Methods Adult subjects were eligible for the 13-week, double-blind, double-dummy trial (NCT00589914) if they had an established diagnosis of schizophrenia for at least one year and a Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score of 60–120 inclusive at screening. Subjects received either paliperidone palmitate (234 mg, day 1; 156 mg, day 8; then once-monthly flexible dosing) or RLAI (25–50 mg biweekly, with oral risperidone supplementation on days 1–28), plus matched placebo injections/tablets. Results This post hoc analysis reports data on 747 subjects who, within 2 weeks of starting double-blind study medication, had reportedly received oral risperidone only (paliperidone palmitate group, n = 126; RLAI group, n = 107), other oral antipsychotics (paliperidone palmitate group, n = 199; RLAI group, n = 203), or no antipsychotic (paliperidone palmitate group, n = 56; RLAI group, n = 56). Mean PANSS total scores improved significantly at end point across all subgroups (mean change from baseline ranged from −17.5 to −19.5, all P < 0.0001). Clinical Global Impression-Severity and Personal and Social Performance scale measures also significantly improved from baseline (all P < 0.0001). Conclusion Treatment with paliperidone palmitate or RLAI resulted in a significant reduction in the symptoms of schizophrenia irrespective of previous recent treatment with oral risperidone only or other oral antipsychotics. For subjects who had previously received oral risperidone only, the difference in formulation was the main change in the intervention because the

  15. Principles of antipsychotic drugs administration and the problem of compliance of the patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Kyziridis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of antipsychotic medications in the clinical practice of psychiatric pharmacotherapy that took place half a century ago was a real revolution. Antipsychotic medications reorientated the organic basis of mental disease and gave a clear therapeutic choice in the treatment of psychotic patients. The gradual application of their use made possible the de-institutionalization of patients as well as the 4th revolution of psychiatry, that is community and social psychiatry.Αntipsychotic medications did not prove to be the solution to every problem that patients faced. This occurred despite the fact that novel drugs were discovered being very effective and deprived of the majority of unwanted side effects of the older drugs. In any case the discovery of antipsychotic medications deserves the title that has been granted to them, and which is that of the second revolution of psychiatry. The knowledge of the basic principles of their pharmacologic actions, their unwanted side-effects and the measures of their prevention and treatment constitute a necessary tool for every nurse; especially when taking into consideration the fact that antipsychotic medications are used in a wide variety of cases even reaching up to the treatment of acute organic brain syndromes, that are highly prevalent in the medical and surgical units of general hospitals.This article deals with the basic principles of nursing process when administering antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, it also deals with the major problem of the compliance of patients to their treatment.

  16. Principles of Antipsychotic Prescribing for Policy Makers, Circa 2008. Translating Knowledge to Promote Individualized Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, Joseph; Radke, Alan; Parker, George; Foti, May-Ellen; Eilers, Robert; Diamond, Mary; Svendsen, Dale; Tandon, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    Findings from 2 pivotal government-funded studies of comparative antipsychotic effectiveness undermine assumptions about the marked superiority of the more expensive second-generation “atypical” medications in comparison to the less expensive first-generation “typical” drugs. Because this assumption was the basis for the almost universal recommendation that these newer antipsychotics be used preferentially resulting in a 10-fold increase in state governmental expenditures on this class of med...

  17. Effects of Antipsychotics on Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Schizophrenia: Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yu; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis are common in patients with schizophrenia and detrimental to illness prognosis and life quality. Although the pathogenesis is not fully clear, series of studies have revealed factors related to low BMD such as life style, psychotic symptoms, medication use and the activity of bone absorption markers. It has been known that antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia plays a critical role on decreased BMD. However, it remains uncertain whether the risk factors differ between men and women. According to the effect on prolactin, antipsychotics can be classified into two groups: prolactin-sparing (PS) and prolactin-raising (PR). Our previous study has demonstrated that clozapine which is among the PS antipsychotics is beneficial for BMD when compared with PR antipsychotics in women with chronic schizophrenia. We have also found that risks factors associated with low BMD are different between men and women, suggesting that gender-specific risk factors should be considered for intervention of bone loss in patients with schizophrenia. This article reviews the effects of antipsychotics use on BMD with particular discussion for the differences on gender and age, which implicate the alterations of sex and other related hormones. In addition, currently reported protective and risk factors, as well as the effects of medication use on BMD including the combination of antipsychotics and other psychotropic agents and other potential medications are also reviewed. PMID:27489377

  18. Effects of Antipsychotics on Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Schizophrenia: Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yu; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin

    2016-08-31

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis are common in patients with schizophrenia and detrimental to illness prognosis and life quality. Although the pathogenesis is not fully clear, series of studies have revealed factors related to low BMD such as life style, psychotic symptoms, medication use and the activity of bone absorption markers. It has been known that antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia plays a critical role on decreased BMD. However, it remains uncertain whether the risk factors differ between men and women. According to the effect on prolactin, antipsychotics can be classified into two groups: prolactin-sparing (PS) and prolactin-raising (PR). Our previous study has demonstrated that clozapine which is among the PS antipsychotics is beneficial for BMD when compared with PR antipsychotics in women with chronic schizophrenia. We have also found that risks factors associated with low BMD are different between men and women, suggesting that gender-specific risk factors should be considered for intervention of bone loss in patients with schizophrenia. This article reviews the effects of antipsychotics use on BMD with particular discussion for the differences on gender and age, which implicate the alterations of sex and other related hormones. In addition, currently reported protective and risk factors, as well as the effects of medication use on BMD including the combination of antipsychotics and other psychotropic agents and other potential medications are also reviewed. PMID:27489377

  19. Atypical eating disorders: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Frederico

    2011-01-01

    Frederico Duarte Garcia1, Héloïse Délavenne2, Pierre Déchelotte11Nutrition and Digestive System Research Group (EA 4311) and Nutrition Unit, Rouen Institute of Medical Research and Innovation, Federative Institute for Peptide Research (IFRMP 23), Rouen University and University Hospital, Rouen, France; 2Department of Addictology of the Rouen University Hospital, Rouen University, Rouen, FranceIntroduction: Atypical eating disorders (AEDs), also known ...

  20. ANTIPSYCHOTICS AND THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF SCHIZOPHRENIC PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Loga, Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Patients’ attitudes and values, their concept of illness and health as well as their previous experiences with medication may significantly affect the subjective response to antipsychotics. Quality of Life (QOL) has holistic concept that includes consideration of economic development, social vitality and environmental health. For most of the researches, QOL has an umbrella concept, which covers all aspects of life and includes physical and mental health, family relations, friendship,...

  1. A qualitative investigation to identify the perceived educational needs of qualified nurses needed to reduce the use of antipsychotic medication when caring for people with dementia in an adult care setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Background: Literature shows that the main challenge of caring for people with dementia is managing difficult behaviour caused by the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Poor knowledge and understanding of BPSD, due to a lack of education in both pre and post-registration nursing programs, has lead to the inappropriate use of antipsychotics which are known to have detrimental effects for people with dementia. This study aimed to identify the perceived educational ...

  2. Antipsychotics and Mortality: Adjusting for Mortality Risk Scores to Address Confounding by Terminal Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonyoung; Franklin, Jessica M.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Levin, Raisa; Crystal, Stephen; Gerhard, Tobias; Huybrechts, Krista F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Earlier studies have documented a greater mortality risk associated with conventional compared with atypical antipsychotics. Concern remains that the association is not causal, but due to residual confounding by differences in underlying health. To address this concern, we evaluated whether adjustment for prognostic indices specifically developed fornursing home (NH) populations affected the magnitude of the previously observed associations. DESIGN Cohort study SETTING A merged dataset of Medicaid, Medicare, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), the Online Survey Certification and Reporting system (OSCAR), and the National Death Index in the US for 2001-2005 PARTICIPANTS Dual eligible subjects ≥ 65 years who initiated antipsychotic treatment in a NH (n=75,445). MEASUREMENTS Three mortality risk scores (MRIS, MMRI-R, and ADEPT) were derived for each patient using baseline MDS data, and their performance was assessed using c-statistics and goodness-of-fit tests. The impact of adjusting for these indices in addition to propensity scores (PS) on the antipsychotic-mortality association was evaluated using Cox models with and without adjustment for risk scores. RESULTS Each risk score showed moderate discrimination for 6-month mortality with c-statistics ranging from 0.61 to 0.63. There was no evidence of lack of fit. Imbalances in risk scores between conventional and atypical antipsychotic users in the full cohort, suggesting potential confounding, were greatly reduced within PS deciles. Accounting for each score in the Cox model did not change the relative risk estimates: 2.24 with PS only adjustment vs. 2.20, 2.20, 2.22 after further adjustment for the three risk scores. CONCLUSION Although causality cannot be proven based on non-randomized studies, this study adds to the body of evidence rejecting alternative explanations for the increased mortality risk associated with conventional antipsychotics. PMID:25752911

  3. Measurement of treatment adherence with antipsychotic agents in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua S Ren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Xinhua S Ren1,2,3, Lawrence Herz4,5, Shirley Qian1,2,3, Eric Smith3,4, Lewis E Kazis1,2,31The Center for the Assessment of Pharmaceutical Practices (CAPP, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center for Health Quality, Outcomes, and Economic Research, Bedford Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bedford, MA, USA; 4Division of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 5Mental Health Service Line, Bedford VA Medical Center, Bedford, MA, USAAbstract: The importance of medication adherence in sustaining control of schizophrenic symptoms has generated a great deal of interest in comparing levels of treatment adherence with different antipsychotic agents. However, the bulk of the research has yielded results that are often inconsistent. In this prospective, observational study, we assessed the measurement properties of 3 commonly used, pharmacy-based measures of treatment adherence with antipsychotic agents in schizophrenia using data from the Veterans Health Administration during 2000 to 2005. Patients were selected if they were on antipsychotics and diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 18,425. A gap of ≥30 days (with no filled index medication was used to define discontinuation of treatment as well as medication “episodes,” or the number of times a patient returned to the same index agent after discontinuation of treatment within a 1-year period. The study found that the 3 existing measures differed in their approaches in measuring treatment adherence, suggesting that studies using these different measures would generate different levels of treatment adherence across antipsychotic agents. Considering the measurement problems associated with each existing approach, we offered a new, medication episode-specific approach, which would provide a fairer comparison of the levels of treatment adherence

  4. Are clozapine blood dyscrasias associated with concomitant medications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, Tammie Lee; Trigoboff, Eileen

    2011-04-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent used for refractory schizophrenia. It has a relatively low affinity for D2 receptors and thus is associated with a lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects when compared with typical antipsychotics. Clozapine as monotherapy can induce a rare, but serious, blood dyscrasia called agranulocytosis; however, some concomitant medications may contribute to the risk. Examples of these medications are mood-stabilizing antiepileptic drugs, such as carbamazepine, and sulfonamide antibiotics, such as sulfamethoxazole. There were no studies at the writing of this article examining the effect of concomitant medications on clozapine blood dyscrasias, and few published reports describing enhanced bone marrow suppression in those taking clozapine. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of concomitant medications used in a state psychiatric hospital on clozapine-induced blood dyscrasias. This was a retrospective record review of adverse drug reactions reported at an adult inpatient state psychiatric center. The records for a pilot sample of 26 patients with reported clozapine-related adverse drug reactions between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009, were reviewed. Fundamental to this study were reported adverse drug reactions defined as 1) substantial drops in white blood cell or absolute neutrophil count (a substantial drop in white blood cell is >3,000 or absolute neutrophil count is >1,500 over a 3-week period); 2) mild leukopenia/granulocytopenia; and 3) moderate-severe leukopenia/granulocytopenia. Concomitant medications were examined for contributions to an increased potential for clozapine-induced blood dyscrasias. Other data collected included demographic information (age, gender, ethnicity), medical and psychiatric diagnoses, dose and duration of medications, and changes in medications. Medications that had a statistically significant impact on the incidence of clozapine-induced blood dyscrasias are

  5. Post-Stroke Mortality, Stroke Severity, and Preadmission Antipsychotic Medicine Use – A Population-Based Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Larsen, Karen Kjær; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Christensen, Jakob; Andersen, Grethe; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: It has been suggested that antipsychotic medication may be neuroprotective and may reduce post-stroke mortality, but studies are few and ambiguous. We aimed to investigate the post-stroke effects of preadmission antipsychotic use. Methods: We conducted a nationwide, popula...... mortality, even after adjustment for known confounders. Antipsychotics play an important role in the treatment of many psychiatric conditions, but our findings do not support the hypothesis that they reduce stroke severity or post-stroke mortality.......Background and Purpose: It has been suggested that antipsychotic medication may be neuroprotective and may reduce post-stroke mortality, but studies are few and ambiguous. We aimed to investigate the post-stroke effects of preadmission antipsychotic use. Methods: We conducted a nationwide......, population-based cohort study of 81,143 persons admitted with stroke in Denmark from 2003–2010. Using Danish health care databases, we extracted data on preadmission use of antipsychotics and confounding factors. We examined the association between current, former, and never use of antipsychotics and stroke...

  6. Role of 5-HT2C receptor gene variants in antipsychotic-induced weight gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandl EJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Tessa JM Wallace, Clement C Zai, Eva J Brandl, Daniel J MüllerNeurogenetics Section, Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medication that can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and non-compliance in patients. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been studied for association with antipsychotic-induced weight gain in an attempt to find genetic predictors of this side effect. An ability to predict this side effect could lead to personalized treatment plans for predisposed individuals, which could significantly decrease the prevalence and severity of weight gain. Variations in the serotonin receptor 2c gene (HTR2C have emerged as promising candidates for prediction of antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Specifically, the well-studied -759C/T promoter polymorphism has been associated with weight gain in diverse populations, although some studies have reported no association. This discrepancy is likely due to heterogeneity in study design with respect to ethnicity, treatment duration, and other variables. Notably, the association between HTR2C and antipsychotic-induced weight gain appears strongest in short-term studies on patients with limited or no previous antipsychotic treatment. Other, less extensively studied promoter polymorphisms (-697C/G, -997G/A, and -1165A/G have also emerged as potential predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Conversely, the well-studied intronic polymorphism Cys23Ser does not appear to be associated. With further research on both HTR2C and other genetic and environmental predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain, a predictive test could one day be created to screen patients and provide preventative or alternative treatment for those who are predisposed to this serious side effect.Keywords: HTR2C, pharmacogenomics, promoter polymorphism

  7. Affinity Chromatography Method for Determination of Binding of Drugs to Melanin and Evaluation of Side Effect Potential of Antipsychotic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Proszowska, Anna; Buciński, Adam; Kaliszan, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The extrapyramidal side effect parameters of typical and atypical antypsychotics were correlated with affinity chromatographic data determined on the melanin-based column. The chromatographic study was performed according to the hypothesis that extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) as side effects of the use of antipsychotic drugs at clinically effective doses are correlated to the affinity of these drugs to neuromelanin. For that aim the polymerization product of L-DOPA (melanin) was immobilized ont...

  8. Iminodibenzyl class antipsychotics for schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of carpipramine, clocapramine, and mosapramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishi T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Taro Kishi, Shinji Matsunaga, Yuki Matsuda, Nakao Iwata Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan Background: We conducted a meta-analysis of the iminodibenzyl antipsychotics carpipramine, clocapramine, and mosapramine, which are classified as second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs for schizophrenia treatment.Methods: We searched data that had been published in PubMed, the Cochrane Library databases, PsycINFO, CiNii, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society up to August 29, 2014. Randomized controlled trials that compared iminodibenzyl antipsychotics with other antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia were included. Odds ratios and standardized mean differences were evaluated.Results: We included four randomized controlled trials on carpipramine (number of patients [n]=290, six on clocapramine (n=1,048, and five on mosapramine (n=986 in the meta-analysis. There were no significant differences in the response rates or in the discontinuation rates either between carpipramine and the other pooled antipsychotics or between clocapramine and the other pooled antipsychotics. On the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, mosapramine’s positive subscale scores were superior to those of the other pooled antipsychotics (standard mean of difference =−0.22; however, on that same scale, there were no significant differences in total scores, negative scores, general subscale scores, response rates, or the discontinuation rates between mosapramine and the other pooled antipsychotics. Furthermore, the incidences of extrapyramidal symptoms and of hyperprolactinemia were significantly greater with mosapramine than with the other pooled antipsychotics.Conclusion: The pharmacological profiles of carpipramine and clocapramine, which are classified as SGAs, were similar to those of first-generation antipsychotics because there were no significant differences in efficacy and safety outcomes. However, mosapramine was

  9. Different antipsychotics elicit different effects on magnocellular oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic neurons as revealed by Fos immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, A; Bundzikova, J; Pirnik, Z;

    2010-01-01

    autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral processes. This study was focused to reveal the responsiveness of hypothalamic OXY- and AVP- producing magnocellular neurons, in terms of quantitative and topographical distinctions, to antipsychotics displaying different pharmacological profiles. Naive male Wistar...... accessory (ACS) cell groups, and 4 distinct PVN subdivisions using a computerized light microscope. Most apparent activation of single Fos, Fos/OXY, and Fos/AVP cells was induced by clozapine and olanzapine; effects of risperidone and haloperidol were substantially lower; no colocalizations were revealed in...... naive or vehicle treated control rats. The data indicate the existence of a substantial diversity in the stimulatory effect of the selected antipsychotics on quantity of Fos, Fos/OXY, and Fos/AVP immunostainings with the preferential action of the atypicals clozapine over olanzapine and little effects...

  10. Antipsychotic dose escalation as a trigger for Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS): literature review and case series report

    OpenAIRE

    Langan Julie; Martin Daniel; Shajahan Polash; Smith Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background “Neuroleptic malignant syndrome” (NMS) is a potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to any medication which affects the central dopaminergic system. Between 0.5% and 1% of patients exposed to antipsychotics develop the condition. Mortality rates may be as high as 55% and many risk factors have been reported. Although rapid escalation of antipsychotic dose is thought to be an important risk factor, to date it has not been the focus of a published case series or scientifica...

  11. Weight Gain, Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: New Findings from Animal Model and Pharmacogenomic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Panariello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess body weight is one of the most common physical health problems among patients with schizophrenia that increases the risk for many medical problems, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, osteoarthritis, and hypertension, and accounts in part for 20% shorter life expectancy than in general population. Among patients with severe mental illness, obesity can be attributed to an unhealthy lifestyle, personal genetic profile, as well as the effects of psychotropic medications, above all antipsychotic drugs. Novel “atypical” antipsychotic drugs represent a substantial improvement on older “typical” drugs. However, clinical experience has shown that some, but not all, of these drugs can induce substantial weight gain. Animal models of antipsychotic-related weight gain and animal transgenic models of knockout or overexpressed genes of antipsychotic receptors have been largely evaluated by scientific community for changes in obesity-related gene expression or phenotypes. Moreover, pharmacogenomic approaches have allowed to detect more than 300 possible candidate genes for antipsychotics-induced body weight gain. In this paper, we summarize current thinking on: (1 the role of polymorphisms in several candidate genes, (2 the possible roles of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in this adverse drug reaction, and (3 the state of development of animal models in this matter. We also outline major areas for future research.

  12. The effect of antipsychotic medication on sexual function and serum prolactin levels in community-treated schizophrenic patients: results from the Schizophrenia Trial of Aripiprazole (STAR study (NCT00237913

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pans Miranda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia in a community based study on sexual function and prolactin levels comparing the use of aripiprazole and standard of care (SOC, which was a limited choice of three widely used and available antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone (The Schizophrenia Trial of Aripiprazole [STAR] study [NCT00237913]. Method This open-label, 26-week, multi-centre, randomised study compared aripiprazole to SOC (olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone in patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR criteria. The primary effectiveness variable was the mean total score of the Investigator Assessment Questionnaire (IAQ at Week 26. The outcome research variables included the Arizona Sexual Experience scale (ASEX. This along with the data collected on serum prolactin levels at week 4, 8, 12, 18 and 26 will be the focus of this paper. Results A total of 555 patients were randomised to receive aripiprazole (n = 284 or SOC (n = 271. Both treatment groups experienced improvements in sexual function from baseline ASEX assessments. However at 8 weeks the aripiprazole treatment group reported significantly greater improvement compared with the SOC group (p = 0.007; OC. Although baseline mean serum prolactin levels were similar in the two treatment groups (43.4 mg/dL in the aripiprazole group and 42.3 mg/dL in the SOC group, p = NS at Week 26 OC, mean decreases in serum prolactin were 34.2 mg/dL in the aripiprazole group, compared with 13.3 mg/dL in the SOC group (p Conclusion The study findings suggest that aripiprazole has the potential to reduce sexual dysfunction, which in turn might improve patient compliance.

  13. Evaluation of Monitoring for Metabolic Effects in Children Treated With Second Generation Antipsychotics in a Pediatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Brooke L.; Ramos, Lourdes; Brahm, Nancy C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the frequency of recommended metabolic monitoring and follow-up in pediatric patients on second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) medications from a pediatric clinic. METHODS A retrospective review of electronic medical records of all patients on antipsychotics from an academic medical center pediatric clinic was conducted. Inclusion criteria required patients to be established members of the pediatric clinic, < 19 years of age, and on ≥ 1 SGA for at least 1 year, regardless of medical diagnosis. Data collection consisted of patient demographic information and frequency of family history, vital signs, and recommended laboratory monitoring. RESULTS A total of 67 patients on antipsychotics were identified. After the application of inclusion criteria, 32 patients qualified for review. The average age was 13.5 ± 4 years and gender distribution included 72% males. Only 4 (13%) patients had documented baseline monitoring that included weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid panel. No patient had a fasting plasma glucose recorded at any point during antipsychotic therapy. Follow-up monitoring decreased over time, with the exception of quarterly weight and annual blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study highlight the lack of baseline and periodic monitoring that occur when pediatric patients are prescribed antipsychotic medications, putting the patient at risk for adverse events. The marked increase in antipsychotic prescribing and concerns related to their safety emphasize the need for improvement in monitoring of antipsychotic medications. This gap in patient care and safety opens an excellent opportunity for a clinical pharmacy team to provide education and assistance with SGA monitoring for the purpose of providing optimal patient care. PMID:24719589

  14. The inhibitory effect of the antipsychotic drug haloperidol on HERG potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Suessbrich, H; Schönherr, R; Heinemann, S H; Attali, B.; Lang, F.; Busch, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug haloperidol can induce a marked QT prolongation and polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. In this study, we expressed several cloned cardiac K+ channels, including the human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) channels, in Xenopus oocytes and tested them for their haloperidol sensitivity.Haloperidol had only little effects on the delayed rectifier channels Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.5 and IsK, the A-type channel Kv1.4 and the inward rectifier channel Kir2.1 (inhibition

  15. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by atypical neuroleptics and responsive to lorazepam

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, Adeeb; Francis, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Objective The authors report three cases of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) induced by atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine and clozapine) which showed classic features of NMS including muscular rigidity and prominent fever. Method Case reports. Results A 66-year-old man with dementia and alcohol abuse developed NMS while on olanzapine for agitation and combativeness. A 62-year-old man with schizophrenia developed NMS 6 days after starting clozapine. A 43-year-old man with bipolar disorde...

  16. Developments in antipsychotic drugs - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G P

    1998-02-01

    Antipsychotic drug research has recently made much progress. Over the past two years several new drugs have been introduced for the treatment of schizophrenia and more compounds are shortly to be released. Pharmacological studies, improved behavioural models and modern imaging techniques have all contributed to a better understanding of the mechanisms of antipsychotic drug action. Some of the developments that have been made over the past year are reviewed here. PMID:15991957

  17. Is it time to consider comorbid substance abuse as a new indication for antipsychotic drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A George

    2012-07-01

    Comorbid drug abuse in schizophrenia has been consistently reported as high, with estimates ranging between 10-70%. Comorbid addictive states in schizophrenia are possibly multifactorial, yet recent research assigns a significant neurobiological role in its genesis. Abnormalities in hippocampal/cortical function in schizophrenia which mediate reward and reinforcement behavior are identified as central to the development and maintenance of comorbid addictive states. Preliminary data suggest that the vulnerability of patients with schizophrenia to substance use disorders may be a primary disease symptom. The management of comorbid substance abuse in schizophrenia relies on the use of antipsychotic medications. Recent data raise the concern about whether first-generation antipsychotics in long-term use can conversely lead to enhancement of the abused substance's reinforcing properties. Some recent reports have assigned a favorable outcome to clozapine and second-generation antipsychotics, pointing to a possible differential role for various antipsychotics. In view of the high prevalence of comorbid drug abuse in schizophrenia, its impact on outcome of treatment and the recent emerging neurobiological information, it is my contention that comorbid drug abuse constitutes a dimension by itself and deserves to receive an indication in the development of new antipsychotics similar to negative symptoms or cognitive deficits. PMID:22170735

  18. Antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial of tapering antipsychotic co-treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Tiihonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable disparity between clinical practice and recommendations based on meta-analyses of antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia. For this reason, we investigated the clinical response to reducing the use olanzapine that had been previously added on clozapine treatment among seriously ill hospitalized patients. In a randomized controlled trial with crossover design, we studied volunteer patients (N = 15 who had olanzapine added on to clozapine in a state mental hospital. Clozapine monotherapy was just as effective as clozapine-olanzapine therapy, according to results from Clinical Global Impression Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning as primary outcome measures. Polypharmacy is widely used in treating schizophrenia, and usually, add-on medications are started because of worsening of the clinical state. A major confounding feature of these add-ons is whether observed improvements are caused by the medication or explained by the natural fluctuating course of the disorder. The present study, in spite of its small size, indicates the necessity of reconsidering the value of polypharmacy in treating schizophrenia.

  19. [Atypical cerebellar neurocytoma resembling a hemangioblastoma. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista Martínez, Olalla; Rivas López, Luis Alfredo; Pombo Otero, Jorge Francisco; Amaro Cendón, Santiago; Bravo García, Christian; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Through August 2013, 105 cases of intracranial extraventricular neurocytoma (EVN) had been described; 6% were located in cerebellum and 22% were atypical EVN. A rare morphologic form of neurocytoma, atypical EVN has had only 24 cases reported to date. Its prognosis is poorer than the typical central neurocytoma. This case report describes an atypical cerebellar EVN, a form that has not been reported yet, hence the interest of this article. We emphasise its cystic nature and mural nodule, in an infrequent presentation. EVN are low-incidence tumours that we need to take into consideration when making the differential diagnosis of cystic cerebellar lesions with mural nodule. Given that the prognosis of atypical EVNs depends on the atypical nature and on the grade of resection, medical follow up has to be more constant, due to the greater degree of recurrence. PMID:24837842

  20. Central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using positron emission tomography and the carbon 11-labeled ligand raclopride, central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in the putamen was determined in psychiatric patients treated with clinical doses of psychoactive drugs. Receptor occupancy in drug-treated patients was defined as the percent reduction of specific carbon 11-raclopride binding in relation to the expected binding in the absence of drug treatment. Clinical treatment of schizophrenic patients with 11 chemically distinct antipsychotic drugs (including both classic and atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine) resulted in a 65% to 85% occupancy of D2-dopamine receptors. In a depressed patient treated with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, no occupancy was found. The time course for receptor occupancy and drug levels was followed after withdrawal of sulpiride or haloperidol. D2-dopamine receptor occupancy remained above 65% for many hours despite a substantial reduction of serum drug concentrations. In a sulpiride-treated patient, the dosage was reduced in four steps over a nine-week period and a curvilinear relationship was demonstrated between central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy and serum drug concentrations. The results demonstrate that clinical doses of all the currently used classes of antipsychotic drugs cause a substantial blockade of central D2-dopamine receptors in humans. This effect appears to be selective for the antipsychotics, since it was not induced by the antidepressant nortriptyline

  1. LASSBio-579, a prototype antipsychotic drug, and clozapine are effective in novel object recognition task, a recognition memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Camila B; Betti, Andresa H; Herzfeldt, Vivian; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Fraga, Carlos A M; Rates, Stela M K

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies on the N-phenylpiperazine derivative LASSBio-579 have suggested that LASSBio-579 has an atypical antipsychotic profile. It binds to D2, D4 and 5-HT1A receptors and is effective in animal models of schizophrenia symptoms (prepulse inhibition disruption, apomorphine-induced climbing and amphetamine-induced stereotypy). In the current study, we evaluated the effect of LASSBio-579, clozapine (atypical antipsychotic) and haloperidol (typical antipsychotic) in the novel object recognition task, a recognition memory model with translational value. Haloperidol (0.01 mg/kg, orally) impaired the ability of the animals (CF1 mice) to recognize the novel object on short-term and long-term memory tasks, whereas LASSBio-579 (5 mg/kg, orally) and clozapine (1 mg/kg, orally) did not. In another set of experiments, animals previously treated with ketamine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or vehicle (saline 1 ml/100 g, intraperitoneally) received LASSBio-579, clozapine or haloperidol at different time-points: 1 h before training (encoding/consolidation); immediately after training (consolidation); or 1 h before long-term memory testing (retrieval). LASSBio-579 and clozapine protected against the long-term memory impairment induced by ketamine when administered at the stages of encoding, consolidation and retrieval of memory. These findings point to the potential of LASSBio-579 for treating cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia and other disorders. PMID:26513177

  2. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo; Rocca, Mara A; Miller, Andrew David; Schmierer, Klaus; Frederiksen, Jette; Gass, Achim; Gama, Hugo; Tilbery, Charles P; Rocha, Antonio J; Flores, José; Barkhof, Frederik; Seewann, Alexandra; Palace, Jacqueline; Yousry, Tarek; Montalban, Xavier; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  3. Sensorimotor gating and habituation in antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after 6 months' treatment with quetiapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggernaes, Bodil; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Ebdrup, Bjorn H; Rasmussen, Hans; Lublin, Henrik; Oranje, Bob

    2010-01-01

    , since these patients are so difficult to recruit. Furthermore, longitudinal studies are few, and their results are inconsistent: some results indicating a reduction of PPI deficits by treatment with atypical antipsychotics, while others do not. This study reports on PPI, habituation and sensitization of......-significant trend for reduced sensitization at baseline, but not at follow-up. Patients and controls showed similar levels of habituation, both at baseline, and at follow-up. These findings indicate that PPI deficits are already present from the earliest stage of clinical onset of schizophrenia, before the patients...... have received any antipsychotic treatment. In addition, following 6 months' treatment with quetiapine these PPI deficits were normalized. Furthermore, the results suggest that schizophrenia patients in the antipsychotic-naive state show reduced levels of sensitization, yet normal levels of habituation....

  4. Commentary on strategies for switching antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leucht Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both the new generation of antipsychotics and the more traditional antipsychotic drugs produce an important and meaningful improvement in patients with schizophrenia, but most patients are neither cured nor free of symptoms. As a consequence, it is common to switch from one drug to another in the hope of obtaining a better response. All antipsychotic drugs produce some side effects, so switching can also be a tolerance issue. There are reports in the literature on the tactics of switching: abrupt discontinuation, cross tapering, starting a patient on a new drug while continuing with the old drug until the new drug has reached a steady state, or some variation on these tactics. In this issue, Ganguli et al. have carried out a randomized switching study, the data from which indicates the tactics that might be optimal. We put this paper into context, provide a critique and describe indications for switching.

  5. Venous thromboembolism as an adverse effect of antipsychotic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies suggest an association between the use of antipsychotics (APs and occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE. Thromboembolism is often related to a significant risk of disability or death. Despite many years of investigating the interrelations between use of APs and VTE, they have not been specified yet. This paper aims to summarize reports on the VTE risk factors in patients using APs. Based on the analyzed clinical studies, meta-analyses and data published by European Medicines Agency, it has been determined, that the main risk factors for VTE are duration of treatment and patient-related factors, such as gender, age, body mass, and physical activity. Current data do not allow to identify the prothrombotic potential for individual APs or indicate a higher risk for developing VTE in patients treated with newer atypical APs. Due to the complex pathogenesis of VTE it would be necessary to perform large, comparative studies, allowing to identify precisely differences in prothrombotic potential of individual APs. It is necessary to specify products with the lowest VTE risk, what would be useful in the treatment of high-risk patients. All patients treated with APs should be assessed with the risk of VTE and, if needed, appropriate prevention methods (including most of all the elimination of modifiable risk factors should be implemented. Moreover, patients should be educated in scope of VTE prodromal symptoms. All patients with the higher VTE risk should be diagnosed as soon as possible and adequate treatment should be implemented.

  6. Prevention of antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia by vitamin D: a data mining prediction followed by experimental exploration of the molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Takuya; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of hyperglycaemia, thus limiting their clinical use. This study focused on finding the molecular mechanism underlying antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia. First, we searched for drug combinations in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database wherein a coexisting drug reduced the hyperglycaemia risk of atypical antipsychotics, and found that a combination with vitamin D analogues significantly decreased the occurrence of quetiapine-induced adverse events relating diabetes mellitus in FAERS. Experimental validation using mice revealed that quetiapine acutely caused insulin resistance, which was mitigated by dietary supplementation with cholecalciferol. Further database analysis of the relevant signalling pathway and gene expression predicted quetiapine-induced downregulation of Pik3r1, a critical gene acting downstream of insulin receptor. Focusing on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling pathway, we found that the reduced expression of Pik3r1 mRNA was reversed by cholecalciferol supplementation in skeletal muscle, and that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into C2C12 myotube was inhibited in the presence of quetiapine, which was reversed by concomitant calcitriol in a PI3K-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that vitamin D coadministration prevents antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance by upregulation of PI3K function. PMID:27199286

  7. Orthostatic Hypotension in Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Atypical Parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad; Johan Lökk

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is one of the commonly occurring nonmotor symptoms in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) and atypical parkinsonism (AP). We aimed to review current evidences on epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of OH in patients with IPD and AP. Major electronic medical databases were assessed including PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase up to February 2013. English-written original or review articles with keywords such as “Parkinson’s disease,” “atypical p...

  8. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics in rats as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain in human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouzet, B; Mow, T; Kreilgaard, Mads; Velschow, S

    2003-01-01

    Several clinical reports have demonstrated that most antipsychotics of the new generation, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol, induce weight gain in schizophrenic patients. Since weight gain induces serious health complications in humans, it is crucial to test upcoming antipsychotic co...

  9. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  10. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria, Ana M.; Franco, José G; Aguado, Víctor; Rico, Guillem; Labad, Javier; de Pablo, Joan; Vilella, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain). Methods A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized datab...

  11. Patterns of Antipsychotic Prescription to Patients with Schizophrenia in Korea: Results from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service-National Patient Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Myung-Soo; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the patterns of antipsychotic prescription to patients with schizophrenia in Korea. Using the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service-National Patients Sample (HIRA-NPS), which was a stratified sampling from the entire population under the Korean national health security system (2009), descriptive statistics for the patterns of the monopharmacy and polypharmacy, neuropsychiatric co-medications, and prescribed individual antipsychotic for patients with schizoph...

  12. Relationship between obesity and antipsychotic drug use in the adult population: A longitudinal, retrospective claim database study in Primary Care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Sicras-Mainar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Antoni Sicras-Mainar1, Ruth Navarro-Artieda2, Javier Rejas-Gutiérrez3, Milagrosa Blanca-Tamayo41Planning Management, Badalona Serveis Assistencials S.A., Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Medical Documentation Service, Hospital Germans Trías i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Health Outcomes Research Derpartment, Medical Unit, Pfizer Spain, Alcobendas, Madrid, Spain; 4Department of Psychiatry, Badalona Serveis Assistencials S.A., Badalona, Barcelona, SpainObjective: To describe the association between obesity and the use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs in adult outpatients followed-up on in five Primary Care settings.Methods: A longitudinal, retrospective design study carried out between July 2004 and June 2005, in patients who were included in a claim database and for whom an APD treatment had been registered. A body mass index (BMI <30 kg/m2 was defined as obesity. The main measurements were: use of APDs, demographics, medical background and co-morbidities, and clinical parameters. Logistic regression analysis and ANCOVA with Bonferroni adjustment were applied to correct the model.Results: A total of 42,437 subjects (mean age: 50.8 (18.4 years; women: 54.5%; obesity: 27.3% [95% confidence intervals (CI, 26.9%–27.7%] were analyzed. A total of 1.3% of the patients were receiving APDs, without statistical differences in distribution by type of drug (typical: 48.8%; atypical: 51.2%. Obesity was associated with the use of APDs [OR = 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.8], hypertension [OR = 2.4 (CI: 2.2–2.5], diabetes [OR = 1.4 (CI: 1.3–1.5] and dyslipidemia [OR = 1.3 (CI: 1.2–1.4], p < 0.0001 in all cases. BMI was significantly higher in subjects on APDs; 28.8 vs. 27.3 kg/m2, p = 0.002, and remained higher after adjusting by age and sex (mean difference 0.4 (CI: 0.1–0.7, p < 0.01. After adjusting by age, sex and the Charlson index, obese subjects generated higher average annual total costs than nonobese subjects; 811 (CI: 787–835 vs. 694 (CI: 679–709

  13. Dengue fever: atypical manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataraj Gangasiddaiah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is affecting millions of population globally. For the past one decade, we have seen several outbreaks and even causing significant mortality of affected population. We witnessed numerous pattern and multisystem presentation of dengue in this period. The CNS manifestation like encephalitis, polyneuropathy (GB like syndrome and paresthesias were uncommonly reported priorly. Pancreatitis, polyserositis, carditis of varying severity and hepatic failure are the, some of atypical manifestations observed in recent out breaks. So dengue illness can presents with multi system involvement and can account to significant mortality. Here an attempt was done to present varying, uncommon and atypical manifestation of dengue illness. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1804-1806

  14. Patient perspectives on antipsychotic treatments and their association with clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hong Liu-Seifert1, Olawale O Osuntokun1, Jenna L Godfrey2, Peter D Feldman11Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: This analysis examined patient-reported attitudes toward antipsychotic medication and the relationship of these attitudes with clinical outcomes and pharmacotherapy adherence. The analysis included three randomized, double-blind studies in patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition and randomly assigned to treatment with olanzapine 5–20 mg/day or another antipsychotic (haloperidol 2–20 mg/day, risperidone 2–10 mg/day, or ziprasidone 80–160 mg/day. Patient-reported improvements were significantly greater for olanzapine (n = 488 versus other treatments (haloperidol n = 145, risperidone n = 158, or ziprasidone n = 271 on multiple Drug Attitude Inventory items. A positive attitude toward medication reported by patients was significantly associated with greater clinical improvement on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and lower discontinuation rates. These results suggest that patients’ perceptions of treatment benefits are associated with objective clinical measures, including reduction of symptom severity and lower discontinuation rates. Furthermore, olanzapine may be associated with more positive treatment attitudes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of reasons for treatment adherence from patients’ own perspectives.Keywords: antipsychotic agents, medication adherence, patient satisfaction, schizophrenia, treatment efficacy

  15. Antipsychotic Potentials of Ocimum sanctum Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Kadian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antipsychotic potential of Ocimum sanctum in experimental animal models. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g and albino mice (25-30 g were used for the study. The antipsychotic effect of the Ocimum sanctum was evaluated on haloperidol induced catalepsy, cooks pole climbing apparatus, locomotor activity on actophotometer, ketamine induced stereotype behavior. Different groups of rats were fed orally with a specially prepared diet containing various concentrations (2% w/w, 4% w/w and 8% w/w of Ocimum sanctum leaves paste (OCLP for 15 consecutive days. Further, the biochemical estimations were done by estimating brain dopamine levels. The OCLP produced significant dose dependent potentiation of haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p. induced catalepsy in rats, significantly increased the time taken by the rat to climb the pole in dose dependent manner, significantly decreased the locomotor activity. The OCLP significantly decreased ketamine (50 mg/kg, i.p. induced stereotyped behavior in a dose dependent manner. Ocimum sanctum leaves paste (OCLP significantly decreased the brain dopamine levels. The results suggest that OCLP posse’s antipsychotic activity. Further neurochemical investigation can explore the mechanism of action of the plant drug with respect to anti-dopaminergic functions and help to establish the plant as an antipsychotic agent.

  16. [Therapy of dementia with antipsychotics and antidepressives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, L; Hausner, L

    2015-04-01

    In dementia depressive symptoms, anxiety, hallucinations and delusions often occur and are accompanied by unspecific behavioral changes. A targeted pharmacotherapy is complicated by the underlying cognitive impairment and physical comorbidities. The current review focusses on recent evidence on the use of antidepressives and antipsychotics for psychotic disturbances, agitation and depression in dementia and analyzes currently published randomized controlled clinical trials and meta-analyses. The evidence on the use of antipsychotics for different indications favors risperidone, with lower evidence levels for quetiapine and aripiprazole, whereas haloperidol should be avoided. Increased mortality and the risk of cerebrovascular events due to antipsychotics are of major concern. With respect to antidepressives, the benefit of antidepressive pharmacotherapy in dementia is critically discussed because of limited efficacy and increased side effects; however, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), such as citalopram and sertraline have demonstrated efficacy on neuropsychiatric behavioral symptoms in general. These conclusions on the risk-benefit ratio of antidepressives and antipsychotics in dementia are in accordance with the recommendations of the German Society of Neurology and German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics (DGN/DGPPN) S3 guidelines on the treatment of dementia. PMID:25787724

  17. Atypical femoral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, Sandro; Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Luciani, Deianira; Mazzotti, Antonio; Donati, Davide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) represent the most widely used therapy for osteoporosis. Recently, a relationship between long-term treatment with BPs and a subset of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) from below the lesser trochanter to the sovracondilar line has been described. Many etiopathogenetic theories have been invoked to explain AFFs: reduced bone turnover and increased osteoblast bone apposition with accumulation of microdamage and decreased bone toughness with subsequent increased risk of mi...

  18. Conns' syndrome - atypical presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary hyperaldosteronism (Conns' syndrome) commonly presents with a combination of clinical features of hypokalemia and hypertension. Atypical presentations like normotension, normokalemia and neurological ailments are described in few cases. We encountered two such cases, the first presenting with acute neurological complaint and second case having insignificant hypertension. Both the patients had a characteristic biochemical and imaging profile consistent with primary hyperaldosteronism and responded to surgical resection of adrenal adenoma. (author)

  19. Differences in frontal cortical activation by a working memory task after substitution of risperidone for typical antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Garry D.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Soni, William; Varatheesan, Malini; Williams, Steve C. R.; Sharma, Tonmoy

    1999-01-01

    Antipsychotic drug treatment of schizophrenia may be complicated by side effects of widespread dopaminergic antagonism, including exacerbation of negative and cognitive symptoms due to frontal cortical hypodopaminergia. Atypical antipsychotics have been shown to enhance frontal dopaminergic activity in animal models. We predicted that substitution of risperidone for typical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia would be associated with enhanced functional activation of frontal cortex. We measured cerebral blood oxygenation changes during periodic performance of a verbal working memory task, using functional MRI, on two occasions (baseline and 6 weeks later) in two cohorts of schizophrenic patients. One cohort (n = 10) was treated with typical antipsychotic drugs throughout the study. Risperidone was substituted for typical antipsychotics after baseline assessment in the second cohort (n = 10). A matched group of healthy volunteers (n = 10) was also studied on a single occasion. A network comprising bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, and posterior parietal cortex was activated by working memory task performance in both the patients and comparison subjects. A two-way analysis of covariance was used to estimate the effect of substituting risperidone for typical antipsychotics on power of functional response in the patient group. Substitution of risperidone increased functional activation in right prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, and posterior parietal cortex at both voxel and regional levels of analysis. This study provides direct evidence for significantly enhanced frontal function in schizophrenic patients after substitution of risperidone for typical antipsychotic drugs, and it indicates the potential value of functional MRI as a tool for longitudinal assessment of psychopharmacological effects on cerebral physiology. PMID:10557338

  20. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  1. Management of antipsychotic treatment discontinuation and interruptions using model-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Samtani, Mahesh

    2012-01-01

    Mahesh N Samtani,1 John J Sheehan,2 Dong-Jing Fu,2 Bart Remmerie,3 Jennifer Kern Sliwa,2 Larry Alphs21Janssen Research and Development, Raritan, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Scientific Affairs, Titusville, NJ, USA; 3Janssen Research and Development, Division of Janssen Pharmaceutica, Beerse, BelgiumBackground: Medication nonadherence is a well described and prevalent clinical occurrence in schizophrenia. These pharmacokinetic model-based simulations analyze predicted antipsychotic plasma concentrations ...

  2. Antipsychotic-induced priapism in an HIV patient: a cytochrome P450-mediated drug interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Geraci, Matthew J.; McCoy, Stacey L.; Crum, Paul M.; Patel, Rajnikant A.

    2010-01-01

    Background With upwards of 48% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons having a probable psychiatric disorder, the possibility of cross-class drug interactions causing adverse effects or fatalities exists. Aims This report discusses an emergent case of low-flow priapism caused by an interaction between a previously prescribed combination protease inhibitor (PI) and newly added antipsychotic medications. Methods A 50-year-old HIV-positive man on highly active antiretroviral ther...

  3. Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes and cytochrome P-450 2D6 genotype : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, [No Value; de Boer, A; van der Weide, J; Steijns, LSW; Roos, RAC; Jansen, PAF; Leufkens, HGM

    2002-01-01

    To study the association between polymorphism of the cytochrome P-450 2D6 gene (CYP2D6) and the risk of antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes, as measured by the use of anti parkinsonian medication. Data for this case-control study were obtained from a psychiatric hospital where newly admit

  4. Refill rate of antipsychotic drugs : an easy and inexpensive method to monitor patients' compliance by using computerised pharmacy data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, CAW; Tobi, H; Vergouwen, ACM; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2004-01-01

    Purpose In the literature, noncompliance to medication in patients with schizophrenia ranges from 20 to 89%. There is an urgent need for reliable and valid techniques that measure compliance in antipsychotic drug treatment. In this study, we use pharmacy-dispensing records to assess compliance by ca

  5. Primary lateral sclerosis mimicking atypical parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlinah, Ibrahim M; Bhatia, Kailash P; Østergaard, Karen;

    2007-01-01

    the atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Here we describe five patients initially referred with a diagnosis of levodopa-unresponsive atypical parkinsonism (n = 4) or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (n = 1), but subsequently found to have features consistent with PLS instead. Onset age varied from......Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), the upper motor neurone variant of motor neurone disease, is characterized by progressive spinal or bulbar spasticity with minimal motor weakness. Rarely, PLS may present with clinical features resembling parkinsonism resulting in occasional misdiagnosis as one of...... eventually seen in all patients. Anterior horn cell involvement developed in three cases. Early gait disturbances resulting in falls were seen in all patients and none of them responded to dopaminergic medications. Two patients underwent dopamine transporter (DaT) SPECT scanning with normal results. Other...

  6. Teaching strategies for atypical presentation of illness in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Aselage, Melissa; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-07-01

    Atypical presentation of illness is a phenomenon where "seeing is believing." Expert geriatric nurses and clinicians know all too well the early signs and symptoms of this phenomenon, which frequently masquerades bacterial infections, pain, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or other serious medical ailments in older adults. Students, however, as novices to clinical practice, require interactive learning approaches to reflect on the patient's illness presentations, help with developing the necessary skills to analyze and synthesize clinically relevant data, and witness resolution of an atypical presentation when found and treated. Use of a case study as an educational tool can facilitate critical thinking about a clinical problem, such as atypical presentation of illness, for students within a problem-based learning format. Furthermore, we highlight strategies for teaching students atypical presentation of illness with consideration of student learning preferences, which include visual, auditory, reading, and kinesthetic modes of learning. PMID:20608591

  7. Atypical acute urticaria in children and its relationship with urticarial vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Zafer; ÖZMEN, Serap; SÜRMELİ, Sara; ARDA, Nilüfer

    2011-01-01

    In childhood, urticarial lesions are sometimes associated with purpura. This form might be identified as atypical, and may also be related to urticarial vasculitis (UV). The aim of this study was to assess the clinicopathologic characteristics of UV in children with atypical urticaria. Materials and methods: Fifteen children with atypical urticaria were evaluated with medical history, physical examination, and laboratory and skin punch biopsy findings. Results: Infections were detected as...

  8. Sensorimotor gating and habituation in antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after 6 months' treatment with quetiapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggernaes, Bodil; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Ebdrup, Bjorn H; Rasmussen, Hans; Lublin, Henrik; Oranje, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Impaired prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) in schizophrenia has been replicated in many studies. However, previous results may have been influenced by course of illness, and antipsychotic medication. Studies on antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients are lacking...... the human startle reflex in a large group of antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients, and the effect of subsequent treatment with quetiapine. Thirty-four antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients (24 males, 10 females), and age- and gender-matched healthy controls......-significant trend for reduced sensitization at baseline, but not at follow-up. Patients and controls showed similar levels of habituation, both at baseline, and at follow-up. These findings indicate that PPI deficits are already present from the earliest stage of clinical onset of schizophrenia, before the patients...

  9. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics: focus on olanzapine pamoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JP Lindenmayer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available JP LindenmayerDepartment of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York NY, USAAbstract: Medication non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia continues to be a significant problem and threatens successful treatment outcomes. Medication non-adherence is often associated with negative consequences, including symptom exacerbation, more frequent emergency room visits, re-hospitalizations and relapse. Long-acting injectable (LAI forms of antipsychotics allow for rapid identification of non-adherence, obviate the need for the patient to take the medication on a daily basis and increase adherence to some significant degree. Eli Lilly has developed a long-acting depot formulation of olanzapine, olanzapine pamoate, which has recently been approved by the FDA for the US market, and which will be reviewed here. Olanzapine LAI appears to be an effective antipsychotic at dosages of 210 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 2 weeks and 405 mg every 4 weeks in patients with acute schizophrenia, and at 150 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 2 weeks and at 405 mg every 4 weeks for the maintenance treatment of stable patients. Oral supplementation appears not to be needed, particularly not at the onset of treatment with the LAI as is necessary with risperidone LAI. Its efficacy is in general comparable to the efficacy seen with oral olanzapine at a corresponding dose. The side effect profile is also comparable to the side effects observed with oral olanzapine, including lower rates of extrapyramidal symptoms, prolactin elevation and cardiovascular side effects, but significant metabolic effects. The latter include significant weight gain, lipid abnormalities and glucose dysregulation. While the injection site adverse events are overall mild, the most significant serious adverse event is the post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS. While rare, this syndrome results from inadvertent intravascular injection of olanzapine LAI and can cause a range of

  10. Antipsychotics and risk of venous thromboembolism: A population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Jönsson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Anna K Jönsson1, Erzsebet Horváth-Puhó2, Staffan Hägg3, Lars Pedersen4, Henrik Toft Sørensen41Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Centre for Registry Research, Aarhus C, Denmark; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, DenmarkAbstract: During the last decade, the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE has been reported in users of antipsychotic drugs. However, the reports have been inconclusive. This study aimed to determine the relative risk of VTE in antipsychotic drug users. Using data from medical databases in North Jutland and Aarhus Counties, Denmark, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we identified 5,999 cases with a first-time diagnosis of VTE and, based on risk set sampling, 59,990 sex- and age-matched population controls during 1997–2005. Users of antipsychotic drugs were identified from population-based prescription databases and categorized based on filled prescriptions prior to admission date for VTE or index date for controls as current (at least one prescription within 90 days, recent (at least one prescription within 91–180 days, former (at least one prescription within 181–365 days or nonusers (no recorded prescription within 365 days. Compared with nonusers, current users of any antipsychotic drugs had an increased risk of VTE (adjusted relative risk [ARR]: 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.69–2.34. Former users of any antipsychotic drugs had a nonsignificant elevated risk of VTE compared with nonusers (ARR: 1.54, 95% CI: 0.99–2.40, p-value: 0.056. In conclusion, users of antipsychotic drugs have an increased risk of VTE, compared with nonusers, which might be due to the treatment itself, to lifestyle factors, to the underlying disease, or to residual confounding. Keywords: antipsychotic agents, venous thromboembolism, adverse effects, case-control study

  11. SWITCHING AMONG ANTIPSYCHOTICS - FOCUS ON SIDE EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ružić, Klementina; Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Grahovac, Tanja; Sabljić, Vladimir; Kosec, Tanja; Knez, Rajna

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a disorder held responsible for high morbidity in the overall population. Causes of depression vary, but lifestyle and stress can greatly contribute to its morbidity. Consumption of antidepressants is showing a trend in the economically developed countries. Apart from antidepressants, the treatment of depression can consist of other psychopharmaca. Depending on the severity of a disorder, that is - of psychotic symptoms, antipsychotics can be introduced in the treatment...

  12. [Antipsychotic agents and stimulants: a judicious combination?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M H; Eussen, M L J M; van Gool, A R

    2010-01-01

    A 31-year-old male, diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving maintenance treatment with olanzapine, was prescribed methylphenidate for comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd). The adhd symptoms diminished and there were hardly any side-effects. No increase in psychotic symptoms occurred. The patient used far fewer amphetamines and benzodiazepines. In theory, stimulants and antipsychotics produce opposite effects. Relevant literature on the subject is discussed. PMID:20054798

  13. Efeitos adversos metabólicos de antipsicóticos e estabilizadores de humor Metabolic side effects of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Ribeiro Teixeira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Um aumento na incidência de obesidade e diabetes melito entre pacientes psiquiátricos foi observado ainda na década de 60, como resultado indesejável do uso de antipsicóticos. Nos anos 80 e 90, a reabilitação da clozapina, a síntese dos demais antipsicóticos atípicos e a disseminação do uso do lítio e do ácido valpróico chamaram novamente a atenção para os efeitos metabólicos desses medicamentos. Este estudo tem por objetivo revisar a literatura médica a respeito dos efeitos adversos metabólicos associados ao uso de antipsicóticos e estabilizadores de humor. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma extensa pesquisa nas bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS até outubro de 2005. CONCLUSÃO: Os efeitos adversos metabólicos permanecem como problemas importantes da psicofarmacologia. Ganho de peso clinicamente relevante ocorre com freqüência em pacientes em uso de antipsicóticos e estabilizadores de humor, principalmente naqueles em uso de clozapina, olanzapina, lítio e ácido valpróico. A clozapina e a olanzapina associam-se também a uma maior incidência de diabetes melito e dislipidemias, seja devido ao ganho de peso, seja por ação deletéria direta sobre o metabolismo da glicose. A incidência de obesidade e outros distúrbios metabólicos é menor com a risperidona, se comparada à olanzapina ou à clozapina. Carbamazepina associa-se a menor ganho de peso, se comparada ao lítio ou ao ácido valpróico. Drogas como o haloperidol, a ziprasidona, o aripiprazol e a lamotrigina não estão associadas a ganho importante de peso ou a maior incidência de diabetes melito e são alternativas para pacientes mais propensos a desenvolver tais efeitos adversos.BACKGROUND: An increase in the incidence of obesity and diabetes mellitus in psychiatric patients using antipsychotic drugs was observed as early as the 1960's. In the 1980's and 1990's, rehabilitation of clozapine, synthesis of other atypical antipsychotics, and spread of the

  14. Review of antipsychotics in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanovic, Suad; Simpson, George M

    2006-10-01

    The use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents in the clinical setting is increasing. This article reviews 77 clinical trials published in the last 10 years, investigating their efficacy, effectiveness, safety and pharmacokinetic data in paediatric populations. The diagnostic categories in which the antipsychotics are commonly used (schizophrenia, pervasive developmental disorders, Tourette's disorder, mental retardation/subaverage intelligence, mood disorders and disruptive behaviour disorders) were used in order to review the evidence and effectiveness. All randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials from the past decade are also summarised. This review refers to recent relevant practice parameters, guidelines and reviews throughout the text. Consistent with previous reviews, it is concluded that the recent trend of increased use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents is not adequately supported by evidence. Specific suggestions have been provided on how to incorporate the existing evidence base into clinical decision making. The review ends with the authors' opinion on the clinical and research implications for the field and future directions. PMID:17020414

  15. Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Somnolence: Incidence, Mechanisms, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Sun, Hongwei; Wang, Zuowei; Ren, Ming; Calabrese, Joseph R; Gao, Keming

    2016-09-01

    Somnolence is a common side effect of antipsychotics. To assess the incidence of this side effect, we performed a MEDLINE search for randomized, double-blinded, placebo- or active-controlled studies of adult patients treated with antipsychotics for schizophrenia, mania, bipolar depression, or bipolar disorder. We extracted rates of somnolence from original publications and pooled them based on the dose of each antipsychotic in the same psychiatric condition, then estimated the absolute risk increase (ARI) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of an antipsychotic relative to placebo or an active comparator in the same psychiatric condition. According to the ARI in acute schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and bipolar depression, antipsychotics can be classified as high somnolence (clozapine), moderate somnolence (olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone), and low somnolence (aripiprazole, asenapine, haloperidol, lurasidone, paliperidone, cariprazine). The risk of somnolence with blonanserin, brexpiprazole, chlorpromazine, iloperidone, sertindole, and zotepine needs further investigation. The rates of somnolence were positively correlated to dose and duration for some antipsychotics, but not for others. Many factors, including antipsychotic per se, the method used to measure somnolence, patient population, study design, and dosing schedule, might affect the incidence of antipsychotic-induced somnolence. The mechanisms of antipsychotic-induced somnolence are likely multifactorial, although the blockade of histamine 1 receptors and α1 receptors may play a major role. The management of antipsychotic-induced somnolence should include sleep hygiene education, choosing an antipsychotic with a lower risk for somnolence, starting at a lower dose with a slower titration based on psychiatric diagnoses, adjusting doses when necessary, and minimizing concurrent somnolence-prone agents. Since most cases of somnolence were mild to moderate, allowing tolerance to

  16. Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.

  17. Did FDA Decisionmaking Affect Anti-Psychotic Drug Prescribing in Children?: A Time-Trend Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M.; Eddings, Wesley; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, many drugs are prescribed for non-FDA-approved (“off-label”) uses. If substantial evidence supports the efficacy and safety of off-label indications, manufacturers can pursue formal FDA approval through supplemental new drug applications (sNDAs). We evaluated the effect of FDA determinations on pediatric sNDAs for antipsychotic drugs on prescribing of these products in children. Methods Retrospective, segmented time-series analysis using new prescription claims during 2003–2012 for three atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone). FDA approved the sNDAs for pediatric use of olanzapine and quetiapine in December 2009, but did not approve the sNDA for pediatric use of ziprasidone. Results During the months before FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA, new prescriptions of olanzapine decreased for both children and adults. After FDA approval, the increase in prescribing trends was similar for both age groups (P = 0.47 for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; P = 0.37 for other indications). Comparable decreases in use of quetiapine were observed between pediatrics and adults following FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.88; P = 0.63). Prescribing of ziprasidone decreased similarly for pediatric and adult patients after FDA non-approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.61; P = 0.79). Conclusions The FDA’s sNDA determinations relating to use of antipsychotics in children did not result in changes in use that favored the approved sNDAs and disfavored the unapproved sNDA. Improved communication may help translate the agency’s expert judgments to clinical practice. PMID:27032095

  18. Sexual dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia treated with conventional antipsychotics or risperidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hong Liu-Seifert1, Bruce J Kinon1, Christopher J Tennant2, Jennifer Sniadecki1, Jan Volavka31Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2CJT Biomedical Consulting, South Lake Tahoe, CA, USA; 3New York University, New York, NY, USAObjective: To better understand sexual dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia and its associations with prolactin and reproductive hormones.Methods: This was a secondary analysis of an open-label, one-day study (N = 402. The primary objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in patients with schizophrenia who had been treated with conventional antipsychotics or risperidone. Other atypical antipsychotics available at the time of the study were not included due to a more favorable prolactin profile.Results: The majority of patients (59% of females and 60% of males reported impairment of sexual function. In postmenopausal females, risk of impaired sexual interest was increased by 31% for every 10 ng/ml increase in prolactin (p = 0.035. In males, lower testosterone was associated with higher prolactin (p < 0.001 and with orgasmic (p = 0.004 and ejaculatory dysfunction (p = 0.028.Conclusion: These findings suggest that hyperprolactinemia may be associated with sexual dysfunction. They also provide more information on the relationships between prolactin, reproductive hormones, and sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction is an understudied yet important consideration in the treatment of schizophrenia. More attention is warranted in this area as it may provide opportunities for improved quality of life and adherence to treatment for patients.Keywords: sexual dysfunction, schizophrenia, hyperprolactinemia, antipsychotics, risperidone

  19. Diabetes mellitus e antipsicóticos atípicos Diabetes mellitus and atypical antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Pondé de Sena; Aline Santos Sampaio; Lucas de Castro Quarantini; Irismar Reis de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Pacientes esquizofrênicos têm maior risco para desenvolvimento de transtorno hiperglicêmico e o uso de antipsicóticos parece ampliar o risco de desenvolvimento de diabetes mellitus. O presente trabalho é uma revisão da literatura acerca da relação entre antipsicóticos atípicos e risco de desenvolvimento de diabetes mellitus. A pesquisa bibliográfica foi realizada por meio dos bancos de dados Medline e Webofscience enfocando os seguintes tópicos: "Hyperglycemia", "Diabetes Mellitus", "Antipsyc...

  20. First- and second-generation antipsychotic drug treatment and subcortical brain morphology in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Nesvåg, Ragnar; Gunleiksrud, Sindre; Raballo, Andrea; Jönsson, Erik G; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic medication may influence brain structure, but to what extent effects of first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) differ is still not clear. Here we aimed to disentangle the effects of FGA and SGA on variation in volumes of subcortical structures in patients with long-term treated schizophrenia. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from 95 patients with schizophrenia and 106 healthy control subjects. Among the patients, 40 received only FGA and 42 received only SGA. FreeSurfer 5.3.0 was used to obtain volumes of 27 subcortical structures as well as total brain volume and estimated intracranial volume. Findings of reduced total brain volume, enlarged ventricular volume and reduced hippocampal volume bilaterally among patients were replicated, largely independent of medication class. In the basal ganglia, FGA users had larger putamen bilaterally and right caudate volume compared to healthy controls, and the right putamen was significantly larger than among SGA users. FGA and SGA users had similar and larger globus pallidus volumes compared to healthy controls. Post hoc analyses revealed that the difference between FGA and SGA could be attributed to smaller volumes in the clozapine users specifically. We therefore conclude that basal ganglia volume enlargements are not specific to FGA. PMID:26547434

  1. A Survey of the Tardive Dyskinesia Induced by Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser tabibi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Tardive Dyskinesia (TD, is one of the important problems of the patients with schizophrenia. The emergence of these side effects depends on so many factors such as the patients' age and the duration of antipsychotic treatment. By discovering new drugs (Atypical, there has been an outstanding decrease in the emergence of these side effects. The present study investigates the symptoms of TD in the Patients with schizophrenia who were under  treatments for more than 6 months. "nMethod: The sample of this study was 200 Patients with schizophrenia of four wards in Razi hospital (two acute and two chronic wards who were hospitalized in the winter of 2006 and were qualified for this study. The subjects were 101 males and 99 females who were younger than 60 and had received antipsychotic drugs for at least 6 months. After psychiatric interview and filling the demographic questionnaire by the patients, the required information about the drugs and the intensity of the symptoms was acquired. Then clinical and physical examinations of tardive dyskinesia were done. Next, the tardive dyskinesia disorders' check list (AIMS was used. Findings of this cross-sectional, descriptive study were analyzed by SPSS. "nResults: There was a high ratio of 95% between TD and the age factor (P=0.05. There was no relationship between symptoms frequency and duration of treatment (P=0.68. Facial muscles and oral zones were mostly involved in T.D disorder (72%. "nConclusion: No significant difference was observed between nine fold symptoms of T.D in patients who were using traditional drugs and those who were using the new ones (typical and atypical. Findings showed that in the intensity of the symptoms, gender does not play a major role.

  2. Phencyclidine-induced disruption of oscillatory activity in prefrontal cortex: Effects of antipsychotic drugs and receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó-Pelfort, L; Troyano-Rodriguez, E; van den Munkhof, H E; Cervera-Ferri, A; Jurado, N; Núñez-Calvet, M; Artigas, F; Celada, P

    2016-03-01

    The non-competitive NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) markedly disrupts thalamocortical activity, increasing excitatory neuron discharge and reducing low frequency oscillations (LFO, effects. Atypical antipsychotic reversal may additionally involve 5-HT1A-R activation (but not 5-HT2A-R blockade) since 8-OH-DPAT and BAYx3702 (but not M100907) fully countered PCP effects. Blockade of histamine H1-R (pyrilamine) and α1-adrenoceptors (prazosin) was without effect. However, the enhancement of GABAA-R-mediated neurotransmission (using muscimol, diazepam or valproate) and the reduction of excitatory neurotransmission (using the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 and the preferential kainite/AMPA antagonist CNQX - but not the preferential AMPA/kainate antagonist NBQX) partially or totally countered PCP effects. Overall, these results shed new light on the neurobiological mechanisms used by antipsychotic drugs to reverse NMDA-R antagonist actions and suggest that agents restoring the physiological excitatory/inhibitory balance altered by PCP may be new targets in antipsychotic drug development. PMID:26781158

  3. Recovery of behavioral changes and compromised white matter in C57BL/6 mice exposed to cuprizone: Effects of antipsychotic drugs

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    Haiyun eXu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent animal and human studies have suggested that the cuprizone (CPZ, a copper chelator-feeding C57BL/6 mouse may be used as an animal model of schizophrenia. The goals of this study were to see the recovery processes of CPZ-induced behavioral changes and damaged white matter and to examine possible effects of antipsychotic drugs on the recovery processes. Mice were fed a CPZ-containing diet for five weeks then returned to normal food for three weeks, during which period mice were treated with different antipsychotic drugs. Various behaviors were measured at the end of CPZ-feeding phase as well as on the 14th and 21st days after CPZ-withdrawal. The damage to and recovery status of white matter in the brains of mice were examined. Dietary CPZ resulted in white matter damage and behavioral abnormalities in the elevated plus-maze, social interaction and Y-maze test. Elevated plus-maze performance recovered to normal range within two weeks after CPZ withdrawal. But, alterations in social interaction showed no recovery. Antipsychotics did not alter animals’ behavior in either of these tests during the recovery period. Altered performance in the Y-maze showed some recovery in the vehicle group; atypical antipsychotics, but not haloperidol, significantly promoted this recovery process. The recovery of damaged white matter was incomplete during the recovery period. None of the drugs significantly promoted the recovery of damaged white matter. These results suggest that CPZ-induced white matter damage and social interaction deficit may be resistant to the antipsychotic treatment employed in this study. They are in good accordance with the clinical observations that positive symptoms in schizophrenic patients respond well to antipsychotic drugs while social dysfunction is usually intractable.

  4. Dermatofibroma: Atypical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Roy Bandyopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma.

  5. Dermatofibroma: Atypical Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Mousumi Roy; Besra, Mrinal; Dutta, Somasree; Sarkar, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma. PMID:26955137

  6. [The modern concept of atypical depression: four definitions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    accepts the relationship between anxiety symptoms and interpersonal rejection sensitivity, while the Columbia group does not recognize the importance of anxiety symptoms because they could not identify a relationship between such symptoms and the efficacy of MAO inhibitors. The concept of atypical depression proposed by the New South Wales group overlaps considerably with that of hysteroid dysphoria, which was proposed by Klein et al., and was the progenitor of Columbia group's concept of atypical depression. The Pittsburgh University group (see Himmelhoch, Kupfer, Thase et al.) and the soft bipolar spectrum group (see Akiskal, Perugi, Benazzi et al.) regard atypical depression as a depressive state that can be observed in bipolar disorder. The former groups takes into account reversed vegetative symptoms and lethargy as signs of bipolar disorder, while the latter recognizes that atypical depression shares features with bipolar II disorder or soft bipolar spectrum disorder. The soft bipolar spectrum group maintains their unique concept of bipolar disorder, which regards some unipolar depressions as bipolar disorder, while the Pittsburg group continues to share the conventional concept of a unipolar-bipolar dichotomy with other groups. The fundamental pattern of atypical depression is represented by chronic mild depressions, which are characterized by a younger age at onset, female predominance, interpersonal rejection sensitivity, and mood lability, which are difficult to distinguish from a characterological pathology. Patients who present with such patterns are frequently diagnosed with borderline, histrionic, or avoidant personality disorders; therefore, we must recognize the significance of atypical depression as a concept that can suggest the utility of medication for these patients. For such patients, however, various groups have proposed different kinds of definition and therapeutic guidelines that are difficult to synthesize and utilize in clinical settings

  7. Risperidone in the treatment of bipolar mania

    OpenAIRE

    Sajatovic, Martha; Subramoniam, Madhusoodanan; Fuller, Matthew A

    2006-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications have assumed growing importance for the treatment of bipolar disorder, an illness that affects approximately 1.2%–3.7% of the general population in a given year. Current practice guidelines for the treatment of bipolar mania support the use of atypical antipsychotic medications as monotherapy or as a component of polytherapy, and in clinical settings the use of atypical antipsychotics to treat bipolar disorder is widespread. Risperidone is an atypical antips...

  8. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümmü Sena Sarı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was first reported in the 1970s in mostly kids should be considered for differential diagnosis in adult cases presenting with high fever, atypical rash and pneumonia even if patients have a history of immunization

  9. Decline in hospitalization risk and health care cost after initiation of depot antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomei Peng, Haya Ascher-Svanum, Douglas Faries, Robert R Conley, Kory J SchuhEli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USAPurpose: To assess change in hospitalization and cost of care from 6 months pre- to 6 months post-initiation on any depot antipsychotic among schizophrenia patients.Patients and methods: Using a large United States commercial claims and encounters database, patients younger than 65 years diagnosed with schizophrenia were identified. Patients initiated on a depot antipsychotic were studied in a mirror-image design to assess change in hospitalization rates, mean duration hospitalized, and hospitalization cost. McNemar’s test and paired t-tests compared the proportions of patients hospitalized and the mean duration. Paired t-test and bootstrapping methods compared costs.Results: In these patients (n = 147, psychiatric hospitalizations declined from 49.7% pre-initiation to 22.4% post-initiation (P < 0.001, and the mean hospitalized duration for psychiatric purposes numerically declined from 7.3 to 4.7 days (P = 0.05. Total health care costs declined from $11,111 to $7884 (P < 0.05 driven by reduction in costs for psychiatric hospitalizations from $5384 to $2538 (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Initiation of depot antipsychotic therapy appeared to be associated with a decline in hospitalization rates and costs. Current findings suggest that treatment with depot antipsychotics may be a cost-effective option for a subgroup of patients with schizophrenia who are at high risk of nonadherence with their oral antipsychotic medication regimen.Keywords: mirror-image, claims database, treatment outcomes, depot antipsychotics

  10. Corrected QT changes during antipsychotic treatment of children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Gjessing; Juul, Klaus; Fink-Jensen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of antipsychotics on the corrected QT (QTc) interval in youth. METHOD: We searched PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) for randomized or open clinical trials of antipsychotics in youth <18 years with QTc data, meta-analyzing the results. Meta-regression a...

  11. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmü Sena Sarı; Figen Kaptan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was ...

  12. A gene co-expression network in whole blood of schizophrenia patients is independent of antipsychotic-use and enriched for brain-expressed genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Simone; Boks, Marco P M; Fuller, Tova F; Strengman, Eric; Janson, Esther; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Ori, Anil P S; Vi, Nancy; Mulder, Flip; Blom, Jan Dirk; Glenthøj, Birte; Schubart, Chris D; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Horvath, Steve; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-01-01

    schizophrenia patients and controls. We applied a systems biology approach to genome-wide expression data from whole blood of 92 medicated and 29 antipsychotic-free schizophrenia patients and 118 healthy controls. We show that gene expression profiling in whole blood can identify twelve large gene co......-expression modules associated with schizophrenia. Several of these disease related modules are likely to reflect expression changes due to antipsychotic medication. However, two of the disease modules could be replicated in an independent second data set involving antipsychotic-free patients and controls. One of......Despite large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the underlying genes for schizophrenia are largely unknown. Additional approaches are therefore required to identify the genetic background of this disorder. Here we report findings from a large gene expression study in peripheral blood of...

  13. [Analysis of the cardiac side effects of antipsychotics: Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Takashi; Okumara, Yasuyuki; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka; Ito, Hiroto

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed the cases of side effects due to antipsychotics reported to Japan's Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2012. We used the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) and analyzed 136 of 216,945 cases using the defined terms. We also checked the cardiac adverse effects listed in the package inserts of the antipsychotics involved. We found cases of Ikr blockade resulting in sudden death (49 cases), electrocardiogram QT prolonged (29 cases), torsade de pointes (TdP, 19 cases), ventricular fibrillation (VF, 10 cases). M2 receptor blockade was observed in tachycardia (8 cases) and sinus tachycardia (3 cases). Calmodulin blockade was involved in reported cardiomyopathy (3 cases) and myocarditis (1 case). Multiple adverse events were reported simultaneously in 14 cases. Our search of package inserts revealed warnings regarding electrocardiogram QT prolongation (24 drugs), tachycardia (23), sudden death (18), TdP (14), VF (3), myocarditis (1) and cardiomyopathy (1). We suggest that when an antipsychotic is prescribed, the patient should be monitored regularly with ECG, blood tests, and/or biochemical tests to avoid adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25069255

  14. Interactions between antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank M C; Berry, David

    2006-01-01

    Antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs are often prescribed together. Interactions between the drugs may affect both efficacy and toxicity. This is a review of human clinical data on the interactions between the antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, valproic acid (sodium valproate), vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, oxcarbazepine, levetiracetam, pregabalin, felbamate, zonisamide, phenobarbital and phenytoin with the antipsychotic drugs risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, amisulpride, sulpiride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, haloperidol and chlorpromazine; the limited information on interactions between antiepileptic drugs and zuclopenthixol, periciazine, fluphenazine, flupenthixol and pimozide is also presented. Many of the interactions depend on the induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but other important mechanisms involve the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase isoenzymes and protein binding. There is some evidence for the following effects. Carbamazepine decreases the plasma concentrations of both risperidone and its active metabolite. It also decreases concentrations of olanzapine, clozapine, ziprasidone, haloperidol, zuclopenthixol, flupenthixol and probably chlorpromazine and fluphenazine. Quetiapine increases the ratio of carbamazepine epoxide to carbamazepine and this may lead to toxicity. The data on valproic acid are conflicting; it may either increase or decrease clozapine concentrations, and it appears to decrease aripiprazole concentrations. Chlorpromazine possibly increases valproic acid concentrations. Lamotrigine possibly increases clozapine concentrations. Phenobarbital decreases clozapine, haloperidol and chlorpromazine concentrations. Phenytoin decreases quetiapine, clozapine, haloperidol and possibly chlorpromazine concentrations. There are major gaps in the data. In many cases there are no published clinical data on interactions that would be predicted on theoretical grounds. PMID

  15. Psychosis with Huntington's disease: role of antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jonathan; Gadit, Amin Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 6-month history of increasing agitation and emotional volatility. His family brought him to the emergency room as they were concerned about his threatening and aggressive behaviour. The patient was initially incoherent and uncooperative. During the interview, the patient's family revealed that he had a previous diagnosis of Huntington's disease; there was also a family history of personality changes preceding Huntington's chorea. The patient was admitted to the psychiatric inpatient unit and started on low-dose risperidone. Consequently, there was marked improvement in his symptoms. Subsequent cognitive tests revealed deficits in multiple domains. After a month, the patient was discharged to a community home in stable state. PMID:25139915

  16. Investigating the safety and efficacy of naltrexone for anti-psychotic induced weight gain in severe mental illness: study protocol of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tek, Cenk; Guloksuz, Sinan; Srihari, Vinod H.; Reutenauer, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is a growing health problem leading to high rates of mortality and morbidity in patients with severe mental illness (SMI). The increased rate of obesity is largely attributed to antipsychotic use. The effect of antipsychotic medications on H1 and 5HT2 receptors has been associated with weight gain, but there is also a substantial amount of evidence showing that D2 receptor blockade may be responsible for weight gain by interacting with the dopamine-opioid system. Unfortunat...

  17. Computerized tomography findings on schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brain CTs of 54 endogenous psychotics (27 males, 27 females) who were less than 40 years of age and were first adimitted in Aichi Medical University from 1982 to 1986, and 20 controls (10 males, 10 females) were examined. Using Mitsuda's classification, we devided all the cases into 29 schizophrenics (18 males, 11 females) and 25 atypical psychotics (9 males, 16 females). In order to investigate the differences of CT findings between the two patient groups, the 3rd ventricle index (the ratio of 3rd ventricle width to the internal diameter of the skull), Evans'ratio, lateral ventricle brain ratio (VBR), Sylvian fissure to brain ratio, 4th ventricle to cerebellum ratio were determined. Schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricles as well as Sylvian fissures when compared to controls, but atypical psychotics had not. Moreover, schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricle than atypical psychotics. But in widths of Sylvian fissures there was no statistical significant difference between the two groups. Ventricle enlargements of schizophrenics did not correlate with duration of illness as well as age, and were not results of prior psychiatric treatment such as medication and EST. Therefore the following is suggested that, this abnormal CT findings predate the onset of schizophrenic psychoses. In atypical psychotics the changes of Sylvian fissures correlated with duration of illness, but not with age. Such observations may possibly suggest that recurrence of the illness might finally attain irreversible changes even in atypical psychotics. Finally, the heterogeneity of schizophrenia and the independence of atypical psychosis were also discussed. (author) 53 refs

  18. Role of community pharmacists in the use of antipsychotics for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD): a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Lydia; Hilton, Andrea; Iqbal, Naveed; Child, Anne; Shaw, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to use qualitative methodology to understand the current role of community pharmacists in limiting the use of antipsychotics prescribed inappropriately for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Design A qualitative study employing focus groups was conducted. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting 3 different geographical locations in the England. Participants Community pharmacists (n=22). Results The focus groups identified an array of factors and constraints, which affect the ability of community pharmacists to contribute to initiatives to limit the use of antipsychotics. 3 key themes were revealed: (1) politics and the medical hierarchy, which created communication barriers; (2) how resources and remit impact the effectiveness of community pharmacy; and (3) understanding the nature of the treatment of dementia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that an improvement in communication between community pharmacists and healthcare professionals, especially general practitioners (GPs) must occur in order for community pharmacists to assist in limiting the use of antipsychotics in people with dementia. Additionally, extra training in working with people with dementia is required. Thus, an intervention which involves appropriately trained pharmacists working in collaboration with GPs and other caregivers is required. Overall, within the current environment, community pharmacists question the extent to which they can contribute in helping to reduce the prescription of antipsychotics. PMID:26983947

  19. Antipsychotic drug treatment for patients with schizophrenia: theoretical background, clinical considerations and patients preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2009-01-01

      The cornerstone in treatment of psychosis is antipsychotic drugs. Treatment options have increased over the years; newer antipsychotic drugs with a proposed efficacy regarding negative and cognitive symptoms, but also a shift in side-effects from neurological side-effects to metabolic side-effe...... treatment. The clinically relevant aspects of antipsychotic drug treatment are reviewed; mechanism of antipsychotic drug action, clinical considerations in treatment, switching antipsychotic drugs, polypharmacy, safety and patient preference.  ...

  20. Pharmacological management of agitation in emergency settings

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIZ, A.; Sachs, G; Turgay, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To review, firstly, published studies comparing classic antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and/or combination of both; and secondly, available data on the use of atypical antipsychotic medications in controlling agitation and aggressive behaviour seen in psychiatric patients in emergency.

  1. Use of second-generation antipsychotics in the acute inpatient management of schizophrenia in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhadhari S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulaiman Alkhadhari,1 Nasser Al Zain,2 Tarek Darwish,3 Suhail Khan,4 Tarek Okasha,5 Hisham Ramy,5 Talaat Matar Tadros6 1Kuwait Center for Mental Health, Safat, Kuwait; 2Al Amal Complex for Mental Health Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3Behavioural Science Pavilion, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 4Jeddah Psychiatric Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 5Institute of Psychiatry, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 6Ibrahim Bin Hamad Obaidallah and Seif Bin Ghubash Hospitals, Ras Alkhaimah, United Arab Emirates Background: Management of acute psychotic episodes in schizophrenic patients remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Despite treatment guidelines recommending that second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs should be used as monotherapy, first-generation antipsychotics, polypharmacy, and lower than recommended doses are frequently administered in clinical practice. Minimal data exist regarding the use of SGAs in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to examine the discrepancies between current clinical practice and guideline recommendations in the region. Methods: RECONNECT-S Beta was a multicenter, noninterventional study conducted in Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates to observe the management of schizophrenic patients who were hospitalized due to an acute psychotic episode. Patients underwent one visit on the day of discharge. Demographic and medical history, together with data on antipsychotic treatment and concomitant medication during the hospitalization period and medication recommendations at discharge were recorded. Results: Of the 1,057 patients, 180 (17.0% and 692 (65.5% received SGAs as monotherapy and in combination therapy, respectively. Overall, the most frequently administered medications were given orally, and included risperidone (40.3%, olanzapine (32.5%, and quetiapine (24.6%; the doses administered varied between countries and deviated from the recommended

  2. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  3. Improvement of Brain Reward Abnormalities by Antipsychotic Monotherapy in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne;

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT Schizophrenic symptoms are linked to a dysfunction of dopamine neurotransmission and the brain reward system. However, it remains unclear whether antipsychotic treatment, which blocks dopamine transmission, improves, alters, or even worsens the reward-related abnormalities. OBJECTIVE To....... Antipsychotic treatment tends to normalize the response of the reward system; this was especially seen in the patients with the most pronounced treatment effect on the positive symptoms. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01154829....... investigate changes in reward-related brain activations in schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic monotherapy with a dopamine D2/D3 antagonist. DESIGN Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING Psychiatric inpatients and outpatients in the Capital Region of Denmark. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-three antipsychotic...

  4. Metabolic Complications of Antipsychotic Therapy for Tourette Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-three children with Tourette syndrome treated with antipsychotics were monitored for metabolic and neurologic side effects every six months in a study at University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

  5. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbloom ArlanL

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-generation drugs, most commonly risperidone, with some patients developing gynecomastia or galactorrhea or, as a result of prolactin inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, amenorrhea. With concern about the long-term effects of antipsychotics on bone mass and pituitary tumor formation, it is prudent to monitor serum prolactin levels in antipsychotic drug-treated pediatric patients and consider treatment with an agent less likely to induce hyperprolactinemia.

  6. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlan L. Rosenbloom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-generation drugs, most commonly risperidone, with some patients developing gynecomastia or galactorrhea or, as a result of prolactin inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, amenorrhea. With concern about the long-term effects of antipsychotics on bone mass and pituitary tumor formation, it is prudent to monitor serum prolactin levels in antipsychotic drug-treated pediatric patients and consider treatment with an agent less likely to induce hyperprolactinemia.

  7. Time Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Ane; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Gasse, Christiane; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antipsychotics are often used to treat neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia, but the evidence for effect is limited. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased risk of adverse events and mortality in patients with dementia, leading to safety regulations worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To...... investigate time trends in use of antipsychotics and other psychotropic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: The study included longitudinal data on all Danish residents ≥65 years. The study population was defined on January 1 of each year from 2000-2012. Data included prescriptions, discharge diagnoses, and...... somatic and psychiatric comorbidities. Multivariate time trend analyses of psychotropic drug use in patients with dementia within 4-year age bands were performed. RESULTS: Overall, among patients with dementia the prevalence of antipsychotic drug use decreased from 31.3% in 2000 to 20.4% in 2012. The...

  8. Glutamatergic and GABAergic disturbances as markers of choice-of-treatment – part of Pan European Collaboration on Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia II (PECANS II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Jessen, Kasper; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    Background Insufficient response to antipsychotic drugs constitutes a major challenge in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia and other targets than the dopamine D2 receptors are highly warranted. Twenty to thirty % of patients do not respond sufficiently to antipsychotic medication, which...... Inclusion started the 1st of January 2014 and is expected to continue until December 2018. So far 3 patients have been included. Analysis of data has not yet taken place. For more information about the project or referral of patients, please contact: Kirsten Borup Bojesen at Kirsten...

  9. Nicotine Reduces Antipsychotic-Induced Orofacial Dyskinesia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bordia, Tanuja; McIntosh, J. Michael; Quik, Maryka

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotics are an important class of drugs for the management of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. They act by blocking dopamine receptors; however, because these receptors are present throughout the brain, prolonged antipsychotic use also leads to serious side effects. These include tardive dyskinesia, repetitive abnormal involuntary movements of the face and limbs for which there is little treatment. In this study, we investigated whether nicotine administration could reduce ...

  10. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-ge...

  11. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbloom ArlanL

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-g...

  12. The personal, societal, and economic burden of schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China: implications for antipsychotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery W

    2013-08-01

    antipsychotic medication appears common and is a strong predictor of relapse. Cost-effectiveness research in the People's Republic of China is needed to examine the potential gains from improved outpatient antipsychotic treatment.Conclusion: Schizophrenia is a very costly mental illness in terms of personal, economic, and societal burden, both in the People's Republic of China and globally. When treated effectively, patients tend to persist longer with antipsychotic treatment, have fewer costly relapses, and have improved functioning. Further research examining the long-term effects of reducing barriers to effective treatments on the societal burden of schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China is needed.Keywords: People's Republic of China, schizophrenia, relapse, review, health care costs, antipsychotic agents

  13. Priapism in Antipsychotic Drug Use: A Rare but Important Side Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igne Sinkeviciute

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Priapism is a rare but important side effect of antipsychotic drugs which may evolve into a urological emergency. Most antipsychotic drugs are alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists, which is thought to be the principal mechanism involved in antipsychotic-induced priapism. Other aetiologies exist, however. A case is presented with multiple episodes of priapism during the use of several different antipsychotic drugs. The case is representative of many patients treated with antipsychotic drugs, as there were hyperprolactinemia, and illicit drug use, which are known causes of priapism. Moreover, the patient used combinations of antipsychotic drugs. The case thus illustrates the etiological complexity which could delay a diagnosis of antipsychotic-induced priapism, and the problem of establishing a link between priapism and one particular ingredient of a drug combination. The case presents how a treatment regimen was finally established balancing antipsychotic efficacy to acceptable side effects and offers guidance to physicians regarding how antipsychotic-induced priapism may be resolved.

  14. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Abrahamsen, Bo;

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) and denosumab reduce the risk of spine and nonspine fractures. Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) located in the subtrochanteric region and diaphysis of the femur have been reported in patients taking BPs and in patients on denosumab, but they also occur in patients with no...... exposure to these drugs. In this report, we review studies on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and medical management of AFFs, published since 2010. This newer evidence suggests that AFFs are stress or insufficiency fractures. The original case definition was revised to highlight radiographic features that...... distinguish AFFs from ordinary osteoporotic femoral diaphyseal fractures and to provide guidance on the importance of their transverse orientation. The requirement that fractures be noncomminuted was relaxed to include minimal comminution. The periosteal stress reaction at the fracture site was changed from a...

  15. Role of Long-Acting Injectable Second-Generation Antipsychotics in the Treatment of First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Přikryl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 80% of patients with the first-episode schizophrenia reach symptomatic remission after antipsychotic therapy. However, within two years most of them relapse, mainly due to low levels of insight into the illness and nonadherence to their oral medication. Therefore, although the formal data available is limited, many experts recommend prescribing long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics (mostly risperidone or alternatively paliperidone in the early stages of schizophrenia, particularly in patients who have benefited from the original oral molecule in the past and agree to receive long-term injectable treatment. Early application of long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics can significantly reduce the risk of relapse in the future and thus improve not only the social and working potential of patients with schizophrenia but also their quality of life.

  16. QSAR–CoMSIA applied to antipsychotic drugs with their dopamine D2 and serotonine 5HT2A membrane receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPERANTA AVRAM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs are psychiatric medication primarily used to manage psychosis (e.g., delusions or hallucinations, particularly in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. First and second generations of antipshychotics tend to block receptors in the brain's dopamine pathways, but antipsychotic drugs encompass a wide range of receptor targets. The inhibition constant, Ki, at the level of membrane receptors is a major determinant of their pharmacokinetic behavior and, consequently, it can affect their antipsychotic activity. Here, predicted inhibition constants, Ki for 71 antipsychotics, already approved for clinical treatment, as well as representative new chemical structures which exhibit antipsychotic activity, were evaluated using 3D-QSAR–CoMSIA models. Significant values of the cross-validated correlation q2 (higher than 0.70 and the fitted correlation r2 (higher than 0.80 revealed that these models have reasonable power to predict the biological affinity of the 15 new risperidone and 12 new olanzapine derivatives in interactions with dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptors; these compounds are suggested for further studies.

  17. Familial benign pemphigus atypical localization

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Maria Veronica; Halac, Sabina; Mainardi, Claudio; Kurpis, Maria; Ruiz Lascano, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We present an atypical case of familial benign pemphigus (Hailey-Hailey disease), which presented as crusted, annular plaques limited to the back without intertriginous involvement. We could not find in the literature another patient with plaques located solely on the back without a prior history of classical disease.

  18. Two Sudden and Unexpected Deaths of Patients with Schizophrenia Associated with Intramuscular Injections of Antipsychotics and Practice Guidelines to Limit the Use of High Doses of Intramuscular Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahidi, Nasratullah; Johnson, Katie M; Brenzel, Allen; de Leon, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous haloperidol has been associated with torsades de pointes (TdP). These two sudden deaths were probable adverse drug reactions (ADRs) following intramuscular (IM) antipsychotics. The autopsies described lack of heart pathology and were highly compatible with the possibility of TdP in the absence of risk factors other than the accumulation of antipsychotics with a high serum peak after the last injection, leading to death within hours. The first case was a 27-year-old African-American male with schizophrenia but no medical issues. His death was probably caused by repeated IM haloperidol injections of 10 mg (totaling 35 mg in 2 days). The second case involves a 42-year-old African-American female with metabolic syndrome. Her probable cause of death was the last ziprasidone IM injection of 20 mg in addition to (1) three extra haloperidol doses (2 hours before the ziprasidone injection, 5 mg oral haloperidol; approximately 21 hours earlier, 5 mg oral haloperidol; and 2 days prior, one 10 mg IM haloperidol injection), (2) 10 mg/day of scheduled oral haloperidol for 6 days before death, and (3) a long-acting paliperidone injection of 156 mg 18 days before death. The study of haloperidol glucuronidation and its impairment in some African-Americans is urgently recommended. PMID:27597919

  19. Recognition and diagnosis of atypical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The term atypical depression dates to the first wave of reports describing differential response to monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). In contrast to more TCA-responsive depressions, patients with so-called atypical symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia, interpersonal sensitivity, leaden paralysis, increased appetite and/or weight, and phobic anxiety) were observed to be more responsive to MAOIs. After several decades of controversy and debate, the phrase "with atypical features" was added as an episode specifier in the DSM-IV in 1994. The 1-year prevalence of the defined atypical depression subtype is approximately 1% to 4%; around 15% to 29% of patients with major depressive disorder have atypical depression. Hardly "atypical" in contemporary contexts, atypical depression also is common in dysthymic bipolar II disorders and is notable for its early age at onset, more chronic course, and high rates of comorbidity with social phobia and panic disorder with agoraphobia. The requirement of preserved mood reactivity is arguably the most controversial of the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression. When compared with melancholia, the neurobiological profiles of patients with atypical depression are relatively normal. The utility of the atypical depression subtype for differential therapeutics diminished substantially when the TCAs were supplanted as first-line antidepressants by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Although introduction of safer MAOIs has fostered renewed interest in atypical depression, the validity and importance of the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression for the nosology of affective illness remains an open question. PMID:17640153

  20. The Influence of Previous Antipsychotic Polypharmacy Versus Monotherapy on the Effectiveness of Antipsychotic after Switching to Paliperidone Extended-release

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hee-Won; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Jung, Seung-Ho; Kang, Min-Hee; Lee, Jeong Seop; Bae, Jae-Nam; Kim, Hee-Yun; Kim, Chul-Eung

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although antipsychotic polypharmacy is widely used in the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia, its effectiveness is controversial. In particular, clinicians tend to avoid switching to monotherapy in patients who have been prescribed polypharmacy. In the present study, the authors investigate whether there is difference in time to discontinuation of antipsychotics between patients on previous monotherapy or polypharmacy. Methods Pooled analysis was conducted on two 24-week, multicenter,...

  1. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; WESOŁOWSKA, ANNA; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impa...

  2. Results of a Longitudinal Analysis of National Data to Examine Relationships Between Organizational and Market Characteristics and Changes in Antipsychotic Prescribing in US Nursing Homes From 1996 Through 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Handler, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to examine the association between organizational characteristics, market characteristics, and changes in antipsychotic medication use in US nursing homes over time. Methods This was a longitudinal study comparing antipsychotic use in US nursing homes from 1996 through 2006 using Medicare and Medicaid data (the Online Survey Certification And Reporting system) and US Department of Health and Human Resources Health Resources and Services Administration data (the Area Resource File). The 3 outcomes of interest were increasing, decreasing, or stable use of antipsychotic medications. The primary independent variables were organizational characteristics (e.g., for-profit status, chain membership) and market characteristics (e.g., Medicaid reimbursement, levels of competition). Results Antipsychotic use increased from 16.4% in 1996 to 25.9% in 2006 (P < 0.05). A multinomial generalized estimating equations model, controlling for facility, staffing, and resident factors, suggested that increased antipsychotic use was associated with for-profit facilities (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.58; 95% CI, 1.51–1.65; P ≤ 0.001). Decreased antipsychotic use was associated with chain membership (AOR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.79–0.85; P ≤ 0.001), higher levels of competition (AOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.16–1.29; P ≤ 0.001), and a higher Medicaid reimbursement rate (AOR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85–0.92; P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion Antipsychotic use is increasing in nursing homes and is associated with certain organizational facility characteristics and market factors. Future interventions to reduce antipsychotic use in nursing homes will have to be targeted toward these factors. PMID:19616182

  3. Decreased glial reactivity could be involved in the antipsychotic-like effect of cannabidiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Felipe V; Llorente, Ricardo; Del Bel, Elaine A; Viveros, Maria-Paz; López-Gallardo, Meritxell; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2015-05-01

    NMDA receptor hypofunction could be involved, in addition to the positive, also to the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits found in schizophrenia patients. An increasing number of data has linked schizophrenia with neuroinflammatory conditions and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, have been related to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties induces antipsychotic-like effects. The present study evaluated if repeated treatment with CBD (30 and 60 mg/kg) would attenuate the behavioral and glial changes observed in an animal model of schizophrenia based on the NMDA receptor hypofunction (chronic administration of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, for 28 days). The behavioral alterations were evaluated in the social interaction and novel object recognition (NOR) tests. These tests have been widely used to study changes related to negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia, respectively. We also evaluated changes in NeuN (a neuronal marker), Iba-1 (a microglia marker) and GFAP (an astrocyte marker) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, and dorsal hippocampus by immunohistochemistry. CBD effects were compared to those induced by the atypical antipsychotic clozapine. Repeated MK-801 administration impaired performance in the social interaction and NOR tests. It also increased the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the mPFC and the percentage of Iba-1-positive microglia cells with a reactive phenotype in the mPFC and dorsal hippocampus without changing the number of Iba-1-positive cells. No change in the number of NeuN-positive cells was observed. Both the behavioral disruptions and the changes in expression of glial markers induced by MK-801 treatment were attenuated by repeated treatment with CBD or clozapine. These data reinforces the proposal

  4. The Influence of Previous Antipsychotic Polypharmacy Versus Monotherapy on the Effectiveness of Antipsychotic after Switching to Paliperidone Extended-release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Won; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Jung, Seung-Ho; Kang, Min-Hee; Lee, Jeong Seop; Bae, Jae-Nam; Kim, Hee-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although antipsychotic polypharmacy is widely used in the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia, its effectiveness is controversial. In particular, clinicians tend to avoid switching to monotherapy in patients who have been prescribed polypharmacy. In the present study, the authors investigate whether there is difference in time to discontinuation of antipsychotics between patients on previous monotherapy or polypharmacy. Methods Pooled analysis was conducted on two 24-week, multicenter, open-label, non-comparative studies that were originally designed to investigate the effectiveness of switching to paliperidone extended-release (ER) in patients with schizophrenia. Patients were divided into two groups according to previously prescribed antipsychotics, that is, to a polypharmacy group or a monotherapy group. The primary outcome measure was time to discontinuation of paliperidone ER. In addition, the authors sought to identify clinical variables that influence time to discontinuation. Results Before switching to paliperidone ER, 535 of 673 (79.5%) patients were prescribed antipsychotic monotherapy, and the remaining 138 (20.5%) patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy. No significant differences in time to discontinuation of paliperidone ER were observed between the polypharmacy and monotherapy groups. Personal and social performance scale score was the only factor found to influence time to discontinuation of paliperidone ER. No differences in psychopathology or adverse effects were found between the monotherapy and polypharmacy groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that number of antipsychotics prescribed before switching to monotherapy does not influence clinical prognosis in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:24465252

  5. Research Units of Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP) Autism Network Randomized Clinical Trial of Parent Training and Medication: One-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Aman, Michael G.; Li, Xiaobai; Butter, Eric; Humphries, Kristina; Scahill, Lawrence; Lecavalier, Luc; McDougle, Christopher J.; Swiezy, Naomi B.; Handen, Benjamin; Wilson, Krystina; Stigler, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To follow up on a three-site, 24-week randomized clinical trial (N = 124) comparing antipsychotic medication alone (MED) with antipsychotic medication plus parent training in the behavior management (COMB) of children with autism spectrum disorders and severe behavior problems. The COMB treatment had shown a significant advantage for…

  6. Effects of Antipsychotics on Dentate Gyrus Stem Cell Proliferation and Survival in Animal Models: A Critical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerburg Keilhoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder. Although a number of different hypotheses have been developed to explain its aetiopathogenesis, we are far from understanding it. There is clinical and experimental evidence indicating that neurodevelopmental factors play a major role. Disturbances in neurodevelopment might result in alterations of neuroanatomy and neurochemistry, leading to the typical symptoms observed in schizophrenia. The present paper will critically address the neurodevelopmental models underlying schizophrenia by discussing the effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics in animal models. We will specifically discuss the vitamin D deficiency model, the poly I:C model, the ketamine model, and the postnatal ventral hippocampal lesion model, all of which reflect core neurodevelopmental issues underlying schizophrenia onset.

  7. Receptor imaging of schizophrenic patients under treatment with typical and atypical neuroleptics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schizophrenic psychosis is typically treated by typical and atypical neuroleptics. Both groups of drugs differ with regard to induction of extrapyramidal side effects. The occupancy of postsynaptic dopaminergic D2 receptors is considered to be an essential aspect of their antipsychotic properties. The dopamine D2 receptor status can be assessed by means of [I-123]IBZM SPECT. Studies on the typical neuroleptic haloperidol revealed an exponential dose response relationship measured by IBZM. Extrapyramidal side effects were presented by all patients below a threshold of the specific binding of IBZM below 0.4 (with one exception, norm value: >0.95). Also under treatment with the atypical neuroleptic clozapine an exponential dose response relationship was found. However, none of these patients showed extrapyramidal side effects. Recently introduced, new atypical neuroleptics such as risperidone and olanzapine again presented with an exponential relationship between daily dose and IBZM binding. The curves of the latter were in between the curves of haloperidol and clozapine. Extrapyramidal side effects were documented in a less number of patients treated with risperidone as compared to haloperidol, for olanzapine only one patient revealed these findings in our own patient group. The pharmacological profile of atypical neuroleptics shows - in addition to their binding to dopamine receptors - also high affinities to the receptors of other neurotransmitter systems, particularly the serotonergic system. Therefore, the lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects seen by atypical in comparison to typical neuroleptics is at least in part most likely due to a complex interaction on a variety of neurotransmitter systems. (orig.)

  8. The use of antipsychotics in preschoolers: a veto or a sensible last option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzia, Jessica; Tracy, Derek; Giaroli, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Recent reports have illustrated a dramatic rise in the use of antipsychotics in preschool children, medications originally designed and licensed for the treatment of adult psychotic disorders. Within this context, the current usage and the associated diagnoses are reviewed and compared with official guidelines and licensing for such use, highlighting a controversial challenge for clinicians. A review of the evidence base of the relative efficacy of such medications for a range of disorders is given. Associated safety and side effects are discussed, with compelling evidence for increased adverse events associated with use of antipsychotics in preschoolers, and neurodevelopmental hypotheses are used to guide predictions of long-term risk. An apparent gap in the literature and evidence base supporting such use and elucidating the risks and benefits leaves a challenge for clinicians and researchers and hinders the development of appropriate guidelines. Pragmatism in clinical practice, mindful of the limited evidence base that does exist and the propensity for harm, is necessary; far more research is required in this important area. PMID:24451556

  9. Antipsychotic monotherapy among outpatients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine or risperidone in Japan: a health care database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wenyu Ye,1 Haya Ascher-Svanum,2 Yuka Tanji,3 Jennifer A Flynn,3 Michihiro Takahashi,3,4 Robert R Conley21Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories Japan, Eli Lilly Japan KK, Kobe, Japan; 4Terauchi-Takahashi Psychiatric Clinic, Ashiya, JapanPurpose: Antipsychotic monotherapy is often recommended over antipsychotic polypharmacy because of fewer adverse events, reduced treatment complexity, and lower medication cost. This study compared the rate and the duration of antipsychotic monotherapy following initiation of olanzapine or risperidone in the treatment of outpatients with schizophrenia in Japan.Methods: Outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia in the Japan Medical Data Center database were identified using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, diagnosis codes. Patients were between 20 and 65 years old, initiated on olanzapine or risperidone therapy between August 2003 and July 2008, and continuously enrolled during the 6 months prior to and the 12 months following the initiation date. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was defined as concurrent use of two or more antipsychotics. The probability of monotherapy during the 12-month follow-up period was assessed using a propensity score-adjusted generalized estimating equation model. Duration of monotherapy was contrasted using a propensity score-adjusted bootstrapping model.Results: After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, the final analytic sample consisted of 332 olanzapine- and 496 risperidone-treated outpatients. At treatment initiation, 61.5% of the olanzapine-treated patients and 45.6% of the risperidone-treated patients received antipsychotic monotherapy (P < 0.001. After correcting for background differences, monotherapy was more common among olanzapine-treated patients (P = 0.001. In addition, olanzapine was used as

  10. Excess of transmission of the G allele of the -1438A/G polymorphism of the 5-HT2A receptor gene in patients with schizophrenia responsive to antipsychotics

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    Hamon Michel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The -1438A/G polymorphism of the 5-HT2A gene has been found to be associated with clinical response to clozapine and other second generation antipsychotics. Testing the impact of this marker on response to first generation antipsychotics (which have a lower affinity for the 5-HT2A receptor provides the opportunity to help disentangling the two different roles that this polymorphism might have. A psychopharmacogenetic role should be detected only for antipsychotics with high affinity to the 5-HT2A receptor (therefore to second generation antipsychotics. An alternative role would imply tagging a subgroup of patients responsive to any antipsychotic, whatever their affinity, meaning that the association is more depending on non pharmacological charaterictics, such as clinical specificities. Methods A family-based sample of 100 Algerian patients with schizophrenia (according to DSM-IV criteria and their 200 biological parents was recruited, in order to avoid stratification biases. Patients were all treated, or have been treated, by conventional antipsychotics (mainly haloperidol for at least four weeks, at appropriate dosage. May and Dencker scale was used to distinguish responders and non responders. Results No allele of the -1438A/G polymorphism of the 5-HT2A gene was transmitted in excess (50 transmitted for 38 untransmitted in the whole sample of patients with schizophrenia (p = .90. In contrast, a significant excess of transmission of the G allele was observed (p = .02 in the subgroup of patients with good treatment response (17 transmitted for 6 untransmitted. Conclusion Using a TDT approach, we showed that the G allele of the -1438A/G polymorphism of the gene coding for the 5-HT2A receptor was associated to schizophrenia with good response to conventional antipsychotics, although this conclusion is based on 88 informative patients only. Because previous data showed the same result with atypical antipsychotics, it can be

  11. Validation of a patient interview for assessing reasons for antipsychotic discontinuation and continuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matza LS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Louis S Matza,1 Glenn A Phillips,2 Dennis A Revicki,1 Haya Ascher-Svanum,3 Karen G Malley,4 Andrew C Palsgrove,1 Douglas E Faries,3 Virginia Stauffer,3 Bruce J Kinon,3 A George Awad,5 Richard SE Keefe,6 Dieter Naber71Outcomes Research, United BioSource Corporation, Bethesda, MD, 2Formerly with Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, 3Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, 4Malley Research Programming, Inc, Rockville, MD, USA; 5Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 6Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC, USA; 7Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, GermanyIntroduction: The Reasons for Antipsychotic Discontinuation Interview (RAD-I was developed to assess patients’ perceptions of reasons for discontinuing or continuing an antipsychotic. The current study examined reliability and validity of domain scores representing three factors contributing to these treatment decisions: treatment benefits, adverse events, and distal reasons other than direct effects of the medication.Methods: Data were collected from patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and their treating clinicians. For approximately 25% of patients, a second rater completed the RAD-I for assessment of inter-rater reliability.Results: All patients (n = 121; 81 discontinuation, 40 continuation reported at least one reason for discontinuation or continuation (mean = 2.8 reasons for discontinuation; 3.4 for continuation. Inter-rater reliability was supported (kappas = 0.63–1.0. Validity of the discontinuation domain scores was supported by associations with symptom measures (the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia, the Clinical Global Impression – Schizophrenia Scale; r = 0.30 to 0.51; all P < 0.01, patients’ primary reasons for discontinuation, and adverse events. However, the continuation domain scores were not significantly associated with these other indicators

  12. Atypical fractures, a biased perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    When stress fractures started to show up in the femurs of elderly ladies, it was soon evident that bisphosphonate use lay behind, and the absolute risk increase due to bisphosphonate use was reasonably well estimated already in 2008. Thereafter followed a period of confusion: the term atypical fracture was introduced, with a definition so vague that the true stress fractures tended to disappear in a cloud of ambiguity. This cast doubt on the association with bisphosphonates. The association was then re-established by large epidemiological studies based on radiographic adjudication. Atypical fractures are largely caused by bisphosphonates. With a correct indication, bisphosphonates prevent many more fractures than they cause, at least during the first years of use. With an incorrect indication they are likely to cause more harm than good. PMID:26768286

  13. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koranne R

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy changes after antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, Agata; Galinska-Skok, Beata; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Bibulowicz, Daniel; Konarzewska, Beata; Tarasow, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) enables the observation of brain function in vivo. Several brain metabolites can be measured by the means of (1)H MRS: N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol (mI) and glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln) and GABA (together as Glx complex or separately). (1)H MRS measures have been found to be abnormal in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Here we specifically review the influence exerted by antipsychotic drugs on brain metabolism, as detected by (1)H MRS. We systematically reviewed the available literature and uncovered 27 studies, 16 before-after treatment and 11 cross-sectional. Most of them addressed the effects of antipsychotics in schizophrenia and mainly focusing on NAA alterations. Follow up studies indicated antipsychotic drugs may act by increasing NAA levels in selected brain areas (the frontal lobe and thalamus), especially during the short-time observation. This phenomenon seems to vanish after longer observation. Other studies indicated that glutamate measures are decreasing along with the duration of the disease, suggesting both a neurodegenerative process present in schizophrenic brain as well as an influence of antipsychotics. The above results were reviewed according to the most recent theories in the field accounting for the impact of antipsychotics (1)HMRS measures. PMID:23157634

  15. Glucoregulation in normal weight schizophrenia patients treated by first generation antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nađa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Schizophrenia patients are at greater risk of obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM, lipid abnormalities and cardiovascular disorders. The metabolic complications in patients are associated with several risk factors: family history of DM, lifestyle, smoking, dietary habits, physical inactivity, but also with antipsychotic medication. In literature, most publications have been focused on the effects of the second generation antipsychotics (SGA on glucose metabolism. However, less attention has been paid to abnormality in glucoregulation, patients with schizophrenia treated with the first generation antipsychotics (FGA. Objective The present study evaluated glucose metabolism in normal weight schizophrenia patients treated with FGA. METHOD The cross-sectional study included 18 patients (FGA treated and 20 healthy controls with neither group differences in sex distribution, age, nor in BMI. Inclusion criteria were normal BMI (20-25 kg/m2. The glucose levels, insulin levels and growth hormone levels during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT were measured. Results Fasting glucose and insulin levels did not differ significantly between groups. Groups differed in OGTT glucose and insulin peak and area under curve (AUC, level of significance p<0.05 (patients vs. controls: glucose peak 8.3±0.4 vs.6.9±0.5 mmol/l, glucose AUC 758±28 vs. 640±36 mU/l/120 min; insulin peak in patients 92.7±15.6 mU/l; insulin AUC 6060±1016 mU/l/120 min, insulin peak in controls 47.9±6.5 mU/l; insulin AUC 2597±256 mU/l/120 min. Conclusion Patients with schizophrenia, although with normal body mass index, are at high risk of abnormal glucose regulation. Not only SGA increase the risk of impaired glucoregulation and metabolic syndrome, but this may also be due to FGA or schizophrenia per se. .

  16. Choice of antipsychotic treatment by European psychiatry trainees: are decisions based on evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauhar Sameer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the factors influencing treatment choice in psychosis, the majority of this work being conducted with specialists (consultant in psychiatry. We sought to examine trainees' choices of treatment for psychosis if they had to prescribe it for themselves, their patients, and factors influencing decision-making. Methods Cross-sectional, semi-structured questionnaire-based study. Results Of the 726 respondents (response rate = 66%, the majority chose second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs if they had to prescribe it for themselves (n = 530, 93% or for their patients (n = 546, 94%. The main factor influencing choice was perceived efficacy, 84.8% (n = 475 of trainees stating this was the most important factor for the patient, and 77.8% (n = 404 stating this was the most important factor for their own treatment. Trainees with knowledge of trials questioning use of SGAs (CATIE, CUtLASS, TEOSS were more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotics than those without knowledge of these trials (χ2 = 3.943; p = 0.047; O.R. = 2.11; 95% C.I. = 1.0-4.48. Regarding psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT was the most popular choice for self (33.1%; n = 240 and patient (30.9%; n = 224. Trainees were significantly more likely to prefer some form of psychotherapy for themselves rather than patients (χ2 = 9.98; p Conclusions Trainees are more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotic medication for patients and themselves. Despite being aware of evidence that suggests otherwise, they predominantly base these choices on perceived efficacy.

  17. Postprandial prolactin suppression appears absent in antipsychotic-treated male patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coello, Klara; Broberg, Brian V; Bak, Nikolaj;

    2015-01-01

    subgroups based on the prolactinogenic liability of their antipsychotic treatment indicated 22 to 65% higher postprandial prolactin levels with high and intermediate prolactinogenic antipsychotics. DISCUSSION: A physiological postprandial suppression of serum prolactin appears absent in antipsychotic......-treated males. Marked variability in fasting prolactin levels may reflect individual variations in the diurnal cycle. Uniform acquisition procedures accounting for diurnal variation and food intake may enhance reliability of prolactin levels in antipsychotic-treated male patients....

  18. Repurposing antipsychotics as glioblastoma therapeutics: Potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, JIN-KU; NAM, DO-HYUN; LEE, JEONGWU

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most lethal primary brain tumor, with tragically little therapeutic progress over the last 30 years. Surgery provides a modest benefit, and GBM cells are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. Despite significant development of the molecularly targeting strategies, the clinical outcome of GBM patients remains dismal. The challenges inherent in developing effective GBM treatments have become increasingly clear, and include resistance to standard treatments, the blood-brain barrier, resistance of GBM stem-like cells, and the genetic complexity and molecular adaptability of GBM. Recent studies have collectively suggested that certain antipsychotics harbor antitumor effects and have potential utilities as anti-GBM therapeutics. In the present review, the anti-tumorigenic effects and putative mechanisms of antipsychotics, and the challenges for the potential use of antipsychotic drugs as anti-GBM therapeutics are reviewed. PMID:26893731

  19. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth Exposed to Antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galling, Britta; Roldán, Alexandra; Nielsen, René E; Nielsen, Jimmi; Gerhard, Tobias; Carbon, Maren; Stubbs, Brendon; Vancampfort, Davy; De Hert, Marc; Olfson, Mark; Kahl, Kai G; Martin, Andres; Guo, Jeff J; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Sung, Fung-Chang; Liao, Chun-Hui; Arango, Celso; Correll, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Antipsychotics are used increasingly in youth for nonpsychotic and off-label indications, but cardiometabolic adverse effects and (especially) type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk have raised additional concern. Objective: To assess T2DM risk associated with antipsychotic treatment in...... youth. Data Sources: Systematic literature search of PubMed and PsycINFO without language restrictions from database inception until May 4, 2015. Data analyses were performed in July 2015, and additional analyses were added in November 2015. Study Selection: Longitudinal studies reporting on T2DM...... incidence in youth 2 to 24 years old exposed to antipsychotics for at least 3 months. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Two independent investigators extracted study-level data for a random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression of T2DM risk. Main Outcomes and Measures: The coprimary outcomes were study...

  20. The effects of abrupt antipsychotic discontinuation in cognitively impaired hospitalised older persons: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Azermai, Majda; Petrovic, Mirko; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Elseviers, Monique; Van der Mussele , Stephan; Debruyne, Hans; Bortel, Lucas; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic use for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) is controversial. Guidelines advise to reduce antipsychotics given the adverse effects and limited efficacy, to limit dose and treatment duration as well as to undertake discontinuation. Methods: A pilot study with 40 hospitalised geriatric cognitively impaired patients, in which the effects of abrupt antipsychotic discontinuation were investigated, using neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI) scores befo...

  1. How antipsychotics work-from receptors to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Shitij; Agid, Ofer; Mizrahi, Romina; Li, Ming

    2006-01-01

    How does a small molecule blocking a few receptors change a patients' passionately held paranoid belief that the FBI is out to get him? To address this central puzzle of antipsychotic action, we review a framework linking dopamine neurochemistry to psychosis, and then link this framework to the mechanism of action of antipsychotics. Normal dopamine transmission has a role in predicting novel rewards and in marking and responding to motivationally salient stimuli. Abnormal dopamine transmission alters these processes and results in an aberrant sense of novelty and inappropriate assignment of salience leading to the experience of psychosis. Antipsychotics improve psychosis by diminishing this abnormal transmission by blocking the dopamine D2/3 receptor (not D1 or D4), and although several brain regions may be involved, it is suggested that the ventral striatal regions (analog of the nucleus accumbens in animals) may have a particularly critical role. Contrary to popular belief, the antipsychotic effect is not delayed in its onset, but starts within the first few days. There is more improvement in the first 2 weeks, than in any subsequent 2-week period thereafter. However, a simple organic molecule cannot target the complex phenomenology of the individual psychotic experience. Antipsychotics diminish dopamine transmission and thereby dampen the salience of the pre-occupying symptoms. Therefore, in the initial stage of an antipsychotic response, the patients experience a detachment from symptoms, a relegation of the delusions and hallucinations to the back of their minds, rather than a complete erasure of the symptoms. Only with time, and only in some, via the mediation of new learning and plasticity, is there a complete resolution of symptoms. The implications of these findings for clinical care, animal models, future target discovery and drug development are discussed. PMID:16490410

  2. Evolving A-Type Artificial Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Orr, Ewan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate Turing's notion of an A-type artificial neural network. We study a refinement of Turing's original idea, motivated by work of Teuscher, Bull, Preen and Copeland. Our A-types can process binary data by accepting and outputting sequences of binary vectors; hence we can associate a function to an A-type, and we say the A-type {\\em represents} the function. There are two modes of data processing: clamped and sequential. We describe an evolutionary algorithm, involving graph-theoretic manipulations of A-types, which searches for A-types representing a given function. The algorithm uses both mutation and crossover operators. We implemented the algorithm and applied it to three benchmark tasks. We found that the algorithm performed much better than a random search. For two out of the three tasks, the algorithm with crossover performed better than a mutation-only version.

  3. Five Cases of Atypical Rickettsial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Salva, I; Gouveia, C.; De Sousa, R.; Brito, MJ

    2011-01-01

    Background: Rickettsia conorii is the most frequent species of RickettsiaI causing disease in Portugal. In general the disease manifests itself by fever, exanthema, headaches and the presence of an eschar. However atypical forms can be present and physicians should be aware. Aims: Analyse the atypical presentation of rickettsiosis. Material and Methods: Children admitted at the CHLC Hospital from 2000 to 2010 with atypical presentation of rickettsiosis. Clinical diagnosis wa...

  4. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Sladek, Malgorzata; Murphy, M Stephen; Escher, Johanna C; Pærregaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of...... atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  5. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Wesołowska, Anna; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impairment as a basis for preclinical evaluation of new drug candidates. The methods used in this study include inhibition of MK-801-induced hyperactivity, forced swim test (FST), passive avoidance (PA), spontaneous locomotor activity, and catalepsy. The drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like activity in the MK-801 test but with diverse profiles in the other models. Risperidone impaired PA performance, but with some dose separation versus its actions in the MK-801 test. In contrast, clozapine, olanzapine, lurasidone, and asenapine showed little or no dose separation in these tests. Aripiprazole did not impair PA performance but was poorly active in the MK-801 test. Diverse effects were also observed in the FST: chlorpromazine was inactive and most other drugs reduced immobility over narrow dose ranges, whereas clozapine reduced immobility over a wider dose range, overlapping with antipsychotic activity. Although the propensity of second-generation antipsychotics to produce catalepsy was lower, they all elicited pronounced sedation. Consistent with clinical data, most currently available second-generation antipsychotics induced cognitive and motor side effects with little separation from therapeutic-like doses. This study provides a uniform in vivo comparative basis on which to evaluate future early-stage drug candidates intended for potential pharmacotherapy of BPSD. PMID:24599316

  6. The Survey and the Analysis of the Antipsychotic Drug Use in A Hospital during 2011~2013%某院2011~2013年抗精神病药使用调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎伟金; 黄焕麟; 吴海峰

    2015-01-01

    Objietive:To understand the development trend and clinical drug use of antipsychotic drugs in A hospital for formulating the basic drug list and promoting clinical rational drug use. Methods:With the retrospective method,we analyzed the antipsychotic drug sales in A hospital during 2011~2013 by Defined Daily Dose(DDDs) and Defined Daily Dose Consumption(DDDc). Results:The Institute of the antipsychotic drug sales amount and the frequency of drug use overall shows ascendant trend. The typical antipsychotic DDDs overall decreased year by year.The atypical antipsychotic DDDs increased year by year. Risperidone and Olanzapine were more than 65%of the amount of the antipsychotic drug sales. Typical antipsychotics such as Perphenazine and Sulpiride had patients welcome.Conclusions:The cost of drugs in A hospital grows steadily and the clinical use of antipsychotic is reasonable.%目的:了解本院抗精神病药的使用情况及临床用药的发展趋势,为制订基本用药目录,促进临床合理用药提供参考。方法:采用回顾性方法,对本院2011~2013年度抗精神病药的销售金额、用药频度(DDDs)和日均费用(DDDc)等情况进行统计分析。结果:本院抗精神病药销售金额和用药频率整体呈逐年上升趋势,典型抗精神病药用药频度整体逐年下降。非典型抗精神病药用药频度整体逐年上升。其中利培酮和奥氮平占抗精神病药销售金额的65%以上,典型抗精神病药奋乃静、舒必利仍受到患者的欢迎。结论:我院药品费用增长平稳,临床抗精神病药使用合理。

  7. Current Trends on Antipsychotics: Focus on Asenapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Piccinni, Armando; Baroni, Stefano; Mungai, Francesco; Presta, Silvio; Mucci, Federico; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, both first- (FGAs) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), continue to gain increasing evidence of being effective in the treatment of psychotic symptoms. Currently, they represent the first-line treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, although they are widely used in psychotic depression and other clinical conditions, such as agitation and/or behavioural disturbances. Despite representing an indispensable tool for the treatment of severe psychotic disorders, they are widely known to have a number of unwanted side effects that the clinician must be aware of, and handle carefully to provide the patient the best available treatment in the short and long-term. However, even with respect to the long-term use of some of the most effective SGAs, it is imperative for clinicians not to overlook the risk linked to the onset of potentially severe metabolic side effects such as weight gain, dyslipidaemia, insulinresistance and type II diabetes. Asenapine is one of the newest SGAs licenced in Europe for the treatment of manic episodes and in the US for schizophrenia. It belongs to the same class of clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine, sharing with them a rather complex pharmacological binding profile. In fact, asenapine shows a high affinity for the serotonin (5HT) receptor of the type 2A (5HT2A) and to a lesser extent for the dopamine receptor of the type 2 (D2), similar to other SGAs. Asenapine behaves also as an antagonist at the level of 5HT2C, H1 and α2-receptors. Asenapine has been reported to be effective either in monotherapy or in combination with mood stabilers (lithium and valproate) in the treatment of manic or mixed episodes, with a lower propensity to induce, or being followed by, depressive symptoms, when compared to other SGAs. These unique properties may explain the increasing interest towards the use of this drug in mixed states, besides schizophrenia and acute mania. The aim of this paper was at reviewing current data on

  8. Atypical parkinsonism: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2015-02-01

    Atypical parkinsonism comprises typically progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and mutilple system atrophy, which are distinct pathologic entities; despite ongoing research, their cause and pathophysiology are still unknown, and there are no biomarkers or effective treatments available. The expanding phenotypic spectrum of these disorders as well as the expanding pathologic spectrum of their classic phenotypes makes the early differential diagnosis challenging for the clinician. Here, clinical features and investigations that may help to diagnose these conditions and the existing limited treatment options are discussed. PMID:25432722

  9. Antipsychotic dose escalation as a trigger for Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS: literature review and case series report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langan Julie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background “Neuroleptic malignant syndrome” (NMS is a potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to any medication which affects the central dopaminergic system. Between 0.5% and 1% of patients exposed to antipsychotics develop the condition. Mortality rates may be as high as 55% and many risk factors have been reported. Although rapid escalation of antipsychotic dose is thought to be an important risk factor, to date it has not been the focus of a published case series or scientifically defined. Description We aimed to identify cases of NMS and review risk factors for its development with a particular focus on rapid dose escalation in the 30 days prior to onset. A review of the literature on rapid dose escalation was undertaken and a pragmatic definition of “rapid dose escalation” was made. NMS cases were defined using DSM-IV criteria and systematically identified within a secondary care mental health service. A ratio of titration rate was calculated for each NMS patient and “rapid escalators” and “non rapid escalators” were compared. 13 cases of NMS were identified. A progressive mean dose increase 15 days prior to the confirmed episode of NMS was observed (241.7 mg/day during days 1–15 to 346.9 mg/day during days 16–30 and the mean ratio of dose escalation for NMS patients was 1.4. Rapid dose escalation was seen in 5/13 cases and non rapid escalators had markedly higher daily cumulative antipsychotic dose compared to rapid escalators. Conclusions Rapid dose escalation occurred in less than half of this case series (n = 5, 38.5%, although there is currently no consensus on the precise definition of rapid dose escalation. Cumulative antipsychotic dose – alongside other known risk factors - may also be important in the development of NMS.

  10. Association of different cognitive domains with lifetime history of psychosis and reported antipsychotic-treatment adverse events in bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kałwa, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The present work aimed to assess the association between cognitive functions, the lifetime occurrence of psychotic symptoms, and reported adverse effects of antipsychotic treatments inpatients with bipolar disorders.Methods. In the present work, 44 bipolar disorder inpatients hospitalized in the Affective Disorders Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, were investigated. All of them met the criteria of remission and were prepared for release from the hospital unit. Twenty-two patients were hospitalized in the manic stage of the illness, and 22 were in the depressive stage of illness. Both groups were assessed using adequate psychiatric rating scales (HDRS or YMRS and CAMRS and neuropsychological tests (WCST, TMT, Stroop Test and Verbal Fluency Test.Results. Patients who had a prior history of psychotic symptoms had poorer verbal functioning in comparison to subjects without such a history. However, individuals hospitalized in the manic state of disease, and who reported more adverse events after antipsychotic medication during the whole course of illness, had worse results in some parameters of executive function measurements in the WCST test, namely occurring in a greater percentage of nonperseverative errors and a lower number of completed categories.Discussion. Generally the results confirm findings according to which, patients with the history of psychosis performe worse on neurocognitive tasks. However, the nature of dysfunctions found, generates questions about its relations with the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment. Conclusion: Different aspects of cognitive dysfunctions may be related to the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment in patients with bipolar disorders.

  11. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...... use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of event. Overall treatment with any antipsychotic was associated with OHCA (odds ratio [OR]= 1.53, 95...

  12. Metabolic side effects of antipsychotic agents: a prospective study in a teaching hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankesh Barnwal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antipsychotic drugs have propensity to produce side effects like extrapyramidal syndrome, hyperglycemia, lipid abnormalities and weight gain. As data from India related to this aspect are scarce, this study was carried out.Aims and Objectives: To study metabolic effects of antipsychotic drugs using biochemical parameters and to compare metabolic effects of different antipsychotic agents.Materials and methods: This was a prospective study of patients attending the psychiatry outpatient department from September 2007 to May 2008. Each patient enrolled was followed up for 12weeks or less till the antipsychotics were prescribed. Body weight,fasting blood glucose, fasting lipid profile were recorded at baseline and at subsequent visits.Results: Out of 45 patients, 33 completed the study. Bipolar disorder (31% was the most frequent diagnosis followed by brief psychotic disorder (22%, schizophrenia (20% and others.Olanzapine was the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drug (56% followed by risperidone (24% and haloperidol (20%. 84% received single antipsychotic drug. After 12weeks of therapy all antipsychotics caused significant weight gain (p<0.001, olanzapine caused significant rise in fasting blood glucose (p<0.001 and serum cholesterol (p<0.001. All antipsychotics caused significant rise in serum triglyceride level (p<0.01 Conclusion: All antipsychotics can cause significant abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Selection of antipsychotics, particularly the newer ones requires consideration of co morbidities like obesity, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemias. During antipsychotic drug therapy periodic monitoring for metabolic abnormalities is advisable.

  13. A Case Report: Anti-Psychotic Agents Related Ocular Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Bonnie Nga Kwan; Ng, Alex Lap Ki; Shum, Jennifer Wei Huen; Fan, Michelle Ching Yim; Lai, Jimmy Shiu Ming

    2016-04-01

    Chlorpromazine is known to cause ocular pigmentary deposits. However, delayed presentation after cessation of chlorpromazine has not been reported. There are also no reports on whether newer generation of anti-psychotic agents contribute to ocular toxicity. We describe a case of ocular toxicity related to anti-psychotic agents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of anterior segment pigmentary deposits associated with olanzapine use, 2 years after the cessation of chlorpromazine.We report a case of ocular toxicity in a patient with history of chlorpromazine usage of 100 mg per day for 13 years and subsequently switched to olanzapine 5 mg for 2 years. There were no signs of ocular toxicity while the patient was on chlorpromazine. However, when the patient switched to olanzapine, she developed the ocular side effect as described for chlorpromazine-induced ocular toxicity, with pigmentary depositions on both corneas and the anterior lens surface and decrease in vision.Olanzapine, a newer anti-psychotic agent, may play a role in the ocular pigmentary deposition, either directly causing pigmentary deposition itself or accentuating the effect of chlorpromazine as the 2 drugs act on the same receptors, although further studies are required to support this hypothesis. As patients with psychiatric conditions may not voluntarily complain of visual symptoms, ocular screening could be considered in these patients receiving chronic anti-psychotic treatment, so that any ocular toxicity could be diagnosed in a timely manner. PMID:27082594

  14. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  15. Atypical extragonadal germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak Deb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review the experience with the diagnosis and management of extragonadal germ cell tumors (GCT with a subset analysis of those with atypical features. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients of extragonadal germ cell tumors between 2000 and 2010 was carried out. Results: Fifteen children aged 7 days to 15 years (median, 1.5 years were included. Three had an antenatal diagnosis (one sacrococcygeal, one retrobulbar, one retroperitoneal tumor and were operated in the neonatal period. The locations were distributed between the retrobulbar area (1, anterior neck-thyroid gland (1, mediastinum (4, abdominothoracic extending through the esophageal hiatus (1, retroperitoneal (4 and sacrococcygeal (4. On histological examination, five harbored immature elements while two were malignant; the latter children received postexcision adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no mortality. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years (6 months to 8 years, 14/15 have had an event-free survival. One immature mediastinal teratoma that recurred locally 7.5 years after the initial operation was excised and adjuvant chemotherapy instituted. Conclusions: Extragonadal GCTs in children are uncommon and occasionally present with atypical clinical, radiological and histological features resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas.

  16. Atypical Findings of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveGuillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy that occurs mostly after prior infection. The diagnosis of this syndrome is dependent heavily on the history and examination, although cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrodiagnostic testing usually confirm the diagnosis. This is a retrospective study which was performed to investigate the atypical features of GBS.Materials & MethodsThirty three patients (21/63.6% males and 12/36.4% females with GBS were retrospectively studied and prospectively evaluated at the Child Neurology institute of Mofid Children Hospital of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences between May 2011 and September 2012.ResultsThe mean age was 5.4 years (range, 1.5-10.5.Twenty one patients (87.9 % had previous history of infections. Eight patients (24.2% admitted with atypical symptoms like upper limb weakness (3%, ptosis (3%, neck stiffness (3%, inability to stand (proximal weakness (9.1%, headache (3% and dysphagia (3%.According to disease process, weakness was ascending in 26 (78.8%, descending in 5 (15.2% and static in 2 (6.1% patients. Cranial nerve involvement was found in 8(24.3% children, most commonly as facial palsy in 3 (9.1%.ConclusionIn this study, 24.3% of our patients presented with atypical symptoms of GBS as upper limb weakness, ptosis, neck stiffness, inability to stand (proximal weakness, headache and dysphagia

  17. Structural brain correlates of sensorimotor gating in antipsychotic-naive men with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Trine B; Oranje, Bob; Skimminge, Arnold; Aggernæs, Bodil; Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Glenthøj, Birte; Baaré, William

    2013-01-01

    in the left rostral dorsal premotor cortex, the right presupplementary motor area and the anterior medial superior frontal gyrus bilaterally. Follow-up analyses suggested that the rostral dorsal premotor cortex and presupplementary motor area correlations were driven predominantly by the controls......Background: Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex is modulated by a complex neural network. Prepulse inhibition impairments are found at all stages of schizophrenia. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that brain correlates of PPI differ between patients with...... schizophrenia and healthy controls; however, these studies included only patients with chronic illness and medicated patients. Our aim was to examine the structural brain correlates of PPI in antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Methods: We performed acoustic PPI assessment and...

  18. Effects of clozapine and typical antipsychotic drugs on plasma 5-HT turnover and impulsivity in patients with schizophrenia: a cross-sectional study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dursun, S. M.; Szemis, A; Andrews, H.; Whitaker, P; Reveley, M A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of clozapine with typical antipsychotic drugs in controlling impulsivity and to explore the possible correlation of impulsivity with plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels, plasma 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and plasma 5-HT turnover. DESIGN: Prospective, cross-sectional study open to medication and blinded to biochemical analyses. PARTICIPANTS: Healthy control subjects (n = 24) and 46 inpatients and outpatients meeting the DSM-IV criteria fo...

  19. Antipsychotics, Lithium, Benzodiazepines, Beta-Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karper, Laurence P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The psychopharmacologic treatment of aggression is a critical component of the treatment of psychiatric patients. The diagnostic assessment of aggressive patients is reviewed and relevant literature is presented to help clinicians select appropriate medication. Side-effects, dosages, and methods of administration are highlighted. (JPS)

  20. Typical and atypical AIS. Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, M; Pinchuk, D

    2012-01-01

    AIS hypothesis has the right to recognition, if it explains the transition of "healthy" vertebra column into status of "scoliotic" one. AIS is the most investigated disease in the history of orthopedics, but up the present time there is no clear explanation of some its phenomena: vertebra column mono-form deformation along with its poly etiology character, interrelation of its origin and development and child's growth process etc. The key for authors' view at AIS was scoliosis with non-standard (concave side) rotation. On the bases of its' multifunctional instrumental investigation results (Rtg, EMG, EEG, optical topography, hormonal and neuropeptides trials, thermo-vision methods and other) in comparison with typical AIS was worked out the new hypothesis, part of it is suggested for discussion. In the work under observation is the sequence of appearance of typical and atypical scoliosis symptomatology beginning from the preclinical stage. PMID:22744477

  1. Osteogenesis imperfecta: an atypical association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Mallakmir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI also known as and lsquo;brittle bone disease', is a clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder with defect in type I collagen. The more prevalent autosomal dominant forms of OI are caused by primary defects in type I collagen, while autosomal recessive forms are caused by deficiency of proteins which interact with type I procollagen for post-translational modification and/or folding. Few cases of OI associated with atypical features have been reported. We report a case of 54 days male child of OI associated with pyloric stenosis. The case probably is a form of autosomal recessive OI with severe phenotype. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 783-785

  2. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy: atypical features and treatment with intracranial balloon angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postpartum cerebral angiopathy (PCA) is an uncommon cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in young women. It is usually clinically benign and not relapsing. We describe a patient with non-hemorrhagic PCA who had an atypical progressive neurological deficit from bilateral hemisphere watershed ischemia despite treatment with aggressive medical therapy and intracranial balloon angioplasty. (orig.)

  3. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy: atypical features and treatment with intracranial balloon angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.K. [Center for Endovascular Surgery, Hyman-Newman Inst. for Neurology and Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States); Cacayorin, E.D. [Interventional Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States); Fisher, S.; Seifert, T.D.; Alexandrov, A.V.; Malkoff, M.D.; Grotta, J.C.; Campbell, M.S. [Div. of Stroke Neurology, Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Postpartum cerebral angiopathy (PCA) is an uncommon cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in young women. It is usually clinically benign and not relapsing. We describe a patient with non-hemorrhagic PCA who had an atypical progressive neurological deficit from bilateral hemisphere watershed ischemia despite treatment with aggressive medical therapy and intracranial balloon angioplasty. (orig.)

  4. Interaction between weight and medications in psychological illnesses of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Alan; Steingart, Lital

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric medications have many implications on weight and growth. Stimulant medications may produce appetite loss and thus affect growth. Second-generation antipsychotics which are widely used for psychosis and many other indications may cause weight gain and subsequent metabolic disease. Weight loss such as that seen in anorexia nervosa may severely interfere with the efficacy of antidepressant agents. PMID:23428698

  5. CYP2D6 genotype predicts antipsychotic side effects in schizophrenia inpatients: a retrospective matched case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobylecki, Camilla J; Jakobsen, Klaus D; Hansen, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present retrospective pilot study was to examine the clinical impact of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme CYP2D6 poor metabolizer (PM) genotype in patients taking antipsychotic medication. The impaired metabolic capacity of the PM genotype results in higher steady......-state plasma concentrations at a given dose, thus increasing the risk of toxic effects from medication. METHODS: We identified 18 PM patients with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis from a clinical database covering all patients who have been analyzed in an ongoing standardized CYP2D6 screening program. Each...... significantly higher prevalence of noncompliance among the same PM patients. Importantly, this association was not due to differences in the use of CYP2D6-dependent or EPS/TD-causing medication across the 3 matched patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: This leads us to conclude that genetically encoded differences in...

  6. The Effect of Concurrent Administration of Typical or Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs and Lithium on Lithium Ratio in Acute Manic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Sina Ahmadi abhari; Shahin Akhondzadeh; Maryam Tabatabaee; Ahmadreza Dehpour; Mahsa Davari; Seyed Ali Ahmadi Abhari

    2008-01-01

    "nObjective: "n The lithium concentration in the plasma is assumed to give someindication as to the concentration of this ion in different organ cells especially incentral nervous system. While the practical value of intracellular lithium measurement is controversial however, erythrocytes have proved to be useful for studying lithium concentration and its transport across the membrane. There are some reports suggesting that neuroleptic drugs are able to affect the erythrocyte lithium concentr...

  7. O uso de antipsicóticos em pacientes com diagnóstico de demência The use of antipsychotics in patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestes Vicente Forlenza

    2008-09-01

    prescription. We discuss the available evidence in the light of the high prevalence of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in this population, along with the greater susceptibility of elderly patients to adverse events. METHOD: Systematic literature review of the use of typical and atypical antipsychotics in patients with dementia was carried out in the databases PubMed/Medline, Embase and SciELO. The search was limited to clinical trials and meta-analysis of the literature published from 1986 to 2007. RESULTS: Evidence drawn from randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trials support the use of both typical and atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of behavioral symptoms of dementia, especially psychotic symptoms and abnormal psychomotor activity. Nevertheless, the use of these drugs in demented patients is not devoid of important adverse events. Although the induction of extrapiramidal symptoms is not as frequent or severe with atypical antipsychotics as it is with first-generation neuroleptics, the former drugs may particularly increase the risk of cerebrovascular events and death. CONCLUSION: Although effective, antipsychotic drugs must be prescribed cautiously in patients with dementia. Dose regimens, duration of treatment and a cautious assessment of risk-benefit must be established for each patient.

  8. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug

    OpenAIRE

    Zuardi A.W.; Crippa J.A.S.; Hallak J.E.C.; Moreira F.A.; Guimarães F.S.

    2006-01-01

    A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis) component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxi...

  9. Antipsychotic-like effect of minocycline in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuyucu, Recep; Kokacya, Hanifi; Inanir, Sema; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Erbas, Oytun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Tetracycline antibiotic drug minocycline has strongly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Minocycline has also remarkable brain tissue penetration, is clinically entirely tolerated and properly absorbed when taken orally. In our study, we class with the effects of minocycline and chlorpromazine, a conventional antipsychotic drug, by evaluating the novelty-induced rearing, apomorphine-induced stereotypic behavior, and brain MDA levels in rats. Materials and Methods: Four...

  10. Could cannabidiol be used as an alternative to antipsychotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects close to 1% of the population. Individuals with this disorder often present signs such as hallucination, anxiety, reduced attention, and social withdrawal. Although antipsychotic drugs remain the cornerstone of schizophrenia treatment, they are associated with severe side effects. Recently, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for pharmacotherapy that is involved in a wide range of disorders, including schizophrenia. Since its discovery, a lot of effort has been devoted to the study of compounds that can modulate its activity for therapeutic purposes. Among them, cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive component of cannabis, shows great promise for the treatment of psychosis, and is associated with fewer extrapyramidal side effects than conventional antipsychotic drugs. The overarching goal of this review is to provide current available knowledge on the role of the dopamine system and the ECS in schizophrenia, and to discuss key findings from animal studies and clinical trials investigating the antipsychotic potential of CBD. PMID:27267317

  11. Adjunctive metformin for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Qi-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Min; Li, Xian-Bin; Ma, Xin; Wang, Chuan-Yue; de Leon, Jose

    2016-03-30

    This systematic review examines adjunctive metformin therapy for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. A computerized search of databases in Chinese and the international databases in English provided three trials with a total of 325 patients including one randomized clinical trial (RCT) and two observational studies (single-group, before-after design). A meta-analysis could not be conducted. The quality of evidence ranged from "very low" to "moderate". Metformin patients had a significant decrease in serum prolactin level with a mean of 54.6μg/l in the three trials. In the RCT, menstruation restarted in 67% of those with menstrual disturbances versus 5% in placebo. In one observational study, 91% of patients no longer had signs or symptoms of galactorrhea. In the RCT, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred at similar incidence rates among metformin and placebo patients, except that no significant increases in nausea, insomnia and agitation occurred which were not associated with discontinuations. Our systematic review indicated that adjunctive metformin significantly lowered prolactin level and relieved prolactin-related symptoms in patients with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. Future higher quality RCTs need to verify the currently available limited evidence based on three trials which suggest that adjunctive metformin may be used effectively and safely for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. PMID:26822064

  12. Thalamic shape abnormalities in antipsychotic naïve schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Danivas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia states abnormal pruning as one of the pathogenetic mechanism in schizophrenia. Though thalamic volume abnormalities have been documented, the shape differences of thalamus in antipsychotic-free schizophrenia in comparison with age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers need validation. Materials and Methods: We examined antipsychotic naïve schizophrenia patients ( n=60 and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers ( n=44. The thalamic shape abnormalities were analyzed from their coded structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data using three-dimensional automated image analysis software, FMRIB′s (Oxford Center for the functional MRI of the brain tools-FIRST (FMRIB′s Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool by creating deformable mesh model. Correlation with the psychopathology scores was carried out using F-statistics. Results: Patients with schizophrenia showed significant inward deformations in the regions corresponding to anterior, ventromedial, mediodorsal, and pulvinar nuclei. There was a direct correlation between negative syndrome score and the deformation in the right mediodorsal and right pulvinar nuclei. Conclusion: The inward deformations of thalamus in antipsychotic naive schizophrenia patients correspond to those nuclei which have reciprocal connections with frontal, superior temporal, and anterior cingulate regions and support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  13. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  14. Surgical Options for Atypical Facial Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Shervin; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-07-01

    Atypical neuropathic facial pain is a syndrome of intractable and unremitting facial pain that is secondary to nociceptive signaling in the trigeminal system. These syndromes are often recalcitrant to pharmacotherapy and other common interventions, including microvascular decompression and percutaneous procedures. Herein, the authors present two other viable approaches (nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone lesioning and motor cortex stimulation), their indications, and finally a possible treatment algorithm to consider when assessing patients with atypical facial pain. PMID:27325003

  15. Interventional trials in atypical parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschlböck, S; Krismer, F; Wenning, G K

    2016-01-01

    Atypical parkinson disorders (APD) are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases with a variable clinical presentation that may even mimic Parkinson's disease. Multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are commonly summarized under this umbrella term. Significant developments in research have expanded knowledge and have broadened available symptomatic treatments, particularly for the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Nonetheless, symptomatic support still remains limited in all of these disorders. Currently, there exists no effective treatment to delay disease progression and disease-modifying trials have failed to provide coherent and convincing results. Recent trials of rasagiline (in MSA), rifampicin (in MSA), tideglusib (in PSP) and davunetide (in PSP) reported negative results. Nevertheless, large cohorts of patients were recruited for interventional studies in the last few years which improved our understanding of trial methodology in APDs immensely. In addition, remarkable progress in basic research has been reported recently and will provide a solid foundation for future therapeutic trials. In this review, we will summarize published randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in APDs. Additionally, the design of ongoing and unpublished interventions will be presented. PMID:26421389

  16. Atypical presentations of neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system classically characterized by acute, severe episodes of optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. The identification of an autoantibody exclusively detected in NMO patients against aquaporin-4 (AQP-4 has allowed identification of cases beyond the classical phenotype. Brain lesions, once thought as infrequent, can be observed in NMO patients, but lesions have different characteristics from the ones seen in multiple sclerosis. Additionally, some AQP-4 antibody positive patients may present with a variety of symptoms not being restricted to optic neuritis and acute myelitis during the first attack or in a relapse. Examples are not limited to, but may include patients only with brain and/or brainstem lesions, narcolepsy with hypothalamic lesions or patients with intractable hiccups, nausea and vomiting. The prompt identification of NMO patients with atypical presentations may benefit these patients with institution of early treatment to reduce disability and prevent further attacks.

  17. Genetic studies of DRD4 and clinical response to neuroleptic medications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J.L.; Petronis, A.; Gao, J. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug that, like most other medications, is effective for some people and not for others. This variable response across individuals is likely significantly determined by genetic factors. An important candidate gene to investigate in clozapine response is the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4). The D4 receptor has a higher affinity for clozapine than any of the other dopamine receptors. Furthermore, recent work by our consortium has shown a remarkable level of variability in the part of the gene coding for the third cytoplasmic loop. We have also identified polymorphisms in the upstream 5{prime} putative regulatory region and at two other sites. These polymorphisms were typed in a group of treatment-resistant schizophrenia subjects who were subsequently placed on clozapine (n = 60). In a logistic regression analysis, we compared genotype at the DRD4 polymorphism to response versus non-response to clozapine. Neither the exon-III nor any of the 5{prime} polymorphisms alone significantly predicted response; however, when the information from these polymorphisms was combined, more predictive power was obtained. In a correspondence analysis of the four DRD4 polymorphisms vs. response, we were able to predict 76% of the variance in response. Refinement of the analyses will include assessment of subfactors involved in clinical response phenotype and incorporation of the debrisoquine metabolizing locus (CYP2D6) into the prediction algorithm.

  18. Use of the second-generation antipsychotic, risperidone, and secondary weight gain are associated with an altered gut microbiota in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, S M; Tyler, B C; Wooldridge, N; Butcher, B D; Burns, T L; Teesch, L M; Oltman, C L; Azcarate-Peril, M A; Kirby, J R; Calarge, C A

    2015-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotic risperidone (RSP) is often associated with weight gain and cardiometabolic side effects. The mechanisms for these adverse events are poorly understood and, undoubtedly, multifactorial in etiology. In light of growing evidence implicating the gut microbiome in the host's energy regulation and in xenobiotic metabolism, we hypothesized that RSP treatment would be associated with changes in the gut microbiome in children and adolescents. Thus, the impact of chronic (>12 months) and short-term use of RSP on the gut microbiome of pediatric psychiatrically ill male participants was examined in a cross-sectional and prospective (up to 10 months) design, respectively. Chronic treatment with RSP was associated with an increase in body mass index (BMI) and a significantly lower ratio of Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes as compared with antipsychotic-naïve psychiatric controls (ratio=0.15 vs 1.24, respectively; Pgut microbiota dominating the RSP-treated participants are enriched for pathways that have been implicated in weight gain, such as short-chain fatty acid production. PMID:26440540

  19. Effectiveness of an Inpatient Movement Disorders Program for Patients with Atypical Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna D. Hohler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism, who typically respond poorly to pharmacologic intervention and are challenging to rehabilitate as outpatients. Ninety-one patients with atypical parkinsonism participated in an inpatient movement disorders program. Patients received physical, occupational, and speech therapy for 3 hours/day, 5 to 7 days/week, and pharmacologic adjustments based on daily observation and data. Differences between admission and discharge scores were analyzed for the functional independence measure (FIM, timed up and go test (TUG, two-minute walk test (TMW, Berg balance scale (BBS and finger tapping test (FT, and all showed significant improvement on discharge (>.001. Clinically significant improvements in total FIM score were evident in 74% of the patients. Results were similar for ten patients whose medications were not adjusted. Patients with atypical parkinsonism benefit from an inpatient interdisciplinary movement disorders program to improve functional status.

  20. Effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohler, Anna D; Tsao, Jyeming M; Katz, Douglas I; Dipiero, T Joy; Hehl, Christina L; Leonard, Alissa; Allen, Valerie; Gardner, Maura; Phenix, Heidi; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Ellis, Terry

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism, who typically respond poorly to pharmacologic intervention and are challenging to rehabilitate as outpatients. Ninety-one patients with atypical parkinsonism participated in an inpatient movement disorders program. Patients received physical, occupational, and speech therapy for 3 hours/day, 5 to 7 days/week, and pharmacologic adjustments based on daily observation and data. Differences between admission and discharge scores were analyzed for the functional independence measure (FIM), timed up and go test (TUG), two-minute walk test (TMW), Berg balance scale (BBS) and finger tapping test (FT), and all showed significant improvement on discharge (P > .001). Clinically significant improvements in total FIM score were evident in 74% of the patients. Results were similar for ten patients whose medications were not adjusted. Patients with atypical parkinsonism benefit from an inpatient interdisciplinary movement disorders program to improve functional status. PMID:22135763

  1. Antipsychotic polypharmacy in a regional health service: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Miguel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyse the extent and profile of outpatient regular dispensation of antipsychotics, both in combination and monotherapy, in the Barcelona Health Region (Spain, focusing on the use of clozapine and long-acting injections (LAI. Methods Antipsychotic drugs dispensed for people older than 18 and processed by the Catalan Health Service during 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. First and second generation antipsychotic drugs (FGA and SGA from the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification (ATC code N05A (except lithium were included. A patient selection algorithm was designed to identify prescriptions regularly dispensed. Variables included were age, gender, antipsychotic type, route of administration and number of packages dispensed. Results A total of 117,811 patients were given any antipsychotic, of whom 71,004 regularly received such drugs. Among the latter, 9,855 (13.9% corresponded to an antipsychotic combination, 47,386 (66.7% to monotherapy and 13,763 (19.4% to unspecified combinations. Of the patients given antipsychotics in association, 58% were men. Olanzapine (37.1% and oral risperidone (36.4% were the most common dispensations. Analysis of the patients dispensed two antipsychotics (57.8% revealed 198 different combinations, the most frequent being the association of FGA and SGA (62.0%. Clozapine was dispensed to 2.3% of patients. Of those who were receiving antipsychotics in combination, 6.6% were given clozapine, being clozapine plus amisulpride the most frequent association (22.8%. A total of 3.800 patients (5.4% were given LAI antipsychotics, and 2.662 of these (70.1% were in combination. Risperidone was the most widely used LAI. Conclusions The scant evidence available regarding the efficacy of combining different antipsychotics contrasts with the high number and variety of combinations prescribed to outpatients, as well as with the limited use of clozapine.

  2. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: patient perspectives and the clinical utility of paliperidone ER

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Birnbaum; Zafar Sharif

    2008-01-01

    Michael Birnbaum1, Zafar Sharif21St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, 1111 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY, USA; 2Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Antipsychotic medications provide the foundation for treatment of acute exacerbations as well as relapse prevention in patients with schizophrenia as demonstrated by rigorous placebo-controlled trials. However, despite their proven effectiveness, poor adherence to prescribed antipsychotic reg...

  3. Management of antipsychotic treatment discontinuation and interruptions using model-based simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samtani MN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mahesh N Samtani,1 John J Sheehan,2 Dong-Jing Fu,2 Bart Remmerie,3 Jennifer Kern Sliwa,2 Larry Alphs21Janssen Research and Development, Raritan, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Scientific Affairs, Titusville, NJ, USA; 3Janssen Research and Development, Division of Janssen Pharmaceutica, Beerse, BelgiumBackground: Medication nonadherence is a well described and prevalent clinical occurrence in schizophrenia. These pharmacokinetic model-based simulations analyze predicted antipsychotic plasma concentrations in nonadherence and treatment interruption scenarios and with treatment reinitiation.Methods: Starting from steady state, pharmacokinetic model-based simulations of active moiety plasma concentrations of oral, immediate-release risperidone 3 mg/day, risperidone long-acting injection 37.5 mg/14 days, oral paliperidone extended-release 6 mg/day, and paliperidone palmitate 117 mg (75 mg equivalents/28 days were assessed under three treatment discontinuation/interruption scenarios, ie, complete discontinuation, one week of interruption, and four weeks of interruption. In the treatment interruption scenarios, pharmacokinetic simulations were performed using medication-specific reinitiation strategies.Results: Following complete treatment discontinuation, plasma concentrations persisted longest with paliperidone palmitate, followed by risperidone long-acting injection, while oral formulations exhibited the most rapid decrease. One week of oral paliperidone or risperidone interruption resulted in near complete elimination from the systemic circulation within that timeframe, reflecting the rapid elimination rate of the active moiety. After 1 and 4 weeks of interruption, minimum plasma concentrations were higher with paliperidone palmitate than risperidone long-acting injection over the simulated period. Four weeks of treatment interruption followed by reinitiation resulted in plasma levels returning to predicted therapeutic levels within 1 week.Conclusion: Due to

  4. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R;

    2010-01-01

    . Given the relative rarity of atypical femoral fractures, the task force recommends that specific diagnostic and procedural codes be created and that an international registry be established to facilitate studies of the clinical and genetic risk factors and optimal surgical and medical management of...... by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of exposure, and there is concern that lack of awareness and underreporting may mask the true incidence of the problem...... and clinical data to establish the true incidence of and risk factors for this condition and to inform orthopedic and medical management....

  5. Treatment with antipsychotics and the risk of diabetes in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Thomsen, Anders Frøkjær; Mogensen, Ulla Brasch; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with antipsychotics seems to increase the risk of developing diabetes but the association is poorly characterised in clinical practice.......Treatment with antipsychotics seems to increase the risk of developing diabetes but the association is poorly characterised in clinical practice....

  6. Loxapine for Reversal of Antipsychotic-Induced Metabolic Disturbances: A Chart Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Andridge, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Loxapine substitution is a promising option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who develop antipsychotic-induced metabolic illness. We performed a chart review of 15 adolescents and adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for ASD, all with antipsychotic-associated weight gain, who received low dose loxapine in an attempt to taper or…

  7. Exploring regional variation in antipsychotic coprescribing practice: a Danish questionnaire survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Allerup, Peter N.; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacologic treatment of schizophrenia is characterized by excessive use of antipsychotic polypharmacy, which reflects a gap between evidence and practice. The aim of the present study was to investigate regional differences in treatment setting characteristics and in physician and nurse...... attitudes toward antipsychotic polypharmacy and clinical guidelines....

  8. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy in a Treatment-Refractory Schizophrenia Population Receiving Adjunctive Treatment With Electroconvulsive Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Diana; Hageman, Ida; Bauer, Jeanett;

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is frequent, but its pattern is unknown in treatment-refractory schizophrenia-spectrum patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).......Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is frequent, but its pattern is unknown in treatment-refractory schizophrenia-spectrum patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)....

  9. Glucometabolic Hormones and Cardiovascular Risk Markers in Antipsychotic-Treated Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Knop, Filip Krag; Madsen, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    levels, non-diabetic antipsychotic-treated patients display emerging signs of dysmetabolism and a compromised cardiovascular risk profile. The appetite regulating hormones, GLP-1 and ghrelin appear not to be influenced by antipsychotic treatment. Our findings provide new clinical insight into the...

  10. A Systemic Review and Experts’ Consensus for Long-acting Injectable Antipsychotics in Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yuan Hwa; Chu, Po-Chung; Wu, Szu-Wei; Lee, Jen-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Sun, I-Wen; Chang, Chen-Lin; Huang, Chien-Liang; Liu, I-Chao; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a major psychiatric disorder that is easily misdiagnosed. Patient adherence to a treatment regimen is of utmost importance for successful outcomes in BD. Several trials of antipsychotics suggested that depot antipsychotics, including long-acting first- and second-generation agents, are effective in preventing non-adherence, partial adherence, and in reducing relapse in BD. Various long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics are available, including fluphenazine decanoate, haloperidol decanoate, olanzapine pamoate, risperidone microspheres, paliperidone palmitate, and aripiprazole monohydrate. Due to the increasing number of BD patients receiving LAI antipsychotics, treatment guidelines have been developed. However, the clinical applicability of LAI antipsychotics remains a global cause for concern, particularly in Asian countries. Expert physicians from Taiwan participated in a consensus meeting, which was held to review key areas based on both current literature and clinical practice. The purpose of this meeting was to generate a practical and implementable set of recommendations for LAI antipsychotic use to treat BD; target patient groups, dosage, administration, and adverse effects were considered. Experts recommended using LAI antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia, rapid cycling BD, BD I, and bipolar-type schizoaffective disorder. LAI antipsychotic use was recommended in BD patients with the following characteristics: multiple episodes and low adherence; seldom yet serious episodes; low adherence potential per a physician’s clinical judgment; preference for injectable agents over oral agents; and multiple oral agent users still experiencing residual symptoms. PMID:26243837

  11. Clinical Presentation of Atypical Genital Herpes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 梁沛杨; 罗北京

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To make a clinical analysis on the basis of 36cases of atypical genital herpes (GH) patients. Methods: Thirty-six cases of atypical GH were diagnosedclinically, and their case histories, symptoms and signs wererecorded in detail and followed up. Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was adopted for testing HSV2-DNA with cotton-tippedswabs. Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) forserum anti-HSV2-IgM was done to establish a definfiivediagnosis. Other diagnoses were excluded at the same time bytesting for related pathogens including fungi, Chlamydia,Mycoplasma, Treponema pallidum, gonococci, Trichomonas,etc. Results: The main clinical manifestations of atypical GHwere: (1) small genital ulcers; (2) inflammation of urethralmeatus; (3) nonspecific genital erythema; (4) papuloid noduleson the glands; (5) nonspecific vaginitis. Twenty-three cases(64%) tested by PCR were HSV2-DNA sera-positive, and 36cases (100 %) anti-HSV2-IgM sera-positive by ELISA. Conclusion: atypical HSV is difficult to be diagnosed. Butthe combination of PCR and ELIAS will be helpful to thediagnosis of atypical HSV.

  12. Antipsychotic treatment for children and adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Tarp, Simon; Glintborg, D;

    2014-01-01

    effectiveness studies in children and adolescents are limited in number and size, and only a few meta-analyses based on conventional methodologies have been conducted. METHODS AND ANALYSES: We will conduct a network meta-analysis of all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluate antipsychotic therapies...... randomly allocate children and adolescents presenting with schizophrenia or a related non-affective psychotic condition to an intervention group or to a control group. Two reviewers will-independently and in duplicate-screen titles and abstracts, complete full text reviews to determine eligibility, and...

  13. Assessing QT interval prolongation and its associated risks with antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Graff, Claus; Kanters, Jørgen K.;

    2011-01-01

    heart, illustrated as a prolongation of the QT interval on a surface ECG. SCD in individuals receiving antipsychotics has an incidence of approximately 15 cases per 10,000 years of drug exposure but the exact association with TdP remains unknown because the diagnosis of TdP is uncertain. Most patients...... other surrogate markers for TdP have been developed but none of them is clinically implemented yet and QT interval prolongation is still considered the most valid surrogate marker. Although automated QT interval determination may offer some assistance, QT interval determination is best performed by a...

  14. Association of antipsychotic polypharmacy with health service cost: a register-based cost analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Lublin, Henrik Kai Francis; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of antipsychotic polypharmacy in schizophrenia with cost of primary and secondary health service use. METHOD: Comparative analysis of health service cost for patients prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy versus antipsychotic monotherapy. Resource...... utilisation and costs were described using central Danish registers for a 2 year period (2007-2008). We included patients attached to one of two Danish psychiatric referral centres in 1 January 2008 and/or 1 January 2009. Their prescribed treatment with either antipsychotic polypharmacy or monotherapy at the...... two cross-sectional dates was recorded and used as proxy of polypharmacy exposure during the preceding year. A multivariate generalised linear model was fitted with total costs of primary and secondary health service use as dependent variable, and antipsychotic polypharmacy, diagnosis, age, gender...

  15. Change in level of productivity in the treatment of schizophrenia with olanzapine or other antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osuntokun Olawale

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When treating schizophrenia, improving patients' productivity level is a major goal considering schizophrenia is a leading cause of functional disability. Productivity level has been identified as the most preferred treatment outcome by patients with schizophrenia. However, little has been done to systematically investigate productivity levels in schizophrenia. We set out to better understand the change in productivity level among chronically ill patients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine compared with other antipsychotic medications. We also assessed the links between productivity level and other clinical outcomes. Methods This post hoc analysis used data from 6 randomized, double-blind clinical trials of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, with each trial being of approximately 6 months duration. Change in productivity level was compared between olanzapine-treated patients (HGBG, n = 172; HGHJ, n = 277; HGJB, n = 171; HGLB, n = 281; HGGN, n = 159; HGDH, n = 131 and patients treated with other antipsychotic medications (separately vs. haloperidol [HGGN, n = 97; HGDH, n = 132], risperidone [HGBG, n = 167; HGGN, n = 158], quetiapine [HGJB, n = 175], ziprasidone [HGHJ, n = 271] and aripiprazole [HGLB, n = 285]. Productivity was defined as functional activities/work including working for pay, studying, housekeeping and volunteer work. Productivity level in the prior 3 months was assessed on a 5-point scale ranging from no useful functioning to functional activity/work 75% to 100% of the time. Results Chronically ill patients treated with olanzapine (OLZ experienced significantly greater improvement in productivity when compared to patients treated with risperidone (RISP (OLZ = 0.22 ± 1.19, RISP = -0.03 ± 1.17, p = 0.033 or ziprasidone (ZIP (OLZ = 0.50 ± 1.38, ZIP = 0.25 ± 1.27, p = 0.026, but did not significantly differ from the quetiapine, aripiprazole or haloperidol treatment groups. Among

  16. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) in schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a basis for possible classification of schinzophrenic psychoses into schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, we studied the brain functional differences among 16 schizophrenic patients, 16 atypical psychosis patients and 16 healthy volunteers by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-[123I] iodoamphetamine. As a result, schizophrenics showed hypofrontality. On the other hand, atypical psychotics had no such hypofrontality but showed a reduced uptake rate in the right thalamic region. No influence of sex, duration of illness and medication was confirmed by the findings. The results suggest that schizophrenics might have some lesions in the frontal regions, whereas atypical psychotics might have no such lesions, but dysfunction in the right thalamic region. Consequently, the SPECT findings as least indicate possibly different etiologies for schizophrenia and atypical psychosis. (author)

  17. Short-term clinical stability and lack of insight are associated with a negative attitude towards antipsychotic treatment at discharge in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Esteban Medina,1 Joan Salvà,2 Rubén Ampudia,3 Jorge Maurino,1 Juan Larumbe41AstraZeneca Medical Department, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; 3Mediclin, Quintiles, Madrid, Spain; 4Hospital Psiquiátrico de Álava, Vitoria, SpainPurpose: The primary aim of this study was to assess the range of attitudes towards antipsychotic treatment at hospital discharge in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The secondary aim was to analyze the relationship between patients' attitudes and sociodemographic and clinical parameters.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study with a sample of patients admitted due to acute exacerbation of schizophrenia or a manic episode was conducted. Attitude towards pharmacological treatment at discharge was assessed with the 10-item Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-10. Logistic regression was used to determine significant variables associated with attitude to medication.Results: Eighty-six patients were included in the study. The mean age was 43.1 years (standard deviation [SD] 12.1, and 55.8% were males. Twenty-six percent of the patients presented a negative attitude towards antipsychotic treatment (mean DAI-10 score of -4.7, SD 2.7. Most of them had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Multivariate analysis showed that poor insight into illness and a greater number of previous acute episodes was significantly associated with a negative attitude towards medication at discharge (odds ratio 1.68 and 1.18, respectively.Conclusion: Insight and clinical stability prior to admission were related to patients' attitude towards antipsychotic treatment at hospital discharge among patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The identification of factors related to the attitude towards medication would offer an improved opportunity for clinicians to select patients eligible for prophylactic adherence-focused interventions.Keywords: attitude towards

  18. Acute weight gain, gender, and therapeutic response to antipsychotics in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhongyun

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research indicated that women are more vulnerable than men to adverse psychological consequences of weight gain. Other research has suggested that weight gain experienced during antipsychotic therapy may also psychologically impact women more negatively. This study assessed the impact of acute treatment-emergent weight gain on clinical and functional outcomes of patients with schizophrenia by patient gender and antipsychotic treatment (olanzapine or haloperidol. Methods Data were drawn from the acute phase (first 6-weeks of a double-blind randomized clinical trial of olanzapine versus haloperidol in the treatment of 1296 men and 700 women with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The associations between weight change and change in core schizophrenia symptoms, depressive symptoms, and functional status were examined post-hoc for men and women and for each medication group. Core schizophrenia symptoms (positive and negative were measured with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, depressive symptoms with the BPRS Anxiety/Depression Scale and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and functional status with the mental and physical component scores on the Medical Outcome Survey-Short Form 36. Statistical analysis included methods that controlled for treatment duration. Results Weight gain during 6-week treatment with olanzapine and haloperidol was significantly associated with improvements in core schizophrenia symptoms, depressive symptoms, mental functioning, and physical functioning for men and women alike. The conditional probability of clinical response (20% reduction in core schizophrenia symptom, given a clinically significant weight gain (at least 7% of baseline weight, showed that about half of the patients who lost weight responded to treatment, whereas three-quarters of the patients who had a clinically significant weight gain responded to treatment. The positive associations between therapeutic

  19. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: how long does every behavior last, and are particular behaviors associated with PRN antipsychotic agent use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Philippe; McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Belzile, Eric; Richard, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) affect approximately all residents in nursing homes at some point; however, the course of BPSD among this group is not well known. The goal of the current study was to describe the course of each measured BPSD over a period of 6 months. A secondary explorative objective was to identify which BPSD are associated with as-needed (PRN) antipsychotic drug use. This secondary analysis study of 146 nursing home residents was drawn from a prospective, observational, multisite (N = 7) cohort study. Results showed that BPSD lasted for an average of 2.3 months, and the BPSD saying things that do not make sense had the longest duration, with 3.6 months. PRN antipsychotic drug administration was associated with nocturnal BPSD and requesting help unnecessarily. Within 3 months, most BPSD were resolved by usual care; use of PRN antipsychotic medication was not associated with behaviors that put the residents or their caregivers at risk. PMID:25369585

  20. Treating prolactinoma and psychosis: medication and cognitive behavioural therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nieman, D.H.; Sutterland, A.L.; Otten, J.; Becker, H.E.; Drent, M.L.; Gaag, van der, R.J.; Birchwood, M.; Haan

    2011-01-01

    The patient in this case report had two severe medical conditions that require oppositional treatment: prolactinoma and psychosis. A prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that produces prolactin. Dopamine agonist medication is the first-line treatment in patients with prolactinoma. The psychotic symptoms started after a dosage increase of a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. Several antipsychotic medications were tried with and without the dopamine D2-receptor agonist, but severe ...

  1. Antipsychotic-Like Effect of Trimetazidine in a Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oytun Erbaş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trimetazidine (TMZ has been used as an anti-ischemic agent for angina pectoris, chorioretinal disturbances, and vertigo. Also, it can induce extrapyramidal type adverse reaction such as parkinsonism, gait disorder, and tremor via blockade of D2 receptors. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of TMZ on novelty-induced rearing behavior and apomorphine-induced stereotypy behavior in male rats. Four groups of rat ( were administrated with TMZ (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p., chlorpromazine (1 mg/kg, i.p., or isotonic saline. One hour later, apomorphine (2 mg/kg, s.c. was administrated to each rat. Our results showed that both doses of TMZ significantly decreased the rearing behavior in rats, whereas the decrease with chlorpromazine was higher. TMZ also decreased the stereotypy scores in a dose-dependent manner. We concluded that TMZ has beneficial effects on rearing behavior and stereotypy, which are accepted to be indicators of antipsychotic effect. Taken together, with its antioxidative and cytoprotective properties, TMZ is worthy of being investigated for its anti-psychotic effects as a primary or an adjunctive drug.

  2. The pharmacogenetics of symptom response to antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gavin P

    2012-03-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are limited in their efficacy by the relatively poor response of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia as well as by the substantial variability in response between patients. Pharmacogenetic studies have sought to identify the genetic factors that underlie the individual variability in response to treatment, with a past emphasis on dopamine and serotonin receptors as candidate genes. Few studies have separated effects on positive and negative symptoms, despite the established differences in response to drug treatment between these syndromes. Where this has been done most findings are consistent with the conclusion that dopamine receptor polymorphisms relate to positive symptom response, while negative symptom improvement is influenced by polymorphisms of genes involved in 5-HT neurotransmission. A wide range of polymorphisms in other candidate genes have been investigated, with some positive findings in those genes associated with glutamatergic transmission and/or risk factors for schizophrenia. However, there remains a lack of good replicated findings; furthermore there is little evidence to support drug-specific genetic associations with treatment response. While most past studies focused on single candidate genes, technology now permits genome-wide association studies with response to antipsychotics. Although not without major limitations, these "hypothesis-free" approaches are beginning to identify further important risk factors for treatment response. Again there is little consistency between various studies, although some of the polymorphisms identified are in genes involved in neurodevelopment, which is increasingly being recognized as important in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:22396678

  3. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome C3 CD46 CFB CFH CFHR5 CFI THBD Related Information ... Manual Consumer Version: Thrombocytopenia Merck Manual Professional Version: Complement System Orphanet: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Patient Support ...

  4. Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics in Norwegian emergency wards, a cross-sectional national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentzel-Larsen Tore

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveys on prescription patterns for antipsychotics in the Scandinavian public health system are scarce despite the prevalent use of these drugs. The clinical differences between antipsychotic drugs are mainly in the areas of safety and tolerability, and international guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia offer rational strategies to minimize the burden of side effects related to antipsychotic treatment. The implementation of treatment guidelines in clinical practice have proven difficult to achieve, as reflected by major variations in the prescription patterns of antipsychotics between different comparable regions and countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the practice of treatment of schizophrenic patients with antipsychotics at discharge from acute inpatient settings at a national level. Methods Data from 486 discharges of patients from emergency inpatient treatment of schizophrenia were collected during a three-month period in 2005; the data were collected in a large national study that covered 75% of Norwegian hospitals receiving inpatients for acute treatment. Antipsychotic treatment, demographic variables, scores from the Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales and information about comorbid conditions and prior treatment were analyzed to seek predictors for nonadherence to guidelines. Results In 7.6% of the discharges no antipsychotic treatment was given; of the remaining discharges, 35.6% were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy and 41.9% were prescribed at least one first-generation antipsychotic (FGA. The mean chlorpromazine equivalent dose was 450 (SD 347, range 25–2800. In the multivariate regression analyses, younger age, previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months before index hospitalization, and a comorbid diagnosis of personality disorder or mental retardation predicted antipsychotic polypharmacy, while previous inpatient treatment in

  5. Construct validity of 2 measures to assess reasons for antipsychotic discontinuation and continuation from patients’ and clinicians’ perspectives in a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faries Douglas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the specific reasons for antipsychotic discontinuation or continuation from patients’ or clinicians’ perspectives. This study aimed to assess the construct validity of 2 new measures of the Reasons for Antipsychotic Discontinuation/Continuation (RAD: RAD-I (a structured interview assessing the patient’s perspective and RAD-Q (a questionnaire assessing the clinician’s perspective. Methods Data were used from a 12-week antipsychotic trial of schizophrenia patients in which the RAD was administered at study entry and at study completion (or discontinuation. Construct validity was assessed through comparisons of RAD responses, clinicians’ responses to a standard patient disposition form identifying reasons for patient’s study discontinuation, and several standard psychiatric measures. Percent agreement quantified the correspondence between patient and clinician scores. Results Patients indicating lack of improvement/worsening of positive symptoms as a ‘somewhat’ to ‘primary’ reason for medication discontinuation had statistically significantly less improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale positive score than patients not reporting these as a reason (concurrent validity. Similar results were observed for the RAD negative symptom, functional, social support, and adherence items, whereas the mood and cognitive items were not significantly associated with change scores on standard psychiatric measures. Responses to the RAD were also weakly associated with variables that theoretically should not be related to them (divergent validity. Level of agreement between the clinician- and patient-rated RAD scores was high (60%-100%. Conclusions Initial validation of the RAD suggests that the instruments are valid tools for gathering detailed information regarding reasons for antipsychotic discontinuation and continuation from patients’ and clinicians’ perspectives.

  6. The Spectrum of Hormone Immunoreactivity in Typical and Atypical Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim ERTAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to assess the spectrum of hormone immunoreactivity in our pituitary adenoma cases and discuss the diagnostic parameters of atypical pituitary adenomas.Material and Methods: A total of 166 pituitary adenoma cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2008 in our department were included in the present study. Hematoxylin-eosin stained and immunohistochemistry performed slides (ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, FSH, LH, Ki-67, and p53 were evaluated. Cases having more than two mitoses on 10 high power fields besides more than 3% Ki-67 index were accepted in the atypical group.Results: Histologically, 159 cases were typical pituitary adenoma and 7 were atypical pituitary adenoma. Of the atypical pituitary adenoma cases, one case was ACTH, one GH and one both GH and prolactin hormone immunoreactive pituitary adenomas. Four cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas. Of the typical pituitary adenoma cases, 39 cases were GH, 19 ACTH, 17 prolactin, 10 FSH, 8 LH and one TSH immunreactive pituitary adenomas. Fourty-seven cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas.Twenty-two of the all pitutary adenoma cases had recurrence. Of these cases, 18 were typical adenoma and four were atypical adenoma.Conclusion: The ratio of prolactin immunoreactive pituitary adenoma cases in the surgical material of neuropathology is decreasing due to medical therapy. Atypical pituitary adenomas are not the sole factor affecting the recurrence mechanism but these tumors have higher recurrence rate compared with typical pituitary adenomas and we think the proliferation index might be the principal approach in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  7. Atypical MRI appearance of desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the atypical MRI features and histopathological findings of a desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma in an 8-year-old girl. The mass was predominantly solid with a large, solid, non-enhancing exophytic component. The adjacent brain showed cortical necrosis and white-matter gliosis, suggesting earlier hypoxia. (orig.)

  8. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  9. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  10. Disentangling the Emerging Evidence around Atypical Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Clark, Emma M

    2012-01-01

    Atypical femur fractures are rare but a growing concern, as they are more common in patients who use bisphosphonates. The best radiology-based studies have had access to only short-term exposure data, while the studies using prescription databases with substantial long-term data did not have access...

  11. Atypical manifestation of dural arteriovenous fistula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary dural arteriovenous fistula presenting as infantile stroke, in a fifteen month old boy, is reported. The initial impression on CT scan in this case was misleading, due to the atypical appearance of the pathological periventricular blood vessels, interpreted as periventricular calcification.

  12. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, William V.; Dickson, Chata A.; Balsamo, Lyn M.; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y.; Farren, Kevin M.; Wheeler, Emily E.; McIlvane, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded…

  13. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how…

  14. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    OpenAIRE

    Derek To; Aaron Wong; Valentina Montessori

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  15. Atypical fractures on long term bisphosphonates therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussein, W

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates reduce fractures risk in patients with osteoporosis. A new pattern of fractures is now being noted in patients on prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. We report a case of an atypical femoral fracture with preceding pain and highlight the characteristics of these fractures.

  16. Non-diabetic atypical necrobiosis lipoidica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One 8 year female child had asymptomatic, anaesthetic, hypohidrotic, atrophic, yellowish, waxy plaque on the front of left thigh since 2 months. No nerve thickening was observed clinically or histopathologically. Hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, epidermal atrophy, degeneration of collagen, mononuclear granulomas and perivascular mononuclear infiltrate confirmed the clinical diagnosis of atypical necrobiosis lipoidica.

  17. Antipsychotic pharmacogenomics in first episode psychosis: a role for glutamate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J M; Reilly, J L; Harris, M S H; Patel, S R; Weiden, P J; Prasad, K M; Badner, J A; Nimgaonkar, V L; Keshavan, M S; Sweeney, J A; Bishop, J R

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors may underlie beneficial and adverse responses to antipsychotic treatment. These relationships may be easier to identify among patients early in the course of disease who have limited exposure to antipsychotic drugs. We examined 86 first episode patients (schizophrenia, psychotic bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder with psychotic features) who had minimal to no prior antipsychotic exposure in a 6-week pharmacogenomic study of antipsychotic treatment response. Response was measured by change in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total score. Risperidone monotherapy was the primary antipsychotic treatment. Pharmacogenomic association studies were completed to (1) examine candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to be involved with glutamate signaling, and (2) conduct an exploratory genome-wide association study of symptom response to identify potential novel associations for future investigation. Two SNPs in GRM7 (rs2069062 and rs2014195) were significantly associated with antipsychotic response in candidate gene analysis, as were two SNPs in the human glutamate receptor delta 2 (GRID2) gene (rs9307122 and rs1875705) in genome-wide association analysis. Further examination of these findings with those from a separate risperidone-treated study sample demonstrated that top SNPs in both studies were overrepresented in glutamate genes and that there were similarities in neurodevelopmental gene categories associated with drug response from both study samples. These associations indicate a role for gene variants related to glutamate signaling and antipsychotic response with more broad association patterns indicating the potential importance of genes involved in neuronal development. PMID:26905411

  18. The utilization of antipsychotics in elderly inpatients of general hospital : clinical analysis%综合性医院老年住院患者抗精神病药物使用状况的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢秋泓; 赵坤英; 解恒革

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the utilization of antipsychotics and its potential effects on physiology and psychology in elderly inpatients of general hospital. Methods 280 inpatients ≥58y who were in the department of geriatrics in our hospital in November 2008 were investigated. Results Thirty-two(11. 4%) inpatients ≥80y received an antipsychotic drug,and 43. 8% of them took the drug for ≥12 months,56. 3% of them took the combination of hypnotics and sedatives. Most of the drugs were atypical antipsychotics. Dementia was the most frequently reported diagnoses a-mong the elderly inpatients using an antipsychotic agent(46. 9%). The main conditions for receiving antipsychotic treatment were the diagnosis of acute delirium or psychosis symptoms, depression and anxiety, and neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia. Conclusions Dementia, delirium, depression and anxiety,and neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia are the main causes of elderly inpatients in general hospital for using antipsychotics. Nearly two thirds of them use the combination of hypnotics and sedatives. The study findings suggest that there is a need to monitor antipsychotic drug use by elderly inpatients in general hospital in light of efficacy and safety of atypical agents.%目的 了解综合性医院老年住院患者抗精神病药物使用情况及其对生理心理的潜在影响.方法 选择2008年11月在我院老年病各科住院的、年龄≥58岁患者280例,随访2年,调查分析患者抗精神病药物的使用情况.结果 共32例惠者使用了抗精神病药物,年龄均≥80岁,绝大部分患者服用非经典抗精神病药物.痴呆患者占46.9%,痴呆是老年住院患者使用抗精神病药物的主要疾病.抗精神病药物的使用主要与急性谵妄或精神病性症状、焦虑抑郁、痴呆相关的精神行为症状等有关.43.8%的患者连续服用≥1年,56.3%的患者合用镇静催眠药.结论 痴呆、谵妄、焦虑抑郁症状是综合性医院老年住院

  19. Atypical presentation of ocular toxoplasmosis: A Case report of exudative retinal detachment and choroidal Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya A Al-Zahrani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old healthy male presented with a chief complaint of blurred vision in the right eye for 1-week. Fundus examination indicated right exudative retinal detachment and choroidal ischemia. The patient responded well to anti-toxoplasmosis medications and steroids. Exudative retinal detachment and choroidal ischemia are atypical presentations of ocular toxoplasmosis. However, both conditions responded well to anti.parasitic therapy with steroid.

  20. Atypical Chikungunya virus infections: clinical manifestations, mortality and risk factors for severe disease during the 2005–2006 outbreak on Réunion

    OpenAIRE

    Economopoulou, A.; Dominguez, M.; Helynck, B.; Sissoko, D.; Wichmann, Ole; Quenel, P; Germonneau, P.; Quatresous, I.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2005, an outbreak of Chikungunya fever occurred on the island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean. During winter 2005, six patients developed meningoencephalitis and acute hepatitis due to Chikungunya virus. Our objectives were to determine the incidence and mortality of atypical Chikungunya viral infections and to identify risk factors for severe disease. A hospital-based surveillance system was established to collect data on atypical Chikungunya cases. Case reports, medical records and ...

  1. Analysis of Effects of Antipsychotic Drugs Division of Thyroid Hormone in Patients with Disease of Spirit%抗精神药物对精神分裂症患者甲状腺激素影响探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祖永建

    2014-01-01

    目的:探究抗精神药物在治疗精神分裂症患者时对其甲状腺激素水平的影响,为后期临床治疗提供参考。方法选取我院住院部的80例精神分裂住院患者作为研究对象,根据治疗药物的不同分为研究组与对照组各40例,同期另选取我院我院体检健康者40例为正常组。观察并比较三组患者在治疗结束后的甲状腺激素水平。结果研究组患者经治疗后与正常组在甲状腺指标比较,差异具有统计学意义(0.05)。结论抗精神药物与非典型性抗精神药物对精神分裂患者的甲状腺水平均有一定程度的影响。%Objective To explore the antidepressant drugs in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia in the thyroid hormone levels, provide reference for clinical treatment. Methods Select 80 cases of schizophrenia inpatient in our hospital patients as the research object, according to the dif erent divided into research group of drugs and the control group (n=40), at the same time the other selected from our hospital medical group 40 cases of normal healthy subjects. To observe and compare the three groups of patients at the end of the treatment with thyroid hormone levels. Results Group patients after treatment compared with normal group in thyroid index, statistically significant dif erence ( 0.05). Conclusion Atypical antipsychotic antidepressant drugs thyroid levels in patients with schizophrenia have a certain degree of influence.

  2. Second-generation antipsychotics in a tertiary care hospital: prescribing patterns, metabolic profiles, and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedrig, David F; Gött, Carmen; Fischer, Anja; Müller, Sabrina T; Greil, Waldemar; Bucklar, Guido; Russmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We carried out an observational study that analyzed population characteristics, metabolic profiles, potentially interacting pharmacotherapy, and related adverse events in second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) users of a tertiary care hospital. Within our pharmacoepidemiological database derived from electronic medical records of 82,358 hospitalizations, we identified 1136 hospitalizations contributing 9165 patient-days with exposure to SGA. Blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, and BMI had been documented in 97.7, 75.7, 24.6, and 77.4% of hospitalizations, respectively. Among these, the prevalence of hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and BMI 30 kg/m or more was 36.9, 22.6, 61.1, and 23.1%, respectively. A total of 63.4, 70.8, and 37.1% of SGA users with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, respectively, received no pharmacotherapy for these conditions. We identified 614 patient-days with SGA plus formally contraindicated comedication and another 1066 patient-days with other high-risk combinations for QTc prolongation. Among those there was one case with associated neutropenia and four cases with abnormal QTc interval. However, specific monitoring for such adverse events was not documented in 45.5% of hospitalizations with contraindicated and 89.8% with high-risk QTc-prolonging combinations. Our study identified targets for improved monitoring and management in SGA users. These may be implemented as automated alerts into electronic prescribing systems and thereby efficiently support safer pharmacotherapy in clinical practice. PMID:26473524

  3. Sexual Dysfunction Due to Psychotropic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Anita H; Alkis, Andrew R; Parikh, Nishant B; Votta, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    Sexual functioning is important to assess in patients with psychiatric illness as both the condition and associated treatment may contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD). Antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antianxiety agents may be associated with SD related to drug mechanism of action. Sexual adverse effects may be related to genetic risk factors, impact on neurotransmitters and hormones, and psychological elements. Effective strategies to manage medication-induced sexual dysfunction are initial choice of a drug unlikely to cause SD, switching to a different medication, and adding an antidote to reverse SD. Appropriate interventions should be determined on a clinical case-by-case basis. PMID:27514298

  4. Psychiatric diagnoses in patients with burning mouth syndrome and atypical odontalgia referred from psychiatric to dental facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Briley, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Miho Takenoshita1, Tomoko Sato1, Yuichi Kato1, Ayano Katagiri1, Tatsuya Yoshikawa1, Yusuke Sato2, Eisuke Matsushima3, Yoshiyuki Sasaki4, Akira Toyofuku11Psychosomatic Dentistry, 2Complete Denture Prosthodontics, 3Liaison Psychiatry and Palliative Medicine, 4Center for Education and Research in Oral Health Care, Faculty of Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) and atypical odontalgia ...

  5. Antipsychotic drugs a last resort for these 5 conditions (ADHD, Anxiety, Depression, Insomnia and PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neurological events, and sedation. Studies in people with schizophrenia found that risperidone is the most likely of the newer antipsychotic drugs to increase a hormone called prolactin, which can result in women missing ...

  6. Determinants of physical health parameters in individuals with intellectual disability who use long-term antipsychotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kuijper, Gerda; Mulder, Hans; Evenhuis, Heleen; Scholte, Frans; Visser, Frank; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability frequently use antipsychotics for many years. This may have detrimental health effects, including neurological symptoms and metabolic and hormonal dysregulation, the latter possibly affecting bone metabolism. There is large variability in the degree in which

  7. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor a...

  8. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti D′Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  9. Acute weight gain, gender, and therapeutic response to antipsychotics in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Zhongyun; Stensland Michael; Ascher-Svanum Haya; Kinon Bruce J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous research indicated that women are more vulnerable than men to adverse psychological consequences of weight gain. Other research has suggested that weight gain experienced during antipsychotic therapy may also psychologically impact women more negatively. This study assessed the impact of acute treatment-emergent weight gain on clinical and functional outcomes of patients with schizophrenia by patient gender and antipsychotic treatment (olanzapine or haloperidol). ...

  10. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Danish psychiatric outpatients treated with antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Breum, Leif; Glümrr, Charlotte;

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is increasing worldwide and is suggested to be higher among psychiatric patients, especially those on antipsychotic treatment.......The incidence of the metabolic syndrome, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is increasing worldwide and is suggested to be higher among psychiatric patients, especially those on antipsychotic treatment....

  11. Pattern of adverse reactions of antipsychotics in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshy T. Viswanathan; Asha Sisupalan; Vidhukumar Karunakaran

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to analyse the pattern of adverse drug reactions (ADR) of antipsychotics among patients attending the psychiatry outpatient department of a tertiary care centre. Methods: Patients attending the psychiatry outpatient department who have been on treatment with one or more antipsychotics for more than 6 weeks were included in the study. Details about the prescription given in the previous appointment were collected. Various adverse effects associated with...

  12. A possible gut microbiota basis for weight gain side effects of antipsychotic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Harshad; Parihar, Ankita; Jiao, Dazhi; Murali, Shwetha; Wild, David J

    2014-01-01

    Weight gain is a well-established side effect of both conventional and newer anti-psychotic drugs, but the cause is not well understood. Recent studies correlate obesity with the presence or absence of particular genetic sequences in the gut microbiota. We identified strong associations between protein targets of antipsychotics and microbiota sequences directly related to weight regulation in human body, leading to a potential metagenomic mechanism of action. Further experimental study is rec...

  13. Diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in patients with schizophrenia, before and after antipsychotic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayees Ahmad Wani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment with antipsychotics increases the risk of developing diabetes in patients of schizophrenia but this diabetogenic potential of different antipsychotics seems to be different. Moreover, there may be an independent link between schizophrenia and diabetes. So we plan to study the prevalence of glucose dysregulation in patients of schizophrenia before and after treatment with various antipsychotics. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients (32 males and 18 females diagnosed with schizophrenia were evaluated for glucose dysregulation using oral glucose tolerance test, initially (drug naive and after antipsychotic treatment. Age- and sex-matched healthy volunteer group of 50 subjects (35 males and 15 females was taken for comparison. Results were interpreted using American Diabetic Association criteria. Results: Though the glycemic status of the patient group was comparable with healthy controls initially but antipsychotic treatment was associated with glucose dysregulation. For first 6 weeks the antipsychotic (olanzapine, risperidone, haloperidol and aripiprazole-induced glucose dysregulation was comparable, which was seen to be maximum with the olanzapine-treated group at the end of this study, 14 weeks. Conclusion: We conclude that antipsychotic treatment of nondiabetic drug naive schizophrenia patients was associated with adverse effects on glucose regulation. For initial 6 weeks the antipsychotic-induced glucose dysregulation was comparable, which was seen to be maximum with olanzapine at the end of study, i.e. 14 weeks. Keeping this at the back of mind we can stabilize a patient initially with a more effective drug, olanzapine, and later on shift to one with less metabolic side effects.

  14. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: Systematic Review and Case Report Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Belvederi Murri, Martino; Guaglianone, Argentina; Bugliani, Michele; Calcagno, Pietro; Respino, Matteo; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco; Pompili, Maurizio; Amore, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, severe, idiosyncratic adverse reaction to antipsychotics. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) were originally assumed to be free from the risk of causing NMS, however several cases of NMS induced by SGAs (SGA-NMS) have been reported. Objectives The aim of this study was to systematically review available studies and case reports on SGA-NMS and compare the presentation of NMS induced by different SGAs. Data Sources Citations were r...

  15. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S.; Dencker, Ditte; Schülein, Christina; Wess, Jürgen; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson’s disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which ...

  16. A translational research approach to poor treatment response in patients with schizophrenia: clozapine–antipsychotic polypharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Honer, William G.; Procyshyn, Ric M.; Eric Y. H. Chen; MacEwan, G. William; Barr, Alasdair M.

    2009-01-01

    Poor treatment response in patients with schizophrenia is an important clinical problem, and one possible strategy is concurrent treatment with more than one antipsychotic (polypharmacy). We analyzed the evidence base for this strategy using a translational research model focused on clozapine-antipsychotic polypharmacy (CAP). We considered 3 aspects of the existing knowledge base and translational research: the link between basic science and clinical studies of efficacy, the evidence for effe...

  17. Bone Density in Chronic Schizophrenia with Long-Term Antipsychotic Treatment: Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Tae-Young; Chung, Moon-Yong; Chung, Hae-Kyung; Choi, Jin-Hee; Kim, Tae-Yong; So, Hyung-Seok

    2010-01-01

    Objective Decreased bone mineral density has been found in the chronic schizophrenic patients who have been given a long-term administration of antipsychotics. Hyperprolactinemia from the antipsychotics and the negative symptom of schizophrenia were considered as the causes for this finding. In this study, the effect of hyperprolactinemia and the negative symptom of schizophrenia on bone mineral density was investigated on male schizophrenic patients. Methods The cross-sectional study was car...

  18. ANTIPSYCHOTIC SIDE-EFFECT – POTENTIAL RISK OF PATIENTS REJECTING THEIR TREATMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ružić, Klementina; Medved, Paola; Tatalović-Vorkapić, Sanja; Graovac, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Antipsychotics side-effects pose an enormous problem in psychiatric treatment. The choice of antipsychotics is a crucial issue in the treatment as both patients' cooperation and compliance often depend upon it. Severe side-effects might sometimes cause the treatment interruption, to which each patient is entitled. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) features include social and interpersonal deficits, discomfort with close relationships, as well as cognitive and perceptual distorti...

  19. Lifting the Fog: The Problem of Antipsychotic Drug Use in Nursing Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin, Carly Serena

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the elder population nationwide, the problem of excessive dependence on risky antipsychotic drug treatment for dementia-related behavioral problems in nursing facilities must be addressed. At the federal level, the over-prescription of antipsychotics to the elderly in nursing homes is addressed first by regulation specific to nursing facilities, such as the Federal Nursing Home Reform Amendments (FNHRA), a part of the Ombudsman Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OB...

  20. A pharmacy led program to review anti-psychotic prescribing for people with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Child Anne; Clarke Amy; Fox Chris; Maidment Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Anti-psychotics, prescribed to people with dementia, are associated with approximately 1,800 excess annual deaths in the UK. A key public health objective is to limit such prescribing of anti-psychotics. Methods This project was conducted within primary care in Medway Primary Care Trust (PCT) in the UK. There were 2 stages for the intervention. First, primary care information systems including the dementia register were searched by a pharmacy technician to identify people ...

  1. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  2. Atypical burkitt's lymphoma transforming from follicular lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chung Lap P; Loong Florence; Hwang Yu Y; Chim Chor S

    2011-01-01

    Amongst follicular lymphoma that transforms into a high-grade lymphoma, majority are diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Here we reported a rare atypical Burkitt's lymphoma transformation from an asymptomatic follicular lymphoma. Lymph node biopsy showed a composite lymphoma with infiltration of the inter-follicular areas by high grade small non-cleaved lymphoma cells amongst neoplastic follicles. Moreover, FISH and molecular genetic study confirmed concomitant MYC translocations and t(14;18) in t...

  3. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    OpenAIRE

    Troxell, Megan L.; Donald C Houghton

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease classically presents with aggressive necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, often with pulmonary hemorrhage. The pathologic hallmark is linear staining of GBMs for deposited immunoglobulin G (IgG), usually accompanied by serum autoantibodies to the collagen IV alpha-3 constituents of GBMs. Methods Renal pathology files were searched for cases with linear anti-GBM to identify cases with atypical or indolent course. Histopa...

  4. Hyperprolactinemia during antipsychotics treatment increases the level of coagulation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishioka M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Masamichi Ishioka, Norio Yasui-Furukori, Norio Sugawara, Hanako Furukori, Shuhei Kudo, Kazuhiko Nakamura Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Japan Objective: The strong association between psychiatric patients who receive antipsychotics and the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE is known. Although previous reports suggest that hyperprolactinemia often increases markers of activated coagulation, few studies have examined the direct relationship between the prolactin level elevated by antipsychotics and activated markers of activated coagulation.Method: The participants included 182 patients with schizophrenia (male =89, female =93 who received antipsychotic treatments for at least 3 months. Markers of VTE (D-dimer, fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products, and thrombin–antithrombin complex and serum prolactin concentrations were measured.Results: Prolactin levels were significantly correlated with the logarithmic transformation of the D-dimer (r=0.320, P=0.002 and fibrin/fibrinogen degradation product levels (r=0.236, P=0.026 but not of the thrombin–antithrombin complex level (r=0.117, ns among men. However, no correlations were found between the VTE markers and prolactin levels among women. These results were confirmed using multiple regression analyses that included demographic factors and antipsychotic dosages. Conclusion: The current study indicates that hyperprolactinemia is associated with an increase in markers of activated coagulation among men receiving antipsychotics. This finding clinically implies that monitoring and modulating prolactin levels among men are important to decrease the risk of VTE. Keywords: prolactin, antipsychotics, venous thromboembolism

  5. Transpupillary thermotherapy for atypical central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ryosuke Kawamura1,2, Hidenao Ideta1, Hideyuki Hori1, Kenya Yuki2, Tsuyoshi Uno1, Tatsurou Tanabe1, Kazuo Tsubota2, Tsutomu Kawasaki11Ideta Eye Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan; 2Keio University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC has been traditionally treated with laser photocoagulation. We thought that transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT utilizing a lower temperature than that of conventional laser photocoagulation might minimize permanent retinal and choroidal damage. Studies suggest that undesirable effects on vision due to TTT are minimal even if it is applied to foveal and/or parafoveal lesions when TTT requires a larger irradiation spot. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of TTT in the management of atypical CSC.Methods: We defined atypical CSC as bullous retinal detachment with diffuse or several leakages, severe leakage with fibrin formation under serous retinal detachment, or leakage within a pigment epithelium detachment. Eight consecutive patients with atypical CSC underwent visual acuity testing, ophthalmic examination, color photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography to evaluate the results of transpupillary thermotherapy. Retreatment of atypical CSC was based on ophthalmic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. TTT was performed on the leaking spots shown in fluorescein angiography, with a power of 50–250 mW, spot size of 500–1200 µm, and exposure time of 13–60 seconds to minimize retinal damage.Results: In five of eight affected eyes, serous detachments completely resolved within 1 month after the initial TTT. One eye had persistent subretinal fluid and required a second TTT treatment. Two eyes showed no resolution of CSC and were treated by conventional photocoagulation. Initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/600 to 20/20 (mean, 20/40; median, 20/30. Final BCVA

  6. Denial and Acceptance Coping Styles and Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Aldebot, Stephanie; Weisman de Mamani, Amy G.

    2009-01-01

    Antipsychotics are often the first line of treatment for individuals with schizophrenia (Fialko et al., 2008). One challenge to effective treatment is lack of adherence to prescribed medication. Lower rates of adherence are associated with considerably higher rates of relapse and poorer course of illness. Therefore studying characteristics that may be related to medication adherence is important. Coping styles may be one such factor. Individuals utilize a variety of coping mechanisms to manag...

  7. The prescribing pattern of a new antipsychotic: A descriptive study of aripiprazole for psychiatric in-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, M.; Manniche, C.; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2008-01-01

    -naive. In 25% aripiprazole, monotherapy was commenced whereas aripiprazole-antipsychotic combinations were initially prescribed in 75%. Overall, 85% of the patients received periods of antipsychotic polypharmacy and aripiprazole was combined with 17 different antipsychotics. Each patient received median...... three (range 0-8) psychoactive drugs parallel with aripiprazole. This study demonstrates reality in psychopharmacology and quote aripiprazole as example. In day-to-day practice, aripiprazole is used as part of highly individualized regimens comprising polypharmacy and excessive dosing. Although...

  8. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalyan, Z. A.; Ter-Pogossyan, Z. R.; Abroyan, L. O.; Hakobyan, L. H.; Avetisyan, A. S.; Yu, Karalyan N.; Karalova, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection. PMID:27536044

  9. Brexpiprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also used with an antidepressant to treat depression when symptoms cannot be controlled by the antidepressant alone. Brexpiprazole is in a class of medications called atypical antipsychotics. It works by ...

  10. Olanzapine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods) in adults and teenagers 13 years of age and older. Olanzapine is in a class of medications called atypical antipsychotics. It works by ...

  11. Ziprasidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Ziprasidone is in a class of medications called atypical antipsychotics. It works by ...

  12. Risperidone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of severe mania, and other abnormal moods). Risperidone is in a class of medications called atypical antipsychotics. It works by ...

  13. Lurasidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lurasidone is in a class of medications called atypical antipsychotics. It works by ...

  14. Comparison of metabolic parameters and Framingham cardiovascular risk scores before and after in-hospital treatment with antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysokiński, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this naturalistic study was to evaluate changes in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS and Framingham cardiovascular risk scores in adult with schizophrenia after inhospital treatment with antipsychotics. Methods. For 58 patients (36 women and 22 men the following data was acquired on admission and at discharge: body height and weight, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TGA, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, blood pressure, concomitant use of antidiabetic, antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic medications. Results. Mean TGA levels increased significantly (140.32 mg/dL vs. 180.17 mg/dL, other parameters did not change. MetS prevalence on admission and at discharge did not differ significantly, irrespective of definition used (IDF: 50.00% vs. 60.34%; ATPIII: 39.66% vs. 43.10%; ATPIII A: 46.55% vs. 51.72%. Two cardiovascular risk scores were reduced at discharge: stroke, 10-year (4.10% vs. 3.46% and hypertension, 4-year (22.18% vs. 16.58%. Other Framingham risk scores did not change. Very high prevalence of abnormal body weight (up to 65%, abdominal obesity (63% in men and 89% in women, hypertension (>50% and lipid abnormalities (31-64% was found. Conclusions. We have found a very high rate of MetS in patients treated with antipsychotics. No metabolic parameters improved after hospital stay, while some worsened. This did not, however, result in increased risk of cardiovascular events. Abnormal body weight and lipid abnormalities were very common in our study population. Our results indicate that metabolic parameters should be monitored regularly, particularly in outpatient settings, and appropriate treatment should be introduced as soon as any signifand appropriate treatment should be introduced as soon as any significant changes are found.

  15. Management of Typical and Atypical Hangman's Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Beagrie, Christopher; Woolley, Ele; Zakaria, Rasheed; Radon, Mark; Clark, Simon; Pillay, Robin; Wilby, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study of a prospectively maintained database. Objective Our aim was to retrospectively review management and outcomes of patients with low-grade hangman's fractures, specifically looking at differences in outcomes between collars and halo immobilization. We also studied fracture patterns and their treatment outcomes. Methods Forty-one patients with hangman's fractures were identified from 105 patients with axis fractures between 2007 and 2013. Typical hangman's fractures were defined as traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis causing a bilateral pars interarticularis fracture. Fractures involving the posterior cortex of C2 on one or both sides or an asymmetrical pattern were defined as atypical. Results There were 41 patients with a mean age of 59 years, with 13 (31.7%) typical and 28 (68.2%) atypical fractures. There were 22 (53.6%) type 1 fractures, 7 (41.4%) type 2 fractures, and 2 (4.9%) type 2a fractures in this series. Cervical collars were used to manage 11 patients (27% of all patients with hangman's fractures) and halo orthosis was used in 27 (65.8%). Three (7.3%) patients underwent surgical fixation of the fracture. Bony union was achieved in all patients on radiologic follow-up. Permanent neurologic deficit occurred in one patient due to associated injuries. Neck pain and stiffness were reported more commonly in the atypical group, but this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusions The majority of hangman type fractures can be treated nonoperatively. We found no difference in outcomes between a rigid collar or halo immobilization for treatment of low-grade fractures. Radiologic follow-up is essential to identify cases of nonunion. PMID:27099816

  16. Trisomy 18 with unilateral atypical ectrodactyly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.C. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Becerra et al. recently reported on an infant with multiple congenital anomalies who had trisomy 18. This preterm infant presented with bilateral ectrodactyly of feet, small cleft palate, esophageal atresia with associated tracheoesophageal fistula, congenital heart disease and other anomalies. The authors referenced article by Castle and Bernstein, in which they reported a male with trisomy 18 and cleft foot as well as a review of the literature which showed 2 other infants with trisomy 18 and ectrodactyly of the feet. An additional case of trisomy 18 associated with multiple congenital anomalies, including unilaterial, atypical ectrodactyly of the left foot.

  17. Gorlin’s syndrome: Atypical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay N. Agrawal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. The condition appears to have complete penetrance and variable expressivity, which makes clinilcal presentation among families variable. All known BCNS carry mutations in PATCHED gene. A 65 years old male patient presented with complaints of characteristic skin lesions on his face, back, palms since early adulthood. The lesions were pigmented nodules with characteristic border. The histopathology showed characteristic features suggestive of Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC. This case was atypical due to appearance of lesions quite later in life.

  18. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Premeshwar Niwant; Mukta Motwani; Sushil Naik

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic res...

  19. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  20. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)