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Sample records for attitude to death

  1. Life Experience with Death: Relation to Death Attitudes and to the Use of Death-Related Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Susan; Dirk, Judith; Mackay, Michael M.; Hux, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the relation of death experience to death attitudes and to autobiographical memory use. Participants (N = 52) completed standard death attitude measures and wrote narratives about a death-related autobiographical memory and (for comparison) a memory of a low point. Self-ratings of the memory narratives were used to assess their…

  2. Personifications of personal and typical death as related to death attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Jonathan F; McCann, Polly A; Cate, Kelly L

    2008-01-01

    The present article examined differences in personifications of personal and typical death as a function of attitudes about death. Ninety-eight students enrolled in psychology classes were randomly assigned to personify death as a character in a movie depicting either their own deathbed scene or the deathbed scene of the typical person prior to completing the Death Attitude Profile-Revised. The results supported the conceptual distinction between attitudes about personal death and death in general. Participants in the personal death condition personified death more frequently as a gentle-comforting image and less frequently as a cold-remote image than did participants in the typical death condition. The results also further validated the relation between personifications of death and death attitudes. Across both conditions, participants who selected the grim-terrifying image reported more fear of death and death avoidance; whereas, participants who selected the cold-remote or robot-like images reported more neutral acceptance.

  3. Death and cadavers: knowledge, skills and attitudes will have to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Death and cadavers: knowledge, skills and attitudes will have to change. *Walsh K. Dear Editor,. Charlier et al are to be praised for bringing to light the beliefs of medical students from Parakou about death and cadavers1. Greater insight into such ... respected opinion leaders to deliver education should help – especially in ...

  4. College Students' Attitudes toward Death Today as Compared to the 1930s.

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    Lester, David; Becker, DeAnne M.

    1993-01-01

    A questionnaire on attitudes toward death first administered to college students in 1935 was administered to college students in 1991. The students in 1991 showed much greater concern with and anxiety over death than did students in 1935. Cancer and car accidents remained causes of death most often anticipated in 1991 as in 1935 and 1970.…

  5. Adolescents' Attitudes toward the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Maggioncalda-Aretz, Maria; Stark, Scott Hunter

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether high school (n=142) and college students (n=112) favored the death penalty for certain criminal acts. Findings indicate that high school students rated more criminal acts as meriting the death penalty. Gender and personality were not found to be associated with attitudes toward the death penalty. (RJM)

  6. Death and cadavers: knowledge, skills and attitudes will have to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    will need an insight into students' skills at explaining autopsies to relatives. Excellent communication skills in this regard will be essential. Thirdly we will need an assessment of students' and doctors' motivation to change their practice. Without motivation, change will simply not happen. Fourthly even with insight.

  7. Korean nurses' attitudes to good and bad death, life-sustaining treatment and advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shinmi; Lee, Yunjung

    2003-11-01

    This study was an investigation of which distinctive elements would best describe good and bad death, preferences for life-sustaining treatment, and advance directives. The following elements of a good death were identified by surveying 185 acute-care hospital nurses: comfort, not being a burden to the family, a good relationship with family members, a readiness to die, and a belief in perpetuity. Comfort was regarded as the most important. Distinctive elements of a bad death were: persistent vegetative state, sudden death, pain and agony, dying alone, and being a burden to the family. Of the 185 respondents, 90.8% answered that they did not intend to receive life-sustaining treatment if they suffered from a terminal illness without any chance of recovery; 77.8% revealed positive attitudes toward advance directives. Sixty-seven per cent of the respondents stated that they were willing to discuss their own death and dying; the perception of such discussions differed according to the medical condition (p = 0.001). The elements of a bad death differed significantly depending on the disease state (p = 0.003) and on economic status (p = 0.023).

  8. [Attitude to death and changes of death image in Hungarian society. Study of the differences in generational value-judgments and of the possibilities of measurement. Is death still a taboo?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zana, Agnes

    2009-06-21

    The aim of our research is to examine the sociological, anthropological, and psychological aspects of attitudes towards death; review the different approaches as a complex system; present the altered death image and the changes of tendency; analyze and interpret the most significant anxiety generating factors according to gender, age, and occupation; validate the fear of death and attitudes towards death scales in the Hungarian population; review the possibilities of interventions designed to reduce anxiety generating fear of death. Our hypotheses of our quantitative research were the following: women are characterized by a marked fear of death and anxiety; young people are more afraid of death; health care workers have a higher level death anxiety in comparison to other professionals due to the fact that they are face the suddenness and inevitability of death on daily basis, and this itself is an anxiety generating factor. We validated, adapted and calibrated two psychometric scales measuring fear of death and attitudes towards death. According to our findings, both the Neimeyer and Moore Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale and the Lester Attitude Toward Death Scale proved valid and suitable for measuring fear of death and attitudes towards death. The Hungarian version of the scales proved reliable. In accordance with our hypothesis, young people and women are characterized by higher level of fear of death and anxiety. Our hypothesis, namely that fear of death among health care workers higher as the normal population, was not confirmed. Yet, contrary to a segment of preceding measurements, lower level of fear and anxiety was found.

  9. Relationships among death anxiety, attitudes toward aging, and experience with death in nursing home employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickio, C J; Cavanaugh, J C

    1985-05-01

    Measures of death anxiety, attitudes toward aging, and experience with death were obtained from 133 nursing home employees representing eight occupational subgroups. Increasing death anxiety was associated with greater anxiety toward aging. Greater exposure to deaths of residents was significantly related to more reported comfort in thinking about or discussing death and dying. The results indicate that a connection between old age and death may underlie the relationship between death anxiety and attitudes toward elderly adults.

  10. Attitude Toward Death, Fear of Being Declared Dead Too Soon, and Donation of Organs After Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessing, Dick J.; Elffers, Henk

    1987-01-01

    Describes a study of willingness to donate organs for transplantation after death based on Weyant's cost-benefit model for altruistic behavior. Two death anxieties (the attitude toward death and the fear of being declared dead too soon) were introduced to help explain the discrepancy between attitudes and behavior in the matter of organ donation.…

  11. Contributions of Health and Demographic Status to Death Anxiety and Attitudes toward Voluntary Passive Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devins, Gerald M.

    1980-01-01

    Greater death acceptance and anxiety were observed among rural as compared to urban-dwelling participants. Responses by a life-threatened geriatric subsample revealed differences in death fears related to type of medical disorder. Previous findings of no difference in the death fears of heart and cancer patients were replicated. (Author)

  12. Attitudes toward Death Education and Grief Counseling.

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    Rosenthal, Nina Ribak

    1981-01-01

    Counselors and counselor educators were surveyed regarding their attitudes toward death education and grief counseling. Comparative results found that death education and grief training has increased significantly in recent years, but that many school counselors report seminars on death education are not conveniently available. (Author)

  13. East Asian Attitudes toward Death- A Search for the Ways to Help East Asian Elderly Dying in Contemporary America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sok K

    2009-01-01

    The art of dying well has been a quintessential subject of ethicoreligious matters among the people in the West and the East. Most of us wish to die at home; however, about 50% of Americans die in acute care hospitals. Furthermore, immigrants from East Asian cultures feel more uncomfortable near death, because their physicians are not familiar with their traditions.This article is written to help American physicians understand the unique aspects of East Asian Confucian Ethics for the better care of the dying elderly. Western attitudes toward death are briefly reviewed and the six East Asian concepts related to death are elaborated from Confucian Chinese philosophy. To widen the horizon of bioethics and to embrace the Confucian wisdom of dying well, three pearls of wisdom from classical Confucianism are proposed: the relational autonomy of family, Confucian creative self-transformation, and the unity of transcendence and the human being.

  14. Belief in Life After Death and Attitudes Toward Voluntary Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Shane

    2017-01-01

    Research has documented associations among religious affiliation, religious practice, and attitudes toward voluntary euthanasia, yet very few studies have investigated how particular religious beliefs influence these attitudes. I use data from the General Social Survey (GSS; N = 19,967) to evaluate the association between the belief in life after death and attitudes toward voluntary euthanasia. I find that those who believe in life after death are significantly less likely than those who do not believe in life after death or those who doubt the existence of life after death to have positive attitudes toward voluntary euthanasia. These associations hold even after controlling for religious affiliation, religious attendance, views of the Bible, and sociodemographic factors. The findings indicate that to understand individuals' views about voluntary euthanasia, one must pay attention to individuals' particular religious beliefs.

  15. UK geriatricians' attitudes to active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D; Dickinson, G; Lancaster, C J; Noble, T W; Ahmedai, S H; Philp, I

    2001-09-01

    To describe the views of British geriatricians on active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted death. Postal questionnaire to 742 consultant members of the British Geriatrics Society. 81% considered active voluntary euthanasia never to be justified ethically, although 23% supported legalization in some situations and 13% would be willing to administer active voluntary euthanasia in some situations. With regard to physician-assisted death, 68% opposed it on ethical grounds and 24% supported its legalization in some instances, with 12% stating they would be willing to provide such assistance in some situations. Free text comments frequently cited good palliative care as an important response to such issues in clinical practice.

  16. Transforming Students' Attitudes and Anxieties Toward Death and Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L; Cohen, Harriet L; Jenkins, David A

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a death and dying course on 39 undergraduate students' attitudes and anxieties about death. Authors outline key aspects of the curriculum used in the course and discuss how the approach lends itself to a transformative learning experience related to death and loss, preparing students who will face clients with a variety of needs in these areas across practice settings. The majority of students ( n = 34) experienced a decrease in death avoidance, fear of death, and overall death anxiety. Students with a history of multiple violent, traumatic, or unexpected deaths ( n = 5) did not experience any significant changes but demonstrated increased scores of death anxiety suggesting that they may be in need of greater support while engaging in death education.

  17. A Course in Death Education as a Factor In Influencing Attitudes Toward Death of Juniors Enrolled in a Parochial High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojock, Charles R.

    Examined were attitudes toward death and death education, as well as the effects of death education, among 144 Catholic students from two high schools. An Attitudes Toward Death Scale was utilized in examining several hypotheses relating to death and death education. Significant results revealed that: (1) Catholic high school students had a…

  18. Mothers' knowledge and attitudes to sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction messages: results from a UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Anna S; Blair, Peter S; Ingram, Jenny; Fleming, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    To investigate mothers' knowledge of reducing the risks for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and attitudes towards safer sleep practices. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in deprived areas of Bristol, UK. Recruitment took place in 2014 at local health visitor-led baby clinics. Of 432 mothers approached, 400 (93%) completed the face-to-face survey. Participants with infants at 'higher' risk of SIDS (using an algorithm based on a previous observational study) were compared with those at 'lower' risk. The survey asked participants to recall three SIDS risk reduction strategies (unprompted), and scored responses to 14 SIDS risk-related infant sleep scenarios (prompted). Overall, 48/400 (12%) mothers were classified as higher risk. Mothers in the higher risk group were less likely to breast feed (multivariate OR=3.59(95% CI 1.46 to 8.86)), less likely to be able to cite two or more unprompted correct SIDS risk reduction strategies (multivariate OR=2.05(95% CI 1.02 to 4.13)) and scored lower on prompted safer sleep scenarios overall.Notably, only 206/400 (52%) of all mothers surveyed (33% in the higher risk group) from these deprived areas in Bristol identified infant sleep position as a risk reduction strategy for SIDS, despite 25 years of campaigns. Mothers in the higher risk group were disadvantaged when it came to some aspects of knowledge of SIDS risk reduction and attitudes to safer sleep. The initial 'Back-to Sleep' message that dramatically reduced these deaths a generation ago needs more effective promotion for today's generation of mothers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Attitudes toward assisted death amongst Portuguese oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ferraz

    2010-03-01

    The attitudes and practise of doctors concerning euthanasia and assisted suicide have been the subject of studies performed in many countries. However, these issues have not been studied properly in Portugal. This study is a survey of 450 Portuguese oncologists by postal means and personal contact. The response rate was 33% (143). Only 13% would practise euthanasia with the present law in force forbidding such practise, and 24% would do so if it were legalised; 39% favoured its legalisation and 36% would like to have the option of euthanasia if they had a terminal disease. About assisted suicide, 15% would do it with the current law in force forbidding such action and 25% would do so if it were made legal; 32% favoured its legalisation and 24% would like to have that option if they had a terminal disease. There was one case of euthanasia and no cases of assisted suicide. The most important factor related with the acceptance of euthanasia and assisted suicide was religion, with non-practising Catholics accepting such practises more often than practising Catholics. The Portuguese oncologists have a very positive view on the potential role of palliative care in preventing many requests for euthanasia and assisted suicide. Portuguese oncologists are mainly against the practise of euthanasia and assisted suicide and the number of requests is also relatively low; consequently, the number of episodes of assisted death is also apparently very low.

  20. Attitudes toward Euthanasia as a Function of Death Fears and Demographic Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Michael E.

    1982-01-01

    Studied the relationship of attitudes toward euthanasia to death fears and demographic variables in a sample of 100 adults. Found the strongest predictors of euthanasia attitude were age and amount of education. Suggests individuals who are more experienced with life and death have a more positive attitude toward euthanasia. (Author)

  1. Evolving Attitudes To the American Dream: Death of a Salesman in the Turkish Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Raw

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available As in other countries, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman has become a popular text in the Turkish theater, as well as being taught on many university courses in American Literature. It has received at least twelve productions in Ankara and Istanbul; and has been translated at least twice – the first appearing in 1952 under the title Satıcının Ölümü, published by the Ministry of Education and translated by Orhan Burian, a major figure in Turkish translation who was responsible for bringing m...

  2. Attitude Change and Death Education: A Consideration of Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatstein, Fredric

    1980-01-01

    The goals of death anxiety reduction and the creation of adaptive, positive, or favorable attitudes toward death in death education courses, as reflected by evaluation procedures, are critically examined. It is suggested that death education courses and evaluations be oriented toward increasing the symbolic engagement with the experience of death.…

  3. Attitudes and experiences of nurses toward death and caring for dying patients in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Banu; Kav, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    Caring of the dying patients and facing the death can be a stressful and difficult experience for nurses. Besides personal and professional experiences, nurses' own attitudes toward death may affect the care given to dying individuals. The aim of this study was to examine Turkish nurses' attitudes toward and experiences with death and caring for dying patients. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted at 2 university hospitals and 1 state hospital located in Ankara, Turkey. Data were collected via sociodemographics form, the Death Attitude Profile-Revised, and Frommelt's Attitude Toward Caring for Dying Patients. The attitudes of Turkish nurses toward death and caring for dying patients are less positive than the reported attitudes of nurses in other studies. Significant relationships were found among level of education, willingness to care for dying patients, and scores on Frommelt's Attitude Toward Caring for Dying Patients and on Death Attitude Profile-Revised subscales (P death. A lack of education and experience may contribute to the negative attitudes. Providing a reflective narrative environment in which nurses can express their personal feelings about death and dying could be a potentially effective approach. This study highlights the need for further educational research and development of better educational programs to help nurses to explore and understand their attitudes toward death, overcome fears, increase communication skills, and enhance coping strategies.

  4. Polish Adaptation of the Death Attitude Profile-Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudek, Paweł; Sękowski, Marcin; Steuden, Stanisława

    2018-01-01

    The article presents the results of work on the Polish adaptation of the Death Attitude Profile-Revised by Wong, Reker, and Gesser (1994). The psychometric properties of the Polish version of the tool have been described. The results are consistent with the original version of the questionnaire and confirm that the Polish version of Death Attitude Profile-Revised fulfils the psychometric requirements for psychological tests and, as a result, can be applied in scientific research. The final version of the questionnaire consists of 32 items (including 31 diagnostic ones) that make up five dimensions of attitudes toward death: (a) Fear of Death, (b) Death Avoidance, (c) Neutral Acceptance, (d) Escape Acceptance, and (e) Approach Acceptance. The questionnaire was tested on 1,285 subjects aged 13 to 90 years ( M = 47.27, SD = 18.21). Reliability values (Cronbach's α) for individual scales vary from α = .63 to α = .89. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the validity of the questionnaire.

  5. Disgust Sensitivity Accounts for Some But Not All Gender Differences in Death Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Jonathan F

    2017-05-01

    The present study investigated whether gender differences in death attitudes could be attributable to social desirability, locus of control, and disgust sensitivity. A total of 238 university students completed the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale and the Revised Death Attitude Profile in addition to measures of social desirability, locus of control, and disgust sensitivity. Women scored higher than men on many of the fear dimensions and also on approach and escape acceptance. There were no gender differences on locus of control or social desirability, but women reported more disgust sensitivity than did men. Locus of control was unrelated to any death attitudes. Social desirability was associated only with less reported fear of premature death. Disgust sensitivity was associated with all death attitudes except neutral acceptance. Some but not all of the gender differences in death attitudes were no longer significant when controlling for disgust sensitivity.

  6. Attitudes of Tennessee physicians toward euthanasia and assisted death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essinger, Douglas

    2003-05-01

    Although many studies of euthanasia and physician-assisted death (PAD) have been performed in the United States, none have specifically addressed attitudes among physicians practicing in Tennessee. In January 2001, we mailed a 30-item survey instrument to a stratified random sample of 1,117 physicians drawn from the Tennessee Licensing Bureau. Tennessee physicians are highly polarized over the issues of euthanasia and assisted death. A slight majority (47%) did not favor euthanasia or PAD and would oppose the legalization of such procedures. Of the physicians supporting euthanasia or PAD (43%), only 25% would administer a lethal overdose and less than a third would counsel/prescribe medication for an overdose. Attitudes were influenced by three primary factors: ethics, religion, and the role of the physician to relieve pain and suffering. Regardless of their overall position, the majority of physicians agreed on basic restrictions and safeguards to prevent abuses and to protect vulnerable patients.

  7. Clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients in China.

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    Wang, Liping; Li, Chaxiang; Zhang, Qiongling; Li, YaJie

    2018-01-02

    To examine Chinese clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients, and to examine the relationships between clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients. A convenience sample of 770 clinical nurses from 15 hospitals in China. All participants completed the Chinese version of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale, Form B (FATCOD-B-C), the Chinese version of the Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R-C), and a demographic questionnaire. The mean score of the FATCOD-B-C items was 95.62 (SD = 7.45). The majority of Chinese clinical nurses were likely to provide care for the dying person's family (mean = 3.77), but did not have a positive attitude towards communication with the dying person(mean = 2.62). The majority of Chinese clinical nurses showed low scores on death avoidance (mean=1.96) and natural acceptance (mean = 1.61), and most of them viewed death as a passageway to a happy afterlife (mean = 4.33). Attitudes towards caring for dying patients were significantly negatively correlated with fear of death (r = -0.120) and positively correlated with approach acceptance (r = 0.127) and natural acceptance (r = 0.117). Factors that predicted clinical nurses' attitudes towards the care of dying patients included education level, fear of death, approach acceptance, religious beliefs, previous education on death and dying, natural acceptance, professional title, and experience with death or dying patients, which accounted for 18.7% of the variance. Nurses' personal attitudes towards death were associated with their attitudes towards the care of dying patients. Training and educational programmes for clinical nurses should take into consideration nurses' personal attitudes towards death as well as their cultural backgrounds and religious beliefs.

  8. Death Education and Attitudes of Counselors-in-Training toward Death: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrawood, Laura K.; Doughty, Elizabeth A.; Wilde, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed how attitudes of counselors-in-training toward death develop after completing a course on death education. Participants included 11 graduate counseling students enrolled in a 2-credit-hour course addressing death and dying, and grief and loss. Qualitative results from a content analysis of free-response narratives suggest the…

  9. Attitudes toward life and death and suicidality among inpatient female adolescents with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel; Zinman, Dana; Halevy, Liron; Yaroslavsky, Amit; Bachar, Eytan; Kreitler, Shulamit; Orbach, Israel

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether attitudes about life and death are associated with suicidal behavior in eating disorders (EDs). We examined 43 nonsuicidal inpatients with EDs, 32 inpatients with EDs who attempted suicide, and 21 control participants with scales assessing attitudes to life and death, body-related attitudes, core ED symptoms, depression, and anxiety. Both ED groups showed less attraction to life and more repulsion from life than did the control participants. The suicide attempters showed greater attraction to death, less repulsion from death, and more negative attitudes toward their body than did the nonsuicidal ED and control participants. Fear of life was associated with elevated depression, body-related problems, and childhood sexual abuse. Pathological attitudes toward death were associated with greater depression and body-related problems. Suicide attempts were found in the inpatients with EDs showing binge/purge ED pathology and maladaptive attitudes toward death. This study suggests that whereas fear of life is a core feature of an ED, maladaptive attitudes toward death appear only in ED patients who have attempted suicide.

  10. Can a Television Series Change Attitudes about Death? A Study of College Students and "Six Feet Under"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiappa, Edward; Gregg, Peter B.; Hewes, Dean E.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of viewing 10 episodes of the television series "Six Feet Under" to assess whether such programming could influence college students' attitudes about death and dying. Students were administered the Death Attitude Profile--Revised, the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale, and the short version of the…

  11. Palliative and Curative Care Nurses' Attitudes Toward Dying and Death in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Edward H.

    1986-01-01

    Examined sociodemographic background, nursing unit, amount of experience caring for dying patients, death anxiety, and attitudes toward working with dying patients among 56 nurses in palliative, surgical, and pediatric services. Work setting was found to be a more significant force in shaping attitudes toward caring for the dying than was…

  12. Investigating the Relationship between Death Anxiety and Attitude towards Life among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Azarian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study conducted with the aim of investigating the relationship between death anxiety and attitude towards life in students of Payam-e-Nour University in Rezvanshahr, Iran. This research was a cross-sectional study and it was conducted in the frame ofa correlational design on a sample of 100 students (N = 100 at Payam-e-Nour Universityin Rezvanshahr in 2015. In order to select subjects in the present study the random sampling method was used, given the nature of this study the method of data collection was a survey approach, and in order to collect data Templers' Death Anxiety Scale (DAS, Life Attitudes Scale (LAS, and checklist of demographic index were used. Also, in order to analyze the data, the independent t-test was used for the difference in the rate of attitude towards life and the Pearson correlation test was used for correlation between the variables. The data analysis showed that there was a significant correlation between the rate of death anxiety and attitude towards life. In addition, there was a significant correlation between students' death anxiety with their high attitude and low attitude towards life (p < 0.05. The findings of this study are in line with the literature review and indicate the effectiveness of death anxiety indicator and high and low attitude towards life.

  13. Death and Dying Attitudes, Anxieties, and Fears of Certified Nursing Assistants: A Descriptive Study

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    Hamilton, Josephine A.

    2010-01-01

    The critical role of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to help elderly nursing home residents' move through declining conditions or diseases to death is salient. It is important for CNAs and nursing home leaders to understand CNAs' attitudes, fears, and anxieties toward death and dying. The quantitative study investigated CNA's…

  14. Can a television series change attitudes about death? A study of college students and Six Feet Under.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiappa, Edward; Gregg, Peter B; Hewes, Dean E

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the effects of viewing 10 episodes of the television series Six Feet Under to assess whether such programming could influence college students' attitudes about death and dying. Students were administered the Death Attitude Profile--Revised, the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale, and the short version of the Threat Index, prior to and after viewing. Significant changes were found on a number of measures. These results are similar to the effects of didactic death education courses.

  15. Death Anxiety, Disclosure Behaviors, and Attitudes of Oncologists toward Terminal Care.

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    Cochrane, Joyce B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined relationships among death anxiety, disclosure behaviors, and attitudes toward terminal care of 99 oncologists. Found death anxiety scores lower for oncologists than typically reported for physicians. Short-term repeated exposure to dying patients resulted in comfort with dying patients whereas long-term repeated exposure resulted in…

  16. Teachers' Attitudes and Experiences Regarding Death Education in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engarhos, Paraskevi; Talwar, Victoria; Schleifer, Michael; Renaud, Sarah-Jane

    2013-01-01

    Today, young children are exposed to death through various forms of media in their communities, schools, and home environments. With this inevitability of exposure, there is a need for death education in order to inform and support today's youth when facing the subject of death. Death is said to be one of the most emotional and complex matters an…

  17. Oncologists' negative attitudes towards expressing emotion over patient death and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Leeat; Ben-David, Merav; Nakash, Ora; Cohen, Michal; Barbera, Lisa; Ariad, Samuel; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the relationship between negative attitudes towards expressing emotion following patient death and burnout in oncologists and to explore oncologists' preferences for institutional interventions to deal with patient death. The participants included a convenience sample of 177 oncologists from Israel and Canada. Oncologists completed a questionnaire package that included a sociodemographic survey, a burnout measure, a survey assessing negative attitudes towards expressing emotion, and a survey assessing desired interventions to cope with patient death. To examine the association between burnout and negative attitudes while controlling for the effect of sociodemographic variables, a hierarchical linear regression was computed. Higher burnout scores were related to higher negative attitudes towards perceived expressed emotion (partial r = .25, p burnout scores are associated with negative attitudes towards expressing emotion and that there is a wide variation in oncologist preferences in coping with patient death. Institutions should promote interventions that are varied and that focus on the needs of oncologists in order to reduce burnout. Interventions that legitimize expression of emotion about patient death may be useful. Another way to reduce stigma would be to require oncologists to "opt out" rather than "opt in" to accessing a selection of social and/or individual interventions.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes toward brain death and organ donation in Bojnurd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Sima Sadat; Nikbakht, Shima; Jouybari, Leila; Abadi, Mehdi Hares; Davoodi, Davood; Azizi, Tooba Hoseini; Yahyaei, Sepideh

    2017-07-01

    Organ donation in Iran is common. Bojnurd (North Khorasan, Iran) is a multi-ethnic city, and people with different religions and cultures live together and that could be associated with their behavior and attitude towards health-related issues. So far, no study has taken place on brain death and organ donation in the province of North Khorasan. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitudes of citizens of Bojnurd toward brain death and organ donation. This cross-sectional study was conducted from March to September 2014, on 380 Bojnurd citizens who were selected through multi-stage sampling. The tool was a researcher-made questionnaire in three parts (demographic information, awareness and attitude surveys), containing 10 questions on awareness and 18 questions on attitude. The questionnaire validity and reliability were confirmed by content validity and Cronbach's alpha (0.76). The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 16, using Chi-square, independent-samples t-test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Significance level was set at porgan donation was moderate and the attitude toward organ donation in the majority (74.1%) was poor. In people with poor attitudes, awareness was also lower, and this was statistically significant (p=0.047). the attitude towards organ donation was negative in the majority of the citizens. In order to correct the beliefs, develop positive attitude and increase citizens' knowledge, public education is essential.

  19. Attitudes toward dying and death: a comparison of recreational groups among older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James D; Toms, Ali; Reese, Joey; Hamel, Michael; Gu, Lucy L; Hart, Christian L

    2013-01-01

    Previous research reports examining the relationship between attitudes toward dying, death, and involvement in death-related occupations have provided mixed findings as no clear pattern has been identified. Examination of the relationship between attitudes toward dying, death, and recreational activity has not received much attention. The current study examined attitudes toward dying and death of older men categorized into four groups defined by recreational activities. The groups included skydivers (high death risk), nursing home residents (high death exposure), volunteer firefighters (high death risk and high death exposure), and a control group. The analyses found that skydivers reported the least fear of death, while nursing home residents reported the highest level. In addition, skydivers and firefighters had higher death acceptance scores than nursing home residents and the control group for the confrontation dimension, whereas skydivers had higher death acceptance scores than all groups, and firefighters were more accepting of death than nursing home residents for the integration dimension.

  20. Physician-assisted death: attitudes and practices of community pharmacists in East Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, J.J.; Bauwens, M.; Bernheim, J.L.; Stichele, R.V.; Deliens, L.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes and practices of community pharmacists with respect to physician-assisted death. Between 15 February and 15 April 2002, we sent anonymous mail questionnaires to 660 community pharmacists in the eastern province of Flanders, Belgium. The response rate was 54%

  1. Physician-assisted death: attitudes and practices of community pharmacists in East Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, J.J.; Bauwens, M.; Bernheim, J.L.; Stichele, R.V.; Deliens, L.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes and practices of community pharmacists with respect to physician-assisted death. Between 15 February and 15 April 2002, we sent anonymous mail questionnaires to 660 community pharmacists in the eastern province of Flanders, Belgium. The response rate was 54% (n =

  2. A study of attitudes of nurses toward death and dying in tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to find out the attitudes of nurses' toward death and dying patients in three (3) tertiary (health) institutions in Cross River State. A twenty (20) items close-ended questionnaire on the four points Likert scale model was designed and administered to a sample population of six hundred (600) ...

  3. Death attitudes and positive coping in Spanish nursing undergraduates: a cross-sectional and correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo-Gual, Montserrat; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Aradilla-Herrero, Amor; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín

    2015-09-01

    To analyse the relationship between death attitudes, emotional intelligence, resilience and self-esteem in a sample of nursing undergraduates. The death attitudes held by nursing students may influence the care they offer to end-of-life patients and their families. Emotional intelligence, resilience and self-esteem are important social and emotional competencies for coping positively with death and dying. Cross-sectional and correlational study. Participants were 760 nursing undergraduates from four nursing schools in Spain. Data were collected in 2013-2014. The students responded anonymously to a self-report questionnaire that gathered socio-demographic data and which assessed the following aspects: fear of death (Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale), death anxiety (Death Anxiety Inventory-Revised), perceived emotional intelligence (Trait Meta-Mood Scale, with its three dimensions: attention, clarity and repair), resilience (Brief Resilient Coping Scale) and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale). In addition to descriptive statistics, analyses of variance, mean differences, correlations and regression analyses were computed. Linear regression analysis indicated that attention to feelings, resilience and self-esteem are the significant predictors of death anxiety. The results show that death anxiety and fear of death are modulated by social and emotional competencies associated with positive coping. The training offered to future nurses should include not only scientific knowledge and technical skills but also strategies for developing social and emotional competencies. In this way, they will be better equipped to cope positively and constructively with the suffering and death they encounter at work, thus helping them to offer compassionate patient-centred care and minimising the distress they experience in the process. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Relationship between identity and attitude toward death in Japanese senior citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagi, Satomi; Tada, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the relationship between identity development stages and attitudes towards death among Japanese senior citizens. The subjects were recruited from among approximately 500 students attending educational courses for senior citizens in Prefecture A. We collected the data by using the questionnaire and interview. The contents of questionnaire were Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory (EPSI) and Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R). In the interview, we represented the four developmental stages, and asked the questions from birth to the present. The collection rate was 85.4% (427 subjects). And 10 subjects participated in the interview. In relation to correlations between the EPSI sub-factors and the DAP-R subscales, there were moderately strong, negative correlations between "Integrity" and "Fear of death" and between "Integrity" and "Avoidance of death". In relation to the subjects' reflections on their lives, the following four categories were extracted: [Trust relationships with others], [Self-confidence regarding my own efforts], [Wanting to contribute to society], and [Let things be as they are]. These results suggested that the accomplishment of "Integrity", which is the developmental task in the maturity stage, leads to the attitude of accepting one's whole life. Further, we have clarified that "Integrity" promotes the acceptance of death.

  5. Death and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which start...

  6. Time trade-off and attitudes toward euthanasia: implications of using 'death' as an anchor in health state valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augestad, Liv A; Rand-Hendriksen, Kim; Stavem, Knut; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2013-05-01

    Health state values are by convention anchored to 'perfect health' and 'death.' Attitudes toward death may consequently influence the valuations. We used attitudes toward euthanasia (ATE) as a sub-construct for attitudes toward death. We compared the influence on values elicited with time trade-off (TTO), lead-time TTO (LT-TTO) and visual analogue scale (VAS).Since the 'death' anchor is most explicit in TTO, we hypothesized that TTO values would be most influenced by ATE. Respondents valued eight EQ-5D health states with VAS, then TTO (n = 328) or LT-TTO (n = 484). We measured ATE on a scale from -2 (fully disagree) to 2 (fully agree) and used multiple linear regressions to predict VAS, TTO, and LT-TTO values by ATE, sex, age, and education. A one-point increase on the ATE scale predicted a mean TTO value change of -.113 and LT-TTO change of -.072. Demographic variables, but not ATE, predicted VAS values. TTO appears to measure ATE in addition to preferences for health states. Different ways of incorporating death in the valuation may impact substantially on the resulting values. 'Death' is a metaphysically unknown concept, and implications of attitudes toward death should be investigated further to evaluate the appropriateness of using 'death' as an anchor.

  7. KAROSHI (WORK TO DEATH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Toriqul Chaer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When the tide of unemployment hit the USA and Europe, in Japan the opposite phenomenon occurs. In 2002, in Japan deaths were recorded because of excessive works. In this country, the phenomenon of death because of excessive works is called Karoshi. Karoshi is common in Japan.  It becomes deadly syndrome as a consequence of long hours works. The debate about deaths from excessive work already sticking out in Japan since the 70s. The first official case of Karoshi was reported in 1969 when a 29-year-old male worker died because of stroke. It is estimated over ten thousand workers died each year due to death by brain and stroke caused by an overload work. Karoshi often happen to male workers dominantly. The main cause of karoshi is stress due to high pressure in the work environment, and work habits of exceeding a  standard of normal working time (8 hours. In addition, their extra time to work is imbalance with and the salary they earn. In its development, the phenomenon of karoshi contributes to the term salaryman and workaholic.

  8. Medical Students' Death Anxiety: Severity and Association With Psychological Health and Attitudes Toward Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Pia; Quince, Thelma; Benson, John; Wood, Diana; Barclay, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Death anxiety (DA) is related to awareness of the reality of dying and death and can be negatively related to a person's psychological health. Physicians' DA also may influence their care for patients approaching death. Doctors face death in a professional context for the first time at medical school, but knowledge about DA among medical students is limited. This study examined medical students' DA in relation to: 1) its severity, gender differences, and trajectory during medical education and 2) its associations with students' attitudes toward palliative care and their psychological health. Four cohorts of core science and four cohorts of clinical students at the University of Cambridge Medical School took part in a questionnaire survey with longitudinal follow-up. Students who provided data on the revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale were included in the analysis (n = 790). Medical students' DA was moderate, with no gender differences and remained very stable over time. High DA was associated with higher depression and anxiety levels and greater concerns about the personal impact of providing palliative care. The associations between high DA and lower psychological health and negative attitudes toward palliative care are concerning. It is important to address DA during medical education to enhance student's psychological health and the quality of their future palliative care provision. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. One or two types of death? Attitudes of health professionals towards brain death and donation after circulatory death in three countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arias, D; Tortosa, J C; Burant, C J; Aubert, P; Aulisio, M P; Youngner, S J

    2013-08-01

    This study examined health professionals' (HPs) experience, beliefs and attitudes towards brain death (BD) and two types of donation after circulatory death (DCD)--controlled and uncontrolled DCD. Five hundred and eighty-seven HPs likely to be involved in the process of organ procurement were interviewed in 14 hospitals with transplant programs in France, Spain and the US. Three potential donation scenarios--BD, uncontrolled DCD and controlled DCD--were presented to study subjects during individual face-to-face interviews. Our study has two main findings: (1) In the context of organ procurement, HPs believe that BD is a more reliable standard for determining death than circulatory death, and (2) While the vast majority of HPs consider it morally acceptable to retrieve organs from brain-dead donors, retrieving organs from DCD patients is much more controversial. We offer the following possible explanations. DCD introduces new conditions that deviate from standard medical practice, allow procurement of organs when donors' loss of circulatory function could be reversed, and raises questions about "death" as a unified concept. Our results suggest that, for many HPs, these concerns seem related in part to the fact that a rigorous brain examination is neither clinically performed nor legally required in DCD. Their discomfort could also come from a belief that irreversible loss of circulatory function has not been adequately demonstrated. If DCD protocols are to achieve their full potential for increasing organ supply, the sources of HPs' discomfort must be further identified and addressed.

  10. Death due to asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert L. Sheffer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minorities are at increased risk of asthma. The perception of dyspnea may be blunted in asthma sufferers. Slow-onset fatal asthma may be associated with submucosal eosinophilic, whereas sudden-onset may be associated with submucosal neutrophilia. Fatal asthma occurs in patients abusing regular |32-agonist therapy. Peak flow assessment often provides insight into asthma deterioration prior to signs of respiratory distress. Markers of risk of death due to asthma further identify the fatality-prone asthma patient.

  11. Death due to asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Sheffer, Albert L.

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minoriti...

  12. NURSES' BEREAVEMENT NEEDS AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS PATIENT DEATH: A QUALITATIVE DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF NURSES IN A DIALYSIS UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Shelley; Josland, Elizabeth; Turner, Kylie

    2016-06-01

    Dialysis nurses have a unique relationship with their patients and often require bereavement support should a patient death occur. This study was conducted in 2014 and aimed to explore the attitudes of dialysis nurses to death and dying and to identify suitable bereavement strategies following a death of a patient. A purposeful, convenience sample of all nurses employed in the dialysis service completed a demographic profile and The Death Attitudes Profile Revisited (DAP_R) survey. There were 52 responses to the survey (98% response rate). The mean age of the participants was 45 years ± 8.0 years; 87% had >10 years nursing experience. Nurses suggest that debriefing and the use of a counsellor would support them in their grieving process while new graduate nurses appear to require extra support following a patient death. Analysis of the death attitude profile-revised (DAP-R) showed significant relationships between fear of death/death avoidance as well as fear of death/neutral acceptance. Spirituality and religion correlate strongly with 'Approach Acceptance' in this study group. Forty-four percent people who 'approach acceptance' of death can be explained by the strength of religious beliefs. Many dialysis nurses appear to have strong religious or spiritual belief systems and this contributes to their acceptance of death, although there also appears to be a degree of death avoidance. The study has highlighted the need to provide adequate bereavement support for dialysis nurses. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  13. Survey Regarding Attitude of Family About Organ Donation After Brain Death in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Jin, Myung Jae; Han, Sang Youb; Han, Kum Hyun; Oh, Se Won; Jang, Hye-Yeon; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Roh, Young-Nam

    2017-10-27

    BACKGROUND This study examined the attitude of patients' relatives in South Korea toward organ donation after brain death. MATERIAL AND METHODS A structured questionnaire was used to obtain the information on the attitude toward organ donation for relatives of patients who were admitted to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) between March 1, 2014 and September 30, 2016. In total, 92 persons participated voluntarily. The investigation included general opinion about organ donation; and additional categorical analysis was performed. RESULTS In this study, 75% of participants agreed that they had positive thoughts on organ donation; however, fewer participants (60.9%) showed a positive attitude towards donating their own body, while only a third of participants (38.1%) agreed that they would donate relatives' body. We could confirm specifically concerns about excessive physical damage during organ recovery (34.7%) and ignorance or disrespect by hospital staff (15.2%), as well as consideration of being sacrificed for the benefit of others (26.0%). The participants who agreed to donate relatives' body showed significantly different responses in each categories of the questionnaire compared to the participants who disagreed or were undecided. CONCLUSIONS Despite positive perceptions concerning organ donation after brain death, there were nonetheless several prejudices and misunderstandings to overcome. The findings of this study can be used to establish evidence-based strategies.

  14. Death Education: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perspectives of Irish Parents and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Marguerita; Barry, Margaret M.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed the knowledge, attitudes, and perspectives of 119 Irish parents and 142 primary school teachers concerning children's grief and the concept of death education. Found high levels of understanding of the nature of children's grief, strong support for discussing death with children before they encounter it, and general support for inclusion…

  15. Current attitudes toward organ donation after cardiac death in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoming; Liu, Linjuan; Xiang, Heli; Ding, Chenguang; Ren, Li; Xue, Wujun

    2014-01-01

    People's attitude toward organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) has not come to an agreement in different countries and regions. Influenced by the local culture in China for thousands of years, the general public has different ideas about this issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current attitudes trend and characteristics of transplantation with organs donated after cardiac death in northwest China. This largest single-center cohort study was performed by an interview or by telephone using a questionnaire. The family members of potential DCD donors were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital, medical college of Xi'an Jiaotong University located in a metropolitan area of northwest China. The 12-item attitude questionnaire was specifically developed from the literature review with coordinator, physician, and donor's family feedback. The participants were asked to rate the queries on a 5-point Likert intensity scale. The 174 participants included 56 (32.2%) women and 118 (67.8%) men. Most people were aged between 41 and 50 years (n = 63, 36.2%), 31 and 40 years (n = 59, 33.9%), and less than 30 years (n = 36, 20.7%). The top five attitudes of participants were the best person to suggest organ donation to a family was ranked as the DCD coordinator of Red Cross Organization (RCO, n = 160, 92%), donor is a hero (n = 143, 82.2%), honor to be a donor's family member (n = 136, 78.2%), improved relationship with colleagues (n = 124, 71.3%), and with recipient after donation (n = 123, 70.7%). The best person to suggest organ donation to a family was ranked as the coordinator of RCO (n = 160, 92%), doctor unrelated to transplantation (n = 104, 59.8%), social worker (n = 36, 20.7%), and doctor related to transplantation (n = 25, 14.4%). The top two reasons for non-consent to donation were that the family insisted on intact body after patient death and did not want to have surgery again (n = 51, 41.5%), and feared that they would be misunderstood by

  16. Learning To Say Goodbye: Dealing with Death and Dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Rosalie; Stefanics, Charlotte

    This book is intended to help the counselor learn to work with terminal patients. The first part presents historical and cultural attitudes toward death and dying. Fear of death, the role of religion, and common myths about terminal cancer patients are discussed. The second part deals with care and treatment of terminal patients. The significance…

  17. Early European attitudes towards "good death": Eugenios Voulgaris, Treatise on euthanasia, St Petersburg, 1804.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, E; Dimoliatis, I D K

    2007-06-01

    Eugenios Voulgaris (Corfu, Greece, 1716; St Petersburg, Russia, 1806) was an eminent theologian and scholar, and bishop of Kherson, Ukraine. He copiously wrote treatises in theology, philosophy and sciences, greatly influenced the development of modern Greek thought, and contributed to the perception of Western thought throughout the Eastern Christian world. In his Treatise on euthanasia (1804), Voulgaris tried to moderate the fear of death by exalting the power of faith and trust in the divine providence, and by presenting death as a universal necessity, a curative physician and a safe harbour. Voulgaris presented his views in the form of a consoling sermon, abundantly enriched with references to classical texts, the Bible and the Church Fathers, as well as to secular sources, including vital statistics from his contemporary England and France. Besides euthanasia, he introduced terms such as dysthanasia, etoimothanasia and prothanasia. The Treatise on euthanasia is one of the first books, if not the very first, devoted to euthanasia in modern European thought and a remarkable text for the study of the very early European attitudes towards "good death". In the Treatise, euthanasia is clearly meant as a spiritual preparation and reconciliation with dying rather than a physician-related mercy killing, as the term progressed to mean during the 19th and the 20th centuries. This early text is worthy of study not only for the historian of medical ethics or of religious ethics, but for everybody who is trying to courageously confront death, either in private or in professional settings.

  18. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patry, Marc W; Penrod, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court's ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases.

  19. Patients' attitudes to doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey was conducted on 1,012 people in the Oxford Region to determine their general attitude to doctors' age, sex and colour and to various aspects of doctor/patient communication. Results indicate that whereas there were no prejudices about appearance there was a significant degree of dissatisfaction with information given by doctors in general and hospital doctors in particular.

  20. Deaths related to chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelites, Joseph J; Kemp, Walter L; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2011-12-01

    The authors present a series of 6 deaths due to the uncommon cause of chemical burns. Of the 6 deaths due to chemical burns, 4 deaths were due to ingestion of a chemical, 1 death was caused by chemical burns of the skin, and 1 death resulted from rectal insufflation of a chemical. Seven additional cases where chemical burns may have been a contributing factor to the death or an incidental finding are also presented. Four cases are related to an incident involving chemical exposure during an industrial explosion. Three cases involve motor fuel burns of the skin. Two cases concern a plane crash incident, and 1 case involved a vehicular collision. Cases are derived from the records of the Dallas County Medical Examiner's Office and those of the authors' consultation practices. Each of the cases is presented, followed by a discussion of the various mechanisms of chemical injury.

  1. Concept of death in young people with intellectual disability: a contribution to the pedagogy on death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo RODRÍGUEZ HERRERO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite being an essential human condition, death is an under-researched area in the effort to improve people with intellectual disabilities’ life quality. In this article we describe the concept of death among young people with intellectual disabilities. A mixed research methodology that includes quantitative and qualitative approaches was employed, including both a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Results indicate that participants have difficulty understanding of biological dimensions of death. Moreover, it has been found that participants present a wide range of opinions, attitudes and beliefs about death. Conclusions reflect on implications of these results for a possible pedagogy on death in young adults that would include accompaniment during bereavement.

  2. Autoerotic death due to electrocution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Arkuszewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autoerotic death is a very rare case in forensic medicine. It is usually caused by asphyxia, but other reasons are also possible. Herein we present a case of autoerotic death due to electrocution caused by a self-made electrical device. The device was constructed to increase sexual feelings through stimulation of the scrotal area.

  3. Attitudes toward death, dying, end-of-life palliative care, and interdisciplinary practice in long term care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Bernard-Simon; Lessard, Sabrina; Bechennec, Coralie; Le Gal, Emma; Benoit, Sylvie; Bellerose, Lyne

    2014-03-01

    Besides personal and professional experiences, long term care providers' own attitudes toward death may affect the care given to dying residents. To assess beliefs, values, and attitudes toward death, dying, palliative, and interdisciplinary care in long term care workers and identify any differences between different job categories and places of work. Descriptive cross-sectional survey study. Five public long term care facilities. One thousand one hundred seventy volunteers, clinical managers, and all categories of residential long term care workers. An anonymous paper or electronic self-administered survey questionnaire consisting of 24 items, answered on a 4-point bipolar Likert scale. Between-group differences were compared with the analysis of variance test after adjustment for the multiple post-hoc comparisons. Healthcare workers had a relatively positive attitude toward more than one-half of the selected aspects of interdisciplinary practice and end-of-life palliative care for long-term residents. However, attitudes were more mixed about 10 other aspects and a higher percentage of respondents indicated negative attitudes toward them. Overall, there are significant differences between upper-level professionals and managers (registered nurses, physicians, rehabilitation staff, and clinical managers) vs the hands-on caregivers (nursing assistants, patient assistants, and volunteers) with regard to some aspects of the care of the dying. The results suggest that healthcare workers' attitudes need to be taken into account in long term care facilities. Patient assistants, volunteers, and nursing assistants seem most likely to above all benefit from training and support programs. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Related to Life satisfaction, Meaning of life, Religiosity and Death Anxiety in Health Care Staff and Students: A Cross Sectional Study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Death is beyond one's personal control, generates great concern and anxiety, among human beings. Studies exploring the association between religious attitudes and death attitudes in adolescents and young adults in postmodern society are scarce. This study examines the relationship between five dimensions of attitude toward death (fear of death, death avoidance, neutral acceptance, approach acceptance, and escape acceptance, death anxiety, life satisfaction and meaning, religiosity and selected personal factors among health care staff and students in three teaching hospitals. A total of 230 adolescents and adults both sexes who were willing participated. Diener et al Satisfaction with Life, Steger et al Meaning of Life Questionnaire; Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, Wong's Death Attitude Profile-R and a religious attitude scale were administered. Findings showed students' search for meaning was higher than faculty. An unusual finding of higher Approach acceptance death attitude in students emerged. Correlation analysis revealed that presence of meaning was related to greater life satisfaction in both groups. It was further related to higher religiosity in both groups and higher neutral acceptance of death and lesser death anxiety in students alone. In both groups search for meaning was positively associated with death anxiety. Faculty's search for meaning was positively associated with negative death attitudes and surprisingly one positive death attitude. Death anxiety was more with faculty's advancing age, and was also more when both groups held negative death attitudes. Religiosity was positively associated with death anxiety in students. Further, religiosity was not only positively associated with positive death attitudes of approach acceptance (both groups and neutral acceptance (faculty but also with negative attitude of death avoidance (faculty. Death anxiety was more despite both groups embracing approach acceptance death attitude indicating

  5. [The attitude among nursing professionals and students when facing death: a review of the scientific literature of the last decade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Hormanez, Marília

    2013-09-01

    Nursing professionals are integral members of the healthcare team and they maintain the most direct and prolonged contact with patients experiencing a terminal illness. This integrative review of the literature sought to investigate the attitude towards death among nursing professionals and students. Data were collected through searches in Lilacs, Medline, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases using the key words "nurses" and "attitude to death" in the period from 2000 to 2011. Of the 1376 articles identified, 262 were selected for data extraction and 35 were downloaded in full, constituting the corpus of research. The results showed a predominance of articles published in Brazilian journals. Studies indicate that the subject of death and dying has been neglected in training institutions, which causes hardship among professionals and nursing students when faced with the issue in practice, in addition to inappropriate conduct when dealing with patients who are experiencing the end of life process. In conclusion, the need for future research that may provide more detailed clarifications on the subject and seek strategies to address the lack of preparation and support of the nursing staff when they cope with death and dying was emphasized.

  6. History of brain death as death: 1968 to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    The concept of brain death was formulated in 1968 in the landmark report A Definition of Irreversible Coma. While brain death has been widely accepted as a determination of death throughout the world, many of the controversies that surround it have not been settled. Some may be rooted in a misconstruction about the history of brain death. The concept evolved as a result of the convergence of several parallel developments in the second half of the 20th century including advances in resuscitation and critical care, research into the underlying physiology of consciousness, and growing concerns about technology, medical futility, and the ethics of end of life care. Organ transplantation also developed in parallel, and though it clearly benefited from a new definition of death, it was not a principal driving force in its creation. Since 1968, the concept of brain death has been extensively analyzed, debated, and reworked. Still there remains much misunderstanding and confusion, especially in the general public. In this comprehensive review, I will trace the evolution of the definition of brain death as death from 1968 to the present, providing background, history and context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Survey of the Knowledge of Brainstem Death and Attitude Toward Organ Donation Among Relations of Neurosurgical Patients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, T B; Oshola, H A; Adebayo, B O

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a developing field in Nigeria, and availability of organs for donation would be a determining factor of the success of the transplant programs. Patients with brainstem death (BSD) are a major source of organs for transplantation. The level of knowledge of BSD as well as attitudes toward organ donation are very important determinants of people's willingness or otherwise to donate organs. We conducted a survey of relations of our in-service neurosurgical patients to assess their knowledge of brainstem death and attitude toward organ donation. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind among the growing Nigerian neurosurgery patient and patient-relations population. Convenience sampling of randomly selected relations of neurosurgical patients on admission using interviewer-administered questionnaires was performed. Demographic information and information about brainstem death, attitude toward brainstem death, knowledge of organ donation, and attitude toward organ donation were obtained. The study comprised 127 respondents with a mean age of 36 years (range, 19-72). The majority of the respondents (87, 62.4%) were Christians, 122 (96.1%) were Yorubas, and 66 (52.0%) were women. Eighty-five (66.9%) of the respondents had at least a secondary level of education, and 77 (60.6%) were of low socioeconomic status. Twenty-eight (22.2%) of the respondents had heard of brainstem death. Twenty-six (92.9%) of those who had heard of brainstem death believed that the brain could die long before life finally ceases. One hundred twenty-five (98.4%) of the respondents believed that death only occurs when both breathing and heartbeat stop, and 107 (83.6%) would agree with the physician on a diagnosis of brainstem death in the relation. Sixty-five (51.2%) would want such patients put on a ventilator, and, of these, 43 (66.2%) would want such patients on the ventilator in hope that he or she may recover. One hundred twelve (88.2%) of the relations were

  8. Death Anxiety and Voluntary Passive Euthanasia: Influences of Proximity to Death and Experiences with Death in Important Other Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devins, Gerald M.

    1979-01-01

    Identified five sources of death anxiety. Significant relationships were observed between each source and experimental factors. The relationship between death anxiety and attitude toward voluntary passive euthanasia was explored, and a significant correlation was noted among elderly persons. Results were consistent with an idiographic orientation…

  9. Preferences of the Dutch general public for a good death and associations with attitudes towards end-of-life decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, Judith A C; van der Heide, Agnes; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van der Maas, Paul J; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2006-10-01

    Euthanasia and other end-of-life decisions are acceptable to the large majority of the Dutch public. Insight in the relationships of such acceptance, with characteristics considered important for a 'good death', may contribute to the understanding of this liberal attitude. Questionnaires were mailed to 1777 members of the Dutch public (response: 78%), containing questions relating to a good death, attitudes towards euthanasia, terminal sedation and increasing morphine, and demographics. Associations between characteristics of a good death and attitudes towards these end-of-life decisions were analysed. Characteristics that were considered important for a good death were: the possibility to say goodbye to loved ones (94%), dying with dignity (92%), being able to decide about end-of-life care (88%), and dying free of pain (87%). Acceptance of euthanasia, terminal sedation and increasing morphine were related to the wish to have a dignified death, and with concerns about burdening relatives with terminal care. Acceptance of euthanasia was also associated with the wish to be able to decide about medical end-of-life treatments and about the moment of death. Besides saying farewell and dying pain free and with dignity, many members of the Dutch public consider values of control and maintenance of independence as important for a good death.

  10. Public Opinion on Organ Donation After Death and Its Influence on Attitudes Toward Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijing, Luo; Wenzhao, Xie; Wei, Wei; Qiquan, Wan; Xuantong, Deng

    2016-08-18

    BACKGROUND China officially launched a pilot program of organ donation after cardiac death to overcome the shortage of available organs since 2011. Voluntary organ donation by deceased citizens became the only source of transplant organs beginning January 1, 2015. To investigate public opinions on organ donation by deceased donors, and discuss the effect of these opinions on the willingness and attitude of the public regarding voluntary organ donation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We designed a questionnaire. The survey was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015 in Changsha City, and 417 valid questionnaires were recovered. RESULTS A total of 162 respondents explicitly expressed a willingness to donate organs, and 269 believed that the organ donors' relatives should be compensated. A total of 255 respondents thought it acceptable to complete the donation-consent form when receiving a driver's license. Among the respondents, 65.3% did not agree with the statement "My body is bestowed by my parents, and to donate my body parts would not display filial respect"; 88.9% agreed that "It is necessary to consider the willingness of my family"; 74.4% agreed that "Donated organs have not been fairly and appropriately used; the wealthy and celebrities have been favored"; and 61.4% agreed that "Organ donation laws and regulations are not well developed, and organ donations will result in unnecessary difficulties." More than 80% believed that organ donation and transplantation extend life. CONCLUSIONS Public opinions on organ donation after death are associated with various factors, including traditional values, religious beliefs, compensation mechanisms, donor registration, institutional credibility, and ideals.

  11. Methadone related deaths compared to all prescription related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Roneet; Petro, Sean; Lee, Ariella; Lee, Oren; Lucas, Jonathan; Castillo, Edward M; Egnatios, Jeremy; Vilke, Gary M

    2015-12-01

    Methadone is increasingly implicated in unintentional overdose deaths. Despite major interventions, rates continue to remain high. One primary intervention, Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are limited in their ability to impact this epidemic due to federal law restricting Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) from sharing data to PDMPs, despite being a major source of Methadone dispensing. This retrospective, observational study analyzed all prescription-related deaths occurring in San Diego County during the year 2013 with a specific focus on methadone-related deaths. All patients designated by medical examiner to have died by unintentional prescription were then referenced in the California PDMP, the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System (CURES). As a whole, patients who died had a high number of average prescriptions, 21, and averaged 4.5 different providers, and three different pharmacies. Methadone-related deaths (MRD) accounted for 46 out of the 254 total patient deaths (18.1%). Methadone prescriptions were found in 14 patients with PDMP reports, 10 of who had methadone on toxicology report. Notably, 100% of methadone prescribed by primary care specialists. MRD patients were less likely to have toxicology reports matching PDMP data compared to other related drug deaths (20.6 vs. 61.2%, pmethadone deaths, only 10 (29.4%) had prescriptions for methadone recorded in the database. Out of the 51 patients with only one drug recorded at death, methadone was most common (n=12; 23.5%). While all deaths had a notably high rate of chronic prescriptions at death (68.8% compared to 2% for all patients in CURES), there was no significant difference between MRD and other drug-related deaths (73.5 vs. 67.8%, p=0.68, respectively). MRD patients were less likely than other drug patients to have matching PDMP data without any illicit substance or alcohol (14.7 vs. 41.4%, p=0.003, respectively). Methadone is a long-acting opioid that carries a

  12. Death Anxiety and Attitudes toward Suicide among Counselors-In-Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Christopher J.

    Only recently have mental health professionals realized the importance and impact of death and death anxiety in the lives of individuals, particularly clients. Indeed few empirical studies have examined the levels of death anxiety among clients, much less among counselors or counselors-in-training. The purpose of this study was to examine whether…

  13. Understanding Death Attitudes: The Integration of Movies, Positive Psychology, and Meaning Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Ryan M.; Schulenberg, Stefan E.

    2011-01-01

    The portrayal of death is one of the most common themes in movies and is often unrealistic, promoting misconceptions to the public. However, there are also many films that portray death acceptance in an instructive way. Such films depict the development of character strengths useful in embracing life and lessening death anxiety, namely zest,…

  14. Public Attitudes to Technological Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Eliot

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the probable changes in public attitudes toward science and technology as a result of the engineering accidents of 1979. Results of national polls conducted to identify public confidence in technological progress are included. (HM)

  15. Attitude of nurses to euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Konečná, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The bachelor thesis "Attitude of nurses to euthanasia" focuses on an understanding of dying, euthanasia and palliative care and their attitude to euthanasia. The work is devided into two parts - a theoretical one and an empirical one. The theoretical part describes the methodology and results of quantitative research by the use of questionaire comparing two specified groups of nurses - hospic care nurses and intensive care nurses. There are summarised findings from the investigation in the co...

  16. Death and Death Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karakus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which starts right after birth, lasts a whole life, is the underlying basis of all fears, have an impact on character development and is formed after realization that the person will no longer exist, can lose the world and everything is actually meaningless. The aim of this review is to overview death and death anxiety, the components of death anxiety, approaches about death anxiety, scales that are used to evaluate the death anxiety and the local and international research on that subject. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(1.000: 42-79

  17. Effect of Terminal Patient Care Training on the Nurses' Attitudes Toward Death in an Oncology Hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göriş, Songül; Taşcı, Sultan; Özkan, Birgül; Ceyhan, Özlem; Kartın, Pınar Tekinsoy; Çeliksoy, Aliye; Elmalı, Ferhan; Eser, Bülent

    2017-03-01

    This is an experimental research aiming at identifying the effect of terminal patient care training on the nurses' attitudes toward death. The sample of this study (n = 41) involves 20 nurses in the training group and 21 nurses in the control group. Nurses were offered terminal patient care training and their attitudes toward death were assessed before and after the intervention. The Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R) subscale mean scores for fear of death (3.9-4.6, p  .05) in any of the five DAP-R subscales. In accordance with these findings, this study suggests that terminal patient care training should be implemented in the nursing curriculum more extensively and should be frequently repeated as part of the nurses' in-service education.

  18. Dynamic neural processing of linguistic cues related to death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Liu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies suggest that humans evolve the capacity to cope with anxiety induced by the awareness of death's inevitability. However, the neurocognitive processes that underlie online death-related thoughts remain unclear. Our recent functional MRI study found that the processing of linguistic cues related to death was characterized by decreased neural activity in human insular cortex. The current study further investigated the time course of neural processing of death-related linguistic cues. We recorded event-related potentials (ERP to death-related, life-related, negative-valence, and neutral-valence words in a modified Stroop task that required color naming of words. We found that the amplitude of an early frontal/central negativity at 84-120 ms (N1 decreased to death-related words but increased to life-related words relative to neutral-valence words. The N1 effect associated with death-related and life-related words was correlated respectively with individuals' pessimistic and optimistic attitudes toward life. Death-related words also increased the amplitude of a frontal/central positivity at 124-300 ms (P2 and of a frontal/central positivity at 300-500 ms (P3. However, the P2 and P3 modulations were observed for both death-related and negative-valence words but not for life-related words. The ERP results suggest an early inverse coding of linguistic cues related to life and death, which is followed by negative emotional responses to death-related information.

  19. Dynamic neural processing of linguistic cues related to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Shi, Zhenhao; Ma, Yina; Qin, Jungang; Han, Shihui

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies suggest that humans evolve the capacity to cope with anxiety induced by the awareness of death's inevitability. However, the neurocognitive processes that underlie online death-related thoughts remain unclear. Our recent functional MRI study found that the processing of linguistic cues related to death was characterized by decreased neural activity in human insular cortex. The current study further investigated the time course of neural processing of death-related linguistic cues. We recorded event-related potentials (ERP) to death-related, life-related, negative-valence, and neutral-valence words in a modified Stroop task that required color naming of words. We found that the amplitude of an early frontal/central negativity at 84-120 ms (N1) decreased to death-related words but increased to life-related words relative to neutral-valence words. The N1 effect associated with death-related and life-related words was correlated respectively with individuals' pessimistic and optimistic attitudes toward life. Death-related words also increased the amplitude of a frontal/central positivity at 124-300 ms (P2) and of a frontal/central positivity at 300-500 ms (P3). However, the P2 and P3 modulations were observed for both death-related and negative-valence words but not for life-related words. The ERP results suggest an early inverse coding of linguistic cues related to life and death, which is followed by negative emotional responses to death-related information.

  20. Response to 'Fear of death and the symmetry argument'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja Deng

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article is a response to 'Fear of death and the symmetry argument', in this issue. In that article, the author discusses the above Lucretian symmetry argument, and proposes a view that justifies the existing asymmetry in our attitudes towards birth and death. I begin by distinguishing this symmetry argument from a different one, also loosely inspired by Lucretius, which also plays a role in the article. I then describe what I take to be the author's solution to the original symmetry argument (i.e. the one above and explain why I am unpersuaded by it.

  1. The death system according to Robert Kastenbaum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Charles A

    This article focuses on Robert Kastenbaum's seminal concept of the societal death system. Beginning with conflicting claims that America is a death-denying society versus a death-accepting society, the article reports Kastenbaum's definition and description of the death system in American society and sets forth the seven functions and five elements or components of that death system. Next, the article notes Kastenbaum's further claim that "All cultures, past and present, have had death systems." Finally, two basic lessons are drawn from the foregoing: (1) Kastenbaum's concept of the death system provides a robust framework to explain the networks societies interpose between their members and death, focusing in particular on a more or less integrated and dynamic network within American society whose functions and components are not difficult to recognize in the ways in which they organize many aspects of the lives of individuals who live within that society; and (2) It is preposterous to assert without qualification that America is a death-denying society when there are so many activities and components within that society that are in whole or in part related to death, i.e., although it may be true that many aspects of the contemporary American death system appear to seek to remove death from the mainstream of life, there is ample evidence to indicate that American society as a whole and individuals within that society both accept and deny death simultaneously.

  2. Dynamic Neural Processing of Linguistic Cues Related to Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yina; Qin, Jungang; Han, Shihui

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies suggest that humans evolve the capacity to cope with anxiety induced by the awareness of death’s inevitability. However, the neurocognitive processes that underlie online death-related thoughts remain unclear. Our recent functional MRI study found that the processing of linguistic cues related to death was characterized by decreased neural activity in human insular cortex. The current study further investigated the time course of neural processing of death-related linguistic cues. We recorded event-related potentials (ERP) to death-related, life-related, negative-valence, and neutral-valence words in a modified Stroop task that required color naming of words. We found that the amplitude of an early frontal/central negativity at 84–120 ms (N1) decreased to death-related words but increased to life-related words relative to neutral-valence words. The N1 effect associated with death-related and life-related words was correlated respectively with individuals’ pessimistic and optimistic attitudes toward life. Death-related words also increased the amplitude of a frontal/central positivity at 124–300 ms (P2) and of a frontal/central positivity at 300–500 ms (P3). However, the P2 and P3 modulations were observed for both death-related and negative-valence words but not for life-related words. The ERP results suggest an early inverse coding of linguistic cues related to life and death, which is followed by negative emotional responses to death-related information. PMID:23840787

  3. Determinants of Public Attitudes towards Euthanasia in Adults and Physician-Assisted Death in Neonates in Austria: A National Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Stolz

    Full Text Available Euthanasia remains a controversial topic in both public discourses and legislation. Although some determinants of acceptance of euthanasia and physician-assisted death have been identified in previous studies, there is still a shortage of information whether different forms of euthanasia are supported by the same or different sub-populations and whether authoritarian personality dispositions are linked to attitudes towards euthanasia.A large, representative face-to-face survey was conducted in Austria in 2014 (n = 1,971. Respondents faced three scenarios of euthanasia and one of physician assisted death differing regarding the level of specificity, voluntariness and subject, requiring either approval or rejection: (1 abstract description of euthanasia, (2 abstract description of physician-assisted suicide, (3 the case of euthanasia of a terminally-ill 79-year old cancer patient, and (4 the case of non-voluntary, physician assisted death of a severely disabled or ill neonate. A number of potential determinants for rejection ordered in three categories (socio-demographic, personal experience, orientations including authoritarianism were tested via multiple logistic regression analyses.Rejection was highest in the case of the neonate (69% and lowest for the case of the older cancer patient (35%. A consistent negative impact of religiosity on the acceptance across all scenarios and differential effects for socio-economic status, area of residence, religious confession, liberalism, and authoritarianism were found. Individuals with a stronger authoritarian personality disposition were more likely to reject physician-assisted suicide for adults but at the same time also more likely to approve of physician-assisted death of a disabled neonate.Euthanasia in adults was supported by a partially different sub-population than assisted death of disabled neonates.

  4. Determinants of Public Attitudes towards Euthanasia in Adults and Physician-Assisted Death in Neonates in Austria: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Erwin; Burkert, Nathalie; Großschädl, Franziska; Rásky, Éva; Stronegger, Willibald J; Freidl, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Euthanasia remains a controversial topic in both public discourses and legislation. Although some determinants of acceptance of euthanasia and physician-assisted death have been identified in previous studies, there is still a shortage of information whether different forms of euthanasia are supported by the same or different sub-populations and whether authoritarian personality dispositions are linked to attitudes towards euthanasia. A large, representative face-to-face survey was conducted in Austria in 2014 (n = 1,971). Respondents faced three scenarios of euthanasia and one of physician assisted death differing regarding the level of specificity, voluntariness and subject, requiring either approval or rejection: (1) abstract description of euthanasia, (2) abstract description of physician-assisted suicide, (3) the case of euthanasia of a terminally-ill 79-year old cancer patient, and (4) the case of non-voluntary, physician assisted death of a severely disabled or ill neonate. A number of potential determinants for rejection ordered in three categories (socio-demographic, personal experience, orientations) including authoritarianism were tested via multiple logistic regression analyses. Rejection was highest in the case of the neonate (69%) and lowest for the case of the older cancer patient (35%). A consistent negative impact of religiosity on the acceptance across all scenarios and differential effects for socio-economic status, area of residence, religious confession, liberalism, and authoritarianism were found. Individuals with a stronger authoritarian personality disposition were more likely to reject physician-assisted suicide for adults but at the same time also more likely to approve of physician-assisted death of a disabled neonate. Euthanasia in adults was supported by a partially different sub-population than assisted death of disabled neonates.

  5. Public attitudes to biomass cofiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-01

    There is substantial interest in producing energy from renewable sources given the continuing concerns regarding climate change. One attractive renewable source for power generation is the use of biomass. Cofiring biomass is one of the simplest ways of reducing GHG emissions from coal-fired power plant. When doing so, in addition to addressing technical factors, it is important to consider public attitudes, as these shape government policies. Surveys of public attitudes to energy usually include renewable sources such as wind, solar and hydro. Bioenergy is sometimes included but cofiring seldom so. When assessing public attitudes, it is instructive to consider what information is freely available to the public. Hence information provided by major national or international organisations, either in favour or against cofiring, are described. It is apparent that the public in most countries have little knowledge of bioenergy as a renewable energy source and most opinion polls do not even address the issue of the public’s attitudes towards it. The few polls that have been conducted indicate that solar, wind and hydro are much more popular than bioenergy. Bioenergy is more popular in countries such as in Northern Europe which have extensive experience in using wood products as an energy source. Opposition to cofiring biomass in coal-fired plant is mainly on the grounds of biomass availability and sustainability. The power industry publications concentrate on the technical issues for the plant when cofiring biomass rather than availability and sustainability concerns.

  6. Child Deaths due to Neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Pakiş

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Child neglect or passive child abuse can be defined as failure to provide for the child’s basic needs or disregard to care which results in serious harm. Although neglect is the most common form of child abuse, it is rarely diagnosed properly. The number of neglect cases referred to the judicial system is limited, as well. Since neglect cases are not identified and diagnosed easily, their mortality rates seem to be low. On the basis of venue, history, postmortem external and internal as well as microscopical examinations 4 cases between 2 months and 3 years of age, autopsi-ed at the Council of Forensic Medicine Morgue Department were evaluated regarding child abuse and neglect. In three of the cases, height and weight was found lower than the growth percentiles established by Istanbul Medical Faculty. In three cases general hygiene was poor and turgor tonus was diminished. Description of the venue; case, family and medical history are of critical importance in cases claimed to be neglect or abuse. Postmortem examination should include detailed external and internal examinations, appropriate microscopical sampling and supportive tests. Key words: Child, neglect, death, abuse

  7. From Death to Death Certificate: What do the Dead say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James R

    2017-03-01

    This is an overview of medicolegal death investigation and death certification. Postmortem toxicological analysis, particularly for ethanol and drugs of abuse, plays a large role in the forensic investigation of natural and unnatural deaths. Postmortem drug concentrations must be interpreted in light of the autopsy findings and circumstances. Interpretations of drug and ethanol concentrations are important for death certification, but they also may be important for other stakeholders such as police, attorneys, public health practitioners, and the next-of-kin.

  8. VALUES AND ATTITUDES TO INNOVATIONS : INTERCULTURAL DIFFERENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebedeva, N. M.

    2009-01-01

    The results of study of interrelations between values and attitudes to innovations of Canadian and Russian students (Russians and representatives of Northern Caucasia), n = 426 per. are presented. Correlation between individuals' values and their attitudes to innovations are determined. Significant

  9. Ambitions Fulfilled? The Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Goal Attainment on Older Adults' Ego-Integrity and Death Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hiel, Alain; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic goal attainment on older adults' ego-integrity, psychological well-being, and death attitudes. Hypotheses were derived from Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000; Vansteenkiste, Ryan, & Deci, in press). Study 1 (N = 202, Mean age = 68.2 years) indicated that, after…

  10. European attitudes to water pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Kejser

    2016-01-01

    as is affordability concern, which may be explained by expectations of inequity measures to come in place in parallel with increasing water prices. Overall these results support the hypothesis that lack of information and affordability concern could lead to resistance towards efficient water pricing among the general......Efficient use of the water resource requires internalization of all costs in the price of water, including environmental and resource costs. However, water resource management tends to be highly political and increasing water prices are a sensitive and complicated policy matter. Hence......, there is a need for increased understanding of the implementation process and the attitudes towards implementation among the general public. This paper explores the spatial heterogeneity in the public attitude towards internalizing environmental and resource costs in the price of water across the EU regions...

  11. Teachers' Attitudes to Self-Access Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyn, Elaine; Voller, Peter

    1993-01-01

    This paper details the results of two surveys of teacher attitudes to self-access that took place at the English Centre at the University of Hong Kong during the 1992-93 year, and relate these back to an earlier survey of teacher attitudes from the previous year. The Survey of Teacher Attitudes to Self-Access Learning is appended. (JL)

  12. Patient Attitudes to Tonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishan Ubayasiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent changes to primary care trusts’ Procedures of Limited Clinical Value (PLCV policy mean that otolaryngologists must now follow policy rather than exercising clinical judgment when listing patients for tonsillectomy. Objectives. To gauge perception within the general public of when tonsillectomy is acceptable and to compare this to the current policy. Method. All patients or their parents attending the adult and paediatric outpatient ENT departments were asked to anonymously complete questionnaires. Results. One hundred and twenty-five completed questionnaires were collected. Thirty-one percent of respondents thought tonsillectomy should be offered solely on patient request, 19% after one to three bouts, and 35% after four to six bouts of tonsillitis. Only 9% thought the current guidelines were reasonable. Patients who had suffered recurrent tonsillitis or had undergone previous tonsillectomy generally thought tonsillectomy advisable after more bouts of tonsillitis than those who had not. Fourteen patients fulfilled the SIGN guidelines for tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis. Of these, 13 (93% felt that suffering 4–6 bouts of tonsillitis was reasonable before tonsillectomy. Conclusion. All patients we surveyed who meet the current PLCV and SIGN guidelines regarding the appropriateness of tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis perceive that they are excessive, believing that 4–6 bouts of recurrent tonsillitis are adequate to justify tonsillectomy.

  13. Attitudes to sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    Many older people enjoy an active sex life although they are likely to experience problems relating to poor health or lack of understanding from healthcare professionals. Health issues include male sexual dysfunction resulting from medication and conditions such as diabetes, vascular disease or prostatic surgery. Older women may experience urogenital atrophy causing dryness, itching and pain on intercourse. Psychological problems such as depression are also associated with poor sexual function.

  14. Attitudes to school in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florander, J.; Skov, P.

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze possible trends in the Danish school on an empirical basis, pointing out facts which may be of importance to the development. This has been done by examining, partly, which attitudes manifest themselves in connection with the work in school, partly, whether these attitudes set the stage for conflicts. Conflicts and prospects of conflict are seen as a possible basis for constructive action. The empirical basis consists of view and attitudes among pupils, parents, teachers, and chairmen of school boards in Denmark. The information has been gathered by means of interviews and questionnaires. Furthermore, written material from trades and professions and from different political quarters are included, as well as official descriptions of objectives, rules, and guidelines for the work in school. The results show that there is an obvious risk that school may be forced into a wrong and undesired direction, making it necessary to give a lower priority to essential fields within the work in school.

  15. The Attitude towards Life and Death of the Participants in the First World War: Frontline Routine Sketch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Senyavskaya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discloses the major aspect of frontline routine – «war as danger», seamless procession of «boundary conditions». Basing on archive data and private sources of Russian participants in the First World War, it touches upon such subjects as combatants’ psychological factors, their attitude towards life and death, soldiers’ fatalism, ways to overcome fear in action, specific character of combat situation perception by enlisted and commanders of the Russian Army, representatives of different service arms, the masses moral preparation for war according to contemporaries’ estimates. The article also considers «the sounds of war» and their impact on frontline soldiers’ minds.

  16. Patients' attitudes to chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Roger

    1985-01-01

    In a survey of 200 female patients attending a five-man practice in a health centre, 75 per cent of the respondents stated that they would like to be offered a chaperone at pelvic examinations. Only six per cent would accept the offer if the examination was performed by their own doctor and 17 per cent if a different doctor examined them. Patients expressing a definite wish for a chaperone were significantly younger and were less likely to have had a previous pelvic examination. Those who def...

  17. Brain Death and Organ Donation: Knowledge, Awareness, and Attitudes of Medical, Law, Divinity, Nursing, and Communication Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaay, A F; Celik, S U; Eker, T; Oksuz, N E; Akyol, C; Tuzuner, A

    2015-06-01

    Throughout the world, there is a shortage of suitable organs for organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, awareness, and attitudes of medical, law, divinity, nursing, and communication students, who will be involved in this issue in the future, regarding brain death and organ donation. Data were collected with the use of a 30-item questionnaire. Of the 341 participants, 228 (66.8%) were female and overall average age was 21.6 ± 2.8 years. Nearly one-half of them (51.3%), especially nursing and medical students, wanted to be a donor, but only 2% had an organ donation card; 78.3% emphasized that family must have the right to make the decision for organ donation, and the vast majority of the participants considered that the organs could not be taken without any permission. Kidney and heart were the most commonly identified transplantable organs; the less frequently known organ was intestine. Only 71 participants, most of them medical, divinity, and law students, correctly answered all questions about brain death; 68.6% stated that organ donation is allowed by religion, and 5% expressed that it is religiously forbidden; 37.3% did not have confidence in health care policy. Law students were more confident, nursing students less confident. Better understanding of organ donation and concepts by the doctors, nurses, legislators, religious officials, and mass communications professionals who will give direction to society's behaviors and beliefs would help to spread positive attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation in the public. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Attitudes of medical students and staff toward organ donation in cases of brain death: a survey at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmatkeshan, Mozhgan; Fallahzadeh, Ebrahim; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Najib, Khadijeh-Sadat; Farjadian, Shirin

    2014-03-01

    Organ transplant is one of the most important management strategies for end-of-life patients. The demand for organs in patients awaiting transplant is increasing, and many of these patients die before a donor is found. To determine the attitudes of medical students and staff at clinical institutions affiliated with a large medical university in the Eastern Mediterranean region toward organ donation in cases of brain death. A total of 500 medical students, physicians, and nurses recruited at hospitals and medical centers affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran.Design and Setting-Information about participants' demographic characteristics, knowledge of organ donation, and willingness to donate their own organs after death was collected by using self-administered questionnaires. Most participants (78%) had favorable attitudes toward donating their own organs after brain death. However, only about 25% of them carried an organ donation card. In addition to public media, the main sources of information about organ donation after brain death were their professors and textbooks. An association in charge of improving public awareness and facilitating the process of registration and issuance of donation cards appears to be necessary.

  19. Relationship of neonatologists' end-of-life decisions to their personal fear of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter

    2007-03-01

    To study the relationship of Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) neonatologists' personal fear of death to their forgoing life-sustaining treatment and hastening death in newborns destined for severe disability and newborns for whom further treatment is considered non-beneficial or overly burdensome. A self-report questionnaire survey of ANZ neonatologists. Neonatologists registered in the 2004 ANZ Directory of Neonatal Intensive Care Units. 78 of 138 (56%) neonatologists who responded to the study questionnaire. Between-group differences in the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale. In newborns for whom further treatment was deemed futile, 73 neonatologists reported their attitude to hastening death as follows: 23 preferred to hasten death by withdrawing minimal treatment, 35 preferred to hasten death with analgesia-sedation, and 15 reported that hastening death was unacceptable. Analysis of variance showed a statistically significant difference between the three groups regarding fear of the dying process (F = 3.78, p = 0.028), fear of premature death (F = 3.28, p = 0.044) and fear of being destroyed (F = 3.20, p = 0.047). Post hoc comparisons showed that neonatologists who reported that hastening death was unacceptable compared with neonatologists who preferred to hasten death with analgesia-sedation had significantly less fear of the dying process and fear of premature death, and significantly more fear of being destroyed. ANZ neonatologists' personal fear of death and their attitude to hastening death when further treatment is considered futile are significantly related. Neonatologists' fear of death may influence their end-of-life decisions.

  20. Consumer attitudes to enzymes in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The use of enzymes in food production has potential benefits for both food manufacturers and consumers. A central question is how consumers react to new ways of producing foods with enzymes. This study investigates the formation of consumer attitudes to different enzyme production methods in three...... European countries. Results show that consumers are most positive towards non-GM enzyme production methods. The enzyme production method is by far the most important factor for the formation of buying intentions compared to price and benefits. Results also show that environmental concern and attitudes...... to technological progress are the socio-political attitudes that have the highest predictive value regarding attitudes to enzyme production methods....

  1. Perspectives on Death: An Experiential Course on Death Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Edwin S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a college psychology course on death education (thanatology). Course objectives were to help students become aware of the feelings involved in facing death, encourage discussion on the subject of death, motivate students to change their attitudes about death, and encourage practical planning for funeral arrangements.…

  2. Neonatal death and parents' grief. Experience, behaviour and attitudes of Swedish nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, A; Nilstun, T

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to survey the experience, behaviour and attitudes of nurses in Swedish neonatal wards towards parents who refuse or are reluctant to see, touch or hold their dying or dead baby. A questionnaire was distributed to 173 nurses, of whom 144 responded. The questionnaire contained questions about the nurses' own experience of such situations, their behaviour, and their attitude towards influencing the parents. Seventy-four percent answered that they had experience of such situations, 59% that they often tried to persuade or in other ways influence the parents to change their mind, and 60% were of the opinion that the parents mourning-process is always facilitated when they touch or hold their dead baby. Most nurses (83%) were of the opinion that the conflict between beneficence and autonomy was difficult but not impossible to solve. A majority of the nurses were inclined to give priority to the principle of beneficence. But is this inclination ethically justified? A well-founded answer to this question requires more knowledge about the experiences of parents who have lived through such traumatic situations.

  3. Development of a Scale to Measure Death Perspectives: Overcoming and Participating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Eric; Hayslip, Bert; Caballero, Daniela M; Jenkins, Sharon Rae

    2015-01-01

    Kastenbaum and Aisenberg have suggested that persons can cope with the impact of death and dying by altering their understanding of what each means to them as well as by changing their behavioral responses to such experiences. The present study's purpose was to develop a reliable and valid measure to assess an individual's particular death perspective based on Kastenbaum and Aisenberg's distinctions between overcomers and participators. The Death Perspective Scale developed here assessed the extent to which individuals utilize either an overcoming or participating approach to (a) assigning meaning to dying and death and (b) behaviorally responding to death-related experiences. Based upon the data collected from 168 adults varying by age and gender, findings suggested that both overcoming and participating could be reliably assessed, correlated with measures of death anxiety and death attitudes, and varied reliably (p death and dying and were less accepting in this respect, while participators reported fewer death-related fears and were more accepting. Women and older adults were more participating, while men and younger adults were more overcoming, though such effects varied depending upon whether meaning versus response to death was considered. The consistency between the present findings and the predictions Kastenbaum and Aisenberg suggests that while person's orientations to death and dying seem to transcend sociocultural change, empirically based efforts to better understand how our death system impacts persons need to move forward.

  4. Deaths Related to Vessel Injuries in Extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursel Türkmen

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lethal or non-lethal extremity injuries are often seen in medico-legal practice. In this study, we planned to investigate medico-legal properties of deaths related to vessel injuries in extremities. In forensic autopsies performed in Bursa, we examined total 4242 autopsy reports between 1996-2003 in included 40 (0,94% cases of deaths caused by vessel injuries in extremities. 90% of cases were male with median age 35.87 (17-66. Stabbing device account for 60% of injuries. Most frequent injuries were in femoral artery and branches. In 82.5% of cases, homicide was the origin of death. In 30% of cases, mean 159.33 mg/dl alcohol blood concentration was detected. In the scene investigation reports, 47.5% of documented incidents were outdoor and 47.5% of the cases died in the scene. As a conclusion, it is observed that alcoholic males of middle age are the risk group for vascular injuries in extremities. In the deaths related to isolated vessel injuries in extremities, the detection of injured vessel, localisation and number of total and lethal wounds would offer a solution for the evil intent; and as in the other violent death cases autopsy is required in the deaths due to vessel injuries in extremities. Key words: Vascular injuries, Extremity, Forensic autopsy.

  5. Death Education and Suicide Potentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Nina Ribak

    1983-01-01

    Assessed whether a death education course attracted students with significantly different attitudes toward death. Results indicated that the death education class did attract persons with greater acceptance of suicide and death. The course tended to further decrease avoidance and increase acceptance. Potentiality for committing suicide was not…

  6. Motorist's attitudes to speed limits in Australia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fildes, B. Lahausse, J. Langford, J. Keall, M. & Nes, N. van

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative research study was undertaken in four Australian states to assess community attitudes towards current speed limits and to identify some of the reasons for these attitudes. An on-line web-based survey conducted in each state yielded a total of 4100 responses from mainly licensed

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Risk for Sudden Unexpected Infant Death in Children of Adolescent Mothers: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Michelle; Shimasaki, Suzuho; Johnston, Katherine; Tung, Gregory; Albright, Karen; Halbower, Ann C

    2016-07-01

    To investigate practices, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding infant sleep among adolescent mothers, a demographic at high risk for sudden unexpected infant death, and to identify novel public health interventions targeting the particular reasons of this population. Seven targeted focus groups including 43 adolescent mothers were conducted at high school daycare centers throughout Colorado. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, validated, and then analyzed in NVivo 10. Validation included coding consistency statistics and expert review. Most mothers knew many of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for infant sleep. However, almost all teens reported bedsharing regularly and used loose blankets or soft bedding despite being informed of risks. Reasons for nonadherence to recommendations included beliefs that babies are safest and sleep more/better in bed with them, that bedsharing is a bonding opportunity, and that bedsharing is easier than using a separate sleep space. The most common justifications for blankets were infant comfort and concern that babies were cold. Participants' decision making was often influenced by their own mothers, with whom they often resided. Participants felt that their instincts trumped professional advice, even when in direct contradiction to safe sleep recommendations. Among focus group participants, adherence with safe sleep practices was poor despite awareness of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations. Many mothers expressed beliefs and instincts that infants were safe in various unsafe sleep environments. Future study should investigate the efficacy of alternative educational strategies, including education of grandmothers, who have significant influence over adolescent mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Febrile seizures prior to sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stampe, Niels Kjær; Glinge, Charlotte; Jabbari, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Febrile seizure (FS) is a common disorder affecting 2-5% of children up to 5 years of age. The aim of this study was to determine whether FS in early childhood are over-represented in young adults dying from sudden cardiac death (SCD). Methods and results: We included all deaths (n = 4595...... with FS was sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (5/8; 62.5%). Conclusion: In conclusion, this study demonstrates a significantly two-fold increase in the frequency of FS prior to death in young SCD cases compared with the two control groups, suggesting that FS could potentially contribute in a risk......) nationwide and through review of all death certificates, we identified 245 SCD in Danes aged 1-30 years in 2000-09. Through the usage of nationwide registries, we identified all persons admitted with first FS among SCD cases (14/245; 5.7%) and in the corresponding living Danish population (71 027/2 369 785...

  9. Attitudes to animal euthanasia do not correlate with acceptance of human euthanasia or suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, U; Kinnison, T; May, S A

    2012-08-18

    Several reasons have been suggested for the elevated risk of suicide experienced by those in the veterinary profession. The current study aimed to investigate possible links between veterinarians' attitudes to 'convenience' or non-justified animal euthanasia and attitudes towards human euthanasia and suicide. Veterinary students and graduates had a negative attitude towards convenience animal euthanasia, but their attitudes changed over time (pre-clinical studies, clinical studies and recently graduated). A greater tolerance to euthanasia was displayed in the later years of study and post qualification - primarily by males. Attitudes towards both human euthanasia and suicide, however, remained stable over time and indicated on average a neutral stance. No correlations were found between attitudes to convenience euthanasia and either human euthanasia or suicide, suggesting a tolerance to convenience euthanasia of animals does not lead to desensitisation in valuing human life and a changed attitude to human euthanasia or suicide, or vice versa. Attitudes to human euthanasia and suicide were predictably correlated, perhaps suggesting an overarching attitude towards control over human death. The results of the current study throw into question the argument that it is the changes in attitudes to animal life that affect veterinarian's attitudes to human life and contribute to the high suicide rate.

  10. Encouraging Students to Have Positive Attitudes toward Learning English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Syukur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A positive attitude is a powerful tool that fosters enthusiasm, promotes self-esteem, and creates an atmosphere conducive to learning. Achievement in a target language relies not only on intellectual capacity, but also on the learner’s attitudes towards language learning. Attitudes could be viewed as a tendency to respond positively or negatively towards a certain thing, idea, person, situation etc. The attitudes that the students should have are attitude towards the language, attitude towards learning the language, attitude towards the language teacher, and attitude towards school in general. This study focuses on discussing about encouraging students to have positive attitudes toward learning English.

  11. 20 CFR 219.23 - Evidence to prove death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence to prove death. 219.23 Section 219... EVIDENCE REQUIRED FOR PAYMENT Evidence of Age and Death § 219.23 Evidence to prove death. (a) Preferred evidence of death. The best evidence of a person's death is— (1) A certified copy of or extract from the...

  12. Disability occurrence and proximity to death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, Bart; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Kunst, Anton E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. This paper aims to assess whether disability occurrence is related more strongly to proximity to death than to age. Method. Self reported disability and vital status were available from six annual waves and a subsequent 12-year mortality follow-up of the Dutch GLOBE longitudinal study.

  13. Addiction to near Death in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Janet

    2012-01-01

    This paper takes Betty Joseph's concept of "addiction to near death," which describes a clinical situation in which sadism and masochism dominate the relationships of a particular group of patients, and applies it specifically to the case material of a girl in adolescent psychotherapy treatment. A link is made between the patient's retreat from…

  14. Patient Death Debriefing Sessions to Support Residents' Emotional Reactions to Patient Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Juliana; Schulman, Elizabeth; Jhanwar, Sabrina M; Shah, Monika K

    2015-09-01

    There is no standard way to help residents deal with the emotional impact of patient deaths. Most available curricula are time and resource intensive. We introduced "Patient Death Debriefing Sessions" into an inpatient medical oncology rotation at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center to provide a structured yet practical way to address residents' emotional reactions following the death of a patient. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the impact of these sessions. Patient Death Debriefing Sessions consist of a brief (~10 minutes), real-time (within 24-48 hours), consistent (following each death), attending physician-led debriefing that focuses on internal medicine residents' emotional reactions following patient deaths. Sessions were guided by a pocketcard tool and did not require faculty training. Residents completing a 4-week medical oncology rotation were surveyed before and after their rotation. Prerotation and postrotation mean differences were evaluated based on the number of sessions they participated in (0 to ≥ 3) using analyses of variance. Ninety-one of 92 participants spanning all training levels completed questionnaires (99% response rate). Of these, 79 (87%) encountered a patient death and were included in the analyses. Overall, residents found debriefing sessions helpful, educational, and appreciated attending physician leadership. The number of debriefing sessions positively influenced residents' perception of received support. This high-yield, novel pilot curriculum supported residents' emotional reactions to patient deaths and may foster communication with team members, including supervising attending physicians. This program is easily implemented and could be adapted for use in other clinical settings.

  15. The contribution of a MOOC to community discussions around death and dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieman, Jennifer; Miller-Lewis, Lauren; Rawlings, Deb; Parker, Deborah; Sanderson, Christine

    2018-02-20

    Advances in medicine have helped many to live longer lives and to be able to meet health challenges. However death rates are anticipated to increase given the ageing population and chronic disease progression. Being able to talk about death is seen to be important in normalising death as part of life and supporting preparedness for death. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) provide opportunities for the community to engage in collaborative learning. A 5 week MOOC was developed covering four main topics (language and humour, representations of death, medicalisation of dying, and digital dying) aiming: To enable participants to openly and supportively discuss and learn about issues around living, death and dying, To explore the normally unheard opinions and views of Australians around death and dying, and To determine what effect online learning and discussions offered through the MOOC had on participants' feelings and attitudes towards death and dying. Data was captured on engagement rates in the various MOOC activities. Death Attitudes were measured by five items representing the MOOC's learning objectives and completed at enrolment and conclusion. MOOC Satisfaction was measured with six items at the end of the MOOC. Descriptive statistics were produced for each variable and Chi-Square Tests of Independence assessed the extent of the relationship between categorical variables. Socio-demographic variables were examined as predictors of the outcome variables of MOOC engagement, MOOC satisfaction, and death attitudes. Ethical approval was received from Flinders University Social and Behavioural Research Ethics Committee (Project No. 7247). One thousand one hundred fifty six people enrolled in the Dying2Learn MOOC with 895 participating in some way. Enrolees were primarily female (92.1%). Age ranged from 16 to 84 (mean = 49.5, SD = 12.3). MOOC satisfaction scores were high. Responses to the experience of participating in the MOOC were very positive, with mean

  16. The attitudes of brain cancer patients and their caregivers towards death and dying: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmelman Jonathan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much money and energy has been spent on the study of the molecular biology of malignant brain tumours. However, little attention has been paid to the wishes of patients afflicted with these incurable tumours, and how this might influence treatment considerations. Methods We interviewed 29 individuals – 7 patients dying of a malignant brain tumor and 22 loved ones. One-on-one interviews were conducted according to a pre-designed interview guide. A combination of open-ended questions, as well as clinical scenarios was presented to participants in order to understand what is meaningful and valuable to them when determining treatment options and management approaches. The results were analyzed, coded, and interpreted using qualitative analytic techniques in order to arrive at several common overarching themes. Results Seven major themes were identified. In general, respondents were united in viewing brain cancer as unique amongst malignancies, due in large part to the premium placed on mental competence and cognitive functioning. Importantly, participants found their experiences, however difficult, led to the discovery of inner strength and resilience. Responses were usually framed within an interpersonal context, and participants were generally grateful for the opportunity to speak about their experiences. Attitudes towards religion, spirituality, and euthanasia were also probed. Conclusion Several important themes underlie the experiences of brain cancer patients and their caregivers. It is important to consider these when managing these patients and to respect not only their autonomy but also the complex interpersonal toll that a malignant diagnosis can have.

  17. Non-suicidal self-injury (Nssi in adolescent inpatients: assessing personality features and attitude toward death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrara Mauro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is a common concern among hospitalized adolescents, and can have significant implications for short and long-term prognosis. Little research has been devoted on how personality features in severely ill adolescents interact with NSSI and "attitude toward life and death" as a dimension of suicidality. Developing more specific assessment methodologies for adolescents who engage in self-harm without suicidal intent is relevant given the recent proposal of a non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI disorder and may be useful in predicting risk in psychiatrically impaired subjects. Methods Consecutively hospitalized adolescents in a psychiatric unit (N = 52; 71% females; age 12-19 years, reporting at least one recent episode of self-harm according to the Deliberate Self-harm Inventory, were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Mental Disorders and Personality Disorders (SCID I and II, the Children's Depression Inventory and the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency Scale (MAST. Results Mean age onset of NSSI in the sample was 12.3 years. All patients showed "repetitive" NSSI (high frequency of self-harm, covering different modalities. Results revealed that 63.5% of adolescents met criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD and that the rest of the sample also met criteria for personality disorders with dysregulated traits. History of suicide attempts was present in 46.1% of cases. Elevated depressive traits were found in 53.8%. Results show a statistically significant negative correlation between the score on the "Attraction to Life" subscale of the MAST and the frequency and diversification of self-harming behaviors. Conclusions Most adolescent inpatients with NSSI met criteria for emotionally dysregulated personality disorders, and showed a reduced "attraction to life" disposition and significant depressive symptoms. This peculiar psychopathological configuration must be addressed in the

  18. Predictors of owner response to companion animal death in 177 clients from 14 practices in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C L; Bonnett, B N; Meek, A H

    2000-11-01

    To identify predictors of grief and client desires and needs as they relate to pet death. Cross-sectional mail survey. 177 clients, from 14 randomly selected veterinary practices, whose cat or dog died between 6 and 43 days prior to returning the completed questionnaire. Veterinary practices were contacted weekly to obtain the names of clients whose pets had died until approximately 200 clients were identified. Clients were contacted by telephone, and a questionnaire designed to measure grief associated with pet death was mailed to those willing to participate within 1 to 14 days of their pet's death. The questionnaire measured potential correlates and modifiers of grief and included three outcome measures: social/emotional and physical consequences, thought processes, and despair. Demographic data were also collected. Approximately 30% of participants experienced severe grief. The most prominent risk factors for grief included level of attachment, euthanasia, societal attitudes toward pet death, and professional support from the veterinary team. Bivariate and multivariate analyses highlighted the impact owners' attitudes about euthanasia and professional intervention by the veterinary team had on reactions to pet death. Owners' perceptions of societal attitudes, also a predictor of grief, indicate that grief for pets is different than grief associated with other losses.

  19. Attitudes to motherhood in different cultures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Razina, Natalya V

    2014-01-01

    .... According to the results of this study, we distinguished the most significant characteristics of the attitudes to motherhood that influence the nature of the relationship between a mother and her unborn child...

  20. [To go along with life until death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, M

    1999-01-01

    We are faced with difficult and complex questions that cannot be answered by stating great principles or ideological convictions, because they refer to painful situations, always singular, in which each individual, in a unique way, faces his life and his death. But the debate can draw on shared convictions and values. Thus, before being a way of assuming death, the Christian faith is fundamentally a way of welcoming the life, in all times and in its fullness, that Christ has given us. The whole Bible and in particular the ministry of Jesus bear witness to that fight for life, against the scandal of suffering and the powers of death that are a denial of the good work of God. Suffering is never, as such, acceptable or justifiable, and truth is never to surrender to it, as if it was a meaningful destiny. And so all suffering that can be avoided must be so. Regarding death, it is often held back in the margins of our lives and societies, as if it was a sort of setback for our human abilities and especially for medicine. Of course those abilities exist but death is not an illness. It's the natural mark of our human finiteness and there is a time when caring is not intended to cure, but to make up for life that defaults, alleviate suffering. That is why what is called to-day palliative caring is so important. Because even when medicine is powerless in front of illness, it can still do something for the sick. Because of all that, the believer can only be opposed to euthanasia which is, after all, only the exact replica of the useless prolongation of life by medical means it pretends to oppose. It's the same activism, the same pretense, the Bible fights, through which human beings want to remain the masters of life and death. But death is not given, except in deathly violence. As life, it is welcomed and is accompanied. The end of a life is still life. To die is to the live to one's last breath. And that questions the claim to die "with dignity" when life can no more be

  1. Gender and death: to speak of death is to speak of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Morales Flores

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available To write about death is to understand that it is necessary to give it a current meaning. This meaning must be related to changes occurring in the complex environment surrounding death. Thus, when someone is close to a sick person o to death, both during and after mourning, and he or she may have the opportunity to speak about all of the feelings that are arising within, including anguish and fears. This may ensure a greater possibility of mitigating suffering, by enduring a better grievance period.

  2. Encouraging Students to Have Positive Attitudes toward Learning English

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Syukur

    2016-01-01

    A positive attitude is a powerful tool that fosters enthusiasm, promotes self-esteem, and creates an atmosphere conducive to learning. Achievement in a target language relies not only on intellectual capacity, but also on the learner’s attitudes towards language learning. Attitudes could be viewed as a tendency to respond positively or negatively towards a certain thing, idea, person, situation etc. The attitudes that the students should have are attitude towards the language, attitude toward...

  3. Attitudes about Death, Dying, and Terminal Care: Differences among Groups at a University Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, C. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Studied attitudes of eight hospital groups on several aspects of terminal care by means of a questionnaire. Responses of the groups, which included physicians, residents, nurses, aides, and orderlies, did not differ on general statements about terminal care. On more specific statements perception of personal involvement influenced responses.…

  4. Explaining attitudes to immigration in France

    OpenAIRE

    DENNISON, James; TALÒ, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes to immigration in France, as in most European countries, are highly stable and are in fact becoming slightly more favourable. • France has relatively negative attitudes to immigration when compared with other western European countries. • However, the French see immigration as a relatively unimportant issue affecting their country, considerably less so than other western European electorates. • The recent uptick in perceived importance of immigration in almost all western European c...

  5. Attitudes of psychology freshmen to mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenjović Lazar R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Two components of the attitude towards mathematics were examined on the groups of psychology and ethnology freshmen using the Attitude to Mathematics Questionnaire by L. Aiken: Enjoyments in mathematics and Value of Mathematics. The means of the psychology students on the two components of the attitude towards mathematics were almost in the middle between those of the civil engineering students on the one side, and those of the ethnology students on the other side. However, considering the markedly asymmetric result distributions on specific components of the attitude towards mathematics, with a view of more real positioning of the psychology students compared with the remaining two groups according to their relation to mathematics, all the subjects were clustered pursuant to their answers to the respective Questionnaire items. The cluster analysis results lead to the conclusion that in their attitude towards mathematics most of the psychology freshmen are closer to the students of those faculties who use mathematics as basic ''tools'' than to the students freshly enrolled in other fields traditionally not employing mathematical ''tools'' in their work. Likewise, a positive attitude towards mathematics prevails in the psychology freshmen.

  6. The attitudes of nursing students to euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseh, Ladan; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common morally controversial issues in endof-life care is euthanasia. Examining the attitudes of nursing students to this issue is important because they may encounter situations related to euthanasia during their clinical courses. The aim of our study was to examine nursing students' attitudes to euthanasia in Shahrekord city in western Iran. This was done using the Euthanasia Attitude Scale. The scale is divided into four categories, ie ethical considerations, practical considerations, treasuring life and naturalistic beliefs. Of 132 nursing students, 120 participated in the study (response rate 93.1%). According to the study's findings, 52.5%, 2.5% and 45% of the students reported a negative, neutral and positive attitude to euthanasia, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the nursing students' attitudes to euthanasia and some demographic characteristics, including sex, age and religious beliefs. Iranian Muslim nursing students participating in the study had a negative attitude to euthanasia. Further studies are recommended among nursing students from different cultures and of different religious faiths.

  7. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  8. Lethal outcome and time to death in injured hospitalised patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen (17.65%) cases sustained injuries to multiple organ systems injuries while open fractures accounted for 12(14.12%) of the deaths. The time to death showed two peaks. The first peak accounted for 12(14.12%) of the deaths. The time to death showed two peaks occurred within the first 96 hours du to uncompensated ...

  9. A Response to the Legitimacy of Brain Death in Islam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Brain death is a novel construct of death for the procurement of transplantable organs. Many authoritative Islamic organizations and governments have endorsed brain death as true death for organ donation. Many commentators have reiterated the misconception that the Quranic text does not define death. We respond by clarifying: (1) the Quran does define death as biologic disintegration and clearly distinguishes it from the dying process, (2) brain death belongs scientifically within the spectrum of neurologic disorders of consciousness and should not be confused with death, and (3) religious and legal discord about brain death has grown in jurisdictions worldwide. We urge for public transparency and truthfulness about brain death and the accommodation and respect of religious objection to the determination of death by neurologic criteria.

  10. Preparing Attitude Scale to Define Students' Attitudes about Environment, Recycling, Plastic and Plastic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Cagri; Aydinli, Bahattin; Bakar, Fatma; Alboga, Yunus

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce an attitude scale in order to define students? attitudes about environment, recycling, plastics, plastic waste. In this study, 80 attitude sentences according to 5-point Likert-type scale were prepared and applied to 492 students of 6th grade in the Kastamonu city center of Turkey. The scale consists of…

  11. Nurses' attitudes to euthanasia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoort, Charlotte; Gastmans, Chris; De Bal, Nele; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the scarce international literature concerning nurses' attitudes to euthanasia. Studies show large differences with respect to the percentage of nurses who are (not) in favour of euthanasia. Characteristics such as age, religion and nursing specialty have a significant influence on a nurse's opinion. The arguments for euthanasia have to do with quality of life, respect for autonomy and dissatisfaction with the current situation. Arguments against euthanasia are the right to a good death, belief in the possibilities offered by palliative care, religious objections and the fear of abuse. Nurses mention the need for more palliative care training, their difficulties in taking a specific position, and their desire to express their ideas about euthanasia. There is a need to include nurses' voices in the end-of-life discourse because they offer a contextual understanding of euthanasia and requests to die, which is borne out of real experience with people facing death.

  12. Using death certificate data to study place of death in 9 European countries: opportunities and weaknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaasa Stein

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic and reliable epidemiological information at population level, preferably cross-national, is needed for an adequate planning of (end-of-life health care policies, e.g. concerning place of death, but is currently lacking. This study illustrates opportunities and weaknesses of death certificate data to provide such information on place of death and associated factors in nine European countries (seven entire countries and five regions. Methods We investigated the possibility and modality of all partners in this international comparative study (BE, DK, IT, NL, NO, SE, UK to negotiate a dataset containing all deaths of one year with their national/regional administration of mortality statistics, and analysed the availability of information about place of death as well as a number of clinical, socio-demographic, residential and healthcare system factors. Results All countries negotiated a dataset, but rules, procedures, and cost price to get the data varied strongly between countries. In total, about 1.1 million deaths were included. For four of the nine countries not all desired categories for place of death were available. Most desired clinical and socio-demographic information was available, be it sometimes via linkages with other population databases. Healthcare system factors could be made available by linking existing healthcare statistics to the residence of the deceased. Conclusion Death certificate data provide information on place of death and on possibly associated factors and confounders in all studied countries. Hence, death certificate data provide a unique opportunity for cross-national studying and monitoring of place of death. However, modifications of certain aspects of death certificate registration and rules of data-protection are perhaps required to make international monitoring of place of death more feasible and accurate.

  13. Suicide Ideation Associations with Attitudes toward Suicide, Quality of Life, and Attitudes toward Death and Dying among Chinese, Korean, Thai, and Vietnamese High School Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Noy S.; Jantaraweragul, Sudgasame; Kanungsukkasem, Vijit; Li, Kaigang; Jones, Megan R.; Huang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Suicide of an individual could leave devastating consequences for family, friends, relatives, and society. Suicide could be considered a serious concern and issue to public health, especially among adolescents. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of suicide ideation with attitudes toward suicide (ATS), quality of life (QOL), and…

  14. The road to maternal death in rural Southwest Ethiopia | Deribe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explored cultural beliefs and practices contributing to maternal deaths together with maternal deaths reviews as testimonial. Six maternal deaths were retrospectively observed in rural southwest Ethiopia. Four of the 6 deaths occurred due to direct obstetric causes. Substandard primary and referral care, not ...

  15. Perspectives on death and an afterlife in relation to quality of life, depression, and hopelessness in cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Schilderman, Johannes; Verhagen, Constans A H H V M; Vissers, Kris C; Prins, Judith

    2011-06-01

    It is unknown whether cancer patients with different life expectancies have different attitudes and emotions toward death and an afterlife. Also, it is unclear whether these attitudes and emotions toward death and afterlife influence patients' distress. To assess the relationship of attitudes and emotions towards death and an afterlife with quality of life, depression and hopelessness in cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients facing death. Ninety-one cancer patients without evidence of disease and 57 advanced cancer patients completed the Dutch Attitudes Toward Death and Afterlife Scale. Emotions toward death were measured using the Self-Confrontation Method. Quality of life was measured with the Satisfaction with Life Scale and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-Life Questionnaire. Depression and hopelessness were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory for Primary Care and the Beck Hopelessness Scale. Average scores on attitudes and emotions toward death and an afterlife were not significantly different between the two groups. However, in the no evidence of disease group, a negative association between negative emotions and social functioning was observed, which was not present in the advanced cancer group. In the advanced cancer group, associations were observed that were not present in the no evidence of disease group: positive associations between an explicitly religious attitude and global health status and between reincarnation belief and role and cognitive functioning, and a negative association between other-directed emotions and social functioning. Patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients do not differ in attitudes or emotions toward death, but the relationship between these attitudes and emotions and aspects of quality of life varies. When there is no evidence of disease, negative emotions play the most important role, whereas in the advanced

  16. Death and the Oldest Old: Attitudes and Preferences for End-of-Life Care--Qualitative Research within a Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Fleming

    Full Text Available Increasing longevity means more people will be dying in very old age, but little is known about the preferences of the 'oldest old' regarding their care at the end of life.To understand very old people's preferences regarding care towards the end of life and attitudes towards dying, to inform policy and practice.Qualitative data collection for n = 42 population-based cohort study participants aged 95-101 (88% women, 42% in long-term-care: topic-guided interviews with n = 33 participants and n = 39 proxy informants, most with both (n = 30: 4 jointly + separate interviews for 26 dyads.Death was a part of life: these very old people mainly live day-to-day. Most were ready to die, reflecting their concerns regarding quality of life, being a nuisance, having nothing to live for and having lived long enough. Contrasting views were rare exceptions but voiced firmly. Most were not worried about death itself, but concerned more about the dying process and impacts on those left behind; a peaceful and pain-free death was a common ideal. Attitudes ranged from not wanting to think about death, through accepting its inevitable approach to longing for its release. Preferring to be made comfortable rather than have life-saving treatment if seriously ill, and wishing to avoid hospital, were commonly expressed views. There was little or no future planning, some consciously choosing not to. Uncertainty hampered end-of-life planning even when death was expected soon. Some stressed circumstances, such as severe dependency and others' likely decision-making roles, would influence choices. Carers found these issues harder to raise but felt they would know their older relatives' preferences, usually palliative care, although we found two discrepant views.This study's rare data show ≥95-year-olds are willing to discuss dying and end-of-life care but seldom do. Formal documentation of wishes is extremely rare and may not be welcome. Although being "ready to die" and

  17. [Maternal deaths due to sudden death. Results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morau, E; Beaumont, E; Verspyck, E

    2017-12-01

    Sudden death is defined as unexpected cardiac arrest occurring less than one hour after the onset of the first symptoms. Between 2010 and 2012, 23 maternal deaths were considered as unexplained sudden deaths and three of them were not evaluated due to a lack of clinical data. In addition, 13 maternal deaths with an identified cause occurred in a clinical context of sudden death (7 cases of pulmonary embolism, 2 cases of epilepsy, and 2 cases of cardiomyopathy). The first maneuvers of resuscitation in the presence of bystanders were attempted in 8 of 22 cases (36%). This emphasizes the importance of teaching the non-medical resuscitation modalities of cardiac arrest in pregnant women. Pregnant women must receive accurate resuscitation as the whole population. An autopsy was performed in 10 of 33 cases (30%) and was considered incomplete in 3 patients. This result emphasizes the necessity to perform a systematic and specialized autopsy in the context of sudden maternal death, which is mostly unexplained. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Using death certificate data to study place of death in 9 European countries: opportunities and weaknesses

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Joachim; Bilsen, Johan; Miccinesi, Guido; Löfmark, Rurik; Addington-Hall, Julia; Kaasa, Stein; Norup, Michael; van der Wal, Gerrit; Deliens, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Background: Systematic and reliable epidemiological information at population level, preferably cross-national, is needed for an adequate planning of (end-of-life) health care policies, e.g. concerning place of death, but is currently lacking. This study illustrates opportunities and weaknesses of death certificate data to provide such information on place of death and associated factors in nine European countries (seven entire countries and five regions). Methods: We investiga...

  19. Existential anxiety as related to conceptualization of self and of death, denial of death, and religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, A S

    1992-12-01

    82 students completed a questionnaire which measured their existential anxiety as described by Yalom, conceptualization of self and of death, denial of death, and religiosity. For these students, scores on existential anxiety correlated with identity confusion, feeling responsible toward others but fearing emotional closeness with them, seeing people as fundamentally different and not seeing oneself as living on in one's tasks or projects. Their existential anxiety scores were not related to a particular concept of death, but death was more likely to be seen as cold and denied. Their existential anxiety seemed symptomatic of adjustment problems for which religiosity was not helpful. Specific suggestions for further research are made.

  20. Death secondary to a donkey's bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Aloja, Ernesto; Grimaldi, Leonardo; Cascini, Fidelia; De Mercurio, Domenico; De-Giorgio, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    We present a unique case of death due to the assault and bites of a donkey on a 65-year-old man. The farmer, found dead in his farmyard, had a very deep wound in the anterior region of the neck, with a sharp transection of the trachea and severe bleeding by several minor vessels wall disruptions. The cause of death was established to be massive bleeding combined with asphyxia due to aspiration of the blood. Moreover, multiple contusions with associated skin abrasions and perforations were present. The general impression of the injuries was consistent with an animal's bite marks. Herbivorous or omnivorous bite attacks on humans are rare; instead, these animals attack by kicking, trampling, and kneeling, resulting in secondary blunt injuries. The donkey is usually a docile animal, but its behavior can be aggressive during the mating season, and the possibility of biting should not be underestimated, as illustrated by the 2 cases published previously as well as by the case presented here.

  1. The Effects of Death Anxiety and Mode of "Case Study" Presentation on Shifts of Attitude toward Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Edward J.

    1978-01-01

    College students (N = 18) were randomized to one of two experimental treatments: a video tape presentation of a burn victim, and a written narrative of the same "case study." There appeared to be significant differences in attitudes toward euthanasia between experimental groups. (Authors)

  2. Deaths due to forklift truck accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschultz, B D; Donoghue, E R

    1994-03-25

    Forklift truck accidents are a common cause of occupational injury and death. The authors review deaths resulting from forklift accidents cases in the years 1984-1992 in Cook County, Illinois (which contains the large city of Chicago). The fatal injuries, the characteristics of the victims, and the circumstances of the deaths are examined. A forklift striking a pedestrian or crushing the operator when tipping over or falling off a dock or truck were the most common causes of death in this study. The authors compare their findings with those found in the literature on the characteristics and prevention of forklift accidents. Also, they comment on the role of the medical examiner's or coroner's office in the investigation of these work-related deaths.

  3. Entrepreneurship Education and Uundergraduates' Attitude to Self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Entrepreneurship Education (EE) and undergraduates' attitude of Obafemi Awolowo University Ile-Ife, Nigeria, (OAU), to self-employment were examined. Over one thousand students enrolled for the special electives in 2006/2007 academic session. These students were administered with questionnaire, pre- and post- ...

  4. Tarantula bite leads to death and gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Kalyan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilobrachys hardwikii-giant black hairy spider bite produced two deaths, one case of gangrene of the foot and urticarial rashes in another person in a remote village of Churulia 30 km from Asansol.

  5. Dying To Be Thin: Attachment to Death in Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Latzer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia Nervosa (AN usually follows a prolonged course accompanied by significant morbidity and high mortality. AN patients have been found to have elevated and attempted suicide rates, with suicide being the second most common cause of death in AN after the complications of the disorder itself. The suicide risk in AN is similar to that in major depression or conduct disorder and linked mainly to longer duration of illness, lower weight, bingeing and purging, impulsivity-related manifestations, comorbid substance abuse, and affective disorder. This paper reviews suicidal tendency and disturbed body image, death and eating disorders, and attachment and death with clinical implications related to AN.

  6. The Effect of Age on Death Disgust: Challenges to Terror Management Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M.T. Fessler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of Terror Management Theory (TMT argue that many facets of disgust serve to defend against existential anxiety accompanying cognizance of one's mortality. Because the passage of time brings death closer, this view predicts that the intensity of disgust elicited by reminders of death should increase with age. Skeptical of TMT, we conducted Internet-based studies using the instrument created by TMT proponents. Results reveal that age is negatively, not positively, correlated with death disgust sensitivity, a pattern consistent with adaptive habituation rather than terror management. The same result was obtained using in-person administration of the instrument in Costa Rica, a society characterized by attitudes toward death that differ from those of the U.S. Additional work in Costa Rica demonstrated that, contrary to TMT predictions, attention to one's own death need not increase disgust reactions to the body or its products. Both the evocative power of death stimuli and the negative effects of age on death disgust are consistent with the argument that disgust is an adaptation motivating disease avoidance rather than a psychodynamic defense mechanism.

  7. An immanent approach to death: Theological implications of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article deals with some philosophical models (especially those of Hegel and Heidegger) that incorporate the negative (non-being, death) into life (the subject). I then outline a model incorporating death into life at a horizontal transcendental level in order to make death plausible. The example cited is Sölle's work.

  8. Aiming for zero preventable deaths: using death review to improve care and reduce harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Rosanne; Pierson, Sharon; McLean, Richard; McAlpine, Sue Anne; Caron, Carole; Beth Morrismorris, Beth; Lucas, Janie

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, our organization set a goal of zero preventable deaths by 2010--notionally a sound goal but extremely challenging to measure, monitor and evaluate. The development of an interdisciplinary Death and Adverse Event Review process has provided a measure and framework for action to decrease adverse events (AEs) that cause harm. Death and Adverse Event Review is a formal process in which trained reviewers consider patient deaths using a modified Global Trigger Tool to establish the presence of AEs or quality of care issues that may have potentially led to death or harm. When identified, these charts go to second-level review by a physician/interdisciplinary team to determine recommendations for actions to prevent future reoccurrences. Data have provided trending of system influences to patient safety. In 2008-2009, 1,817 deaths were reviewed and AE rates of 12.1% and 16.3% were identified. There were 422 AEs and 114 quality of care issues identified for follow-up. Of the 4.7% and 6.3% referred to the physician/interdisciplinary team for secondary review, 2.3% and 2.6% resulted in recommendations for improvement. In addition to local improvements, many system improvements have occurred as a result of the review, such as proposed minimum standards for physician documentation; a formal review of post-operative guidelines for patients with sleep apnea; and a working group to review nursing documentation, communication/follow-up of vital signs, fluid balance and pain management. The Death and Adverse Event Review process provides a new critical level of detail that supports continuous improvements to our care processes and ongoing progress toward our goal of zero preventable deaths.

  9. Health Care Professionals' Attitudes About Physician-Assisted Death: An Analysis of Their Justifications and the Roles of Terminology and Patient Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Derek W; Marcus, Brian S; Wakim, Paul G; Mercurio, Mark R; Kopf, Gary S

    2017-10-01

    Health care professionals (HCPs) are crucial to physician-assisted death (PAD) provision. To quantitatively assess the favorability of justifications for or against PAD legalization among HCPs, the effect of the terms "suicide" and "euthanasia" on their views and their support for three forms of PAD. Our questionnaire presented three cases: physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia for a competent patient, and euthanasia for an incompetent patient with an advance directive for euthanasia. Respondents judged whether each case was ethical and should be legal and selected their justifications from commonly cited reasons. The sample included physician clinicians, researchers, nonphysician clinicians, and other nonclinical staff at a major academic medical center. Of 221 HCPs, the majority thought that each case was ethical and should be legal. In order of declining favorability, justifications supporting PAD legalization were relief of suffering, right to die, mercy, acceptance of death, nonabandonment, and saving money for the health care system; opposing justifications were the slippery slope argument, unnecessary due to palliative care, killing patients is wrong, religious views, and suicide is wrong. The use of suicide and euthanasia terminology did not affect responses. Participants preferred physician-assisted suicide to euthanasia for a competent patient (P euthanasia for an incompetent patient to euthanasia for a competent patient (P euthanasia language did not bias HCPs against PAD, challenging claims that such value-laden terms hinder dialogue. More research is required to understand the significance of competency in shaping attitudes toward PAD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Overseas visitor deaths in Australia, 2001 to 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Wilks, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The health and safety of international visitors remain an important issue for Australia and other tourist destinations. The death of visitors remains an important indicator of safety. The aim of this study was to provide updated figures on deaths of overseas travelers in Australia. Data were sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics concerning deaths of overseas visitors for the years 2001 to 2003. There were 1,068 overseas visitor deaths (701 males, 66%) during the study period 2001 to 2003. Death by natural causes increased with age, while deaths associated with accidents were more frequent among younger age groups. The majority of deaths were from natural causes (782, 73%), particularly ischemic heart diseases (26%). There were a total of 247 accidental deaths (23% of all deaths) with the main causes being transportation accidents (14% of all deaths) and accidental drowning/submersion (5% of all deaths). The countries contributing the most deaths were the UK (247, 23%), New Zealand (108, 10%) Melanesia/Micronesia (95, 9%), and the United States (57, 5%). Australia remains a relatively safe destination for international travelers, at least in terms of fatalities, which appear to be declining. Most deaths of overseas tourists in Australia are due to natural causes with cardiovascular disease being the predominant cause of death in this group. Accidents remain the most common preventable cause of death of travelers, with road and water safety being the major issues. It is important that tourism and travel medicine groups continue to advocate for improved health and safety of international travelers visiting Australia.

  11. Palliative care for those with heart failure: nurses' knowledge, attitude, and preparedness to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghee; Hwang, Won Ju

    2014-04-01

    Palliative care is an important element of holistic care but has received little attention in cardiac disease patients. The purpose of the paper is (a) to investigate nurses' knowledge of palliative care, attitudes toward care of the dying, coping with death, and preparedness to practice palliative care for those with heart failure, and (b) to evaluate influencing factors on preparedness to practice on palliative care. A cross-sectional descriptive design employed a structured questionnaire that tested nurses' knowledge, attitude, coping, and preparedness to practice on palliative care for patients with heart failure. Ninety nurses in two tertiary university hospitals in South Korea participated in the survey. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple regression. Results showed low levels of knowledge reported (an average of 48.3% correct answers), attitude (134.8±110.1), coping (117.2±24.3), and preparedness to practice (17.3±4.7) relating to palliative care. The extent of knowledge was related to both attitudes and coping. These attitudes and coping skills were related to preparedness to practice. The multiple regression analysis showed that preparedness to practice was explained by coping and attitude (R (2) =0.46, F=6.1, pknowledge, attitude, coping, and preparedness to practice. Guidance to assist healthcare professionals involved in palliative care for those with cardiac disease needs to be developed and provided.

  12. Attitudes of medical students to induced abortion | Buga |

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical students as future doctors may have attitudes to abortion that will affect the provision of safe abortion. Little is known about the attitudes of South African medical students to abortion. Objectives: To assess sexual practices and attitudes of medical students to induced abortion and to determine some of the factors that ...

  13. To Reinstate or to Not Reinstate? An Exploratory Study of Student Perspectives on the Death Penalty in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinkrah, Mensah; Clemens, William M

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. state of Michigan abolished the death penalty in 1846. Since then, several abortive efforts have been made by state legislators to re-establish the death sentence to deal with convicted murderers. Concurrently, some support exists among Michigan residents for the restoration of capital punishment in the state. This article presents the results of the analysis of an attitudinal survey of 116 college students enrolled in three criminal justice courses in a Michigan public university concerning the reinstatement of the death sentence in the state. The data from this exploratory study show that a slight majority (52.6%) of respondents favored reinstatement whereas 45.7% opposed restoration. Advocates and opponents of re-establishment of the death penalty in Michigan provided similar religious, moral and economic arguments proffered by others in previous surveys on capital punishment available in the death penalty literature. The current study makes a contribution to the scant extant literature on attitudes toward the death penalty in abolitionist jurisdictions. As this body of literature grows, it can provide baseline data or information with which to compare attitudes in retentionist states.

  14. Towards a different attitude to uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Pe'er

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The ecological literature deals with uncertainty primarily from the perspective of how to reduce it to acceptable levels. However, the current rapid and ubiquitous environmental changes, as well as anticipated rates of change, pose novel conditions and complex dynamics due to which many sources of uncertainty are difficult or even impossible to reduce. These include both uncertainty in knowledge (epistemic uncertainty and societal responses to it. Under these conditions, an increasing number of studies ask how one can deal with uncertainty as it is. Here, we explore the question how to adopt an overall alternative attitude to uncertainty, which accepts or even embraces it. First, we show that seeking to reduce uncertainty may be counterproductive under some circumstances. It may yield overconfidence, ignoring early warning signs, policy- and societal stagnation, or irresponsible behaviour if personal certainty is offered by externalization of environmental costs. We then demonstrate that uncertainty can have positive impacts by driving improvements in knowledge, promoting cautious action, contributing to keeping societies flexible and adaptable, enhancing awareness, support and involvement of the public in nature conservation, and enhancing cooperation and communication. We discuss the risks of employing a certainty paradigm on uncertain knowledge, the potential benefits of adopting an alternative attitude to uncertainty, and the need to implement such an attitude across scales – from adaptive management at the local scale, to the evolving Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES at the global level.

  15. Nurses' attitudes to assisted suicide: sociodemographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Luke

    This literature review seeks to explore the factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards assisted suicide. A poll conducted by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) showed that 49% of nurses supported assisted suicide while 40% were opposed to it. A literature review resulted in 16 articles being identified for data synthesis using a recognised critiquing framework. The articles revealed four key themes: nursing specialty, level of education, geographical location and religion. It was concluded that these four themes are key to understanding a nurse's attitude towards assisted suicide. Nursing staff need to be aware of their own influences on this topic, since they will inevitably be involved in the process in some way or another, in countries where assisted suicide has been legalised.

  16. Attitudes to Mathematics in Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Dowker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 44 Grade 3 children and 45 Grade 5 children from English primary schools were given the British abilities scales basic number skills subtest, and a Mathematics Attitude and Anxiety Questionnaire, using pictorial rating scales to record their Self-rating for maths, Liking for maths, Anxiety about maths, and Unhappiness about poor performance in mathematics. There were few year group differences in attitudes. Boys rated themselves higher than girls, but did not differ significantly in actual performance. Overall, Anxiety was not related to actual performance, but Self-rating was. This relationship between Self-rating and actual performance seemed to develop between Grade 3 and Grade 5. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  17. Attitude to plagiarism in different European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Foltýnek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is an important and frequently discussed issue, which may have severe financial impacts for higher education institutions across Europe. However, there are different attitudes to this topic in different countries. Whereas ECTS aims to provide an objective measurement of student effort allowing students to spend part of their studies at different institutions and even different countries, the penalties for plagiarism and other types of cheating may be different. Even the definition of plagiarism may be understood differently in particular European countries. One of the aims of the project IPPHEAE is to identify these differences and try to find common solutions for related problems.The aim of the paper is to present results of research focused on attitudes to plagiarism in Great Britain, Czech Republic, Poland, Lithuania, Cyprus and Bulgaria. A questionnaire survey was conducted in these countries among students and teachers. The results are interesting and inspiring and show huge differences in attitude to plagiarism between western and post-communist countries, surprisingly including the Czech Republic in the group of western countries.

  18. Attitudes of medical students to induced abortion | Buga | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unsafe abortion causes 13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Safe abortion can only be offered under conditions where legislation has been passed for legal termination of unwanted pregnancy. Where such legislation exists, accessibility of safe abortion depends on the attitudes of doctors and other healthcare ...

  19. Changing attitudes to sun exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weyden, R

    An understanding of the historical context and the psychological rationale for sunbathing is a prerequisite to designing effective health education strategies. The apparent destruction of the ozone layer, with an increase in the incidence of skin cancers, has brought this issue to the fore.

  20. Consumer attitudes to different pig production systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Barcellos, Marcia Dutra; Grunert, Klaus G.; Zhou, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In many countries consumers have shown an increasing interest to the way in which food products are being produced. This study investigates Chinese consumers’ attitudes towards different pig production systems by means of a conjoint analysis. While there has been a range of studies on Western con...... of rural and environmental development, quality aspects, and food safety measures are challenges that must be met by the stakeholders of pig production systems in China....

  1. Instructional strategies to improve women's attitudes toward science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbill, Phyllis Leary

    Although negative attitudes toward science are common among women and men in undergraduate introductory science classes, women's attitudes toward science tend to be more negative than men's. The reasons for women's negative attitudes toward science include lack of self-confidence, fear of association with social outcasts, lack of women role models in science, and the fundamental differences between traditional scientific and feminist values. Attitudes are psychological constructs theorized to be composed of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral components. Attitudes serve functions, including social expressive, value expressive, utilitarian, and defensive functions, for the people who hold them. To change attitudes, the new attitudes must serve the same function as the old one, and all three components must be treated. Instructional designers can create instructional environments to effect attitude change. In designing instruction to improve women's attitudes toward science, instructional designers should (a) address the emotions that are associated with existing attitudes, (b) involve credible, attractive women role models, and (c) address the functions of the existing attitudes. Two experimental instructional modules were developed based on these recommendations, and two control modules were developed that were not based on these recommendations. The asynchronous, web-based modules were administered to 281 undergraduate geology and chemistry students at two universities. Attitude assessment revealed that attitudes toward scientists improved significantly more in the experimental group, although there was no significant difference in overall attitudes toward science. Women's attitudes improved significantly more than men's in both the experimental and control groups. Students whose attitudes changed wrote significantly more in journaling activities associated with the modules. Qualitative analysis of journals revealed that the guidelines worked exactly as predicted

  2. Explicit- and Implicit Bullying Attitudes in Relation to Bullying Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goethem, Anne A. J.; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly developed measures of implicit bullying attitudes (a…

  3. Maternal deaths: the need to rethink coping strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cruz Esmeraldo Áfio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze maternal deaths and present the Maternal Mortality Ratio in the city of Fortaleza, in the Northeast region of Brazil, from 2008-2010. This is a descriptive study. Data collection occurred in the Mortality Information System and in the maternal death investigation files of the Local Health Department. Fifty-six maternal deaths were investigated with a Maternal Mortality Ratio of 39.75/100,000 live births. The prevalent age group was 20-29 years (50.0%. Hypertensive disorders (50.0% were the most prevalent causes of direct obstetric deaths. As for indirect obstetric deaths, infectious and parasitic diseases (28.1% prevailed. Nearly all deaths were considered preventable or possibly preventable (91.1%. Thus, it can be assumed that most deaths could have been avoided by ensuring the quality of prenatal care.

  4. Patients' attitudes to rubber dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D A; McHugh, E S

    2002-10-01

    The aims of this study were to record patients' views of their experience of RD use in an objective manner, and to evaluate the influence of some personal and clinical factors on patients' opinion. A questionnaire was designed which was then distributed to patients receiving dental treatment under RD by (a) final-year dental students at Birmingham Dental School, and (b) general dental practitioners. Patients completed the confidential questionnaire anonymously after treatment, outside the treatment room. After 100 correctly completed forms were collected from group (a) and 106 from group (b), data were entered into a database and subsequently analyzed using SPSS. Analyses were confined to simple cross-tabulations of the patients' responses and potential associated factors, with chi-square analysis and appropriate follow-up comparisons wherever necessary. In both groups, the majority of patients said they would prefer RD to be used at their next appointment, and most had a positive opinion of the experience. No statistically significant association between age, sex, procedure, application time or duration of use and preference for rubber dam was found. Prolonged RD use showed some association with a negative opinion of the experience of RD. Compared with the dentists, students took longer to apply rubber dam and it was in place for longer. Fewer student patients preferred RD next time, and were less positive about its use than the dentists' patients. Further evidence is presented that (i) Patients generally are not averse to RD. (ii) Placement of rubber dam does not take long. (iii) Operator experience improves patient compliance.

  5. Parental experience following perinatal death: exploring the issues to make progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einaudi, M A; Le Coz, P; Malzac, P; Michel, F; D'Ercole, C; Gire, C

    2010-08-01

    This study was performed to understand the parental attitudes, needs and ethical issues associated with perinatal death, to assist in the development of interventions for bereaved families. We conducted a qualitative descriptive survey of parental experiences with perinatal death. We developed a questionnaire based on the Delphi method, conducted semi-directed interviews or asked subjects to return the questionnaire by post. As a secondary analysis, we examined whether certain ethical principles (i.e., the concepts of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy, and justice) were encountered by the study participants. The study population consisted of families who had experienced perinatal death in the maternity department of a French university hospital, as well as members of bereaved parent support groups. Six of the 12 parents who participated in the survey were members of a support group. Responses were analyzed according to precise objectives and grouped according to key themes. In particular, we studied deaths that occurred during neonatal palliative care and deaths relating to multiple pregnancies. Parents expressed opinions about the caregivers' practices (e.g., which practices were beneficial and detrimental). Half of the parents did not feel that their feelings and decisions were respected according to ethical principles. Understanding the experience of parents allows staff to reconsider and change their practices. By understanding parents' feelings toward neonatal death, caregivers can better assist with the grieving process. Our study reveals parents' attitudes toward the ethical decision-making process and shows that it is difficult for perinatal medicine caregivers to respect parents' autonomy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pre-Service Accounting Teachers' Attitudes to Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhize, Msizi Vitalis; Maistry, Suriamurthee Moonsamy

    2017-01-01

    Mathematics proficiency has an acknowledged impact on students' accounting grades. Success in this core business subject is dependent on students' mathematical aptitude, attitude and type of secondary schooling. Our study investigated accounting students' attitudes to mathematics on domains of the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitudes Scales…

  7. Influence of Teacher Factors on Attitudes of Geography Teachers to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those teachers that hold negative attitudes should work at such attitudes so that through the lessons they teach they could impact positively on the behaviour of their students. Also, teacher professional development on the job should be taken into account in the improvement of teacher attitude to teaching. Ife PsychologIA ...

  8. Samuel Hartlib on the death of Descartes: a rediscovered letter to Henry More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penman, Leigh T. I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discloses the content of a previously overlooked epistle by the Anglo-Prussian intelligencer Samuel Hartlib to Henry More concerning the death of René Descartes. After a discussion situating the letter within the sequence of the More–Hartlib correspondence, an analysis of the rhetorical structure of the epistle is offered, followed by a brief assessment of Hartlib's attitude towards Descartes, and the identification of his source concerning the news of the philosopher's death. An account of the transmission of the letter via a nineteenth-century periodical is also provided. The text of Hartlib's letter and an overlooked passage of Hartlib's diary concerning Descartes's death, which draws on the content of the More letter, are presented as appendixes.

  9. Total brain death: a reply to Alan Shewmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patrick; GriseZ, Germain

    2012-06-01

    D. Alan Shewmon has advanced a well-documented challenge to the widely accepted total brain death criterion for death of the human being. We show that Shewmon’s argument against this criterion is unsound, though he does refute the standard argument for that criterion. We advance a distinct argument for the total brain death criterion and answer likely objections. Since human beings are rational animals--sentient organisms of a specific type--the loss of the radical capacity for sentience (the capacity to sense or to develop the capacity to sense) involves a substantial change, the passing away of the human organism. In human beings total brain death involves the complete loss of the radical capacity for sentience, and so in human beings total brain death is death.

  10. CONSUMERS’ ATTITUDES RELATED TO BIOFUEL USE IN TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Mariasiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a field survey to determine the attitudes of consumers (citizens related to the use of biofuels in transport. Attitudes of citizens towards biotechnologies and renewable energy use to reduce pollutant effects on the environment are an important factor (and even decisive in political decision-making necessary to develop new investments and the practical implementation of the proposed projects in the field of renewable sources. The aim of the study was to identify the attitudes of citizens (consumers regarding follow specific issues: the identification of environmental attitudes and use of biofuels, exploring the connections between attitudes and actions declared effective environmentally taken and exploring attitudes towards authorities environmental policies. It was found that there is a favorable attitude for a massive use of biofuels in transport, even in the absence of relevant sources of information about the complexity of the effects of using biofuels in transport.

  11. Assessment of the wish to hasten death in patients with advanced disease: A systematic review of measurement instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido-Pérez, Mercedes; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Porta-Sales, Josep; Balaguer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with advanced conditions may present a wish to hasten death. Assessing this wish is complex due to the nature of the phenomenon and the difficulty of conceptualising it. Aim: To identify and analyse existing instruments for assessing the wish to hasten death and to rate their reported psychometric properties. Design: Systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of validation studies and the measurement properties of the instrument described. Data sources: The CINAHL, PsycINFO, Pubmed and Web of Science databases were searched from inception to November 2015. Results: A total of 50 articles involving assessment of the wish to hasten death were included. Eight concerned instrument validation and were evaluated using COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments criteria. They reported data for between two and seven measurement properties, with ratings between fair and excellent. Of the seven instruments identified, the Desire for Death Rating Scale or the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death feature in 48 of the 50 articles. The Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death is the most widely used and is the instrument whose psychometric properties have been most often analysed. Versions of the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death are available in five languages other than the original English. Conclusion: This systematic review has analysed existing instruments for assessing the wish to hasten death. It has also explored the methodological quality of studies that have examined the measurement properties of these instruments and offers ratings of the reported properties. These results will be useful to clinicians and researchers with an interest in a phenomenon of considerable relevance to advanced patients. PMID:28124578

  12. [The management of risks related to deaths in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béranger, Christophe; Moustache, Bouchaïb

    Caregivers are inevitably exposed to the death of the people they care for as almost all deaths occur in a health or medical-social facility. This generates emotional situations which naturally impact on caregivers in their everyday work. The healthcare manager must take into account this reality in the management of risks related to the issue of death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Using the UMLS and Simple Statistical Methods to Semantically Categorize Causes of Death on Death Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Bill; Than, Nhan; Hogarth, Michael

    2010-11-13

    Cause of death data is an invaluable resource for shaping our understanding of population health. Mortality statistics is one of the principal sources of health information and in many countries the most reliable source of health data. 1 A quick classification process for this data can significantly improve public health efforts. Currently, cause of death data is captured in unstructured form requiring months to process. We think this process can be automated, at least partially, using simple statistical Natural Language Processing, NLP, techniques and the Unified Medical Language System, UMLS, as a vocabulary resource. A system, Medical Match Master, MMM, was built to exercise this theory. We evaluate this simple NLP approach in the classification of causes of death. This technique performed well if we engaged the use of a large biomedical vocabulary and applied certain syntactic maneuvers made possible by textual relationships within the vocabulary.

  14. Recent modifications to the investigation of diving related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-03-01

    The investigation of deaths that involve diving using a compressed breathing gas (SCUBA diving) is a specialized area of forensic pathology. Diving related deaths occur more frequently in certain jurisdictions, but any medical examiner or coroner's office may be faced with performing this type of investigation. In order to arrive at the correct conclusion regarding the cause and manner of death, forensic pathologists and investigators need to have a basic understanding of diving physiology, and should also utilize more recently developed technology and ancillary techniques. In the majority of diving related deaths, the cause of death is drowning, but this more often represents a final common pathway due to a water environment. The chain of events leading to the death is just as important to elucidate if similar deaths are to be minimized in the future. Re-enactment of accident scenarios, interrogation of dive computers, postmortem radiographic imaging, and slight alterations in autopsy technique may allow some of these diving related deaths to the better characterized. The amount and location of gas present in the body at the time of autopsy may be very meaningful or may simply represent a postmortem artifact. Medical examiners, coroners, and forensic investigators should consider employing select ancillary techniques to more thoroughly investigate the factors contributing a death associated with SCUBA diving.

  15. Love and death of cattle : the paradox in Suri attitudes toward livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, J.

    2003-01-01

    Livestock herding peoples are known for their close involvement with their animals, valuing them in multiple ways. This paper addresses the issue of the nature of emotional and moral commitment to livestock animals, particularly cattle, among a group of livestock herders in southwest Ethiopia, the

  16. Death Education in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Surveys the development of informal death education in the United Kingdom since Gorer's (Geoffrey) 1965 survey of attitudes to death, grief, and mourning. Shows how the media, exhibitions, courses, and reports contribute to the attainment of four goals originally applied in "American Death Education" by Gordon (Audrey) and Klass (Dennis)…

  17. Death Outlook and Social Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifel, Herman; Schag, Daniel

    1980-01-01

    Examined the hypothesis that there is a relationship between outlook on death and orientation toward mercy killing, abortion, suicide, and euthanasia. Some relationships between death attitudes and perspectives on the social issues emphasized the need to consider specific circumstances as well as abstract concepts. (Author)

  18. Deaths related to Hurricane Andrew in Florida and Louisiana, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, D L; Parrish, R G; McNabb, S J; Davis, J H

    1996-06-01

    Information about circumstances leading to disaster-related deaths helps emergency response coordinators and other public health officials respond to the needs of disaster victims and develop policies for reducing the mortality and morbidity of future disasters. In this paper, we describe the decedent population, circumstances of death, and population-based mortality rates related to Hurricane Andrew, and propose recommendations for evaluating and reducing the public health impact of natural disasters. To ascertain the number and circumstances of deaths attributed to Hurricane Andrew in Florida and Louisiana, we contacted medical examiners in 11 Florida counties and coroners in 36 Louisiana parishes. In Florida medical examiners attributed 44 deaths to the hurricane. The mortality rate for directly-related deaths was 4.4 per 1 000 000 population and that for indirectly-related deaths was 8.5 per 1 000 000 population. In Louisiana, coroners attributed 11 resident deaths to the hurricane. Mortality rates were 0.6 per 1000 000 population for deaths directly related to the storm and 2.8 for deaths indirectly related to the storm. Six additional deaths occurred among non-residents who drowned in international waters in the Gulf of Mexico. In both Florida and Louisiana, mortality rates generally increased with age and were higher among whites and males. In addition to encouraging people to follow existing recommendations, we recommend emphasizing safe driving practices during evacuation and clean-up, equipping shelters with basic medical needs for the population served, and modifying zoning and housing legislation. We also recommend developing and using a standard definition for disaster-related deaths, and using population-based statistics to describe the public health effectiveness of policies intended to reduce disaster-related mortality.

  19. Late Maternal Deaths and Deaths from Sequelae of Obstetric Causes in the Americas from 1999 to 2013: A Trend Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico G de Cosio

    Full Text Available Data on maternal deaths occurring after the 42 days postpartum reference time is scarce; the objective of this analysis is to explore the trend and magnitude of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas between 1999 and 2013, and to recommend including these deaths in the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs.Exploratory data analysis enabled analyzing the magnitude and trend of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes for seven countries of the Americas: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A Poisson regression model was developed to compare trends of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes between two periods of time: 1999 to 2005 and 2006 to 2013; and to estimate the relative increase of these deaths in the two periods of time.The proportion of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes ranged between 2.40% (CI 0.85% - 5.48% and 18.68% (CI 17.06% - 20.47% in the seven countries. The ratio of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes per 100,000 live births has increased by two times in the region of the Americas in the period 2006-2013 compared to the period 1999-2005. The regional relative increase of late maternal death was 2.46 (p<0.0001 times higher in the second period compared to the first.Ascertainment of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes has improved in the Americas since the early 2000's due to improvements in the quality of information and the obstetric transition. Late and obstetric sequelae maternal deaths should be included in the monitoring of the SDGs as well as in the revision of the International Classification of Diseases' 11th version (ICD-11.

  20. Late Maternal Deaths and Deaths from Sequelae of Obstetric Causes in the Americas from 1999 to 2013: A Trend Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cosio, Federico G; Jiwani, Safia S; Sanhueza, Antonio; Soliz, Patricia N; Becerra-Posada, Francisco; Espinal, Marcos A

    2016-01-01

    Data on maternal deaths occurring after the 42 days postpartum reference time is scarce; the objective of this analysis is to explore the trend and magnitude of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas between 1999 and 2013, and to recommend including these deaths in the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Exploratory data analysis enabled analyzing the magnitude and trend of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes for seven countries of the Americas: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A Poisson regression model was developed to compare trends of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes between two periods of time: 1999 to 2005 and 2006 to 2013; and to estimate the relative increase of these deaths in the two periods of time. The proportion of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes ranged between 2.40% (CI 0.85% - 5.48%) and 18.68% (CI 17.06% - 20.47%) in the seven countries. The ratio of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes per 100,000 live births has increased by two times in the region of the Americas in the period 2006-2013 compared to the period 1999-2005. The regional relative increase of late maternal death was 2.46 (p<0.0001) times higher in the second period compared to the first. Ascertainment of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes has improved in the Americas since the early 2000's due to improvements in the quality of information and the obstetric transition. Late and obstetric sequelae maternal deaths should be included in the monitoring of the SDGs as well as in the revision of the International Classification of Diseases' 11th version (ICD-11).

  1. Awareness and attitude of doctors and nurses at a teaching hospital to skin donation and banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, A I; Ademola, S A; Olawoye, O A; Iyun, A O; Oluwatosin, O M

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to determine the awareness and attitude of doctors and nurses in a teaching hospital to skin donation and banking, and to identify needs for personnel educational programmes. A cross sectional survey on doctors and nurses was carried out using a 44-item questionnaire that included a Likert scale on attitudes. Predictors of favourable attitudes were determined. Eighty (49.7%) doctors and 81 (50.3%) nurses participated in the study. Many participants, 126 (78.3%), knew that skin could be donated, but only 96 (59.6%) participants were aware of skin banking. The main source of information was during professional training (17.4%). Only 41 (25.5%) participants were willing to donate skin after death. Body disfigurement was the major reason (20.5%) against skin donation. Participants who were doctors, were aware of skin banking, and who were previous blood donors had higher attitudes scores (pbanking were predictors of favourable attitudes to skin donation and banking. Knowledge transfer during health professional training on the usefulness of banked skin in patients with major burns may lead to improved attitude of health professionals and acceptance of this modality of burn management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. [Attitudes to food and eating in an Icelandic cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurbjornsdottir, Olof Drofn; Torfadottir, Johanna Eyrun; Olafsdottir, Anna Sigridur; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2016-07-01

    Few studies exist on eating attitudes and well-being of adults in Iceland. In most Western societies great emphasis is placed on a lean and fit body, nevertheless the number of people gaining weigt keeps increasing. Such circumstances may cause discomfort related to food and food choice. The aim of this study was to examine attitudes towards food and eating among Icelandic adults. We used data from the Icelandic national health survey of 5,861 adults, age 18-79, conducted in 2007. A numerical assessment tool for measuring eating attitude was established, based on answers to questions on eating attitude. We used binary regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for unhealthy eating attitude according to different demographic factors. The prevalence of unhealthy eating attitude according to the measurement tool used in the study was 17% among participants, 22% for women and 11% for men. Unhealthy eating attitude was most prevalent in the age-group 18-29 years (36% of women, 15% of men), among those dissatisfied with their body weight (35% of women, 22% of men) and among those defined as obese (38% of women, 23% of men). Our data show that women are more prone to express unhealthy eating attitude compared to men. Those of younger age, with weight dissatisfaction and with high body mass index are positively associated with unhealthy eating attitude, irrespective of gender. Diet, Dietary restraint, Public Health, Eating attitude, Body weight satisfaction. Correspondence: Laufey Steingrimsdottir, laufey@hi.is.

  3. Music as a lens to study death rituals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoondert, Martin; Bruin-Mollenhorst, Janieke

    2016-01-01

    In this article we focus on music as a ‘lens’ to understand death rituals in general and cremation rituals in particular. It is linked to current research on music and death, performed by the first author, and can be considered as a programmatic presentation of a PhD project, running from September

  4. A Contextualist Thanatology: A Pragmatic Approach to Death and Dying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Andrew J.

    1977-01-01

    Denying the value of death but accepting its reality, the author points to dying, not death, as the problematic phenomenon with which a pragmatist thanatology must deal. It is suggested that dying contains opportunities for growth--for the dying as well as for their surviving friends and relatives. (Author)

  5. Relationship of Death Education to the Anxiety, Fear, and Meaning Associated with Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Kim H.; Elfenbein, Morton H.

    1993-01-01

    Compared death anxiety and fear of death levels expressed by 29 college students who had completed death and dying course with comparison group of 74 students. Found that those enrolled in thanatology class reported significantly higher death anxiety at end of semester. Results suggest different effect that thanatology course can have on…

  6. Staff and caregiver attitude to coercion in India

    OpenAIRE

    Raveesh, B. N.; Pathare, S.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Gowda, G. S.; Lepping, P.; Bunders-Aelen, J. G. F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of Indian psychiatrists and caregivers toward coercion. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Psychiatry, Krishna Rajendra Hospital, Mysore, India. Staff Attitude to Coercion Scale (SACS), a 15-item questionnaire, was administered to self-selected psychiatrists across India and caregivers from Mysore to measure attitudes on coercion. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and investigating d...

  7. Dying in hospital: a study of incidence and factors related to hospital death using death certificate data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houttekier, D.; Cohen, J.; Pepersack, T.; Deliens, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Most people prefer not to die in a hospital, and for those with palliative care needs, doing so may result in inappropriate care and poor outcomes. We examined place of death and factors associated with hospital death in a population eligible for palliative care. Methods: We used death

  8. Consumer attitudes toward and intentions to accept mobile advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abednego Feehi Okoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the drivers of consumers’ attitudes towards mobile advertisement. It also sought the relationship between consumers’ attitudes towards mobile advertisement and their willingness to accept mobile advertising. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the measurement model while structural equation was conducted to assess the goodness-fit of the overall model. The findings indicate that entertainment, credibility and personalization had positive effects on consumers’ attitudes toward mobile advertising. Furthermore, the results show that, consumers’ attitude determines their willingness to accept mobile advertising.

  9. The quality of dying and death in cancer and its relationship to palliative care and place of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Sarah; Chiu, Aubrey; Husain, Amna; Braun, Michal; Rydall, Anne; Gagliese, Lucia; Zimmermann, Camilla; Rodin, Gary

    2014-11-01

    Health care is increasingly focused on end-of-life care outcomes, but relatively little attention has been paid to how the dying experience is subjectively evaluated by those involved in the process. To assess the quality of death of patients with cancer and examine its relationship to receipt of specialized palliative care and place of death. A total of 402 deaths of cancer patients treated at a university-affiliated hospital and home palliative care program in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada were evaluated by bereaved caregivers eight to 10 months after patient death with the Quality of Dying and Death (QODD) questionnaire. Caregivers also reported on bereavement distress, palliative care services received, and place of death. Overall quality of death was rated "good" to "almost perfect" by 39% and "neither good nor bad" by 61% of caregivers. The lowest QODD subscale scores assessed symptom control (rated "terrible" to "poor" by 15% of caregivers) and transcendence over death-related concerns (rated "terrible" to "poor" by 19% of caregivers). Multivariable analyses revealed that late or no specialized palliative care was associated with worse death preparation, and home deaths were associated with better symptom control, death preparation, and overall quality of death. The overall quality of death was rated positively for the majority of these cancer patients. Ratings were highest for home deaths perhaps because they are associated with fewer complications and/or a more extensive support network. For a substantial minority, symptom control and death-related distress at the end of life were problematic, highlighting areas for intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Attitudes to trainee-led surgical mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O; Nugent, M; Cahill, R; Mulsow, J

    2017-11-04

    Surgical mentorship remains important especially in an era of run-through training but can be hindered by the 'generation gap' between consultants and students. To cater for this, we established a trainee-led mentorship programme for medical students interested in surgery and herein report our initial findings. Our aim is to assess the attitudes of surgical mentors and mentees to a newly established surgical trainee-led mentorship programme to determine factors desirable for its successful delivery. Six first year surgical trainees enrolled as mentors in September 2014. Ninety students enrolled as mentees. During the second semester both mentees and mentors were surveyed by an anonymous questionnaire to assess attitudes to the programme. Data was collected from 85 respondents. Eighty-nine percent of mentees felt their participation had positively impacted their decision to pursue a surgical career. The main benefits were found to be in improving technical skills (40%), providing surgical career guidance (35%) and information about surgical training programmes (14%). Of the mentor qualities most appreciated, 89% preferred institutional proximity while 30 and 27% valued enthusiasm and approachability. Ninety-three percent felt gender is unimportant; 49% preferred a mentor in their speciality of interest. Mentors valued this responsibility drawing greater job satisfaction. Our study, the first to describe the experience and potential benefits of a surgical trainee-led mentoring programme in Ireland, demonstrates a significant appetite amongst students and surgical trainees for mentorship. Further evaluation of the importance of mentoring programmes and the role of trainees in their delivery are necessary.

  11. A Donation After Circulatory Death Program Has the Potential to Increase the Number of Donors After Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Andrew R; Manara, Alex; Bramhall, Simon; Cartmill, Maria; Gardiner, Dale; Neuberger, James

    2016-02-01

    Donation after circulatory death has been responsible for 75% of the increase in the numbers of deceased organ donors in the United Kingdom. There has been concern that the success of the donation after circulatory death program has been at the expense of donation after brain death. The objective of the study was to ascertain the impact of the donation after circulatory death program on donation after brain death in the United Kingdom. Retrospective cohort study. A national organ procurement organization. Patients referred and assessed as donation after circulatory death donors in the United Kingdom between October and December 2013. None. A total of 257 patients were assessed for donation after circulatory death. Of these, 193 were eligible donors. Three patients were deemed medically unsuitable following surgical inspection, 56 patients did not proceed due to asystole, and 134 proceeded to donation. Four donors had insufficient data available for analysis. Therefore, 186 cases were analyzed in total. Organ donation would not have been possible in 79 of the 130 actual donors if donation after circulatory death was not available. Thirty-six donation after circulatory death donors (28% of actual donors) were judged to have the potential to progress to brain death if withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment had been delayed by up to a further 36 hours. A further 15 donation after circulatory death donors had brain death confirmed or had clinical indications of brain death with clear mitigating circumstances in all but three cases. We determined that the maximum potential donation after brain death to donation after circulatory death substitution rate observed was 8%; however due to mitigating circumstances, only three patients (2%) could have undergone brain death testing. The development of a national donation after circulatory death program has had minimal impact on the number of donation after brain death donors. The number of donation after brain death donors

  12. Analyzing online game players: from materialism and motivation to attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ju-Hui; Zhang, Hongxia

    2008-12-01

    The online game market has been growing rapidly and has received an increasing amount of attention in recent years. The results of a survey conducted in China to explore online game players' attitude formation reveal that (a) the online game player's level of materialism positively influences the motivation for playing, (b) motivation positively influences attitude toward online games, and (c) motivation fully mediates the effects of materialism on attitude.

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oligodendrocytes increases sensitivity to excitotoxic death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Monica A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously found that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes at the onset of demyelination in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD model of multiple sclerosis (MS (Carlson et al. J.Neuroimmunology 2006, 149:40. This suggests that COX-2 may contribute to death of oligodendrocytes. Objective The goal of this study was to examine whether COX-2 contributes to excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes and potentially contributes to demyelination. Methods The potential link between COX-2 and oligodendrocyte death was approached using histopathology of MS lesions to examine whether COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes. COX-2 inhibitors were examined for their ability to limit demyelination in the TMEV-IDD model of MS and to limit excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes in vitro. Genetic manipulation of COX-2 expression was used to determine whether COX-2 contributes to excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes. A transgenic mouse line was generated that overexpressed COX-2 in oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocyte cultures derived from these transgenic mice were used to examine whether increased expression of COX-2 enhanced the vulnerability of oligodendrocytes to excitotoxic death. Oligodendrocytes derived from COX-2 knockout mice were evaluated to determine if decreased COX-2 expression promotes a greater resistance to excitotoxic death. Results COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes in MS lesions. COX-2 inhibitors limited demyelination in the TMEV-IDD model of MS and protected oligodendrocytes against excitotoxic death in vitro. COX-2 expression was increased in wild-type oligodendrocytes following treatment with Kainic acid (KA. Overexpression of COX-2 in oligodendrocytes increased the sensitivity of oligodendrocytes to KA-induced excitotoxic death eight-fold compared to wild-type. Conversely, oligodendrocytes prepared from COX-2 knockout mice showed a

  14. Attitudes and reactions to a healthcare robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Kuo, I Han; Lee, Yong In; Rabindran, Joel; Kerse, Ngaire; Stafford, Rebecca; MacDonald, Bruce A

    2010-06-01

    The use of robots in healthcare is a new concept. The public's perception and acceptance is not well understood. The objective was to investigate the perceptions and emotions toward the utilization of healthcare robots among individuals over 40 years of age, investigate factors contributing to acceptance, and evaluate differences in blood pressure checks taken by a robot and a medical student. Fifty-seven (n = 57) adults aged over 40 years and recruited from local general practitioner or gerontology group lists participated in two cross-sectional studies. The first was an open-ended questionnaire assessing perceptions of robots. In the second study, participants had their blood pressure taken by a medical student and by a robot. Patient comfort with each encounter, perceived accuracy of each measurement, and the quality of the patient interaction were studied in each case. Readings were compared by independent t-tests and regression analyses were conducted to predict quality ratings. Participants' perceptions about robots were influenced by their prior exposure to robots in literature or entertainment media. Participants saw many benefits and applications for healthcare robots, including simple medical procedures and physical assistance, but had some concerns about reliability, safety, and the loss of personal care. Blood pressure readings did not differ between the medical student and robot, but participants felt more comfortable with the medical student and saw the robot as less accurate. Although age and sex were not significant predictors, individuals who held more positive initial attitudes and emotions toward robots rated the robot interaction more favorably. Many people see robots as having benefits and applications in healthcare but some have concerns. Individual attitudes and emotions regarding robots in general are likely to influence future acceptance of their introduction into healthcare processes.

  15. Images of death as perspectives in a life crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherer-Rath, M.; Ven, J.A. van der; Felling, A.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Images of death are reflections of one's own attitude to life, and in existential crises such as a suicide crisis, their meaning should therefore not be underestimated. This article describes the results of a research that has attempted to discuss attitudes, which people adopt towards death in times

  16. Desire to work as a death anxiety buffer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakobi, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Four studies were conducted to examine the death anxiety buffering function of work as a terror management mechanism, and the possible moderating role of culture. In Study 1, making mortality salient led to higher reports of participants' desire to work. In Study 2, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work after mortality salience reduced the accessibility of death-related thoughts. In Study 3, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work reduced the effects of mortality salience on out-group derogation. In Study 4, priming thoughts about obstacles to the actualization of desire to work led to greater accessibility of death-related thoughts. Although two different cultures with contrasting work values were examined, the results were consistent, indicating that the desire to work serves as a death anxiety buffer mechanism in both cultures.

  17. Effects of Reciprocal Peer Guidance on Adolescents' Attitudes to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to determine the effects of Reciprocal Peer Guidance (RPG) on students' attitudes to family responsibilities. ... Based on these findings, it was recommended that to enhance positive students' attitudes to family responsibilities, peer-based guidance strategies such as RPG should be adopted in addition to ...

  18. The anthropology of death or the new anthropology and the religious complex connected to death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors give a review of new anthropological work pertaining to dying, death and beliefs in life after death. Dying and the valorization of ways of dying are the subject of a paper by sociologist Todor Kuljić, while other relevant texts commented on by the authors are the results of the work done by anthropologists. Thus, the traditional belief in “prikoljiš” is analyzed in the text of Ivan Kovačević, while the folk belief in dying after death was analyzed by Dušan Bandić, and modern forms of grief in obituaries are analyzed by Ivan Čolović. The traditional belief in the vampire is the subject of analysis in papers by Dušan Bandić and Lidija Radulović, while the analysis of beliefs in immortality, present in a new religion, is the topic of a paper by Danijel Sinani.

  19. Sudden death of a child due to respiratory diphtheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Rajanikanta; Behera, Chittaranjan; Arava, Sudheer Kumar; Kundu, Naveen

    2016-06-01

    A four-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with respiratory distress. Death occurred despite attempted resuscitation. The illness was not clinically diagnosed. Her father revealed that she had a fever and sore throat for the last four days and was not immunised for diphtheria. Characteristic gross and microscopic pathology of respiratory diphtheria and microbiological findings were observed. The cause of death was acute respiratory failure consequent upon upper airway obstruction from diphtheria. Forensic pathologists should remember that the diphtheria cases can cause sudden death especially in developing countries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Sudden death due to inhalant abuse in youth: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Akcan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intentional inhalation or abuse of volatile substances is a common public health problem all over the world. As these substances generate euphoria frequency of use among adolescents and young adults is increasing steadily. In cases using inhalants to achieve a euphoric state -without knowing possible consequences- sudden death may occurdue to acute cardio-pulmonary dysfunction.Here we present a case of sudden death of a nineteen-year-old female due to inhalation of volatile from butane containing lighter gas tube, with the findings of autopsy and death scene investigation.In the context of this case; it was aimed to draw attention to the risk of sudden death and steady increase of frequencyof volatile substance abuse among adolescents and young adults due to various psycho-social factors.

  1. Attitudes to motherhood in different cultures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Razina, Natalya V

    2014-01-01

      The study of motherhood is a promising and relevant field of psychology. This article represents the results of a study in which a socio-psychological analysis of reproductive attitudes and demographic behaviour was conducted...

  2. Skeptical Legal Education. How to Develop a Critical Attitude?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klink, B.M.J.; de Vries, U.

    2013-01-01

    Law teachers at the university want students to develop a critical attitude. But what exactly does it mean to be critical and why is it important to be critical? How can a critical attitude be promoted? In this article we intend to elucidate the role that critical thinking may play in legal

  3. Malaysian University Students' Attitudes to Academic Dishonesty and Business Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zauwiyah; Simun, Maimun; Mohammad, Junaini

    2008-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is believed to have predictive ability for subsequent behaviours in the workplace. This study adds to the literature by investigating Malaysian business students' attitudes to academic dishonesty and their attitudes to ethics issues in business. This study also explores the association between these two constructs. The form of…

  4. Adolescents' attitudes towards AIDS precautions and intention to use condoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, N R; Moore, S M

    1990-12-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward AIDS precautions of 370 15- and 16-yr.-old secondary school students. Attitudes reflected levels of apathy, denial, and confusion high enough to lead to concern for this potentially high-risk group. Intention to use condoms in future sexual encounters was related to sex, conflict and confusion about AIDS precautions, plus other attitudinal variables.

  5. Gratitude lessens death anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rosanna W L; Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated whether a brief gratitude induction could reduce death anxiety. 83 Chinese older adults (mean age = 62.7, SD = 7.13) were randomly assigned into one of three conditions: gratitude, hassle, and neutral, in which they wrote different types of life events before responding to measures of death anxiety and affect. Participants in the gratitude induction reported lower death anxiety than the hassle and the neutral condition, whereas no difference was observed for the latter two conditions. There was no experimental effect on positive affect, and a significant effect on negative affect but which did not favor the gratitude condition. By reexamining life events with a thankful attitude, people may become less fearful of death due to a sense that life has been well-lived. Because gratitude can be induced using a very brief procedure, there are broad applications in clinical and health-care settings for the relief of death anxiety.

  6. From motivation to acceptability: a survey of public attitudes towards organ donation in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordfalk, Francisca; Olejaz, Maria; Jensen, Anja M B; Skovgaard, Lea Larsen; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, public attitudes to organ donation have been a subject of numerous studies focusing on donor motivation. Here, we present a fresh approach. We suggest focusing on public acceptability instead of motivation. The point is to understand public attitudes well enough to avoid risking public support for organ transplantation. We conducted the study in Denmark because there have been significant developments in public attitudes to organ donation in this country. In the 1990s, Denmark was a country with very low public support for organ donation and Denmark was the last country in Europe to introduce brain death as a legal criterion of death, whereas today Eurobarometer surveys rate Denmark as one of the European countries with the highest support for deceased organ donation from brain dead donors. We conducted a telephone survey in Denmark (N = 1195). A questionnaire was developed on the basis of preceding qualitative studies and pilot testing and included reuse of one item from earlier surveys to facilitate historical comparison. The analysis of the data was carried out using IBM SPSS Statistics 22 and focused on descriptive statistics. A clear majority of 91.9 % are positive or very positive towards organ donation; 85.8 % like the idea of their body being used after their death, 85.0 % is willing to donate their own organs, 82.1 % to donate their tissue and only 2.3 % find that too much has been done to promote organ donation. There is limited support for monetary incentives for organ donation (5.8 %) and presumed consent (30.4 %), while a majority (63.9 %) supports making it mandatory to register a personal decision. Religious self-identification has limited impact on attitudes. We can identify a shift over the past three decades from marked opposition to organ transplantation to strong support as well as a pattern in the contemporary public attitudes, which can help explain what is central to public acceptability: self

  7. How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  8. TIPS to reduce Pressure Decreasess rebleed and Death (Monescillo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TIPS to reduce Pressure Decreasess rebleed and Death (Monescillo A, Oct 2004, Hepatology). 116 Bleeders. Liver Pressure > 20 mm Hg - 52 Patients (high risk)

  9. Gender Differences in Attitudes to Learning Science in Grade 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Leelakrishna

    2017-01-01

    Learners' attitude to learning science plays a vitally important role with respect to career choices. This study reflects on the nature of the learners' attitude towards science and the effect of gender. A total of 547 Grade 7 learners from an urban district of Gauteng Province (South Africa) were administered a questionnaire to probe their…

  10. Does exposure to music videos predict adolescents' sexual attitudes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, J.W.J.; Konig, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether exposure to music videos predicts adolescents' sexual attitudes when controlled for relevant characteristics of individuals and their social environment. Sexual attitudes are related to their music video use (i.e. exposure to music videos, peer group talk about music

  11. English Language Teachers' Attitudes to the Promotion of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... major factors found to be militating against Nigerian learners of the English language, this study .... of assessment when it is. English Language Teachers‟ Attitudes to the Promotion of the Standard Nigerian English … ..... Attitudes towards Speakers, a Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics. Submitted to the ...

  12. Attitudes to Chronic Poverty in the "Global Village"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Armando; Neff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores attitudes to chronic poverty in a cross-section of developed and developing countries contributing data to the World Values Survey Wave Three (1994-1998). The analysis finds a consistent belief among a majority of respondents that poverty is persistent. The paper also explores the factors influencing public attitudes to chronic…

  13. Relationship between Students Variables and their Attitudes to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A positive attitude to life or profession has been identified as a means of rapid development. It is a force that compels an individual to go extra mile in any discipline or career of his choice. The purpose of this study is to examine the attitude of undergraduate students in taking a career in Agriculture. A stratified random ...

  14. Does Exposure to Music Videos Predict Adolescents' Sexual Attitudes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, J.W.J.; Konig, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether exposure to music videos predicts adolescents' sexual attitudes when controlled for relevant characteristics of individuals and their social environment. Sexual attitudes are related to their music video use (i.e. exposure to music videos, peer group talk about music

  15. Does exposure to music videos predict adolescents’ sexual attitudes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, J.W.J.; Konig, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether exposure to music videos predicts adolescents' sexual attitudes when controlled for relevant characteristics of individuals and their social environment. Sexual attitudes are related to their music video use (i.e. exposure to music videos, peer group talk about music

  16. Attitudes to organ donation among some urban South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To repeat the 1993 survey as far as possible and determine whether public attitudes to organ donation in some South African ... Generally attitudes to organ donation have not changed since 1993, remaining positive among the study population. ..... with field work, as well as Astellas Transplant and Roche for unrestricted.

  17. Attitudes of Turkish Nursing Students Related to Ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Özlem; Bilgili, Naile

    2016-09-01

    The sociocultural structure of society, changes in attitude and behaviors, and individual and social perspectives on aging all affect the nature of services that are offered to elderly people. "Ageism" is one of the problems that has an impact on the level and quality of service that is provided to the older adults. This study was undertaken to examine the attitudes of Turkish undergraduate nursing students toward aging. A cross-sectional survey was given to 495 nursing students in four universities in Turkey. A questionnaire developed from the related literature and the Ageism Attitude Scale were used to collect data, which was analyzed using standard descriptive statistical methods. The variables of school year, age, cohabitation with an elderly person (yes/no), prior experience with the older adults (yes/no), and willingness to work with the older adults after graduation all significantly influenced the attitudes of participants toward aging (p Ageism Attitude Scale revealed that the participants held a generally positive attitude toward aging. It is of great importance to include more lessons on the older adults and the aging process and to increase activities to develop awareness of ageism, to help students develop positive attitudes and perspectives toward the care of the older adults. Because experience caring for the older adults is important in developing a positive attitude toward the older adults, arranging relevant clinical practice, especially at institutions with an elderly population, may be an effective approach to strengthening the communication and experiences of nursing students.

  18. Subjective nearness to death and end-of-life anxieties: the moderating role of ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Yoav S; Bodner, Ehud; Shrira, Amit

    2017-02-06

    Subjective nearness to death (SNtD), or individuals' subjective evaluation of how close they are to death, has been demonstrated to be an important predictor for different aspects of the individual's aging process across the life cycle. However, the relationship between SNtD and anxieties linked with the aging process has not been examined among individuals who may be in the initial stages of experiencing the first physical and cognitive signs of aging. Thus, this study examined the association between SNtD and aging, dying, and death anxieties. Moreover, the role of ageism, or negative attitudes toward older adults, as a moderator for these perceptions regarding the end of life has not been addressed. Moreover, we examined whether ageism serves as a moderator for the aforementioned association. A convenience sample of 1146 Israeli participants, ranging in age from 45 to 65, filled out scales assessing SNtD, aging anxiety, dying anxiety, death anxiety, and ageism. High levels of SNtD were positively associated with aging, dying, and death anxieties. Moreover, there was a positive association between ageism and the three end-of-life anxieties. Significant interactions demonstrated the moderating effect of ageism for the relationship between SNtD and both aging and dying anxieties, but not for death anxiety. SNtD is an important construct, which is connected to various perceptions and anxieties concerning the aging and dying processes. Moreover, while high ageism mitigates the positive association between SNtD and certain anxieties, the role of ageism is more complicated, and its negative aspects are discussed.

  19. Deaths in construction related to personnel lifts, 1992-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This study examined deaths of construction workers due to personnel lifts (boom-supported and scissor lifts, suspended scaffolds, and crane platforms). Deaths of construction workers for 1992-1999 were examined using data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, a Bureau of Labor Statistics database. The study identified 339 deaths: 42% from boom-supported lifts; 26% from suspended scaffolds; 19% from scissor lifts; 5% from crane platforms; and 7% from unapproved lifts (e.g., forklift platforms). The main causes of death were falls (36%), collapses/tipovers (29%), and electrocutions (21%). Recommendations include: following OSHA regulations, wearing personal fall protection equipment, adequate maintenance, inspection before use, and training on the model of lift used. Precautions are also needed to prevent contact with overhead power lines. The increasing popularity of boom-supported lifts and scissor lifts, both in construction and other industries, make their safety an important issue.

  20. Uloma Doris Onuoha Abstract This study investigated attitude to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uloma1

    while the least used methods were the use of Cloud (e.g. Dropbox) and social bookmarking sites. A significant relationship was found to exist between attitude to plagiarism and personal information management behaviour. There was, however, no significant relationship between the level of study and attitude towards ...

  1. Staff and caregiver attitude to coercion in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raveesh, B.; Pathare, S.; Noorthoorn, E.; Gowda, G.; Lepping, P.; Bunders-Aelen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of Indian psychiatrists and caregivers toward coercion. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Psychiatry, Krishna Rajendra Hospital, Mysore, India. Staff Attitude to Coercion Scale (SACS), a 15-item

  2. Attitude toward Homosexuality and Attention to News about AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennamer, J. David; Honnold, Julie A.

    1995-01-01

    Finds that lower attention to news about AIDS was predicted by negative attitudes toward homosexuality, conservative AIDS policy attitudes, lower perceived risk of getting AIDS, in addition to being male, older, white, and better educated. Finds that the model predicted media attention better for men than for women. (SR)

  3. Assessing community attitudes to speed limits : final report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahausse, J. Nes, N. van Fildes, B. Langford, J. & Keall, M.

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative research study was undertaken in four Australian states to assess community attitudes towards current speed limits and to identify some of the reasons for these attitudes. An on-line web-based survey conducted in each state yielded a total of 4100 responses from mainly licensed

  4. Connection to Nature: Children's Affective Attitude toward Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Judith Chen-Hsuan; Monroe, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    A connection to nature index was developed and tested to measure children's affective attitude toward the natural environment. The index was employed through a survey that investigates students' attitude toward Lagoon Quest, a mandatory environmental education program for all fourth-grade, public school students in Brevard County, Florida. Factor…

  5. Concussion knowledge and return-to-play attitudes among subelite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the concussion knowledge and concussion-related RTP attitudes of subelite rugby union players in South Africa. Methods. ... employed to determine significant differences in concussion knowledge and RTP attitudes between previously concussed and non- .... kaans via the back-translation method.[18].

  6. Explicit- and implicit bullying attitudes in relation to bullying behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, A.A.J.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Wiers, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly

  7. Explicit- and Implicit Bullying Attitudes in Relation to Bullying Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goethem, A.A.J. van; Scholte, R.H.J.; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine whether an assessment of implicit bullying attitudes could add to the prediction of bullying behavior after controlling for explicit bullying attitudes. Primary school children (112 boys and 125 girls, M age = 11 years, 5 months) completed two newly

  8. Parental knowledge and attitude to children's eye care services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parental knowledge and attitude to children's eye care services. ... Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics ... Purpose: To find out parents knowledge and attitude towards eye examination and treatment for their children and the effect of demographic factors such as gender, age, educational status and number of children. Method: A ...

  9. Individual characteristics as correlates of attitudes to Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Positive attitudes to information technology (IT) among relevant stakeholders are an important precursor to the effective IT use at different levels of education. This paper presents the findings of a study that investigated the relationships between the individual characteristics of Nigerian university lecturers and their attitudes ...

  10. Secondary School Teachers' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Reactions to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaensens, Stefanie; Struyf, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study identifies teachers' beliefs about and attitudes toward stuttering and explores to what extent these beliefs and attitudes prompt specific teachers' reactions to the stuttering of a student. Method: Participants were teachers in secondary education in Flanders (Belgium), currently teaching an adolescent who stutters. They were…

  11. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    expression. Here, we examined receptor-mediated HR PCD responses in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg), and show that infection-induced lesions are contained in atg mutants. We also provide evidence that HR cell death initiated via Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR)-type immune receptors through...... the defense regulator EDS1 is suppressed in atg mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PCD triggered by coiled-coil (CC)-type immune receptors via NDR1 is either autophagy-independent or engages autophagic components with cathepsins and other unidentified cell death mediators. Thus, autophagic cell death......Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene...

  12. Attitudes of Women to Menopause: Implications for Counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause, a normal midlife transition for women remains poorly understood. This study examined the attitudes of women to menopause. A total of 300 married female teachers made up the sample for the study. Data was collected using the modified Attitude Towards Menopause (ATM) checklist. The responses of the ...

  13. Attitude Of Extension Personnel To Training And Visit Extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to make the attitudes of extension workers more affirmative, the paper recommended, inter alia, staff motivation, minimizing political and administrative interference in staff work and a reasonable reduction in the work load of extension staff. Key words: attitude, extension personnel, training and visit. Journal of ...

  14. Mass Counseling: Effective Tool to Improve Knowledge, Attitude and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mass Counseling: Effective Tool to Improve Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior Regarding Blood Donation. ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research ... and post‑counseling knowledge, attitude, and behavior (KAB) scores regarding blood donation were assessed using a pre‑tested semi‑structured questionnaire.

  15. Assessing Attitude to and Knowledge of Entrepreneurship among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated attitude and knowledge of secondary students with hearing impairment towards entrepreneurship. The main goal was to know the depth of their knowledge and attitude in becoming entrepreneurial in line with millennium development goals. A sample of 124 students with hearing impairment was ...

  16. The Structure and Implications of Children's Attitudes to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Paul; Attwood, Gaynor; Fuller, Carol; Last, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports a study of children's attitudes to school based on a questionnaire survey of 845 pupils in their first year of secondary school in England, together with interviews with a sample of the children. A clearly structured set of attitudes emerged from a factor analysis which showed a distinction between instrumental and affective…

  17. Using "Bad" Undergraduate Research to Foster "Good" Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Mary B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper postulates that having students engage in albeit limited and flawed research is a more effective way of changing attitudes than lecture or discussion. A common goal of the introductory linguistics course is to instill healthy language attitudes, but there is little extant research on the pedagogy of linguistics indicating how this may…

  18. The Relationship of Counselor Attitudes to Training and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael J.; Finley, Robert E.

    The Test of Counselor Attitudes (Porter) was administered to five groups representing different levels of counselor training and experience. Significant differences were found between the groups on all five of the counselor attitudes meased: (1) evaluative; (2) interpretive; (3) understanding; (4) supportive; and (5) probing. As students receive…

  19. Estonian and Russian Parental Attitudes to Childrearing and Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Aino; Niglas, Katrin

    2001-01-01

    Used Neukater and van der Kooji's parental attitude questionnaire to ask three groups of mothers (Estonian, non-Estonian in Estonia, Russians in Moscow) about their attitudes toward children's education and play. Found that Estonian mothers applied least control and that higher mother education resulted in less child control and instruction. (DLH)

  20. Investigating privacy attitudes and behavior in relation to personalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garde-Perik, E. van de; Markopoulos, P.; Ruyter, B.E.R. de; Eggen, B.; IJsselsteijn, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study of privacy-related attitudes and behaviors regarding a music recommender service based on two types of user modeling: personality traits and musical preferences. Contrary to prior expectations and attitudes reported by participants, personality traits are

  1. Pre-service accounting teachers' attitudes to mathematics | Mkhize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematics proficiency has an acknowledged impact on students' accounting grades. Success in this core business subject is dependent on students' mathematical aptitude, attitude and type of secondary schooling. Our study investigated accounting students' attitudes to mathematics on domains of the ...

  2. Nursing students' attitudes to biomedical science lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Modhefer, A K; Roe, S

    To explore what first-year nursing students believe to be the preferred characteristics of common foundation programme biomedical science lecturers, and to investigate whether students prefer active or passive learning. Survey and interview methodologies were used to explore the attitudes of a cohort of first-year nursing students at Queen's University Belfast. Questionnaires were distributed among 300 students. Individuals were asked to select five of a list of 14 criteria that they believed characterised the qualities of an effective lecturer. Informal interviews were carried out with five participants who were randomly selected from the sample to investigate which teaching methods were most beneficial in assisting their learning. Nursing students favoured didactic teaching and found interactivity in lectures intimidating. Students preferred to learn biomedical science passively and depended heavily on their instructors. In response to the survey, the authors propose a set of recommendations to enhance the learning process in large classes. This guidance includes giving clear objectives and requirements to students, encouraging active participation, and sustaining student interest through the use of improved teaching aids and innovative techniques.

  3. Pre-registration dietetic students' attitudes to learning communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, B T; Lennie, S C

    2012-04-01

      Communication is a core skill and a prerequisite for dietitians' clinical competence. It is generally acknowledged that communication skills can be taught and learned. There is a paucity of published work identifying dietetic students' attitudes towards learning communication skills, and understanding this is important.   The present cross-sectional study aimed to address this issue using an adapted version of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS), which was designed to capture information concerning positive and negative attitudes to learning communication skills. An online questionnaire was sent to all undergraduate and post-graduate dietetic programmes in the UK.   Of the students' solicited for enrolment in the study, 33.4% (n = 300) completed the questionnaire. A one-way analysis of variance showed attitudes to learning communication skills differed significantly between years of study on both subscales of the CSAS. Subsequent analyses indicated that first-year students' attitudes to learning communication skills were significantly more positive than those of fourth-year students (P = 0.042). Third-year students had significantly more positive attitudes to learning communication skills than fourth-year students (P = 0.028). Negative attitudes were also linked to the year of study with fourth-year students having significantly more negative attitudes than third-year students (P = 0.046). Sex, practice placement experience and parental occupation did not significantly influence attitudes to learning communication skills.   These findings indicate that efforts are required to maintain positive attitudes to learning communication skills. Further longitudinal studies are recommended in this respect. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  4. THE ATTITUDES OF ADOLESCENTS TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoljub Višnjić

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes of students towards Physical Education were determined by Mercer’s inventory of attitudes, which was modifi ed for research in primary schools and secondary schools. With the application of this inventory of attitudes we tried to determine the infl uence of school age on forming of students’ attitudes towards Physical Education. The specimen had 140 students which were divided into four sub specimens – according to the criterion of age. With the procedures of multivariant analysis there were signifi cant statistical differences between four classes, comparing six signs, evaluation of attitude to Physical Education. By the application of Roy’s test statistically signifi cant difference was determined between four classes in fi ve from six researched signs. By the procedures of discriminative analysis there were statistically signifi cant differences and clearly defi ned limits between four classes.

  5. The Right to Choose Life or Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Evan R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The right of terminally ill patients to decide whether they want to be kept alive by extraordinary means is discussed. Efforts of the Society for the Right to Die, including the living will, are described. (RM)

  6. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Death qualification and prejudice: the effect of implicit racism, sexism, and homophobia on capital defendants' right to due process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Brooke

    2007-01-01

    Two hundred venirepersons from the 12th Judicial Circuit in Bradenton, Florida completed the following measures: (1) one question that measured their level of support for the death penalty; (2) one question that categorized their death-qualification status; (3) 23 questions that measured their attitudes toward the death penalty (ATDP); (4) 22 questions that assessed their attitudes toward women (ATW); (5) 25 questions that measured their level of homophobia (H); (6) seven questions that assessed their level of modern racism (MR); (7) eight questions that measured their level of modern sexism (MS); and (8) standard demographic questions. Results indicated that as death-penalty support increased participants exhibited more positive attitudes toward the death penalty, more negative attitudes toward women, and higher levels of homophobia, modern racism, and modern sexism. Findings also suggested that death-qualified venirepersons exhibited more positive attitudes toward the death penalty and higher levels of homophobia, modern racism, and modern sexism. Finally, more positive attitudes toward the death penalty were correlated with more negative attitudes toward women and higher levels of homophobia, modern racism, and modern sexism. Legal implications are discussed. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Using poison center exposure calls to predict methadone poisoning deaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabarun Dasgupta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There are more drug overdose deaths in the Untied States than motor vehicle fatalities. Yet the US vital statistics reporting system is of limited value because the data are delayed by four years. Poison centers report data within an hour of the event, but previous studies suggested a small proportion of poisoning deaths are reported to poison centers (PC. In an era of improved electronic surveillance capabilities, exposure calls to PCs may be an alternate indicator of trends in overdose mortality. METHODS: We used PC call counts for methadone that were reported to the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS® System in 2006 and 2007. US death certificate data were used to identify deaths due to methadone. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship of deaths and poison center calls. RESULTS: Compared to decedents, poison center callers tended to be younger, more often female, at home and less likely to require medical attention. A strong association was found with PC calls and methadone mortality (b=0.88, se=0.42, t=9.5, df=1, p<0.0001, R(2 =0.77. These findings were robust to large changes in a sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of underreporting of methadone overdose deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that calls to poison centers for methadone are correlated with poisoning mortality as identified on death certificates. Calls received by poison centers may be used for timely surveillance of mortality due to methadone. In the midst of the prescription opioid overdose epidemic, electronic surveillance tools that report in real-time are powerful public health tools.

  9. Exposure to Death, Disasters, and Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    this series Individual and Group Behavior in Toxic and Contained Environments Performance and Operations in Toxic Environments Individual Response to...kinds of things to get a picture. People tried to come in with fake press passes and bogus credentials. QUESTION: Is Dover accustomed to working with...would be oysters on the half shell on the airplanes together with gin and vodka . The NCOs had a problem with that. When the crew gets wild they really

  10. Public deaths and the right to die

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    supporting doctors practising voluntary euthanasia, accept that rational thinking is a central requirement in competence to make end of life decisions.4 This being the case, respect for autonomy should guide actions. From a psychiatric perspec- tive, unqualified acceptance of a right to die raises the spectre of complicity in ...

  11. The right to death. Fiction or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucan Maria Casandra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article is part of a dense literature – result of a perennial debate – that has polarized societies for a long time and has evident reverberations in the present. It deals with “the right to death”, trying to offer some answers referring to its existence in fact and the way in which it is perceived by different states and diverse entities with juridical nature. In the first part of the paper, it is insisted upon the right to life, so that subsequently, to speak in detail about a “right to death” and the moral and juridical implications of using such phrases. There are analyzed different states of the world found on one part or the other of the barricade in what concerns the legality of euthanasia and assisted suicide – considered the two hypostasis of the right in question. It is offered, as well, an analysis of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, mentioning that, paradoxically, while it cannot be modified so that it allows the appearance of some new rights, it can tacitly accept the creation by some states that have adhered to it of some rights antagonistic with those presented in its text. The conclusion, is that not any liberalization movement of a social action – quantified through the request of a right – has as a direct result a progress of the respective society, especially when the action creates something diametrically opposed to some fundamental functioning norms, such as, by excellence, the granting of the protection of life of all individuals.

  12. Death and Death Anxiety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    .... In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual...

  13. DAMPs from death to new life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie eVénéreau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Our body handles tissue damage by activating the immune system in response to intracellularmolecules released by injured tissues (Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns, DAMPs, in a similar way as it detects molecular motifs conserved in pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs. DAMPs are molecules that have a physiological role inside the cell, but acquire additional functions when they are released outside the cell: they alert the body about danger, stimulate an inflammatory response, and finally promote the regeneration process. Beside their passive release by dead cells, some DAMPs can be secreted or exposed by living cells undergoing a life-threatening stress. DAMPs have been linked to inflammation and related disorders: hence, inhibition of DAMP-mediated inflammatory responses is a promising strategy to improve the clinical management of infection- and injury-elicited inflammatory diseases. However, it is important to consider that DAMPs are not only danger signals but also central players in tissue repair. Indeed, some DAMPs have been studied for their role in tissue healing after sterile or infection-associated inflammation. This review is focused on two exemplary DAMPs, HMGB1 and ATP, and their contribution to both inflammation and tissue repair.

  14. Students' Attitudes to Paper Consumption in relation to Carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' Attitudes to Paper Consumption in Relation to Carbon Emissions global warming, climate change, carbon sinks and sustainable development. In contrast to the high levels of awareness of the concepts of greenhouse gases, carbon footprint and climate change, relatively few (29% and 36%) reported knowing a lot ...

  15. Students' Attitudes to Paper Consumption in relation to Carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact, in relation to carbon emissions, of electronic course document use and attitudes to paper consumption levels among third- and fifth-year environmental engineering students (N = 78) enrolled in two courses during the 2015/2016 academic year at the. Copperbelt University ...

  16. Influence of Access to Media Resources on Adolescents' Attitude to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of adolescents' access to media resources on attitude to sexual and reproductive health. The survey research design was adopted while the questionnaire was. used as the major instrument of data collection. Sixty copies of questionnaire were administered to the adolescents that were ...

  17. Learning Economics and Attitudes to Market Solutions to Environmental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Niklas; Davies, Peter; Lundholm, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Climate change challenges governments to reduce emissions, and to gain support for such actions from their citizens. This can be in the form of taxation or legislation, or other forms of government interventions. In previous research, several instruments have been developed to capture attitudes towards the roles of markets and governments in the…

  18. The Campbell paradigm as a conceptual alternative to the expectation of hypocrisy in contemporary attitude research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Florian G; Byrka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Hypocrisy-professing a general attitude without implementing corresponding attitude-relevant behavior-is, according to Ajzen and Fishbein (2005), commonly found in attitude research that aims to explain individual behavior. We conducted two studies that adopted the Campbell paradigm, an alternative to the traditional understanding of attitudes. In a laboratory experiment, we found that specific attitude-relevant cooperation in a social dilemma was a function of people's pre-existing general environmental attitude. In a quasi-experiment, we corroborated the reverse as well; engagement in attitude-relevant dietary practices was indicative of environmental attitude. When using Campbellian attitude measures, there is no room for hypocrisy: People put their general attitudes into specific attitude-relevant practices, and differences in people's general attitudes can be derived from their attitude-relevant behavior.

  19. Microteaching: From Infant Death to Immortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian K.

    A general introduction to the concept of microteaching and its development is presented, and the generally accepted format and the skills practiced for microteaching are described. Aspects of microteaching commonly perceived as favorable and unfavorable are addressed, and a review of current research is provided and followed by a discussion of the…

  20. Parental Grief Response to Perinatal Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne Clarke; Borgers, Sherry B.

    1989-01-01

    Examined grief responses of parents suffering perinatal loss and explored effects of gender, type of loss, time since loss, number of losses, and subsequent pregnancy on grief response. Responses to Grief Experience Inventory from 176 such parents revealed subjects suffering grief. Grief response was affected by subjects' perception that loss was…

  1. Brain death: from inflammation to metabolic changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebolledo Acevedo, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation is an excellent opportunity for patients with end-stage organ failure. However, the number of patients that are still on the waiting list indicates the necessity to increase the number of organs suitable for transplantation. Most organs for transplantation are retrieved from

  2. Thanatophobia (Death Anxiety) in the Elderly: The Problem of the Child's Inability to Assess Their Own Parent's Death Anxiety State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinoff, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Thanatophobia is omnipresent in our lives. Research has shown separate but connected constructs: fear of death or fear of the dying process. The influences on death anxiety are varied including religiosity, gender, psychological state, and age. It is often assumed by the children of the elderly that the fear of death is prevalent in their parents. Daily the medical staff encounters the presence of death anxiety: from family members or the staff itself. In order to understand this phenomenon, a three-tier study was conducted on non-terminal elderly inpatients in an acute geriatric care ward. The study showed that the elderly had low levels of anxiety (scoring 4/15 on Templer's Death Anxiety Scale) but their children scored higher for themselves (6.9/15) and for their parents (8.9/15). A regression model showed that only the presence of generalized anxiety and religiosity of parent had an effect explaining 33.6% of the variance. Death anxiety of death is usually absent in the elderly but rather they fear the dying process. On the other hand, their children do fear death, which they extrapolate onto their parents. This causes conflicts since the children prevent disclosure of relevant medical information to their parents. This has to be addressed by the staff when dealing with family members, to allow open and honest communication with their patients. The staff need to explain to the family that the elderly are not afraid of death but of the suffering from the dying process.

  3. Death to perturbative QCD in exclusive processes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckardt, R.; Hansper, J.; Gari, M.F. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Bochum (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The authors discuss the question of whether perturbative QCD is applicable in calculations of exclusive processes at available momentum transfers. They show that the currently used method of determining hadronic quark distribution amplitudes from QCD sum rules yields wave functions which are completely undetermined because the polynomial expansion diverges. Because of the indeterminacy of the wave functions no statement can be made at present as to whether perturbative QCD is valid. The authors emphasize the necessity of a rigorous discussion of the subject and the importance of experimental data in the range of interest.

  4. Judicial attitude to environmental litigation and access to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines judicial attitude to environmental litigation and access to environmental justice in Nigeria. The paper employs expository analysis as its methodology in discussing the theme. Essentially, the paper finds that environmental litigations in Nigeria are bedeviled by legal technicalities such that victims of ...

  5. DeepDeath: Learning to predict the underlying cause of death with Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid Reza; Ying Sha; Wang, May D

    2017-07-01

    Multiple cause-of-death data provides a valuable source of information that can be used to enhance health standards by predicting health related trajectories in societies with large populations. These data are often available in large quantities across U.S. states and require Big Data techniques to uncover complex hidden patterns. We design two different classes of models suitable for large-scale analysis of mortality data, a Hadoop-based ensemble of random forests trained over N-grams, and the DeepDeath, a deep classifier based on the recurrent neural network (RNN). We apply both classes to the mortality data provided by the National Center for Health Statistics and show that while both perform significantly better than the random classifier, the deep model that utilizes long short-term memory networks (LSTMs), surpasses the N-gram based models and is capable of learning the temporal aspect of the data without a need for building ad-hoc, expert-driven features.

  6. Deaths of the elderly exposed to violence in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Haluk; Aliustaoglu, Suheyla; Yazici, Yüksel; Ince, Nurhan

    2008-06-01

    Due to the socio-cultural and demographical changes that have been taking place in Turkey, differences in types of violence are coming on the scene. The purpose of the present study is to reveal the number of violence deaths and the variation by time in the types of violence resulting in death in the elderly of ages 65 and above in Turkey. Using a retrospective (descriptive) epidemiological method, this study was carried out with 1,326 subjects of ages 65 and above among 17,015 criminal autopsies between years 1996-2001. According to the crime scene investigations, the percentage of deaths caused by firearm injuries increased to 4.0% in 2001 from 1.9% in 1994. The dispersion of the subjects according to autopsy findings were pathologically caused death (32.3%), negative autopsy (20.3%), general body trauma (20.1%) and hanging (6.3%). Changes in the rates of deaths caused by cutting/piercing tool injuries are 1.9% and 4.3%, respectively. Regulations are needed to reinforce and financially support the family, to secure humanely life standards for the elderly, and to ensure homecare to an optimum extent.

  7. Religious characteristics and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Monica K; Hayward, R David

    2008-04-01

    Using one mock trial scenario, this study investigated whether religious and demographic factors were related to death penalty attitudes and sentencing verdicts. Those who favored the death penalty differed from those who had doubts about the penalty in gender, affiliation, fundamentalism, evangelism, literal Biblical interpretism, beliefs about God's attitudes toward murders, and perceptions of how their religious groups felt about the death penalty. These relationships generally held after mock jurors were death qualified. Gender, fundamentalism, literal interpretism, beliefs about God's death penalty position, and perceptions of how one's religious group felt about the death penalty predicted death penalty sentencing verdicts. Future research could determine whether using peremptory challenges to exclude potential jurors based on religion can help lawyers choose a more favorable jury.

  8. Learning Economics and Attitudes to Market Solutions to Environmental Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Harring

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change challenges governments to reduce emissions, and to gain support for such actions from their citizens. This can be in the form of taxation or legislation, or other forms of government interventions. In previous research, several instruments have been developed to capture attitudes towards the roles of markets and governments in the economy. Some of these instruments have assumed that respondents will have the same attitude towards the role of markets and governments, regardless of the context (e.g., welfare, environment, health or the form of government intervention (law, taxation, subsidy, spending etc.. However, these studies have not examined attitudes towards, or belief in, the efficacy of government intervention in markets, through microeconomic policies on taxation (e.g., duties levied on particular products or subsidies. This paper reports on the results of taking such a specific focus, that is, investigating economics students’ knowledge of, and attitudes towards, government interventions in markets, specifically addressing the problem of climate change. We make use of unique, two-wave longitudinal data from Swedish university students. The data were collected during their initial semester at the university. The first data collection was performed at the beginning of the semester, August/September 2014, and the second wave of data collection was performed in December/January 2014/2015, at the end of the semester. We were able to match 414 students between the first and second survey. The results show that students of economics change their policy attitudes and become more knowledgeable in economics. After one semester, they are more likely to think of economic instruments/incentives (taxes and subsidies as good and efficient policy instruments, and less likely to think that other instruments (regulation and information are good and efficient policy instruments. However, further analyses show that knowledgeable students do

  9. Death due to Occupational Accident a Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Bütün

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Today's rapid technological developments increase, also the risks to worker's health and work safety. Occupational accidents occurred with reasons such as necessary safety measures in work environment, incorrect behavior, inability on personal skills, technical failures result in bodily injury, loss of labor, disability or death. In this study; two male death cases aged 27 and 39 occured as a result of work accident in the area at the chrome mines were discussed. On the cases, physical examination, forensic autopsy and post-mortem examinations were performed. Event-related findings are similar; the cases were evaluated, together. It was determined that, respectively, cyanotic appearance on facial area and the front of the neck, the hyperemia on the sclera during external body examinations; in places punctuated hemorrhages under the skin and on the visceral organs' surfaces during the autopsies; hemorrhage in subarachoidal area of the brain, hemorrhage on pleural areas of the lungs, sub-mucosal bleeding and congestion in the stomach during the post-mortem histopathology. Finally, the death cause of cases was due to lack of oxygen. In this study; also taking into account of work accident related injuries and deaths seen hight rates in our country, the determination of personal, socio-economic and enviromental factors and, the importance of taking the necessary measures for prevention of occupational accident were emphasized. Also, it aimed to be discussed forensic medical approach to occupational injuriy cases in the literature. Key Word: Forensic medicine, Work accident, Asphyxia, Death, Autopsy.

  10. Explaining consumer attitudes to genetic modification in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    Consumers have not had many possibilities yet for seeking out, buying and consuming genetically modified food products. However, for various reasons consumer attitude formation with regard to these products is likely to be complex and closely related to personal values. The paper presents a model...... for explaining consumer attitudes to genetic modification in food production which builds on modern cognitive psychology and multi-attribute attitude theory. In addition, the paper introduces the empirical research which is undertaken at present to validate and estimate the parameters of the model by means...

  11. Drug attitude and adherence to anti-glaucoma medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samin; Kang, Sung Yong; Yoon, Jong Uk; Kang, Uicheon; Seong, Gong Je; Kim, Chan Yun

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess patient attitudes towards anti-glaucoma medication and their association with adherence, visual quality of life, and personality traits. One hundred and forty-seven glaucoma patients were enrolled this study. The participants were divided into 'pharmacophobic' and 'pharmacophilic' groups according to their scores on the Modified Glaucoma Drug Attitude Inventory (MG-DAI). To establish a correlation with patient drug attitude, each group had their subjective drug adherence, visual quality of life, and personality traits examined. For personality traits, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was used to sub-classify each group. Among the patients analyzed, 91 (72.80%) patients showed a 'pharmacophobic' attitude and 34 (27.20%) patients showed a 'pharmacophilic' attitude. The pharmacophobic group tended to have worse adherence than the pharmacophilic group. Personality dichotomies from the MBTI also showed different patterns for each group. In glaucoma patients, pharmacological adherence was influenced by their attitude towards drugs; an association might exist between drug attitude and underlying personality traits.

  12. Reaction on Twitter to a Cluster of Perinatal Deaths: A Mixed Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Sarah; Cussen, Leanne; Greene, Richard A; O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2016-07-27

    Participation in social networking sites is commonplace and the micro-blogging site Twitter can be considered a platform for the rapid broadcasting of news stories. The aim of this study was to explore the Twitter status updates and subsequent responses relating to a number of perinatal deaths which occurred in a small maternity unit in Ireland. An analysis of Twitter status updates, over a two month period from January to March 2014, was undertaken to identify the key themes arising in relation to the perinatal deaths. Our search identified 3577 tweets relating to the reported perinatal deaths. At the height of the controversy, Twitter updates generated skepticism in relation to the management of not only of the unit in question, which was branded as unsafe, but also the governance of the entire Irish maternity service. Themes of concern and uncertainty arose whereby the professional motives of the obstetric community and staffing levels in the maternity services were called into question. Twitter activity provides a useful insight into attitudes towards health-related events. The role of the media in influencing opinion is well-documented and this study underscores the challenges that clinicians face in light of an obstetric media scandal. Further study to identify how the obstetric community could develop tools to utilize Twitter to disseminate valid health information could be beneficial.

  13. Reaction on Twitter to a Cluster of Perinatal Deaths: A Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in social networking sites is commonplace and the micro-blogging site Twitter can be considered a platform for the rapid broadcasting of news stories. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the Twitter status updates and subsequent responses relating to a number of perinatal deaths which occurred in a small maternity unit in Ireland. Methods An analysis of Twitter status updates, over a two month period from January to March 2014, was undertaken to identify the key themes arising in relation to the perinatal deaths. Results Our search identified 3577 tweets relating to the reported perinatal deaths. At the height of the controversy, Twitter updates generated skepticism in relation to the management of not only of the unit in question, which was branded as unsafe, but also the governance of the entire Irish maternity service. Themes of concern and uncertainty arose whereby the professional motives of the obstetric community and staffing levels in the maternity services were called into question. Conclusions Twitter activity provides a useful insight into attitudes towards health-related events. The role of the media in influencing opinion is well-documented and this study underscores the challenges that clinicians face in light of an obstetric media scandal. Further study to identify how the obstetric community could develop tools to utilize Twitter to disseminate valid health information could be beneficial. PMID:27466002

  14. CONSUMERS’ BEHAVIOURS RELATED TO PACKAGING AND THEIR ATTITUDES TOWARDS ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Jeżewska-Zychowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to establish the relationship between the attitude of consumers towards the environment and their behaviours when choosing food products taking into consideration their packaging. This relationship was established according to gender, age and the educational level of the consumers. Questionnaire study was carried out in 2010 within 548 adults from Warsaw. Participants were asked questions on attitudes towards environment and behaviours related to reduction of packaging waste. Frequency, factor and cluster analysis were used. Signifi cantly more women than men agreed that buying pro ducts in larger packages and beverages in glass bottles can reduce the amount of garbage. Over twice more people with positive attitude claimed not buying food in disposable plastic or paper packaging. Negative attitude fostered doing nothing to minimize waste packaging. Attitudes towards the environment have had signifi - cant impact on the choice of food packaging. More positive attitudes favoured the reduction of the amount of packaging waste. Thus, environmental campaigns focused on attitudes and environmentally relevant use of food packing are required.

  15. Nuclear death: an unprecedented challenge to psychiatry and religion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The growing danger of a nuclear holocaust has intensified two aspects of the human predicament that concern both religion and psychiatry: the inevitability of death and the disastrous consequences of the characteristic termed pride by theologians and narcissism by psychiatrists. For the first time, humans have power to exterminate themselves and death threatens all ages equally. Pride of power causes leaders to exaggerate their ability to control nuclear weapons; moral pride leads to demonizing enemies. The author considers implications for psychiatrists and clergy, with special reference to preventing a nuclear holocaust.

  16. [Maternal deaths due to infectious cause, results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigouzzo, A; Tessier, V; Zieleskiewicz, L

    2017-12-01

    Over the period 2010-2012, maternal mortality from infectious causes accounted for 5% of maternal deaths by direct causes and 16% of maternal deaths by indirect causes. Among the 22 deaths caused by infection occurred during this period, 6 deaths were attributed to direct causes from genital tract origin, confirming thus the decrease in direct maternal deaths by infection during the last ten years. On the contrary, indirect maternal deaths by infection, from extragenital origin, doubled during the same period, with 16 deaths in the last triennium, dominated by winter respiratory infections, particularly influenza: the 2009-2010 influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic was the leading cause of indirect maternal mortality by infection during the studied period. The main infectious agents involved in maternal deaths from direct causes were Streptococcus A, Escherichia Coli and Clostridium perfringens: these bacterias were responsible for toxic shock syndrome, severe sepsis, secondary in some cases to cellulitis or necrotizing fasciitis. Of the 6 deaths due to direct infection, 4 were considered avoidable because of inadequate management: delayed or missed diagnosis, delayed or inadequate initiation of a specific medical and/or surgical treatment. Of the 16 indirect maternal deaths due to infection causes, the most often involved infectious agents were influenza A (H1N1) virus and Streptococcus pneumonia with induced purpura fulminans: the absence of influenza vaccination during pregnancy, delayed diagnosis and emergency initiation of a specific treatment, were the main contributory factors to these deaths and their avoidability in 70% of the cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Lethality by pneumonia and factors associated to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sidnei; Sant'anna, Clemax C; March, Maria de Fátima B P; Santos, Marilene Augusta R C; Cunha, Antonio Jose Ledo A

    2014-01-01

    To describe the case-fatality rate (CFR) and risk factors of death in children with community-acquired acute pneumonia (CAP) in a pediatric university hospital. A longitudinal study was developed with prospective data collected from 1996 to 2011. Patients aged 1 month to 12 years were included in the study. Those who left the hospital against medical orders and those transferred to ICU or other units were excluded. Demographic and clinical-etiological characteristics and the initial treatment were studied. Variables associated to death were determined by bivariate and multivariate analysis using logistic regression. A total of 871 patients were selected, of whom 11 were excluded; thus 860 children were included in the study. There were 26 deaths, with a CFR of 3%; in 58.7% of these, penicillin G was the initial treatment. Pneumococcus was the most common pathogen (50.4%). From 1996 to 2000, there were 24 deaths (93%), with a CFR of 5.8% (24/413). From 2001 to 2011, the age group of hospitalized patients was older (p = 0.03), and the number of deaths (p = 0.02) and the percentage of disease severity were lower (p = 0.06). Only disease severity remained associated to death in the multivariate analysis (OR = 3.2; 95%CI: 1.2-8.9; p = 0.02). When the 1996-2000 and 2001-2011 periods were compared, a significant reduction in CFR was observed in the latter, as well as a change in the clinical profile of the pediatric inpatients at the institute. These findings may be related to the improvement in the socio-economical status of the population. Penicillin use did not influence CFR. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Lethality by pneumonia and factors associated to death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the case-fatality rate (CFR and risk factors of death in children with community-acquired acute pneumonia (CAP in a pediatric university hospital. METHOD: A longitudinal study was developed with prospective data collected from 1996 to 2011. Patients aged 1 month to 12 years were included in the study. Those who left the hospital against medical orders and those transferred to ICU or other units were excluded. Demographic andclinical-etiological characteristics and the initial treatment were studied. Variables associated to death were determined by bivariate and multivariate analysis using logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 871 patients were selected, of whom 11 were excluded; thus 860 children were included in the study. There were 26 deaths, with a CFR of 3%; in 58.7% of these, penicillin G was the initial treatment. Pneumococcus was the most common pathogen (50.4%. From 1996 to 2000, there were 24 deaths (93%, with a CFR of 5.8% (24/413. From 2001 to 2011, the age group of hospitalized patients was older (p = 0.03, and the number of deaths (p = 0.02 and the percentage of disease severity were lower (p = 0.06. Only disease severity remained associated to death in the multivariate analysis (OR = 3.2; 95%CI: 1.2-8.9; p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: When the 1996-2000 and 2001-2011 periods were compared, a significant reduction in CFR was observed in the latter, as well as a change in the clinical profile of the pediatric in patients at the institute. These findings may be related to the improvement in the socio-economical status of the population. Penicillin use did not influence CFR.

  19. Talking about Death: Implementing Peer Discussion as a Coping Mechanism to Overcome Fears about Dissection, Death, and Dying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, Sanet Henriet; Mole, Calvin Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported on the perceptions of medical students toward dissection. It is important to understand the feelings and symptoms experienced during dissection so that they can be adequately handled. Prior to dissection, first year students are given lectures on aspects of dissection, death and dying, and death rituals in various…

  20. Attitudes of employees toward offenders sentenced to community service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether alternative penalties served by offenders in the community will be successful can also largely depend on the general attitudes in the workplace where the offender will be serving his penalty. This study, conducted in Belgrade, Serbia, was aimed to determine the inclination and factor structure of attitudes towards offenders and ex-offenders, and their correlation with the respondents' age and education. The sample consisted of men from the general population (N=78, employed in companies where offenders serve community sentence. The study also considers the association between attitudes and the age and education of the respondents. The Scale for Attitudes toward Prisoners and Ex-Prisoners was used in the study. Research results showed that the respondents in general had positive attitude toward offenders. On the Scale of Attitudes, a statement 'I would socialize with a person who is on parole from prison' had the highest frequency, with which 44.90% of respondents 'mostly agree' (MOD=4. With most negatively formulated statements, the frequency of statements 'I strongly agree' is low, ranging from 7,70% to 15.60%. Factor analysis of the attitude scale indicated three respectable factors which were named: Rejection, Trust, and Perception of Penalty. The correlation between the demographic variables of age and education, and the expressed attitudes shows there was no significant correlation (p=0.93; p=0.86. The findings of the study have an important impact on practical psychosocial issues, such as that of preparing the community to accept offenders serving alternative punishments, as well as theoretical questions regarding the understanding of the structure, cause, origin, function, and form of attitudes toward offenders.

  1. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Neitemeier

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by Xc- inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death.

  2. [Maternal deaths due to hypertensive disorders. Results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, M; Weber, P; Zieleskiewicz, L

    2017-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012, the rate of maternal death caused by hypertensive disorders (0,5/100,000 living birth) was reduced by 50% compared to the 2007-2009 period. Hypertensive disorders were responsible from 5% of maternal deaths and from 10% of direct maternal mortality. Eleven deaths happened during the postpartum period but 9 hypertensive complications began before delivery. Seventy percent of these deaths seem to be avoidable. The main causes of suboptimal management were: unappropriated or insufficient obstetrical and anesthetic treatments, undiagnosed HELLP syndrome and subcapsular liver hematoma, delayed treatment. The analysis of these maternal deaths gave the opportunity to stress some major lessons to optimize medical management in case of hypertensive diseases during pregnancy: abdominal symptoms during third trimester of pregnancy lead to search hypertensive disorders; HELLP syndrome with severe anemia indicate to carry out abdominal ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Toward Death Integration: Implications for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombana, Judy H.

    1979-01-01

    Counselors need to develop knowledge of the death process and examine their own attitudes. Then they can assist the terminally ill person to develop appropriate coping mechanisms. They can help families to express grief, progress through mourning, and restructure the family system. Finally, they can develop death education programs. (Author)

  4. Predicting counseling psychologists attitudes and clinical judgments with respect to older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Jody K; Munley, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine age, gender, training and experience in aging issues, fear of death, and multicultural competence in predicting counseling psychologists' global attitudes toward older adults and specific clinical judgments concerning a case vignette of an older client. A national sample of 364 practicing counseling psychologists participated in the study. Participants completed a demographic measure, Polizzi's refined version of the Aging Semantic Differential (Polizzi, 2003 ), a survey of professional bias based on a clinical vignette of a 70-year-old woman (James & Haley, 1995), the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale 3.0 (Lester, & Abdel-Khalek, 2003), the Multicultural Counseling Knowledge and Awareness Scale (MCKAS; Ponterotto, Gretchen, Utsey, Rieger, & Austin, 2002), and a Training and Experience Questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to investigate the extent to which the selected variables predicted more favorable attitudes toward older adults and less professional bias toward an older client beyond prediction by age and gender. Results revealed that older age and higher total scores on the MCKAS predicted less professional bias in clinical judgments. Gender was a significant predictor of global attitudes toward older adults. Findings suggest that multicultural knowledge, awareness, and skills are important in working with older adults.

  5. Knowledge, attitudes and acceptability to provider-initiated HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    numerical Unstructured Data Indexing and Theorizing (NUDIST) software. Knowledge about PITC services was generally low. Compared to men, women had a more positive attitude towards PITC services, because of its ability to identify and ...

  6. A Scale to Measure Attitude Toward Smoking Marihuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Raymond J.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the construction and validity of a scale to measure student attitudes toward marihuana. The scale could be used as a means to select the best presentation for drug education in schools. (KH)

  7. Case Report: Early Neonatal Death Due To Liver Rupture Caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An early neonatal death due to liver to liver rupture caused by maternal abdominal manipulation and massage is presented. An apparently health baby girl was born to 26 years old primigravida who came in the second state of labour and deliver of her baby within eight minutes of arrival to the labour ward. Her labour lasted ...

  8. The importance of studies of beliefs and attitudes to sociolinguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Botassini, Jacqueline Ortelan Maia; Universidade Estadual de Maringá

    2015-01-01

    Studies related to the theme “Linguistics Beliefs and Attitudes” have shown paths to Sociolinguistics to understand issues that may be related to certain linguistic attitudes manifested by a group or by a speaking community. In the whole society, the differences of “power” existent among distinct social groups may be realized through the linguistic variation and through attitudes towards these variations. Normally, the standards of language use of the dominant group are referred to as necessa...

  9. Student body diversity: relationship to medical students' experiences and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Gretchen; Chang, Mitchell J; Wilkerson, LuAnn

    2007-10-01

    Multiple studies of undergraduate college students have demonstrated the effects of cross-cultural interaction and exposure to diverse ideas on a variety of educational outcomes. The current study was designed to extend this work into medical education, examining student body diversity and school-supported cross-cultural experiences on students' attitudes about diversity. Four-hundred forty-one rising fourth-year medical students from three schools with differing levels of student body diversity completed a 55-item questionnaire on their background, experiences, and attitudes related to cross-cultural diversity. Medical students' attitudes about culture and health and their perspectives on societal issues related to diversity were influenced by their medical school experiences. Informal instructional interactions seem to have been most influential in shaping these beliefs. The opportunity for students from diverse backgrounds to interact as part of the curriculum is an important means of promoting positive attitudes toward diversity in educational and social environments.

  10. Reasons for Unwillingness of Libyans to Donate Organs After Death ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Organ transplantation in Libya depends exclusively on donations from live relatives. This limitation increases mortality and prolongs the patients' suffering and waiting time. Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore willingness to donate organs after death and to identify the reasons for refusal. Methods: ...

  11. Death Concern and the Helping Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Janet; Garlie, Norman W.

    The authors rewiew the literature on the current state of training for health professionals to cope with death and dying. They also comment on recent changes in cultural attitudes toward death. Representatives of the helping professions (counselors, teachers, nurses, doctors, clergy, social workers) should be better prepared to help people deal…

  12. The Night-Death binomial as a poetic ploy - a cross-cultural look from the graveyard poets to expressionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioba Simon-Schuhmacher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The essay describes the use of the Night-Death binomial and tracks its evolution from the eighteenth century to Expressionism across Great Britain, Germany, Spain, and Austria, at the hand of poems such as Edward Young’s Night Thoughts (1745, Novalis’s Hymnen an die Nacht, (1800, José Blanco White’s sonnet “Night and Death” (1828, and Georg Trakl’s “Verwandlung des Bösen” (1914. Romanticism brought along a preference for the nocturnal: night, moonlight, shades and shadows, mist and mystery, somber mood, morbidity, and death, as opposed to the Enlightenment’s predilection for day, light, clarity, and life. The essay analyses how poets from different national contexts and ages employ images and symbols of the night to create an association with death. It furthermore shows how, with varying attitudes and results, they manage to convert this binomial into a poetic ploy.

  13. Adolescent Deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Tüzün

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to find out the examination of adolescent deaths included in forensic cases and the effects of behavior peculiarities of this period on the cause and origin of deaths. 564 cases aged 11-20 years autopsied at the Morgue Department of İstanbul, Turkey in 1994-96 were examined. In 534 cases, the cause of death was determined and included in the study, but 26 cases left outside of this study because the cause of death was not determined. The 76.8 percent of the 538 cases was males and 23.2 percent was females. Accidental deaths(%4l.3 occupied the majority of the adolescent deaths. Homicidal deaths(%36.2 and suicidal deaths (%17.6 were the other origins of deaths. Manner of death'was not determined in 25 cases. Unnatural deaths (%93-l were found to be the most common cause of death. Firearm deaths (%18.4 occupied the majority of all unnatural deaths. The following causes of unnatural deaths were stab and incised wounds (%14.8 and hanging (%13.6. The results demonstrated that the causes of adolescent deaths in forensic cases almost reflected the violence based behavior pecularities of this age group. Key Words: Child, Adolescent, Violence, Death.

  14. Young Australians’ Attitudes to the Military and Military Service

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Wadham; Grace Skrzypiec; Phillip Slee

    2014-01-01

    What are young Australians’ understandings of, and attitudes to, the military and military service? This article describes a pilot study of 320 young Australian university students’ attitudes to the military and military service during a time when Australia was engaged in the Afghanistan war. The main purpose of this study was to develop a survey instrument for further work in researching civil–military relations in Au...

  15. Assessment of the knowledge, attitude and practices related to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the knowledge, attitude and practices related to the treatment and prevention of lymphatic filariasis among the adult residents of Bokkos local government area of Plateau state, Nigeria.

  16. Healthcare Professionals' Attitudes to Rehabilitation Programming for Male Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Midtgaard, Julie; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe and interpret the attitudes and conduct of hospital healthcare professionals (HCPs) in association with male cancer survivors and their municipal rehabilitation participation. Design: Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted, consisting of participant...

  17. Generalization of positive and negative attitudes towards individuals to outgroup attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stark, Tobias; Flache, Andreas; Veenstra, René

    The generalization of attitudes toward individual outgroup members into attitudes toward the outgroup as a whole can affect intergroup relations. However, little is known about the relative strengths of the generalization of negative and positive interpersonal attitudes into attitudes about the

  18. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, FY 1983. Special Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This report describes research programs focusing on the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and indicates some presently available results. Specific attention is given to research on sleep apnea, respiratory control, and hypoxia, as well as to infectious disease processes and immunology. Findings of a large-scale multidisciplinary SIDS project are…

  19. The death of Philosophy: A response to Stephen Hawking | Scott ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indeed, Hawking's appeal to multiverse theory and his core discussion of the metaphysical problem of being are philosophical. The question of the death of Philosophy has contemporary relevance for the discipline which is particularly under threat for its survival in the academy, oftentimes assumed to be irrelevant.

  20. Mitochondria can Power Cells to Life and Death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    apoptosis. Failed apoptosis may give rise to cancer, whereas excessive cell death may result in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease and many others. (Table 2). A number of agents, including those of viral origin, have been found to inhibit the process of apoptosis (Table 3).

  1. Death is not the only healthcare outcome important to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, John

    2016-07-01

    Unfortunately throughout history there have been wide variations in the way death has been handled by the medical profession in different times and places, and even today within the same hospital there are big difference between what doctors say they do and what actually happens. It is not currently possible to determine when severely ill patients become irreversibly unsalvageable and when attempts at resuscitation after death are futile. Without this knowledge it is impossible to honestly advise patients and their loved ones. There is little data available to show what proportions of patients are less sick or feel better on discharge from hospital than they were on admission and no robust systems for predicting such outcomes. Death is not the only healthcare outcome important to patients. Regaining or preserving health is the ultimate goal for patients, yet most hospital outcomes are reported only in terms of mortality. Developing models that predict a good clinical outcome may be more clinically useful than those that predict death. Patients are more likely to want to know their chances of getting better than their chances of dying. Also expressing treatment options in terms of its benefits (i.e. the chance of getting better) versus the risks (i.e. the chances the treatment will kill you) may be far more acceptable to patients than providing their risks versus the chance that they are going to die anyway. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intrauterine foetal death in multiple gestation: to conserve or intervene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrauterine foetal death in multiple gestation: to conserve or intervene. F.A. Ogutu, N.A. Shatry, M Kilonzo, R.J. Kosgei, A.B. Kihara. Abstract. There is an increasing incidence of higher order gestations especially due to fertility treatments, associated with higher morbidity and mortality. This is a case of a primigravida with ...

  3. Religion and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia and physician assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-05-01

    In this review of empirical studies we aimed to assess the influence of religion and world view on nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. We searched PubMed for articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Most identified studies showed a clear relationship between religion or world view and nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. Differences in attitude were found to be influenced by religious or ideological affiliation, observance of religious practices, religious doctrines, and personal importance attributed to religion or world view. Nevertheless, a coherent comparative interpretation of the results of the identified studies was difficult. We concluded that no study has so far exhaustively investigated the relationship between religion or world view and nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide and that further research is required.

  4. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac) - a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froen, J. Frederik; Pinar, Halit; Flenady, Vicki; Bahrin, Safiah; Charles, Adrian; Chauke, Lawrence; Day, Katie; Duke, Charles W.; Facchinetti, Fabio; Fretts, Ruth C.; Gardener, Glenn; Gilshenan, Kristen; Gordijn, Sanne J.; Gordon, Adrienne; Guyon, Grace; Harrison, Catherine; Koshy, Rachel; Pattinson, Robert C.; Petersson, Karin; Russell, Laurie; Saastad, Eli; Smith, Gordon C. S.; Torabi, Rozbeh

    2009-01-01

    A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose

  5. Attitude to rehabilitative counselling in southwestern Nigerian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Alao, Kayode; F Adebowale, Olusegun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of prison inmates and warders (prison staff) to rehabilitative counselling and its relationship to their prison status on one hand and their educational attainment on the other. The study adopts a descriptive survey research design. In all 123 prison inmates and 110 warders were selected by stratified random sampling from Osogbo prison headquarters, as well as Ilesa and Ile-Ife prisons in southwestern Nigeria. Data were collected through a self-constructed questionnaire titled "inmate and prison staff attitude to rehabilitation counselling". Data collected were analysed using percentages and χ2 statistics. The results showed that the prison inmates and staff possessed positive attitude to rehabilitative counselling. No significant difference was found between the attitudes of prison inmates and staff members or on the basis of their prison statuses. However, the study found a significant relationship between the prison inmates' attitude to rehabilitative counselling and their educational attainment. Research LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Statutory provision needs be made for professional rehabilitative counselling in Nigerian prisons in contrast to the religious instructions currently being allowed prisoners. Educational opportunities should be provided to ensure that the knowledge so obtained complements the rehabilitative counselling. Originality/value - This paper fulfils an identified need to study the attitude towards rehabilitative counselling.

  6. Factors contributing to attitude exchange amongst preservice elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Previous research has shown that elementary education majors often dislike science and lack confidence in their ability to teach it. This is an important problem because students who hold these attitudes are likely to avoid teaching science, or teach it poorly, when they become teachers. It is therefore necessary to identify preservice elementary teachers who hold negative attitudes towards science, and attempt to convert these attitudes to positive before they become teachers. This study was designed to identify students whose attitudes had changed from negative to positive (i.e., attitude exchange had occurred) after participating in a one-semester elementary science education course, and to identify the course factors that were responsible. Four participants were individually interviewed. The transcripts indicated that attitude exchange had occurred for each of the four students. Each student described several features of the course that had a positive influence. These were of three main types: personal attributes of the tutor, specific teaching strategies, and external validation. It was proposed that many of the individual factors were effective because they represented either performance accomplishments or vicarious experience as defined by Bandura (Psychological Review, 84, 1977, 191-215).

  7. Sudden infant death due to Lactococcal infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Nakayama, M; Nakahira, K; Nakura, Y; Kanagawa, N; Yanagihara, I; Miyaishi, S

    2016-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) of infants is rare, most of which occur associated with congenital heart disease or its cardiac surgery. We experienced a case of sudden death of a four-month-old male infant without congenital heart disease. It was elucidated by postmortem examination that the dead had suffered severe IE, which led him to death. In the microbiological genetic analysis using histological section, the pathogen causing inflammation in the present case was identified as Lactococcus lactis subspecies, although Staphylococci have been reported to be common and important one. Previously reported infectious diseases by Lactococcus lactis subspecies were all adult cases and this is the first report of an infantile death due to Lactococcal IE according to our knowledge. Any fatal disease may be included in sudden death cases targeted for forensic autopsy, even if it is rare. It is expected for forensic pathologists that they note such case and share each experience among themselves and other medical fields to develop a strategy for prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Accompany death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Borrell, Montserrat

    2010-11-01

    One of the roles of nursing is to take care of the patients in terminal situation. The time, the experience, the formation, and the personal and professional attitudes that the nurse has will propitiate that taking care of moribund patients might turn into one of the more rewarding human experiences in life. There for, it is indispensable that nurses assume death as a natural and inevitable reality to achieve. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the competence of confrontation and the autoefficiency of the welfare among nurses who work with adult patients at the end of the life. Descriptive study realized in the units of Oncology, Hametology and Palliative Care of the following centers: La Fe, Clínico, Dr. Peset, H. General, Arnau de Vilanova and Dr. Moliner de Portacoelli in Valencia (Spain). The following instruments were used: the Bugen Scale of confrontation of the Death (1980-1981) and the Robbins Scale of Autoefficiency (1992). Data suggests that major coping gives major autoeffciency and vice versa. The realized study opens numerous questions, specially related with training and the burden of preparation along the whole professional career, in order to achieve competence for coping and autoefficiency.

  9. Time-varying interaction leads to amplitude death in coupled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new form of time-varying interaction in coupled oscillators is introduced. In this interaction, each individual oscillator has always time-independent self-feedback while its interaction with other oscillators are modulated with time-varying function. This interaction gives rise to a phenomenon called amplitude death even in ...

  10. Deaths Attributable to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-06

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the article, Deaths Attributable to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections.  Created: 8/6/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/13/2014.

  11. Educational and screening campaigns to reduce deaths from melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Alan C

    2009-06-01

    Many deaths of melanoma can be prevented through identification and screening of persons at greatest risk of disease. Herein, we discuss various strategies to reduce avoidable mortality--including targeted screening of persons with changing moles and middle-aged and older men of lower socioeconomic status. We also propose the framework for a randomized screening trial for melanoma.

  12. Teaching about Loss and Death to Junior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christine M.

    1989-01-01

    Presents educational unit on death and loss designed to help junior high school students better understand themselves and their world and develop skills required for coping positively with stressful life events. Includes brief explanations for each of eight course themes and descriptions of major classroom activities. (Author/NB)

  13. An integrated approach to cause-of-death analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram; Preston, Samuel H.; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    . This integration is accomplished by new formulas that make clearer the interactions among causes of death in determining life expectancy. We apply our approach to changes in life expectancy in the United States between 1970 and 2000. We demonstrate, and explain analytically, the paradox that cancer is responsible...

  14. From Memory to Attitude: The Neurocognitive Process beyond Euthanasia Acceptance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Enke

    Full Text Available Numerous questionnaire studies on attitudes towards euthanasia produced conflicting results, precluding any general conclusion. This might be due to the fact that human behavior can be influenced by automatically triggered attitudes, which represent ingrained associations in memory and cannot be assessed by standard questionnaires, but require indirect measures such as reaction times (RT or electroencephalographic recording (EEG. Event related potentials (ERPs of the EEG and RT during an affective priming task were assessed to investigate the impact of automatically triggered attitudes and were compared to results of an explicit questionnaire. Explicit attitudes were ambivalent. Reaction time data showed neither positive nor negative associations towards euthanasia. ERP analyses revealed an N400 priming effect with lower mean amplitudes when euthanasia was associated with negative words. The euthanasia-related modulation of the N400 component shows an integration of the euthanasia object in negatively valenced associative neural networks. The integration of all measures suggests a bottom-up process of attitude activation, where automatically triggered negative euthanasia-relevant associations can become more ambiguous with increasing time in order to regulate the bias arising from automatic processes. These data suggest that implicit measures may make an important contribution to the understanding of euthanasia-related attitudes.

  15. From Memory to Attitude: The Neurocognitive Process beyond Euthanasia Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Martin; Meyer, Patric; Flor, Herta

    2016-01-01

    Numerous questionnaire studies on attitudes towards euthanasia produced conflicting results, precluding any general conclusion. This might be due to the fact that human behavior can be influenced by automatically triggered attitudes, which represent ingrained associations in memory and cannot be assessed by standard questionnaires, but require indirect measures such as reaction times (RT) or electroencephalographic recording (EEG). Event related potentials (ERPs) of the EEG and RT during an affective priming task were assessed to investigate the impact of automatically triggered attitudes and were compared to results of an explicit questionnaire. Explicit attitudes were ambivalent. Reaction time data showed neither positive nor negative associations towards euthanasia. ERP analyses revealed an N400 priming effect with lower mean amplitudes when euthanasia was associated with negative words. The euthanasia-related modulation of the N400 component shows an integration of the euthanasia object in negatively valenced associative neural networks. The integration of all measures suggests a bottom-up process of attitude activation, where automatically triggered negative euthanasia-relevant associations can become more ambiguous with increasing time in order to regulate the bias arising from automatic processes. These data suggest that implicit measures may make an important contribution to the understanding of euthanasia-related attitudes.

  16. From Memory to Attitude: The Neurocognitive Process beyond Euthanasia Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Martin; Meyer, Patric; Flor, Herta

    2016-01-01

    Numerous questionnaire studies on attitudes towards euthanasia produced conflicting results, precluding any general conclusion. This might be due to the fact that human behavior can be influenced by automatically triggered attitudes, which represent ingrained associations in memory and cannot be assessed by standard questionnaires, but require indirect measures such as reaction times (RT) or electroencephalographic recording (EEG). Event related potentials (ERPs) of the EEG and RT during an affective priming task were assessed to investigate the impact of automatically triggered attitudes and were compared to results of an explicit questionnaire. Explicit attitudes were ambivalent. Reaction time data showed neither positive nor negative associations towards euthanasia. ERP analyses revealed an N400 priming effect with lower mean amplitudes when euthanasia was associated with negative words. The euthanasia-related modulation of the N400 component shows an integration of the euthanasia object in negatively valenced associative neural networks. The integration of all measures suggests a bottom-up process of attitude activation, where automatically triggered negative euthanasia-relevant associations can become more ambiguous with increasing time in order to regulate the bias arising from automatic processes. These data suggest that implicit measures may make an important contribution to the understanding of euthanasia-related attitudes. PMID:27088244

  17. Preparedness for Death and Adjustment to Bereavement among Caregivers of Recently Placed Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Richard; Boerner, Kathrin; Klinger, Julie; Rosen, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preparedness for death as a predictor of post-bereavement adjustment has not been studied prospectively. Little is known about pre-death factors associated with feeling prepared prior to the death of a loved one.

  18. Public attitudes to organ donation among a sample of urban-dwelling South African adults: a 2012 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheredge, H R; Turner, R E; Kahn, D

    2013-01-01

    Published literature suggests that attitudes toward organ donation in South Africa are generally positive. However, there has been a decline in the actual number of transplants taking place annually, which is not consistent with expressed positive attitudes. Assess the attitudes of a representative sample of the urban-dwelling South African population toward organ donation and how these might affect transplant numbers. A structured questionnaire was utilized to measure attitudes among a study population of 1048 adults in five major metropolitan areas of South Africa. Field work was undertaken by supervised field workers. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of respondents had heard of organ donation, and 77% indicated that they would accept an organ transplant if necessary. Seventy percent (70%) of respondents specified they would be willing to donate their own organs after death, while 67% expressed willingness to donate a relative's organs after death. Participants were more positive about kidney donation than any other organ. Public attitudes toward organ donation among this population are generally positive. Recommendations include cultural and linguistic sensitivity in educational and advertising campaigns, as well as extensive research into other possible causes of organ shortage. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Trying to trust: Brain activity during interpersonal social attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkowski, Megan M; Anderson, Ian W; Haas, Brian W

    2016-04-01

    Interpersonal trust and distrust are important components of human social interaction. Although several studies have shown that brain function is associated with either trusting or distrusting others, very little is known regarding brain function during the control of social attitudes, including trust and distrust. This study was designed to investigate the neural mechanisms involved when people attempt to control their attitudes of trust or distrust toward another person. We used a novel control-of-attitudes fMRI task, which involved explicit instructions to control attitudes of interpersonal trust and distrust. Control of trust or distrust was operationally defined as changes in trustworthiness evaluations of neutral faces before and after the control-of-attitudes fMRI task. Overall, participants (n = 60) evaluated faces paired with the distrust instruction as being less trustworthy than faces paired with the trust instruction following the control-of-distrust task. Within the brain, both the control-of-trust and control-of-distrust conditions were associated with increased temporoparietal junction, precuneus (PrC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and medial prefrontal cortex activity. Individual differences in the control of trust were associated with PrC activity, and individual differences in the control of distrust were associated with IFG activity. Together, these findings identify a brain network involved in the explicit control of distrust and trust and indicate that the PrC and IFG may serve to consolidate interpersonal social attitudes.

  20. Bleeding to death because of hemorrhage into soft tissues as a cause of death in a beaten battered child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čukić Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bleeding to death is one of the leading causes of death speaking about violent death in general. Bleeding to death mostly happens through hurt organs or blood vessels of thorax, abdomen and neck or because of destruction of extremities or the whole body. Bleeding to death is very often the consequence of blood pouring, rarely of simultaneous pouring and suffusing of blood, and it is extremely rarely the result of blood suffusing solely and especially due to subcutaneous, retoperitoneal and intramediastinal blood suffusing. Fatal bleeding into soft tissues solely is very rare. During a 10- year- period among 3 000 performed autopsies in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Podgorica, the presented case was the unique one. Case report. The paper presents a 5-year-old boy who was beaten to death by his mother and step-father and died because of massive bleeding into soft tissues. Conclusion. In order to establish a cause of death in cases of exsanguination in soft tissues, a series of postmortem diagnostic procedures should be performed, like those presented in this paper.

  1. Conceptualizing leadership perceptions as attitudes: Using attitude theory to further understand the leadership process.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Allan; Martin, Robin; Thomas, Geoff; Guillaume, Yves; Maio, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is one of the most examined factors in relation to understanding employee well-being and performance. While there are disparate approaches to studying leadership, they share a common assumption that perceptions of a leader’s behavior determine reactions to the leader. The concept of leadership perception is poorly understood in most theoretical approaches. To address this, we propose that there are many benefits from examining leadership perceptions as an attitude towards the lea...

  2. Finding death in meaninglessness: Evidence that death-thought accessibility increases in response to meaning threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, David; Zhang, Rui; Schimel, Jeff; Blatter, Jamin

    2016-03-01

    The meaning maintenance model proposes that violations to one's expectations will cause subsequent meaning restoration. In attempts to distinguish meaning maintenance mechanisms from mechanisms of terror management, previous research has failed to find increased death-thought accessibility (DTA) in response to various meaning threats. The present research suggests that this failure may have resulted from methodological differences in the way researchers measured DTA. Studies 1a and 1b found that by replacing this method with a standard method employed when studying worldview and self-esteem threats, DTA increased in response to two different meaning violations. Study 2 found increased DTA, but only among individuals high in personal need for structure, when using this standard DTA procedure, but not when using the procedure taken from previous meaning maintenance studies. Interestingly, these studies did not find increased meaning restoration, so an additional study (Study 3) was designed to provide a theoretically informed examination of this null effect. A meaning restoration effect was observed after removing the standard DTA assessment procedure, but only among participants high in personal need for structure. Implications for the threat-compensation literature are discussed. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Development of an Attitude Scale to Assess K-12 Teachers' Attitudes toward Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ling

    2012-05-01

    To maximize the contributions of nanotechnology to this society, at least 60 countries have put efforts into this field. In Taiwan, a government-funded K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was established to train K-12 teachers with adequate nanotechnology literacy to foster the next generation of Taiwanese people with sufficient knowledge in nanotechnology. In the present study, the Nanotechnology Attitude Scale for K-12 teachers (NAS-T) was developed to assess K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T included 23 Likert-scale items that can be grouped into three components: importance of nanotechnology, affective tendencies in science teaching, and behavioural tendencies to teach nanotechnology. A sample of 233 K-12 teachers who have participated in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme was included in the present study to investigate the psychometric properties of the NAS-T. The exploratory factor analysis of this teacher sample suggested that the NAS-T was a three-factor model that explained 64.11% of the total variances. This model was also confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis to validate the factor structure of the NAS-T. The Cronbach's alpha values of three NAS-T subscales ranged from 0.89 to 0.95. Moderate to strong correlations among teachers' NAS-T domain scores, self-perception of own nanoscience knowledge, and their science-teaching efficacy demonstrated good convergent validity of the NAS-T. As a whole, psychometric properties of the NAS-T indicated that this instrument is an effective instrument for assessing K-12 teachers' attitudes toward nanotechnology. The NAS-T will serve as a valuable tool to evaluate teachers' attitude changes after participating in the K-12 Nanotechnology Programme.

  4. [Sudden death in traffic due to natural causes (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauland, W

    1978-03-28

    Together with the increase in motorisation sudden death at the wheel by natural causes has also gained more importance although this is not a very frequent occurrence. Scattered reports on such cases in the literature are summarized and discussed with regard to recognition, frequency, age and sex distribution, pathological changes and marginal problems, e. g. diagnostic difficulties, risk and prevention. At the top of the list of the causes of sudden natural death at the wheel are disturbances of the cardiovascular circulation and under this heading the ischemical heart diseases with 83%. The frequency peak lies in the sixties age group and in the case of the ischemical diseases generally in the seventies age group which is an indication that driving is particularly a burden for the circulation. The percentage of women (2.6%) is approx. 10 times less than it is in sudden deaths generally, this obviously being due to the fact that women in advanced years do not drive as often as men. In approx. 50% of cases the sudden natural death takes place when the vehicle is stationary. Serious accidents are seldom. Diagnostic difficulties occur when alcohol has been consumed or when in an accident caused by the sickness the victim is fatally injured or when the question of guilt is not clear. Restrictive measures will not completely prevent sudden death when driving; it is most important that a patient with a history of myocardial infarction or of advanced age should be advised of the dangers of driving by the physician treating him.

  5. Defining Sudden Infant Death and Sudden Intrauterine Unexpected Death Syndromes with Regard to Anatomo-Pathological Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700-2,000. Yet, despite advances in maternal-infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS) has a sixfold to eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS-SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures. On the basis of these considerations, the new common definition of the SIDS-SIUDS complex is "The sudden death of a fetus after the 25th gestational week or infant under one year of age which is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including examination of the death scene, performance of a general autopsy and examination of the fetal adnexa". Therefore, given that the general autopsy does not disclose any cause of death, a more in-depth histopathological analysis of the cardiac conduction system and autonomic nervous system by specialized pathologists is necessary.

  6. [Differences between immediate and 30-day deaths due to traffic injuries according to forensic sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbería, Eneko; Suelves, Josep M; Xifró, Alexandre; Medallo, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    To study immediate (same day of the collision) and delayed (within 30 days of the collision) deaths due to traffic injuries in Catalonia (Spain) according to forensic sources and to assess the differences between the two kinds of deaths. An observational study was conducted of all the traffic accident deaths registered in the Institute of Legal Medicine of Catalonia between January 1(st) 2005 and December 31(st) 2014. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS v.18.0 statistical package. Comparisons of proportions were based on the χ(2) test. During the study period, 4044 deaths due to traffic injuries were recorded. Deaths within 30 days included more women, minors, elderly people, and pedestrians than immediate deaths. Traffic injury deaths in the 30 days following a crash differ from immediate deaths. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. The fight-to-die: older people and death activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Richards

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the activities and convictions of older right-to-die activists who belong to a small but very active interest group based in Scotland, UK, called Friends at the End (FATE. The analysis presented here is based on knowledge gained through seventeen months of ethnographic research with the organisation. While FATE activists currently campaign for a legal right to a medically assisted death, many are also open to taking matters into their own hands, either by travelling to the Swiss organisation Dignitas or by opting for what is known as ‘‘self-deliverance’’. FATE members’ openness to different means of securing a hastened death contrasts sharply with the more limited demands of the UK’s main right-to-die organisation, Dignity in Dying, and highlights their specific orientation to freedom, which, it is argued here, results from the organisation’s older demographic.

  8. Community knowledge, attitude and practice of childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-08-08

    five deaths in Nige- ria and poor knowledge and atti- tude have been responsible for non-vaccination of children. This study aimed to assess the knowl- edge, attitude and practice of childhood immunization among community ...

  9. Development of an Attitude Scale to Measure the Undergraduate Students' Attitudes Towards Nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Seyda

    2017-10-01

    Nanobiotechnology, which resulted from the convergence of biotechnology and nanotechnology, is a new field of research, and it has an increasing impact on peoples' everyday lives. Thus, it is important to measure peoples' attitudes towards nanobiotechnology, in particular, those who are specifically involved in biology and science education. However, despite the existence of an adequate number of instruments on biotechnology or nanotechnology, for nanobiotechnology, there is no instrument that has been rigorously validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a nanobiotechnology scale for assessing the undergraduate students' attitudes. The data were gathered from 236 student teachers enrolled in the departments of biology education and elementary science education. The findings from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the final form of the scale. At total of 36 items were identified and contained within the following four factors, nanobiotechnology awareness, interest in nanobiotechnology, nanobiotechnology education, and the applications of nanobiotechnology. The total variance was 53.021%, and the Cronbach's alpha for the overall scale was 0.93. The scale was later given to 203 student teachers, the results of which were presented in this study. The results indicated significant differences in gender and department in some of the subscales of the scale. As a result, it is believed that the instrument will be a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers in science education to assess the student teachers' attitudes about nanobiotechnology.

  10. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac – a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose a classification system that could serve all these needs, and be applicable in both developing and developed countries. It is developed to adhere to basic concepts of underlying cause in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, although gaps in ICD prevent classification of perinatal deaths solely on existing ICD codes. We tested the Causes of Death and Associated Conditions (Codac classification for perinatal deaths in seven populations, including two developing country settings. We identified areas of potential improvements in the ability to retain existing information, ease of use and inter-rater agreement. After revisions to address these issues we propose Version II of Codac with detailed coding instructions. The ten main categories of Codac consist of three key contributors to global perinatal mortality (intrapartum events, infections and congenital anomalies, two crucial aspects of perinatal mortality (unknown causes of death and termination of pregnancy, a clear distinction of conditions relevant only to the neonatal period and the remaining conditions are arranged in the four anatomical compartments (fetal, cord, placental and maternal. For more detail there are 94 subcategories, further specified in 577 categories in the full version. Codac is designed to accommodate both the main cause of death as well as two associated conditions. We suggest reporting not only the main cause of death, but also the associated relevant conditions so that scenarios of combined conditions and events are captured. The appropriately applied Codac system promises to better manage information on causes of perinatal deaths, the conditions

  11. Deaths of cyclists in london: trends from 1992 to 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee William E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cycling is an increasingly important mode of transport for environmental and health reasons. Cycling fatalities in London were previously investigated in 1994 using routinely collected data. Since then, there have been shifts in the modes of transport used, and in transport policies. We sought to replicate the previous work using data on cyclist deaths in London between 1992 and 2006, specifically investigating whether heavy goods vehicles continued to pose a threat. Methods Observational study based on analysis of time series of police road casualties data, 1992 to 2006, in London, UK. The main outcome measures were cyclists killed in road traffic collisions. Poisson regression and chi-squared test for homogeneity were used to assess time effects. Travel flow data was then used to estimate annual fatality rates per 100,000 cyclists per kilometre. Results From 1992 to 2006 there was a mean of 16 cycling fatalities per year (range 8-21. 146 deaths (60% were in inner London and 96 in outer London. There was no evidence for a decline over time (p = 0.7 other than a pronounced dip in 2004 when there were 8 fatalities. Freight vehicles were involved in 103 of 242 (43% of all incidents and the vehicle was making a left turn in over half of these (53%. The fatality rate ranged from 20.5 deaths in 1992 to 11.1 deaths in 2006 per 100,000 estimated cyclists per kilometre (rate ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 1.03. Conclusions There is little evidence fatality rates have fallen. Freight vehicles over 3.5 tonnes continue to present a disproportionate threat; they should be removed from urban roads and more appropriate means of delivery of essential goods found.

  12. Values, inter-attitudinal structure, and attitude change: value accessibility can increase a related attitude's resistance to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Kevin L; Wegener, Duane T; Murray, Renee A

    2015-12-01

    Accessibility is one of the most basic structural properties of an attitude and an important factor to consider in attitude strength. Despite its importance, relatively little work has examined the role of attitude accessibility in an inter-attitudinal context, particularly as it relates to the strength of related attitudes in the network. The present research examines accessibility as a property of one attitude (toward an abstract goal or end-state, that is, a value) that might influence the strength of a different but related attitude (toward a social policy conceptually related to the value). In Study 1, a highly accessible evaluative component of a value increased resistance to change of attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a social policy related to that value. Similarly, a manipulation of value accessibility (Studies 2 and 3) led to increased resistance of attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a social policy related to that value. Implications for the role of accessibility in inter-attitudinal strength are discussed. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  13. Study of recent and future trends in place of death in Belgium using death certificate data: a shift from hospitals to care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houttekier, D.; Cohen, J.; Surkyn, J.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Since most patients prefer out-of-hospital death, place of death can be considered an indicator of end-of-life care quality. The study of trends in place of death is necessary to examine causes of shifts, to evaluate efforts to alter place of death and develop future policies. This study

  14. Reporting a sudden death due to accidental gasoline inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María Antonia; Ballesteros, Salomé; Alcaraz, Rafael

    2012-02-10

    The investigation of uncertain fatalities requires accurate determination of the cause of death, with assessment of all factors that may have contributed to it. Gasoline is a complex and highly variable mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons that can lead to cardiac arrhythmias due to sensitization of the myocardium to catecholamines or acts as a simple asphyxiant if the vapors displace sufficient oxygen from the breathing atmosphere. This work describes a sudden occupational fatality involving gasoline. The importance of this petroleum distillate detection and its quantitative toxicological significance is discussed using a validated analytical method. A 51 year-old Caucasian healthy man without significant medical history was supervising the repairs of the telephone lines in a manhole near to a gas station. He died suddenly after inhaling gasoline vapors from an accidental leak. Extensive blistering and peeling of skin were observed on the skin of the face, neck, anterior chest, upper and lower extremities, and back. The internal examination showed a strong odor of gasoline, specially detected in the respiratory tract. The toxicological screening and quantitation of gasoline was performed by means of gas chromatography with flame ionization detector and confirmation was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Disposition of gasoline in different tissues was as follows: heart blood, 35.7 mg/L; urine, not detected; vitreous humor, 1.9 mg/L; liver, 194.7 mg/kg; lung, 147.6 mg/kg; and gastric content, 116,6 mg/L (2.7 mg total). Based upon the toxicological data along with the autopsy findings, the cause of death was determined to be gasoline poisoning and the manner of death was accidental. We would like to alert on the importance of testing for gasoline, and in general for volatile hydrocarbons, in work-related sudden deaths involving inhalation of hydrocarbon vapors and/or exhaust fumes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  15. The development of a scale to measure medical students' attitudes towards communication skills learning: the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte; Sheard, Charlotte; Davies, Susie

    2002-02-01

    There is little research identifying medical students' attitudes towards communication skills learning. This pilot study outlines the development of a new scale to measure attitudes towards communication skills learning. First- and second-year medical students (n = 490) completed the 26-item Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) and 39 students completed the CSAS on a second occasion. Factor analysis was conducted to determine the factors underpinning the scale. The internal consistency of the subscales was determined using alpha coefficients. The test-retest reliability of the individual scale items were determined using weighted kappa coefficients and the test-retest reliability of the subscales were established using intraclass correlation coefficients. Maximum likelihood extraction with direct oblimin rotation resulted in a 2-factor scale with 13 items on each subscale. Factor I represented positive attitudes towards communication skills learning and factor II represented negative attitudes. Subscale I had an internal consistency of alpha=0.873 and an intraclass correlation of 0.646 (P attitude subscales (n=8, 61.5%) possessed moderate test-retest reliability. The development of a new and reliable scale to identify medical students' attitudes towards communication skills learning will enable researchers to explore the relationships between medical students' attitudes and their demographic and education-related characteristics. Further work is needed to validate this scale among a broader population of medical students.

  16. Using Q Methodology to Investigate Undergraduate Students' Attitudes toward the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Julia M.; Shepardson, Daniel P.

    2018-01-01

    Undergraduate students have different attitudes toward the geosciences, but few studies have investigated these attitudes using Q methodology. Q methodology allows the researcher to identify more detailed reasons for students' attitudes toward geology than Likert methodology. Thus this study used Q methodology to investigate the attitudes that 15…

  17. Attitudes to cadaveric organ donation in Irish preclinical medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kevin C; Ettarh, Rajunor R

    2011-01-01

    There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this topic, there has been none in Ireland. Anatomy dissection can be a stressor to medical students-we investigate the attitudes of Irish students to organ donation and how they change with exposure to anatomy dissection. A questionnaire was administered to first year students in the School of Medicine in University College Dublin, Ireland, three times over a nine-week period at the commencement of classes in an academic year. The attitudes of the students were positive throughout regarding organ donation by a stranger, a family member, or themselves. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for the donation of a family member's organs in a minority of students. Irish students' attitudes to postmortem organ donation are positive and are not changed by exposure to the dissecting room. There is support for the donation of organs, and willingness among students to donate their own organs and support donation by family members. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. Attitudes to cadaveric organ donation in Irish preclinical medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin C

    2011-06-01

    There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this topic, there has been none in Ireland. Anatomy dissection can be a stressor to medical students-we investigate the attitudes of Irish students to organ donation and how they change with exposure to anatomy dissection. A questionnaire was administered to first year students in the School of Medicine in University College Dublin, Ireland, three times over a nine-week period at the commencement of classes in an academic year. The attitudes of the students were positive throughout regarding organ donation by a stranger, a family member, or themselves. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for the donation of a family member\\'s organs in a minority of students. Irish students\\' attitudes to postmortem organ donation are positive and are not changed by exposure to the dissecting room. There is support for the donation of organs, and willingness among students to donate their own organs and support donation by family members.

  19. Traditions Versus Changing Bedouin Attitudes toward Higher Education: How Do Bedouin College Students Perceive Their Family's Attitudes to Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Blossom

    1997-01-01

    Explores Bedouin student backgrounds to determine attitude transformations that enabled family and clan approval for their participation in an Israeli teacher-training program. Results show the existence of transformations within the tribe toward education, especially for women. Student attitudes toward becoming instruments of educational…

  20. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  1. ACCIDENTAL DEATHS DUE TO ELECTROCUTION DURING AMATEUR ELECTRO - FISHING

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay; Krishnan; Liza

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Electro - fishing (passing electricity through water to catch fish) requires sophisticated equipment. While this method is commonly employed b y scientists for survey and fisheries management, a crude and illegal form electro - fishing is employed in Kerala for catching fish from water bodies. This can result in accidental electrocution and even fatalities. Even though they are rare, forensic patho logists in Kerala do come across such deaths from ti...

  2. Stakeholders' attitude to genetically modified foods and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Jahi, Jamaluddin Md; Nor, Abd Rahim Md

    2013-01-01

    Public acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods has to be adequately addressed in order for their potential economic and social benefits to be realized. The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of the Malaysian public toward GM foods (GM soybean and GM palm oil) and GM medicine (GM insulin). A survey was carried out using self-constructed multidimensional instrument measuring attitudes towards GM products. The respondents (n = 1017) were stratified according to stakeholders' groups in the Klang Valley region. Results of the survey show that the overall attitude of the Malaysian stakeholders towards GM products was cautious. Although they acknowledged the presence of moderate perceived benefits associated with GM products surveyed and were moderately encouraging of them, they were also moderately concerned about the risks and moral aspects of the three GM products as well as moderately accepting the risks. Attitudes towards GM products among the stakeholders were found to vary not according to the type of all GM applications but rather depend on the intricate relationships between the attitudinal factors and the type of gene transfers involved. Analyses of variance showed significant differences in the six dimensions of attitude towards GM products across stakeholders' groups.

  3. Stakeholders’ Attitude to Genetically Modified Foods and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah Amin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Public acceptance of genetically modified (GM foods has to be adequately addressed in order for their potential economic and social benefits to be realized. The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of the Malaysian public toward GM foods (GM soybean and GM palm oil and GM medicine (GM insulin. A survey was carried out using self-constructed multidimensional instrument measuring attitudes towards GM products. The respondents (n=1017 were stratified according to stakeholders’ groups in the Klang Valley region. Results of the survey show that the overall attitude of the Malaysian stakeholders towards GM products was cautious. Although they acknowledged the presence of moderate perceived benefits associated with GM products surveyed and were moderately encouraging of them, they were also moderately concerned about the risks and moral aspects of the three GM products as well as moderately accepting the risks. Attitudes towards GM products among the stakeholders were found to vary not according to the type of all GM applications but rather depend on the intricate relationships between the attitudinal factors and the type of gene transfers involved. Analyses of variance showed significant differences in the six dimensions of attitude towards GM products across stakeholders’ groups.

  4. Older patients' attitudes to general practice registrars - A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Andrew; Phillipson, Lyn; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2009-11-01

    Research suggests that older patients may be reluctant to engage general practice registrars (GPRs) in their care. The authors undertook a qualitative study of the attitudes of older patients to GPRs to investigate this issue. Thirty-eight patients aged 60 years and over from three training practices participated in semistructured telephone interviews, which explored patients responses to GPRs. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using a template analysis approach. Analysis of the interviews produced five major themes concerning patients' attitudes to GPRs: 'desire for continuity', 'desire for access', 'openness', 'trust' and a 'desire for meaningful communication'. Older patients' attitudes to GPRs cannot be viewed in isolation from their relationship with their usual general practitioner, and this needs to be taken into account when engaging GPRs in the care of older patients. Systems need to be developed to maintain relational and informational continuity with older patients' 'regular' GP.

  5. Modelling Local Attitudes to Protected Areas in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bragagnolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During a time of intensifying competition for land, Protected Areas (PAs are coming under increasing pressure to justify their status. Positive local attitudes to a PA are a potentially important component of any such justification, especially in the developing world where human pressure on natural resources is often high. However, despite numerous studies our understanding of what drives positive attitudes to PAs is still exceedingly limited. Here, we review the literature on local attitudes towards PAs in developing countries. Our survey reveals a highly fragmented research area where studies typically lack an explicit conceptual basis, and where there is wide variation in choice of statistical approach, explanatory and response variables, and incorporation of contextual information. Nevertheless, there is a relatively high degree of concordance between studies, with certain variables showing strong associations with attitudes. We recommend that PA attitude researchers in developing countries adopt a more rigorous model building approach based on a clear conceptual framework and drawing on the extensive empirical literature. Such an approach would improve the quality of research, increase comparability, and provide a stronger basis to support conservation decision-making.

  6. Attitudes toward a game-based approach to mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Christine P; Bowers, Clint A

    2015-01-01

    Based on preliminary research, game-based treatments appear to be a promising approach to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, attitudes toward this novel approach must be better understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine if video game self-efficacy mediates the relationship between expectations and reactions to a game-based treatment for PTSD. Participants played the serious game "Walk in My Shoes" (Novonics Corp., Orlando, FL) and completed a series of scales to measure attitudes toward the intervention. Video game self-efficacy was found to be a partial mediator of expectancies and reactions. These results suggest that enhancing attitudes via self-efficacy in a clinical setting may maximize treatment effectiveness.

  7. Attitudes of meat retailers to animal welfare in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-de la Lama, Genaro C; Sepúlveda, Wilmer S; Villarroel, Morris; María, Gustavo A

    2013-11-01

    This study analyzes retailer attitude towards animal welfare in Spain, and how this attitude has changed over recent years (2006-2011). Retailers were concerned about animal welfare issues but a declining trend is observed recently, probably due to the financial crisis. The concern about animal welfare was affected by sex, with women retailers expressing a more positive attitude towards animal welfare issues than men. Retailers, based on their experience, perceive a low level of willingness to pay more for welfare friendly products (WFP) on behalf of their customers. This fact is reflected in the sales of the WFP, which declined from 2006 to 2011. The main reason for consumers to buy WFP, according to retailer perception, is organoleptic quality, with improved welfare being second. The results obtained provide a pessimistic picture in relation to the current market positioning of WFP, which is probably a consequence of market contraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Attitudes toward reintroduction of European bison (Bison bonasus) to Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsten, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The European bison (Bison bonasus) is no longer present in the wild fauna of Sweden. Reintroduction, an attempt to reestablish a viable population of a species in an area to which it is native, has been discussed. To make such an operation successful it is essential to know the attitudes of the stakeholders involved. This study has sensed the attitudes toward reintroducing E. bison to Sweden. It was done through a survey sent to the Wildlife Management Boards (Boards) and to landowners/farmer...

  9. Quality of life and attitudes to ageing in Turkish older adults at old people's homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Mehmet; Dikmetaş, Elif

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate quality of life (QOL) and attitudes to ageing in Turkish older adults at two old people's homes (nursing homes) and to explain relationship between QOL and attitudes to ageing. This study is a quantitative and descriptive exploratory study of QOL and attitudes to ageing of older adults in nursing homes in a developing country. Two international data measurement tools were used for data collection. Data measurement instruments in this study are The World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD) and the WHO - Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire (AAQ). The WHOQOL-OLD module consists of 24 items assigned to six facets (sensory abilities, autonomy, past, present and future activities, social participation, death and dying and intimacy) AAQ consists of 24 items classified in three domains (psychosocial loss, physical change and psychological growth) with eight items each. The Turkish version of the WHOQOL-OLD and AAQ was administered to 120 older (>65 years) adults living in two old people's homes in Samsun Province, Turkey. This study was conducted and planned between on 1 November 2011 and on 31 November, 2011. The results indicated that there was significant relationship between QOL and attitudes to ageing of older adults. In this study, the highest significant relationship is between psychological growth subscale of attitudes to ageing and sensory abilities subscale of QOL (r = 0.579; P ageing had a significant and positive relationship (r = 0.408; P ageing (psychosocial loss, physical change and psychological growth) were significant predictors for QOL in older adults in Turkey. It was found that the gender does not affect overall QOL in older adults. However, happiness is significant variable for overall QOL in this study. The results suggest that QOL is a complex, multidimensional concept that should be studied at different levels of analysis in Turkey and other developing countries

  10. Students’ Attitudes to Universal Design in Architecture Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Larkin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognised that the built environment can dramatically impact the participation and engagement of people with disability and diverse needs. It has therefore become necessary for architects and designers to consider these needs when working within their profession. The implementation of universal design teaching into architecture and design curriculum has been recognised as an important step in facilitating and enhancing the uptake of universal design during the design process. Using a quantitative approach, this study aimed to compare, contrast and explore the attitudes of two groups of architecture students to the universal design of built environments. One group had received education relating to diversity and universal design as part of a prior project while the other group had not received this content. Findings from this comparison demonstrated that overall, no significant differences between groups existed. However further investigation provided interesting insight and perspectives into student attitudes to universal design and potential influencers of these attitudes.

  11. What To Do with Death: The End of Life in Reform Jewish Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorr, Alan

    1990-01-01

    After interviewing Jewish teenagers about death, finds Reform Judaism teachers teach about love and marriage but not death. Observes students know little of Jewish customs related to death. Notes Jewish doctrine focuses on the needs of the living. Considers elements that will be necessary to provide for effective death education in Reform Jewish…

  12. Air Mattresses Linked to More Than 100 Infant Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Health News on Infant and Newborn Care Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Infant and Newborn Care Sudden Infant Death Syndrome About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support ...

  13. Nurses values, attitudes and behaviour related to falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jennifer

    2009-03-01

    To test changes in adherence to nurses' falls prevention work resulting from improving attitudes and ownership of practice. Workforce surveys indicate that nurses leave nursing because they cannot deliver the care they value. When challenged why, nurses claim no power of decision-making or authority to change their work with dissatisfaction and disengagement with work ensuing. Nurses espouse 'caring' but are observed taking risks with patients' safety reflecting poor congruence between values and behaviours. Attitudes and decision-making involvement are factors that influence work behaviours. Hence, increased adherence should be achieved by improving nurses' attitudes through active decision-making surrounding practice. Mixed methods study. Mixed methods were employed during 2004 by surveying attitudes (self-esteem, professional values and work satisfaction) before and after re-engineering nurses' work using practice development (PD) to gain time to spend in prevention work. Practice behaviour was observed and measured at intervals during the study. Initially, nurses had good self-esteem and professional values but were not satisfied with their work. Following the PD, self-esteem and professional values were unaffected; however, nurses expressed increased sense of ownership and greater satisfaction. Nurses were observed to engage in more prevention work. More effective ways of assessing and communicating risk and monitoring nurses' performance of prevention work were created and evaluated. Patients' environments were made safer and more patient-centred. Manipulation of attitudes and values is not warranted if attitudes and values are good. However, participation in work-related decision-making engages practitioners and leads to greater congruence between values and behaviour. Recommendations include promoting reflection and action to achieve cultural change and person-centred care. This study is relevant to international readership as adds to what is known about

  14. Understanding the will to live in patients nearing death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochinov, Harvey Max; Hack, Thomas; Hassard, Thomas; Kristjanson, Linda J; McClement, Susan; Harlos, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This study examined concurrent influences on the will to live in 189 patients with end-stage cancer The authors found significant correlations between the will to live and existential, psychological, social, and, to a lesser degree, physical sources of distress. Existential variables proved to have the most influence, with hopelessness, burden to others, and dignity entering into the final model. Health care providers must learn to appreciate the importance of existential issues and their ability to influence the will to live among patients nearing death.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN TO ATTITUDE TOWARDS GREEN PRODUCTS: EVIDENCES FROM INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Danish Kirmani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of environmental concern of consumers with their attitude towards green products and also to identify the predictors of environmental concern. The data was generated from a researcher controlled sample of graduate and post-graduate students enrolled in educational institutions located in the national capital of India (New Delhi and surrounding areas popularly known as National Capital Region (NCR. The data generated was analysed employing Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. The study findings indicate that environmental concern has a significant and positive influence on attitude towards green products. Collectivism and eco-literacy emerged as predictors of the environmental concern of consumers. The findings of this study are expected to enhance the understanding of marketers of the role played by variables such as religiosity, collectivism, eco-literacy, and environmental concern in formation of attitude of consumers towards green products.

  16. Hawaii natural compounds are promising to reduce ovarian cancer deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei-Zhang, David J; Li, Chunshun; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-07-02

    The low survival rate of patients with ovarian cancer largely results from the advanced ovarian tumors as well as tumor resistance to chemotherapy, leading to metastasis and recurrence. However, it is missing as to an effective therapeutic approach that focuses on these aspects to prolong progression-free survival and to decrease mortality in ovarian cancer patients. Here, based on our cancer drug discovery studies, we provide prospective insights into the development of a future line of drugs to effectively reduce ovarian cancer deaths. Pathways that increase the probability of cancer, such as the defective Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, may render cancer cells more sensitive to new drug targeting.

  17. Evidence That Thinking about Death Relates to Time-Estimation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Andy; Schmeichel, Brandon J.

    2011-01-01

    Time and death are linked--the passing of time brings us closer to death. Terror management theory proposes that awareness of death represents a potent problem that motivates a variety of psychological defenses (Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1997). We tested the hypothesis that thinking about death motivates elongated perceptions of brief…

  18. Nigerian medical students attitudes to unmodified electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bawo Onesirosan; Omoaregba, Joyce O; Olotu, Osasu S

    2009-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective and affordable form of treatment for a range of psychiatric disorders. Historical antecedents, the media, and movies have generated myths about its continued use and relevance. We explored medical students' knowledge of and attitude to ECT on completion of an 8-week clinical rotation (clerkship) in psychiatry. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among final-year medical students at the end of a clerkship in psychiatry using a self-administered questionnaire adapted from previously published work, to assess their attitudes to and knowledge of unmodified ECT. Knowledge of medicine, psychiatry, and ECT were self-rated as average by most students. Most had an interest in pursuing psychiatry as a profession and would receive ECT if judged clinically appropriate. Most students had positive attitudes toward ECT; the vast majority thought it was a relevant form of treatment and did not think that ECT was used to control violent or used by government to torture opponents. Although an overwhelming majority did not think ECT was outmoded or causes permanent brain damage, answers about pain associated with ECT and about the dangers associated with the procedure seem to be more evenly split. A minority thought that ECT was used only in the poor and should not be given to the elderly or children. A substantial majority thought that ECT was the treatment of last resort. Respondents who were likely to choose psychiatry as a profession agreed that ECT causes pain, but disagreed that it was used by governments to torture political opponents or that it causes permanent brain damage. Students with minimal knowledge of ECT showed more negative attitudes toward the myth that ECT is misused and should be a treatment of last resort. The similarity of the attitudes of students exposed to unmodified ECT with attitudes of students exposed to modified ECT suggests that modification has made little impact on the attitudes of health

  19. [Maternal deaths due to gestational trophoblastic diseases, results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, M

    2017-12-01

    Gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTD) correspond to several entities which all have a common pattern: hypersecretion of human chorionic gondotrophin by trophoblastic hyperplasia. Between 2010 and 2012, there were 4 maternal deaths due to GTD (choriocarcinoma). The ratio of maternal death caused by GTD was 0,16/100,000 living births which was similar to the rate from the 2007-2009 period. These deaths represented 1.6% from the whole maternal mortality and 3.3% of the direct maternal mortality. These four deaths occurred after delivery and the diagnosis of GTD was made between 60 and 180 days in the postpartum period. Two cases seemed to be potentially avoidable. The main causes of suboptimal management were linked to delay either in diagnosis of GTD or in initiating the appropriate treatment. The analysis of these maternal deaths gave the opportunity to stress some major lessons to optimize medical management of GTD. Therefore, a patient presenting with persistent bleedings more than six weeks after delivery needs some specific exams such as plasma human chorionic gondotrophin measurement and histopathologic examination to affirm GTD and start early specific treatments generally leading to complete recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Attitudes and reactions to nuclear weapons: responses to fear arousal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    This study employed a pre-posttest design to investigate how degree of commitment to a preventive nuclear war strategy, and various demographic characteristics influence nuclear-war-related factors. Two hundred sixteen college students were assigned to one of four groups. Subjects in the first two groups completed the pretest, and waited three weeks before receiving the posttest. The posttest asked subjects in the first group to imagine and write about what might happen to them in the event of a major nuclear war, and re-administered the pretest research questions. Individuals in the second group responded to a fantasy on earthquakes, followed by the posttest. Subjects in the third group responded only to the nuclear was fantasy and theposttest, while those individuals in the fourth group were administered the posttest only. Subjects committed to a strategy considered their chance of death by nuclear war more likely after the nuclear-war fantasy than after the earthquake fantasy. Subjects uncommitted viewed their chance of death by nuclear was as less likely after the nuclear war fantasy than after the earthquake fantasy. This supports previous research indicating that cognitive strategies may be employed to reduce fear arousal. Women reported greater (a) chance of death by nuclear war, (b) nuclear anxiety, (c) nuclear concern, and (d) fear of the future than men. Subjects committed to a strategy expressed greater nuclear concern, greater nuclear anxiety, and employed less nuclear denial than those who were uncommitted.

  1. Ethical aspects of the concept of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pinchuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors attempt to summarize views of leading russian experts in bioethics and medical deontology on the moral and ethical issues related to the development of the concept of brain death and its application in modern medicine. A variety of ethical issues associated with the use of the concept of "brain death" in organ donation and clinical transplantation is noted. The official attitude of representatives of the world's major faiths to the problems of brain death and organ transplantation is reflected. Authors express their own attitude to the issues discussed, as professionals facing daily with challenges of brain death in their own clinical practice.

  2. Dental insurance, attitudes to dental care, and dental visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, Dana N; Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John

    2013-01-01

    Dental insurance status is strongly associated with service use. In models of dental visiting, insurance is typically included as an enabling factor. However, in Australia, people self-select into health insurance (privately purchased) and levels of cover for dental services are modest. Rather than enabling access, insurance status may be a "marker" for unmeasured predisposing attitudes. This study aims to explore associations between dental insurance status and visiting while adjusting for dental care attitudes. Participants (South Australians aged 45-54 years) of a 2-year prospective cohort study (2005-2007) investigating dental service use were surveyed on their attitudes to dental care and insurance status. Six attitudinal factors were assessed using a 23-item Likert scale. Bivariate associations between insurance, attitudes, visiting, and other known covariates (age, sex, and household income) were explored. A series of regression models assessed whether prevalence ratios of visiting were attenuated after controlling for attitudinal factors. Response rate was 85.0 percent. Analysis was limited to dentate adults with known dental insurance status (n=529). The majority had dental insurance (75.2%) and made regular visits (63.7%). Insurance status, visiting, and attitudinal factors were significantly associated. Controlling for covariates, insured adults, compared with the uninsured, were 57 percent more likely to make regular visits. After adjusting for attitudinal factors, the significant association between insurance and visiting persisted. Dental care attitudes did not confound the association between dental insurance and visiting, indicating that dental insurance status was not a "marker" for predisposing attitudes. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Public attitudes to genomic science: an experiment in information provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Patrick; Brunton-Smith, Ian; Fife-Schaw, Chris

    2010-03-01

    We use an experimental panel study design to investigate the effect of providing "value-neutral" information about genomic science in the form of a short film to a random sample of the British public. We find little evidence of attitude change as a function of information provision. However, our results show that information provision significantly increased dropout from the study amongst less educated respondents. Our findings have implications both for our understanding of the knowledge-attitude relationship in public opinion toward genomic science and for science communication more generally.

  4. Deaths from cerebrovascular diseases correlated to month of birth: elevated risk of death from subarachnoid hemorrhage among summer-born

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, K.; Imaizumi, Y.

    It has been suggested that maternal nutrition, and fetal and infant growth have an important effect on the risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. We investigated the population-based distribution of deaths from cerebrovascular diseases (ICD9 codes 430, 431, or 434) in Japan in 1986-1994 as a function of birth month, by examining death-certificate records. For a total of 853 981 people born in the years 1900-1959, the distribution of the number of deaths according to the month of birth was compared with the distribution expected from the monthly numbers of all births for each sex and for the corresponding birth decade. For those born between 1920 and 1949, there were significant discrepancies between the actual numbers of deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (ICD9 430) and the numbers expected, and these differences were related to the month of birth. Those born in summer, June-September, consistently had an elevated risk of death, particularly men, where the excess risk was 8%-23%. This tendency was also observed, less distinctly but significantly, for deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICD9 431), but was not observed for those dying from occlusion of the cerebral arteries (ICD9 434). The observation that the risk of dying from subarachnoid hemorrhage was more than 10% higher among those born in the summer implies that at least one in ten deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage has its origin at a perinatal stage. Although variations in hypertension in later life, which could possibly be ''programmed'' during the intra-uterine stages, could be an explanation for this observation, the disease-specific nature of the observation suggests the involvement of aneurysm formation, which is a predominant cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  5. Death in the field: teaching paramedics to deliver effective death notifications using the educational intervention "GRIEV_ING".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Cherri; Mathew, Dana; Woodyard, Donald J; Shofer, Frances S; Brice, Jane H

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are rarely trained in death notification despite frequently terminating resuscitation in the field. As research continues to validate guidelines for the termination of resuscitation (TOR) and reputable organizations such as NAEMSP lend support to such protocols, death notification in the field will continue to increase. We sought to test the hypothesis that a learning module, GRIEV_ING, which teaches a structured method for death notification, will improve the confidence, competency, and communication skills of EMS personnel in death notification. The GRIEV_ING didactic session consisted of a 90-minute education session composed of a didactic lecture, small group breakout session, and role-plays. This was both preceded and followed by a 15-minute case role-play using trained standardized survivors. To assess performance we used a pre-post design with 3 quantitative measures: confidence, competency, and, communication. Paramedics from the local EMS agency participated in the education as a part of continuing education. Pre-post differences were measured using a paired t-test and McNemar's test. Thirty EMS personnel consented and participated. Confidence and competency demonstrated statistically significant improvements: confidence (percent change in scores = 11.4%, p paramedics to use a structured communication model based on the GRIEV_ING mnemonic improved confidence and competence of EMS personnel delivering death notification.

  6. Using response-time latencies to measure athletes’ doping attitudes: the brief implicit attitude test identifies substance abuse in bodybuilders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowing and, if necessary, altering competitive athletes’ real attitudes towards the use of banned performance-enhancing substances is an important goal of worldwide doping prevention efforts. However athletes will not always be willing to reporting their real opinions. Reaction time-based attitude tests help conceal the ultimate goal of measurement from the participant and impede strategic answering. This study investigated how well a reaction time-based attitude test discriminated between athletes who were doping and those who were not. We investigated whether athletes whose urine samples were positive for at least one banned substance (dopers) evaluated doping more favorably than clean athletes (non-dopers). Methods We approached a group of 61 male competitive bodybuilders and collected urine samples for biochemical testing. The pictorial doping Brief Implicit Association Test (BIAT) was used for attitude measurement. This test quantifies the difference in response latencies (in milliseconds) to stimuli representing related concepts (i.e. doping–dislike/like–[health food]). Results Prohibited substances were found in 43% of all tested urine samples. Dopers had more lenient attitudes to doping than non-dopers (Hedges’s g = -0.76). D-scores greater than -0.57 (CI95 = -0.72 to -0.46) might be indicative of a rather lenient attitude to doping. In urine samples evidence of administration of combinations of substances, complementary administration of substances to treat side effects and use of stimulants to promote loss of body fat was common. Conclusion This study demonstrates that athletes’ attitudes to doping can be assessed indirectly with a reaction time-based test, and that their attitudes are related to their behavior. Although bodybuilders may be more willing to reveal their attitude to doping than other athletes, these results still provide evidence that the pictorial doping BIAT may be useful in athletes from other sports

  7. Using response-time latencies to measure athletes' doping attitudes: the brief implicit attitude test identifies substance abuse in bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Ralf; Wolff, Wanja; Thieme, Detlef

    2014-09-10

    Knowing and, if necessary, altering competitive athletes' real attitudes towards the use of banned performance-enhancing substances is an important goal of worldwide doping prevention efforts. However athletes will not always be willing to reporting their real opinions. Reaction time-based attitude tests help conceal the ultimate goal of measurement from the participant and impede strategic answering. This study investigated how well a reaction time-based attitude test discriminated between athletes who were doping and those who were not. We investigated whether athletes whose urine samples were positive for at least one banned substance (dopers) evaluated doping more favorably than clean athletes (non-dopers). We approached a group of 61 male competitive bodybuilders and collected urine samples for biochemical testing. The pictorial doping Brief Implicit Association Test (BIAT) was used for attitude measurement. This test quantifies the difference in response latencies (in milliseconds) to stimuli representing related concepts (i.e. doping-dislike/like-[health food]). Prohibited substances were found in 43% of all tested urine samples. Dopers had more lenient attitudes to doping than non-dopers (Hedges's g = -0.76). D-scores greater than -0.57 (CI95 = -0.72 to -0.46) might be indicative of a rather lenient attitude to doping. In urine samples evidence of administration of combinations of substances, complementary administration of substances to treat side effects and use of stimulants to promote loss of body fat was common. This study demonstrates that athletes' attitudes to doping can be assessed indirectly with a reaction time-based test, and that their attitudes are related to their behavior. Although bodybuilders may be more willing to reveal their attitude to doping than other athletes, these results still provide evidence that the pictorial doping BIAT may be useful in athletes from other sports, perhaps as a complementary measure in evaluations of

  8. Reasons for Unwillingness of Libyans to Donate Organs After Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WA Alashek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organ transplantation in Libya depends exclusively on donations from live relatives. This limitation increases mortality and prolongs the patients’ suffering and waiting time. Objectives:The aims of this study were to explore willingness to donate organs after death and to identify the reasons for refusal. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to July 2008 on a cluster sample of 1652 persons (58% males and 42% females. The questionnaire included demographic information and mainly enquired about willingness to donate organs after death and the reasons for refusal when applicable. Results: About one-third (29.7% of participants were in favor of donating their organs after death, 60.1% refused and 10.2% were undecided. Willingness was significantly associated with being male, younger age, having a college or graduate degree, and being single (P <0.05 for all. Lack of adequate knowledge about the importance of deceased organ donation and uncertainty about its religious implications were the most predominant reasons for refusal (43.8% and 39.5%, respectively. Other reasons included ethical concerns about retrieving organs from dead bodies (37.9%, preference for being buried intact (28%, and uneasiness about the idea of cadaver manipulation (33%. Conclusion: There were a considerable resistance to deceased organ donation, especially among females, those of older age, married people, and those with a low education level. The barriers to cadaveric donations were lack of adequate knowledge, unease about body manipulation, and concerns about religious implications. Public educational campaigns should be coordinated with religious leadership.

  9. Attitude of Jos University medical students to their initial encounter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed to discover the emotional reactions, attitudes and beliefs of undergraduate medical students of University of Jos medical school to 1st time encounter with human cadaver. Materials and Methods: A structured pretested and validated questionnaire was administered to 450 students of 200 to 500 ...

  10. Attitudes to female genital mutilation/cutting among male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [1,3] Focusing on male adolescents, who are tomorrow's fathers, will indicate what interventions are necessary to transform them into advocates of eradication of FGM/C. Objective. To evaluate knowledge about and attitudes to FGM/C among male adolescents, and their preparedness to protect their future daughters from it.

  11. Coping, life attitudes, and immune responses to imagery and group support after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M A; Post-White, J; Grimm, E A; Moye, L A; Singletary, S E; Justice, B

    1997-09-01

    The pilot study used clinical trial methodology to differentiate the effects of imagery and support on coping, life attitudes, immune function, quality of life, and emotional well-being after breast cancer. Women (N = 47) who completed treatment for primary breast cancer, excluding stage IV, were randomly assigned to standard care (n = 15) or six weekly support (n = 16) or imagery (n = 16) sessions. Self-report measures included Ways of Coping-Cancer, Life Attitude Profile, Quality of Life (FACT-B), Profile of Mood States, and Functional Support. Immune measures included natural killer cell activity, plasma neopterin, interferon-gamma, interleukins 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 2, and beta-endorphin levels. Differences between groups over time were tested using general linear models, adjusted for pretest score and covariates (age, stage, and months posttreatment). For all women, interferon-gamma increased, neopterin decreased, quality of life improved, and natural killer activity remained unchanged. Compared with standard care, both interventions improved coping skills (seeking support) and perceived social support, and tended to enhance meaning in life. Support boosted overall coping and death acceptance. When comparing imagery with support, imagery participants tended to have less stress, increased vigor, and improved functional and social quality of life. Although imagery reduced stress and improved quality of life, both imagery and support improved coping, attitudes, and perception of support. The clinical implications of these changes warrant further testing.

  12. Caregiver Attitudes to Gynaecological Health of Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chu, Cordia M.; Chen, Li-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little information available related to the reproductive health of people with intellectual disability (ID). The aims of the present study are to describe caregiver attitudes and to examine determinants of gynaecological health for women with ID. Method: We recruited 1152 caregivers (response rate = 71.87%) and analysed their…

  13. Knowledge And Attitude Of Youth Corps Members In Lagos To ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sickle cell disease has remained a public health problem in Nigeria. This study was carried out to determine the knowledge and attitudes of unmarried NYSC members in Lagos State to sickle cell disease and screening. This study was a cross sectional study. Multistage sampling technique was used to select the ...

  14. attitude of extension personnel to training and visit extension system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISAAC E. ILEVBAOJE. ABSTRACT. This study was undertaken to find out the attitudes of extension workers to the training and visit (T&V) extension system as a complimentary step to specify if this extension approach is on course in Nigeria. Results obtained indicate that about 10. 8, 65.8 and 23.3% of the extension ...

  15. The Effects of Health Education on Knowledge and Attitudes to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was an intervention study to assess the effects of health education on the knowledge and attitudes to emergency contraception (EC) by female students of University of Nigeria in southeast Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 337 female students of a tertiary educational institution (150 in ...

  16. Knowledge of, beliefs about and attitudes to disability: implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: South Africa is a multicultural, multiracial and multilingual nation with many different values, traditions and cultural practices. Different belief systems may give rise to different attitudes and practices relating to disability, which may impact on rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ...

  17. Public secondary school teachers' attitude to family life education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to assess and compare the attitude of teachers in two geopolitical zones of Nigeria to family life education. Methods: Multi stage sample selection was used to pick 6 public secondary schools (3 junior, 3 senior) in each zone. All teachers (221) in the selected schools were ...

  18. Attitudes to School Science Held by Primary Children in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad; Nageen, Tabassum; Pell, Anthony William

    2008-01-01

    Attitudes to science scales developed earlier in England have been used in and around a Pakistan city with children in Primary/Elementary Grades 4-8. The limitations of a "transferred scale" in a culturally different context are apparent in a failure to reproduce the English factor patterns, but items are identified to serve as a base…

  19. Attitudes to coercion at two Norwegian psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Rolf; Kvalvik, Ann-Mari; Hynnekleiv, Torfinn

    2011-04-01

    Many countries allow for the use of restraint and seclusion in emergencies with psychiatric inpatients. Authors have suggested that the attitudes of staff are of importance to the use of restraint and seclusion. To examine the attitudes to coercion at two Norwegian psychiatric units. In contrast to the idea that attitudes to coercion vary much within and between institutions, we hypothesized that staff's attitudes would be quite similar. We distributed a questionnaire to staff at two psychiatric units in two Norwegian counties. Eight wards were included. The questionnaire contained fictitious case histories with one patient that was violent and one patient that was self-harming, and staff were asked to describe how they would intervene in each emergency. Emergency strategies were sorted according to degree of restrictiveness, from the highly restrictive (restraint, seclusion) to the unrestrictive (talking, offering medication). Data were analysed with regression analyses. There was only a limited degree of variance in how staff at the different units and various groups of staff responded. Staff were more likely to favour a highly restrictive intervention when the patients were physically violent. Male staff and unskilled staff were significantly more prone to choosing a highly restrictive intervention. Our hypothesis was confirmed, as there was a limited degree of variance in staff's responses with respect to degree of restrictiveness. The study supported the idea that a range of different interventions are used in emergency situations.

  20. South African geneticists' attitudes to the present Abortion and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study objective. To ascertain the attitudes of clinical geneticists and genetic counsellors practising in South Africa to the current Abortion and Sterilisation Act of 1975 (the Act). Design. Postal questionnaire. Main results. Ninety-two per cent of the questionnaires were returned, and the responses were comparable to those of ...

  1. Is There a Right to the Death of the Foetus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathison, Eric; Davis, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    At some point in the future - perhaps within the next few decades - it will be possible for foetuses to develop completely outside the womb. Ectogenesis, as this technology is called, raises substantial issues for the abortion debate. One such issue is that it will become possible for a woman to have an abortion, in the sense of having the foetus removed from her body, but for the foetus to be kept alive. We argue that while there is a right to an abortion, there are reasons to doubt that there is a right to the death of the foetus. Our strategy in this essay is to consider and reject three arguments in favour of this latter right. The first claims that women have a right not to be biological mothers, the second that women have a right to genetic privacy, and the third that a foetus is one's property. Furthermore, we argue that it follows from rejecting the third claim that genetic parents also lack a right to the destruction of cryopreserved embryos used for in vitro fertilization. The conclusion that a woman possesses no right to the death of the foetus builds upon the claims that other pro-choice advocates, such as Judith Jarvis Thomson, have made. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel O. L. Bacellar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS, which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research.

  3. Attributing death to cancer: cause-specific survival estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survival estimation is an important part of assessing the overall strength of cancer care in a region. Generally, the death of a patient is taken as the end point in estimation of overall survival. When calculating the overall survival, the cause of death is not taken into account. With increasing demand for better survival of cancer patients it is important for clinicians and researchers to know about survival statistics due to disease of interest, i.e. net survival. It is also important to choose the best method for estimating net survival. Increase in the use of computer programmes has made it possible to carry out statistical analysis without guidance from a bio-statistician. This is of prime importance in third- world countries as there are a few trained bio-statisticians to guide clinicians and researchers. The present communication describes current methods used to estimate net survival such as cause-specific survival and relative survival. The limitation of estimation of cause-specific survival particularly in India and the usefulness of relative survival are discussed. The various sources for estimating cancer survival are also discussed. As survival-estimates are to be projected on to the population at large, it becomes important to measure the variation of the estimates, and thus confidence intervals are used. Rothman′s confidence interval gives the most satisfactory result for survival estimate.

  4. Knowledge and attitude to prostate cancer screening in a discrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the knowledge and attitude of doctors to prostate cancer screening in the middle belt region of Nigeria. Methods: Self-administeredquestionnaires were distributed to all physicians at a continuing medical education (CME) workshop organized by the Benue State Chapter of the Nigerian Medical Association in ...

  5. Attitude To Caesarean Section Amongst Antenatal Clients In Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was a cross-sectional study carried out on 372 clients receiving antenatal care at a rural, suburban and urban centres, in order to assess the acceptance of caesarean delivery amongst them and the factors influencing their attitude. Caesarean section was acceptable to 65.7%. Many respondents will refuse the surgery, ...

  6. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to voluntary counseling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) services has become an important tool in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. A cross-sectional knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) study was conducted with 50 nursing students in Zambia. All students were aware of where to go for VCT, and 80% had ...

  7. Knowledge and Attitude of Women to Exclusive Breastfeeding in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infant malnutrition is a public health problem in developing countries. Objective: To determine the knowledge and attitude of women to exclusive breastfeeding in Ikosi district of Ikosi/Isheri Local Government Area. Methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study which employed a multistage sampling ...

  8. Friluftsliv: Outdoor Nature Life as a Method to Change Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellnes, Atle

    1993-01-01

    "Nature-rich mentoring" is a method aimed at changing attitudes and behavior toward the environment. In this method, a small group with members from diverse backgrounds participates in an outdoor expedition with opportunities for daily reflection and discussion. Expeditions should be planned according to participant ability to allow…

  9. Journalists\\' Knowledge of AIDS and Attitude to Persons Living with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study surveyed 254 journalists from the seven media organisations in Ibadan, Nigeria, to assess their knowledge of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), attitude to persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWA) and reports of AIDS-related issues. The journalists\\' overall mean AIDS knowledge score was 10.6 out of 14 ...

  10. Attitude and Beliefs of Nigerian Undergraduates to Spectacle Wear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Uncorrected refractive error is a common cause of preventable visual impairment. Glasses are the cheapest and commonest form of correction of refractive errors. To achieve this, patients must exhibit good compliance to spectacle wear. Patients' attitude and perception of glasses and eye health could affect ...

  11. Attitude of University of Nigeria Medical Students to Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: A study was carried out among 136 final year medical students of University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, to verify their attitude to Community Medicine as well as selection of the course for future specialization. Methods: The study was a cross sectional descriptive one involving all final year medical students of the ...

  12. Attitude of Youth to Agricultural Development Programmes In Ughelli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problems associated with youth behaviours in the Niger Delta region necessitated the study. The specific objectives were to collate the current agricultural development intervention programmes; compare the attitude of youth leaders and non-leaders to agricultural development intervention programmes, and examine ...

  13. Attitude of librarians to the use of computerised information systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A self-constructed questionnaire titled “Librarians Attitudes to Computerised Information Systems (LACIS)” was administered to evaluate the perception of Librarians at the Kenneth Dike Library, University of Ibadan on the use of computerised information system. Based on a four-point Lickert scale, descriptive and inferential ...

  14. Knowledge and attitude towards mother to child transmission of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    factors related to knowledge and attitudes regarding. MTCT, PMTCT (Prevention of Mother to Child. Transmission), VCT and breastfeeding. Data were entered into a computer using SPSS statistical software. Analysis including frequencies, percentages, odds ratios and bivariate analyses were used for reporting the findings.

  15. Knowledge and attitude of nurses to Community Psychiatry services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and attitude of nurses to Community Psychiatry services in Edo state, Nigeria. ... The research instrument for this study was self developed structured questionnaire design in line with the variables to be measured. Descriptive statistics of frequencies and percentages, independent t–test and Pearson Moment ...

  16. Factors Associated with Rabies Awareness and Attitude to Dog Bite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preponderance of stray dogs at the study site necessitated assessment of awareness on rabies and associated factors, attitude to dog bite and knowledge on rabies among students and staff members in a University community. We reviewed hospital records for dog bite cases from 2005 to 2010 and administered structured ...

  17. Knowledge, attitude and practices related to diabetes among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This cross-sectional study sought to establish the level of knowledge of diabetes among community members in rural and urban setups in Kenya and determine how this impacts on their attitude and practices towards diabetes. Methods: A face-to-face interview was done for selected respondents using a ...

  18. Influence of principals' leadership style and teachers' attitude to work ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a serious concern about the spate of indiscipline among youths in recent times, especially those in secondary schools. This study sets out to assess how the leadership style of principals and teachers' attitude to works influence discipline among secondary schools students in Akamkpa Local Government Area ...

  19. Attitudes of Health Professionals to Child Sexual Abuse and Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, N.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Results of surveying 299 professionals concerning their knowledge and attitudes about child sexual abuse and incest showed that the type of sexual activity involved influenced responses; the type of relationship between adult and child, less so. Estimates of incest were low but incest was considered to be harmful to the victim. (Author/DB)

  20. Development of Scales to Assess Homeownership Consumption and Investment Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jeanette A.; Olson, Geraldine I.

    1986-01-01

    A method to measure homeowners' housing consumption and investment attitudes was developed. Dimensions in the consumption scale were space, tenure, structure, quality, and neighborhood. The investment scale included tax benefits, equity, rate of return, leverage, and risk. Personal variables were hypothesized to have an effect on overall…

  1. Attitudes to other ethnicities among New Zealand workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houkamau, C.A.; Boxall, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the “other-group orientation” (OGO) of New Zealand (NZ) workers as a way of measuring their attitudes to the growing ethnic diversity in the contemporary workplace. Design/methodology/approach In all, 500 randomly selected NZ employees were surveyed

  2. Using Pictures to Explore Children's Attitudes toward the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, Carol; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Drawings of one man at four ages, 20, 40, 60, 80 were presented to 180 children (preschool-sixth grade) in a structured interview situation in order to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward age and the elderly. Development of the concept of old follows a cognitive-developmental sequence. (Author)

  3. Attitudes of Educated Yoruba Bilinguals to Codeswitching | Akande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the attitudes of some university and tertiary institution students to codeswitching. Respondents were drawn from four tertiary institutions located in the Southwestern part of Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was administered to the informants whose ages ranged between sixteen and fifty-five years.

  4. Attitude of health care workers to patients and colleagues infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitude of health care workers to patients and colleagues infected with human immunodeficiency virus. ... HCWs were unwilling to accept that medical procedures be carried out on them by HIV-infected doctors and nurses, with almost 80% refusing surgery or assistance at surgery on them by an HIV-infected doctor or nurse.

  5. Nurses' attitude to reading research articles and their perception of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... attitude to reading research articles and their utilization in nursing practice was conducted in University College Hospital (UCH) and Adeoyo Maternity Teaching Hospital (AMTH) both in the city of Ibadan, Nigeria. Data were collected through a 50-item-structured questionnaire using purposive sampling technique to select ...

  6. Study on knowledge, attitude and dog ownership patterns related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    February 2002 to October 2003 showed that the most common animals involved in ... Keywords: Addis Ababa, Attitude, Dog ownership, Knowledge, Rabies ... Therefore this study was designed to generate preliminary information on dog population, dog ownership patterns and socioeconomic status of the community in ...

  7. Public attitudes to organ donation in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract Public attitudes to organ donation may be influ- enced by cultural beliefs as .... Language group. English. 656. 0. 0. Afrikaans. 643. 0. 0. Zulu. 0. 356. 211. Xhosa. 0. 316. 141. Tswana. 0. 58*. 197. Sotho (N and S). 0. 96. 76. Area. PWV. 791. 258*. Transvaal ..... ence black opinions to a large extent (T. Marala - per-.

  8. 'Natural' and 'Unnatural' medical deaths and coronial law: A UK and international review of the medical literature on natural and unnatural death and how it applies to medical death certification and reporting deaths to coroners: Natural/Unnatural death: A Scientific Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    In the United Kingdom, when people die, either a doctor writes an acceptable natural cause of death medical certificate, or a coroner (fiscal in Scotland) investigates the case, usually with an autopsy. An inquest may or may not follow. The concept of 'natural or unnatural cause' death is not internationally standardized. This article reviews scientific evidence as to what is a natural death or unnatural death and how that relates to the international classification of deaths. Whilst there is some consensus on the definition, its application in considering whether to report to the coroner is more difficult. Depictions of deaths in terminal care, medical emergencies and post-operative care highlight these difficulties. It secondly reviews to what extent natural and unnatural are criteria for notification of deaths in England and Wales and internationally. It concludes with consideration of how medical concepts of unnatural death relate in England and Wales to coroners' legal concepts of what is unnatural. Deaths that appear natural to clinicians and pathologists may be legally unnatural and vice versa. It is argued that the natural/unnatural dichotomy is not a good criterion for reporting deaths under medical care to coroners, but the notification of a medical cause of death, using the International Classification of Disease Codes and the medical professional view as to whether it is scientifically natural, is of great value to the coroner in deciding whether it is legally unnatural.

  9. Risk of death due to chronic chagasic cardiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique C Manzullo

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In this longitudinal study 5,710 people were included. The inclusion criteria were two positive serological results for Trypanosoma cruzi infection, 15 and 50 years old and no other demostrable diesease at the time of study. In the five year follow up 1,117 patients were lost. The follow up involved yearly evaluation of serology, clinical examination, X-ray of torax, and ECG, for 4,593 patients and 263 were contacted at home because they did not assist for their clinical consultant. Time average of follow up was 5.3 years. Eighty nine (1.5% of the 4,593 patients died during the follow-up period, 63 (71% by cardiac insufiency (CI and 26 (29% by severe ventricular arrithmias. Diagnosis of cardiomegaly was present in all the patients with diagnosis of CI and in 15 (5% of the patients with diagnosis of arrithmias.The ECG alterations of these pacients show 61 right bundle brunch block (RBBB, associated or not with left anterior hemiblock (LAHB, 47 pathological Q wave and 70 primary repolarization alterations; 61 had polyfocal ventricular arrithmia. The death rate was similar in the sexes and was more frequent between 40 and 50 years of age. Information on 1,380 recuperated patients shows that 15 died with no previous symptoms and without medical assistance and were interpretate as sudden death. The latest ECG in three follow-up of these pacients indicates (before death that only one had normal study and 14 presented 12 RBBB; 9 LAHB; 7 isolated ventricular arrithmia; 10 repolariz alterations; 2 patological Q wave, 10 patients of them with RBBB and repolariz alterations. In all the cases we had people between 35 and 43 years old, 9 men and 6 women. This study shows that in Chagas disease is possible to differenciate two risk groups. A low risk death group that have normal ECG and clinical evaluation during the follow up, and a high risk group associate ECG with RBBB and primary alterations of repolarization and/or inactivation zones with not anual

  10. Measuring Bystander Attitudes and Behavior to Prevent Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Allen, Christopher T.; Postmus, Judy L.; McMahon, Sheila M.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe Hoffman, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to further investigate the factor structure and strength of the Bystander Attitude Scale-Revised and Bystander Behavior Scale-Revised (BAS-R and BBS-R). Participants: First-year students (N = 4,054) at a large public university in the Northeast completed a survey in 2010 as part of a larger longitudinal…

  11. Community knowledge, attitudes and practices related to tick-borne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) is a vector-borne disease of humans which causes serious illness, primarily for children under five years old and pregnant women. Understanding people's knowledge, attitude and practices on the disease is important in designing appropriate interventions. This study was conducted to ...

  12. Study on knowledge, attitude and dog ownership patterns related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted from May 2003 to August 2003 in Addis Ababa with the objective of understanding the distribution of stray and owned dogs, dog ownership patterns and attitudes of people towards rabies and its prevention and control methods. A total of 2390 households were selected from 6 Sub Cities of Addis ...

  13. Attitude of Reproductive Healthcare Providers to the Post-Partum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The knowledge, attitude and practice of the post partum IUD among staff in the obstetrics and gynaecological unit of the Jos University Teaching Hospital has been in doubt all along. Clients were not forth coming for this method of contraception despite the fact that it was readily available in the facility. Objective: To ...

  14. Teacher Attitude to Inspectors and Inspection: Quality Control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the attitude of teachers in Lagos State to inspectors and inspection. The study took the form of a survey. Two hundred and fifty teachers from public secondary schools were selected as samples for the study using stratified random sampling technique. The instruments used for the data collection was the ...

  15. Adolescent religiosity and attitudes to HIV and AIDS in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationships between adolescent religiosity and attitudes to HIV/AIDS based on two major techniques of analysis, factor and regression analysis towards informing preventive school education strategies. Using cross-sectional data of 448 adolescents in junior high school, the study incorporated ...

  16. test anxiety, attitude to schooling, parental influence, and peer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated test anxiety, attitude to schooling, parental influence, and peer pressure as predictors of cheating ... Ex-post facto research design was adopted for the study. Using stratified random ... B. A. Bassey, Department of Educational Foundations, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River. State, Nigeria.

  17. Secondary school teachers' attitude to mental illness in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attitude to mental illness in. Ogun State, Nigeria. NC Aghukwa. Department of Psychiatry, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria. Abstract. Objective: Teachers as role models stand in a unique position in the formation of their pupils' set values about mental health issues. The aim of this study ...

  18. Introduction to Effective Music Teaching: Artistry and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    "Introduction to Effective Music Teaching: Artistry and Attitude" provides the prospective teacher with front-line tested strategies and approaches that are based on current research and the author's three decades of service as a public school music educator, department chairman, and public school district music administrator. Starting with a…

  19. European attitudes to water pricing: Internalizing environmental and resource costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejser, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Efficient use of the water resource requires internalization of all costs in the price of water, including environmental and resource costs. However, water resource management tends to be highly political and increasing water prices are a sensitive and complicated policy matter. Hence, there is a need for increased understanding of the implementation process and the attitudes towards implementation among the general public. This paper explores the spatial heterogeneity in the public attitude towards internalizing environmental and resource costs in the price of water across the EU regions. Within an extensive spatial dataset constructed for the purpose, we estimate the effect of individual information levels and affordability concerns on the attitude towards environmental water pricing. Information about water problems is found to have a significant and positive effect on attitudes as is affordability concern, which may be explained by expectations of inequity measures to come in place in parallel with increasing water prices. Overall these results support the hypothesis that lack of information and affordability concern could lead to resistance towards efficient water pricing among the general public. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Attitudes of Spanish University Teaching Staff to Quality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandiaran-Galdos, Marta; Barrenetxea-Ayesta, Miren; Cardona-Rodriguez, Antonio; Mijangos-Del-Campo, Juan Jose; Olaskoaga-Larrauri, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article sets out to investigate the notions Spanish university teaching staff have of quality in education, on the assumption that those notions give a reliable picture of the attitudes of teaching staff towards education policy design and university management. The paper takes an empirical approach, collecting opinions telematically via a…

  1. Parental knowledge and attitude to children's eye care services

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Achugwo DC. Abah I. Parental knowledge and attitude to children's eye care services. Accepted: 17th December 2015. Onyekachukwu MA. Abah I. Department of optometry,. Faculty of Life Sciences .... sary, 10 lack of funds,11, 12 distance from eye clinic, time, reliance on pediatricians, general practitioners and visual.

  2. The Opinions and Attitudes of Mothers to Mental Retardation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Mental retardation is a chronic and permanent disorder occurring during developmental period of life. The uncertainty of the future and independent existence result in negative attitudes toward the affected children. An increased burden of care leading to emotional and psychological distress among parents.

  3. An Integrative Approach to Language Attitudes and Identity in Brittany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Rachel

    2001-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes of young people in Brittany towards Breton and French, including questions of identity and perceptions of the future of the Breton language. Combined several different techniques within the same project to gain different insights into the issues and established techniques for gathering data on language attitudes…

  4. Attitudes of Undergraduate Students to the Uses of Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisstreet, Martin; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 244 British university undergraduates in biology, computer science, and English investigated attitudes about various uses of animals, including killing animals to make luxury clothing, killing of animals for food, general and medical research using animals, and captivity. Response differences by discipline, gender, and age were also…

  5. Attitude and Perceptions of Clinicians in Lagos to Autopsy Practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitude and Perceptions of Clinicians in Lagos to Autopsy Practice. ... The reasons for this delay include relegation of autopsy pathology as a surbodinate of research or surgical pathology and lack of motivation for the pathologist who is no longer compensated in any way that would encourage his effort. The study shows ...

  6. Assessing Attitude to and Knowledge of Entrepreneurship among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Assessing Attitude to and Knowledge of. Entrepreneurship among Students with Hearing. Impairment in Nigeria. Oyewumi, A. - Department of Special Education, University of Ibadan. E-mail: oyedebomi@yahoo.com. &. Adeniyi, Sam Olufemi - Department of Educational Psychology,. Federal College of Education (Tech) ...

  7. A Path Model for Students' Attitudes to Writing a Thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, John

    2002-01-01

    Using responses of 90 undergraduate and graduate students, developed a model in which action-control belief variables have only an indirect effect on students' attitudes to writing a thesis mediated through two academic orientation variables. The model accounted for a large proportion of the repeatable variance in the two academic orientation…

  8. Adolescent religiosity and attitudes to HIV and AIDS in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kofi Nyame Amoako-Agyeman

    Abstract. This study investigated the relationships between adolescent religiosity and attitudes to HIV/AIDS based on two major techniques of analysis, factor and regression analysis towards informing preventive school education strategies. Using cross-sectional data of 448 adolescents in junior high school, the study ...

  9. Test anxiety, attitude to schooling, parental influence, and peer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated test anxiety, attitude to schooling, parental influence, and peer pressure as predictors of cheating tendencies in examination among secondary school students in Edo State, Nigeria. Ex-post facto research design was adopted for the study. Using stratified random sampling technique, 1200 senior ...

  10. Attitude of teachers to school based adolescent reproductive health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... adolescent sexual behaviour, including contraceptive use is important. The attitude of teachers to school-based adolescent reproductive health services was assessed among two hundred and twenty three teachers in Sagamu. Forty seven percent of them were trained family life educators while 52.9% had ...

  11. Knowledge and Attitude to Female Condom Use among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes and use of the female condom among undergraduates of Kigali Health Institute. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out between May and June 2010. The sample was randomly selected from the students of Kigali Health Institute. A questionnaire based study was ...

  12. Perceptions and attitudes of geography teachers to biotechnology: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports the perceptions and attitudes of geography teachers towards biotechnology and genetically-modified (GM) foods in Turkey. A survey was conducted with secondary school geography teachers attending teacher workshops in various parts of the country in 2008 and was responded to by 78 teachers from ...

  13. comparative study on effective factors on consent to organ donation among families of brain death victims in Isfahan, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the previous studies, several social, cultural, and organizational factors are involved in the decision of families of brain death victims for organ donation. The present study was performed to determine the effective factors in the decision of organ donation among families of brain death victims. Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study data were gathered through a self-made questionnaire. The reliability of questionnaire was determined by calculating Cronbach’s alpha (0.81 and the face and content validity were studied and approved by a number of experts. Statistical population included all family members of brain death victims in Isfahan/Iran during 2012-2013. They were divided into two groups of with and without consent to organ donation. The whole population was considered as the study sample. Data analysis were done through SPSS using independent T-test, ANOVA, and Chi-square tests. Results: According to the present study, age and marital status of the victims have no effect on their families’ consent to organ donation (P> 0.05; but sex, duration of hospitalization in the emergency department, having organ donation card ,and personal opinion of the brain death victim showed significant relationship with consent to organ donation (P< 0.05. Conclusion: Since the rate of awareness, knowledge, and attitude of family members are effective in their decision for organ donation, improving cultural backgrounds required for this decision and increasing awareness and knowledge of people can improve the attitude of people in this regard and facilitate the acceptance of family members

  14. Determinants of Public Attitudes to Genetically Modified Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Gausmian, Mohd Hanafy; Zulkifli, Faizah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM) salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country. PMID:24489695

  15. Determinants of public attitudes to genetically modified salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah Amin

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country.

  16. Attitudes to anatomy dissection in an Irish medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kevin C; Ettarh, Raj R

    2009-04-01

    Many studies around the world have looked at the stresses placed on medical students by cadaveric dissection. Although these studies have linked the use of cadavers in medical teaching to stress, some investigations have suggested an association with severe psychological stress and even post-traumatic stress disorder. This study assessed the attitudes of medical and biomedical sciences students in an Irish medical school towards cadaveric dissection by recording, through a questionnaire, their perceptions and experience before initial exposure to dissection and subsequently examining their attitudes after the first dissection and after 9 weeks. Student attitudes towards the dissecting room remained consistently positive for the duration of the study with only a minority of respondents reporting negative symptoms. Pre-existing attitudes to the idea of dissection were unaffected by exposure and subsequent continuous experience of dissection. The majority of students in this study did not find the dissecting room experience stressful, and considered time spent in the dissecting room valuable. However, the proportion of students with negative experiences in the dissecting room was higher than has been reported in previous studies. Many respondents felt they could be better prepared for the dissecting room experience, indicating an increasing requirement for effective preparatory programmes. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Death anxiety as related to somatic symptoms in two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M; Lester, David

    2009-10-01

    Two undergraduate samples from Kuwait (52 men, 157 women; M age = 21.2 yr., SD =2.1) and the USA (46 men, 145 women; M age = 22.4 yr., SD = 5.3) answered the Somatic Symptoms Inventory, the Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety, and the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale. The Kuwaiti sample obtained significantly higher mean scores on all the scales than the American sample. Scores on the Somatic Symptoms Inventory were positively correlated with Death Anxiety scores, indicating that people who enjoy good physical health are less concerned with death.

  18. Microbiota: In Health and in Sickness, From Birth to Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Salih; Uyar, Yunus; Karaca, Serkan; Yazar, Süleyman

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms colonize tissues and organs such as the skin and gastrointestinal, respiratory, and genitourinary systems. These microorganisms are generally called as "human microbiota". Human microbiota mostly consists of commensal microorganisms. The commensal microorganisms located on and in the human body are bacteria, fungi, viruses, archaea, and parasites. The microbiota genome is 100 times bigger in size than the human genome. Although the human genome is stationary, microbial genome has a compatible flexible variability during human life. As well as 2-year-old child and newborn, adult and adolescent, the elderly and pregnant woman have a different microbiota. Microbiota and the microbiota genome can be changed by personal and household diet, antibiotic use, mode of delivery, and hygiene within days or even hours, depending on such as these factors. The human immune system and microbiota grow up, develop, and mature as childhood friends by playing with each other from birth to death. Association between microbiota and human is not just related to childhood-it continues with health and disease, until death separates them. This review focused on the roles of microbiota in parasitology, autoimmune diseases, metabolic diseases, and cancer treatment in detail. In addition, inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles of microbiota on the intestinal immune system and how innate and adaptive immune systems regulate microbiota and its content were explained.

  19. Cardiac screening to prevent sudden death in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmehil, Christopher; Malhotra, Devika; Patel, Dilip R

    2017-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden and unexpected death caused by loss of heart of function. SCD may occur in any population, but when it occurs on the playing field in a young individual, communities worldwide are affected. Although these events are rare, media coverage of sudden cardiac arrests in young athletes have created the impression that these events are far more common than they appear. With a heightened awareness of SCD in young athletes, screening methods have been developed to try and prevent these events from occurring. The American Heart Associations (AHA) currently employs history and physical examination alone during the preparticipation physical exam (PPE), which clears a young athlete for participation in sports. There has been recent discussion on whether to include screening electrocardiogram (ECG) in the PPE especially after one study in Italy by Corrado et al. found that using routine ECG reduced the annual incidence of SCD by 90%. In this article we will discuss how effective the current screening recommendations are, whether routine ECG use should be included in the PPE and if it is cost effective, and review other screening modalities that may be useful in the detection of young athletes at risk for SCD.

  20. East Asian Attitudes toward Death— A Search for the Ways to Help East Asian Elderly Dying in Contemporary America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sok K

    2009-01-01

    The art of dying well has been a quintessential subject of ethicoreligious matters among the people in the West and the East. Most of us wish to die at home; however, about 50% of Americans die in acute care hospitals. Furthermore, immigrants from East Asian cultures feel more uncomfortable near death, because their physicians are not familiar with their traditions. This article is written to help American physicians understand the unique aspects of East Asian Confucian Ethics for the better care of the dying elderly. Western attitudes toward death are briefly reviewed and the six East Asian concepts related to death are elaborated from Confucian Chinese philosophy. To widen the horizon of bioethics and to embrace the Confucian wisdom of dying well, three pearls of wisdom from classical Confucianism are proposed: the relational autonomy of family, Confucian creative self-transformation, and the unity of transcendence and the human being. PMID:20740092

  1. Sudden death due to forced ingestion of vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lisa B E; Rolf, Cristin M; Hunsaker, John C

    2016-09-01

    Vinegar is a clear colorless liquid that commercially consists of 5% acetic acid. It has numerous benefits in everyday use, including culinary, medical, and cleaning. The ingestion of concentrated acetic acid is strongly discouraged and may have detrimental consequences, such as acute pancreatitis, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, gastric and hepatic complications, upper airway obstruction, or death. We report the first case in the literature of a 5-year-old boy who experienced a sudden death due to ingestion of distilled white vinegar. The manner was homicide. There was evidence of nonfatal blunt force impacts of the head, trunk, and extremities. A pungent aromatic odor of the viscera, gastric/small bowel contents, and cranial cavity was noted at autopsy. A dusky gray discoloration of the gastric mucosa, small bowel, and pancreas was observed. Forensic pathologists should consider ingestion of vinegar when confronted with a compelling history as well as an aromatic odor suggesting vinegar and dusky gray discoloration of the gastric mucosa and small bowel. While vinegar is a common household item and has several advantages, it may prove fatal if ingested in large quantities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. From "apparent death" to "birth asphyxia": a history of blame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2017-11-08

    Since the sixteenth century, competition between midwives and surgeons has created a culture of blame around the difficult delivery. In the late seventeenth century, 100 years before oxygen was discovered, researchers associated "apparent death of the newborn" with impaired respiratory function of the placenta. The diagnosis "birth asphyxia" replaced the term "apparent death of the newborn" during the mass phobia of being buried alive in the eighteenth century. This shifted the interpretation from unavoidable fate to a preventable condition. Although the semantic inaccuracy ("pulselessness") was debated, "asphyxia" was not scientifically defined until 1992. From 1792 the diagnosis was based on a lack of oxygen. "Blue" and "white" asphyxia were perceived as different disorders in the eighteenth, and as different grades of the same disorder in the nineteenth century. In 1862, William Little linked birth asphyxia with cerebral palsy, and although never confirmed, his hypothesis was accepted by scientists and the public. Fetal well-being was assessed by auscultating heart beats since 1822, and continuous electronic fetal monitoring was introduced in the 1960s without scientific assessment. It neither diminished the incidence of birth asphyxia nor of cerebral palsy, but rather raised the rate of cesarean sections and litigation against obstetricians and midwives.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 8 November 2017; doi:10.1038/pr.2017.238.

  3. Attitudes and perceptions of workers to sexual harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Hardman, Lisa

    2005-12-01

    The authors investigated how individual factors (age, gender, gender role, past experiences of sexual harassment) and organizational factors (gender ratio, sexual harassment policies, the role of employers) related to workers' attitudes toward and perceptions of sexual harassment. In Study 1, participants were 176 workers from a large, white-collar organization. In Study 2, participants were 75 workers from a smaller, blue-collar organization. Individuals from Study 2 experienced more sexual harassment, were more tolerant of sexual harassment, and perceived less behavior as sexual harassment than did individuals from Study 1. For both samples, organizational and individual factors predicted workers' attitudes toward and experiences of sexual harassment. Individual factors-such as age, gender, gender role, past experiences of sexual harassment, and perceptions of management's tolerance of sexual harassment-predicted attitudes toward sexual harassment. Workers' attitudes, the behavioral context, and the gender of the victim and perpetrator predicted perceptions of sexual harassment. The authors discussed the broader implications of these findings and suggested recommendations for future research.

  4. Exploring the limits of implicit attitude measures from social psychology to study language attitudes:contextualizing the P-IAT

    OpenAIRE

    Rosseel, Laura; Geeraerts, Dirk; Speelman, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the matched guise technique in the 1960s (Lambert et al. 1960), there has been little methodological innovation in the field of language attitude research (Speelman et al. 2013). In social psychology, by contrast, a considerable number of new methods to measure implicit attitudes has been developed in the past two decades (Gawronski & De Houwer 2014). It is only recently that sociolinguistics has started to explore the potential of some of these social psychological ...

  5. Giving birth to death.Life professionals managing the bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Hernández Garre

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the main representations, experiences and coping strategies developed by health professionals involved in perinatal bereavement care. A qualitative and phenomenological approach was used conducting a series of semi-structured interviews to professionals of different categories of obstetric areas of three public hospitals in the region of Murcia. The stories talk about of professionals trained for the life they have to face death, talk about of a lack of institutional training to the professionals react drawing on the experience, empathy or self-taught. They talk about painful situations that are experienced by clinicians with hints of tragedy, speak of care directed to the psychological management of mourning, talks about the transition from coping models duels based on avoidance and emotional detachment to others centered on the verbalization of experience and contact with the stillborn.

  6. Death by Numbers: A Response to Backer, Sarigianides, and Stillwaggon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this response essay, Peter Taubman considers the relationship between melancholia and Freud's notion of a death drive. Taubman explores how audit culture sustains melancholia and intensifies the death drive, ultimately deadening our psyches by erasing memory, disparaging feelings, shutting down thought, and ignoring history. Taubman concludes…

  7. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Jelinek, Anja; Laino, Vincenzo; Hoffmann, Lena; Eisenbach, Ina; Eying, Roman; Ganjam, Goutham K; Dolga, Amalia M; Oppermann, Sina; Culmsee, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Ferroptosis has been defined as an oxidative and iron-dependent pathway of regulated cell death that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis and established pathways of death receptor-mediated regulated necrosis. While emerging evidence linked features of ferroptosis induced e.g. by

  8. Surveillance of deaths caused by arboviruses in Brazil: from dengue to chikungunya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Freitas, André Ricardo Ribas; Brasil, Patrícia; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio

    2017-01-01

    Did death occur DUE TO dengue, or in a patient WITH dengue virus infection? It seems a matter of semantics, but in fact, it underscores how challenging it is to distinguish whether the disease contributed to death, or was itself the underlying cause of death. Can a death be attributed to chikungunya virus, when some deaths occur after the acute phase? Did the virus decompensate the underlying diseases, leading to death? Did prolonged hospitalisation lead to infection, resulting in the patient’s progression to death? Were there iatrogenic complications during patient care? The dengue question, for which there has not yet been a definitive response, resurfaces prominently under the chikungunya surveillance scenario. We are facing an epidemic of a disease that seems to be more lethal than previously thought. The major challenge ahead is to investigate deaths suspected of occurring due to arbovirus infections and to understand the role of each infection in the unfavourable outcome. PMID:28767985

  9. The Attitudes of Students from ESL and EFL Countries to English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Hasbi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is to study the attitudes of English students from English as a Second Language (ESL and English as a Foreign Language (EFL country in English and Foreign Languages University (EFL University, Hyderabad to English. This is a descriptive-quantitative research with a survey method. The attitudes researched include those to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The data was taken through questionnaire consisting of 20 questions. The findings of this study showed that the English students in EFL University have neutral-to-positive attitudes to Listening, positive attitudes to Speaking, positive attitudes to Reading, and poor attitudes to Writing. In addition, the English students from ESL country have better attitudes to Reading (positive and Writing (neutral and those from EFL country have better attitudes to Speaking (neutral-to-positive and Listening (neutral-to-positive.

  10. The Attitudes of Students From ESL And EFL Countries To English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hasbi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is to study the attitudes of English students from English as a Second Language (ESL and English as a Foreign Language (EFL country in English and Foreign Languages University (EFL University, Hyderabad to English. This is a descriptive-quantitative research with a survey method. The attitudes researched include those to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The data was taken through questionnaire consisting of 20 questions. The findings of this study showed that the English students in EFL University have neutral-to-positive attitudes to Listening, positive attitudes to Speaking, positive attitudes to Reading, and poor attitudes to Writing. In addition, the English students from ESL country have better attitudes to Reading (positive and Writing (neutral and those from EFL country have better attitudes to Speaking (neutral-to-positive and Listening (neutral-to-positive.

  11. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... to approach in vivo conditions. Microfluidics also allow implementation of a wide range of electrochemical or optical assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, extracellular pH, cell viability and enzyme activity1,2. Currently...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  12. Ageism and death: effects of mortality salience and perceived similarity to elders on reactions to elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Andy; Greenberg, Jeff; Schimel, Jeff; Landau, Mark J

    2004-12-01

    The present research investigated the hypotheses that elderly people can be reminders of our mortality and that concerns about our own mortality can therefore instigate ageism. In Study 1, college-age participants who saw photos of two elderly people subsequently showed more death accessibility than participants who saw photos of only younger people. In Study 2, making mortality salient for participants increased distancing from the average elderly person and decreased perceptions that the average elderly person possesses favorable attitudes. Mortality salience did not affect ratings of teenagers. In Study 3, these mortality salience effects were moderated by prior reported similarity to elderly people. Distancing from, and derogation of, elderly people after mortality salience occurred only in participants who, weeks before the study, rated their personalities as relatively similar to the average elderly person's. Discussion addresses distinguishing ageism from other forms of prejudice, as well as possibilities for reducing ageism.

  13. Rationalized Psycho-Economic Decisions And Parental Attitude To ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings showed that parental attitude to equal access to and the participation of the girl-child to education is still negative and unsupportive. Some 83.3% of the parents preferred to educate the boys rather than the girls as only 29.0% agreed that girls are useful to their family of origin when they are married while 77.1% ...

  14. The Australian Governments' Attitude to East Timor Problem in 1974-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е V Esakova

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author considers the reasons of East Timor problem, the factors which conditioned the Australian government attitude to the issue as well as the attitude of Indonesian government to this conflict resolution.

  15. PROCRASTINATION AS FACTOR OF THE EMOTIONAL ATTITUDE OF STUDENTS TO LEARNING ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kuznetsov

    2016-04-01

    Manifestation of academic procrastination in the emotional attitude to learning activity is connected with students’ academic progress. High academic progress students’ emotional attitude to learning activity is broken by procrastination more than that of low academic progress students.

  16. Correcting the Count: Improving Vital Statistics Data Regarding Deaths Related to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, Brandi C; Davis, Gregory G; Dye, Daniel W

    2017-11-15

    Obesity can involve any organ system and compromise the overall health of an individual, including premature death. Despite the increased risk of death associated with being obese, obesity itself is infrequently indicated on the death certificate. We performed an audit of our records to identify how often "obesity" was listed on the death certificate to determine how our practices affected national mortality data collection regarding obesity-related mortality. During the span of nearly 25 years, 0.2% of deaths were attributed to or contributed by obesity. Over the course of 5 years, 96% of selected natural deaths were likely underreported as being associated with obesity. We present an algorithm for certifiers to use to determine whether obesity should be listed on the death certificate and guidelines for certifying cases in which this is appropriate. Use of this algorithm will improve vital statistics concerning the role of obesity in causing or contributing to death. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. RESPONSES OF SHEEP TO ZYGADENUS GRAMINEUS, "DEATH CAMAS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, A R

    1931-01-30

    An extract of Zygadenus gramineus, "death camas," from which most of the resins had been removed was given intravenously to sheep prepared for recording blood-pressure and respiratory movements. Following the intravenous injection of this extract there occurred a respiratory inhibition which in the case of the injection of larger amounts of the extract was followed by asphyxia-like rises of blood-pressure. The graphic record of this asphyxial condition was practically duplicated by closing the tracheal cannula for a short time following the recovery of the animal from the effects of the plant extract. Although, from a field standpoint, no satisfactory antidote has been found, it has been demonstrated that caffein sodio-benzoate possesses marked powers of stimulation for the respiratory center affected by the depressive substances found in Zygadenus gramineus.

  18. [Sudden cardiac death due to sarcoidosis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejben, István; Som, Zoltán; Cserni, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology, which is characterized by bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary disease. Clinically detected cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of sarcoid patients, although cardiac manifestations are discovered in 25% of the cases at autopsy. Sarcoid heart disease frequently causes atrioventricular block. The authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with bradycardia. On admission, second degree Mobitz II, then third degree atrioventricular block was diagnosed. Coronarography showed normal coronary arteries. 2.5 years following artificial Biotronik Entovis DR type pacemaker implantation, sudden cardiac death occurred. Autopsy revealed sarcoidosis with cardiac, pulmonary, splenic, renal and lymph node involvement. In case of young or middle-aged patients with atrioventricular block, it is best to search for other causes if the most common coronary origin can be excluded. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(27): 1067-1070.

  19. Attitudes of psychiatric nurses to treatment and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Philip, A E

    1985-06-01

    A sample of 208 psychiatric nurses and nursing assistants completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes to treatment and patients. Significant attitudinal differences between groups were found in relation to professional grade, age and sex. Staff with more professional training were less authoritarian and impersonal than staff more junior in the hierarchy. Younger males with Registered Mental Nurse training were found to be significantly less inclined towards physical methods of nursing and treatment. Male nurses tended to favour therapeutic techniques which emphasized independent nurse action and psychological proximity to patients. Female nurses were more favourably inclined to physical methods of treatment and were significantly more authoritarian and formal towards patients in line with the traditional stereotype of the general hospital nurse. Results are discussed in relation to the setting up of new treatment regimes within psychiatric hospitals and the influence that staff attitudes have on their functioning.

  20. Experiences, considerations and emotions relating to cardiogenetic evaluation in relatives of young sudden cardiac death victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, Christian; Onderwater, Astrid T; van Langen, Irene M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2014-02-01

    Relatives of young sudden cardiac death (SCD) victims are at increased risk of carrying a potentially fatal inherited cardiac disease. Hence, it is recommended to perform an autopsy on the victim and to refer his or her relatives to a cardiogenetics clinic for a full evaluation to identify those at risk and allow preventive measures to be taken. However, at present, the number of families attending a cardiogenetics clinic after the SCD of a young relative is low in the Netherlands. We performed a qualitative study and report on the experiences and attitudes of first-degree relatives who attended a cardiogenetics clinic for evaluation. In total, we interviewed nine first-degree relatives and one spouse of seven SCD victims about their experiences, considerations and emotions before attendance and at the first stage of the cardiogenetic evaluation before DNA results were available. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed. Medical professionals did not have an important role in informing or referring relatives to a cardiogenetics clinic. Importantly, all participants indicated that they would have appreciated a more directive approach from medical professionals, because their mourning process hampered their own search for information and decision-making. A need to understand the cause of death and wanting to prevent another SCD event occurring in the family were the most important reasons for attending a clinic. There are possibilities to improve the information process and better support their decision-making. The multidisciplinary cardiogenetic evaluation was appreciated, but could be improved by minor changes in the way it is implemented.

  1. Attitudes to Improving Speaking Skills by Guided Individual Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Galina Kavaliauskienė; Ligija Kaminskienė

    2014-01-01

    Students’ perceptions of difficulties in speaking on professional issues are in the focus of the present article. It is generally assumed that the skill of speaking a foreign language is very difficult to master, while speaking on professional topics involves such difficulties as the usage of specific vocabulary and ability to deal with listeners’ oncoming arguments. The aims of the current research are to investigate learners’ attitudes to the level of difficulty in speaking activi - ties on...

  2. British political values, attitudes to climate change, and travel behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Ron; Deeming, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The UK is committed to a sharp reduction of greenhouse gases. Progress towards its goal will depend on whether the public can be persuaded to change their travel behaviour. Using British Social Attitudes 2011 survey data, analyses show that the majority of adults – especially the young and better-educated – believe that climate change is occurring but even concerned believers appear reluctant to modify their behaviour. Policies designed to alter transport habits and induce behaviour change ne...

  3. Psychiatrists׳ fear of death is associated with negative emotions toward borderline personality disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Ehud; Shrira, Amit; Hermesh, Hagai; Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Iancu, Iulian

    2015-08-30

    This study examines the relationship between psychiatrists׳ fear of death and negative emotions toward patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). A survey (N=120) demonstrated that fear of death is associated with stronger negative attitudes toward BPD patients, after controlling for attitudes toward suicide. Our findings emphasize the importance of psychiatrists׳ awareness to their fear of death as a relevant factor for their emotions toward BPD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF CANINE DEATH DUE TO PROJECTILE INJURY - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Banerjee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reason of death of a dog was analysed by radiographic findings of thoracic cavity during post mortem examination and the specific cause of death was diagnosed as due to projectile injury.

  5. Ways To Reduce the Risk of SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death Page Content Research shows that there are several ... SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death: The actions listed here and in Safe to ...

  6. The Relationship of age, attitude, knowladge, cost to cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminatul Fitria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is the leading cause of 51% blindness case in the world. Cataract can only be cured trough surgery, but most people with cataract in Indonesia is not in undergoing surgery due to several factors. The increasing number of cataract victim whose not undergoing any treatment to cure them will resulting in increasing number of blindness case, so blindness cause by cataracts can be a public health problem. This research was conducted to determine the relationship of age, attitudes, knowledge and the cost of the action to perform cataract surgery. This research was an observational analytic study with cross sectional design. The samples were cataract patients in Undaan Eye Hospital Surabaya who were randomly selected using a simple random sampling based on medical records of 60 people. Data collection was done by taking secondary data and interviews to patients. Those variables was analyzed with chi square or Fisher’s exact with significancy level at 95%. The result showed that there were correlation between knowledge (p = 0.017, operating costs (p = 0.001 and attitude (0.000 while age was not related (p = 1.000, the actions to perform cataract surgery. The conclusion from this research was the attitude, knowledge and operating costs related to the actions to perform cataract surgery, while age was not related to the actions to perform cataract surgery. It is recommended to give through leaflets or other media in the lobby for improving patient education, counseling to the patient family, the doctor’s advice to convince patient for surgery. Keywords: practice, surgery, cataract, attitudes, costs

  7. Training law enforcement to respond to opioid overdose with naloxone: Impact on knowledge, attitudes, and interactions with community members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karla D; Bovet, L James; Haynes, Bruce; Joshua, Alfred; Davidson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Training law enforcement officers (LEOs) to administer naloxone to opioid overdose victims is increasingly part of comprehensive efforts to reduce opioid overdose deaths. Such efforts could yield positive interactions between LEOs and community members and might ultimately help lower overdose death rates. We evaluated a pilot LEO naloxone program by (1) assessing opioid overdose knowledge and attitudes (competency in responding, concerns about naloxone administration, and attitudes towards overdose victims) before and after a 30min training on overdose and naloxone administration, and (2) conducting qualitative interviews with LEOs who used naloxone to respond to overdose emergencies after the training. Eighty-one LEOs provided pre- and post-training data. Nearly all (89%) had responded to an overdose while serving as an LEO. Statistically significant increases were observed in nearly all items measuring opioid overdose knowledge (p's=0.04 to overdose competencies (pnaloxone administration (poverdose victims (p=0.90). LEOs administered naloxone 11 times; nine victims survived and three of the nine surviving victims made at least one visit to substance abuse treatment as a result of a LEO-provided referral. Qualitative data suggest that LEOs had generally positive experiences when they employed the skills from the training. Training LEOs in naloxone administration can increase knowledge and confidence in managing opioid overdose emergencies. Perhaps most importantly, training LEOs to respond to opioid overdose emergencies may have positive effects for LEOs and overdose victims. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 20 CFR 410.450 - Death due to pneumoconiosis, including statutory presumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death due to pneumoconiosis, including... COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.450 Death due to pneumoconiosis, including statutory presumption...

  9. 20 CFR 410.458 - Irrebuttable presumption of death due to pneumoconiosis-survivor's claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Irrebuttable presumption of death due to... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.458 Irrebuttable presumption of death due to pneumoconiosis—survivor's...

  10. Health discourses, slimness ideals and attitudes to physical activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfister, Gertrud Ursula; With-Nielsen, Ninna; Lenneis, Verena

    2017-01-01

    messages about a healthy and active lifestyle. Based on five focus-group interviews and a survey among 784 female students aged 16-20, we explored their attitudes and practices with regard to physical activity and health. The analysis of the material is theoretically informed by the work of Foucauldian...... scholars who have used the concepts of governmentality and disciplinary power to explore current public health policies and young people’s health-related attitudes and practices. We found that for the participants in our study ‘health’ was inextricably intertwined with slimness and fitness, to which......Studies conducted in Denmark reveal that many young women drop out of sport and exercise in their teenage years even though they possess good knowledge about health recommendations and the benefits of physical activity. This raises the question as to how they interpret and make use of the current...

  11. Attitudes to publicly funded obesity treatment and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas Bøker; Sandøe, Peter; Lassen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the Danish public’s support for publicly funded obesity treatment and prevention. It was also examined whether levels of support could be explained by dislike of obese people and / or the belief that those who are obese are personally responsible...... for their condition. A representative survey of members of the Danish public (N=1,141) was conducted using a web-based questionnaire. The survey was designed to assess attitudes to public funding for obesityrelated health care, and to investigate the impact, on those attitudes, of dislike of obese people......, the perceived controllability of obesity, self-reported BMI, and additional attitudinal and sociodemographic characteristics. Public funding of some obesity treatments, such as weight-loss surgery, attracted only limited public support. A majority of the Danish public did support ‘softer’ treatment...

  12. Great expectations: students' educational attitudes upon the transition to post-secondary vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elffers, L.; Oort, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine students’ educational attitudes upon the transition to Dutch senior vocational education (SVE), a transition associated with high dropout rates in the first year. Prior studies have identified differences in educational attitudes between sociodemographic groups. However,

  13. Continuous Sedation Until Death With or Without the Intention to Hasten Death-A Nationwide Study in Nursing Homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the removal of consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a controversial practice. Some consider CSD a palliative treatment, whereas others claim that CSD is frequently used with the intention to hasten death. In nursing

  14. TIMSS 2003: Relating dimensions of mathematics attitude to mathematics achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadijević Đorđe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, which used a sample of 137,346 students from thirty three countries that participated in the TIMSS 2003 project in the eighth grade, examined the features of the individual and collective relations of three dimensions of mathematics attitude to mathematics achievement (MA, searching for the dimension mostly related to that achievement. The three dimensions of mathematics attitude were self-confidence in learning mathematics (SCLM, liking mathematics (LM and usefulness of mathematics (UM. By utilizing psychometrically valid and reliable measures of the three dimensions, it was found that: (1 each dimension of mathematics attitude alone was positively related to MA for almost all thirty three countries; (2 SCLM was primarily related to MA for thirty one countries; (3 when the two other dimensions were held constant, SCLM was positively related to MA for thirty three countries, LM was negatively related to MA for thirty countries, whereas UM was not related to MA for twenty one countries; (4 positive collective relationships of SCLM, LM and UM to MA considerably varied from country to country. Implications for research and practice are included.

  15. Parental adjustment and attitudes to parenting after in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, F L; Ungerer, J A; Tennant, C C; Saunders, D M

    2000-03-01

    To examine the psychosocial and parenthood-specific adjustment and attitudes to parenting at 1 year postpartum of IVF parents. Prospective, controlled study. Volunteers in a teaching hospital environment. Sixty-five primiparous women with singleton IVF pregnancies and their partners, and a control group of 61 similarly aged primiparous women with no history of infertility and their partners. Completion of questionnaires and interviews. Parent reports of general and parenthood-specific adjustment and attitudes to parenting. The IVF mothers tended to report lower self-esteem and less parenting competence than control mothers. Although there were no group differences on protectiveness, IVF mothers saw their children as significantly more vulnerable and "special" compared with controls. The IVF fathers reported significantly lower self-esteem and marital satisfaction, although not less competence in parenting. Both IVF mothers and fathers did not differ from control parents on other measures of general adjustment (mood) or those more specific to parenthood (e.g., attachment to the child and attitudes to child rearing). The IVF parents' adjustment to parenthood is similar to naturally conceiving comparison families. Nonetheless, there are minor IVF differences that reflect heightened child-focused concern and less confidence in parenting for mothers, less satisfaction with the marriage for the fathers, and vulnerable self-esteem for both parents.

  16. Attitudes to euthanasia in ICUs and other hospital departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepehan, Selma; Ozkara, Erdem; Yavuz, M Fatih

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal doctors' and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia in intensive care units and surgical, internal medicine and paediatric units in Turkey. A total of 205 doctors and 206 nurses working in several hospitals in Istanbul participated. Data were collected by questionnaire and analysed using SPSS v. 12.0. Significantly higher percentages of doctors (35.3%) and nurses (26.6%) working in intensive care units encountered euthanasia requests than those working in other units. Doctors and nurses caring for terminally ill patients in intensive care units differed considerably in their attitudes to euthanasia and patient rights from other health care staff. Euthanasia should be investigated and put on the agenda for discussion in Turkey.

  17. Emergency and palliative care nurses' levels of anxiety about death and coping with death: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Louise; Cant, Robyn; Payne, Sheila; O'Connor, Margaret; McDermott, Fiona; Hood, Kerry; Morphet, Julia; Shimoinaba, Kaori

    2013-11-01

    Caring for dying patients and their families presents many challenges, and may be negatively affected by nurses' Fear of Death. This study investigates attitudes of emergency and palliative care nurses towards death and dying. A mixed methods design including questionnaire and interview, was utilised. This paper reports questionnaire results from the Death Attitude Profile-Revised Scale and coping skills. Twenty-eight emergency nurses and 28 palliative care nurses from two health services participated. Nurses held low to moderate Fear of Death (44%), Death Avoidance (34%), Escape Acceptance (47%) and Approach Acceptance (59%). Emergency nurses reported higher death avoidance and, significantly lower coping skills than palliative care nurses. Both reported high acceptance of the reality of death (Neutral Acceptance 82%), and indicated they coped better with a patient who was dying than with, the patient's family. Nurses generally held positive attitudes towards death and dying. Participants could cope with caring for dying patients, but were significantly less comfortable coping with patients' family members. Nurses should be aware of the impact their attitude towards death may have on providing supportive nursing care for the dying. Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Attitudes to kidney donation among primary care patients in rural Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatziarsenis Marios

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Greece, there is limited research on issues related to organ donation, and the low rate of registration as donors requires explanation. This study reports the findings of a survey of knowledge and attitudes to kidney donation among primary care patients in rural Crete, Greece. Methods Two rural primary care settings in the island of Crete, Anogia Health Centre and Vrachasi Practice, were involved in a questionnaire survey. This was conducted among primary care patients (aged 18 years and over with routine appointments, to assess their knowledge and attitudes to kidney donation. General practitioners (GPs recruited patients and questionnaires were completed following the patients' medical consultation. Pearson's chi square tests were used and crude odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated in order to investigate into the possible associations between the respondents' knowledge, attitudes and specific concerns in relation to their socio-demographic features. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine differences by geographical location. Results The 224 (92.5% of the 242 primary care attenders who were approached agreed to participate. Only 2.2% (5/224 of the respondents carried a donor card. Most participants (84.4%, 189/224 did not feel well informed about registering as a kidney donor. More than half of the respondents (54.3%, 121/223 were unwilling to register as a kidney donor and donate kidneys for transplant after death. Over a third of respondents (35.4%, 79/223 were not confident that medical teams would try as hard as possible to save the life of a person who has agreed to donate organs. People with a higher level of education were more likely to be willing to register as kidney donors [(OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.8–6.0, p Conclusion Lack of knowledge and information regarding organ donation and negative attitudes related to registration as donors were the main findings of this study

  19. Attitudes of physicians and public to pharmaceutical industry 'gifts'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneill, P U; Kerridge, I H; Newby, D; Stokes, B J; Doran, E; Henry, D A

    2010-05-01

    Few studies have reported the attitudes of both individual doctors and members of the public toward the appropriateness of 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies. To investigate the attitudes of both doctors and members of the public toward the appropriateness of receiving particular 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies, and to consider whether public acceptability is a suitable criterion for determining the ethical appropriateness of 'gifts'. A survey questionnaire of medical specialists in Australia and a survey questionnaire of members of the public itemized 23 'gifts' (valued between AU$10 and AU$2500) and asked whether or not each was appropriate. Both medical specialists and members of the public believe certain 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies are appropriate but not others. There was a tendency for members of the public to be more permissive than medical specialists. Although some professional guidelines place importance on the attitudes of the general public to 'gift' giving, and other guidelines give importance to a need for transparency and public accountability, we question whether public acceptability is a suitable criterion for determining the ethical appropriateness of 'gifts'. We suggest that more weight be given to the need for independence of clinical decision making, with empirical evidence indicating that even small 'gifts' can bias clinicians' judgments, and to important values such as the primacy of patient welfare, autonomy and social justice. We conclude that it is time to eliminate giving and receiving of promotional items between the pharmaceutical industry and members of health professions.

  20. Exposure to Violence and Children's Desensitization Attitudes in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabah, Asma; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Usta, Jinan; Doyle, John

    2016-11-01

    Children exposed to multiple sources of violence may become desensitized, increasing the possibility of them imitating the aggressive behaviors they watch and considering such behavior as normal. The purpose of this article is to assess the association between exposure to various types of violence (including war) and desensitization in Lebanese children. A cross-sectional design with 207 school-aged children assessed exposure to violence using three surveys: (a) violence in the media (the Media Preference survey), (b) exposure to violence (the KID-SAVE survey), and (c) desensitization attitudes (the Attitude Toward Violence-Child Version). Children were between 8 and 12 years old, 56% were males, and 70%were from middle socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Seventy-six percent of children reported being exposed to violence, with more exposure in males and in the lower SES group. Impact, however, was greater on girls. The predictors of attitude toward violence were "Frequency" of exposure, "Impact" of exposure, and the amount of violence viewed on television. Children are massively exposed to violence in Lebanon resulting in desensitization, which may habituate them to accept violence as normal and put them at risk for imitating violent behaviors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Caring for dying people: attitudes among Iranian and Swedish nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Sedigheh; Axelsson, Karin; Häggström, Terttu; Sävenstedt, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    To compare the attitudes of Iranian and Swedish nursing students toward caring for dying persons. Their attitudes were measured with the Frommelt's Attitude Toward Caring of the Dying and the Death Attitude Profile Revised. The results indicated that the participating Iranian students were more afraid of death and less likely to give care to dying persons than the Swedish participants. It is suggested that theoretical education should be individualized and culturally sensitive in order to positively influence the students' attitudes, and promote professional development.

  2. Caring for dying people: Attitudes among Iranian and Swedish nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Iranmanesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the attitudes of Iranian and Swedish nursing students toward caring for dying persons. Materials and Methods: Their attitudes were measured with the Frommelt′s Attitude Toward Caring of the Dying and the Death Attitude Profile Revised. Results: The results indicated that the participating Iranian students were more afraid of death and less likely to give care to dying persons than the Swedish participants. Conclusion: It is suggested that theoretical education should be individualized and culturally sensitive in order to positively influence the students′ attitudes, and promote professional development.

  3. Cardiac screening to prevent sudden death in young athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmehil, Christopher; Malhotra, Devika; Patel, Dilip R.

    2017-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden and unexpected death caused by loss of heart of function. SCD may occur in any population, but when it occurs on the playing field in a young individual, communities worldwide are affected. Although these events are rare, media coverage of sudden cardiac arrests in young athletes have created the impression that these events are far more common than they appear. With a heightened awareness of SCD in young athletes, screening methods have been developed t...

  4. Pathways to lifespan health following childhood parental death

    OpenAIRE

    Luecken, Linda J.; Roubinov, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01

    The death of a parent is a profoundly stressful form of childhood adversity, increasing the short- and long-term risk of mental health problems. Emerging research suggests it may also disrupt biological regulatory systems and increase the risk of long-term physical health problems. This article presents a theoretical framework of the process by which the experience of parental death during childhood may influence mental and physical health outcomes over time. Drawing from a broad literature o...

  5. SPECIFICS OF ADOLESCENT ATTITUDE TO PHYSICAL TRAINING AND SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Antonova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, the role of physical education and sports in youth health improvement has deteriorated, the public status of physical training for purposes of health improvement and promotion has fallen. The article outlines the results of a study of attitudes to physical education and sports among 310 senior grades in secondary schools of the town of Zhukovsky in Moscow region under the program of research into health-saving behaviours in adolescents. Along with a low sports activity most adolescents of both sexes do not do morning exercises at all. At the same time, their overall motor performance is also at a very low level. The sedentary life style becomes a dominant feature in the development of younger generation.Key words: adolescents, attitude to sports, motor performance.

  6. Attitudes to telehealth use among rural residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Fyhn Lykke

    2008-01-01

    Context: Rural communities tend to be underserved by medical services. Low access to medical services affects quality of life and may also affect settlement decisions. The use of telehealth has often been mentioned as an alternative way to provide health care services in remote, underserved areas...

  7. Develop, apply and attitude scale to investigate the social marketing of sport

    OpenAIRE

    Ünal, Hakan; Mengütay, Sami

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop, apply and assess an attitude scale to investigate the social marketing of sport, its effects on the public attitude and the attitude of the society towards sport. The sample scale consists of 55 attitude statements including 5 dimensions (habit of doing sport regularly, society and sport, media-advertisement and sport, the effect of state and private sectors on sport, sportive education of families and children). The pilot study was carried out with 150 pe...

  8. Comparison of ENVISAT's Attitude Simulation and Real Optical and SLR Observations in order to Refine the Satellite Attitude Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silha, J.; Schildknecht, T.; Pittet, J.; Bodenmann, D.; Kanzler, R.; Karrang, P.; Krag, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Astronomic Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) in cooperation with other three partners is involved in an ESA study dedicated to the attitude determination of large spacecraft and upper stages. Two major goals are defined. First is the long term prediction of tumbling rates (e.g. 10 years) for selected targets for the future Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions. Second goal is the attitude state determination in case of contingencies, when a short response time is required between the observations themselves and the attitude determination. One of the project consortium partners, Hypersonic Technology Goettingen (HTG), is developing a highly modular software tool ιOTA to perform short- (days) to long-term (years) propagations of the orbit and the attitude motion of spacecraft in space. Furthermore, ιOTA's post-processing modules will generate synthetic measurements, e.g. light curves, SLR residuals and Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) images that can be compared with the real measurements. In our work we will present the first attempt to compare real measurements with synthetic measurements in order to estimate the attitude state of tumbling satellite ENVISAT from observations performed by AIUB. We will shortly discuss the ESA project and ιOTA software tool. We will present AIUB's ENVISAT attitude state determined from the SLR ranges acquired by the Zimmerwald SLR station. This state was used as the initial conditions within the ιOTA software. Consequently the attitude of satellite was predicted by using ιOTA and compared with the real SLR residuals, as well with the high frame-rate light curves acquired by the Zimmerwald 1-m telescope.

  9. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1999-05-01

    Current law in the United States authorizes physicians to diagnose brain death by applying generally accepted neurologic criteria for determining loss of function of the entire brain. This article offers a medical-legal perspective on problems that may arise with respect to the determination of brain death. These include the possibility of diagnostic error, conceptual disagreements that may constrain the use of neurologic criteria to diagnose death, and the conflation of brain death and loss of consciousness. This article also addresses legal aspects of the debate over whether to expand the definition of brain death to include permanent unconsciousness. Although existing laws draw a clear distinction between brain death and the persistent vegetative state, many courts have authorized removal of life support from individuals whose unconsciousness is believed to be permanent on proof that removal accords with preferences expressed before sentience was lost.

  10. Still on physicians' attitude to medical marijuana

    OpenAIRE

    Olukayode Abayomi; Emmanuel Babalola

    2014-01-01

    Desai and Patel highlighted in a recent review that and ldquo;there are several issues related to medical marijuana, which concern public health such as its medical use, harmful effects, laws and physicians role. and rdquo; Certainly, physician's perspectives and position on the relative harm and benefits of marijuana contribute to the growing controversy over its legalization in western countries. Interestingly, the seeming resistance of physicians in western countries to marijuana prescrip...

  11. Scale to Measure Attitudes toward Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Anu A.; Paul E. Brauchle; Kenton F. Machina

    2013-01-01

    The current post-secondary graduation rates in computing disciplines suggest American universities are only training enough students to fill one third of the projected 1.4 million technology and computing jobs available (National Center for Women and Information Technology, 2011). Pursuit of information technology (IT) majors depends, to a great…

  12. Attitude of secondary school youth to the healthy nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Řeháková, Jarmila

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the point of the secondary school youth attitude on the issue of the rational nutrition. Using the questionnaire investigation that is divided into several research areas I am trying to prove or disconfirm the existence of the mutual relationship between the branch of study and the preferences of healthy nutrition and healthy lifestyle for youth. My thesis deals with the question of a provable relationship in knowledge achieved in the field of healthy nutrition and hea...

  13. [Maternal deaths due to amniotic fluid embolism. Results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morau, E; Proust, A; Ducloy, J-C

    2017-12-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an unpredictable, dreadful complication of pregnancy or childbirth. EA typically includes in the same lapse of time respiratory, haemodynamic, neurological and hemorrhagic symptoms (from early and severe coagulopathy). Immediate supportive treatment by a multidisciplinary team is the cornerstone of the management. Between 2010 an 2012 in France, 24 deaths were related to AFE giving a maternal mortality ratio of 1/100,000 live births (CI 95% 0.6-1.4). AFE ranks as the second leading cause of direct maternal death. Eight cases over 23 were classified as having some degree of substandard care. Substandard care included delays in performing aggressive surgical treatment or delays in the diagnosis and the treatment of the coagulopathy. Learning points focus on the importance to pay attention on premonitory symptoms, to early assess the clotting status and to train in multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Perceptions, Attitudes, and Choosing to Study Foreign Languages in England: An Experimental Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Florentina; Marsden, Emma J.

    2014-01-01

    The declining interest in foreign languages in English-speaking countries has been attributed to negative societal attitudes and specific pupil attitudes and perceptions. While various initiatives have aimed to encourage language study, little research has systematically documented the relationship among perceptions, attitudes, and actually opting…

  15. East to West or West to East: Plague Spread after the Black Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Cui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Black Death, one of the most destructive pandemics in human history, has claimed millions of lives and considerably influenced human civilization. Following the Black Death, plague outbreaks in Europe lasted for several hundred years until late the 18th century. It is generally presumed that the Black Death was caused by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis and spread from China to Europe in one or more waves. However, because of the lack of etiological research during the medieval period and absence of a natural plague focus in Europe today, the causative agent of this pandemic and its transmission has led to long-term debate among researchers. Thus, several questions remain including whether Y. pestis actually caused the Black Death, whether a natural plague focus existed in medieval Europe and led to post-Black Death plague outbreaks, and whether the Europe plague focus played a role in the spread and evolution of Y. pestis.

  16. SCORE should be preferred to Framingham to predict cardiovascular death in French population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Ivanny; Boissel, Jean-Pierre; Kassaï, Behrouz; Bejan, Theodora; Massol, Jacques; Vidal, Chrystelle; Amsallem, Emmanuel; Naudin, Florence; Galan, Pilar; Czernichow, Sébastien; Nony, Patrice; Gueyffier, François

    2009-10-01

    Numerous studies have examined the validity of available scores to predict the absolute cardiovascular risk. We developed a virtual population based on data representative of the French population and compared the performances of the two most popular risk equations to predict cardiovascular death: Framingham and SCORE. A population was built based on official French demographic statistics and summarized data from representative observational studies. The 10-year coronary and cardiovascular death risk and their ratio were computed for each individual by SCORE and Framingham equations. The resulting rates were compared with those derived from national vital statistics. Framingham overestimated French coronary deaths by 2.8 in men and 1.9 in women, and cardiovascular deaths by 1.5 in men and 1.3 in women. SCORE overestimated coronary death by 1.6 in men and 1.7 in women, and underestimated cardiovascular death by 0.94 in men and 0.85 in women. Our results revealed an exaggerated representation of coronary among cardiovascular death predicted by Framingham, with coronary death exceeding cardiovascular death in some individual profiles. Sensitivity analyses gave some insights to explain the internal inconsistency of the Framingham equations. Evidence is that SCORE should be preferred to Framingham to predict cardiovascular death risk in French population. This discrepancy between prediction scores is likely to be observed in other populations. To improve the validation of risk equations, specific guidelines should be issued to harmonize the outcomes definition across epidemiologic studies. Prediction models should be calibrated for risk differences in the space and time dimensions.

  17. I Have to Go on: The Effect of a Mother's Death on Her Daughter's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Theresa Helen McLuskey

    2011-01-01

    Parents die during the lives of their children. If the child is an adolescent, that death will impact the student's education immediately or in subsequent years. Findings show the death of a mother does impact the daughter's education. It is imperative educators are willing to work with the student at the time the death occurs as well as in the…

  18. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  19. Young, Black, and Sentenced To Die: Black Males and the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Janice

    1996-01-01

    Explores the death penalty as imposed on young black males in the United States and examines the disparity in death penalty rates for homicides with black offenders and white victims. States continue to impose the death penalty rather than viewing youth violence as a failure of the social system. (SLD)

  20. First Grade Teacher's Feelings about Discussing Death in the Classroom and Suggestions To Support Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Cordero, Minerva

    Drawing on the literature and a survey of first-grade teachers, this paper provides a summary of the ways children grieve, children's ideas on death, ways to help children contend with the difficulties surrounding death, and teachers' feelings about discussing death in the classroom. Twelve teachers completed a questionnaire about how to…