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Sample records for attenuates hypobaric hypoxia

  1. Hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt attenuates hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative damage in rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dhananjay; Saxena, Saurabh; Jayamurthy, Purushotman; Sairam, Mustoori; Singh, Mrinalini; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Bansal, Anju; Ilavazaghan, Govindaswamy

    2009-01-01

    Shukla, Dhananjay, Saurabh Saxena, Purushotman Jayamurthy, Mustoori Sairam, Mrinalini, Singh, Swatantra Kumar Jain, Anju Bansal, and Govindaswamy Ilavazaghan. High Alt. Med. Biol. 10:57-69, 2009.-Hypoxic preco759nditioning (HPC) provides robust protection against injury from subsequent prolonged hypobaric hypoxia, which is a characteristic of high altitude and is known to induce oxidative injury in lung by increasing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing the effectiveness of the antioxidant defense system. We hypothesize that HPC with cobalt might protect the lung from subsequent hypobaric hypoxia-induced lung injury. HPC with cobalt can be achieved by oral feeding of CoCl(2) (12.5 mg kg(-1)) in rats for 7 days. Nonpreconditioned rats responded to hypobaric hypoxia (7619 m) by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio. They also showed a marked increase in lipid peroxidation, heat-shock proteins (HSP32, HSP70), metallothionins (MT), levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, MCP-1), and SOD, GPx, and GST enzyme activity. In contrast, rats preconditioned with cobalt were far less impaired by severe hypobaric hypoxia, as observed by decreased ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, and inflammatory cytokine release and an inceased GSH/GSSG ratio. Increased expression of antioxidative proeins Nrf-1, HSP-32, and MT was also observed in cobalt- preconditioned animals. A marked increase in the protein expression and DNA binding activity of hypoxia-inducible transcriptional factor (HIF-1alpha) and its regulated genes, such as erythropoietin (EPO) and glucose transporter-1 (glut-1), was observed after HPC with cobalt. We conclude that HPC with cobalt enhances antioxidant status in the lung and protects from subsequent hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. PMID:19278353

  2. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: Molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor κB (NFκB) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NFκB inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NFκB in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NFκB. The lower levels of NFκB observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NFκB DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT

  3. Approximate Simulation of Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia with Normobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Some manufacturers of reduced oxygen (O2) breathing devices claim a comparable hypobaric hypoxia (HH) training experience by providing F(sub I) O2 hypoxia (NH) as for HH exposures the devices ignore P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 as more direct agents to induce signs and symptoms of hypoxia during acute training exposures. RESULTS. There is not a sufficient integrated physiological understanding of the determinants of P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 under acute NH and HH given the same hypoxic pO2 to claim a device that provides isohypoxia. Isohypoxia is defined as the same distribution of hypoxia signs and symptoms under any circumstances of equivalent hypoxic dose, and hypoxic pO2 is an incomplete hypoxic dose. Some devices that claim an equivalent HH experience under NH conditions significantly overestimate the HH condition, especially when simulating altitudes above 10,000 feet (3,048 m). CONCLUSIONS. At best, the claim should be that the devices provide an approximate HH experience since they only duplicate the ambient pO2 at sea level as at altitude (iso-pO2 machines). An approach to reduce the overestimation is to at least provide machines that create the same P(sub I)O2 (iso-P(sub I)O2 machines) conditions at sea level as at the target altitude, a simple software upgrade.

  4. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  5. Relationship between mitochondrial haplogroup and physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Motoi, Midori; Nishimura, Takayuki; Egashira, Yuka; Kishida, Fumi; Watanuki, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between mtDNA polymorphism and physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia. The study included 28 healthy male students, consisting of 18 students in haplogroup D and 10 in haplogroup M7+G. Measurement sensors were attached to the participants for approximately 30 min in an environment with a temperature of 28 °C. After resting for 15 min, the programmed operation of the hypobaric chamber decreased the atmospheric pressure by 11.9 Torr every minute to...

  6. Neuroprotective effect of cobalt chloride on hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Kalpana; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju; Sairam, Mustoori; Banerjee, P K; Ilavazhagan, Govindaswamy

    2008-02-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia, characteristic of high altitude is known to increase the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), and decrease effectiveness of antioxidant enzymes. RONS are involved and may even play a causative role in high altitude related ailments. Brain is highly susceptible to hypoxic stress and is involved in physiological responses that follow. Exposure of rats to hypobaric hypoxia (7619 m) resulted in increased oxidation of lipids and proteins due to increased RONS and decreased reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio. Further, there was a significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) levels. Increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was also noticed along with metallothionein (MT) II and III. Administration of cobalt appreciably attenuated the RONS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained GSH/GSSH ratio similar to that of control cells via induction of HO-1 and MT offering efficient neuroprotection. It can be concluded that cobalt reduces hypoxia oxidative stress by maintaining higher cellular HO-1 and MT levels via hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) signaling mechanisms. These findings provide a basis for possible use of cobalt for prevention of hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. PMID:17706837

  7. Relationship between mitochondrial haplogroup and physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoi, Midori; Nishimura, Takayuki; Egashira, Yuka; Kishida, Fumi; Watanuki, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between mtDNA polymorphism and physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia. The study included 28 healthy male students, consisting of 18 students in haplogroup D and 10 in haplogroup M7+G. Measurement sensors were attached to the participants for approximately 30 min in an environment with a temperature of 28 °C. After resting for 15 min, the programmed operation of the hypobaric chamber decreased the atmospheric pressure by 11.9 Torr every minute to simulate an increase in altitude of 150 m until 9.7 Torr (equivalent to 2500 m) and then decreased 9.7 Torr every minute until 465 Torr (equivalent to 4000 m). At each altitude, the pressure was maintained for 15 min and various measurements were taken. Haplogroup D showed higher SpO2 (p haplogroup M7+G. The distal skin temperature was higher in haplogroup D when compared with M7+G. These results suggested that haplogroup D maintained SpO2 at a higher level with higher peripheral blood flow during acute hypobaric exposure. PMID:27130215

  8. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

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    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  9. An Insight into the Changes in Human Plasma Proteome on Adaptation to Hypobaric Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Garg, Iti; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia is required by animals and human in several physiological and pathological situations. Hypobaric hypoxia is a pathophysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. Identifying the molecular variables playing key roles in this process would be of paramount importance to shed light on the mechanisms known to counteract the negative effects of oxygen lack. To obtai...

  10. Proteomic Identification of Novel Differentiation Plasma Protein Markers in Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. Methods In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat ind...

  11. Guanfacine ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial working memory deficits.

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    Kauser, H; Sahu, S; Kumar, S; Panjwani, U

    2014-01-17

    Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) observed at high altitude causes mild cognitive impairment specifically affecting attention and working memory. Adrenergic dysregulation and neuronal damage in prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in hypoxia induced memory deficits. Optimal stimulation of alpha 2A adrenergic receptor in PFC facilitates the spatial working memory (SWM) under the conditions of adrenergic dysregulation. Therefore the present study was designed to test the efficacy of alpha 2A adrenergic agonist, Guanfacine (GFC), to restore HH induced SWM deficits and PFC neuronal damage. The rats were exposed to chronic HH equivalent to 25,000ft for 7days in an animal decompression chamber and received daily treatment of GFC at a dose of 1mg/kg body weight via the intramuscular route during the period of exposure. The cognitive performance was assessed by Delayed Alternation Task (DAT) using T-Maze and PFC neuronal damage was studied by apoptotic and neurodegenerative markers. Percentage of correct choice decreased significantly while perseverative errors showed a significant increase after 7days HH exposure, GFC significantly ameliorated the SWM deficits and perseveration. There was a marked and significant increase in chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, neuronal pyknosis and fluoro Jade positive cells in layer II of the medial PFC in hypoxia exposed group, administration of GFC significantly reduced the magnitude of these changes. Modulation of adrenergic mechanisms by GFC may serve as an effective countermeasure in amelioration of prefrontal deficits and neurodegenerative changes during HH. PMID:24184415

  12. Proteomic identification of novel differentiation plasma protein markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. METHODS: In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h, separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF. Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers.

  13. Muscle fatigue and exhaustion during dynamic leg exercise in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter;

    1996-01-01

    Using an exercise device that integrates maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC) of knee extensor muscles with dynamic knee extension, we compared progressive muscle fatigue, i.e., rate of decline in force-generating capacity, in normoxia (758 Torr) and hypobaric hypoxia (464 Torr). Eight...... closely to impaired shortening velocity than to failure of force-generating capacity....

  14. Consequences of Longterm-Confinement and Hypobaric Hypoxia on Immunity in the Antarctic Concordia Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Chouker, Alexander; Pierson, Duane; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Salam, Alex; Sams, Clarence

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the affects of longterm-confinement and hypobaric hypoxia on immunity in the Antarctic Concordia environment. It includes information on spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation, immune-related knowledge gaps, and ground-based space flight analogs.

  15. Evidence Report: Risk of Hypobaric Hypoxia from the Exploration Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Jason R.; Conkin, Johnny; Wessel, James H., III; Norsk, Peter; Law, Jennifer; Arias, Diana; Goodwin, Tom; Crucian, Brian; Whitmire, Alexandra; Bloomberg, Jacob; Platts, Steve; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Douglas, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) is at the core of a manned space exploration program. Some elements of exploration may be safely and effectively performed by robots, but certain critical elements will require the trained, assertive, and reasoning mind of a human crewmember. To effectively use these skills, NASA needs a safe, effective, and efficient EVA component integrated into the human exploration program. The EVA preparation time should be minimized and the suit pressure should be low to accommodate EVA tasks without causing undue fatigue, physical discomfort, or suit-related trauma. Commissioned in 2005, the Exploration Atmospheres Working Group (EAWG) had the primary goal of recommending to NASA an internal environment that allowed efficient and repetitive EVAs for missions that were to be enabled by the former Constellation Program. At the conclusion of the EAWG meeting, the 8.0 psia and 32% oxygen (O2) environment were recommended for EVA-intensive phases of missions. After re-evaluation in 2012, the 8/32 environment was altered to 8.2 psia and 34% O2 to reduce the hypoxic stress to a crewmember. These two small changes increase alveolar O2 pressure by 11 mmHg, which is expected to significantly benefit crewmembers. The 8.2/34 environment (inspired O2 pressure = 128 mmHg) is also physiologically equivalent to the staged decompression atmosphere of 10.2 psia / 26.5% O2 (inspired O2 pressure = 127 mmHg) used on 34 different shuttle missions for approximately a week each flight. As a result of selecting this internal environment, NASA gains the capability for efficient EVA with low risk of decompression sickness (DCS), but not without incurring the additional negative stimulus of hypobaric hypoxia to the already physiologically challenging spaceflight environment. This report provides a review of the human health and performance risks associated with the use of the 8.2 psia / 34% O2 environment during spaceflight. Of most concern are the potential effects on the

  16. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

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    Belén Feriche

    Full Text Available When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17 in conditions of normoxia (N1 and hypobaric hypoxia (HH and G2 (n = 11 in conditions of normoxia (N2 and normobaric hypoxia (NH. Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax was recorded as the highest P(mean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max (∼ 3% and maximal strength (1 RM (∼ 6% in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05. We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean and P(peak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01 and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001. No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  17. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean) and P(peak) in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  18. Effects of physical training on pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise under hypobaric hypoxia in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, Osamu; Sakai, Akio

    1991-12-01

    In this investigation, we assessed the effects of physical training on exercise-induced systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic changes under hypobaric hypoxia in catheter-implanted rats. We made continuous measurements of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures during progressive treadmill exercises under hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to altitudes of 2500 and 5500 m) in 46 control and 41 trained rats. Trained rats were exercised on two running schedules: 4 weeks (4-trained) and 6 weeks (6-trained). Both these groups of trained rats were exercised for the same length of running time each day. The increase in resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure(overline {P_{pa} } ) with increasing equivalent altitude was lower in the two trained groups than in the control group. The increase in(overline {P_{pa} } ) with progressive intensity of exercise was lower in the 6-trained than in the 4-trained and control groups at 610 and 2500 m. The 6-trained rats showed higher pH, P a CO 2 and O2 saturation in their blood than did the control group, whereas the P a O 2 was less. Lung tissue cyclic AMP concentration at rest was higher in the 6-trained than in the control group. Finally, it may be noted that exercise-induced lung tissue vasodilator responses seem to be enhanced in well-trained rats under both normobaric normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia. This study indicates that exercise training may be useful in preventing pulmonary hypertension resulting from both hypoxia and exercise.

  19. Cerium oxide nanoparticles protect rodent lungs from hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation

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    Arya A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aditya Arya,1 Niroj Kumar Sethy,1 Sushil Kumar Singh,2 Mainak Das,3 Kalpana Bhargava1 1Peptide and Proteomics Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Defence Research and Development Organization, Delhi, 2Functional Materials Division, Solid State Physics Laboratory, Defence Research and Development Organization, Delhi, 3Biological Science and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India Background: Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria are effective at quenching reactive oxygen species (ROS in cell culture and animal models. Although nanoceria reportedly deposit in lungs, their efficacy in conferring lung protection during oxidative stress remains unexplored. Thus, the study evaluated the protective efficacy of nanoceria in rat lung tissue during hypobaric hypoxia. Methods: A total of 48 animals were randomly divided into four equal groups (control [C], nanoceria treated [T], hypoxia [H], and nanoceria treated plus hypoxia [T+H]. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with either a dose of 0.5 µg/kg body weight/week of nanoceria (T and T+H groups or vehicle (C and H groups for 5 weeks. After the final dose, H and T+H animals were challenged with hypobaric hypoxia, while C and T animals were maintained at normoxia. Lungs were isolated and homogenate was obtained for analysis of ROS, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, protein carbonylation, and 4-hydroxynonenal-adduct formation. Plasma was used for estimating major inflammatory cytokines using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intact lung tissues were fixed and both transmission electron microscopy and histopathological examinations were carried out separately for detecting internalization of nanoparticles as well as altered lung morphology. Results: Spherical nanoceria of 7–10 nm diameter were synthesized using a microemulsion method, and the lung protective efficacy of the nanoceria evaluated during hypobaric hypoxia. With repeated

  20. An Insight into the Changes in Human Plasma Proteome on Adaptation to Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Garg, Iti; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia is required by animals and human in several physiological and pathological situations. Hypobaric hypoxia is a pathophysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. Identifying the molecular variables playing key roles in this process would be of paramount importance to shed light on the mechanisms known to counteract the negative effects of oxygen lack. To obtain a molecular signature, changes in the plasma proteome were studied by using proteomic approach. To enrich the low-abundance proteins in human plasma, two highly abundant proteins, albumin and IgG, were first removed. By comparing the plasma proteins of high altitude natives with those of a normal control group, several proteins with a significant alteration were found. The up-regulated proteins were identified as vitamin D-binding protein, hemopexin, alpha-1–antitrypsin, haptoglobin β-chain, apolipoprotein A1, transthyretin and hemoglobin beta chain. The down-regulated proteins were transferrin, complement C3, serum amyloid, complement component 4A and plasma retinol binding protein. Among these proteins, the alterations of transthyretin and transferrin were further confirmed by ELISA and Western blotting analysis. Since all the up- and down- regulated proteins identified above are well-known inflammation inhibitors and play a positive anti-inflammatory role, these results show that there is some adaptive mechanism that sustains the inflammation balance in high altitude natives exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:23844025

  1. An insight into the changes in human plasma proteome on adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available Adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia is required by animals and human in several physiological and pathological situations. Hypobaric hypoxia is a pathophysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. Identifying the molecular variables playing key roles in this process would be of paramount importance to shed light on the mechanisms known to counteract the negative effects of oxygen lack. To obtain a molecular signature, changes in the plasma proteome were studied by using proteomic approach. To enrich the low-abundance proteins in human plasma, two highly abundant proteins, albumin and IgG, were first removed. By comparing the plasma proteins of high altitude natives with those of a normal control group, several proteins with a significant alteration were found. The up-regulated proteins were identified as vitamin D-binding protein, hemopexin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin β-chain, apolipoprotein A1, transthyretin and hemoglobin beta chain. The down-regulated proteins were transferrin, complement C3, serum amyloid, complement component 4A and plasma retinol binding protein. Among these proteins, the alterations of transthyretin and transferrin were further confirmed by ELISA and Western blotting analysis. Since all the up- and down- regulated proteins identified above are well-known inflammation inhibitors and play a positive anti-inflammatory role, these results show that there is some adaptive mechanism that sustains the inflammation balance in high altitude natives exposed to hypobaric hypoxia.

  2. Intermittent hypoxia hypobaric exposure minimized oxidative stress and antioxidants in brain cells of Sprague Dawleymice

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    Wardaya Wardaya

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Hipoksia hypobaric meningkatkan produksi radikal bebas, terutama spesies oksigen reaktif (ROS. Peningkatan ROS akan menyebabkan stres oksidatif bila tidak disertai dengan peningkatan enzim antioksidan. Kondisi ini dapat dikurangi dengan hipoksia hipobarik intermiten (HHI. Tujuan penelitian ini mengidentifikasi frekuensi IHH yang dapat meminimalkan efek hipoksia hipobarik terhadap stres oksidatif dan aktivitas antioksidan spesifik pada tikus Sprague Dawley.Metode: Penelitian eksperimental pada bulan Februari-April 2010, Subjek terdiri dari satu kelompok kontrol dan empat kelompok paparan pada mencit jantan Sprague Dawley. Setiap kelompok terdiri dari 5 tikus. Kelompok kontrol tidak terpapar IHH. Kelompok terpapar (dengan selang waktu satu minggu terpapar sekali, dua kali, tiga kali, atau empat kali IHH. Semua kelompok paparan dipaparkan hipobarik setara dengan ketinggian: 35.000 ft (1 menit, 25.000 ft (5 menit, dan 18.000 ft (25 menit. Jaringan otak diperiksa untuk 8-OHdG dan SOD.Hasil:Setelah tiga paparan IHH tingkat 8-OHdG sudah kembali ke nilai kontrol (P = 0,843. Tingkat SOD meningkat secara progresif pada dua, tiga, dan empat kali paparan IHH. Bahkan setelah paparan kedua, tingkat SOD sudah sama dengan nilai kontrol, 0,231 ± 0,042 (P = 0,191.Kesimpulan: Tiga kali IHH sudah dapat meminimalkan pengaruh hipoksia hipobarik terhadap stres oksidatif dan aktivitas spesifik antioksidan pada tikus Sprague Dawley.Kata kunci: hipoksia hipobarik intermiten, stres oksidatif, antioksidanAbstractBackground: Hypoxia hypobaric increase the production of free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS. The increase in ROS would cause oxidative stress when not accompanied by an increase in antioxidant enzymes. This condition may minimize by intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH. This study aimed to identify the number of IHH which may minimize the effect of hypoxia hypobaric on oxidative stress and the specific activity of

  3. The effects of acute intermittent hypoxia on cardiovascular parameters in normotensive and chronic hypobaric hypoxia-induced hypertensive rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Muhittin O; Guner, Ibrahim; Uzun, Hafize; Sahin, Gulderen; Yelmen, Nermin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of both chronic hypoxia and acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) on cardiovascular system are unclear. We designed this study to develop a rabbit model of hypertension by exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) and to investigate the effects of AIH on hypertensive rabbits. Present study was performed in 13 albino rabbits that divided into CHH and control groups. To develop hypertension, the rabbits were placed in a hypobaric chamber (390 mmHg; 22 hours/day, 30 days). Afterwards, AIH protocol was applied (8% FIO2 (Fraction of Inspired Oxygen) 1 min + 5 min normoxia, 20 cycles, 2 hours) to rabbits anesthetized with urethane and alpha-chloralose. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and hematocrit values have been determined. Also asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and norepinephrine values have been analyzed in blood. We developed a model of hypertension in rabbits via exposure to severe CHH and we believe that ADMA is an important parameter in the development and permanence of CHH-induced hypertension. The main finding of this sudy was the depressor effect of AIH on blood pressure and heart rate in CHH- induced hypertension model. Finally, we believe that AIH protocol may be applicable for prevention and treatment of hypertension if properly developed. PMID:24448370

  4. Hypobaric Hypoxia Induces Depression-like Behavior in Female Sprague-Dawley Rats, but not in Males

    OpenAIRE

    Kanekar, Shami; Bogdanova, Olena V.; Olson, Paul R.; Sung, Young-Hoon; D'Anci, Kristen E.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Kanekar, Shami, Olena V. Bogdanova, Paul R. Olson, Young-Hoon Sung, Kristen E. D'Anci, and Perry F. Renshaw. Hypobaric hypoxia induces depression-like behavior in female Sprague-Dawley rats, but not males. High Alt Med Biol 16:52–60, 2015—Rates of depression and suicide are higher in people living at altitude, and in those with chronic hypoxic disorders like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and smoking. Living at altitude exposes people to hypobaric hypoxia, which can lo...

  5. Modulatory effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Jayamurthy; Suryakumar, Geetha; Shukla, Dhananjay; Malhotra, Anand Swaroop; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Kumar, Ratan; Sawhney, Ramesh Chand; Chami, Arumughan

    2008-11-25

    Cerebral edema caused by vascular leakage is a major problem in various injuries of the CNS, such as stroke, head injury and high-altitude illness. A common feature of all these disorders is the fact that they are associated with tissue hypoxia. Hypoxia has been suggested to be a major pathogenic factor for the induction of vascular leakage in the brain. The objective of the present study was to evaluate potential of seabuckthorn (SBT) (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in curtailing hypoxia induced transvascular fluid leakage in brain of hypoxia-exposed rats. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia (9144 m, 5h) caused a significant increase in the transvascular leakage studied by measuring water content and leakage of sodium fluorescein dye in the brain. Hypoxic stress also significantly enhanced the oxidative stress markers such as free radicals and malondialdehyde and it accompanied with decreased levels of antioxidants such as glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Pretreatment of animals with SBT seed oil significantly restricted the hypoxia induced increase in fluorescein dye leakage suggesting protection against hypoxia induced transvascular leakage in the brain. Hypoxia induced increase in the levels of free radicals and malondialdehyde were significantly lowered after SBT pretreatment. The SBT seed oil pretreatment also resulted in the significantly improved hypoxic tolerance as evidenced by increased hypoxic gasping time and survival time and decreased plasma catecholamine levels, as compared to hypoxic animals. These observations suggest that SBT seed oil possesses significant hypoxia protection activity and curtailed hypoxia induced enhanced vascular leakage in the brain. PMID:18824077

  6. Hypobaric-hypoxia induces alteration in microbes and microbes-associated enzyme profile in rat colonic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Chiranjit; Lahiri, Pallavi; Adak, Atanu; Ghosh, Kuntal; Pati, Bikas R; Mondal, Keshab C

    2013-10-01

    Present study deals with the straight impact of hypobaric hypoxia on the quantity and composition of some predominant fecal microflora and its functional aspects. For that, isolated fecal contents of rat were exposed to two different simulated air pressures (70 kPa and 40 kPa) for different time durations (1, 3, and 5 h) and the bacterial community composition was compared with normobaric groups (101.3 kPa). It was found that the total anaerobes, Escherichia coli, Enterbacters spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium spp. were increased whereas total aerobes were decreased at both hypobaric treatments. The increased number of amplicon was detected in the pressure-treated groups than the control that clearly mentioned the disruption of microbiota structure at different simulated hypobaric-hypoxia. The amylase, protease, tannase, β-glucuronidase, and alkaline phosphatase activities were increased at these atmospheric pressures. Thus, the present investigation demonstrates that the hypobaric hypoxia is an important environmental factor which can strongly modulate the composition of intestinal flora as well as microflora-derived functional aspects. PMID:24215884

  7. Hypobaric hypoxia in ascites resistant and susceptible broiler genetic lines influences gut morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los, Santos F Solis; Tellez, G; Farnell, M B; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Pavlidis, H O; Donoghue, A M

    2005-09-01

    Genetic selection based on rapid growth rates, improved feed conversion, and increased body weights has led to a predisposition to ascites in broiler populations. Sire-family selection was applied to a commercial elite line to produce divergent lines of ascites-resistant (RES) and ascites-susceptible (SUS) broilers by the 8th generation. One objective of this research was to determine the effects of hypobaric hypoxia on gut morphology in these genetic lines. In two separate trials, pedigree broiler chickens were randomly assigned to cages in a hypobaric chamber (simulated 2,900 m above sea level) or a matching local altitude chamber (390 m above sea level). Ascites incidence was characterized by heart enlargement and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. At the end of the study on d 42, all surviving birds were killed and evaluated for the presence of ascites and 2-cm sections from the duodenum and lower ileum were collected from 5 chickens per line, per altitude for each trial for morphometric analysis. At a high altitude, ascites incidence was lower in the RES line (20.9 and 3.7%) than in the SUS line (86.4 and 66.9%, Trials 1 and 2, respectively). No ascites was observed at a local altitude. Under hypoxic conditions, duodenum villus surface area was higher (P ascites susceptibility suggests reduced enteric function and may provide clues as to why these birds have increased incidence of ascites. PMID:16206574

  8. Regional differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity response to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, Berend; Neupane, Pritam; Thanbichler, Florian; Hadolt, Irmgard; Sattelmeyer, Vera; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Waanders, Robb; Noachtar, Soheyl; Ausserer, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) may appear above 2,500 m altitude, if the time allowed for acclimatization is insufficient. As the mechanisms underlying brain adaptation to the hypobaric hypoxic environment are not fully understood, a prospective study was performed investigating neurophysiological changes by means of near infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalograpy (EEG), and transcranial doppler sonography at 100, 3,440 and 5,050 m above sea level in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal. Fourteen of the 26 mountaineers reaching 5,050 m altitude developed symptoms of AMS between 3,440 and 5,050 m altitude (Lake-Louise Score ⩾3). Their EEG frontal beta activity and occipital alpha activity increased between 100 and 3,440 m altitude, i.e., before symptoms appeared. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) increased in all mountaineers between 100 and 3,440 m altitude. During further ascent to 5,050 altitude, mountaineers with AMS developed a further increase in CBFV in the MCA, whereas in all mountaineers CBFV decreased continuously with increasing altitude in the posterior cerebral arteries. These results indicate that hypobaric hypoxia causes different regional changes in CBFV despite similar electrophysiological changes. PMID:26082017

  9. Effect of Acute Dietary Nitrate Consumption on Oxygen Consumption During Submaximal Exercise in Hypobaric Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriker, Colin R; Mermier, Christine M; Van Dusseldorp, Trisha A; Johnson, Kelly E; Beltz, Nicholas M; Vaughan, Roger A; McCormick, James J; Cole, Nathan H; Witt, Christopher C; Gibson, Ann L

    2016-08-01

    Reduced partial pressure of oxygen impairs exercise performance at altitude. Acute nitrate supplementation, at sea level, may reduce oxygen cost during submaximal exercise in hypobaric hypoxia. Therefore, we investigated the metabolic response during exercise at altitude following acute nitrate consumption. Ten well-trained (61.0 ± 7.4 ml/kg/min) males (age 28 ± 7 yr) completed 3 experimental trials (T1, T2, T3). T1 included baseline demographics, a maximal aerobic capacity test (VO2max) and five submaximal intensity cycling determination bouts at an elevation of 1600 m. A 4-day dietary washout, minimizing consumption of nitrate-rich foods, preceded T2 and T3. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover fashion, subjects consumed either a nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (PL) or ~12.8 mmol nitrate rich (NR) beverage 2.5 hr before T2 and T3. Exercise at 3500 m (T2 and T3) via hypobaric hypoxia consisted of a 5-min warm-up (25% of normobaric VO2max) and four 5-min cycling bouts (40, 50, 60, 70% of normobaric VO2max) each separated by a 4-min rest period. Cycling RPM and watts for each submaximal bout during T2 and T3 were determined during T1. Preexercise plasma nitrite was elevated following NR consumption compared with PL (1.4 ± 1.2 and 0.7 ± 0.3 uM respectively; p exercise at 3500 m does not reduce oxygen cost but may reduce blood lactate accumulation at lower intensity workloads. PMID:26630309

  10. H2S Regulates Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Early Glio-Vascular Dysfunction and Neuro-Pathophysiological Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Gaurav; Chhabra, Aastha; Mishra, Shalini; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Meena, Ramniwas; Ahmad, Yasmin; Bhargava, Kalpana; Prasad, Dipti N.; Sharma, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Hypobaric Hypoxia (HH) is an established risk factor for various neuro-physiological perturbations including cognitive impairment. The origin and mechanistic basis of such responses however remain elusive. We here combined systems level analysis with classical neuro-physiological approaches, in a rat model system, to understand pathological responses of brain to HH. Unbiased ‘statistical co-expression networks’ generated utilizing temporal, differential transcriptome signatures of hippocampus...

  11. Combined intermittent hypobaric hypoxia and muscle electro-stimulation: a method to increase circulating progenitor cell concentration?

    OpenAIRE

    Corral, Luisa; Javierre, Casimiro; Blasi, Juan; Viscor, Ginés; Ricart, Antoni; Ventura, Josep Lluis

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal was to test whether short-term intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) at a level well tolerated by healthy humans could, in combination with muscle electro-stimulation (ME), mobilize circulating progenitor cells (CPC) and increase their concentration in peripheral circulation. Methods Nine healthy male subjects were subjected, as the active group (HME), to a protocol involving IHH plus ME. IHH exposure consisted of four, three-hour sessions at a barometric pressure of 540 hP...

  12. Hypobaric hypoxia induces depression-like behavior in female Sprague-Dawley rats, but not in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Shami; Bogdanova, Olena V; Olson, Paul R; Sung, Young-Hoon; D'Anci, Kristen E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2015-03-01

    Rates of depression and suicide are higher in people living at altitude, and in those with chronic hypoxic disorders like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and smoking. Living at altitude exposes people to hypobaric hypoxia, which can lower rat brain serotonin levels, and impair brain bioenergetics in both humans and rats. We therefore examined the effect of hypobaric hypoxia on depression-like behavior in rats. After a week of housing at simulated altitudes of 20,000 ft, 10,000 ft, or sea level, or at local conditions of 4500 ft (Salt Lake City, UT), Sprague Dawley rats were tested for depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST). Time spent swimming, climbing, or immobile, and latency to immobility were measured. Female rats housed at altitude display more depression-like behavior in the FST, with significantly more immobility, less swimming, and lower latency to immobility than those at sea level. In contrast, males in all four altitude groups were similar in their FST behavior. Locomotor behavior in the open field test did not change with altitude, thus validating immobility in the FST as depression-like behavior. Hypobaric hypoxia exposure therefore induces depression-like behavior in female rats, but not in males. PMID:25803141

  13. A Four-Way Comparison of Cardiac Function with Normobaric Normoxia, Normobaric Hypoxia, Hypobaric Hypoxia and Genuine High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Christopher John; O’Hara, John Paul; Mellor, Adrian; Hodkinson, Peter David; Tsakirides, Costas; Reeve, Nicola; Gallagher, Liam; Green, Nicholas Donald Charles; Woods, David Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been considerable debate as to whether different modalities of simulated hypoxia induce similar cardiac responses. Materials and Methods This was a prospective observational study of 14 healthy subjects aged 22–35 years. Echocardiography was performed at rest and at 15 and 120 minutes following two hours exercise under normobaric normoxia (NN) and under similar PiO2 following genuine high altitude (GHA) at 3,375m, normobaric hypoxia (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to simulate the equivalent hypoxic stimulus to GHA. Results All 14 subjects completed the experiment at GHA, 11 at NN, 12 under NH, and 6 under HH. The four groups were similar in age, sex and baseline demographics. At baseline rest right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure (RVSP, p = 0.0002), pulmonary vascular resistance (p = 0.0002) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) scores were higher and the SpO2 lower (p<0.0001) among all three hypoxic groups (GHA, NH and HH) compared with NN. At both 15 minutes and 120 minutes post exercise, AMS scores, Cardiac output, septal S’, lateral S’, tricuspid S’ and A’ velocities and RVSP were higher and SpO2 lower with all forms of hypoxia compared with NN. On post-test analysis, among the three hypoxia groups, SpO2 was lower at baseline and 15 minutes post exercise with GHA (89.3±3.4% and 89.3±2.2%) and HH (89.0±3.1 and (89.8±5.0) compared with NH (92.9±1.7 and 93.6±2.5%). The RV Myocardial Performance (Tei) Index and RVSP were significantly higher with HH than NH at 15 and 120 minutes post exercise respectively and tricuspid A’ was higher with GHA compared with NH at 15 minutes post exercise. Conclusions GHA, NH and HH produce similar cardiac adaptations over short duration rest despite lower SpO2 levels with GHA and HH compared with NH. Notable differences emerge following exercise in SpO2, RVSP and RV cardiac function. PMID:27100313

  14. High Resolution ECG for Evaluation of Heart Function During Exposure to Subacute Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupet, Petra; Finderle, Zarko; Schlegel, Todd T.; Princi, Tanja; Starc, Vito

    2010-01-01

    High altitude climbing presents a wide spectrum of health risks, including exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Risks are also typically exacerbated by the difficulty in appropriately monitoring for early signs of organ dysfunction in remote areas. We investigated whether high resolution advanced ECG analysis might be helpful as a non-invasive and easy-to-use tool (e.g., instead of Doppler echocardiography) for evaluating early signs of heart overload in hypobaric hypoxia. Nine non-acclimatized healthy trained alpine rescuers (age 43.7 plus or minus 7.3 years) climbed in four days to the altitude of 4,200 m on Mount Ararat. Five-minute high-resolution 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded (Cardiosoft) in each subject at rest in the supine position on different days but at the same time of day at four different altitudes: 400 m (reference altitude), 1,700 m, 3,200 m and 4,200 m. Changes in conventional and advanced resting ECG parameters, including in beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG was estimated by calculation of the regression coefficients in independent linear regression models. A p-value of less than 0.05 was adopted as statistically significant. As expected, the RR interval and its variability both decreased with increasing altitude, with trends k = -96 ms/1000 m with p = 0.000 and k = -9 ms/1000 m with p = 0.001, respectively. Significant changes were found in P-wave amplitude, which nearly doubled from the lowest to the highest altitude (k = 41.6 microvolt/1000 m with p = 0.000), and nearly significant changes in P-wave duration (k = 2.9 ms/1000 m with p = 0.059). Changes were less significant or non-significant in other studied parameters including those of waveform complexity, signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG. High resolution ECG analysis, particularly of the P wave, shows promise as a tool for monitoring early changes in heart function

  15. [Effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia and exhaustive exercise on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Shan, Fa-Bo; Guan, Li-Bin; Cai, Ming-Chun

    2012-04-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the changes of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) level in skeletal muscle after exposure to acute hypobaric hypoxia and exhaustive exercise. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sea level and high altitude groups. The rats in high altitude group were submitted to simulated 5 000 m of high altitude in a hypobaric chamber for 24 h, and sea level group was maintained at normal conditions. All the rats were subjected to exhaustive swimming exercise. The exhaustion time was recorded. Before and after the exercise, blood lactate and glycogen content in skeletal muscle were determined; AMPK and pAMPK levels in skeletal muscle were detected by Western blot. The results showed that the exhaustion time was significantly decreased after exposure to high altitude. At the moment of exhaustion, high altitude group had lower blood lactate concentration and higher surplus glycogen content in gastrocnemius compared with sea level group. Exhaustive exercise significantly increased the pAMPK/AMPK ratio in rat skeletal muscles from both sea level and high altitude groups. However, high altitude group showed lower pAMPK/AMPK ratio after exhaustion compared to sea level group. These results suggest that, after exposure to acute hypobaric hypoxia, the decrement in exercise capacity may not be due to running out of glycogen, accumulation of lactate or disturbance in energy status in skeletal muscle. PMID:22513470

  16. Cardioprotective adaptation of rats to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia is accompanied by the increased association of hexokinase with mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waskova-Arnostova, Petra; Elsnicova, Barbara; Kasparova, Dita; Hornikova, Daniela; Kolar, Frantisek; Novotny, Jiri; Zurmanova, Jitka

    2015-12-15

    Chronic hypoxia increases the myocardial resistance to acute ischemia-reperfusion injury by affecting the mitochondrial redox balance. Hexokinase (HK) bears a high potential to suppress the excessive formation of reactive oxygen species because of its increased association with mitochondria, thereby inhibiting the membrane permeability transition pore opening and preventing cell death. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of severe intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (7,000 m, 8 h/day, 5 wk) on the function and colocalization of HK isoforms with mitochondria in the left (LV) and right ventricles of rat myocardium. The real-time RT-PCR, Western blot, enzyme coupled assay, and quantitative immunofluorescence techniques were used. Our results showed significantly elevated expression of HK isoforms (HK1 and HK2) in the hypoxic LV. In addition, intermittent hypoxia increased the total HK activity and the association of HK isoforms with mitochondria in both ventricles. These findings suggest that HK may contribute to the cardioprotective phenotype induced by adaptation to severe intermittent hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:26494452

  17. Effects of hypobaric hypoxia on adenine nucleotide pools, adenine nucleotide transporter activity and protein expression in rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-Yang Li; Jun-Ze Liu; Li-Ping Wu; Bing Li; Li-Fen Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of hypobaric hypoxia on mitochondrial energy metabolism in rat liver.METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to a hypobaric chamber simulating 5000 m high altitude for 23 h every day for 0 (HO), 1 (H1), 5 (HS), 15 (H15) and 30 d (H30) respectively. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation and liver was removed. Liver mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation program. The size of adenine nucleotide pool (ATP, ADP, and AMP) in tissue and mitochondria was separated and measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) activity was determined by isotopic technique. The ANT total protein level was determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Compared with HO group, intra-mitochondrial ATP content decreased in all hypoxia groups. However,the H5 group reached the lowest point (70.6%) (P< 0.01)when compared to the control group. Intra-mitochondrial ADP and AMP level showed similar change in all hypoxia groups and were significantly lower than that in HO group. In addition, extra-mitochondrial ATP and ADP content decreased significantly in all hypoxia groups.Furthermore, extra-mitochondrial AMP in groups H5, H15and H30 was significantly lower than that in HO group,whereas H1 group had no marked change compared to the control situation. The activity of ANT in hypoxia groups decreased significantly, which was the lowest in H5 group (55.7%) (P<0.01) when compared to HO group. ANT activity in H30 group was higher than in H15 group, but still lower than that in HO group. ANT protein level in H5, H15, H30 groups, compared with HO group decreased significantly, which in H5 group was the lowest, being 27.1% of that in HO group (P<0.01). ANT protein level in H30 group was higher than in H15 group,but still lower than in HO group.CONCLUSION: Hypobaric hypoxia decreases the mitochondrial ATP content in rat liver, while mitochondrial ATP level recovers during long-term hypoxia exposure.The lower

  18. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Sherpa heart: a phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate signature of metabolic defense against hypobaric hypoxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hochachka, P W; Clark, C M; Holden, J E; Stanley, C; Ugurbil, K; Menon, R S

    1996-01-01

    Of all humans thus far studied, Sherpas are considered by many high-altitude biomedical scientists as most exquisitely adapted for life under continuous hypobaric hypoxia. However, little is known about how the heart is protected in hypoxia. Hypoxia defense mechanisms in the Sherpa heart were explored by in vivo, noninvasive 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Six Sherpas were examined under two experimental conditions [normoxic (21% FiO2) and hypoxic (11% FiO2) and in two adaptational state...

  19. Effects of vitamin C on the hypobaric hypoxia-induced immune changes in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Ananda Raj; Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2014-02-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) induces oxidative stress (OS) and is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Vitamin C is an efficient antioxidant, and it is used in a high-altitude environment to reduce the OS. The present study explores the role of vitamin C on some HH-induced changes of immune parameters in rats which were exposed to HHc condition at 18,000 ft in a simulated chamber for 8 h/day for 6 days with and without vitamin C administration at three different doses (200, 400, and 600 mg/kg body wt). The phagocytic activity of circulating blood WBC was increased, and the cytotoxic activity of splenic mononuclear cell (MNC) and the delayed type of hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were decreased in rats exposed to HHc condition, but these immune changes were blocked after administration of vitamin C at 400 mg/kg body wt. The leukocyte adhesive inhibition index (LAI) was not altered either in HHc condition or after administration of vitamin C in HHc condition. The serum corticosterone (CORT) concentration was increased in rats exposed to HHc condition which was blocked after administration of vitamin C (400 mg/kg body wt). The immune parameters and serum CORT concentration, however, did not show any recovery after administration of vitamin C at the dose of 200 and 600 mg/kg body wt. The present study indicates that administration of vitamin C at a dose of 400 mg/kg body wt may prevent the HH-induced immunological changes but not at the lower dose (200 mg/kg body wt) or higher dose (600 mg/kg body wt) in rats.

  20. NITRIC OXIDE (NO), CITRULLINE - NO CYCLE ENZYMES, GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ANOXIA (HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA) AND REPERFUSION IN RAT BRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    M. Swamy, Mohd Jamsani Mat Salleh, K. N .S. Sirajudeen, Wan Roslina Wan Yusof, G. Chandran

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide is postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders due to hypoxia/ anoxia in brain due to increased release of glutamate and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurological disorders and in brain function. To understand their role in anoxia (hypobaric hypoxia) and reperfusion (reoxygenation), the nitric oxide synthase, argininosuccinate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase...

  1. Prolonged hypobaric hypoxemia attenuates vasopressin secretion and renal response to osmostimulation in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestle, Morten H; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Poulsen, Troels D;

    2002-01-01

    (19.5 +/- 2.0 to 10.9 +/- 0.9 mU/l) and plasma vasopressin (1.14 +/- 0.16 to 0.38 +/- 0.06 pg/ml), and doubled circulating levels of norepinephrine (103 +/- 16 to 191 +/- 35 pg/ml) and endothelin-1 (3.0 +/- 0.2 to 6.3 +/- 0.6 pg/ml), whereas urodilatin excretion rate decreased from day 2 (all changes...... P <0.05 compared with sea level). Plasma arginine vasopressin response and the antidiuretic response to hypertonic saline loading were unchanged, but the natriuretic response was attenuated. In conclusion, chronic hypobaric hypoxemia 1) elevates the set point of plasma osmolality......-to-plasma vasopressin relationship, possibly because of concurrent hypertension, thereby causing hypovolemia and hyperosmolality, and 2) blunts the natriuretic response to hypertonic volume expansion, possibly because of elevated circulating levels of norepinephrine and endothelin, reduced urodilatin synthesis, or...

  2. Same Performance Changes after Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugy, Jonas J.; Schmitt, Laurent; Hauser, Anna; Constantin, Guillaume; Cejuela, Roberto; Faiss, Raphael; Wehrlin, Jon P.; Rosset, Jérémie; Robinson, Neil; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the changes in physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study. Methods: Well-trained triathletes (n = 16) were split into two groups and completed two 18-day LTHL camps during which they trained at 1100–1200 m and lived at 2250 m (PiO2 = 111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg) under NH (hypoxic chamber; FiO2 18.05 ± 0.03%) or HH (real altitude; barometric pressure 580.2 ± 2.9 mmHg) conditions. The subjects completed the NH and HH camps with a 1-year washout period. Measurements and protocol were identical for both phases of the crossover study. Oxygen saturation (SpO2) was constantly recorded nightly. PiO2 and training loads were matched daily. Blood samples and VO2max were measured before (Pre-) and 1 day after (Post-1) LHTL. A 3-km running-test was performed near sea level before and 1, 7, and 21 days after training camps. Results: Total hypoxic exposure was lower for NH than for HH during LHTL (230 vs. 310 h; P < 0.001). Nocturnal SpO2 was higher in NH than in HH (92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, P < 0.001). VO2max increased to the same extent for NH and HH (4.9 ± 5.6 vs. 3.2 ± 5.1%). No difference was found in hematological parameters. The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time. Conclusion: Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions. PMID:27148076

  3. Behavioural, brain and cardiac responses to hypobaric hypoxia in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica E; Christensen, Karen; Vizzier-Thaxton, Yvonne; Mitchell, Malcolm A; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2016-09-01

    A novel approach to pre-slaughter stunning of chickens has been developed in which birds are rendered unconscious by progressive hypobaric hypoxia. Termed Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning (LAPS), this approach involves application of gradual decompression lasting 280s according to a prescribed curve. We examined responses to LAPS by recording behaviour, electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) in individual male chickens, and interpreted these with regard to the welfare impact of the process. We also examined the effect of two temperature adjusted pressure curves on these responses. Broiler chickens were exposed to LAPS in 30 triplets (16 and 14 triplets assigned to each pressure curve). In each triplet, one bird was instrumented for recording of EEG and ECG while the behaviour of all three birds was observed. Birds showed a consistent sequence of behaviours during LAPS (ataxia, loss of posture, clonic convulsions and motionless) which were observed in all birds. Leg paddling, tonic convulsions, slow wing flapping, mandibulation, head shaking, open bill breathing, deep inhalation, jumping and vocalisation were observed in a proportion of birds. Spectral analysis of EEG responses at 2s intervals throughout LAPS revealed progressive decreases in median frequency at the same time as corresponding progressive increases in total power, followed later by decreases in total power as all birds exhibited isoelectric EEG and died. There was a very pronounced increase in total power at 50-60s into the LAPS cycle, which corresponded to dominance of the signal by high amplitude slow waves, indicating loss of consciousness. Slow wave EEG was seen early in the LAPS process, before behavioural evidence of loss of consciousness such as ataxia and loss of posture, almost certainly due to the fact that it was completely dark in the LAPS chamber. ECG recordings showed a pronounced bradycardia (starting on average 49.6s into LAPS), often associated with arrhythmia, until

  4. Time course of endocrine changes in the hypophysis-gonad axis induced by hypobaric hypoxia in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Jorge Gonzalo; Bustos-Obregón, Eduardo; Tapia, Pablo Jose; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Zepeda, Andrea; Juantok, Camila; Cruz, Gonzalo; Soto, Gustavo; Benites, Julio; Reyes, Juan Guillermo

    2008-02-01

    Chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) induces a decrease in sperm output and spermatogenesis in male rats. The mechanisms that underlie these changes in testicular function are unknown and could involve changes in the hypophysis-gonad axis. We have tested the hypothesis that changes take place in the endocrine status (FSH, follicle stimulating hormone; LH, luteinizing hormone; testosterone) of rats subjected to CHH. Male Wistar rats were maintained under normobaric or hypobaric conditions (428 torr, 4,600 m). On days 0, 5, 15 and 30 post-exposure, 12 rats were anesthetized, their body weights were measured and blood samples were collected. The testicles were fixed in 4% formaldehyde and processed for histological analysis. In this time course, the FSH levels rose by day 5 post-exposure. On subsequent days, the FSH levels decreased in rats subjected to CHH with a tendency to remain higher than the normoxic group. The LH plasma levels decreased in rats exposed to CHH. Consistent with the decrease in LH levels, the plasma testosterone level decreased significantly after 30 days of CHH exposure. Integrated analysis of hormonal changes in rats subjected to CHH and the body dehydration that occurs in HH allows us to conclude that the effects of CHH on spermatogenesis may be partially related to changes in the hypophysis-gonad hormonal axis. PMID:17984574

  5. S1P prophylaxis mitigates acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced molecular, biochemical, and metabolic disturbances: A preclinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Sonam; Rahar, Babita; Saxena, Shweta

    2016-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging to have hypoxic preconditioning potential in various preclinical studies. The study aims to evaluate the preclinical preconditioning efficacy of exogenously administered S1P against acute hypobaric hypoxia (HH)-induced pathological disturbances. Male Sprague Dawley rats (200 ± 20 g) were preconditioned with 1, 10, and 100 μg/kg body weight (b.w.) S1P (i.v.) for three consecutive days. On the third day, S1P preconditioned animals, along with hypoxia control animals, were exposed to HH equivalent to 7,620 m (280 mm Hg) for 6 h. Postexposure status of cardiac energy production, circulatory vasoactive mediators, pulmonary and cerebral oxidative damage, and inflammation were assessed. HH exposure led to cardiac energy deficit indicated by low ATP levels and pronounced AMPK activation levels, raised circulatory levels of brain natriuretic peptide and endothelin-1 with respect to total nitrate (NOx), redox imbalance, inflammation, and alterations in NOx levels in the pulmonary and cerebral tissues. These pathological precursors have been routinely reported to be coincident with high-altitude diseases. Preconditioning with S1P, especially 1 µg/kg b.w. dose, was seen to reverse the manifestation of these pathological disturbances. The protective efficacy could be attributed, at least in part, to enhanced activity of cardioprotective protein kinase C and activation of small GTPase Rac1, which led to further induction of hypoxia-adaptive molecular mediators: hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and Hsp70. This is a first such report, to the best of our knowledge, elucidating the mechanism of exogenous S1P-mediated HIF-1α/Hsp70 induction. Conclusively, systemic preconditioning with 1 μg/kg b.w. S1P in rats protects against acute HH-induced pathological disturbances. © 2016 IUBMB Life 68(5):365-375, 2016. PMID:26959531

  6. Circulating progenitor cells during exercise, muscle electro-stimulation and intermittent hypobaric hypoxia in patients with traumatic brain injury. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Corral Ansa, Luisa; Conde, L; Guillamó Casanoves, Elisabet; Blasi Cabús, Joan; Juncadella i Puig, Montserrat; Javierre Garcés, Casimiro F.; Viscor Carrasco, Ginés; Ventura i Farré, Josep Lluís

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Circulating progenitor cells (CPC) treatments may have great potential for the recovery of neurons and brain function. OBJECTIVE: To increase and maintain CPC with a program of exercise, muscle electro-stimulation (ME) and/or intermittent-hypobaric-hypoxia (IHH), and also to study the possible improvement in physical or psychological functioning of participants with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). METHODS: Twenty-one participants. Four groups: exercise and ME group (EEG), cycling gr...

  7. H2S Regulates Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Early Glio-Vascular Dysfunction and Neuro-Pathophysiological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Chhabra, Aastha; Mishra, Shalini; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Meena, Ramniwas; Ahmad, Yasmin; Bhargava, Kalpana; Prasad, Dipti N.; Sharma, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Hypobaric Hypoxia (HH) is an established risk factor for various neuro-physiological perturbations including cognitive impairment. The origin and mechanistic basis of such responses however remain elusive. We here combined systems level analysis with classical neuro-physiological approaches, in a rat model system, to understand pathological responses of brain to HH. Unbiased ‘statistical co-expression networks’ generated utilizing temporal, differential transcriptome signatures of hippocampus—centrally involved in regulating cognition—implicated perturbation of Glio-Vascular homeostasis during early responses to HH, with concurrent modulation of vasomodulatory, hemostatic and proteolytic processes. Further, multiple lines of experimental evidence from ultra-structural, immuno-histological, substrate-zymography and barrier function studies unambiguously supported this proposition. Interestingly, we show a significant lowering of H2S levels in the brain, under chronic HH conditions. This phenomenon functionally impacted hypoxia-induced modulation of cerebral blood flow (hypoxic autoregulation) besides perturbing the strength of functional hyperemia responses. The augmentation of H2S levels, during HH conditions, remarkably preserved Glio-Vascular homeostasis and key neuro-physiological functions (cerebral blood flow, functional hyperemia and spatial memory) besides curtailing HH-induced neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus. Our data thus revealed causal role of H2S during HH-induced early Glio-Vascular dysfunction and consequent cognitive impairment. PMID:27211559

  8. Intermittent hypoxia attenuates ischemia/reperfusion induced apoptosis in cardiac myocytes via regulating Bcl-2/Bax expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia has been shown to provide myocardial protection against ishemia/reperfusion-induced injury.Cardiac myocyte loss through apoptosis has been reported in ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our aim was to investigate whether intermittent hypoxia could attenuate ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis in cardiac myocytes and its potential mechanisms. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hypoxia simulated 5000 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h/day, lasting 42 days. Normoxia group rats were kept under normoxic conditions. Isolated perfused hearts from both groups were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion.Incidence of apoptosis in cardiac myocytes was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. Expressions of apoptosis related proteins,Bax and Bcl-2, in cytosolic and membrane fraction were detected by Western Blotting. After ischemia/reperfusion,enhanced recovery of cardiac function was observed in intermittent hypoxia hearts compared with normoxia group.Ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis, as evidenced by TUNEL-positive nuclei and DNA fragmentation, was significantly reduced in intermittent hypoxia group compared with normoxia group. After ischemia/reperfusion,expression of Bax in both cytosolic and membrane fractions was decreased in intermittent hypoxia hearts compared with normoxia group. Although ischemia/reperfusion did not induce changes in the level of Bcl-2 expression in cytosolic fraction between intermittent hypoxia and normoxia groups, the expression of Bcl-2 in membrane fraction was upregulated in intermittent hypoxia group compared with normoxia group. These results indicated that the cardioprotection of intermittent hypoxia against ischemia/reperfusion injury appears to be in part due to reduce myocardial apoptosis. Intermittent hypoxia attenuated ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis via increasing the ratio of Bcl

  9. Naproxen, a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug, Can Affect Daily Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Alterations of Monoamine Levels in Different Areas of the Brain in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Ananda Raj; Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-06-01

    Goswami, Ananda Raj, Goutam Dutta, and Tusharkanti Ghosh. Naproxen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug can affect daily hypobaric hypoxia-induced alterations of monoamine levels in different areas of the brain in male rats. High Alt Med Biol. 17:133-140, 2016.-The oxidative stress (OS)-induced prostaglandin (PG) release, in hypobaric hypoxic (HHc) condition, may be linked with the changes of brain monoamines. The present study intends to explore the changes of monoamines in hypothalamus (H), cerebral cortex (CC), and cerebellum (CB) along with the motor activity in rats after exposing them to simulated hypobaric condition and the role of PGs on the daily hypobaric hypoxia (DHH)-induced alteration of brain monoamines by administering, an inhibitor of PG synthesis, naproxen. The rats were exposed to a decompression chamber at 18,000 ft for 8 hours per day for 6 days after administration of vehicle or naproxen (18 mg/kg body wt.). The monoamine levels (epinephrine, E; norepinephrine, NE; dopamine, DA; and 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in CC, CB, and H were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection, and the locomotor behavior was measured by open field test. The NE and DA levels were decreased in CC, CB, and H of the rat brain in HHc condition. The E and 5-HT levels were decreased in CC, but in H and CB, they remained unaltered in HHc condition. These DHH-induced changes of monoamines in brain areas were prevented after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The locomotor behavior remained unaltered in HHc condition and after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The DHH-induced changes of monoamines in the brain in HHc condition are probably linked with PGs that may be induced by OS. PMID:26894935

  10. Proteins modulation in human skeletal muscle in the early phase of adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigano, A.; Ripamonti, M.; Palma, S. De;

    2008-01-01

    level featuring a reduction of mitochondrial volume density, accumulation of lipofuscin, a product of lipid peroxidation, and dysregulation of enzymes whose time course is unknown. The effects of 7-9 days exposure to 4559 m (Margherita Hut, Monte Rosa, Italy) on the muscle proteins pattern were......High altitude hypoxia is a paraphysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. In man, skeletal muscle, after prolonged exposure to hypoxia, undergoes mass reduction and alterations at the cellular...... investigated, pre- and post-exposure, in ten young subjects, by 2-D DIGE and MS. Ten milligram biopsies were obtained from the mid part of the vastus lateralis muscle at sea level (control) and at altitude, after 7-9 days hypoxia. Differential analysis indicates that proteins involved in iron transport...

  11. Influence of in vivo hypobaric hypoxia on function of lymphocytes, neutrocytes, natural killer cells, and cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, M; Kharazmi, A; Galbo, H;

    1993-01-01

    of an increased concentration of lymphocytes. The absolute and relative concentration of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells increased markedly during hypoxia and returned to pretest values after 2 h of recovery. The NK cell activity of blood mononuclear cells (BMNC, %lysis/fixed no. of BMNC) boosted...

  12. Oxidative Stress in Hypobaric Hypoxia and Influence on Vessel-Tone Modifying Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline Renée; Sonntag, Denise; Hefti, Urs; Risch, Lorenz; Schoch, Otto D; Turk, Alexander J; Hess, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E; Maggiorini,Marco; Merz, Tobias Michael; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Huber, Andreas R

    2013-01-01

    Increased pulmonary artery pressure is a well-known phenomenon of hypoxia and is seen in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases, and also in mountaineers on high altitude expedition. Different mediators are known to regulate pulmonary artery vessel tone. However, exact mechanisms are not fully understood and a multimodal process consisting of a whole panel of mediators is supposed to cause pulmonary artery vasoconstriction. We hypothesized that increased hypoxemia is associated with an ...

  13. Oxidative stress in hypobaric hypoxia and influence on vessel-tone modifying mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline; Sonntag, Denise; Hefti, Urs; Risch, Lorenz; Schoch, Otto D; Turk, Alexander J; Hess, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E; Maggiorini,Marco; Merz, Tobias M; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Huber, Andreas R

    2013-01-01

    Increased pulmonary artery pressure is a well-known phenomenon of hypoxia and is seen in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases, and also in mountaineers on high altitude expedition. Different mediators are known to regulate pulmonary artery vessel tone. However, exact mechanisms are not fully understood and a multimodal process consisting of a whole panel of mediators is supposed to cause pulmonary artery vasoconstriction. We hypothesized that increased hypoxemia is associated with an incr...

  14. The effect of 10 days of heat acclimation on exercise performance in acute hypobaric hypoxia (4350 m).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ailish C; Salgado, Roy M; Astorino, Todd A; Loeppky, Jack A; Schneider, Suzanne M; McCormick, James J; McLain, Trisha A; Kravitz, Len; Mermier, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effect ("cross-tolerance") of heat acclimation (HA) on exercise performance upon exposure to acute hypobaric hypoxia (4350 m). Eight male cyclists residing at 1600 m performed tests of maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) at 1600 m and 4350 m, a 16 km time-trial at 4350 m, and a heat tolerance test at 1600 m before and after 10 d HA at 40°C, 20% RH. Resting blood samples were obtained pre-and post- HA to estimate changes in plasma volume (ΔPV). Successful HA was indicated by significantly lower exercise heart rate and rectal temperature on day 10 vs. day 1 of HA and during the heat tolerance tests. Heat acclimation caused a 1.9% ΔPV, however VO2max was not significantly different at 1600 m or 4350 m. Time-trial cycling performance improved 28 sec after HA (p = 0.07), suggesting a possible benefit for exercise performance at acute altitude and that cross-tolerance between these variables may exist in humans. These findings do not clearly support the use of HA to improve exercise capacity and performance upon acute hypobaric hypoxia, however they do indicate that HA is not detrimental to either exercise capacity or performance. PMID:27227084

  15. NITRIC OXIDE (NO, CITRULLINE - NO CYCLE ENZYMES, GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ANOXIA (HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA AND REPERFUSION IN RAT BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Swamy, Mohd Jamsani Mat Salleh, K. N .S. Sirajudeen, Wan Roslina Wan Yusof, G. Chandran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders due to hypoxia/ anoxia in brain due to increased release of glutamate and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurological disorders and in brain function. To understand their role in anoxia (hypobaric hypoxia and reperfusion (reoxygenation, the nitric oxide synthase, argininosuccinate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, glutamine synthetase and arginase activities along with the concentration of nitrate /nitrite, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total antioxidant status were estimated in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem of rats subjected to anoxia and reperfusion. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the increased production of nitric oxide by increased activity of nitric oxide synthase. The increased activities of argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase suggest the increased and effective recycling of citrulline to arginine in anoxia, making nitric oxide production more effective and contributing to its toxic effects. The decreased activity of glutamine synthetase may favor the prolonged availability of glutamic acid causing excitotoxicity leading to neuronal damage in anoxia. The increased formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased total antioxidant status indicate the presence of oxidative stress in anoxia and reperfusion. The increased arginase and sustained decrease of GS activity in reperfusion group likely to be protective.

  16. Cardioprotective adaptation of rats to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia is accompanied by the increased association of hexokinase with mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wasková-Arnoštová, P.; Elsnicová, B.; Kašparová, D.; Horníková, D.; Kolář, František; Novotný, J.; Žurmanová, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 12 (2015), s. 1487-1493. ISSN 8750-7587 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hexokinase * mitochondrial colocalization * cardioprotection * chronic hypoxia * rat heart Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2014

  17. Effects of prolonged exposure to hypobaric hypoxia on oxidative stress, inflammation and gluco-insular regulation: the not-so-sweet price for good regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Siervo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The mechanisms by which low oxygen availability are associated with the development of insulin resistance remain obscure. We thus investigated the relationship between such gluco-insular derangements in response to sustained (hypobaric hypoxemia, and changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress, inflammation and counter-regulatory hormone responses. METHODS: After baseline testing in London (75 m, 24 subjects ascended from Kathmandu (1,300 m to Everest Base Camp (EBC;5,300 m over 13 days. Of these, 14 ascended higher, with 8 reaching the summit (8,848 m. Assessments were conducted at baseline, during ascent to EBC, and 1, 6 and 8 week(s thereafter. Changes in body weight and indices of gluco-insular control were measured (glucose, insulin, C-Peptide, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR] along with biomarkers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-HNE, inflammation (Interleukin-6 [IL-6] and counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, adrenalin, noradrenalin. In addition, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 and venous blood lactate concentrations were determined. RESULTS: SpO2 fell significantly from 98.0% at sea level to 82.0% on arrival at 5,300 m. Whilst glucose levels remained stable, insulin and C-Peptide concentrations increased by >200% during the last 2 weeks. Increases in fasting insulin, HOMA-IR and glucagon correlated with increases in markers of oxidative stress (4-HNE and inflammation (IL-6. Lactate levels progressively increased during ascent and remained significantly elevated until week 8. Subjects lost on average 7.3 kg in body weight. CONCLUSIONS: Sustained hypoxemia is associated with insulin resistance, whose magnitude correlates with the degree of oxidative stress and inflammation. The role of 4-HNE and IL-6 as key players in modifying the association between sustained hypoxia and insulin resistance merits further investigation.

  18. Hjertets muskelmasse og funksjon ved ekstrem hypobar hypoksi

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia imposes a catabolic reaction on the human organism. We postulated that there would be a significant reduction in left ventricular (LV) myocardial mass, significant changes in cardiac enzymes (CK-MB, Troponin-T, pro-BNP) and signs of diastolic dysfunction after exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. We studied healthy expedition members (n=7) before departure to (pre), directly after return from (post) and 1 month after return from (1 month follow-up) expeditions to 8000-meter pea...

  19. Design and conduct of Xtreme Everest 2: An observational cohort study of Sherpa and lowlander responses to graduated hypobaric hypoxia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/57m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gilbert-Kawai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oxygen availability falls with ascent to altitude and also as a consequence of critical illness. Because cellular sequelae and adaptive processes may be shared in both circumstances, high altitude exposure (‘physiological hypoxia’ assists in the exploration of the response to pathological hypoxia. We therefore studied the response of healthy participants to progressive hypobaric hypoxia at altitude. The primary objective of the study was to identify differences between high altitude inhabitants (Sherpas and lowland comparators. Methods: We performed an observational cohort study of human responses to progressive hypobaric hypoxia (during ascent and subsequent normoxia (following descent comparing Sherpas with lowlanders. Studies were conducted in London (35m, Kathmandu (1300m, Namche Bazaar (3500m and Everest Base Camp (5300m. Of 180 healthy volunteers departing from Kathmandu, 64 were Sherpas and 116 were lowlanders. Physiological, biochemical, genetic and epigenetic data were collected. Core studies focused on nitric oxide metabolism, microcirculatory blood flow and exercise performance. Additional studies performed in nested subgroups examined mitochondrial and metabolic function, and ventilatory and cardiac variables. Of the 180 healthy participants who left Kathmandu, 178 (99% completed the planned trek. Overall, more than 90% of planned testing was completed. Forty-four study protocols were successfully completed at altitudes up to and including 5300m. A subgroup of identical twins (all lowlanders was also studied in detail. Conclusion: This programme of study (Xtreme Everest 2 will provide a rich dataset relating to human adaptation to hypoxia, and the responses seen on re-exposure to normoxia. It is the largest comprehensive high altitude study of Sherpas yet performed. Translational data generated from this study will be of relevance to diseases in which oxygenation is a major factor.

  20. Rapamycin attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tillmanns Harald H

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hypoxia induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation and hypertrophy are important contributors to the remodeling that occurs in chronic hypoxic pulmonary vasculature. We hypothesized that rapamycin (RAPA, a potent cell cycle inhibitor, prevents pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypoxic mice. Methods Mice were held either at normoxia (N; 21% O2 or at hypobaric hypoxia (H; 0.5 atm; ~10% O2. RAPA-treated animals (3 mg/kg*d, i.p. were compared to animals injected with vehicle alone. Proliferative activity within the pulmonary arteries was quantified by staining for Ki67 (positive nuclei/vessel and media area was quantified by computer-aided planimetry after immune-labeling for α-smooth muscle actin (pixel/vessel. The ratio of right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum (RV/[LV+S] was used to determine right ventricular hypertrophy. Results Proliferative activity increased by 34% at day 4 in mice held under H (median: 0.38 compared to N (median: 0.28, p = 0.028 which was completely blocked by RAPA (median HO+RAPA: 0.23, p = 0.003. H-induced proliferation had leveled off within 3 weeks. At this time point media area had, however, increased by 53% from 91 (N to 139 (H, p Conclusion Therapy with rapamycin may represent a new strategy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  1. Long-Term Chronic Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia in Rats Causes an Imbalance in the Asymmetric Dimethylarginine/Nitric Oxide Pathway and ROS Activity: A Possible Synergistic Mechanism for Altitude Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüneburg, Nicole; Siques, Patricia; Brito, Julio; Arriaza, Karem; Pena, Eduardo; Klose, Hans; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Böger, Rainer H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and chronic hypoxia (CH) are associated with high-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH). Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, may contribute to HAPH. This study assessed changes in the ADMA/NO pathway and the underlying mechanisms in rat lungs following exposure to CIH or CH simulated in a hypobaric chamber at 428 Torr. Twenty-four adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups: CIH2x2 (2 days of hypoxia/2 days of normoxia), CH, and NX (permanent normoxia), for 30 days. All analyses were performed in whole lung tissue. L-Arginine and ADMA were analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Under both hypoxic conditions right ventricular hypertrophy was observed (p < 0.01) and endothelial NOS mRNA increased (p < 0.001), but the phosphorylated/nonphosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) ratio was unchanged. ADMA increased (p < 0.001), whereas dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity decreased only under CH (p < 0.05). Although arginase activity increased (p < 0.001) and L-arginine exhibited no changes, the L-arginine/ADMA ratio decreased significantly (p < 0.001). Moreover, NOX4 expression increased only under CH (p < 0.01), but malondialdehyde (MDA) increased (up to 2-fold) equally in CIH2x2 and CH (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that ADMA and oxidative stress likely reduce NO bioavailability under altitude hypoxia, which implies greater pulmonary vascular reactivity and tone, despite the more subdued effects observed under CIH. PMID:27313889

  2. Reduction of Oxidative Stress Attenuates Lipoapoptosis Exacerbated by Hypoxia in Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Youn Hwang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intermittent hypoxia, a characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, is associated with the progression of simple hepatic steatosis to necroinflammatory hepatitis. We determined whether inhibition of a hypoxia-induced signaling pathway could attenuate hypoxia-exacerbated lipoapoptosis in human hepatocytes. The human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 was used in this study. Palmitic acid (PA-treated groups were used for two environmental conditions: Hypoxia (1% O2 and normoxia (20% O2. Following the treatment, the cell viability was determined by the 3,4-(5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium salt (MTS assay, and the mechanism of lipoapoptosis was evaluated by Western blotting. Hypoxia exacerbated the suppression of hepatocyte growth induced by palmitic acid via activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as a result of endoplasmic reticulum (ER and oxidative stresses. Ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species, attenuated the hypoxia-exacerbated lipoapoptosis in hepatocytes, whereas glycerol, which reduces ER stress, did not. This may have been because inhibition of oxidative stress decreases the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, such as caspase 9 and cytochrome c. These results suggested that modulation of apoptotic signaling pathways activated by oxidative stress can aid in identifying novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH with OSA. Further in vivo studies are necessary to understand the pathophysiologic mechanism of NASH with OSA and to prove the therapeutic effect of the modulation of the signaling pathways.

  3. Hypoxia attenuates anti-Aspergillus fumigatus immune responses initiated by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliesser, Mirjam; Wallstein, Marion; Kurzai, Oliver; Einsele, Hermann; Löffler, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic mould that causes invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. During the course of IPA, localised areas of tissue hypoxia occur. Bacterial infection models revealed that hypoxic microenvironments modulate the function of host immune cells. However, the influence of hypoxia on anti-fungal immunity has been largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of hypoxia on the human anti-A. fumigatus immune response. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were stimulated in vitro with germ tubes of A. fumigatus under normoxia or hypoxia (1% O2 ), followed by analysis of DC viability, maturation and cytokine release. While DC viability was unaffected, hypoxia attenuated cytokine release from DCs and maturation of DCs upon stimulation with A. fumigatus. These data suggest that hypoxia at the site of A. fumigatus infection inhibits full activation and function of human DCs. Thereby, this study identified hypoxia as a crucial immune-modulating factor in the human anti-fungal immune response that might influence the course and outcome of IPA in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27005862

  4. Disodium cromoglycate attenuates hypoxia induced enlargement of end-expiratory lung volume in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxová, H; Hezinová, A; Vízek, M

    2011-01-01

    Mechanism responsible for the enlargement of end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) induced by chronic hypoxia remains unclear. The fact that the increase in EELV persists after return to normoxia suggests involvement of morphological changes. Because hypoxia has been also shown to activate lung mast cells, we speculated that they could play in the mechanism increasing EELV similar role as in vessel remodeling in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We, therefore, tested an effect of mast cells degranulation blocker disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on hypoxia induced EELV enlargement. Ventilatory parameters, EELV and right to left heart weight ratio (RV/LV+S) were measured in male Wistar rats. The experimental group (H+DSCG) was exposed to 3 weeks of normobaric hypoxia and treated with DSCG during the first four days of hypoxia, control group was exposed to hypoxia only (H), two others were kept in normoxia as non-treated (N) and treated (N+DSCG) groups. DSCG treatment significantly attenuated the EELV enlargement (H+DSCG = 6.1+/-0.8; H = 9.2+/-0.9; ml +/-SE) together with the increase in minute ventilation (H + DSCG = 190+/-8; H = 273 +/- 10; ml/min +/- SE) and RV/LV + S (H + DSCG = 0.39 +/- 0.03; H = 0.50 +/- 0.06). PMID:22106819

  5. Complement C3 deficiency attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M Bauer

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests a role of both innate and adaptive immunity in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The complement system is a key sentry of the innate immune system and bridges innate and adaptive immunity. To date there are no studies addressing a role for the complement system in pulmonary arterial hypertension.Immunofluorescent staining revealed significant C3d deposition in lung sections from IPAH patients and C57Bl6/J wild-type mice exposed to three weeks of chronic hypoxia to induce pulmonary hypertension. Right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy were increased in hypoxic vs. normoxic wild-type mice, which were attenuated in C3-/- hypoxic mice. Likewise, pulmonary vascular remodeling was attenuated in the C3-/- mice compared to wild-type mice as determined by the number of muscularized peripheral arterioles and morphometric analysis of vessel wall thickness. The loss of C3 attenuated the increase in interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in response to chronic hypoxia, but not endothelin-1 levels. In wild-type mice, but not C3-/- mice, chronic hypoxia led to platelet activation as assessed by bleeding time, and flow cytometry of platelets to determine cell surface P-selectin expression. In addition, tissue factor expression and fibrin deposition were increased in the lungs of WT mice in response to chronic hypoxia. These pro-thrombotic effects of hypoxia were abrogated in C3-/- mice.Herein, we provide compelling genetic evidence that the complement system plays a pathophysiologic role in the development of PAH in mice, promoting pulmonary vascular remodeling and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition we demonstrate C3d deposition in IPAH patients suggesting that complement activation plays a role in the development of PAH in humans.

  6. Mechanism research for the resistant effects of Saussurea involucrate cultured cell extracts on acute hypobaric hypoxia%雪莲培养细胞提取物的抗急性低压缺氧作用机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周湘洁; 邸敏; 张丽芬; 杜学礼; 赵华丽; 钟悦; 尚颖; 周晓春; 郭志刚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the resistance to acute hypobaric hypoxia of Saussurea involucrata cultured cell extracts and the underlying mechanism.Methods Thirty-six Wistar rats were averagely divided into blank control group,negative control group and Saussurea involucrate cultured cell extracts group according to random number table.The Saussurea involucrate cultured cell extracts were infused to the rats of Saussurea involucrate cultured cell extracts group with the dose of 500 mg/kg for 14 d while the distilled water was fed to other 2 groups in the period.Except blank control group,the rats of other groups were exposed in simulative 8 000 m altitude experiencing acute hypobaric hypoxia after 14 d infusion.Then the rats of all groups were killed and sampled blood serum and brain tissue.The changes of various biochemical factors in brain tissue and blood serum,such as glutamic acid (GLU),lactic acid (LD),lactate dehydrogenase (LDH),malondialdehyde (MDA),total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathion peroxidase (GSH-PX) were tested.Results Comparing with those of blank control group,the GLU,NO,LD,LDH and MDA in blood serum and brain tissue of negative control group were significantly increased (P<0.01),and Na+-K+-ATPase,Ca2+ Mg2+-ATPase,TAOC,SOD and GSH-PX were significantly decreased (P<0.01).The GLU,NO,LD,LDH and MDA of Saussurea involucrate cultured cell extracts group were significantly lower than those of negative control group (P<0.01) but with significantly higher Na+-K +-ATPase,Ca2+-Mg2 +-ATPase,T-AOC,SOD and GSH-PX (P<0.01).Conclusions For simulated 8 000 m hypoxia exposure,Saussurea involucrata cultured cell extracts can effectively remove or inhibit the generation of excessive oxygen free radicals and may prevent glutamic acid and lactic acid from accumulating in rat brain tissue and blood serum.By protecting the function of Na-K+-ATPase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase on cell membrane and preventing the consequent toxic reaction induced by energy

  7. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hong [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Xinyi, E-mail: xywu8868@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  8. L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins E and C improve the cardiovascular performance of broiler chickens grown under chronic hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortega, J; Ruiz-Feria, C A

    2010-10-01

    Two hundred broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments: control [CTL; 3,200 kcal of ME/kg, 23% CP, 1.55% Arg, and 40 IU of vitamin E (VE)/kg of feed], high-Arg (HA; CTL+0.8% Arg), or high-Arg and high antioxidant-vitamin diet (AEC; HA+200 IU of VE/kg of feed and 500 mg of vitamin C/L of water). The chicks were housed in wire cages in hypobaric chambers simulating 3,000 m above sea level. From d 28 to 42, clinically healthy birds were selected for cardiovascular performance (n=7 to 12/treatment). After surgery, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were taken at 180, 120, and 60 s (basal values) before an epinephrine (EPI) challenge and then at 30, 60, 120, 180, 300, 600, and 1,200 s after the challenge, followed by a second EPI challenge with similar sample readings. There were no differences in the basal PAP values among chicken groups. The PAP increased within 30 s after both EPI challenges in all groups. It took 180 s after the first EPI challenge for the CTL chickens to return to the basal PAP values, whereas HA and AEC chickens returned to basal PAP values in 120 s. After the second EPI challenge, it took 60, 180, and 300 s for the AEC, HA, and CTL groups, respectively, to return to basal PAP values. The MAP response pattern to the EPI challenges mimicked that of PAP, but there were no differences among treatments in MAP at any sampling point. Supplemental Arg, VE, and vitamin C did not reduce ascites incidence in hypoxic broilers. In conclusion, supplemental Arg improved the pulmonary vascular performance of hypoxic broiler chickens and its effects were further improved by the addition of the antioxidant VE and vitamin C. Arginine and antioxidant vitamins may have played synergistic roles to increase NO bioavailability and reduce oxidative stress damage, thus improving cardiopulmonary performance. PMID:20852105

  9. The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Srivastava, Mousami; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and responses induced after immediate exposure and the resolution of these effects in challenge to hypobaric hypoxia. In the present study, using 2-DE/MS approach, we attempt to resolve these shortcomings by analysing the proteome alterations in lungs in response to different durations of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Our study thus highlights the gradual and dynamic changes in pulmonary proteome following hypobaric hypoxia. For the first time, we also report the possible consideration of SULT1A1, as a biomarker for the diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Higher SULT1A1 levels were observed in rats as well as in humans exposed to high altitude, when compared to sea-level controls. This study can thus form the basis for identifying biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in responses to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:26022216

  10. Attenuation of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Venkatesh; Radish, Aaron C; Eis, Annie L; Broniowska, Katarzyna; Hogg, Neil; Konduri, Girija G

    2009-03-01

    Pulmonary vascular endothelial injury resulting from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and oxygen toxicity contributes to vascular simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Whether the severity of endotoxin-induced endothelial injury is modulated by ambient oxygen tension (hypoxic intrauterine environment vs. hyperoxic postnatal environment) remains unknown. We posited that ovine fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells (FPAEC) will be more resistant to LPS toxicity under hypoxic conditions (20-25 Torr) mimicking the fetal milieu. LPS (10 microg/ml) inhibited FPAEC proliferation and induced apoptosis under normoxic conditions (21% O(2)) in vitro. LPS-induced FPAEC apoptosis was attenuated in hypoxia (5% O(2)) and exacerbated by hyperoxia (55% O(2)). LPS increased intracellular superoxide formation, as measured by 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) formation, in FPAEC in normoxia and hypoxia. 2-HE formation in LPS-treated FPAEC increased in parallel with the severity of LPS-induced apoptosis in FPAEC, increasing from hypoxia to normoxia to hyperoxia. Differences in LPS-induced apoptosis between hypoxia and normoxia were abolished when LPS-treated FPAEC incubated in hypoxia were pretreated with menadione to increase superoxide production. Apocynin decreased 2-HE formation, and attenuated LPS-induced FPAEC apoptosis under normoxic conditions. We conclude that ambient oxygen concentration modulates the severity of LPS-mediated injury in FPAEC by regulating superoxide levels produced in response to LPS. PMID:19135525

  11. The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Srivastava, Mousami; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and...

  12. Rat Spermatogenesis Damage in Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia and the Protective Role of Melatonin. II: Testicular Parameters Daño de la Espermatogénesis en Rata en la Hipoxia Hipobárica Intermitente y Rol Protector de la Melatonina. II: Parámetros Testiculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bustos-Obregón

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available At present it is not clear if male fertility is affected by intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH. This is an important issue since a large human population works over 3000 masl. This study analyzes testicular changes in adult Sprague Dawley rats after five cycles of IHH (7 day exposure to 4200 masl in a hypobaric chamber / 7 day at 500 masl. The animals were separated into groups of 8, one group was exposed to hypoxia (7 days, and the others to IHH for one to five cycles. Controls (500 masl were examined at the beginning and at the end of the 70 experimental days. A duplicate set of rats treated with melatonin (supposedly protecting from hypoxia was also examined, as were their controls, injected with 0,03% ethanol (melatonin solvent.Immunohistochemical and histometric analysis of testicular tissue were performed. Damage caused by IHH increases with time. Morphometry reveals an increase in tubular and luminal diameters and a reduction in epithelial height. Inmunohistochemistry for HIF-1alpha shows an increase with time, however the opposite happens with HSP-70. Spermatogenic cells submitted to comet assay present an increase of (+ cells. Melatonin counteracts all this damage, possibly due to its high efficiency as a reactive oxygen species scavenger. In conclusion, IHH exposure damages male reproductive function.Actualmente no se conoce claramente si la fertilidad masculina se afecta por la hipoxia hipobarica intermitente (IHH. Esto es de importancia porque una gran población humana trabaja sobre 3000 metros sobre el nivel del mar (sml. Este trabajo analiza los cambios testiculares en ratas adultas Sprague Dawley luego de cinco ciclos de IHH (7 días a 4.200 sml en una camara hipobarica/7días a 500 metros: Normoxia. Los animales de dividieron en grupos de 8; un grupo expuesto a hipoxia (7 días y los otros a IHH por uno y hasta cinco ciclos. Los controles ( 500 sml se analizaron al inicio y al final de los 70 días experimentales. Un set

  13. Rat Spermatogenesis Damage in Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia and the Protective Role of Melatonin: I Cauda Epididymal Spermatozoa Daño en la Espermatogénesis de Rata en Hipoxia Hipobárica Intermitente y el Papel Protector de la Melatonina: I Espermatozoides de la Cauda Epididimaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hartley

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available At present it is not clear if male fertility is affected by intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH. This is an important issue since a large human population works over 3000 masl. This study analyzes epididymal sperm, in adult Sprague Dawley rats after five cycles of IHH (7 days exposure to 4200 masl in a hypobaric chamber / 7 days at 500 masl. The animals were separated into groups of 8, one group was exposed to hypoxia (7 days, and the others to IHH for one to five cycles. Controls (500 masl were examined at the beginning and at the end of the 70 experimental days. A duplicate set of rats treated with melatonin (supposedly protecting from hypoxia was also examined, as were their controls, injected with 0,03% ethanol (melatonin solvent. Epididymal sperm parameters, were evaluated. Damage caused by IHH increases with time. Sperm counts drop, while sperm chromatin swelling, DNA instability (metachromasia with acridine orange epifluorescence and comet (+ tests increase. Melatonin counteracts all this damage, possibly due to its high efficiency as a reactive oxygen species scavenger. In conclusion, IHH exposure damages sperm quality and therefore male reproductive function.En la actualidad no está claro si la fertilidad masculina se ve afectada por la hipoxia hipobárica intermitente (HHI. Esta es una cuestión importante, ya que una gran población humana trabaja a más de 3000 metros sobre el nivel del mar (msnm. Este estudio analiza los espermatozoides del epidídimo, en ratas Sprague Dawley adultas, después de cinco ciclos de HHI (7 días de exposición a 4200 msnm en una cámara hipobárica / 7 días a 500 msnm. Los animales fueron separados en grupos de 8, un grupo fue expuesto a la hipoxia (7 días, y los otros a HHI de uno a cinco ciclos. Los controles (500 msnm se examinaron al comienzo y al final de los 70 días de experimentación. Un grupo duplicado de ratas tratadas con melatonina (supuestamente protegiendo de la hipoxia también fue

  14. [The role of preventing nitric oxide deficiency in the antihypertensive effect of adaptation to hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashina, S Iu; Smirin, B V; Pokidyshev, D A; Malyshev, I Iu; Liamina, N P; Senchikin, V N; Markov, Kh M; Manukhin, E B

    2001-01-01

    Shortage of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) manifested as decreased daily urinary excretion of nitrate and nitrite as well as attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of conduit and resistance vessels progresses with age-related increase of blood pressure (BP) in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Simultaneous NO-dependent suppression of vascular contractions is, apparently, due to the inducible NO synthase activity in vascular smooth muscle specific for spontaneously hypertensive rat. Adaptation of rats to hypobaric hypoxia initiated at early hypertensive stage (at the age of 5-6 weeks) decelerates hypertension progress. The antihypertensive effect of the adaptation was accompanied by stimulation of endothelial NO synthesis and prevention of impaired NO-dependent response in isolated blood vessels. Nitric oxide stores were formed in the vascular wall of SHRSP and WKY rats at the same time. The obtained data indicate a significant role of correction of endothelial NO deficiency in the antihypertensive effect of adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:15926321

  15. Hypoxia-inducible factor-mediated induction of WISP-2 contributes to attenuated progression of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuady JH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jerry H Fuady,1,* Mattia R Bordoli,1,* Irene Abreu-Rodríguez,1,* Glen Kristiansen,2 David Hoogewijs,1,** Daniel P Stiehl,1,** Roland H Wenger1,**1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2University Hospital Bonn, Institute of Pathology, Bonn, Germany*,**These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Hypoxia and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF signaling pathway trigger the expression of several genes involved in cancer progression and resistance to therapy. Transcriptionally active HIF-1 and HIF-2 regulate overlapping sets of target genes, and only few HIF-2 specific target genes are known so far. Here we investigated oxygen-regulated expression of Wnt-1 induced signaling protein 2 (WISP-2, which has been reported to attenuate the progression of breast cancer. WISP-2 was hypoxically induced in low-invasive luminal-like breast cancer cell lines at both the messenger RNA and protein levels, mainly in a HIF-2α-dependent manner. HIF-2-driven regulation of the WISP2 promoter in breast cancer cells is almost entirely mediated by two phylogenetically and only partially conserved functional hypoxia response elements located in a microsatellite region upstream of the transcriptional start site. High WISP-2 tumor levels were associated with increased HIF-2α, decreased tumor macrophage density, and a better prognosis. Silencing WISP-2 increased anchorage-independent colony formation and recovery from scratches in confluent cell layers of normally low-invasive MCF-7 cancer cells. Interestingly, these changes in cancer cell aggressiveness could be phenocopied by HIF-2α silencing, suggesting that direct HIF-2-mediated transcriptional induction of WISP-2 gene expression might at least partially explain the association of high HIF-2α tumor levels with prolonged overall survival of patients with breast cancer.Keywords: invasion, metastasis, motility, oxygen, tumor, transcriptional

  16. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE ATTENUATES PHRENIC LONG-TERM FACILITATION FOLLOWING ACUTE INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    OpenAIRE

    Vinit, Stéphane; Windelborn, James A; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammatory responses, including microglial activation in the central nervous system. Since LPS impairs certain forms of hippocampal and spinal neuroplasticity, we hypothesized that LPS would impair phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) in outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) and inbred Lewis (L) rats.. Approximately three hours following a single LPS injection (i.p.), the phrenic response during hypoxic episodes is reduced i...

  17. Panax notoginseng saponin attenuates hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced oxidative stress in cortical neurons★

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Chen; Zhu, Jinqiang; Jia, Xiaoxu; Wang, Chao; Wang, Shaoxia; Kang, Liyuan

    2012-01-01

    The present study monitored the effect of 2, 10, and 50 mg/L of Panax notoginseng saponin exposure following hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in fetal rat cortical neurons. Results showed that varying doses of Panax notoginseng saponin significantly enhanced the cell viability of neurons, reduced malondialdehyde content, increased superoxide dismutase activity, inhibited mRNA and protein expression of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and decreased the release of nitric oxide in hypox...

  18. 慢性间歇性低压低氧抑制线粒体途径介导的代谢综合征大鼠心肌组织细胞凋亡%Chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia ameliorates myocardial apoptosis through inhibiting mitochondrial pathway in rats with metabolism syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁芳; 李艳青; 滕旭; 周京京; 郭赞; 王昕; 张自伟; 张翼

    2015-01-01

    Aim To confirm the inhibitory effect of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia ( CIHH) on my-ocardial apoptosis induced by metabolism syndrome ( MS) , and to investigate its mechanism. Methods A rat model of MS induced by fructose was used. The blood pressure and the plasma content of glucose, tri-glyceride, cholesterol, and insulin after 12 h fasting were detected. HE stain were used to detect the cardi-ac structure. The TUNEL staining and activity of caspase-3 were used to detect the apoptosis of myocar-dium. The protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bax was detected by Western blot . Results Compared with the control rats, the blood pressure and the plasma content of glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, and insu-lin were all increased in rats with MS. In rats with MS, the impairment of cardiac structure and the increase of apoptosis were also observed. The protein expression of Bcl-2 was significantly down-regulated, and that of Bax was significantly up-regulated in MS rats. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was also significantly decreased. Interest-ingly, CIHH could ameliorate all of the above issues. There was no significant difference between control group and CIHH group. Conclusion CIHH may im-prove the increased apoptosis in rats with MS via inhib-iting the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. This stud-y might provide new targets for therapy and the preven-tion of MS patients.%目的:证实CIHH( chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxi-a, CIHH)具有改善代谢综合征( metabolism syndrome, MS)大鼠心肌细胞凋亡的作用,并探讨其机制。方法10%果糖水喂养SD大鼠(250~300) g 42 d制备MS模型,检测动脉血压以及空腹血糖、胆固醇、甘油三酯和胰岛素含量,HE染色观察心肌结构,TUNEL染色和caspase-3活性测定检测心肌细胞凋亡, Western blot 检测 Bcl-2和 Bax 的蛋白表达水平。结果与正常大鼠比较,果糖喂养大鼠表现出明显的高血压、高血糖、高甘油三脂血症、高胆固醇血症和高胰

  19. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm progression through the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jen-Chun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway is associated with many vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, arterial aneurysms, pulmonary hypertension and chronic venous diseases. Significant HIF-1α expression could be found at the rupture edge at human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissues. While our initial in vitro experiments had shown that deferoxamine (DFO) could attenuate angiotensin II (AngII) induced endothelial activations; we unexpectedly found that DFO augmented the severity of AngII-induced AAA, at least partly through increased accumulation of HIF-1α. The findings promoted us to test whether aneurysmal prone factors could up-regulate the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 through aberrantly increased HIF-1α and promote AAA development. AngII induced AAA in hyperlipidemic mice model was used. DFO, as a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, stabilized HIF-1α and augmented MMPs activities. Aneurysmal-prone factors induced HIF-1α can cause overexpression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and promote aneurysmal progression. Pharmacological HIF-1α inhibitors, digoxin and 2-ME could ameliorate AngII induced AAA in vivo. HIF-1α is pivotal for the development of AAA. Our study provides a rationale for using HIF-1α inhibitors as an adjunctive medical therapy in addition to current cardiovascular risk-reducing regimens. PMID:27363580

  20. Peak heart rate decreases with increasing severity of acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Araoz, M; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    , 459, and 404 mmHg) in a hypobaric chamber and while breathing 9% O(2) in N(2). These conditions were equivalent to altitudes of 3300, 4300, 5300, and 6300 m above sea level, respectively. At 4300 m, maximal exercise was also repeated after 4 and 8 h. Peak heart rate (HR) decreased from 191 (182......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the degree to which peak heart rate is reduced during exhaustive exercise in acute hypoxia. Five sea-level lowlanders performed maximal exercise at normobaric normoxia and at three different levels of hypobaric hypoxia (barometric pressures of 518...

  1. Characteristics of fat metabolism in skeletal muscle of rats after hypobaric hypoxic acclimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Sunzhong; Gao Yuqi; Chen Jian; Liu Fuyi; Gao Wenxiang; Huang Jian; Liao Weigong; Cai Mingchun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of fat metabolism in rat skeletal muscle after hypobaric hypoxia acclimation. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups randomly: control group (H0), hypoxic 5-day group (H5), and hypoxic 15-day group (HI5). Animals of H5 and 15 groups were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia chamber simulating 5 000 m high altitude for 5 d or 15 d respectively, 23 h per day. H0 group stayed outside of chamber.The level of fatty acid oxidation and uptake, and glucose oxidation were examined, and the level of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) were also assayed in rat skeletal muscles. Results: The contents of ATP and PCr in H5 group were lower than those in H0 and H15 groups (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between H0 and H15. Compared with H0, the blood NEFA level in all hypoxia groups was increased significantly (P<0.05). The muscle NEFA level in HI5 group was greatly higher than that in H0 and H5 groups. The rates of fatty acid oxidation and uptake in H15 group were significantly higher than those in H0 and H5 groups (P<0.05), and the rate of glucose oxidation in all hypoxia groups was significantly decreased than that in H0 group (P<0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that the enhanced fat oxidation may be one of the mechanisms in the maintenance of energy homeostasis after hypobaric hypoxic acclimation.

  2. Pre-Conditioning with CDP-Choline Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Death in a Hypoxia/Reperfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor González-Pacheco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. CDP-choline is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is an essential component of cellular membranes, and a cell signalling mediator. CDP-choline has been used for the treatment of cerebral ischaemia, showing beneficial effects. However, its potential benefit for the treatment of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored yet. Aim. In the present work, we aimed to evaluate the potential use of CDP-choline as a cardioprotector in an in vitro model of ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Methods. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes were isolated and subjected to hypoxia/reperfusion using the coverslip hypoxia model. To evaluate the effect of CDP-choline on oxidative stress-induced reperfusion injury, the cells were incubated with H2O2 during reperfusion. The effect of CDP-choline pre- and postconditioning was evaluated using the cell viability MTT assay, and the proportion of apoptotic and necrotic cells was analyzed using the Annexin V determination by flow cytometry. Results. Pre- and postconditioning with 50 mg/mL of CDP-choline induced a significant reduction of cells undergoing apoptosis after hypoxia/reperfusion. Preconditioning with CDP-choline attenuated postreperfusion cell death induced by oxidative stress. Conclusion. CDP-choline administration reduces cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress after hypoxia/reperfusion of cardiac myocytes. Thus, it has a potential as cardioprotector in ischaemia/reperfusion-injured cardiomyocytes.

  3. Resveratrol attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced macrophage migration to visceral white adipose tissue and insulin resistance in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X L; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gozal, David

    2015-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea. PMID:25406018

  4. Heat acclimation attenuates physiological strain and the HSP72, but not HSP90 alpha, mRNA response to acute normobaric hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, OR; Turner, G.; Tuttle, JA; Taylor, L.; Watt, PW; Maxwell, NS

    2015-01-01

    Heat acclimation (HA) attenuates physiological strain in hot conditions via phenotypic and cellular adaptation. The aim of this study was to determine whether HA reduced physiological strain, and heat shock protein (HSP) 72 and HSP90α mRNA responses in acute normobaric hypoxia. Sixteen male participants completed ten 90-min sessions of isothermic HA (40°C/40% relative humidity) or exercise training [control (CON); 20°C/40% relative humidity]. HA or CON were preceded (HYP1) and proceeded (HYP2...

  5. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade partially attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets: relationship with the nitrergic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camelo, J.S. Jr. [Departamento de Puericultura e Pediatria, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Martins, A.R. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG (Brazil); Rosa, E. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SPBrasil (Brazil); Hehre, D.; Bancalari, E.; Suguihara, C. [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Developmental Biology Laboratory, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2012-02-10

    The objective of this study was to observe possible interactions between the renin-angiotensin and nitrergic systems in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. Thirteen chronically instrumented newborn piglets (6.3 ± 0.9 days; 2369 ± 491 g) were randomly assigned to receive saline (placebo, P) or the AT{sub 1} receptor (AT{sub 1}-R) blocker L-158,809 (L) during 6 days of hypoxia (FiO{sub 2} = 0.12). During hypoxia, pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa; P < 0.0001), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR; P < 0.02) and the pulmonary to systemic vascular resistance ratio (PVR/SVR; P < 0.05) were significantly attenuated in the L (N = 7) group compared to the P group (N = 6). Western blot analysis of lung proteins showed a significant decrease of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in both P and L animals, and of AT{sub 1}-R in P animals during hypoxia compared to normoxic animals (C group, N = 5; P < 0.01 for all groups). AT{sub 1}-R tended to decrease in L animals. Inducible NOS (iNOS) did not differ among P, L, and C animals and iNOS immunohistochemical staining in macrophages was significantly more intense in L than in P animals (P < 0.01). The vascular endothelium showed moderate or strong eNOS and AT{sub 1}-R staining. Macrophages and pneumocytes showed moderate or strong iNOS and AT{sub 1}-R staining, but C animals showed weak iNOS and AT{sub 1}-R staining. Macrophages of L and P animals showed moderate and weak AT{sub 2}-R staining, respectively, but the endothelium of all groups only showed weak staining. In conclusion, pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia in newborn piglets is partially attenuated by AT{sub 1}-R blockade. We suggest that AT{sub 1}-R blockade might act through AT{sub 2}-R and/or Mas receptors and the nitrergic system in the lungs of hypoxemic newborn piglets.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediating downregulated StAR and 3-beta-HSD and low plasma testosterone caused by hypoxia is attenuated by CPU86017-RS and nifedipine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Gui-Lai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia exposure initiates low serum testosterone levels that could be attributed to downregulated androgen biosynthesizing genes such as StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 3-beta-HSD (3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the testis. It was hypothesized that these abnormalities in the testis by hypoxia are associated with oxidative stress and an increase in chaperones of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress and ER stress could be modulated by a reduction in calcium influx. Therefore, we verify that if an application of CPU86017-RS (simplified as RS, a derivative to berberine could alleviate the ER stress and depressed gene expressions of StAR and 3-beta-HSD, and low plasma testosterone in hypoxic rats, these were compared with those of nifedipine. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, hypoxia for 28 days, and hypoxia treated (mg/kg, p.o. during the last 14 days with nifedipine (Nif, 10 and three doses of RS (20, 40, 80, and normal rats treated with RS isomer (80. Serum testosterone (T and luteinizing hormone (LH were measured. The testicular expressions of biomarkers including StAR, 3-beta-HSD, immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (Bip, double-strand RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK and pro-apoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP were measured. Results In hypoxic rats, serum testosterone levels decreased and mRNA and protein expressions of the testosterone biosynthesis related genes, StAR and 3-beta-HSD were downregulated. These changes were linked to an increase in oxidants and upregulated ER stress chaperones: Bip, PERK, CHOP and distorted histological structure of the seminiferous tubules in the testis. These abnormalities were attenuated significantly by CPU86017-RS and nifedipine. Conclusion Downregulated StAR and 3-beta-HSD significantly contribute to low testosterone in hypoxic rats and is associated with ER stress

  7. Effectiveness of beneficial plant-microbe interactions under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions in an advanced life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Olathe; Stasiak, Michael; Cottenie, Karl; Trevors, Jack; Dixon, Mike

    An assembled microbial community in the hydroponics solution of an advanced life support system may improve plant performance and productivity in three ways: (1) exclusion of plant pathogens from the initial community, (2) resistance to infection, and (3) plant-growth promotion. However, the plant production area is likely to have a hypobaric (low pressure) and hypoxic (low oxygen) atmosphere to reduce structural mass and atmosphere leakage, and these conditions may alter plant-microbe interactions. Plant performance and productivity of radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) grown under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions were investigated at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility. Changes in the microbial communities that routinely colonized the re-circulated nutrient solution, roots, and leaves of radishes in these experiments were quantified in terms of similarity in community composition, abundance of bacteria, and community diversity before and after exposure to hypobaric and hypoxic conditions relative to communities maintained at ambient growth conditions. The microbial succession was affected by extreme hypoxia (2 kPa oxygen partial pressure) while hypobaria as low as 10 kPa total pressure had little effect on microbial ecology. There were no correlations found between the physiological profile of these unintentional microbial communities and radish growth. The effects of hypobaric and hypoxic conditions on specific plant-microbe interactions need to be determined before beneficial gnotobiotic communities can be developed for use in space. The bacterial strains Tal 629 of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and WCS417 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani will be used in future experiments. B. japonicum Tal 629 promotes radish growth in hydroponics systems and P. fluorescens WCS417 induces systemic resistance to fusarium wilt (F. oxysporum f. sp. raphani) in radish under ambient

  8. Gene Therapy by Targeted Adenovirus-mediated Knockdown of Pulmonary Endothelial Tph1 Attenuates Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Morecroft, Ian; White, Katie; Caruso, Paola; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Alba, Raul; Reynolds, Paul N; Danilov, Sergei M.; Andrew H. Baker; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is produced by pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) via tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1). Pathologically, serotonin acts on underlying pulmonary arterial cells, contributing to vascular remodeling associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The effects of hypoxia on PAEC-Tph1 activity are unknown. We investigated the potential of a gene therapy approach to PAH using selective inhibition of PAEC-Tph1 in vivo in a hypoxic model of PAH. We exposed cultured bovine pulmo...

  9. Overexpression of DJ-1 reduces oxidative stress and attenuates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in NRK-52E cells exposed to high glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zi-Ying; Sun, Qian; Xia, Zhong-Yuan; Meng, Qing-Tao; Lei, Shao-Qing; Zhao, Bo; Tang, Ling-Hua; Xue, Rui; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes are more vulnerable to renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is implicated in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. We previously reported that the hyperglycemia-induced inhibition of DJ-1, a novel oncogene that exhibits potent antioxidant activity, is implicated in the severity of myocardial I/R injury. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of DJ-1 in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in renal cells exposed to high glucose (HG). For this purpose, NRK-52E cells were exposed to HG (30 mM) for 48 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h and reoxygenation for 2 h, which significantly decreased cell viability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, accompanied by a decrease in DJ-1 protein expression. The overexpression of DJ-1 by transfection with a DJ-1 overexpression plasmid exerted protective effects against HG-induced H/R injury, as evidenced by increased CCK-8 levels and SOD activity, the decreased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the decreased MDA content, and increased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Similar effects were observed following treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. These results suggest that the overexpression of DJ-1 reduces oxidative stress and attenuates H/R injury in NRK-52E cells exposed to HG. PMID:27430285

  10. Individual Susceptibility to Hypobaric Environments: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Watkins, Sharmi

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts are at risk for developing decompression sickness (DCS) while exposed to the hypobaric environment of the extravehicular suit in space, in terrestrial hypobaric chambers, and during ascent from neutral buoyancy training dives. There is increasing recognition that DCS risk is different between diving and altitude exposures, with many individual parameters and environmental factors implicated as risk factors for development of DCS in divers but are not recognized as risk factors in altitude exposures. Much of the literature to date has focused on patent foramen ovale (PFO), which has long been considered a major risk factor for DCS in diving exposures, but its link to serious DCS in altitude exposures remains unclear. Knowledge of those risk factors specific to hypobaric DCS may help identify susceptible individuals and aid in astronaut selection, crew assignment, and mission planning. This paper reviews the current literature pertaining to these risk factors, including PFO, anthropometric parameters, gender, menstrual cycle, lifetime diving experience, physical fitness, biochemical levels, complement activation, cigarette smoking, fluid balance, and ambient temperature. Further research to evaluate pertinent risk factors for DCS in altitude exposures is recommended.

  11. Cerebral Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  12. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  13. Tissue-Related Hypoxia Attenuates Proinflammatory Effects of Allogeneic PBMCs on Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polina I. Bobyleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose tissue-stromal derived cells (ASCs are considered a perspective tool for regenerative medicine. Depending on the application mode ASC/allogeneic immune cell interaction can occur in the systemic circulation under plenty high concentrations of O2 and in target tissues at lower O2 levels. Here we examined the effects of allogeneic PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs on ASCs under ambient (20% oxygen and “physiological” hypoxia (5% O2. As revealed with microarray analysis ASCs under 20% O2 were more affected by activated PBMCs, which was manifested in differential expression of more than 300 genes, whereas under 5% O2 only 140 genes were changed. Altered gene pattern was only partly overlapped at different O2 conditions. Under O2 ASCs retained their proliferative and differentiative capacities, mesenchymal phenotype, and intracellular organelle’ state. ASCs were proinflammatory activated on transcription level that was confirmed by their ability to suppress activation and proliferation of mitogen-stimulated PBMCs. ASC/PBMCs interaction resulted in anti-inflammatory shift of paracrine mediators in conditioning medium with significant increase of immunosuppressive LIF level. Our data indicated that under both ambient and tissue-related O2 ASCs possessed immunosuppressive potential and maintained functional activity. Under “physiological” hypoxia ASCs were less susceptible to “priming” by allogeneic mitogen-activated PBMCs.

  14. Tissue-Related Hypoxia Attenuates Proinflammatory Effects of Allogeneic PBMCs on Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobyleva, Polina I.; Andreeva, Elena R.; Gornostaeva, Aleksandra N.; Buravkova, Ludmila B.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-stromal derived cells (ASCs) are considered a perspective tool for regenerative medicine. Depending on the application mode ASC/allogeneic immune cell interaction can occur in the systemic circulation under plenty high concentrations of O2 and in target tissues at lower O2 levels. Here we examined the effects of allogeneic PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on ASCs under ambient (20%) oxygen and “physiological” hypoxia (5% O2). As revealed with microarray analysis ASCs under 20% O2 were more affected by activated PBMCs, which was manifested in differential expression of more than 300 genes, whereas under 5% O2 only 140 genes were changed. Altered gene pattern was only partly overlapped at different O2 conditions. Under O2 ASCs retained their proliferative and differentiative capacities, mesenchymal phenotype, and intracellular organelle' state. ASCs were proinflammatory activated on transcription level that was confirmed by their ability to suppress activation and proliferation of mitogen-stimulated PBMCs. ASC/PBMCs interaction resulted in anti-inflammatory shift of paracrine mediators in conditioning medium with significant increase of immunosuppressive LIF level. Our data indicated that under both ambient and tissue-related O2 ASCs possessed immunosuppressive potential and maintained functional activity. Under “physiological” hypoxia ASCs were less susceptible to “priming” by allogeneic mitogen-activated PBMCs. PMID:26880965

  15. Germination under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi

    Is the agriculture on Mars without a pressured greenhouse dome possible? In order to inves-tigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant, Jute, Chrysanthemum, Komatsuna, Cucumber, Okra, and Eggplant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. Oxygen partial pressure was 1kPa which was equal to 1/100 of normal earth atmosphere. Seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species. In the case of Jute, germination rate under the oxygen partial pressure of 1kPa was very high, 70

  16. Hypoxia-induced changes of seizure susceptibility in immature rats are modified by vigabatrin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 10, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 37-44. ISSN 1294-9361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/2582 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : immature brain * hypobaric hypoxia * vigabatrin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.919, year: 2007

  17. Clematichinenoside (AR Attenuates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis via a Mitochondria-Mediated Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Ding

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R injury. Clematichinenoside (AR is a triterpenoid saponin isolated from the roots of Clematis chinensis with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory cardioprotection effects against MI/R injury, yet the anti-apoptotic effect and underlying mechanisms of AR in MI/R injury remain unclear. We hypothesize that AR may improve mitochondrial function to inhibit MI/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In this study, we replicated an in vitro H9c2 cardiomyocyte MI/R model by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R treatment. The viability of H9c2 cardiomyocytes was determined by MTT assay; apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry and TUNEL experiments; mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP opening was analyzed by a calcein-cobalt quenching method; and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm was detected by JC-1. Moreover, we used western blots to determine the mitochondrial cytochrome c translocation to cytosolic and the expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2, and Bax proteins. These results showed that the application of AR decreased the ratio of apoptosis and the extent of mPTP opening, but increased ΔΨm. AR also inhibited H/R-induced release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and decreased the expression of the caspase-3, Bax proteins. Conversely, it remarkably increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein. Taken together, these results revealed that AR protects H9c2 cardiomyocytes against H/R-induced apoptosis through mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway.

  18. Clematichinenoside (AR) Attenuates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis via a Mitochondria-Mediated Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haiyan; Han, Rong; Chen, Xueshan; Fang, Weirong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xuemei; Wei, Qin; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Li, Yunman

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Clematichinenoside (AR) is a triterpenoid saponin isolated from the roots of Clematis chinensis with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory cardioprotection effects against MI/R injury, yet the anti-apoptotic effect and underlying mechanisms of AR in MI/R injury remain unclear. We hypothesize that AR may improve mitochondrial function to inhibit MI/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In this study, we replicated an in vitro H9c2 cardiomyocyte MI/R model by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment. The viability of H9c2 cardiomyocytes was determined by MTT assay; apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry and TUNEL experiments; mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was analyzed by a calcein-cobalt quenching method; and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was detected by JC-1. Moreover, we used western blots to determine the mitochondrial cytochrome c translocation to cytosolic and the expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2, and Bax proteins. These results showed that the application of AR decreased the ratio of apoptosis and the extent of mPTP opening, but increased ΔΨm. AR also inhibited H/R-induced release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and decreased the expression of the caspase-3, Bax proteins. Conversely, it remarkably increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein. Taken together, these results revealed that AR protects H9c2 cardiomyocytes against H/R-induced apoptosis through mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway. PMID:27248986

  19. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  20. Short-term supplementation with alpha-ketoglutaric acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural does not prevent the hypoxia induced decrease of exercise performance despite attenuation of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatterer, H; Greilberger, J; Philippe, M; Faulhaber, M; Djukic, R; Burtscher, M

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are thought to partly be responsible for the hypoxia induced performance decrease. The present study evaluated the effects of a broad based antioxidant supplementation or the combined intake of alpha-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) on the performance decrease at altitude. 18 healthy, well-trained males (age: 25±3 years; height: 179±6 cm; weight: 76.4±6.8 kg) were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to a placebo group (PL), a α-KG and 5-HMF supplementation group (AO1) or a broad based antioxidant supplementation group (AO2). Participants performed 2 incremental exercise tests to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer; the first test under normoxia and the second under hypoxia conditions (simulated altitude, FiO2=13% ~ 4 300 m). Supplementation started 48 h before the hypoxia test. Maximal oxygen uptake, maximal power output, power output at the ventilatory and lactate threshold and the tissue oxygenation index (NIRS) were measured under both conditions. Oxidative stress markers were measured before the supplementation and after the hypoxia test. Under hypoxia conditions all performance parameters decreased in the range of 19-39% with no differences between groups. A significant change from normoxia to hypoxia (pextraction, as indicated by the tissue oxygenation index, might indicate that mitochondrial functioning was actually influenced by the supplementation. PMID:22893323

  1. Re-exposure to the hypobaric hypoxic brain injury of high altitude: plasma S100B levels and the possible effect of acclimatisation on blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C D; Whyte, T; Cardinal, J; Kenny, R; Ballard, E

    2016-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxic brain injury results in elevated peripheral S100B levels which may relate to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. A period of acclimatisation or dexamethasone prevents altitude-related illnesses and this may involve attenuation of BBB compromise. We hypothesised that both treatments would diminish the S100B response (a measure of BBB dysfunction) on re-ascent to the hypobaric hypoxia of high altitude, in comparison to an identical ascent completed 48 h earlier by the same group. Twelve healthy volunteers, six of which were prescribed dexamethasone, ascended Mt Fuji (summit 3700 m) and serial plasma S100B levels measured. The S100B values reduced from a baseline 0.183 µg/l (95 % CI 0.083-0.283) to 0.145 µg/l (95 % CI 0.088-0.202) at high altitude for the dexamethasone group (n = 6) and from 0.147 µg/l (95 % CI 0.022-0.272) to 0.133 µg/l (95 % CI 0.085-0.182) for the non-treated group (n = 6) [not statistically significant (p = 0.43 and p = 0.82) for the treated and non-treated groups respectively]. [These results contrasted with the statistically significant increase during the first ascent, S100B increasing from 0.108 µg/l (95 % CI 0.092-0.125) to 0.216 µg/l (95 % CI 0.165-0.267) at high altitude]. In conclusion, an increase in plasma S100B was not observed in the second ascent and this may relate to the effect of acclimatisation (or hypoxic pre-conditioning) on the BBB. An exercise stimulated elevation of plasma S100B levels was also not observed during the second ascent. The small sample size and wide confidence intervals, however, precludes any statistically significant conclusions and a larger study would be required to confirm these findings. PMID:26924650

  2. CPU86017-RS attenuated hypoxia-induced testicular dysfunction in mice by normalizing androgen biosynthesis genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-lin ZHANG; Feng YU; De-zai DAI; Yu-si CHENG; Can ZHANG; Yin DAI

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Downregulation of androgen biosynthesis genes StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory)and 3β-HSD (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase)contributes to low testosterone levels in hypoxic mice and is possibly related to increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the testis.The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of CPU86017-RS that block Ca2+ influx on hypoxia-induced testis insult in mice.Methods:Male ICR mice were divided into 5 groups:control group,hypoxia group,hypoxia group treated with nifedipine (10 mg/kg),hypoxia groups treated with CPU86017-RS (60 or 80 mg/kg).Hypoxia was induced by placing the mice in a chamber under 10%+0.5% 02 for 28 d (8 h per day).The mice were orally administered with drug in the last 14 d.At the end of experiment the testes of the mice were harvested.The mRNA and protein levels of StAR,3β-HSD,connexin 43 (Cx43),matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP9),endothelin receptor A (ETAR)and leptin receptor (OBRb)were analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blotting,respectively.The malondialdehyde (MDA),lactate dehydrogenase (LDH),succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)and acid phosphatase (ACP)levels were measured using biochemical kits.Serum testosterone concentration was measured with radioimmunoassay.Results:Hypoxia significantly increased the MDA level,and decreased the LDH,ACP and SDH activities in testes.Meanwhile,hypoxia induced significant downregulation of StAR and 3β-HSD in testes responsible for reduced testosterone biosynthesis.It decreased the expression of Cx43,and increased the expression of MMP9,ETAR and OBRb,leading to abnormal testis function and structure.These changes were effectively diminished by CPU86017-RS (80 mg/kg)or nifedipine (10 mg/kg).Conclusion:Low plasma testosterone level caused by hypoxia was due to downregulation of StAR and 3β-HSD genes,in association with an increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.These changes can be alleviated by CPU86017-RS or nifedipine.

  3. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    OpenAIRE

    XU, Chunlan; Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The oth...

  4. Hypoxia-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain during postnatal ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rauchová, Hana; Vokurková, Martina; Koudelová, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.1 (2012), S89-S101. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypobaric hypoxia * reactive oxygen species (ROS) * polyunsaturated fatty acids * Na * K-ATPase * catalase * L-carnitine Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  5. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl2 confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype

  6. The ROS-induced cytotoxicity of ascorbate is attenuated by hypoxia and HIF-1alpha in the NCI60 cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Noor, Seema; Venturelli, Sascha; Berger, Alexander; Schuler, Paul; Garbe, Claus; Busch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate is used in complementary palliative medicine to treat cancer patients. Pharmacological doses of ascorbate in the mM range induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely hydrogen peroxide and ascorbyl radicals. However, little is known about intrinsic or extrinsic factors modulating this ascorbate-mediated cytotoxicity. Under normoxia and hypoxia, ascorbate IC50 values were determined on the NCI60 cancer cell...

  7. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Nobutaka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ogawa, Ryohei, E-mail: ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Cui, Zheng-Guo [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko [New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  8. MicroRNA-223 Attenuates Hypoxia-induced Vascular Remodeling by Targeting RhoB/MLC2 in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Kang, Kang; Chen, Jidong; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Jinyong; Lu, Wenju; Chen, Yuqin; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhai, Yujia; Qu, Junle; Ramchandran, Ramaswamy; Raj, J. Usha; Wang, Jian; Gou, Deming

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that microRNAs are implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we identified that miR-223 was significantly downregulated in chronically hypoxic mouse and rat lungs, as well as in pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) exposed to hypoxia. Knockdown of miR-223 increased PASMC proliferation. In contrast, miR-223 overexpression abrogated cell proliferation, migration and stress fiber formation. Administering miR-223 agomir in vivo antagonized hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure and distal arteriole muscularization. RhoB, which was increased by hypoxia, was identified as one of the targets of miR-223. Overexpressed miR-223 suppressed RhoB and inhibited the consequent phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and the expression of myosin light chain of myosin II (MLC2), which was identified as another target of miR-223. Furthermore, serum miR-223 levels were decreased in female patients with PAH associated with congenital heart disease. Our study provides the first evidence that miR-223 can regulate PASMC proliferation, migration, and actomyosin reorganization through its novel targets, RhoB and MLC2, resulting in vascular remodeling and the development of PAH. It also highlights miR-223 as a potential circulating biomarker and a small molecule drug for diagnosis and treatment of PAH. PMID:27121304

  9. Performances in extreme environments: effects of hyper/hypobarism and hypogravity on skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Bosco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental factors may affect muscle plasticity but some have exclusive characteristics that allow them to play a key role to maintain the muscle capacity to generate force; these factors are: i the oxygen availability and ii the load applied to muscle fibres. Hyperbarism is a condition that occurs when a man is subjected to pressure increases. To keep the lungs from collapsing, the air is supplied to him under high pressure which exposes the blood in the lungs to high alveolar gas pressures. Under this condition, the PO2 become sufficiently increased, serious disorders may occur, such as modification of oxygen delivery and/or oxygen availability to permit regular muscle contraction. Also altitude hypobaric hypoxia induces modification of muscle capacity to generate work. Prolonged exposure to high altitude leads significant loss in body mass, thigh muscle mass, muscle fiber area and volume density of muscle mitochondria. Spaceflight results in a number of adaptations to skeletal muscle, including atrophy and early muscle fatigue. Muscle atrophy is observed in a wide range of muscles, with the most extensive loss occurring in the legs, because astronauts are no longer needed to support the body's weight. This review will describe the background on these topics suggesting the strategies to correct the specific muscle changes in presence of environmental stresses, such as the alteration in oxygen-derived signaling pathways or the metabolic consequence of microgravity that may indicate rational interventions to maintain muscle mass and function.

  10. P2X7 Receptor Antagonism Attenuates the Intermittent Hypoxia-induced Spatial Deficits in a Murine Model of Sleep Apnea Via Inhibiting Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The P2X7R antagonism attenuates the CIH-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and spatial deficits, demonstrating that the P2X7R is an important therapeutic target in the cognition deficits accompanied OSAS.

  11. The ROS-induced cytotoxicity of ascorbate is attenuated by hypoxia and HIF-1alpha in the NCI60 cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Noor, Seema; Venturelli, Sascha; Berger, Alexander; Schuler, Paul; Garbe, Claus; Busch, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate is used in complementary palliative medicine to treat cancer patients. Pharmacological doses of ascorbate in the mM range induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely hydrogen peroxide and ascorbyl radicals. However, little is known about intrinsic or extrinsic factors modulating this ascorbate-mediated cytotoxicity. Under normoxia and hypoxia, ascorbate IC50 values were determined on the NCI60 cancer cells. The cell cycle, the influence of cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression (a pro-survival HIF-1α-downstream-target) were analysed after ascorbate exposure under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The amount of ascorbyl radicals increased with rising serum concentrations. Hypoxia (0.1% O2 ) globally increased the IC50 of ascorbate in the 60 cancer cell lines from 4.5 ± 3.6 mM to 10.1 ± 5.9 mM (2.2-fold increase, P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney t-test), thus inducing cellular resistance towards ascorbate. This ascorbate resistance depended on HIF-1α-signalling, but did not correlate with cell line-specific expression of the ascorbate transporter GLUT-1. However, under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, ascorbate treatment at the individual IC50 reduced the expression of GLUT-1 in the cancer cells. Our data show a ROS-induced, HIF-1α- and O2 -dependent cytotoxicity of ascorbate on 60 different cancer cells. This suggests that for clinical application, cancer patients should additionally be oxygenized to increase the cytotoxic efficacy of ascorbate. PMID:24330097

  12. Cerebral hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the veins ( deep vein thrombosis ) Lung infections (pneumonia) Malnutrition When to Contact a Medical Professional Cerebral hypoxia ... References Bernat JL. Coma, vegetative state, and brain death. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  13. [Exercise training in hypoxia prevents hypoxia induced mitochondrial DNA oxidative damage in skeletal muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Hai; Li, Ling; Duan, Fu-Qiang; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-10-25

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of exercise training on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidative damage and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) expression in skeletal muscle of rats under continuous exposure to hypoxia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 8): normoxia control group (NC), normoxia training group (NT), hypoxia control group (HC), and hypoxia training group (HT). The hypoxia-treated animals were housed in normobaric hypoxic tent containing 11.3% oxygen for consecutive 4 weeks. The exercise-trained animals were exercised on a motor-driven rodent treadmill at a speed of 15 m/min, 5% grade for 60 min/day, 5 days per week for 4 weeks. The results showed that, compared with NC group, hypoxia attenuated complex I, II, IV and ATP synthase activities of the electron transport chain, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential in HC group (P hypoxia decreased mitochondrial OGG1, MnSOD, and GPx activities (P hypoxia attenuated muscle and mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/ [NADH] ratio, and SIRT3 protein expression (P exercise training in hypoxia elevated complex I, II, IV and ATP synthase activities, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential in HT group (P exercise training in hypoxia increased MnSOD and GPx activities and mitochondrial OGG1 level (P exercise training in hypoxia increased muscle and mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/[NADH] ratio, as well as SIRT3 protein expression (P exercise training in hypoxia can decrease hypoxia-induced mtDNA oxidative damage in the skeletal muscle through up-regulating exercise-induced mitochondrial OGG1 and antioxidant enzymes. Exercise training in hypoxia may improve hypoxia tolerance in skeletal muscle mitochondria via elevating [NAD⁺]/[NADH] ratio and SIRT3 expression. PMID:25332006

  14. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  15. Endurance training attenuates the bioenergetics alterations of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria submitted to acute hypoxia:Role of ROS and UCP3%耐力训练抑制急性低氧时骨骼肌线粒体生物能学变化:ROS和UCP3的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薄海; 王义和; 李海英; 赵娟; 张红英; 佟长青

    2008-01-01

    The physiological significance of skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3(UCP3)in hypoxia is elusive.In the current study,UCP3 mRNA and protein expressions were investigated along with mitochondrial respiratory function,reactive oxygen species(ROS)generation,as well as manganese superoxide dismutase(MnSOD)expression in rat skeletal muscle with or without endurance training after an acute and severe hypobaric hypoxia exposure for different time.Acute hypoxia induced a series of impairments in skeletal muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics.In untrained rats,UCP3 protein content increased by 60%above resting level at 4 h hypoxia,whereas MnSOD protein content and activity were unaltered.UCP3 upregulation increased mitochondrial uncoupling respiration thus reducing 02 generation,but inevitably decreased ATP production.Training decreased acute hypoxia-induced upregulation of UCP3 protein(67% vs 42%)in rat skeletal muscle.ROS production in trained rats also showed a dramatic decrease at 2 h,4 h and 6 h,respectively,compared with that in untrained rats.MnSOD protein contents and activities were significantly(50%and 34%)higher in trained than those in untrained rats.Training adaptation of MnSOD may enhance the mitochondrial tolerante to ROS production,and reduce UCP3 activation during severe hypoxia.thus maintaining the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation.In trained rats,mitochondrial respiratory control(RCR)and P/O ratios were maintained relatively constant despite severe hypoxia.whereas in untrained rats RCR and P/O ratios were significantly decreased.These results indicate that(1)UCP3 mRNA and protein expression in rat skeletal muscle are upregulated during acute and severe hypobaric hypoxia,which may reduce the increased cross-membrane potential(△Ψ)and thus ROS production;(2)Endurance training can blunt hypoxia-induced UCP3 upregulation,and improve mitochondrial efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation due to increased removal of ROS.%骨

  16. Combined intermittent hypoxia and surface muscle electrostimulation as a method to increase peripheral blood progenitor cell concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azqueta Carmen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goal was to determine whether short-term intermittent hypoxia exposure, at a level well tolerated by healthy humans and previously shown by our group to increase EPO and erythropoiesis, could mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and increase their presence in peripheral circulation. Methods Four healthy male subjects were subjected to three different protocols: one with only a hypoxic stimulus (OH, another with a hypoxic stimulus plus muscle electrostimulation (HME and the third with only muscle electrostimulation (OME. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia exposure consisted of only three sessions of three hours at barometric pressure 540 hPa (equivalent to an altitude of 5000 m for three consecutive days, whereas muscular electrostimulation was performed in two separate periods of 25 min in each session. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein on three consecutive days immediately before the experiment and 24 h, 48 h, 4 days and 7 days after the last day of hypoxic exposure. Results There was a clear increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after combined hypobaric hypoxia and muscular electrostimulation. This response was not observed after the isolated application of the same stimuli. Conclusion Our results open a new application field for hypobaric systems as a way to increase efficiency in peripheral HSC collection.

  17. Brain and skin do not contribute to the systemic rise in erythropoietin during acute hypoxia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Taudorf, Sarah; Sørensen, Henrik; Berg, Ronan M G; Jacobs, Robert A; Bailey, Damian M; Olsen, Niels V; Secher, Niels H; Møller, Kirsten; Lundby, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) preserves arterial oxygen content by controlling red blood cell and plasma volumes. Synthesis of EPO was long thought to relate inversely to renal oxygenation, but in knockout mice, brain and skin have been identified as essential for the acute hypoxic EPO response. Whether t...... hypobaric hypoxia with or without breathing oxygen-enriched air to ensure systemic normoxemia. With 9 h of hypoxia, arterial EPO increased (from 6.0±2.2 to 22.0±6.0 mU/ml, n=11, P...

  18. Reproduction of the model of plateau hypoxia in different degrees in gestational sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie HU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce the model of plateau hypoxia in different degrees in pregnant sheep by using hypobaric chamber for the evaluation of oxygenation status and oxidative damage in these models. Methods Twenty-four pregnant sheep conceived by successful artificial insemination were randomly divided into three groups (8 each: low altitude control group (LAC, mild hypoxia exposure group (MHE and severe hypoxia exposure group (SHE. Sheep in the latter two groups were fed in hypobaric chamber, and the models were reproduced by adjusting the temperature, humidity, pressure and oxygen content simulating environment of different altitudes of northwest China. The degree of oxygenation, vital signs, behavior pattern and oxidative damage biomarkers were dynamically determined before modeling and 7, 15, 30, 90, 120 days after modeling, respectively. Results Thirty and 90 days after modeling, the arterial blood gas parameters of sheep in MHE and SHE group met the diagnostic criteria. Ninety days after modeling, the respiratory frequency decreased (P<0.05, the heart rate increased (P<0.05, and lassitude were found in MHE and SHE groups than in LAC group; the consumption of feeding decreased in SHE group than in MHE group (P<0.05. One hundred and twenty days after modeling, the CO and MDA increased significantly in MHE and SHE groups than those in LAC group (P<0.05, also in SHE group compared with that in MHE group (P<0.05. Conclusion Different degrees of hypoxia models of pregnant sheep have been successfully reproduced by using hypobaric chamber, and the results showed that the hypoxic environment in high altitude regions may cause oxidative stress injury of gestational sheep. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.05

  19. Carbon dioxide exchange of lettuce plants under hypobaric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, K. A.; Bates, M. E.; Adams, S. L.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Growth of plants in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) may involve the use of hypobaric pressures enabling lower mass requirements for atmospheres and possible enhancement of crop productivity. A controlled environment plant growth chamber with hypobaric capability designed and built at Ames Research Center was used to determine if reduced pressures influence the rates of photosynthesis (Ps) and dark respiration (DR) of hydroponically grown lettuce plants. The chamber, referred to as a plant volatiles chamber (PVC), has a growing area of about 0.2 m2, a total gas volume of about 0.7 m3, and a leak rate at 50 kPa of CO2 than at 81 Pa CO2. This is consistent with reports showing greater inhibition of photorespiration (Pr) in reduced O2 at low CO2 concentrations. When the partial pressure of O2 was held constant but the total pressure was varied between 51 and 101 kPa, the rate of CO2 uptake was nearly constant, suggesting that low pressure enhancement of Ps may be mainly attributable to lowered partial pressure of O2 and the accompanying reduction in Pr. The effects of lowered partial pressure of O2 on Ps and DR could result in substantial increases in the rates of biomass production, enabling rapid throughput of crops or allowing flexibility in the use of mass and energy resources for a CELSS.

  20. Carbon dioxide exchange of lettuce plants under hypobaric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, K. A.; Bates, M. E.; Adams, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of plants in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) may involve the use of hypobaric pressures enabling lower mass requirements for atmospheres and possible enhancement of crop productivity. A controlled environment plant growth chamber with hypobaric capability designed and built at Ames Research Center was used to determine if reduced pressures influence the rates of photosynthesis (Ps) and dark respiration (DR) of hydroponically grown lettuce plants. The chamber, referred to as a plant volatiles chamber (PVC), has a growing area of about 0.2 m^2, a total gas volume of about 0.7 m^3, and a leak rate at 50 kPa of photorespiration (Pr) in reduced O_2 at low CO_2 concentrations. When the partial pressure of O_2 was held constant but the total pressure was varied between 51 and 101 kPa, the rate of CO_2 uptake was nearly constant, suggesting that low pressure enhancement of Ps may be mainly attributable to lowered partial pressure of O_2 and the accompanying reduction in Pr. The effects of lowered partial pressure of O_2 on Ps and DR could result in substantial increases in the rates of biomass production, enabling rapid throughput of crops or allowing flexibility in the use of mass and energy resources for a CELSS.

  1. The cortisol response to hypobaric hypoxia at rest and post-exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, D R; Davison, A; Stacey, M; Smith, C; Hooper, T; Neely, D; Turner, S; Peaston, R; Mellor, A

    2012-04-01

    High altitude exposure normally leads to a marked natriuresis and diuresis. Acute mountain sickness is often associated with fluid retention, to which an elevated cortisol may contribute. Most investigators report a rise in resting cortisol with ascent, but little data exist regarding the cortisol response to a day trekking. We therefore measured salivary cortisol during ascent to > 5000 m in a cohort of between 42-45 subjects following a 6-h trek (samples taken between 15:30-16:30 h) and between 15-20 subjects at rest (morning samples taken between 08:00-09:00 h). Morning resting cortisol [nmol/l, mean±sd, (range)] was 5.5±2.9 (2.13-13.61) at 1300 m; 4.7±6.8 (1.4-27.02) at 3400 m, and significantly (p=0.002) rose between 4270 m [3.5±2.1 (1.4-8.34)] and 5150 m [14.5±30.3 (1.9-123.1)]. Post-exercise cortisol [nmol/l, mean±sd, (range)] dropped between 3400 m [7±6 (1.5-33.3)] and 4270 m [4.2±4.8 (1.4-29.5)] (p=0.001) followed by a significant rise in post-exercise cortisol between 4270 m [4.2±4.8 (1.4-29.5)] and 5 150 m [9.2±10.2 (1.4-61.3)] (p 5000 m, but present the novel finding that the cortisol response to a day trekking at HA appears suppressed at 4270 m. PMID:22368038

  2. Determinants of erythropoietin release in response to short-term hypobaric hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ri-Li; Witkowski, S.; Zhang, Y.; Alfrey, C.; Sivieri, M.; Karlsen, T.; Resaland, G. K.; Harber, M.; Stray-Gundersen, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2002-01-01

    We measured blood erythropoietin (EPO) concentration, arterial O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))), and urine PO(2) in 48 subjects (32 men and 16 women) at sea level and after 6 and 24 h at simulated altitudes of 1,780, 2,085, 2,454, and 2,800 m. Renal blood flow (Doppler) and Hb were determined at sea level and after 6 h at each altitude (n = 24) to calculate renal O(2) delivery. EPO increased significantly after 6 h at all altitudes and continued to increase after 24 h at 2,454 and 2,800 m, although not at 1,780 or 2,085 m. The increase in EPO varied markedly among individuals, ranging from -41 to 400% after 24 h at 2,800 m. Similar to EPO, urine PO(2) decreased after 6 h at all altitudes and returned to baseline by 24 h at the two lowest altitudes but remained decreased at the two highest altitudes. Urine PO(2) was closely related to EPO via a curvilinear relationship (r(2) = 0.99), although also with prominent individual variability. Renal blood flow remained unchanged at all altitudes. Sa(O(2)) decreased slightly after 6 h at the lowest altitudes but decreased more prominently at the highest altitudes. There were only modest, albeit statistically significant, relationships between EPO and Sa(O(2)) (r = 0.41, P or =2,100-2,500 m appear to be a threshold for stimulating sustained EPO release in most subjects; 2) short-term acclimatization may restore renal tissue oxygenation and restrain the rise in EPO at the lowest altitudes; and 3) there is marked individual variability in the erythropoietic response to altitude that is only partially explained by "upstream" physiological factors such as those reflecting O(2) delivery to EPO-producing tissues.

  3. Effect of acute hypobaric hypoxia on the endothelial glycocalyx and digital reactive hyperemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Bergström, Anita; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    concentrations of biomarkers reflecting endothelial and glycocalyx degradation (catecholamines, syndecan-1, soluble CD40 ligand, protein C, soluble thrombomodulin, tissue-type plasminogen activators, histone-complexed DNA fragments, and nitrite/nitrate). Endothelial function was assessed by the hyperemic...... rebounded to higher than baseline levels suggesting improved endothelial functionality....

  4. Erythrocyte ion transport in rats subjected to acute and chronic hypobaric hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rauchová, Hana; Vokurková, Martina; Dobešová, Zdenka; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2006), s. 711-713. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/04/0500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : erytrocyte * intracellular transport * Na+-K+ pump Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  5. Lipid peroxidation process and some metabolic changes induced by acute hypobaric hypoxia conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rauchová, Hana; Vokurková, Martina; Koudelová, J.

    Trivandrum : Research Signpost, 2009 - (Díaz-Muňoz, M.; del Angel, A.), s. 105-119 ISBN 978-81-308-0308-1 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : brain * thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance * L-carnitine Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  6. Hypobaric pressure exposure effects on cochlear frequency selectivity in fluctuating, low-frequency hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Brännström, K. J.; Grenner, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To study the effects of hypobaric pressure chamber exposure on the cochlear frequency selectivity of subjects with monaural, fluctuating, low-frequency hearing loss, such as occurs in Ménière's disease.Methods:We used a hypobaric pressure chamber to create relative underpressure in the ear canal, in order to impose positive pressure gradients on the inner ear. Psychophysical tuning curves, transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions and speech recognition scores in noise were measured in...

  7. Hypoxia. 2. Hypoxia regulates cellular metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wheaton, William W.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation to lowering oxygen levels (hypoxia) requires coordinated downregulation of metabolic demand and supply to prevent a mismatch in ATP utilization and production that might culminate in a bioenergetic collapse. Hypoxia diminishes ATP utilization by downregulating protein translation and the activity of the Na-K-ATPase. Hypoxia diminishes ATP production in part by lowering the activity of the electron transport chain through activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible fact...

  8. Systemic pro-inflammatory response facilitates the development of cerebral edema during short hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ting-Ting; Bi, Yan-Hua; Gao, Yu-Qi; Huang, Rui; Hao, Ke; Xu, Gang; Tang, Jia-Wei; Ma, Zhi-qiang; Kong, Fan-Ping; Coote, John H.; Chen, Xue-qun; Du, Ji-Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Background High-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is the severe type of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and life threatening. A subclinical inflammation has been speculated, but the exact mechanisms underlying the HACE are not fully understood. Methods Human volunteers ascended to high altitude (3860 m, 2 days), and rats were exposed to hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber (5000 m, 2 days). Human acute mountain sickness was evaluated by the Lake Louise Score (LLS), and plasma corticotrophin-releasing ho...

  9. Hypoxia: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kambiz Gilany; Mohtaram Vafakhah

    2010-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia occurs where there is an imbalance between oxygen supply and consumption. Growing evidence from experimental and clinical studies points to the fundamental and patho-physiologic role of hypoxia in cancer, ischemic tolerance, and stroke. Hypoxia-induced changes in ion homeostasis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, proliferation and differentiation. This review outlines hypoxia effect at molecular level and describes briefly hypoxia role in the physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Hypoxia-induced aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer cells is due to increased expression of VEGF, IL-6 and miR-21, which can be attenuated by CDF treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Bao

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is known to play critical roles in cell survival, angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Hypoxia mediated over-expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF has been shown to be associated with therapeutic resistance, and contributes to poor prognosis of cancer patients. Emerging evidence suggest that hypoxia and HIF pathways contributes to the acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC functions, and also maintains the vicious cycle of inflammation-all which lead to therapeutic resistance. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s by which hypoxia/HIF drives these events are not fully understood. Here, we show, for the first time, that hypoxia leads to increased expression of VEGF, IL-6, and CSC signature genes Nanog, Oct4 and EZH2 consistent with increased cell migration/invasion and angiogenesis, and the formation of pancreatospheres, concomitant with increased expression of miR-21 and miR-210 in human pancreatic cancer (PC cells. The treatment of PC cells with CDF, a novel synthetic compound inhibited the production of VEGF and IL-6, and down-regulated the expression of Nanog, Oct4, EZH2 mRNAs, as well as miR-21 and miR-210 under hypoxia. CDF also led to decreased cell migration/invasion, angiogenesis, and formation of pancreatospheres under hypoxia. Moreover, CDF decreased gene expression of miR-21, miR-210, IL-6, HIF-1α, VEGF, and CSC signatures in vivo in a mouse orthotopic model of human PC. Collectively, these results suggest that the anti-tumor activity of CDF is in part mediated through deregulation of tumor hypoxic pathways, and thus CDF could become a novel, and effective anti-tumor agent for PC therapy.

  11. Blood pressure and plasma catecholamines in acute and prolonged hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, I L; Poulsen, T D; Hansen, J M;

    1999-01-01

    5 days after rapid, passive transport to high altitude (4,559 m). Acute mountain sickness scores ranged from 5 to 16 (maximal attainable score: 20) on the first day but were reduced to 0-8 by the fifth day. Systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma epinephrine increased on day 1 at altitude......This study measured the pressor and plasma catecholamine response to local hypothermia during adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia. Eight healthy men were studied at rest and after 10 and 45 min of local cooling of one hand and forearm as well as after 30 min of rewarming at sea level and again 24 h and...... compared with sea level but declined again on day 5, whereas diastolic and mean blood pressures continued to rise in parallel with plasma norepinephrine. With local cooling, an increased vasoactive response was seen on the fifth day at altitude. Very high pressures were obtained, and the pressure elevation...

  12. The study of genistein attenuating genioglossus muscle fatigue under chronic intermittent hypoxia%金雀异黄素减弱慢性间歇性低氧大鼠颏舌肌疲劳的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁王辉; 李文; 陈小燕; 施洁珺

    2016-01-01

    weeks.Electrophysiological method was used to detect the change of genioglossus muscle function, and real-time reverse transcription(RT)-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the level of Nrf-2 gene and protein.Results Compared to NC group, the contractive properties of genioglossus muscle fatigue test at every time set was significantly decreased in CIH group(P<0.05).Compared to CIH group, the contractive properties was significantly increased in T group(P<0.05).The level of Nrf-2 gene and protein were less in CIH group(0.54±0.11 and 0.35±0.13) than in NC group(1.00±0.00 和 1.00±0.00)(P<0.05).Compared to CIH group the level of Nrf-2 gene and protein were increased in T group (0.76 ± 0.16 and 0.63 ± 0.14)(P<0.05), however, it was still less than the level in NC group(P<0.05).Conclusions CIH attenuates genioglossus muscle fatigue resistance under chronic intermittent hypoxia through Nrf-2/ARE signaling pathway.Genistein protects genioglossus muscle function through up-regulation of the level of Nrf-2 gene and protein.

  13. The relation between intraocular pressure change and plasma natriuretic peptide under simulated hypobaric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadag Remzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To ascertain whether the changes in intraocular pressure (IOP that occur during hypobaric hypoxic exposure are related to plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (BNP levels. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 26 healthy participants (all male, mean age 23.1 years. IOP was measured at local ground level, (792 m above sea level, then while in a chamber providing hypobaric hypoxic conditions (the subjects were exposed to a pressure equivalent to 9144 m for 1-3 min, and again after exit from the chamber. In each condition, the mean of three consecutive measurements of IOP was calculated for each eye. For BNP measurements, blood samples were drawn before the participants entered the chamber and just after they left the chamber. Results: IOP during hypobaric hypoxic exposure (18.00 ± 3.70 mmHg was significantly greater than that before (15.66 ± 2.10 mmHg, P < 0.001 or after (16.10 ± 2.63 mmHg, P = 0.001 the exposure. IOP levels before and after the exposure were not significantly different (P = 0.136. Plasma BNP levels measured before and after exposure to hypobaric hypoxic conditions were not significantly different (P = 0.462. Conclusion: Plasma BNP levels did not change after short-term hypobaric hypoxic exposure, while the IOP increased. This increase may have been caused by some other systemic factors. As the hypobaric hypoxic conditions were reversed, IOP decreased to normal levels.

  14. Effect of chronic hypoxia on 45Ca and 86Rb uptake in aortic smooth muscle from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of chronic hypobaric hypoxia equivalent to a simulated high altitude of 4000 m was investigated on the Ca2+ and Rb+ uptake in vascular smooth muscle. The decline in systolic blood pressure in SHR due to hypoxia was associated with a significant decrease in 45Ca uptake and ouabain-insensitive 86Rb uptake as well as the tissue Ca2+ and K+ content. It seems likely that the reduction of the higher vascular tone in SHR by chronic hypoxia is due to the alteration of the transmembrane ion fluxes in the vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the meaning and the nature of the active and passive ion fluxes involved in this problem remains to be clarified. (author)

  15. Suppression of TRPV4 channels ameliorates anti-dipsogenic effects under hypoxia in the subfornical organ of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Zhou, Li; Wang, Dong; Yang, Li-Li; Yuan, Guo-Rong; Huang, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of water intake reduction during the 1(st) day of hypobaric hypoxia has been known for a long time. However, the reason for the same is yet unknown. The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels, including TRPV1 and TRPV4, are located in the subfornical organ (SFO). These are calcium permeable cationic channels gated by various stimuli such as cell swelling, low pH, and high temperature, and participate in anti-dipsogenic effects when activated. We aimed to explore the drinking behavior of rats and the mechanism of TRPVs under hypoxia. Chemical TRPV4 inhibitors (HC-067047 and Gadolinium) or TRPV4 knockout, but not TRPV1 inhibitor SB-705498, could restore the water intake under hypoxia. Hypoxia-mediated direct activation of TRPV4 may be the reason of anti-dipsogenic effects because the serum sodium, pH, and intracranial temperature are unaltered. Interestingly, we found that hypoxia immediately increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in HEK293-TRPV4 cells and primary neurons from SFO region, but not in the HEK293-TRPV1 cells. Moreover, hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase depended on the indispensable hemeoxygenase-2 (HO-2) and TRPV4. HO-2 and TRPV4 were also confirmed to form a complex in SFO neurons. These results demonstrated that SFO cells sense hypoxia and activate via the HO-2/TRPV4 multiple channels, which are associated with anti-dipsogenic effects. PMID:27436489

  16. The cerebral venous system and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher H E

    2016-01-15

    Most hypobaric hypoxia studies have focused on oxygen delivery and therefore cerebral blood inflow. Few have studied venous outflow. However, the volume of blood entering and leaving the skull (∼700 ml/min) is considerably greater than cerebrospinal fluid production (0.35 ml/min) or edema formation rates and slight imbalances of in- and outflow have considerable effects on intracranial pressure. This dynamic phenomenon is not necessarily appreciated in the currently taught static "Monro-Kellie" doctrine, which forms the basis of the "Tight-Fit" hypothesis thought to underlie high altitude headache, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema. Investigating both sides of the cerebral circulation was an integral part of the 2007 Xtreme Everest Expedition. The results of the relevant studies performed as part of and subsequent to this expedition are reviewed here. The evidence from recent studies suggests a relative venous outflow insufficiency is an early step in the pathogenesis of high altitude headache. Translation of knowledge gained from high altitude studies is important. Many patients in a critical care environment develop hypoxemia akin to that of high altitude exposure. An inability to drain the hypoxemic induced increase in cerebral blood flow could be an underappreciated regulatory mechanism of intracranial pressure. PMID:26294747

  17. Hypoxia, MTOR and autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    Although hypoxia can cause cell cycle arrest, it may simultaneously suppress a conversion from this arrest to senescence. Furthermore, hypoxia can suppress senescence caused by diverse stimuli, maintaining reversible quiescence instead. Hypoxia activates autophagy and inhibits MTOR, thus also activating autophagy. What is the relationship between autophagy and cellular senescence? Also, can inhibition of MTOR and stimulation of autophagy explain the gerosuppressive effects of hypoxia?

  18. Effects of hypoxia on interval moderate exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TASOS ADAMOS, ZISIS PAPANIKOLAOU, VASILIOS VOUTSELAS,DIMITRIOS SOULAS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a controversy in the published scientific data whether extended training at altitude increases performance at sea level. The effect of hypoxia at rest and on the response to interval moderate exercise was determined in six healthy male individuals during an incremental 3×5min exercise cycle test (5min recovery at sea level and in a hypobaric chamber (10000 feet/3100m altitude. Ventilation rate (VE, breathing frequency (BF, heart rate (HR, cardiac output (Q, blood lactate (Labl and % of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2 were measured. Blood samples were drawn at rest and at the end of each exercise bout. Hypoxia led to a significant increase in VE during exercise (81.7 vs. 62, 87 vs. 66, 89 vs. 64ml/l, for the three exercise bouts, respectively p<.05. There was also a significant increase in BF (11.3 vs. 10, 29 vs. 25, 32 vs. 24, 33 vs. 25, p<.05, HR (73 vs. 62, 153 vs. 138, 161 vs. 138, 166 vs. 137b/min, p<.05, Q (4.8 vs. 4, 13.1 vs. 12.5, 14.6 vs. 12.2, 15.5 vs. 12.8l/min, p<.05 and Labl (0.41 vs. 0.35, 3.8 vs. 2.6, 4.7 vs 3, 5.9 vs 2.9 mmol/l, p<.05 at rest and during exercise. Hypoxia lowered SaO2 at rest and exercise (99.3 vs 98.6, 98.1 vs 95.1, 98.5 vs 95.3, 98.3 vs 95.5%, p<.05. The results suggest that there is a hypoxic augmentation of the cardiorespiratory variables measured. Also we concluded that exercise potentiated the acute ventilatory response to hypoxia by increasing VE, breathing frequency, heart rate, cardiac output, blood lactate and decreasing SaO2.

  19. Effect of intermittent hypoxia and exercise on blood rheology and oxygen transport in trained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Espinosa, Cristian; Douziech, Anne; Ríos-Kristjánsson, Juan Gabriel; Rizo, David; Torrella, Joan Ramon; Pagès, Teresa; Viscor, Ginés

    2014-02-01

    Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) exposure, accompanied or not with active recovery, can help to skeletal muscle repair. However, the erythropoietic response elicited can disturb blood rheology and thus alter the oxygen delivery to tissues. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in two basal states: untrained and trained and compared with early (1-3 days) and late (7-14 days) stages of damage recovery in three groups of trained rats that had suffered skeletal muscle injury: Control, passive recovery rats; HYP, rats exposed to IHH after muscle damage; and EHYP, trained rats that performed light aerobic exercise sessions in addition to IHH. Hematocrit, RBC count and hemoglobin were only elevated in the late stage of recovery in HYP (13%; 14% and 8%) and EHYP (18%; 13% and 15%) groups. Blood viscosity increased about double for EHYP rats. It is concluded that intermittent exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in combination with light aerobic exercise in normoxia has an erythropoietic effect, but also provides advantageous hemorheological conditions for the perfusion of damaged muscle. PMID:24373840

  20. Probabilistic Assessment of Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Treatment Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Norcross, Jason R.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wessel, James H., III

    2014-01-01

    The Hypobaric Decompression Sickness (DCS) Treatment Model links a decrease in computed bubble volume from increased pressure (DeltaP), increased oxygen (O2) partial pressure, and passage of time during treatment to the probability of symptom resolution [P(symptom resolution)]. The decrease in offending volume is realized in 2 stages: a) during compression via Boyle's Law and b) during subsequent dissolution of the gas phase via the O2 window. We established an empirical model for the P(symptom resolution) while accounting for multiple symptoms within subjects. The data consisted of 154 cases of hypobaric DCS symptoms along with ancillary information from tests on 56 men and 18 women. Our best estimated model is P(symptom resolution) = 1 / (1+exp(-(ln(Delta P) - 1.510 + 0.795×AMB - 0.00308×Ts) / 0.478)), where (DeltaP) is pressure difference (psid), AMB = 1 if ambulation took place during part of the altitude exposure, otherwise AMB = 0; and where Ts is the elapsed time in mins from start of the altitude exposure to recognition of a DCS symptom. To apply this model in future scenarios, values of DeltaP as inputs to the model would be calculated from the Tissue Bubble Dynamics Model based on the effective treatment pressure: (DeltaP) = P2 - P1 | = P1×V1/V2 - P1, where V1 is the computed volume of a spherical bubble in a unit volume of tissue at low pressure P1 and V2 is computed volume after a change to a higher pressure P2. If 100% ground level O2 (GLO) was breathed in place of air, then V2 continues to decrease through time at P2 at a faster rate. This calculated value of (DeltaP then represents the effective treatment pressure at any point in time. Simulation of a "pain-only" symptom at 203 min into an ambulatory extravehicular activity (EVA) at 4.3 psia on Mars resulted in a P(symptom resolution) of 0.49 (0.36 to 0.62 95% confidence intervals) on immediate return to 8.2 psia in the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle. The P(symptom resolution) increased

  1. Exploiting Aerobic Fitness to Reduce Risk of Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Wessel, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is multivariable. But we hypothesize an aerobically fit person is less likely to experience hypobaric DCS than an unfit person given that fitness is exploited as part of the denitrogenation (prebreathe, PB) process prior to an altitude exposure. Aerobic fitness is peak oxygen uptake (VO2pk, ml/kg/min). Treadmill or cycle protocols were used over 15 years to determine VO2pks. We evaluated dichotomous DCS outcome and venous gas emboli (VGE) outcome detected in the pulmonary artery with Doppler ultrasound associated with VO2pk for two classes of experiments: 1) those with no PB or PB under resting conditions prior to ascent in an altitude chamber, and 2) PB that included exercise for some part of the PB. There were 165 exposures (mean VO2pk 40.5 plus or minus 7.6 SD) with 25 cases of DCS in the first protocol class and 172 exposures (mean VO2pk 41.4 plus or minus 7.2 SD) with 25 cases of DCS in the second. Similar incidence of the DCS (15.2% vs. 14.5%) and VGE (45.5% vs. 44.8%) between the two classes indicates that decompression stress was similar. The strength of association between outcome and VO2pk was evaluated using univariate logistic regression. An inverse relationship between the DCS outcome and VO2pk was evident, but the relationship was strongest when exercise was done as part of the PB (exercise PB, coef. = -0.058, p = 0.07; rest or no PB, coef. = -0.005, p = 0.86). There was no relationship between VGE outcome and VO2pk (exercise PB, coef. = -0.003, p = 0.89; rest or no PB, coef. = 0.014, p = 0.50). A significant change in probability of DCS was associated with fitness only when exercise was included in the denitrogenation process. We believe a fit person that exercises during PB efficiently eliminates dissolved nitrogen from tissues.

  2. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine;

    2016-01-01

    Migraine with aura is prevalent in high-altitude populations suggesting an association between migraine aura and hypoxia. We investigated whether experimental hypoxia triggers migraine and aura attacks in patients suffering from migraine with aura. We also investigated the metabolic and vascular...... response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations in...... the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three and...

  3. Effect of Hypoxia and Bedrest on Peripheral Vasoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Adam C.; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Dolenc-Groselj, Leja; Jaki Mekjavic, Polona; Eiken, Ola

    2013-02-01

    Future planetary habitats may expose astronauts to both microgravity and hypobaric hypoxia, both inducing a reduction in peripheral perfusion. Peripheral temperature changes have been linked to sleep onset and quality [5]. However, it is still unknown what effect combining hypoxia and bedrest has on this relationship. Eleven male participants underwent three 10-day campaigns in a randomized manner: 1) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAmb); 2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR); 3) normobaric normoxic bed rest (NBR). There was no change in skin temperature gradient between the calf and toes, an index of peripheral perfusion (Δ Tc-t), over the 10-d period in the HAmb trial. However, there was a significant increase (p< 0.001) in daytime (9am-9pm) Δ Tc-t on day 10 of the inactivity/unloading periods (HBR and NBR trials). This reduction in the perfusion of the toes during the daytime was augmented during the HBR trial compared to NBR (p< 0.001). Before and on day 10 of the interventions we conducted polysomnographic assessment, which revealed no changes in sleep onset and/or architecture. These data support the theory that circadian changes in temperature are functionally linked to sleepiness [1].

  4. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  5. Sustained acclimatization in Chilean mine workers subjected to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Jorge G; Osorio, Jorge; Soto, Gustavo; Brito, Julio; Siques, Patricia; Reyes, Juan G

    2006-01-01

    Farias, Jorge G., Jorge Osorio, Gustavo Soto, Julio Brito, Patricia Siques, and Juan G. Reyes. Sustained acclimatization in Chilean mine workers subjected to chronic intermittent hypoxia. High Alt. Med. Biol. 7:302-306, 2006--We wanted to know if sea-level mine workers exposed previously to chronic intermittent hypoxia reached a steady acclimatization at 36 months under hypobaric hypoxia. An intermittently exposed group of mine workers (IE, n = 25) were subjected to submaximal exercise (100 W) at 4500 m. Their systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (HbSatO(2)) were monitored. Two comparison groups of unacclimatized sea-level workers (n = 17) were studied. A nonexposed group (NE) performed 5 min of submaximal exercise at sea level. Some kind of exercise was performed both by an acutely exposed group (AE) and IE group at 4500 m. No statistical differences were found for HR, SBP, and DBP (p > 0.05) during exercise between IE and AE groups. Resting HbSatO(2) of IE (87 +/- 6%) was lower than NE (97 +/- 3%) (p < 0.05), but was higher than AE (82 +/- 4%) (p < 0.05). In the exercise condition, HbSatO(2) of IE (85 +/- 5%) was lower than NE (95 +/- 3%) (p < 0.05), but was higher than AE (76 +/- 2%) (p < 0.05). These responses were maintained through the 6 months of the study period. Thus, mine workers subjected to intermittent hypobaric condition for 3 years showed a good degree of acclimatization that was maintained through time. PMID:17173515

  6. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin: its response to hypoxia and association with acute mountain sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Adrian; Boos, Christopher; Stacey, Mike; Hooper, Tim; Smith, Chris; Begley, Joe; Yarker, Jo; Piper, Rick; O'Hara, John; King, Rod; Turner, Steve; Woods, David R

    2013-01-01

    Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is a common clinical challenge at high altitude (HA). A point-of-care biochemical marker for AMS could have widespread utility. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) rises in response to renal injury, inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether NGAL rises with HA and if this rise was related to AMS, hypoxia or exercise. NGAL was assayed in a cohort (n = 22) undertaking 6 hours exercise at near sea-level (SL); a cohort (n = 14) during 3 hours of normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 11.6%) and on two trekking expeditions (n = 52) to over 5000 m. NGAL did not change with exercise at SL or following normobaric hypoxia. During the trekking expeditions NGAL levels (ng/ml, mean ± sd, range) rose significantly (P < 0.001) from 68 ± 14 (60-102) at 1300 m to 183 ± 107 (65-519); 143 ± 66 (60-315) and 150 ± 71 (60-357) at 3400 m, 4270 m and 5150 m respectively. At 5150 m there was a significant difference in NGAL between those with severe AMS (n = 7), mild AMS (n = 16) or no AMS (n = 23): 201 ± 34 versus 171 ± 19 versus 124 ± 12 respectively (P = 0.009 for severe versus no AMS; P = 0.026 for mild versus no AMS). In summary, NGAL rises in response to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia and demonstrates a relationship to the presence and severity of AMS. PMID:24227892

  7. Moderate Hypoxia Exposure: A Novel Strategy to Improve Glucose Metabolism in Humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Vogel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The obesity epidemic calls for novel strategies to prevent and treat obesity and its comorbidities. Several studies have indicated that the amount of oxygen to which tissues are exposed may substantially impact cardiometabolic health. Interestingly, living at high altitude (hypobaric hypoxia seems to be associated with improved glucose homeostasis and a decreased prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, normobaric hypoxia exposure has been shown to exert beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in rodents and humans. This may, at least in part, be explained by altered adipose tissue and skeletal muscle oxygen tension. In contrast, patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, which is characterised by episodes of severe intermittent hypoxia due to periodic collapse of the upper airway during sleep, show impairments in glucose homeostasis and are at increased cardiovascular risk. These discrepancies may be explained by the severity, duration, and pattern (number of cycles of hypoxic episodes, but underlying mechanisms have not yet been studied in detail. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of available studies on the link between oxygen tension, inflammation, and glucose homeostasis. Detailed studies to elucidate the effects of moderate hypoxia exposure on wholebody and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity in humans are clearly warranted.

  8. The morphology, physiology and nutritional quality of lettuce grown under hypobaria and hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongkang; Gao, Feng; Guo, Shuangsheng; Li, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this research were to investigate the morphological, physiological and nutritional characteristics of lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Rome) under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions. Plants were grown under two levels of total pressures (101 and 30 kPa) and three levels of oxygen partial pressures (21, 6 and 2 kPa) for 20 days. Hypoxia (6 or 2 kPa) not only significantly inhibited the growth of lettuce plants by decreasing biomass, leaf area, root/shoot ratio, water content, the contents of minerals and organic compounds (vitamin C, crude protein and crude fat), but also destroyed the ultrastructure of mitochondria and chloroplast. The activities of catalase and total superoxide dismutase, the contents of glutathione and the total antioxidant capacity significantly decreased due to hypoxia. Hypobaria (30 kPa) did not markedly enhance the biomass, but it increased leaf area, root/shoot ratio and relative water content. Hypobaria also decreased the contents of total phenols, malondialdehyde and total carbohydrate and protected the ultrastructure of mitochondria and chloroplast under hypoxia. Furthermore, the activities of catalase and total superoxide dismutase, the contents of minerals and organic compounds markedly increased under hypobaria. This study demonstrates that hypobaria (30 kPa) does not increase the growth of lettuce plants, but it enhances plant's stress resistance and nutritional quality under hypoxia.

  9. Effect of hypobaric storage on quality, antioxidant enzyme and antioxidant capability of the Chinese bayberry fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hangjun; Yang, Hailong; Gao, Haiyan; Long, Jie; Tao, Fei; Fang, Xiangjun; Jiang, Yueming

    2013-01-01

    Background The Chinese bayberry (Myrica rubra Sieb. and Zucc.) is a subtropical fruit native to China, with unique flavor, sweet and sour taste, and high nutrition and health values. The fruit is highly perishable and susceptible to mechanical injury, physiological deterioration and fungal decay once harvested. This study was to investigate the effect of hypobaric storage on the quality of Chinese bayberry fruit and then develop storage technology to prolong the supply of the fruit. Results T...

  10. Hypobaric chamber for the study of oral health problems in a simulated spacecraft environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A hypobaric chamber was constructed to house two marmo-sets simultaneously in a space-simulated environment for periods of 14, 28 and 56 days which coincided with the anticipated Skylab missions. This report details the fabrication, operation, and performance of the chamber and very briefly reviews the scientific data from nine chamber trials involving 18 animals. The possible application of this model system to studies unrelated to oral health or space missions is discussed.

  11. Thermoneutrality modifies the impact of hypoxia on lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jonathan C; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Devera, Ronald; Fonti-Bevans, Shannon; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2013-02-15

    Hypoxia has been shown to rapidly increase triglycerides in mice by decreasing plasma lipoprotein clearance. However, the usual temperature of hypoxic exposure is below thermoneutrality for mice, which may increase thermogenesis and energy requirements, resulting in higher tissue lipid uptake. We hypothesize that decreased lipid clearance and ensuing hyperlipidemia are caused by hypoxic suppression of metabolism at cold temperatures and, therefore, would not occur at thermoneutrality. Twelve-week-old, male C57BL6/J mice were exposed to 6 h of 10% O₂ at the usual temperature (22°C) or thermoneutrality (30°C). Acclimation to 22°C increased lipid uptake in the heart, lungs, and brown adipose tissue, resulting in lower plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels. At this temperature, hypoxia attenuated lipid uptake in most tissues, thereby raising plasma triglycerides and LDL cholesterol. Thermoneutrality decreased tissue lipid uptake, and hypoxia did not cause a further reduction in lipid uptake in any organs. Consequently, hypoxia at thermoneutrality did not affect plasma triglyceride levels. Unexpectedly, plasma HDL cholesterol increased. The effect of hypoxia on white adipose tissue lipolysis was also modified by temperature. Independent of temperature, hypoxia increased heart rate and glucose and decreased activity, body temperature, and glucose sensitivity. Our study underscores the importance of ambient temperature for hypoxia research, especially in studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:23249698

  12. ROCK2 and MYLK variants under hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude associate with high altitude pulmonary edema and adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey P

    2015-11-01

    of ROCK2 and MYLK.Conclusion: The data suggest the association of ROCK2 with HAPE and MYLK with HAPE and adaptation in Indian population. The outcome has provided new insights into the physiology of HAPE and adaptation. Keywords: adaptation, hypobaric hypoxia, ROCK2, MYLK, high altitude pulmonary edema, SNP

  13. PET imaging of hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia in tumors has been related to poor response to conventional therapies. This paper will discuss the methods, both invasive and non-invasive, used to determine hypoxia levels within tumors. PET imaging with two lead compounds 18F-fluoro misonidazole (18FMISO) and Cu-(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone (Cu-ATSM) and their relative effectiveness in delineating hypoxic regions will be discussed. The advantages of Cu-ATSM-PET over existing imaging agents will be discussed along with its potential application as a direct-and/or surrogate marker for the determination of oncological hypoxia in vivo

  14. Role of ATP-sensitive K+-channels in antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective action of adaptation to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, František; Neckář, Jan; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Maslov, L. N.; Stakheev, D. L.; Tayurskaya, A. S.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 145, č. 4 (2008), s. 418-421. ISSN 0007-4888 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : arrhythmias * myocardial infarction * K(ATP) channels Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 0.258, year: 2008

  15. Effect of hypobaric hypoxia, simulating conditions during long-haul air travel, on coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet function, and endothelial activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.D. Toff; C.I. Jones; I. Ford; R.J. Pearse; H.G. Watson; S.J. Watt; J.A.S. Ross; D.P. Gradwell; A.J. Batchelor; K.R. Abrams; J.C.M. Meijers; A.H. Goodall; M. Greaves

    2006-01-01

    Context The link between long-haul air travel and venous thromboembolism is the subject of continuing debate. It remains unclear whether the reduced cabin pressure and oxygen tension in the airplane cabin create an increased risk compared with seated immobility at ground level. Objective To determin

  16. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The other rats were given equal volume saline. The results showed that high altitude hypoxia caused the enlargement of heart, liver, lung and kidney, and intestinal villi damage. Supplementation with vitamin E significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs including intestine, increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05), diamino oxidase (DAO) (p< 0.01) levels, and decreased the serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) (p< 0.01), interleukin-4 (IL-4) (p<0.001), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) (p<0.01) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.001), and decreased the serum erythropoietin (EPO) activity (p<0.05). Administration of vitamin E significantly increased the S-IgA (p<0.001) in ileum and significantly improved the expression levels of occludin and IκBα, and decreased the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and 2 alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), Toll-like receptors (TLR4), P-IκBα and nuclear factor-κB p65(NF-κB P65) in ileum compared to the HH group. This study suggested that vitamin E protectis from intestinal injury caused by high altitude hypoxia environment. These effects may be related to the HIF and TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25177163

  17. Acute Mountain Sickness, Hypoxia, Hypobaria and Exercise Duration each Affect Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPasquale, D M; Strangman, G E; Harris, N S; Muza, S R

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we quantified the changes in post-exercise resting heart rate (HRrst) associated with acute mountain sickness (AMS), and compared the effects of hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and normobaric hypoxia (NH) on HRrst. We also examined the modulating roles of exercise duration and exposure time on HRrst. Each subject participated in 2 of 6 conditions: normobaric normoxia (NN), NH, or HH (4 400 m altitude equivalent) combined with either 10 or 60 min of moderate cycling at the beginning of an 8-h exposure. AMS was associated with a 2 bpm higher HRrst than when not sick, after taking into account the ambient environment, exercise duration, and SpO2. In addition, HRrst was elevated in both NH and HH compared to NN with HRrst being 50% higher in HH than in NH. Participating in long duration exercise led to elevated resting HRs (0.8-1.4 bpm higher) compared with short exercise, while short exercise caused a progressive increase in HRrst over the exposure period in both NH and HH (0.77-1.2 bpm/h of exposure). This data suggests that AMS, NH, HH, exercise duration, time of exposure, and SpO2 have independent effects on HRrst. It further suggests that hypobaria exerts its own effect on HRrst in hypoxia. Thus NH and HH may not be interchangeable environments. PMID:25837245

  18. Potentiation of the radioprotective effect of hypoxia after administration of dextran sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice of the strain (CBAxC5781)F 1 injected with a single dose (40 mg.kg-1) of dextran sulphate (m.w 5x105) were used to determine the survival rate after a lethal dose (13.0 Gy) of gamma irradiation, the number of haemopoietic stem cells in bone marrow (CFUs) and that of spleen endogenous colonies. Irradiation was performed in a hypobaric chamber at levels of 20%, 15%, 12% and 10% of the oxygen content. While in the control groups the levels of hypoxia showed a weak radioprotective effect in animals treated with DS, radioprotection was observed both in 10% O2 and in 15% O2. The animals treated exhibited a higher survival rate up to day 30 after irradiation, an elevated number of survived haemopoietic stem cells (CFUs) in the bone marrow, and increased number of endogenous spleen colonies, as compared with the control group. the poentiation of the radioprotective effect of hypoxia (10% O2) was observed till the end of observation (6th day after DS injection). The results obtained support and earlier observation that increased activity of haemopoiesis forms a convenient pool for the potentiation of the radioprotective efficiency of hypoxic hypoxia

  19. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia (≥24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia (≤6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1α. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  20. Hypoxia in paradise: widespread hypoxia tolerance in coral reef fishes.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Göran E.; Ostlund-Nilsson, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Using respirometry, we examined the hypoxia tolerance of 31 teleost fish species (seven families) inhabiting coral reefs at a 2-5 m depth in the lagoon at Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia). All fishes studied maintained their rate of oxygen consumption down to relatively severe hypoxia (20-30% air saturation). Indeed, most fishes appeared unaffected by hypoxia until the oxygen level fell below 10% of air saturation. This, hitherto unrecognized, hypoxia tolerance among coral reef f...

  1. Expression and role of factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in pulmonary arteries of rat with hypoxia-induced hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daiyan Fu; Aiguo Dai; Ruicheng Hu; Yunrong Chen; Liming Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-11α subunit (HIF-1α) plays a pivotal role during the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) by transactivating it's target genes. As an oxygen-sensitive attenuator, factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH)hydroxylates a conserved asparagine residue within the C-terminal transactivation domain of HIF-1α under normoxia and moderate hypoxia. FIH protein is downregulated in response to hypoxia, but its dynamic expression and role during the development of HPH remains unclear. In this study,an HPH rat model was established. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia.The pulmonary artery remodeling index became evident after 7 d of hypoxia, while the right ventricular hypertrophy index became significant after 14 d of hypoxia. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a well-characterized target gene of HIF-1α, were markedly upregulated after exposure to hypoxia in pulmonary arteries. FIH protein in lung tissues declined after 7 d of hypoxia and continued to decline through the duration of hypoxia. FIH mRNA had few changes after exposure to hypoxia compared with after exposure to normoxia.In hypoxic rats, FIH protein showed significant negative correlation with VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein. FIH protein was negatively correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary artery remodeling index and right ventricular hypertrophy index. Taken together, our results suggest that, in the pulmonary arteries of rat exposed to moderate hypoxia, a time-dependent decrease in FIH protein may contribute to the development of rat HPH by enhancing the transactivation of HIF-1α target genes such as VEGF.

  2. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes (64Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective 64Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective 64Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential, with hypoxia

  3. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearling, J.L

    1998-11-01

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes ({sup 64}Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective {sup 64}Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective {sup 64}Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential

  4. Effects of intermittent hypoxia and light aerobic exercise on circulating stem cells and side population, after strenuous eccentric exercise in trained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Espinosa, Cristian; Ferreira, Inês; Ríos-Kristjánsson, Juan Gabriel; Rizo-Roca, David; García Godoy, Maria Dolors; Rico, Laura G; Rubi-Sans, Gerard; Torrella, Joan Ramon; Pagès, Teresa; Petriz, Jordi; Viscor, Ginés

    2015-01-01

    Our goal was to address if intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) exposure can help to increase the number of peripheral blood circulating progenitor cells and side population (SP) stem cells, in order to establish the usefulness of this intervention for skeletal muscle repair, because these cells play a role in tissue regeneration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in two basal states: untrained and trained and compared with 1, 3, 7 and 14 days stages of damage recovery of trained rats that had suffered skeletal muscle injury. Three experimental groups were studied: rats with passive recovery (CTRL); rats exposed to IHH after muscle damage (HYP); and, trained rats that, in addition to IHH, performed light aerobic exercise sessions (EHYP). We observed an increase in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) (mean = 0.153% of cells) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) (mean = 0.0020% of cells) in EHYP on day 7. Also these cells showed characteristics of more primitive progenitors in comparison to the other experimental groups (mean = 0.107% of cells), as deduced by retention of the promising fluorescent probe Vybrant Dye Cycle Violet. We concluded that intermittent exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in combination with light aerobic exercise increased the number of HSCs and EPCs on the 7th day in EHYP group, although the exercise-induced stimulus showed a reverse effect on SP kinetics. PMID:25266982

  5. Chemoreceptors and cardiovascular control in acute and chronic systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Marshall

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the ways in which the primary bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction evoked by selective stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can be modified by the secondary effects of a chemoreceptor-induced increase in ventilation. The evidence that strong stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can evoke the behavioural and cardiovascular components of the alerting or defence response which is characteristically evoked by novel or noxious stimuli is considered. The functional significance of all these influences in systemic hypoxia is then discussed with emphasis on the fact that these reflex changes can be overcome by the local effects of hypoxia: central neural hypoxia depresses ventilation, hypoxia acting on the heart causes bradycardia and local hypoxia of skeletal muscle and brain induces vasodilatation. Further, it is proposed that these local influences can become interdependent, so generating a positive feedback loop that may explain sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. It is also argued that a major contributor to these local influences is adenosine. The role of adenosine in determining the distribution of O2 in skeletal muscle microcirculation in hypoxia is discussed, together with its possible cellular mechanisms of action. Finally, evidence is presented that in chronic systemic hypoxia, the reflex vasoconstrictor influences of the sympathetic nervous system are reduced and/or the local dilator influences of hypoxia are enhanced. In vitro and in vivo findings suggest this is partly explained by upregulation of nitric oxide (NO synthesis by the vascular endothelium which facilitates vasodilatation induced by adenosine and other NO-dependent dilators and attenuates noradrenaline-evoked vasoconstriction.

  6. Upregulated copper transporters in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M Zimnicka

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX, a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2 also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness.

  7. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  8. Effects of Chinese herbal monomers on oxidative phosphorylation and membrane potential in cerebral mitochondria isolated from hypoxia-exposed rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Yan; Junze Liu

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is the key pathogenic mechanism of cerebral injury induced by high-altitude hypoxia. Some Chinese herbal monomers may exert anti-hypoxic effects through enhancing the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, effects of 10 kinds of Chinese herbal monomers on mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential of cerebral mitochondria isolated from hypoxia-exposed rats in vitro were investigated to screen anti-hypoxic drugs. Rats were exposed to a low-pressure environment of 405.35 mm Hg (54.04 kPa) for 3 days to establish high-altitude hypoxic models. Cerebral mitochondria were isolated and treated with different concentrations of Chinese herbal monomers (sinomenine, silymarin, glycyrrhizic acid, baicalin, quercetin, ginkgolide B, saffron, piperine, ginsenoside Rg1 and oxymatrine) for 5 minutes in vitro. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential were measured using a Clark oxygen electrode and the rhodamine 123 fluorescence analysis method, respectively. Hypoxic exposure significantly decreased the state 3 respiratory rate, respiratory control rate and mitochondrial membrane potential, and significantly increased the state 4 respiratory rate. Treatment with saffron, ginsenoside Rg1 and oxymatrine increased the respiratory control rate in cerebral mitochondria isolated from hypoxia-exposed rats in dose-dependent manners in vitro, while ginsenoside Rg1, piperine and oxymatrine significantly increased the mitochondrial membrane potential in cerebral mitochondria from hypoxia-exposed rats. The Chinese herbal monomers saffron, ginsenoside Rg1, piperine and oxymatrine could thus improve cerebral mitochondrial disorders in oxidative phosphorylation induced by hypobaric hypoxia exposure in vitro.

  9. Hypoxia and the Presence of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Affect Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ackerstaff

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor progression and metastasis are influenced by hypoxia, as well as by interactions between cancer cells and components of the stroma, such as endothelial cells. Here, we have used a magnetic resonance (MRcompatible invasion assay to further understand the effects of hypoxia on human prostate cancer cell invasion and metabolism in the presence and absence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Additionally, we compared endogenous activities of selected proteases related to invasion in PC-3 cells and HUVECs, profiled gene expression of PC-3 cells by microarray, evaluated cell proliferation of PC-3 cells and HUVECs by flow cytometry, under hypoxic and oxygenated conditions. The invasion of less-invasive DU-145 cells was not affected by either hypoxia or the presence of HUVECs. However, hypoxia significantly decreased the invasion of PC-3 cells. This hypoxia-induced decrease was attenuated by the presence of HUVECs, whereas under oxygenated conditions, HUVECs did not alter the invasion of PC-3 cells. Cell metabolism changed distinctly with hypoxia and invasion. The endogenous activity of selected extracellular proteases, although altered by hypoxia, did not fully explain the hypoxia-induced changes in invasion. Gene expression profiling indicated that hypoxia affects multiple cellular functions and pathways.

  10. Cerium oxide nanoparticles promote neurogenesis and abrogate hypoxia-induced memory impairment through AMPK–PKC–CBP signaling cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aditya Arya,1 Anamika Gangwar,1 Sushil Kumar Singh,2 Manas Roy,3,4 Mainak Das,3 Niroj Kumar Sethy,1 Kalpana Bhargava1 1Peptide and Proteomics Division, Defense Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, 2Functional Materials Division, Solid State Physics Laboratory, Defense Research and Development Organization, Timarpur, Delhi, 3Biological Science and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, 4Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Howrah, India Abstract: Structural and functional integrity of the brain is adversely affected by reduced oxygen saturation, especially during chronic hypoxia exposure and often encountered by altitude travelers or dwellers. Hypoxia-induced generation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species reportedly affects the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain, promoting memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, also known as nanoceria, switch between +3 and +4 oxidation states and reportedly scavenge superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective as well as the cognition-enhancing activities of nanoceria during hypobaric hypoxia. Using polyethylene glycol-coated 3 nm nanoceria (PEG-CNPs, we have demonstrated efficient localization of PEG-CNPs in rodent brain. This resulted in significant reduction of oxidative stress and associated damage during hypoxia exposure. Morris water maze-based memory function tests revealed that PEG-CNPs ameliorated hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Using microscopic, flow cytometric, and histological studies, we also provide evidences that PEG-CNPs augmented hippocampus neuronal survival and promoted neurogenesis. Molecular studies revealed that PEG-CNPs promoted neurogenesis through the 5'-adenine monophosphate-activated protein kinase–protein kinase C–cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein

  11. Rhodiola crenulata and Its Bioactive Components, Salidroside and Tyrosol, Reverse the Hypoxia-Induced Reduction of Plasma-Membrane-Associated Na,K-ATPase Expression via Inhibition of ROS-AMPK-PKCξ Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to hypoxia leads to impaired pulmonary sodium transport, which is associated with Na,K-ATPase dysfunction in the alveolar epithelium. The present study is designed to examine the effect and mechanism of Rhodiola crenulata extract (RCE and its bioactive components on hypoxia-mediated Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. A549 cells were exposed to hypoxia in the presence or absence of RCE, salidroside, or tyrosol. The generation of intracellular ROS was measured by using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA, and the endocytosis was determined by measuring the expression level of Na,K-ATPase in the PM fraction. Rats exposed to a hypobaric hypoxia chamber were used to investigate the efficacy and underlying mechanism of RCE in vivo. Our results showed that RCE and its bioactive compounds significantly prevented the hypoxia-mediated endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase via the inhibition of the ROS-AMPK-PKCζ pathway in A549 cells. Furthermore, RCE also showed a comparable preventive effect on the reduction of Na,K-ATPase endocytosis and inhibition of AMPK-PKCξ pathway in the rodent model. Our study is the first to offer substantial evidence to support the efficacy of Rhodiola products against hypoxia-associated Na,K-ATPase endocytosis and clarify the ethnopharmacological relevance of Rhodiola crenulata as a popular folk medicine for high-altitude illness.

  12. Low Molecular Weight Fucoidan Inhibits Tumor Angiogenesis through Downregulation of HIF-1/VEGF Signaling under Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factors-1 (HIF-1 plays a critical role in promoting tumor angiogenesis, growth and metastasis. Low molecular weight fucoidan (LMWF is prepared from brown algae, and exhibits anticancer activity. However, whether LMWF attenuates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in bladder cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. This is the first study to demonstrate that LMWF can inhibit hypoxia-stimulated H2O2 formation, HIF-1 accumulation and transcriptional activity vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion, and the migration and invasion in hypoxic human bladder cancer cells (T24 cells. LMWF also downregulated hypoxia-activated phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K/4EBP-1 signaling in T24 cells. Blocking PI3K/AKT or mTOR activity strongly diminished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression and VEGF secretion in T24 cells, supporting the involvement of PI3K/AKT/mTOR in the induction of HIF-1α and VEGF. Additionally, LMWF significantly attenuated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo evidenced by reduction of tube formation of hypoxic human umbilical vascular endothelial cells and blood capillary generation in the tumor. Similarly, administration of LMWF also inhibited the HIF-1α and VEGF expression in vivo, accompanied by a reduction of tumor growth. In summary, under hypoxia conditions, the antiangiogenic activity of LMWF in bladder cancer may be associated with suppressing HIF-1/VEGF-regulated signaling pathway.

  13. Description of the NASA Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Database (1982-1998)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, J. H., III; Conkin, J.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of high-speed computers, data analysis software, and internet communication are compelling reasons to describe and make available computer databases from many disciplines. Methods: Human research using hypobaric chambers to understand and then prevent decompression sickness (DCS) during space walks has been conducted at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) from 1982 to 1998. The data are archived in the NASA Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Database, within an Access 2003 Relational Database. Results: There are 548 records from 237 individuals that participated in 31 unique tests. Each record includes physical characteristics, the denitrogenation procedure that was tested, and the outcome of the test, such as the report of a DCS symptom and the intensity of venous gas emboli (VGE) detected with an ultrasound Doppler bubble detector as they travel in the venous blood along the pulmonary artery on the way to the lungs. We documented 84 cases of DCS and 226 cases where VGE were detected. The test altitudes were 10.2, 10.1, 6.5, 6.0, and 4.3 pounds per square inch absolute (psia). 346 records are from tests conducted at 4.3 psia, the operating pressure of the current U.S. space suit. 169 records evaluate the Staged 10.2 psia Decompression Protocol used by the Space Shuttle Program. The mean exposure time at altitude was 242.3 minutes (SD = 80.6), with a range from 120 to 360 minutes. Among our test subjects, 96 records of exposures are females. The mean age of all test subjects was 31.8 years (SD = 7.17), with a range from 20 to 54 years. Discussion: These data combined with other published databases and evaluated with metaanalysis techniques would extend our understanding about DCS. A better understanding about the cause and prevention of DCS would benefit astronauts, aviators, and divers.

  14. The adverse pial arteriolar and axonal consequences of traumatic brain injury complicated by hypoxia and their therapeutic modulation with hypothermia in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Guoyi; Oda, Yasutaka; Wei, Enoch P.; Povlishock, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of posttraumatic hypoxia on cerebral vascular responsivity and axonal damage, while also exploring hypothermia's potential to attenuate these responses. Rats were subjected to impact acceleration injury (IAI) and equipped with cranial windows to assess vascular reactivity to topical acetylcholine, with postmortem analyses using antibodies to amyloid precursor protein to assess axonal damage. Animals were subjected to hypoxia alone, IAI and hypoxia, IAI and hypox...

  15. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. PMID:25997947

  16. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in p...

  17. Evaluation of the visual analog score (VAS to assess acute mountain sickness (AMS in a hypobaric chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Wu

    Full Text Available The visual analog score (VAS is widely used in clinical medicine to evaluate the severity of subjective symptoms. There is substantial literature on the application of the VAS in medicine, especially in measuring pain, nausea, fatigue, and sleep quality. Hypobaric chambers are utilized to test and exercise the anaerobic endurance of athletes. To this end, we evaluated the degree of AMS using the visual analog scale (VAS in a hypobaric chamber in which the equivalent altitude was increased from 300 to 3500 m.We observed 32 healthy young men in the hypobaric chamber (Guizhou, China and increased the altitude from 300 to 3500 m. During the five hours of testing, we measured the resting blood oxygen saturation (SaO2 and heart rate (HR. Using the VAS, we recorded the subjects' ratings of their AMS symptom intensity that occurred throughout the phase of increasing altitude at 300 m, 1500 m, 2000 m, 2500 m, 3000 m, and 3500 m.During the phase of increasing altitude in the hypobaric chamber, the patients' SaO2 was 96.8 ± 0.8% at 300 m and 87.5 ± 4.1% at 3500 m (P<0.05 and their HR was 79.0 ± 8.0 beats/minute at 300 m and 79.3 ± 11.3 beats/minute at 3500 m. The incidence of symptoms significantly increased from 21.9% at an altitude of 1000 m to 65.6% at an altitude of 3500 m (P<0.05. The composite VAS score, which rated the occurrence of four symptoms (headache, dizziness, fatigue, and gastrointestinal discomfort, was significantly correlated with elevation (P<0.01.Based on the experimental data, the VAS can be used as an auxiliary diagnostic method of Lake Louise score to evaluate AMS and can show the changing severity of symptoms during the process of increased elevation in a hypobaric chamber; it also reflects a significant correlation with altitude.

  18. Chronic hypoxia promotes pulmonary artery endothelial cell proliferation through H2O2-induced 5-lipoxygenase.

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    Kristi M Porter

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Hypertension (PH is a progressive disorder characterized by endothelial dysfunction and proliferation. Hypoxia induces PH by increasing vascular remodeling. A potential mediator in hypoxia-induced PH development is arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase (ALOX5. While ALOX5 metabolites have been shown to promote pulmonary vasoconstriction and endothelial cell proliferation, the contribution of ALOX5 to hypoxia-induced proliferation remains unknown. We hypothesize that hypoxia exposure stimulates HPAEC proliferation by increasing ALOX5 expression and activity. To test this, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC were cultured under normoxic (21% O2 or hypoxic (1% O2 conditions for 24-, 48-, or 72 hours. In a subset of cells, the ALOX5 inhibitor, zileuton, or the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor, MK-886, was administered during hypoxia exposure. ALOX5 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blot and HPAEC proliferation was assessed. Our results demonstrate that 24 and 48 hours of hypoxia exposure have no effect on HPAEC proliferation or ALOX5 expression. Seventy two hours of hypoxia significantly increases HPAEC ALOX5 expression, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release, and HPAEC proliferation. We also demonstrate that targeted ALOX5 gene silencing or inhibition of the ALOX5 pathway by pharmacological blockade attenuates hypoxia-induced HPAEC proliferation. Furthermore, our findings indicate that hypoxia-induced increases in cell proliferation and ALOX5 expression are dependent on H2O2 production, as administration of the antioxidant PEG-catalase blocks these effects and addition of H2O2 to HPAEC promotes proliferation. Overall, these studies indicate that hypoxia exposure induces HPAEC proliferation by activating the ALOX5 pathway via the generation of H2O2.

  19. Neuroprotective effect of peroxiredoxin 6 against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Anil

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to respond to changes in the extra-intracellular environment is prerequisite for cell survival. Cellular responses to the environment include elevating defense systems, such as the antioxidant defense system. Hypoxia-evoked reactive oxygen species (ROS-driven oxidative stress is an underlying mechanism of retinal ganglion cell (RGC death that leads to blinding disorders. The protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 plays a pleiotropic role in negatively regulating death signaling in response to stressors, and thereby stabilizes cellular homeostasis. Results We have shown that RGCs exposed to hypoxia (1% or hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride display reduced expression of PRDX6 with higher ROS expression and activation of NF-κB. These cells undergo apoptosis, while cells with over-expression of PRDX6 demonstrate resistance against hypoxia-driven RGC death. The RGCs exposed to hypoxia either with 1% oxygen or cobalt chloride (0-400 μM, revealed ~30%-70% apoptotic cell death after 48 and 72 h of exposure. Western analysis and real-time PCR showed elevated expression of PRDX6 during hypoxia at 24 h, while PRDX6 protein and mRNA expression declined from 48 h onwards following hypoxia exposure. Concomitant with this, RGCs showed increased ROS expression and activation of NF-κB with IkB phosphorylation/degradation, as examined with H2DCF-DA and transactivation assays. These hypoxia-induced adverse reactions could be reversed by over-expression of PRDX6. Conclusion Because an abundance of PRDX6 in cells was able to attenuate hypoxia-induced RGC death, the protein could possibly be developed as a novel therapeutic agent acting to postpone RGC injury and delay the progression of glaucoma and other disorders caused by the increased-ROS-generated death signaling related to hypoxia.

  20. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in breast cancer: Hypoxia and tumourigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microenvironmental hypoxia that arises as a consequence of the development of a solid tumour also acts to promote tumour growth. Hypoxia induces the expression of key components of the angiogenic and apoptotic signalling cascades, the glycolytic pathway and various cell-cycle control proteins. At the cellular level it mediates the infiltration and accumulation of tumour-associated macrophages within avascular tumour regions. Complex interactions between tumour cell and macrophage hypoxia-regulated gene products and their associated pathways form the basis for the hypoxic promotion of tumourigenesis and malignant progression

  1. Hypoxia. Hypoxia in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, C.; Schett, G; Gay, S; Distler, O.; Distler, J.H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmunity, microangiopathy and tissue fibrosis are hallmarks of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Vascular alterations and reduced capillary density decrease blood flow and impair tissue oxygenation in SSc. Oxygen supply is further reduced by accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM), which increases diffusion distances from blood vessels to cells. Therefore, severe hypoxia is a characteristic feature of SSc and might contribute directly to the progression of the disease. Hypoxia stimulates the p...

  2. Effects of chloramphenicol preconditioning on oxidative respiratory function of cerebral mitochondria in rats exposed to acute hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽峰; 柳君泽; 党永明; 宋熔

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the roles of chloramphenicol (CAP) preconditioning in the oxidative respiratory function of cerebral mitochondria in rats exposed to acute hypoxia during acute hypoxia by observing the changes of mitochondrial oxidative respiratory function and cytochrome C oxidase (COX) activity. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control (C), medication (M), hypoxia (H), and medication plus hypoxia (MH). Rats in groups M and MH were administered by peritoneal injection of CAP (50 mg/kg) every 12 h for 7 d before decapitation, but those in groups H and MH were exposed to a hypobaric chamber simulating 5 000 m high altitude for 24 h. The rat cerebral cortex was removed and mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiratory function and COX activity were measured by Clark oxygen electrode. Results: Compared with Group C, Group H showed significantly elevated state 4respiration (ST4), decreased state 3 respiration (ST3), and respiratory control rate (RCR) in mitochondrial respiration during acute hypoxic exposure. ST3 in Group MH was significantly lower than that in Group C, but was not significantly different from that in Groups H and M, while ST4 in Group MH was significantly lower than that in groups C and H. RCR in Group MH was higher than that in Group H, but lower than that in Group C. COX activity in Group H was significantly lower than that in Group C. In Group MH, COX activity increased and was higher than that in Group H, but was still lower than that in Group C. Conclusion: Acute hypoxic exposure could lead to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction, suggesting that CAP preconditioning might be beneficial to the recovery of rat respiratory finction. The change of COX activity is consistent with that of mitochondrial respiratory function during acute hypoxic exposure and CAP-administration, indicating that COX plays an important role in oxidative phosphorylation function of mitochondria from

  3. Role of the D2 dopamine receptor in molecular adaptation to chronic hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Zhu, W H; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-01

    We have previously shown that pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells rapidly depolarize and undergo Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in response to moderate hypoxia and that intracellular free Ca2+ is modulated by activation of dopamine D2 receptors in this cell type. The present study shows that D2 (quinpirole-mediated) inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (ICa) in PC12 cells is dramatically attenuated after chronic exposure to moderate hypoxia (24 h at 10% O2). Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin abolished D2-mediated inhibition of ICa. The D2-induced inhibition of ICa did not depend on protein kinase A (PKA), as it persisted both in the presence of a specific PKA inhibitor (PKI) and in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. Prolonged exposure to hypoxia (24 h) significantly reduced the level of Gi/o alpha immunoreactivity, but did not alter G beta levels. Furthermore, dialysis of recombinant G(o) alpha protein through the patch pipette restored the inhibitory effect of quinpirole in cells chronically exposed to hypoxia. We conclude that the attenuation of the D2-mediated inhibition of ICa by chronic hypoxia is caused by impaired receptor-G protein coupling, due to reduced levels of G(o) alpha protein. This attenuated feedback modulation of ICa by dopamine may allow for a more sustained Ca2+ influx and enhanced cellular excitation during prolonged hypoxia. PMID:10591061

  4. Clinical Biomarkers for Hypoxia Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Courter, Don

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia or a reduction of the tissue oxygen tension is a key microenvironmental factor for tumor progression and treatment resistance in solid tumors. Because hypoxic tumor cells have been demonstrated to be more resistant to ionizing radiation, hypoxia has been a focus of laboratory and clinical research in radiation therapy for many decades. It is believed that proper detection of hypoxic regions would guide treatment options and ultimately improve tumor response. To date, most clinic...

  5. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  6. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the 18Fluoromisonidazole PET ([18F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [18F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  7. Hypoxia and Hypoxia-Inducible Factors in Leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deynoux, Margaux; Sunter, Nicola; Hérault, Olivier; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Despite huge improvements in the treatment of leukemia, the percentage of patients suffering relapse still remains significant. Relapse most often results from a small number of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) within the bone marrow, which are able to self-renew, and therefore reestablish the full tumor. The marrow microenvironment contributes considerably in supporting the protection and development of leukemic cells. LSCs share specific niches with normal hematopoietic stem cells with the niche itself being composed of a variety of cell types, including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, bone cells, immune cells, neuronal cells, and vascular cells. A hallmark of the hematopoietic niche is low oxygen partial pressure, indeed this hypoxia is necessary for the long-term maintenance of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Hypoxia is a strong signal, principally maintained by members of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family. In solid tumors, it has been well established that hypoxia triggers intrinsic metabolic changes and microenvironmental modifications, such as the stimulation of angiogenesis, through activation of HIFs. As leukemia is not considered a "solid" tumor, the role of oxygen in the disease was presumed to be inconsequential and remained long overlooked. This view has now been revised since hypoxia has been shown to influence leukemic cell proliferation, differentiation, and resistance to chemotherapy. However, the role of HIF proteins remains controversial with HIFs being considered as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, depending on the study and model. The purpose of this review is to highlight our knowledge of hypoxia and HIFs in leukemic development and therapeutic resistance and to discuss the recent hypoxia-based strategies proposed to eradicate leukemias. PMID:26955619

  8. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors in leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux eDeynoux

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite huge improvements in the treatment of leukaemia, the percentage of patients suffering relapse still remains significant. Relapse most often results from a small number of leukaemic stem cells (LSCs within the bone marrow, which are able to self-renew and therefore re-establish the full tumour. The marrow microenvironment contributes considerably in supporting the protection and development of leukaemic cells. LSCs share specific niches with normal haematopoietic stem cells with the niche itself being composed of a variety of cell types including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, bone cells, immune cells, neuronal cells and vascular cells. A hallmark of the haematopoietic niche is low oxygen partial pressure, indeed this hypoxia is necessary for the long-term maintenance of HSCs. Hypoxia is a strong signal, principally maintained by members of the hypoxia-inducible factor family. In solid tumours, it has been well-established that hypoxia triggers intrinsic metabolic changes and microenvironmental modifications, such as the stimulation of angiogenesis, through activation of HIFs. As leukaemia is not considered a solid tumour, the role of oxygen in the disease was presumed to be inconsequential and remained long overlooked. This view has now been revised since hypoxia has been shown to influence leukaemic cell proliferation, differentiation and resistance to chemotherapy. However, the role of HIF proteins remains controversial with HIFs being considered as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes, depending on the study and model. The purpose of this review is to highlight our knowledge of hypoxia and HIFs in leukaemic development and therapeutic resistance, and to discuss the recent hypoxia-based strategies proposed to eradicate leukaemias.

  9. The Gas Exchange, Ultrastructure and Stress Resistance of Lettuce Plants under Short-Term Hypobaric and Hypoxic Conditions%短期低压低氧下莴苣的气体交换、超微结构和抗逆特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐永康; 高峰; 郭双生

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of plants cultivation at hypobaria and hypoxia , the gas ex-change, ultrastructure and stress resistance of lettuce were conducted under short-term hypobaric and hy-poxic conditions.The gas exchange and growth of 25-day old lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.var.Rome) seed-lings were tested after 1-h or 24-h equilibration under two levels of total atmospheric pressure (101kPa and 30kPa)and three levels of oxygen partial pressure (21 kPa, 6 kPa and 2 kPa).The results showed that the biomass, ratio of root/shoot, water content and mineral contents of lettuce plants were not affect-ed by the changes of total atmospheric pressure and oxygen partial pressure;Under the same total pres-sure conditions (101 kPa or 30 kPa), hypoxia (6 kPa or 2 kPa) resulted in the increases of photosynthe-sis rate , soluble sugar and malondialdehyde and the reduction of dark respiration of lettuce leaves .The change of mitochondrion ultrastructure and the decrease of transpiration were found at 2 kPa oxygen par-tial pressure;Under the same oxygen partial pressure conditions , photosynthesis rate ,the chloroplast ul-trastructure ,the contents of chlorophyll and carotenoid of lettuce leaves were not affected by short-term hypobaric treatment (30 kPa) ,but the rates of dark respiration and transpiration increased and the con-tents of soluble sugar and malondialdehyde in lettuce leaves decreased .Lettuce can grow under short-term hypobaric and hypoxic conditions.Short-term hypoxia (6 kPa or 2 kPa) resulted in hypoxic stress and hypobaria(30 kPa) enhanced the stress resistance of lettuce .%为探索低压低氧环境中培养植物的可行性,研究了短期低压和低氧对莴苣气体交换、叶片超微结构和抗逆特性的影响。将莴苣植株(25天株龄)在两种总压(101 kPa和30 kPa )和三种氧分压(21 kPa、6 kPa和2 kPa)条件下进行了1小时和24小时平衡处理。发现短期低压和低氧均未影响莴苣植株生物量、根

  10. Limited effects of exogenous glucose during severe hypoxia and a lack of hypoxia-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated rainbow trout cardiac muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Tracy A.; DellaValle, Brian; Gesser, Hans;

    2013-01-01

    for aerobic preparations (1) paced at 0.5 or 1.1 Hz, (2) at 15 or 23°C, (3) receiving adrenergic stimulation or (4) during reoxygenation with or without adrenaline after severe hypoxia. Contractile responses to ryanodine, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, were also not...... affected by exogenous glucose. However, glucose did attenuate the fall in twitch force during severe hypoxia. Glucose uptake was assayed in non-contracting ventricle strips using 2-[(3)H] deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, at different incubation temperatures and with different...... inhibitors. Based upon a lack of saturation of 2-DG uptake and incomplete inhibition of uptake by cytochalasin B and d-glucose, 2-DG uptake was mediated by a combination of facilitated transport and simple diffusion. Hypoxia stimulated lactate efflux sixfold to sevenfold with glucose present, but did not...

  11. Hypoxia induces TFE3 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Guang-Tao; Huang, Cong-Fa; Bu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Lu

    2016-03-01

    To assess the role of transcription factor μE3 (TFE3) in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), human HNSCC tissue arrays were investigated for TFE3 expression. Human HNSCC tissues with neoadjuvant inductive chemotherapey (docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil, TPF) and mice HNSCC tissues from transgenic mice model were evaluated for TFE3 expression and the hypoxia pathway. The roles of EGF/EGFR mediated hypoxia in TFE3 nuclear expression were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. TFE3 expression was higher in human HNSCC tissues compared with that in normal oral mucosa. Moreover, high TFE3 expression was related to HIF-1α, PAI-1, and EGFR, which demonstrated the activation of the hypoxia pathway in HNSCC tissues. Furthermore, elevated TFE3 expression was observed in HNSCC after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and high TFE3 expression may indicate poor response to TPF inductive chemotherapy. Furthermore, similar changes with increased TFE3 were observed in HNSCC of the transgenic mouse HNSCC model. Hypoxic culture in the human HNSCC cell line increased TFE3 expression, which promoted cell survival under hypoxia. EGFR inhibiton by cetuximab could attenuate hypoxia-induced TFE3 in the HNSCC cell line and transgenic mouse HNSCC model. These findings indicated that TFE3 was an important hypoxia-induced transcriptional factor in HNSCC. TFE3 could be regarded as a durgable therapeutic oncotarget by EGFR inhibition. PMID:26872381

  12. Hypoxia inhibits pulmonary artery endothelial cell apoptosis via the e-selectin/biliverdin reductase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shasha; Yi, Zhi; Zhang, Min; Mao, Min; Fu, Li; Zhao, Xijuan; Liu, Zizhen; Gao, Jiayin; Cao, Weiwei; Liu, Yumei; Shi, Hengyuan; Zhu, Daling

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia-induced inhibition of apoptosis in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) has an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravated hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms involved in the hypoxia-induced inhibition of PAEC apoptosis have not been elucidated. e-selectin and biliverdin reductase (BVR) have been reported to contribute to the cascade of apoptosis in several cell lines but not in PAECs. In the present study, we show that the expression of e-selectin and BVR was both up-regulated by hypoxia in PAECs. Moreover, hypoxia attenuated the decreased cell survival and apoptotic protein expression, and increased DNA fragmentation induced by serum deprivation in the PAECs, which was mediated by the e-selectin/BVR pathway. In addition, by examining the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane proteins (Bcl-2 and BAX), we show that the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway was necessary for the e-selectin/BVR pathway inducing the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in PAECs. Taken all together, our data show that the e-selectin/BVR pathway participates in the inhibitory process of hypoxia in PAEC apoptosis which is mediated by the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:27033411

  13. Hypoxia-mediated tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, K; Askham, Z; Martin, L; Spearman, H; Day, D; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    2003-04-01

    Hypoxia is a common physiological feature of tumours. It activates a signalling cascade that culminates in the stabilization of the HIF-1 transcription factor and activation of genes that possess a hypoxia response element (HRE). We have used an optimized hypoxia responsive promoter (OBHRE) to investigate hypoxia-targeted gene expression in vivo in the context of an adenovirus vector. The OBHRE promoter showed limited activity in the liver or spleen such that expression was 1000-fold lower than that driven by the strong CMV/IE promoter. However, in the context of the tumour microenvironment, the OBHRE promoter achieved expression levels comparable to that of the CMV/IE promoter. Next, we showed that an adenovirus expressing the human cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6) regulated by the OBHRE promoter delays tumour growth in response to the prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA). Finally, we exploited the hepatotropism of adenovirus to investigate whether the OBHRE promoter could mitigate the hepatotoxicity of a recombinant adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase (TK) in the context of the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). High-dose Ad.CMVTK/GCV treatment caused significant liver necrosis whereas the same dose of Ad.HRETK was well tolerated. These in vivo data demonstrate that hypoxia-targeted gene expression via the OBHRE promoter can be used to increase the therapeutic window of cytotoxic cancer gene therapy. PMID:12646859

  14. [The intensity of respiration in pea and corn seedlings under high-altitude hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafurova, T P; Ageev, B G; Sapozhnikova, V A; Ponomarev, Iu N; Zaĭtseva, T A; Zotnikova, A P

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of CO2 gas-exchange and enzymatic activity of the respiratory metabolism of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings during hypobaric hypoxia simulating the altitude of 5000 m above the sea level was studied. In the 48-hour chamber experiment (total barometric pressure is 54 kPa, partial O2 pressure is 11 kPa), the relative intensity of CO2 emission was found to increase and be essentially higher for pea than maize. Periodic reactions with small upward spikes and time offset were recorded in the pea plants. The initial increase of CO2 emission velocity by maize rapidly reached the level of saturation and since then remained constant. High velocity of the main catabolic ways and carboxylating activity in maize seedlings was the effect of hypoxic stress. Utilisation of respiratory substrates by pea seedlings was blocked at the Krebs cycle level, whereas glycolysis and oxidizing pentose phosphate pathways were activated. Weak activity of the carboxylate system does not provide refixation of endogenous carbon dioxide, excessive quantities of which invade the environment. PMID:8963291

  15. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in breast cancer: Hypoxia signalling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF), which is centrally involved in physiological oxygen homeostasis, is also activated in the majority of tumours. Activation of HIF can occur through genetic mechanisms or as a result of hypoxia within the tumour microenvironment. In some cases HIF activation appears to be intimately linked to the proliferative stimulus itself. HIF affects patterns of gene expression and tumour growth, although precise effects vary between tumour types. Modulation of HIF activity, if correctly applied, may be therapeutically beneficial in tumour therapy

  16. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Greijer, A.E.; Wall

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis can be induced in response to hypoxia. The severity of hypoxia determines whether cells become apoptotic or adapt to hypoxia and survive. A hypoxic environment devoid of nutrients prevents the cell undergoing energy dependent apoptosis and cells become necrotic. Apoptosis regulatory proteins are delicately balanced. In solid tumours, hypoxia is a common phenomenon. Cells adapt to this environmental stress, so that after repeated periods of hypoxia, selection for resistance to hypoxi...

  17. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis can be induced in response to hypoxia. The severity of hypoxia determines whether cells become apoptotic or adapt to hypoxia and survive. A hypoxic environment devoid of nutrients prevents the cell undergoing energy dependent apoptosis and cells become necrotic. Apoptosis regulatory proteins are delicately balanced. In solid tumours, hypoxia is a common phenomenon. Cells adapt to this environmental stress, so that after repeated periods of hypoxia, selection for resistance to hypoxi...

  18. Ghrelin Increases Lymphocytes in Chronic Normobaric Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzaie Bavil, Fariba; Mohaddes, Gisou; Ebrahimi, Hadi; Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Ghiyasi, Rafigheh; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a condition of decreased availability of oxygen. To adapt hypoxia, some changes in blood cells occur in the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on different types of blood cell in normobaric hypoxia situation.

  19. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH. PMID:25656991

  20. Role of endoplasmic reticular stress in aortic endothelial apoptosis induced by intermittent/persistent hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuan-yuan; SHANG Jin; LIU Hui-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence shows that hypoxia can induce endothelial apoptosis,however the mechanism is still unknown.We hypothesized whether intermittent or persistent hypoxia could induce endoplasmic reticular stress,leading to endothelial apoptosis.Methods Twenty-four 8-week male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups:normoxia (NC) group,intermittent hypoxia (IH) group and persistent hypoxia (PH) group.TUNEL staining was performed to detect aortic arch endotheliar apoptosis,and immunohistochemistry for BIP,CHOP and caspase12 to test protein expression;human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) of the line ECV304 were cultured (with or without taurodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) 10 mmol/L,100 mmol/L) and divided into four groups:NC group (20.8% O2 for 4 hours),PH1 group (5% O2 for 4 hours),PH2 group (5% O2 for 12 hours) and IH group (20.8% O2 and 5% O2 alternatively for 8 hours).Annexin V-fluorescein-isothiocyanate/propidium iodide flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis in each group.The expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12 were detected by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.Result Intermittent and persistent hypoxia could increase the rate of endothelium apoptosis and the expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12 compared with the control,induction by intermittent hypoxia was slightly higher than persistent hypoxia.In the HUVEC experiment,TUDCA significantly reduced apoptosis and the expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12.Conclusion Hypoxia,especially intermittent,can induce endothelial cell apoptosis possibly through endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway,which can be attenuated by taurodeoxycholic acid.

  1. Preconditioning with associated blocking of Ca2+ inflow alleviates hypoxia-induced damage to pancreatic β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuheng Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Beta cells of pancreatic islets are susceptible to functional deficits and damage by hypoxia. Here we aimed to characterize such effects and to test for and pharmacological means to alleviate a negative impact of hypoxia. METHODS AND DESIGN: Rat and human pancreatic islets were subjected to 5.5 h of hypoxia after which functional and viability parameters were measured subsequent to the hypoxic period and/or following a 22 h re-oxygenation period. Preconditioning with diazoxide or other agents was usually done during a 22 h period prior to hypoxia. RESULTS: Insulin contents decreased by 23% after 5.5 h of hypoxia and by 61% after a re-oxygenation period. Preconditioning with diazoxide time-dependently alleviated these hypoxia effects in rat and human islets. Hypoxia reduced proinsulin biosynthesis ((3H-leucine incorporation into proinsulin by 35%. Preconditioning counteracted this decrease by 91%. Preconditioning reduced hypoxia-induced necrosis by 40%, attenuated lowering of proteins of mitochondrial complexes I-IV and enhanced stimulation of HIF-1-alpha and phosphorylated AMPK proteins. Preconditioning by diazoxide was abolished by co-exposure to tolbutamide or elevated potassium (i.e. conditions which increase Ca(2+ inflow. Preconditioning with nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, partly reproduced effects of diazoxide. Both diazoxide and nifedipine moderately reduced basal glucose oxidation whereas glucose-induced oxygen consumption (tested with diazoxide was unaffected. Preconditioning with diaxoxide enhanced insulin contents in transplants of rat islets to non-diabetic rats and lowered hyperglycemia vs. non-preconditioned islets in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Preconditioning of human islet transplants lowered hyperglycemia in streptozotocin-diabetic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS: 1 Prior blocking of Ca(2+ inflow associates with lesser hypoxia-induced damage, 2 preconditioning affects basal mitochondrial metabolism and accelerates

  2. Pilot study: rapidly cycling hypobaric pressure improves pain after 5 days in adiposis dolorosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Herbst

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Karen L Herbst1, Thomas Rutledge21Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, California, USAAbstract: Adiposis dolorosa (AD is a rare disorder of painful nodular subcutaneous fat ­accompanied by fatigue, difficulty with weight loss, inflammation, increased fluid in ­adipose ­tissue (lipedema and lymphedema, and hyperalgesia. Sequential compression relieves ­lymphedema pain; we therefore hypothesized that whole body cyclic pneumatic hypobaric compression may relieve pain in AD. To avoid exacerbating hyperalgesia, we utilized a touch-free method, which is delivered via a high-performance altitude simulator, the Cyclic Variations in Altitude ConditioningTM (CVACTM process. As a pilot study, 10 participants with AD completed pain and quality of life questionnaires before and after 20–40 minutes of CVAC process daily for 5 days. Participants lost weight (195.5 ± 17.6–193.8 ± 17.3 lb; P = 0.03, and bioimpedance significantly decreased (510 ± 36–490 ± 38 ohm; P = 0.01. There was a significant decrease in scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (P = 0.039, in average (P = 0.002, highest (P = 0.029, lowest (P = 0.04, and current pain severity (P = 0.02 on the Visual Analogue Scale, but there was no change in pain quality by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. There were no significant changes in total and physical SF-36 scores, but the mental score improved significantly (P = 0.049. There were no changes in the Pain Disability Index or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. These data present a potential, new, noninvasive means of treating pain in AD by whole body pneumatic compression as part of the CVAC process. Although randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these data, the CVAC process could potentially help in treating AD pain and other chronic pain disorders.Keywords: bioimpedance, chronic pain, lipedema

  3. Preeclampsia, Hypoxia, Thrombosis, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Shamshirsaz, Amir A.; Michael Paidas; Graciela Krikun

    2011-01-01

    Reductions in uteroplacental flow initiate a cascade of molecular effects leading to hypoxia, thrombosis, inflammation, and endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in untoward pregnancy outcomes. In this review, we detail these effects and their relationship to preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR).

  4. Experimental hypoxia and embryonic angiogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nanka, O.; Valášek, P.; Dvořáková, Marta; Grim, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 235, č. 3 (2006), s. 723-733. ISSN 1058-8388 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Experimental hypoxia * Embryonic angiogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2006

  5. Evidence nitric oxide mediates the vasodepressor response to hypoxia in sino-denervated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Miaokun; Reis, D.J. (Cornell Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Systemic hypoxia, produced in deeply anesthetized, paralyzed rats in which arterial chemoreceptors were denervated, elicited a decrease in arterial pressure (AP) averaging {minus}47 mmHg. Systemic administration of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NO{sub 2}Arg), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, attenuated the hypoxic depressor response by 79% and elevated AP by 21 mmHg. The effects of L-NO{sub 2}Arg on the hypoxic depressor response and arterial pressure were reversed by systemic administration of L- but not D-arginine. Elevation of AP with arginine-vasopressin or reduction of AP with nitroprusside to the pre-L-NO{sub 2}Arg levels did not modify the fall of AP to hypoxia. Endogenous NO synthesized in vivo from L-arginine, mediates most of the hypoxia depressor response.

  6. Cordyceps sinensis Increases Hypoxia Tolerance by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1 and Metallothionein via Nrf2 Activation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mrinalini Singh; Rajkumar Tulsawani; Praveen Koganti; Amitabh Chauhan; Manimaran Manickam; Kshipra Misra

    2013-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, an edible mushroom growing in Himalayan regions, is widely recognized in traditional system of medicine. In the present study, we report the efficacy of Cordyceps sinensis in facilitating tolerance to hypoxia using A549 cell line as a model system. Treatment with aqueous extract of Cordyceps sinensis appreciably attenuated hypoxia induced ROS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained antioxidant status similar to that of controls via induction of antioxid...

  7. Rotary antenna attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Hardy, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Radio frequency attenuator, having negligible insertion loss at minimum attenuation, can be used for making precise antenna gain measurements. It is small in size compared to a rotary-vane attenuator.

  8. Design and conduct of Caudwell Xtreme Everest: an observational cohort study of variation in human adaptation to progressive environmental hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythen Monty G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological responses to hypoxaemia and cellular hypoxia are poorly understood, and inter-individual differences in performance at altitude and outcome in critical illness remain unexplained. We propose a model for exploring adaptation to hypoxia in the critically ill: the study of healthy humans, progressively exposed to environmental hypobaric hypoxia (EHH. The aim of this study was to describe the spectrum of adaptive responses in humans exposed to graded EHH and identify factors (physiological and genetic associated with inter-individual variation in these responses. Methods Design Observational cohort study of progressive incremental exposure to EHH. Setting University human physiology laboratory in London, UK (75 m and 7 field laboratories in Nepal at 1300 m, 3500 m, 4250 m, 5300 m, 6400 m, 7950 m and 8400 m. Participants 198 healthy volunteers and 24 investigators trekking to Everest Base Camp (EBC (5300 m. A subgroup of 14 investigators studied at altitudes up to 8400 m on Everest. Main outcome measures Exercise capacity, exercise efficiency and economy, brain and muscle Near Infrared Spectroscopy, plasma biomarkers (including markers of inflammation, allele frequencies of known or suspected hypoxia responsive genes, spirometry, neurocognitive testing, retinal imaging, pupilometry. In nested subgroups: microcirculatory imaging, muscle biopsies with proteomic and transcriptomic tissue analysis, continuous cardiac output measurement, arterial blood gas measurement, trans-cranial Doppler, gastrointestinal tonometry, thromboelastography and ocular saccadometry. Results Of 198 healthy volunteers leaving Kathmandu, 190 reached EBC (5300 m. All 24 investigators reached EBC. The completion rate for planned testing was more than 99% in the investigator group and more than 95% in the trekkers. Unique measurements were safely performed at extreme altitude, including the highest (altitude field measurements of exercise

  9. Effect of oral nitrate supplementation on pulmonary hemodynamics during exercise and time trial performance in normoxia and hypoxia: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eBourdillon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction increases pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP and may impede right heart function and exercise performance. This study examined the effects of oral nitrate supplementation on right heart function and performance during exercise in normoxia and hypoxia. We tested the hypothesis that nitrate supplementation would attenuate the increase in PAP at rest and during exercise in hypoxia, thereby improving exercise performance.Methods: Twelve trained male cyclists [age: 31 ± 7 yr (mean ± SD] performed 15km time-trial cycling (TT and steady-state submaximal cycling (50, 100, and 150 W in normoxia and hypoxia (11% inspired O2 following 3-day oral supplementation with either placebo or sodium nitrate (0.1 mmol/kg/day. We measured TT time-to-completion, muscle tissue oxygenation during TT and systolic right ventricle to right atrium pressure gradient (RV-RA gradient: index of PAP during steady state cycling.Results: During steady state exercise, hypoxia elevated RV-RA gradient (p>0.05, while oral nitrate supplementation did not alter RV-RA gradient (p>0.05. During 15 km TT, hypoxia lowered muscle tissue oxygenation (p0.05. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that oral nitrate supplementation does not attenuate acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction nor improve performance during time trial cycling in normoxia and hypoxia.

  10. The zinc transporter ZIP12 regulates the pulmonary vascular response to chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan; Oliver, Eduardo; Maratou, Klio; Atanur, Santosh S; Dubois, Olivier D; Cotroneo, Emanuele; Chen, Chien-Nien; Wang, Lei; Arce, Cristina; Chabosseau, Pauline L; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Frid, Maria G; Moyon, Benjamin; Webster, Zoe; Aldashev, Almaz; Ferrer, Jorge; Rutter, Guy A; Stenmark, Kurt R; Aitman, Timothy J; Wilkins, Martin R

    2015-08-20

    The typical response of the adult mammalian pulmonary circulation to a low oxygen environment is vasoconstriction and structural remodelling of pulmonary arterioles, leading to chronic elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (pulmonary hypertension) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Some mammals, however, exhibit genetic resistance to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We used a congenic breeding program and comparative genomics to exploit this variation in the rat and identified the gene Slc39a12 as a major regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodelling. Slc39a12 encodes the zinc transporter ZIP12. Here we report that ZIP12 expression is increased in many cell types, including endothelial, smooth muscle and interstitial cells, in the remodelled pulmonary arterioles of rats, cows and humans susceptible to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We show that ZIP12 expression in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells is hypoxia dependent and that targeted inhibition of ZIP12 inhibits the rise in intracellular labile zinc in hypoxia-exposed pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells and their proliferation in culture. We demonstrate that genetic disruption of ZIP12 expression attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in rats housed in a hypoxic atmosphere. This new and unexpected insight into the fundamental role of a zinc transporter in mammalian pulmonary vascular homeostasis suggests a new drug target for the pharmacological management of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26258299

  11. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression. PMID:16651461

  12. Enhancing lysosome biogenesis attenuates BNIP3-induced cardiomyocyte death

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiucui; Godar, Rebecca J.; Liu, Haiyan; Diwan, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible pro-death protein BNIP3 (BCL-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3), provokes mitochondrial permeabilization causing cardiomyocyte death in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibition of autophagy accelerates BNIP3-induced cell death, by preventing removal of damaged mitochondria. We tested the hypothesis that stimulating autophagy will attenuate BNIP3-induced cardiomyocyte death. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NRCMs) were adenovirally transduced with BNIP3 (or LacZ as c...

  13. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P;

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level and......(Evans') and PV(CO) increased from 1.04 (0.99-1.09) at sea level to 1.15 (1.06-1.24) at high altitude (P <0.05). In conclusion, the two methods were not interchangeable as measures of hypoxia-induced changes in PV. The mechanism responsible for the bias remains unknown, but it is suggested that the results may...

  14. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane; Kolb, Hartmuth C.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a well-established biological phenomenon that affects the curability of solid tumors, regardless of treatment modality. Especially for head and neck cancer patients, tumor hypoxia is linked to poor patient outcomes. Given the biological problems associated with tumor hypoxia, the goal for clinicians has been to identify moderately to severely hypoxic tumors for differential treatment strategies. The “gold standard” for detecting and characterizing of tumor hypoxia are the inv...

  15. Detecting and responding to hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hao; Jackson, Tim; Bunn, H. Franklin

    2002-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia is a topic of considerable clinical relevance, as it influences the pathophysiology of anaemia, polycythaemia, tissue ischaemia and cancer. A growing number of physiologically relevant genes are regulated in response to changes in intracellular oxygen tension. These include genes encoding erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase. Studies on the regulation of the erythropoietin gene have provided insights into the common mechanism of oxy...

  16. HIF and pulmonary vascular responses to hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoda, Larissa A.; Steven S Laurie

    2013-01-01

    In the lung, acute reductions in oxygen lead to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas prolonged exposures to hypoxia result in sustained vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, and the development of pulmonary hypertension. Data from both human subjects and animal models implicate a role for hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), oxygen-sensitive transcription factors, in pulmonary vascular responses to both acute and chronic hypoxia. In this review, we discuss work from our laborat...

  17. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A.E.; Wall, E. van der

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis can be induced in response to hypoxia. The severity of hypoxia determines whether cells become apoptotic or adapt to hypoxia and survive. A hypoxic environment devoid of nutrients prevents the cell undergoing energy dependent apoptosis and cells become necrotic. Apoptosis regulatory protei

  18. Role of chronic hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor in kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cells are endowed with a defensive mechanism against hypoxia,namely hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE).Under hypoxic conditions,activation of HIF leads to expression of a variety of adaptive genes with HRE in a coordinated manner.

  19. DC attenuation meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  20. Hypobaric Treatment Effects on Chilling Injury, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and the Ascorbate-Glutathione (AsA-GSH) Cycle in Postharvest Peach Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Wang, Jinhua; Shafi, Mohammad; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jiasheng; Wu, Aimin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hypobaric treatment effects were investigated on chilling injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in peach fruit stored at 0 °C. Internal browning of peaches was dramatically reduced by applying 10-20 kPa pressure. Hypobaric treatment markedly inhibited membrane fluidity increase, whereas it kept mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) concentration and cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity relatively high in mitochondria. Similarly, 10-20 kPa pressure treatment reduced the level of decrease observed in AsA and GSH concentrations, while it enhanced ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) activities related to the AsA-GSH cycle. Furthermore, comparative transcriptomic analysis showed that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with the metabolism of glutathione, ascorbate, and aldarate were up-regulated in peaches treated with 10-20 kPa for 30 days at 0 °C. Genes encoding GR, MDHAR, and APX were identified and exhibited higher expression in fruits treated with low pressure than in fruits treated with normal atmospheric pressure. Our findings indicate that the alleviation of chilling injury by hypobaric treatment was associated with preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and triggering the AsA-GSH cycle by the transcriptional up-regulation of related enzymes. PMID:27195461

  1. Role of the D2 dopamine receptor in molecular adaptation to chronic hypoxia in PC12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Conforti, Laura; Zhu Dana Beitner-Johnson, Wylie H.; Millhorn, David E.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously shown that pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells rapidly depolarize and undergo Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in response to moderate hypoxia and that intracellular free Ca2+ is modulated by activation of dopamine D2 receptors in this cell type. The present study shows that D2 (quinpirole-mediated) inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (ICa) in PC12 cells is dramatically attenuated after chronic exposure to moderate hypoxia (24 h at 10% O2). Pretreatm...

  2. Evolution of Bacillus subtilis to enhanced hypobaric growth: global alterations in gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne; Robles-Martinez, Jose; Rivas-Castillo, Andrea; Schuerger, Andrew

    Much astrobiology research is concerned with defining the environmental limits for life in the universe. Because Mars currently is the primary target for life detection missions, it is important to understand how terrestrial microbes might survive, proliferate, and evolve in martian envi-ronments. This issue is relevant in three distinct but related contexts: (i) testing panspermia hypotheses [1], (ii) mitigating the forward contamination of Mars [2], and (iii) understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to microbial growth in extreme extraterrestrial environments [3]. Prime candidates for Earth-to-Mars transfer include bacteria of the genus Bacillus, spores of which are significant contaminants of Mars-bound spacecraft and which are considered good candidates for lithopanspermia [1-4]. It is thus relevant to assess the potential for such microbes to survive and proliferate in the martian environment. The martian atmosphere poses a significant barrier to growth of terrestrial microbes, due to its low pressure (1-10 mbar; average 7 mbar) and anoxic (˜95% CO2) composition. In an earlier study [5] we showed that low pressures approaching those found on the surface of Mars exhibited an inhibitory effect on the germination and vegetative growth of several Bacillus spp. isolated from spacecraft or their assembly facilities. Even in an Earth-like 80%N2/20%O2 atmosphere, growth of B. subtilis cells was nearly completely inhibited at pressures below 35 mbar, well above the highest pressure on the martian surface [5]. The purpose of the present investigation was to use low pressure as a selective agent to test the hypothesis that a terrestrial microorganism, Bacillus subtilis, could evolve the ability for enhanced growth under hypobaric conditions approaching those of Mars. B. subtilis wild-type strains WN624 (SpcR) and WN628 (CmR) have been described previously [6] and were used as ancestral strains. Strains were propagated in LB liquid medium containing the appropriate

  3. Targeting hypoxia in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of 'targeting' hypoxia stems from recognition of the fact that oxygen (or its lack) is central to the practice of radiation oncology. Targeting embraces the alternative goals of trying to overcome hypoxia on the one hand and trying to exploit it on the other. This presentation briefly reviews these two approaches with major emphasis on the latter

  4. The Influence of Exercise on Cognitive Performance in Normobaric Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; Burns, Keith; Fennell, Curtis; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Gunstad, John; Glickman, Ellen; McDaniel, John

    2015-12-01

    Although previous reports indicate that exercise improves cognitive function in normoxia, the influence of exercise on cognitive function in hypoxia is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the impaired cognitive function in hypoxia can be restored by low to moderate intensity exercise. Sixteen young healthy men completed the ANAM versions of the Go/No-Go task (GNT) and Running Memory Continuous Performance Task (RMCPT) in normoxia to serve as baseline (B-Norm) (21% O2). Following 60 minutes of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (B-Hypo) (12.5% O2), these tests were repeated at rest and during cycling exercise at 40% and 60% of adjusted Vo2max. At B-Hypo, the % correct (p≤0.001) and throughput score (p≤0.001) in RMCPT were significantly impaired compared to B-Norm. During exercise at 40% (p=0.023) and 60% (p=0.006) of adjusted Vo2max, the throughput score in RMCPT improved compared to B-Hypo, and there was no significant difference in throughput score between the two exercise intensities. Mean reaction time also improved at both exercise intensities compared to B-Hypo (p≤0.028). Both peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSo2) significantly decreased during B-Hypo (p≤0.001) and further decreased at 40% (p≤0.05) and 60% (p≤0.039) exercise. There was no significant difference in Spo2 or rSo2 between two exercise intensities. These data indicate that low to moderate exercise (i.e., 40%-60% adjusted Vo2max) may attenuate the risk of impaired cognitive function that occurs in hypoxic conditions. PMID:26214045

  5. Hypoxia induces differential translation of enolase/MBP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxic microenvironments in tumors contribute to transformation, which may alter metabolism, growth, and therapeutic responsiveness. The α-enolase gene encodes both a glycolytic enzyme (α-enolase) and a DNA-binding tumor suppressor protein, c-myc binding protein (MBP-1). These divergent α-enolase gene products play central roles in glucose metabolism and growth regulation and their differential regulation may be critical for tumor adaptation to hypoxia. We have previously shown that MBP-1 and its binding to the c-myc P2 promoter regulates the metabolic and cellular growth changes that occur in response to altered exogenous glucose concentrations. To examine the regulation of α-enolase and MBP-1 by a hypoxic microenvironment in breast cancer, MCF-7 cells were grown in low, physiologic, or high glucose under 1% oxygen. Our results demonstrate that adaptation to hypoxia involves attenuation of MBP-1 translation and loss of MBP-1-mediated regulation of c-myc transcription, evidenced by decreased MBP-1 binding to the c-myc P2 promoter. This allows for a robust increase in c-myc expression, 'early c-myc response', which stimulates aerobic glycolysis resulting in tumor acclimation to oxidative stress. Increased α-enolase mRNA and preferential translation/post-translational modification may also allow for acclimatization to low oxygen, particularly under low glucose concentrations. These results demonstrate that malignant cells adapt to hypoxia by modulating α-enolase/MBP-1 levels and suggest a mechanism for tumor cell induction of the hyperglycolytic state. This important 'feedback' mechanism may help transformed cells to escape the apoptotic cascade, allowing for survival during limited glucose and oxygen availability

  6. Advances of Hypoxia and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebing LI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the malignant tumors with fastest growing rates in incidence and mortality in our country, also with largest threat to human health and life. However, the exact mechanisms underlying lung cancer development remain unclear. The microenvironment of tumor hypoxia was discovered in 1955, but hypoxia in lung cancer tissues had not been successfully detected till 2006. Further studies show that hypoxia not only functions through the resistance to radiotherapy, but also regulates lung cancer development, invasion, metastasis, chemotherapy resistance and prognosis through an important oncogene HIF (hypoxia inducible factor, with its regulators PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain and pVHL (product of von Hippel-Lindau gene. Therefore, hypoxia, HIF, PHD and pVHL should be considered as potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer pathogenesis and progression.

  7. Functional alterations in macrophages after hypoxia selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrossoli, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma

    2007-01-01

    Regions of low oxygen tension are common features of inflamed and infected tissues and provide physiologic selective pressure for the expansion of cells with enhanced hypoxia tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether macrophages resistant to death induced by hypoxia were accompanied by functional alterations. A mouse macrophage cell line (J774 cells) was used to obtain subpopulations of death-resistant macrophages induced by long-term exposure to severe hypoxia (J774 macrophages to periods of severe hypoxia results in the selection of cells with phenotypes associated with the modulation of heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitric oxide (NO) production and reduced susceptibility to parasite Leishmania infection. Thus, we suggest that hypoxia-selected macrophages may influence the outcome of inflammation and infection. PMID:17202589

  8. Pressure surge attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  9. Ecosystem impacts of hypoxia: thresholds of hypoxia and pathways to recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coastal hypoxia is increasing in the global coastal zone, where it is recognized as a major threat to biota. Managerial efforts to prevent hypoxia and achieve recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia are largely based on nutrient reduction plans. However, these managerial efforts need to be informed by predictions on the thresholds of hypoxia (i.e. the oxygen levels required to conserve biodiversity) as well as the timescales for the recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia. The thresholds for hypoxia in coastal ecosystems are higher than previously thought and are not static, but regulated by local and global processes, being particularly sensitive to warming. The examination of recovery processes in a number of coastal areas managed for reducing nutrient inputs and, thus, hypoxia (Northern Adriatic; Black Sea; Baltic Sea; Delaware Bay; and Danish Coastal Areas) reveals that recovery timescales following the return to normal oxygen conditions are much longer than those of loss following the onset of hypoxia, and typically involve decadal timescales. The extended lag time for ecosystem recovery from hypoxia results in non-linear pathways of recovery due to hysteresis and the shift in baselines, affecting the oxygen thresholds for hypoxia through time.

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates microglial activation and production of inflammatory mediators in neonatal rat brain following hypoxia: role of TLR4 in hypoxic microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Linli

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia induces microglial activation which causes damage to the developing brain. Microglia derived inflammatory mediators may contribute to this process. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 has been reported to induce microglial activation and cytokines production in brain injuries; however, its role in hypoxic injury remains uncertain. We investigate here TLR4 expression and its roles in neuroinflammation in neonatal rats following hypoxic injury. Methods One day old Wistar rats were subjected to hypoxia for 2 h. Primary cultured microglia and BV-2 cells were subjected to hypoxia for different durations. TLR4 expression in microglia was determined by RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Small interfering RNA (siRNA transfection and antibody neutralization were employed to downregulate TLR4 in BV-2 and primary culture. mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was assessed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, nitric oxide (NO and NF-κB levels were determined by flow cytometry, colorimetric and ELISA assays respectively. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression was quantified and where necessary, the protein expression was depleted by antibody neutralization. In vivo inhibition of TLR4 with CLI-095 injection was carried out followed by investigation of inflammatory mediators expression via double immunofluorescence staining. Results TLR4 immunofluorescence and protein expression in the corpus callosum and cerebellum in neonatal microglia were markedly enhanced post-hypoxia. In vitro, TLR4 protein expression was significantly increased in both primary microglia and BV-2 cells post-hypoxia. TLR4 neutralization in primary cultured microglia attenuated the hypoxia-induced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. siRNA knockdown of TLR4 reduced hypoxia-induced upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, ROS and

  11. Photonic Crystal Fiber Attenuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo Beom Eom; Hokyung Kim; Jinchae Kim; Un-Chul Paek; Byeong Ha Lee

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel fiber attenuator based on photonic crystal fibers. The difference in the modal field diameters of a conventional single mode fiber and a photonic crystal fiber was used. A variable optical attenuator was also achieved by applying macro-bending on the PCF part of the proposed attenuator

  12. Effects of 3, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone on Cytosolic Calcium in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells during Acute Hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farmanullah Wazir; WANG Dixun(王迪浔); HU Qinghua(胡清华)

    2004-01-01

    The effects of 3, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone (3, 4-DHAP) on cytosolic free calcium[Ca2+ ]i in pulmonary artery endothelia (PAECs) and smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) during acute hypoxia were studied. Porcine pulmonary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells (PASMCs)were cultured primarily, and they were divided into 4 groups: groups incubated under normoxia or hypoxia and those with or without treatment with 3, 4-DHAP. The [Ca2+ ]i of both PAECs and PASMCs was measured by determining the fluorescence of fura 2 AM on spetrofluorometer. Our results showed that hypoxia caused significant elevation of [Ca2+ ]i, in both PAECs and PASMCs,3, 4-DHAP could attenuate the hypoxic elevation of [Ca2+ ]i only in PASMCs but not in PAECs. It is concluded that 3, 4-DHAP decreases the hypoxic elevation of [Ca2+ ]i in PASMCs. This might contribute to its inhibitory effect on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  13. A 26-Gene Hypoxia Signature Predicts Benefit from Hypoxia-Modifying Therapy in Laryngeal Cancer but Not Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eustace, A.; Mani, N.; Span, P.N.; Irlam, J.J.; Taylor, J.; Betts, G.N.; Denley, H.; Miller, C.J.; Homer, J.J.; Rojas, A.M.; Hoskin, P.J.; Buffa, F.M.; Harris, A.L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; West, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor hypoxia is associated with a poor prognosis, hypoxia modification improves outcome, and hypoxic status predicts benefit from treatment. Yet, there is no universal measure of clinical hypoxia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 26-gene hypoxia signature predicted benefi

  14. Regulation of Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death in Human Tenocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Min Liang; Cornell, Hannah R.; Nasim Zargar Baboldashti; Thompson, Mark S.; Carr, Andrew J.; Hulley, Philippa A

    2012-01-01

    Degenerate shoulder tendons display evidence of hypoxia. However tendons are relatively avascular and not considered to have high oxygen requirements and the vulnerability of tendon cells to hypoxia is unclear. Cultured human tenocytes were exposed to hypoxia and the cellular response detected using QPCR, Western blotting, viability, and ELISA assays. We find that tenocytes respond to hypoxia in vitro by activating classical HIF-1 α -driven pathways. Total hypoxia caused significant tenocyte ...

  15. Hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 are important transcriptional effectors in primary macrophages experiencing hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Hughes, Russell; Murdoch, Craig; Coffelt, Seth; Biswas, Subhra K.; Harris, Adrian L.; Johnson, Randall S; Imityaz, Hongxia Z.; Simon, M. Celeste; Fredlund, Erik; Greten, Florian; Rius, Jordi; Lewis, Claire E.

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia exists in many diseased tissues including arthritic joints, atherosclerotic plaques and malignant tumors. Macrophages accumulate in these sites and upregulate hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 in response to the hypoxia present. Here we show that the gene expression profile in primary human and murine macrophages changes markedly when they are exposed to hypoxia for 18h. For example, they were seen to upregulate the cell surface receptors, CXCR4 and GLUT1, and th...

  16. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in breast cancer: Tumour hypoxia – therapeutic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusive research has shown that regions of acute/chronic hypoxia, which exist within the majority of solid tumours, have a profound influence on the therapeutic outcome of cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are a strong prognostic factor of disease progression and survival. A strong argument therefore exists for assessing the hypoxic fraction of tumours, prior to patient treatment, and to tailor this treatment accordingly. Tumour hypoxia also provides a powerful physiological stimulus that can be exploited as a tumour-specific condition, allowing for the rationale design of hypoxia-activated anticancer drugs or novel hypoxia-regulated gene therapy strategies

  17. Exercise training attenuates chemoreflex-mediated reductions of renal blood flow in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Noah J; Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Schiller, Alicia M; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Zucker, Irving H; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-07-15

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), carotid body chemoreceptor (CBC) activity is increased and contributes to increased tonic and hypoxia-evoked elevation in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Elevated RSNA and reduced renal perfusion may contribute to development of the cardio-renal syndrome in CHF. Exercise training (EXT) has been shown to abrogate CBC-mediated increases in RSNA in experimental heart failure; however, the effect of EXT on CBC control of renal blood flow (RBF) is undetermined. We hypothesized that CBCs contribute to tonic reductions in RBF in CHF, that stimulation of the CBC with hypoxia would result in exaggerated reductions in RBF, and that these responses would be attenuated with EXT. RBF was measured in CHF-sedentary (SED), CHF-EXT, CHF-carotid body denervation (CBD), and CHF-renal denervation (RDNX) groups. We measured RBF at rest and in response to hypoxia (FiO2 10%). All animals exhibited similar reductions in ejection fraction and fractional shortening as well as increases in ventricular systolic and diastolic volumes. Resting RBF was lower in CHF-SED (29 ± 2 ml/min) than in CHF-EXT animals (46 ± 2 ml/min, P hypoxia, and this was prevented in CHF-EXT animals. Both CBD and RDNX abolished the RBF response to hypoxia in CHF. Mean arterial pressure increased in response to hypoxia in CHF-SED, but was prevented by EXT, CBD, and RDNX. EXT is effective in attenuating chemoreflex-mediated tonic and hypoxia-evoked reductions in RBF in CHF. PMID:26001414

  18. 2006 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  19. 2004 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  20. 2007 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  1. Hypoxia and the heart of poikilotherms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2014), s. 28-32 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : blood supply heart * poikilotherms * tolerance to hypoxia Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  2. 2002 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  3. 2005 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  4. 2003 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  5. 2001 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  6. The two aspects of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia is a therapeutic problem as it renders solid tumours resistant to sparsely ionizing radiation and some forms of chemotherapy. At present it is postulated that tumour hypoxia induces two types of reactions. On the one hand tissue O2 concentration 2 2 0.5-20 mm Hg), not severely, hypoxic cells may be of the greatest importance in determining biological resistance. The methods of assessing hypoxia currently applied in clinical practice are not satisfactory. However, recent advances in imaging technologies suggest that in the near future it might be possible to track temporal changes in O2 level and acute and chronic hypoxic tumour sub fractions. The ultimate goal is understanding tumour biology basing on the clinical bio markers that reflect hypoxia-associated genetic or proteomic signatures in tumour cells, in order to individualize therapy. (authors)

  7. Triptolide protects astrocytes from hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minfang Guo; Hongcui Fan; Jiezhong Yu; Ning Ji; Yongsheng Sun; Liyun Liang; Baoguo Xiao; Cungen Ma

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes in an in vitro murine astrocyte model of oxygen and glucose deprivation/hypoxia and reoxygenation were treated with different concentrations of triptolide (250, 500, 1 000 ng/mL) in a broader attempt to elucidate the protection and mechanism underlying triptolide treatment on astrocytes exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. The results showed that the matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6 expressions were significantly decreased after triptolide treatment in the astrocytes exposed to hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury, while interleukin-10 expression was upregulated. In addition, the vitality of the injured astrocytes was enhanced, the triptolide's effect was apparent at 500 ng/mL. These experimental findings indicate that triptolide treatment could protect astrocytes against hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury through the inhibition of inflammatory response and the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

  8. Regulation of mitochondrial genome replication by hypoxia: The role of DNA oxidation in D-loop region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukh, Viktor M; Gorodnya, Olena M; Gillespie, Mark N; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria of mammalian cells contain multiple copies of mitochondrial (mt) DNA. Although mtDNA copy number can fluctuate dramatically depending on physiological and pathophysiologic conditions, the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial genome replication remain obscure. Hypoxia, like many other physiologic stimuli that promote growth, cell proliferation and mitochondrial biogenesis, uses reactive oxygen species as signaling molecules. Emerging evidence suggests that hypoxia-induced transcription of nuclear genes requires controlled DNA damage and repair in specific sequences in the promoter regions. Whether similar mechanisms are operative in mitochondria is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that controlled oxidative DNA damage and repair in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome are required for mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription in hypoxia. We found that hypoxia had little impact on expression of mitochondrial proteins in pulmonary artery endothelial cells, but elevated mtDNA content. The increase in mtDNA copy number was accompanied by oxidative modifications in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome. To investigate the role of this sequence-specific oxidation of mitochondrial genome in mtDNA replication, we overexpressed mitochondria-targeted 8-oxoguanine glycosylase Ogg1 in rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, enhancing the mtDNA repair capacity of transfected cells. Overexpression of Ogg1 resulted in suppression of hypoxia-induced mtDNA oxidation in the D-loop region and attenuation of hypoxia-induced mtDNA replication. Ogg1 overexpression also reduced binding of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) to both regulatory and coding regions of the mitochondrial genome without altering total abundance of TFAM in either control or hypoxic cells. These observations suggest that oxidative DNA modifications in the D-loop region during hypoxia are important for increased TFAM binding and ensuing replication of the mitochondrial

  9. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  10. On the mechanisms that limit oxygen uptake during exercise in acute and chronic hypoxia: role of muscle mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert;

    2009-01-01

    -legged knee extension exercise: Knee)muscle mass in normoxia, acute hypoxia (AH) (FIO2 = 0.105) and after 9 weeks of residence at 5260 m (CH). Reducing the size of the active muscle mass blunted by 62% the effect of hypoxia on VO2,peak in AH and abolished completely the effect of hypoxia on VO2,peak after...... altitude acclimatization. Acclimatization improved Bike peak exercise Pa,O2 from 34 +/- 1 in AH to 45 +/- 1 mmHg in CH(P <0.05) and Knee Pa,O2 from 38 +/- 1 to 55 +/- 2 mmHg(P <0.05). Peak cardiac output and leg blood flow were reduced in hypoxia only during Bike. Acute hypoxia resulted in reduction of...... during hypoxic exercise, attenuates the Bohr effect on oxygen uploading at the lungs and preserves sea level convective O2 transport to the active muscles. Thus, the altitude-acclimatized human has potentially a similar exercising capacity as at sea level when the exercise model allows for an adequate...

  11. Editorial: an introduction and welcome to Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Katschinski DM

    2013-01-01

    Dörthe M Katschinski Institute of Cardiovascular Physiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyHypoxia can influence many aspects of physiology and pathophysiology, including high altitude, embryonic development, wound healing, anemia, inflammation, cancer, and ischemic diseases, such as infarction and stroke. Researchers involved in hypoxia-related science are from a variety of different fields, and include cell biol...

  12. Editorial: an introduction and welcome to Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Katschinski, Doerthe

    2013-01-01

    Dörthe M Katschinski Institute of Cardiovascular Physiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyHypoxia can influence many aspects of physiology and pathophysiology, including high altitude, embryonic development, wound healing, anemia, inflammation, cancer, and ischemic diseases, such as infarction and stroke. Researchers involved in hypoxia-related science are from a variety of different fields, and i...

  13. Sensing and surviving hypoxia in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Buck, Leslie T; Perry, Steve F; Schwerte, Thorsten; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    Surviving hypoxia is one of the most critical challenges faced by vertebrates. Most species have adapted to changing levels of oxygen in their environment with specialized organs that sense hypoxia, while only few have been uniquely adapted to survive prolonged periods of anoxia. The goal of this review is to present the most recent research on oxygen sensing, adaptation to hypoxia, and mechanisms of anoxia tolerance in nonmammalian vertebrates. We discuss the respiratory structures in fish, including the skin, gills, and air-breathing organs, and recent evidence for chemosensory neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in these tissues that initiate reflex responses to hypoxia. The use of the zebrafish as a genetic and developmental model has allowed observation of the ontogenesis of respiratory and chemosensory systems, demonstration of a putative intracellular O2 sensor in chemoreceptors that may initiate transduction of the hypoxia signal, and investigation into the effects of extreme hypoxia on cardiorespiratory development. Other organisms, such as goldfish and freshwater turtles, display a high degree of anoxia tolerance, and these models are revealing important adaptations at the cellular level, such as the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in defense of homeostasis in central neurons. PMID:25959851

  14. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its effect will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which the cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique might be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials: The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29, was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole, followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results: In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1α staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, although the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1α. Conclusion: HIF1α can be compared with either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation

  15. Molecular imaging of hypoxia with radiolabelled agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue hypoxia results from an inadequate supply of oxygen (O2) that compromises biological functions. Structural and functional abnormalities of the tumour vasculature together with altered diffusion conditions inside the tumour seem to be the main causes of tumour hypoxia. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies points to a role for tumour hypoxia in tumour propagation, resistance to therapy and malignant progression. This has led to the development of assays for the detection of hypoxia in patients in order to predict outcome and identify patients with a worse prognosis and/or patients that would benefit from appropriate treatments. A variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches have been developed to measure tumour oxygenation including oxygen-sensitive electrodes and hypoxia marker techniques using various labels that can be detected by different methods such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. This review aims to give a detailed overview of non-invasive molecular imaging modalities with radiolabelled PET and SPECT tracers that are available to measure tumour hypoxia. (orig.)

  16. Variable laser attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  17. Hypoxia increases the metastatic ability of breast cancer cells via upregulation of CXCR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redmond H Paul

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokine SDF1α and its unique receptor CXCR4 have been implicated in organ-specific metastases of many cancers including breast cancer. Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. We hypothesized that hypoxia would upregulate CXCR4 expression and lead to increased chemotactic responsiveness to its specific ligand SDF1α. Methods Three breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF7 and 4T1 were subjected to 48 hrs of hypoxia or normoxia. Cell surface receptor expression was evaluated using flow cytometry. An extracellular matrix invasion assay and microporous migration assay was used to assess chemotactic response and metastatic ability. Results CXCR4 surface expression was significantly increased in the two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, following exposure to hypoxia. This upregulation of CXCR4 cell surface expression corresponded to a significant increase in migration and invasion in response to SDF1-α in vitro. The increase in metastatic potential of both the normoxic and the hypoxic treated breast cancer cell lines was attenuated by neutralization of CXCR4 with a CXCR4 neutralizing mAb, MAB172 or a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, showing the relationship between CXCR4 overexpression and increased chemotactic responsiveness. Conclusions CXCR4 expression can be modulated by the tissue microenvironment such as hypoxia. Upregulation of CXCR4 is associated with increased migratory and invasive potential and this effect can be abrogated by CXCR4 inhibition. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a potential therapeutic target in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

  18. Hypoxia increases the metastatic ability of breast cancer cells via upregulation of CXCR4

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Patricia A

    2010-05-21

    Abstract Background Chemokine SDF1α and its unique receptor CXCR4 have been implicated in organ-specific metastases of many cancers including breast cancer. Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. We hypothesized that hypoxia would upregulate CXCR4 expression and lead to increased chemotactic responsiveness to its specific ligand SDF1α. Methods Three breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF7 and 4T1 were subjected to 48 hrs of hypoxia or normoxia. Cell surface receptor expression was evaluated using flow cytometry. An extracellular matrix invasion assay and microporous migration assay was used to assess chemotactic response and metastatic ability. Results CXCR4 surface expression was significantly increased in the two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, following exposure to hypoxia. This upregulation of CXCR4 cell surface expression corresponded to a significant increase in migration and invasion in response to SDF1-α in vitro. The increase in metastatic potential of both the normoxic and the hypoxic treated breast cancer cell lines was attenuated by neutralization of CXCR4 with a CXCR4 neutralizing mAb, MAB172 or a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, showing the relationship between CXCR4 overexpression and increased chemotactic responsiveness. Conclusions CXCR4 expression can be modulated by the tissue microenvironment such as hypoxia. Upregulation of CXCR4 is associated with increased migratory and invasive potential and this effect can be abrogated by CXCR4 inhibition. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a potential therapeutic target in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Hypoxia increases the metastatic ability of breast cancer cells via upregulation of CXCR4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemokine SDF1α and its unique receptor CXCR4 have been implicated in organ-specific metastases of many cancers including breast cancer. Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. We hypothesized that hypoxia would upregulate CXCR4 expression and lead to increased chemotactic responsiveness to its specific ligand SDF1α. Three breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF7 and 4T1 were subjected to 48 hrs of hypoxia or normoxia. Cell surface receptor expression was evaluated using flow cytometry. An extracellular matrix invasion assay and microporous migration assay was used to assess chemotactic response and metastatic ability. CXCR4 surface expression was significantly increased in the two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, following exposure to hypoxia. This upregulation of CXCR4 cell surface expression corresponded to a significant increase in migration and invasion in response to SDF1-α in vitro. The increase in metastatic potential of both the normoxic and the hypoxic treated breast cancer cell lines was attenuated by neutralization of CXCR4 with a CXCR4 neutralizing mAb, MAB172 or a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, showing the relationship between CXCR4 overexpression and increased chemotactic responsiveness. CXCR4 expression can be modulated by the tissue microenvironment such as hypoxia. Upregulation of CXCR4 is associated with increased migratory and invasive potential and this effect can be abrogated by CXCR4 inhibition. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a potential therapeutic target in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer

  20. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hung Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis.

  1. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-10-15

    1. Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia. 2. Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h. 3. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h. 4. Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10% O2 for 48 h. 5. PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10% O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsalpha, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway. 6. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10% O2.7. We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia

  2. Hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in gastric cancer: prognostic significance for clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To examine the relationship between hypoxia level, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression, tumor vascularity, and clinicopathologic parameters in gastric cancer; to assess the impact of hypoxia-associated events on the prognosis of clinical outcome. High hypoxia levels were found in 29 % of pts., and low - in 71 % of pts. Strong nuclear expressions of HIF-1α were found in 7 % of pts., moderate - in 80 % of pts., and weak - in 13 % of pts. Strong microvessel densities were observed in 54 % of pts. and moderate - in 46 % of pts. It was revealed a close association between the hypoxia level in tumor assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy and expression of HIF-1α in tumor cells (P0.05). Hypoxia level and microvessel density in tumor tissue correlated with clinical stage (P<0.05). High hypoxia levels positively correlated with decreased overall survival (P=0.044). For overall survival, hypoxia level and HIF-1α expression (hazard ratio, 2.10; 95 % CI, 0.67-4.67; P=0.035 and 3.45; 0.89-3.01, 0.047, respectively) were independently predictive in multivariate analysis for lymph-node negative patients; and hypoxia level (hazard ratio, 4.50; 95 % CI, 0.42-2.57; P=0.027) for lymph-node positive patients. Statistical analysis has indicated that PME/Pi ratio in tumor tissue may be used as an parameter of hypoxia level as well as independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome in patients with gastric cancer. Methodological approaches are started now to be used in the analysis of head and neck tumors treated with hyperthermia combined with radiation/chemotherapy. (author)

  3. Functional genomics approach to hypoxia signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Karen A; Millhorn, David E

    2004-02-01

    Mammalian cells require a constant supply of oxygen to maintain energy balance, and sustained hypoxia can result in cell death. It is therefore not surprising that sophisticated adaptive mechanisms have evolved that enhance cell survival during hypoxia. During the past few years, there have been a growing number of reports on hypoxia-induced transcription of specific genes. In this review, we describe a unique experimental approach that utilizes focused cDNA libraries coupled to microarray analyses to identify hypoxia-responsive signal transduction pathways and genes that confer the hypoxia-tolerant phenotype. We have used the subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH) method to create a cDNA library enriched in hypoxia-regulated genes in oxygen-sensing pheochromocytoma cells and have used this library to create microarrays that allow us to examine hundreds of genes at a time. This library contains over 300 genes and expressed sequence tags upregulated by hypoxia, including tyrosine hydroxylase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and junB. Hypoxic regulation of these and other genes in the library has been confirmed by microarray, Northern blot, and real-time PCR analyses. Coupling focused SSH libraries with microarray analyses allows one to specifically study genes relevant to a phenotype of interest while reducing much of the biological noise associated with these types of studies. When used in conjunction with high-throughput, dye-based assays for cell survival and apoptosis, this approach offers a rapid method for discovering validated therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and tumors. PMID:14715686

  4. Hypoxia and Hypoxia Mimetics Decrease Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) Expression through Both Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α and Proteasome-Mediated Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Fan Yang; Sartor, Maureen A.; David Gozal; Maria Czyzyk-Krzeska; Menon, Anil G.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium plays a central role in gas exchange and fluid transport, and is therefore critical for normal lung function. Since the bulk of water flux across this epithelium depends on the membrane water channel Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), we asked whether hypoxia had any effect on AQP5 expression. We show that hypoxia causes a significant (70%) decrease in AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia and the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt, also caused similar decreases in AQ...

  5. Protein-bound Polysaccharide-K Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling Through Down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ Transcription Under Hypoxia, Suppressing the Malignant Phenotype in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Akio; Onishi, Hideya; Imaizumi, Akira; Kawamoto, Makoto; Fujimura, Akiko; Oyama, Yasuhiro; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog signaling is activated in pancreatic cancer and could be a therapeutic target. We previously demonstrated that recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin-kappa-J region (RBPJ) and mastermind-like 3 (MAML3) contribute to the hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Smoothened (SMO) transcription. We have also shown that protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) could be effective for refractory pancreatic cancer that down-regulates SMO transcription under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated whether the anticancer mechanism of PSK involves inhibiting RBPJ and MAML3 expression under hypoxia. PSK reduced SMO, MAML3 and RBPJ expression in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxia. PSK also blocked RBPJ-induced invasiveness under hypoxia by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase expression. Lastly, we showed that PSK attenuated RBPJ-induced proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that PSK suppresses Hedgehog signaling through down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ transcription under hypoxia, inhibiting the induction of a malignant phenotype in pancreatic cancer. Our results may lead to development of new treatments for refractory pancreatic cancer using PSK as a Hedgehog inhibitor. PMID:27466498

  6. Hypoxia in a neonate caused by intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Beddis, I R; Silverman, M

    1980-01-01

    A newborn baby receiving mechanical ventilation was noted to have an extremely variable degree of hypoxia, despite the administration of 100% oxygen. The hypoxia was relieved rapidly when mechanical ventilation was withdrawn.

  7. Preparation and Preservation of Hypoxia UW Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Chidang; WANG Chunyou; LIU Tan; CHENG Rui; YANG Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the method to prepare hypoxia UW solution and the stability and preservation of hypoxia UW solution, UW solution was purged by argon or air for 15 min or 60 at a flow rate of 0.8 or 2 L/min, and the oxygen partial pressure of UW solution was detected. The hy-poxia UW solution was exposed to the air or sealed up to preserve by using different methods, and the changes of oxygen partial pressure was tested. The results showed that oxygen partial pressure of 50 mL UW solution, purged by argon for 15 min at a flow rate of 2 L/min, was declined from 242±6 mmHg to 83±10 mmHg. After exposure to the air, oxygen partial pressure of hypoxia UW solution was gradually increased to 160±7 mmHg at 48 h. After sealed up by the centrifuge tube and plastic bad filled with argon, oxygen partial pressure of hypoxia UW solution was stable, about 88±13 mmHg at 72 h. It was concluded that oxygen of UW solution could be purged by argon efficiently. Sealed up by the centrifuge tube and plastic bag filled with argon, oxygen partial pressure of UW so- lution could be stabilized.

  8. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P dopamine (P dopamine (P dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes. PMID:27418545

  9. Targeting tumour hypoxia to improve outcome of stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenborn, Thomas R; Horsman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is a characteristic feature of solid tumours that significantly reduces the efficacy of conventional radiation therapy. In this study we investigated the role of hypoxia in a stereotactic radiation schedule by using a variety of hypoxic modifiers in a preclinical tumour model...... OXi4503 and heat with the final 15 Gy had a significantly larger effect (TCD50 = 2 Gy). CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant modifiers of hypoxia effectively enhanced an equivalent stereotactic radiation treatment confirming the importance of hypoxia in such schedules....

  10. Evolutionary Genetics of Hypoxia Tolerance in Cetaceans during Diving

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Ran; Wang, Zhengfei; Niu, Xu; Zhou, Kaiya; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia was a major challenge faced by cetaceans during the course of secondary aquatic adaptation. Although physiological traits of hypoxia tolerance in cetaceans have been well characterized, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the sequences of 17 hypoxia-tolerance-related genes in representative cetaceans to provide a comprehensive insight into the genetic basis of hypoxia tolerance in these animals. Genes involved in carrying and transporting oxygen in the ...

  11. The Effect of Hypoxia on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Ejtehadifar; Karim Shamsasenjan; Aliakbar Movassaghpour; Parvin Akbarzadehlaleh; Nima Dehdilani; Parvaneh Abbasi; Zahra Molaeipour; Mahshid Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Although physiological and pathological role of hypoxia have been appreciated in mammalians for decades however the cellular biology of hypoxia more clarified in the past 20 years. Discovery of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, in the 1990s opened a new window to investigate the mechanisms behind hypoxia. In different cellular contexts HIF-1 activation show variable results by impacting various aspects of cell biology such as cell cycle, apoptosis, diff...

  12. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases. CONCLUSIONS: These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  13. Cardiovascular Response to High Altitude Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Manchanda

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal and abnormal cardiovascular response to high altitude (HA hypoxia were studied in 98 healthy subjects and in 15 patients with HA pulmonary oedema (HAPO and acute mountain sickness (AMS at an altitudeof 3,658 m. The healthy sea level (SL residents showed marked blood volume changes during the first week with pulmonary hypotension and depression of left ventricular (LV performance and physical work capacity (PWC. The HA natives, however, had better LV performance and PWC indicating a better adaptation to HA hypoxia. HAPO subjects showed evidence of severe pulmonary hypertension with normal left atrial pressures but the exact mechanism of this condition is still not clear. AMS subjects showed no circulatory abnormalities 'but had relative hypercapnia and severe hypoxemia suggesting that AMS may be causcd by relative hyposensitiveness of the respiratory centre to hypoxia or hypercapnia.

  14. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  15. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  16. Editorial: an introduction and welcome to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katschinski DM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dörthe M Katschinski Institute of Cardiovascular Physiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyHypoxia can influence many aspects of physiology and pathophysiology, including high altitude, embryonic development, wound healing, anemia, inflammation, cancer, and ischemic diseases, such as infarction and stroke. Researchers involved in hypoxia-related science are from a variety of different fields, and include cell biologists, molecular biologists, and clinical scientists. The research being done in this field will help us to gain a better understanding of the physiologic processes involved and to develop new therapies for the above-mentioned diseases. A detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of hypoxia sensing, signaling, and adaptation is important to achieve these goals and ultimately exploit this signaling pathway for therapeutic applications. Together with scientists from HypoxiaNet, a COST Action (Cooperation in Science and Technology funded by the European Union, Dove Press has developed and established Hypoxia, a new open-access peer-reviewed journal. The advent of a journal dedicated to hypoxia-related research is considered to be one way to bundle the already existing but widespread research activities in this field. Early in the development process, many leading scientists have agreed to support the journal as editorial board members. In addition, widely recognized experts are preparing review articles that are scheduled to appear in early 2014 to set the standard and thematic ground for the journal. As the Editor-in-Chief, I am grateful for this wonderful support.

  17. MURC deficiency in smooth muscle attenuates pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ogata, Takehiro; Naito, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Takuya; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav1) is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. MURC (also called Cavin-4) is a member of the cavin family, which regulates caveolar formation and functions together with caveolins. Here, we show that hypoxia increased Murc mRNA expression in the mouse lung, and that Murc-null mice exhibited attenuation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) accompanied by reduced ROCK activity in the lung. Conditional knockout mice lacking Murc in smooth muscle also resist hypoxia-induced PH. MURC regulates the proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through Rho/ROCK signalling. Cav1 suppresses RhoA activity in PASMCs, which is reversed by MURC. MURC binds to Cav1 and inhibits the association of Cav1 with the active form of Gα13, resulting in the facilitated association of the active form of Gα13 with p115RhoGEF. These results reveal that MURC has a function in the development of PH through modulating Rho/ROCK signalling. PMID:27546070

  18. Posterior mediastinal extramedullary hematopoiesis secondary to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzo, A; D’Auria, V; Moccia, LG; Vatrella, A; Bocchino, M; Rea, G

    2016-01-01

    Two mediastinal masses were incidentally detected at high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of a 72 year-old male patient, former smoker, affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with worsening dyspnea and 2-year medical history of polycythemia secondary to hypoxia. Integration with a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan after administration of intravenous injection contrast medium showed slightly inhomogeneous increase of enhancement of masses, suggesting in the first case potential malignancy. Diagnosis of extramedullary hematopoiesis was achieved by fine needle aspiration citology (FNAC). Extramedullary hematopoiesis must be considered in differential diagnosis in patients with medical history of polycythemia and severe hypoxia. PMID:27326388

  19. The impact of hypoxia on oncolytic virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo ZS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Z Sheng GuoUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The hypoxic tumor microenvironment plays significant roles in tumor cell metabolism and survival, tumor growth, and progression. Hypoxia modulates target genes in target cells mainly through an oxygen-sensing signaling pathway mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor of transcription factors. As a result, hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to conventional therapeutics such as radiation and chemotherapy. Oncolytic virotherapy may be a promising novel therapeutic for hypoxic cancer. Some oncolytic viruses are better adapted than others to the hypoxic tumor environment. Replication of adenoviruses from both groups B and C is inhibited, yet replication of herpes simplex virus is enhanced. Hypoxia seems to exert little or no effect on the replication of other oncolytic viruses. Vaccinia virus displayed increased cytotoxicity in some hypoxic cancer cells even though viral protein synthesis and transgene expression were not affected. Vesicular stomatitis virus replicated to similar levels in both hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and is effective for killing hypoxic cancer cells. However, vesicular stomatitis virus and reovirus, but not encephalomyocarditis virus, are sensitive to elevated levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in renal cancer cells with the loss of von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor protein, because elevated hypoxia-inducible factor activity confers dramatically enhanced resistance to cytotoxicity mediated by vesicular stomatitis virus or reovirus. A variety of hypoxia-selective and tumor-type-specific oncolytic adenoviruses, generated by incorporating hypoxia-responsive elements into synthetic promoters to control essential genes for viral replication or therapeutic genes, have been shown to be safe and efficacious. Hypoxic tumor-homing macrophages can function effectively as carrier

  20. Diverse electron sources support denitrification under hypoxia in the obligate methanotroph Methylomicrobium album strain BG8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kits, K. Dimitri; Campbell, Dustin J.; Rosana, Albert R.; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are a diverse group of microorganisms that are ubiquitous in natural environments. Along with anaerobic MOB and archaea, aerobic methanotrophs are critical for attenuating emission of methane to the atmosphere. Clearly, nitrogen availability in the form of ammonium and nitrite have strong effects on methanotrophic activity and their natural community structures. Previous findings show that nitrite amendment inhibits the activity of some cultivated methanotrophs; however, the physiological pathways that allow some strains to transform nitrite, expression of gene inventories, as well as the electron sources that support this activity remain largely uncharacterized. Here we show that Methylomicrobium album strain BG8 utilizes methane, methanol, formaldehyde, formate, ethane, ethanol, and ammonia to support denitrification activity under hypoxia only in the presence of nitrite. We also demonstrate that transcript abundance of putative denitrification genes, nirS and one of two norB genes, increased in response to nitrite. Furthermore, we found that transcript abundance of pxmA, encoding the alpha subunit of a putative copper-containing monooxygenase, increased in response to both nitrite and hypoxia. Our results suggest that expression of denitrification genes, found widely within genomes of aerobic methanotrophs, allow the coupling of substrate oxidation to the reduction of nitrogen oxide terminal electron acceptors under oxygen limitation. The present study expands current knowledge of the metabolic flexibility of methanotrophs by revealing that a diverse array of electron donors support nitrite reduction to nitrous oxide under hypoxia. PMID:26500622

  1. Diverse electron sources support denitrification under hypoxia in the obligate methanotroph Methylomicrobium album strain BG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dimitri eKits

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria are a diverse group of microorganisms that are ubiquitous in natural environments. Along with anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria and archaea, aerobic methanotrophs are critical for attenuating emission of methane to the atmosphere. Clearly, nitrogen availability in the form of ammonium and nitrite have strong effects on methanotrophic activity and their natural community structures. Previous findings show that nitrite amendment inhibits the activity of some cultivated methanotrophs; however, the physiological pathways that allow some strains to transform nitrite, expression of gene inventories, as well as the electron sources that support this activity remain largely uncharacterized. Here we show that M. album strain BG8 utilizes methane, methanol, formaldehyde, formate, ethane, ethanol and ammonia to support denitrification activity under hypoxia only in the presence of nitrite. We also demonstrate that transcript abundance of putative denitrification genes, nirS and one of two norB genes, increased in response to nitrite. Furthermore, we found that transcript abundance of pxmA, encoding the alpha subunit of a putative copper-containing monooxygenase, increased in response to both nitrite and hypoxia. Our results suggest that expression of denitrification genes, found widely within genomes of aerobic methanotrophs, allow the coupling of substrate oxidation to the reduction of nitrogen oxide terminal electron acceptors under oxygen limitation. The present study expands current knowledge of the metabolic flexibility of methanotrophs by revealing that a diverse array of electron donors support nitrite reduction to nitrous oxide under hypoxia.

  2. Attenuator And Conditioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Carson, Richard F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Kemme, Shanalyn Adair; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.

    2006-04-04

    An apparatus and method of attenuating and/or conditioning optical energy for an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module is disclosed. An apparatus for attenuating the optical output of an optoelectronic connector including: a mounting surface; an array of optoelectronic devices having at least a first end; an array of optical elements having at least a first end; the first end of the array of optical elements optically aligned with the first end of the array of optoelectronic devices; an optical path extending from the first end of the array of optoelectronic devices and ending at a second end of the array of optical elements; and an attenuator in the optical path for attenuating the optical energy emitted from the array of optoelectronic devices. Alternatively, a conditioner may be adapted in the optical path for conditioning the optical energy emitted from the array of optoelectronic devices.

  3. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... exposed to 2 h each of hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, hypocapnic normoxia, and normal breathing of room air (control experiment). During the control experiment, serum-EPO showed significant variations (ANOVA P = 0.047) with a 15% increase in mean values. The serum-EPO measured in the other...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...

  4. SirT1 confers hypoxia-induced radioresistance via the modulation of c-Myc stabilization on hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intratumoral hypoxia is an important contributory factor to tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy. SirT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has been linked to the decrease of radiation-induced DNA damage and seems to be critical for cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SirT1 in hypoxia-induced radiation response on hepatoma cells. It was found that the administration with resveratrol, a putative SirT1 activator, enhanced the resistance of HepG2 cells against radiation-induced DNA damage of MN formation under hypoxia condition; while nicotinamide, a well-known SirT1 inhibitor, sensitized this radiation damage. Nevertheless, pretreatment of cells with 10058-F4, a specific inhibitor of c-Myc, almost eliminated the nicotinamide-induced radiosensitive effect. Further studies revealed that resveratrol inhibited c-Myc protein accumulation via up-regulation of SirT1 expression and deacetylase activity, and this loss of c-Myc protein was abolished by inhibiting its degradation in the presence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteasome. In contrast, nicotinamide attenuated c-Myc protein degradation induced by radiation under hypoxia through inhibition of SirT1 deacetylase activity. Our findings suggest that SirT1 could serve as a novel potent target of radiation-induced DNA damage and thus as a potential strategy to advance the efficiency of radiation therapy in hepatoma entities. (author)

  5. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  6. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E;

    2014-01-01

    used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...

  7. Protein synthesis during hypoxia in fetal lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the rate of fetal protein synthesis decreases during fetal hypoxia. Catheters were inserted into 13 sheep fetuses under maternal spinal and local fetal anesthesia. Five days after surgery, an infusion of L-[14C]tyrosine was begun. Measurements were first made when tyrosine-specific activity reached steady state at 3 h and then again 3 h after fetal oxygen delivery was reduced by lowering the maternal inspired oxygen concentration. Umbilical blood flow was measured by injecting microspheres containing one of five radiolabels into the inferior venacava. Fetal tyrosine uptake across the umbilical circulation was 1.34 +/- 0.20 μ mol x kg-1 x min-1 during normoxia and decreased to 0.72 +/- 0.12 μ mol x kg-1 x min-1 during hypoxia. Tyrosine use from the plasma compartment was 1.25 +/- 0.18 μ mol x kg-1 x min-1 during normoxia and decreased to 0.64 +/- 0.12 μ mol x kg-1 x min-1 during hypoxia. Fetal tyrosine use decreased during reduced oxygen delivery because the rate of tyrosine use for fetal protein synthesis decreased. Fetal oxygen consumption decreased by 40 μ mol x kg-1 x min-1 during hypoxia. Decreased protein synthesis reduced the energy needed for protein synthesis and explained 28 μ mol x kg-1 x min-1 of this reduction

  8. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....

  9. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula STR1 wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO2 is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole are developed. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers. 9 figs

  10. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  11. Protective effects of myricetin on acute hypoxia-induced exercise intolerance and mitochondrial impairments in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zou

    Full Text Available Exercise tolerance is impaired in hypoxia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of myricetin, a dietary flavonoid compound widely found in fruits and vegetables, on acute hypoxia-induced exercise intolerance in vivo and in vitro.Male rats were administered myricetin or vehicle for 7 days and subsequently spent 24 hours at a barometric pressure equivalent to 5000 m. Exercise capacity was then assessed through the run-to-fatigue procedure, and mitochondrial morphology in skeletal muscle cells was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The enzymatic activities of electron transfer complexes were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA. mtDNA was quantified by real-time-PCR. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 staining. Protein expression was detected through western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence.Myricetin supplementation significantly prevented the decline of run-to-fatigue time of rats in hypoxia, and attenuated acute hypoxia-induced mitochondrial impairment in skeletal muscle cells in vivo and in vitro by maintaining mitochondrial structure, mtDNA content, mitochondrial membrane potential, and activities of the respiratory chain complexes. Further studies showed that myricetin maintained mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle cells under hypoxic conditions by up-regulating the expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis-related regulators, in addition, AMP-activated protein kinase(AMPK plays a crucial role in this process.Myricetin may have important applications for improving physical performance under hypoxic environment, which may be attributed to the protective effect against mitochondrial impairment by maintaining mitochondrial biogenesis.

  12. Hypoxia-induced hypothermia mediated by GABA in the rostral parapyramidal area of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, T

    2014-05-16

    Hypoxia evokes a regulated decrease in the body core temperature (Tc) in a variety of animals. The neuronal mechanisms of this response include, at least in part, glutamatergic activation in the lateral preoptic area (LPO) of the hypothalamus. As the sympathetic premotor neurons in the medulla oblongata constitute a cardinal relay station in the descending neuronal pathway from the hypothalamus for thermoregulation, their inhibition can also be critically involved in the mechanisms of the hypoxia-induced hypothermia. Here, I examined the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced hypothermia is mediated by glutamate-responsive neurons in the LPO that activate GABAergic transmission in the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) and neighboring parapyramidal region (PPy) of the medulla oblongata in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. Unilateral microinjection of GABA (15nmol) into the rRPa and PPy regions elicited a prompt increase in tail skin temperature (Ts) and decreases in Tc, oxygen consumption rate (VO2), and heart rate. Next, when the GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide (bicuculline methiodide (BMI), 10pmol) alone was microinjected into the rRPa, it elicited unexpected contradictory responses: simultaneous increases in Ts, VO2 and heart rate and a decrease in Tc. Then, when BMI was microinjected bilaterally into the PPy, no direct effect on Ts was seen; and thermogenic and tachycardic responses were slight. However, pretreatment of the PPy with BMI, but not vehicle saline, greatly attenuated the hypothermic responses evoked by hypoxic (10%O2-90%N2, 5min) ventilation or bilateral microinjections of glutamate (5nmol, each side) into the LPO. The results suggest that hypoxia-induced hypothermia was mediated, at least in part, by the activation of GABAA receptors in the PPy. PMID:24607346

  13. The nexus between VEGF and NFκB orchestrates a hypoxia-independent neovasculogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael DeNiro

    Full Text Available Nuclear Factor-Kappa B [NFκB] activation triggers the elevation of various pro-angiogenic factors that contribute to the development and progression of diabetic vasculopathies. It has been demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF] activates NFκB signaling pathway. Under the ischemic microenvironments, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 [HIF-1] upregulates the expression of several proangiogenic mediators, which play crucial roles in ocular pathologies. Whereas YC-1, a soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] agonist, inhibits HIF-1 and NFκB signaling pathways in various cell and animal models. Throughout this investigation, we examined the molecular link between VEGF and NFκB under a hypoxia-independent microenvironment in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells [hRMVECs]. Our data indicate that VEGF promoted retinal neovasculogenesis via NFκB activation, enhancement of its DNA-binding activity, and upregulating NFκB/p65, SDF-1, CXCR4, FAK, αVβ3, α5β1, EPO, ET-1, and MMP-9 expression. Conversely, YC-1 impaired the activation of NFκB and its downstream signaling pathways, via attenuating IκB kinase phosphorylation, degradation and activation, and thus suppressing p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and inhibiting NFκB-DNA binding activity. We report for the first time that the nexus between VEGF and NFκB is implicated in coordinating a scheme that upregulates several pro-angiogenic molecules, which promotes retinal neovasculogenesis. Our data may suggest the potential use of YC-1 to attenuate the deleterious effects that are associated with hypoxia/ischemia-independent retinal vasculopathies.

  14. Regulation of mRNA translation influences hypoxia tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia is a heterogenous but common characteristic of human tumours and poor oxygenation is associated with poor prognosis. We believe that the presence of viable hypoxic tumor cells reflects in part an adaptation and tolerance of these cells to oxygen deficiency. Since oxidative phosphorylation is compromized during hypoxia, adaptation may involve both the upregulation of glycolysis as well as downregulation of energy consumption. mRNA translation is one of the most energy costly cellular processes, and we and others have shown that global mRNA translation is rapidly inhibited during hypoxia. However, some mRNAs, including those coding for HIF-1 α and VEGF, remain efficiently translated during hypoxia. Clearly, the mechanisms responsible for the overall inhibition of translation during hypoxia does not compromize the translation of certain hypoxia-induced mRNA species. We therefore hypothesize that the inhibition of mRNA translation serves to promote hypoxia tolerance in two ways: i) through conservation of energy and ii) through differential gene expression involved in hypoxia adaptation. We have recently identified two pathways that are responsible for the global inhibition of translation during hypoxia. The phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 α by the ER resident kinase PERK results in down-regulation of protein synthesis shortly after the onset of hypoxia. In addition, the initiation complex eIF4F is disrupted during long lasting hypoxic conditions. The identification of the molecular pathways responsible for the inhibition of overall translation during hypoxia has rendered it possible to investigate their importance for hypoxia tolerance. We have found that mouse embryo fibroblasts that are knockout for PERK and therefore not able to inhibit protein synthesis efficiently during oxygen deficiency are significantly less tolerant to hypoxia than their wildtype counterparts. We are currently also investigating the functional significance

  15. Pimonidazole: a novel hypoxia marker for complementary study of tumor hypoxia and tumor biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objectives: Tumor hypoxia appears to be associated with treatment resistance and with gene expression that may lead to hypoxia-mediated selection of tumor cells as a source for cell growth and metastases. The objective of this study was to develop complementary techniques of hypoxia detection with molecular markers of cell proliferation and metastases in order to investigate the role of tumor hypoxia in tumor biology. Materials and Methods: Pimonidazole is a 2-nitroimidazole which is reductively-activated and becomes covalently bound to thiol-containing proteins only in hypoxic cells. These adducts can be detected using immunohistochemistry, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay or flow cytometry as a measure of hypoxia in tumors. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis has been completed for five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were given pimonidazole hydrochloride (0.5 g/m2 intravenously) followed by cervical biopsies 24 hours later. Informed consent was obtained according to a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board. A minimum of 3 random biopsies were obtained from the tumors and at least four sections examined from each biopsy site. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections were immunostained for pimonidazole binding using a mouse monoclonal antibody. Commercially available monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell proliferation markers MIB-1 (Ki-67) and to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells in contiguous sections. The extent of immunostaining was expressed as the percent of immunostained to total tumor cells as determined by Chalkley point counting. Results: No clinical toxicities were associated with pimonidazole infusion. Immunostaining with pimonidazole antibody was observed in all patients indicating the presence of tumor hypoxia. Qualitatively there is little or no overlap between the areas of hypoxia and proliferation. Quantitative data tabulated below show the

  16. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Amelia J; Saunders, Philo U; Vallance, Brent S; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Gore, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities) on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10) or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night(-1) at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8). A control group (CON; n = 10) lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p night (p = 0.03) and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006) after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m) combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m) as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass. Key pointsIn some countries, it may not be possible to perform classical altitude training effectively, due to the low elevation at altitude training venues. An additional hypoxic stimulus can be provided by simulating higher altitudes overnight, using altitude tents.Three weeks of combined (living and training at 1380 m) and simulated altitude exposure (at 3000 m) can improve haemoglobin mass by over 3% in comparison to control values, and can also improve time to exhaustion by ~9% in comparison to baseline.We recommend that, in the context of an altitude training camp at low altitudes (~1400 m) the addition of a relatively short

  17. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia J. Carr, Philo U. Saunders, Brent S. Vallance, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Christopher J. Gore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass, maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max, time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10 or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night-1 at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8. A control group (CON; n = 10 lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p < 0.05. There was a 3.7% increase in Hbmass in lowHH+NHnight compared with CON (p = 0.02. In comparison to baseline, Hbmass increased by 1.2% (±1.4% in the lowHH group, 2.6% (±1.8% in lowHH+NHnight, and there was a decrease of 0.9% (±4.9% in CON. VO2max increased by ~4% within both experimental conditions but was not significantly greater than the 1% increase in CON. There was a ~9% difference in pre and post-intervention values in time to exhaustion after lowHH+NH-night (p = 0.03 and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006 after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass.

  18. Adenosine concentration in the porcine coronary artery wall and A2A receptor involvement in hypoxia-induced vasodilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøbert, Ole; Haink, Gesine; Simonsen, Ulf; Gravholt, Claus H; Levin, Max; Deussen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We tested whether hypoxia-induced coronary artery dilatation could be mediated by an increase in adenosine concentration within the coronary artery wall or by an increase in adenosine sensitivity. Porcine left anterior descendent coronary arteries, precontracted with prostaglandin F2α (10−5m), were mounted in a pressure myograph and microdialysis catheters were inserted into the tunica media. Dialysate adenosine concentrations were analysed by HPLC. Glucose, lactate and pyruvate were measured by an automated spectrophotometric kinetic enzymatic analyser. The exchange fraction of [14C]adenosine over the microdialysis membrane increased from 0.32 ± 0.02 to 0.46 ± 0.02 (n = 4, P < 0.01) during the study period. At baseline, interstitial adenosine was in the region of 10 nm which is significantly less than previously found myocardial concentrations. Hypoxia (PO2 30 mmHg for 60 min, n = 5) increased coronary diameters by 20.0 ± 2.6% (versus continuous oxygenation −3.1 ± 2.4%, n = 6, P < 0.001) but interstitial adenosine concentration fell. Blockade of adenosine deaminase (with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl-)-adenine, 5 μm), adenosine kinase (with iodotubericidine, 10 μm) and adenosine transport (with n-nitrobenzylthioinosine, 1 μm) increased interstitial adenosine but the increase was unrelated to hypoxia or diameter. A coronary dilatation similar to that during hypoxia could be obtained with 30 μm of adenosine in the organ bath and the resulting interstitial adenosine concentrations (n = 5) were 20 times higher than the adenosine concentration measured during hypoxia. Adenosine concentration–response experiments showed vasodilatation to be more pronounced during hypoxia (n = 9) than during normoxia (n = 9, P < 0.001) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (20 nm, n = 5), attenuated hypoxia-induced vasodilatation while the selective A2B receptor antagonist MRS1754 (20 nm, n = 4), had no effect. The lactate/pyruvate ratio was significantly increased in

  19. Cross acclimation between heat and hypoxia: Heat acclimation improves cellular tolerance and exercise performance in acute normobaric hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben James Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The potential for cross acclimation between environmental stressors is not well understood. Thus the aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of fixed-workload heat or hypoxic acclimation on cellular, physiological and performance responses during post acclimation hypoxic exercise in humans. Method. Twenty-one males (age 22 ± 5 years; stature 1.76 ± 0.07m; mass 71.8 ± 7.9kg; V ̇O2 peak 51 ± 7mL.kg-1.min-1 completed a cycling hypoxic stress test (HST and self-paced 16.1km time trial (TT before (HST1, TT1, and after (HST2, TT2 a series of 10 daily 60 min training sessions (50% N V ̇O2peak in control (CON, n = 7; 18°C, 35%RH, hypoxic (HYP, n = 7; or hot (HOT, n = 7; 40°C, 25% RH conditions. Results. TT performance in hypoxia was improved following both acclimation treatments, HYP (-3:16 ± 3:10 mins:sec; p = 0.0006 and HOT (-2:02 ± 1:02 mins:sec; p = 0.005, but unchanged after CON (+0:31 ± 1:42 mins:sec. Resting monocyte heat shock protein 72 (mHSP72 increased prior to HST2 in HOT (62 ± 46% and HYP (58 ± 52%, but was unchanged after CON (9 ± 46%, leading to an attenuated mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise in HOT and HYP HST2 compared to HST1 (p < 0.01. Changes in extracellular hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α followed a similar pattern to those of mHSP72. Physiological strain index (PSI was attenuated in HOT (HST1 = 4.12 ± 0.58, HST2 = 3.60 ± 0.42; p = 0.007 as a result of a reduced HR (HST1 = 140 ± 14 b.min-1; HST2 131 ± 9 b.min-1 p = 0.0006 and Trectal (HST1 = 37.55 ± 0.18°C; HST2 37.45 ± 0.14°C; p = 0.018 during exercise. Whereas PSI did not change in HYP (HST1 = 4.82 ± 0.64, HST2 4.83 ± 0.63. Conclusion. Heat acclimation improved cellular and systemic physiological tolerance to steady state exercise in moderate hypoxia. Additionally we show, for the first time, that heat acclimation improved cycling time trial performance to a magnitude similar to that achieved by hypoxic acclimation.

  20. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  1. Response of the plasma hypoxia marker osteopontin to in vitro hypoxia in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is recognized as a tumor-associated protein and has recently been shown to be a potential plasma marker of tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancer patients. We sought to detect patterns of OPN accumulation and secretion in human tumor cells during in vitro hypoxia. Materials and methods: The human tumor cell lines A 549 lung carcinoma, U 87 malignant glioma, HT 1080 fibrosarcoma, FaDu pharyngeal carcinoma and HT 29 and HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma were treated with 1, 6 or 24 h of hypoxia (0.1% O2) or 24 h followed by 4 h or 20 of reoxygenation. OPN concentration in the supernatant was measured by ELISA, OPN protein and mRNA levels by Western and Northern blotting. Results: In FaDu, HT 29 and HCT 116, OPN levels in the supernatant remained below 10 ng/ml under all conditions. In A 549, HT 1080 and U 87, mean aerobic OPN concentrations were 2296, 164 and 115 ng/ml, respectively. No increase of OPN in the medium during 24 h of hypoxia, but moderate increases during subsequent 24-hour-reoxygenation were observed in these three cell lines. Intracellular OPN protein was present to a similar extent in all six-cell lines under aerobic conditions and also did not accumulate during hypoxia treatment. OPN mRNA response to hypoxia and reoxygenation was very heterogeneous between cell lines. Conclusion: Reoxygenation rather than hypoxia appears to induce OPN secretion from human tumor cells in a cell-type specific manner

  2. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kishimoto, Koshi N., E-mail: kishimoto@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Kaneko, Kazuo [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoi, Eiji [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  3. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. → The expression of C/EBPβ, α and PPARγ were increased under hypoxia. → Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) β, α and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) γ were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  4. Cordyceps sinensis Increases Hypoxia Tolerance by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1 and Metallothionein via Nrf2 Activation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinalini Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps sinensis, an edible mushroom growing in Himalayan regions, is widely recognized in traditional system of medicine. In the present study, we report the efficacy of Cordyceps sinensis in facilitating tolerance to hypoxia using A549 cell line as a model system. Treatment with aqueous extract of Cordyceps sinensis appreciably attenuated hypoxia induced ROS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained antioxidant status similar to that of controls via induction of antioxidant gene HO1 (heme oxygenase-1, MT (metallothionein and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2. In contrast, lower level of NFκB (nuclear factor kappaB and tumor necrosis factor-α observed which might be due to higher levels of HO1, MT and transforming growth factor-β. Further, increase in HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its regulated genes; erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and glucose transporter-1 was observed. Interestingly, Cordyceps sinensis treatment under normoxia did not regulate the expression HIF1, NFκB and their regulated genes evidencing that Cordyceps sinensis per se did not have an effect on these transcription factors. Overall, Cordyceps sinensis treatment inhibited hypoxia induced oxidative stress by maintaining higher cellular Nrf2, HIF1 and lowering NFκB levels. These findings provide a basis for possible use of Cordyceps sinensis in tolerating hypoxia.

  5. Hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 are important transcriptional effectors in primary macrophages experiencing hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Hughes, Russell; Murdoch, Craig; Coffelt, Seth; Biswas, Subhra K.; Harris, Adrian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Imityaz, Hongxia Z.; Simon, M. Celeste; Fredlund, Erik; Greten, Florian; Rius, Jordi; Lewis, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia exists in many diseased tissues including arthritic joints, atherosclerotic plaques and malignant tumors. Macrophages accumulate in these sites and upregulate hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 in response to the hypoxia present. Here we show that the gene expression profile in primary human and murine macrophages changes markedly when they are exposed to hypoxia for 18h. For example, they were seen to upregulate the cell surface receptors, CXCR4 and GLUT1, and the potent, tumor-promoting cytokines, VEGFA, interleukins 1β and 8, adrenomedullin, CXCR4 and angiopoietin-2. Hypoxia also stimulated their expression and/or phosphorylation of various proteins in the NF-κB signalling pathway. We then used both genetic and pharmacological methods to manipulate the levels of HIFs 1α and 2α or NF-κB in primary macrophages in order to elucidate their role in the hypoxic induction of many of these key genes. These studies showed that both HIFs 1 and 2, but not NF-κB, are important transcriptional effectors regulating the responses of macrophages to such a period of hypoxia. Further studies using experimental mouse models are now warranted to investigate the role of such macrophage responses in the progression of various diseased tissues like malignant tumors. PMID:19454749

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 are important transcriptional effectors in primary macrophages experiencing hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Hughes, Russell; Murdoch, Craig; Coffelt, Seth B; Biswas, Subhra K; Harris, Adrian L; Johnson, Randall S; Imityaz, Hongxia Z; Simon, M Celeste; Fredlund, Erik; Greten, Florian R; Rius, Jordi; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-07-23

    Ischemia exists in many diseased tissues, including arthritic joints, atherosclerotic plaques, and malignant tumors. Macrophages accumulate in these sites and up-regulate hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 in response to the hypoxia present. Here we show that the gene expression profile in primary human and murine macrophages changes markedly when they are exposed to hypoxia for 18 hours. For example, they were seen to up-regulate the cell surface receptors, CXCR4 and GLUT1, and the potent, tumor-promoting cytokines, vascular endothelial growth factor A, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-8, adrenomedullin, CXCR4, and angiopoietin-2. Hypoxia also stimulated their expression and/or phosphorylation of various proteins in the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. We then used both genetic and pharmacologic methods to manipulate the levels of HIFs-1alpha and 2alpha or NF-kappaB in primary macrophages to elucidate their role in the hypoxic induction of many of these key genes. These studies showed that both HIF-1 and -2, but not NF-kappaB, are important transcriptional effectors regulating the responses of macrophages to such a period of hypoxia. Further studies using experimental mouse models are now warranted to investigate the role of such macrophage responses in the progression of various diseased tissues, such as malignant tumors. PMID:19454749

  7. Hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics decrease aquaporin 5 (AQP5 expression through both hypoxia inducible factor-1α and proteasome-mediated pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitesh D Kawedia

    Full Text Available The alveolar epithelium plays a central role in gas exchange and fluid transport, and is therefore critical for normal lung function. Since the bulk of water flux across this epithelium depends on the membrane water channel Aquaporin 5 (AQP5, we asked whether hypoxia had any effect on AQP5 expression. We show that hypoxia causes a significant (70% decrease in AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia and the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt, also caused similar decreases in AQP5 mRNA and protein expression in the mouse lung epithelial cell line MLE-12. The action of hypoxia and cobalt on AQP5 transcription was demonstrated by directly quantifying heternonuclear RNA by real-time PCR. Dominant negative mutants of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF-1α and HIF-1α siRNA blocked the action of cobalt, showing that HIF-1α is a key component in this mechanism. The proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor-III completely abolished the effect of hypoxia and cobalt both at the protein and mRNA level indicating that the proteasome pathway is probably involved not only for the stability of HIF-1α protein, but for the stability of unidentified transcription factors that regulate AQP5 transcription. These studies reveal a potentially important physiological mechanism linking hypoxic stress and membrane water channels.

  8. Pressure surge attenuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pressure surge attenuation arrangement comprises crushable metal foam disposed adjacent regions adapted to be expanded by a pressure surge. In a pipe system such region consists of a thin walled inner pipe surrounded by a housing with crushable metal foam disposed in the space between the housing and the inner pipe. (author)

  9. Tritium Attenuation by Distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine how a 100 Area distillation system could be used to reduce to a satisfactory low value the tritium content of the dilute moderator produced in the 100 Area stills, and whether such a tritium attenuator would have sufficient capacity to process all this material before it is sent to the 400 Area for reprocessing

  10. Natural attenuation of herbicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Nina; Højberg, Anker Lajer; Broholm, Mette Martina;

    2002-01-01

    A field injection experiment in a sandy, aerobic aquifer showed that two phenoxy acids MCPP (mecoprop) and dichlorprop were degraded within I in downgradient of the injection wells after an apparent lag period. The plume development and microbial measurements indicated that microbial growth gover...... observations may be important for application of natural attenuation as a remedy in field scale systems....

  11. Radionuclide imaging of perfusion and hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a review of radionuclide imaging of tumour vascular physiology as it relates to angiogenesis. We focus on clinical trials in human subjects using PET and SPECT to evaluate tumour physiology, in particular blood flow and hypoxia. A systematic review of literature based on MEDLINE searches updated in February 2010 was performed. Twenty-nine studies were identified for review: 14 dealt with 15O-water PET perfusion imaging, while 8 dealt with 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET hypoxia imaging. Five used SPECT methods. The studies varied widely in technical quality and reporting of methods. A subset of radionuclide methods offers accurate quantitative scientific observations on tumour vascular physiology of relevance to angiogenesis and its treatment. The relationship between cellular processes of angiogenesis and changing physiological function remains poorly defined. The promise of quantitative functional imaging at high specificity and low administered dose sustains interest in radionuclide methods. (orig.)

  12. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems. PMID:26898739

  13. Hemodynamic and ventilatory response to different levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia in carotid body-denervated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo J. Sabino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chemoreceptors play an important role in the autonomic modulation of circulatory and ventilatory responses to changes in arterial O2 and/or CO2. However, studies evaluating hemodynamic responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in rats have shown inconsistent results. Our aim was to evaluate hemodynamic and respiratory responses to different levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia in conscious intact or carotid body-denervated rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were submitted to bilateral ligature of carotid body arteries (or sham-operation and received catheters into the left femoral artery and vein. After two days, each animal was placed into a plethysmographic chamber and, after baseline measurements of respiratory parameters and arterial pressure, each animal was subjected to three levels of hypoxia (15, 10 and 6% O2 and hypercapnia (10% CO2. RESULTS: The results indicated that 15% O2 decreased the mean arterial pressure and increased the heart rate (HR in both intact (n = 8 and carotid body-denervated (n = 7 rats. In contrast, 10% O2did not change the mean arterial pressure but still increased the HR in intact rats, and it decreased the mean arterial pressure and increased the heart rate in carotid body-denervated rats. Furthermore, 6% O2 increased the mean arterial pressure and decreased the HR in intact rats, but it decreased the mean arterial pressure and did not change the HR in carotid body-denervated rats. The 3 levels of hypoxia increased pulmonary ventilation in both groups, with attenuated responses in carotid body-denervated rats. Hypercapnia with 10% CO2 increased the mean arterial pressure and decreased HR similarly in both groups. Hypercapnia also increased pulmonary ventilation in both groups to the same extent. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the hemodynamic and ventilatory responses varied according to the level of hypoxia. Nevertheless, the hemodynamic and ventilatory responses to hypercapnia did not depend on the

  14. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  15. Cardiovascular Response to High Altitude Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Manchanda, S C

    1984-01-01

    Normal and abnormal cardiovascular response to high altitude (HA) hypoxia were studied in 98 healthy subjects and in 15 patients with HA pulmonary oedema (HAPO) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at an altitudeof 3,658 m. The healthy sea level (SL) residents showed marked blood volume changes during the first week with pulmonary hypotension and depression of left ventricular (LV) performance and physical work capacity (PWC). The HA natives, however, had better LV performance and PWC indicating...

  16. Pathophysiology and clinical effects of chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D J

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia exists when there is a reduced amount of oxygen in the tissues of the body. Hypoxemia refers to a reduction in PO2 below the normal range, regardless of whether gas exchange is impaired in the lung, CaO2 is adequate, or tissue hypoxia exists. There are several potential physiologic mechanisms for hypoxemia, but in patients with COPD the predominant one is V/Q mismatching, with or without alveolar hypoventilation, as indicated by PaCO2. Hypoxemia caused by V/Q mismatching as seen in COPD is relatively easy to correct, so that only comparatively small amounts of supplemental oxygen (less than 3 L/min for the majority of patients) are required for LTOT. Although hypoxemia normally stimulates ventilation and produces dyspnea, these phenomena and the other symptoms and signs of hypoxia are sufficiently variable in patients with COPD as to be of limited value in patient assessment. Chronic alveolar hypoxia is the main factor leading to development of cor pulmonale--right ventricular hypertrophy with or without overt right ventricular failure--in patients with COPD. Pulmonary hypertension adversely affects survival in COPD, to an extent that parallels the degree to which resting mean pulmonary artery pressure is elevated. Although the severity of airflow obstruction as measured by FEV1 is the best correlate with overall prognosis in patients with COPD, chronic hypoxemia increases mortality and morbidity for any severity of disease. Large-scale studies of LTOT in patients with COPD have demonstrated a dose-response relationship between daily hours of oxygen use and survival. There is reason to believe that continuous, 24-hours-per-day oxygen use in appropriately selected patients would produce a survival benefit even greater than that shown in the NOTT and MRC studies. PMID:10771781

  17. Relaxin Protects Astrocytes from Hypoxia In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Willcox, Jordan M.; Alastair J S Summerlee

    2014-01-01

    The peptide relaxin has recently been shown to protect brain tissues from the detrimental effects of ischemia. To date, the mechanisms for this remain unclear. In order to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms by which relaxin may protect the brain, we investigated the possibility that relaxin protects astrocytes from hypoxia or oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultured astrocytes were pre-treated with either relaxin-2 or relaxin-3 and exposed to OGD for 24 or 48 hours. Following OGD ex...

  18. Inner Retinal Oxygen Delivery and Metabolism Under Normoxia and Hypoxia in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-yu; Blair, Norman P.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism arereported in rat under systemic normoxia and hypoxia. Blood flow compensation for the reduced oxygen availability maintained inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism during moderate hypoxia, but not under severe hypoxia.

  19. The role of hypoxia in intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yatrik M

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the intestine. IBD is a multifactorial disorder, and IBD-associated genes are critical in innate immune response, inflammatory response, autophagy, and epithelial barrier integrity. Moreover, epithelial oxygen tension plays a critical role in intestinal inflammation and resolution in IBD. The intestines have a dynamic and rapid fluctuation in cellular oxygen tension, which is dysregulated in IBD. Intestinal epithelial cells have a steep oxygen gradient where the tips of the villi are hypoxic and the oxygenation increases at the base of the villi. IBD results in heightened hypoxia throughout the mucosa. Hypoxia signals through a well-conserved family of transcription factors, where hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In inflamed mucosa, HIF-1α increases barrier protective genes, elicits protective innate immune responses, and activates an antimicrobial response through the increase in β-defensins. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining an epithelial-elicited inflammatory response and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. HIF-1α activation in colitis leads to a protective response, whereas chronic activation of HIF-2α increases the pro-inflammatory response, intestinal injury, and cancer. In this mini-review, we detail the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in intestinal inflammation and injury and therapeutic implications of targeting HIF signaling in IBD. PMID:26812949

  20. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  1. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926–9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655–8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1–24). (synthesis and review)

  2. Dietary supplementation of some antioxidants against hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanaa Ahmed Ali; Hanan Farouk Aly; Lilla Mohammed Faddah; Zeenat F Zaidi

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to clarifythe protective effect of supplementation with some antioxidants,such as idebenone (200 mg/kg,ip),melatonin (10 mg/kg,ip) and arginine (200 mg/kg,ip) and their combination,on liver function (T.protein,albumin,alanine aminotransferase,aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase),energetic parameters (adenosine triphosphate,adenosine diphosphate,adenosine monophosphate,inorganic phosphate,total adenylate,adenylate energy charge and potential phosphate).The effect on glycolytic and glycogenolytic enzymes (glucose,glycogen,glycogen phosphorylase,pyruvate kinase and phosphofructokinase against hypoxia) was also studied.The drugs were administered 24 and 1 h prior sodium nitrite intoxication.All biochemical parameters were estimated 1 h after sodium nitrite injection.Injection of sodium nitrite (75 mg/kg,sc) produced a significant disturbance in all biochemical parameters of liver function,energetic parameters and glycolytic and glycogenolytic enzymes.Hepatic damage was confirmed by histopathological examination of the liver as compared to controls.The marked changes in hepatic cells induced by sodium nitrite were completely abolished by pretreatment with the drug combination,suggesting potential protection against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia.It could be concluded that a combination of both idebenone and melatonin or idebenone and arginine provides potential protection against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia by improving biochemical parameters and preserving liver histology.

  3. Hypoxia, therapeutic resistance, and sphingosine 1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle; Bouquerel, Pierre; Brizuela, Leyre; Gstalder, Cécile; Malavaud, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, defined as a poor oxygenation, has been long recognized as a hallmark of solid tumors and a negative prognostic factor for response to therapeutics and survival of patients. Cancer cells have evolved biochemical mechanisms that allow them to react and adapt to hypoxia. At the cellular level, this adaptation is under the control of two related transcription factors, HIF-1 and HIF-2 (hypoxia-inducible factor), that respond rapidly to decreased oxygen levels to activate the expression of a broad range of genes promoting neoangiogenesis, glycolysis, metastasis, increased tumor growth, and resistance to treatments. Recent studies have identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway-which elicits various cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, or angiogenesis-as a new regulator of HIF-1 or HIF-2 activity. In this review, we will focus on how the inhibition/neutralization of the SphK1/S1P signaling could be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:23290779

  4. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2013-03-01

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926-9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655-8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1-24).

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  6. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E

    1993-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated in the carotid body, sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla by hypoxia. We found that a reduction in oxygen tension from 21% to 10% caused a substantial increase (200% at 1 hour and 500% at 6 hours exposure) in the concentration of TH mRNA in carotid body type I cells but not in either the sympathetic ganglia or adrenal gland. In addition, we found that hypercapnia, another natural stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to enhance TH mRNA in type I cells. Removal of the sensory and sympathetic innervation of the carotid body failed to prevent the induction of TH mRNA by hypoxia in type I cells. Our results show that TH gene expression is regulated by hypoxia in the carotid body but not in other peripheral catecholamine synthesizing tissue and that the regulatory mechanism is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:7909954

  7. Plasma osteopontin, hypoxia, and response to the hypoxia sensitiser nimorazole in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Nordsmark, Marianne;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of osteopontin (SPP1) in plasma is associated with tumour hypoxia. The DAHANCA 5 trial found that the hypoxia radiosensitiser nimorazole significantly improved the outcome of radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer compared with placebo. However, whether...... all patients benefit from such modification of hypoxia is unclear. We aimed to assess whether the concentration of plasma osteopontin could predict response to the hypoxia radiosensitiser. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of osteopontin were measured by use of ELISA from stored samples of 320 patients...... can be improved by use of nimorazole. High concentrations of osteopontin can predict clinically relevant hypoxia, and might identify patients who will benefit from modification of hypoxia during radiotherapy....

  8. Sildenafil attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Eric M; Palei, Ana C; Dent, Edward A; Granger, Joey P

    2013-08-15

    Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy that is marked by hypertension, proteinuria, and maternal endothelial dysfunction. A central factor in the etiology of the disease is the development of placental hypoxia/ischemia, which releases pathogenic soluble factors. There is currently no effective treatment for preeclampsia, but the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor sildenafil has been suggested, as PDE-5 is enriched in the uterus, and its antagonism could improve uteroplacental function. Here, we report in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model that administration of oral sildenafil is effective in attenuating placental ischemia-induced hypertension during gestation. RUPP animals have significantly elevated arterial pressure compared with control animals (132 ± 3 vs. 100 ± 2 mmHg; P PDE-5/β-actin ratio (1 ± 0.14 vs. 1.63 ± 0.18; P < 0.05) expression with a resulting reduction in renal medullary cGMP (1.5 ± 0.15 vs. 0.99 ± 0.1 pmol/μg protein, P < 0.05) compared with controls. Although sildenafil had no effect on renal medullary cGMP in control animals, it significantly increased cGMP in RUPP animals (1.3 ± 0.1 pmol/μg protein; P < 0.05). These data suggest that sildenafil might provide an effective therapeutic option for the management of hypertension during preeclampsia. PMID:23785075

  9. A compact rotary vane attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, D. L.; Otosh, T. Y.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1969-01-01

    Rotary vane attenuator, when used as a front end attenuator, introduces an insertion loss that is proportional to the angle of rotation. New technique allows the construction of a shortened compact unit suitable for most installations.

  10. Photon attenuation by intensifying screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photon attenuation by intensifying screens of different chemical composition has been determined. The attenuation of photons between 20 keV and 120 keV was measured by use of a multi-channel analyzer and a broad bremsstrahlung distribution. The attenuation by the intensifying screens was hereby determined simultaneously at many different monoenergetic photon energies. Experimentally determined attenuations were found to agree well with attenuation calculated from mass attenuation coefficients. The attenuation by the screens was also determined at various bremsstrahlung distributions, simulating those occurring behind the patient in various diagnostic X-ray examinations. The high attenuation in some of the intensifying screens form the basis for an analysis of the construction of asymmetric screen pairs. Single screen systems are suggested as a favourable alternative to thick screen pair systems. (Author)

  11. Hypoxia-induced alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition requires mitochondrial ROS and hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Guofei; Dada, Laura A.; Wu, Minghua; Kelly, Aileen; Trejo, Humberto; Zhou, Qiyuan; Varga, John; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury develop hypoxia, which may lead to lung dysfunction and aberrant tissue repair. Recent studies have suggested that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to determine whether hypoxia induces EMT in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). We found that hypoxia induced the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin and decreased the expression of E-cadherin in transformed and primary human, rat, and mouse AEC, ...

  12. 减压贮藏对冷藏枇杷果实品质和木质化败坏的影响%Effects of hypobaric storage on quality and flesh leatheriness of cold-stored loquat fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郜海燕; 宋丽丽; 周拥军; 杨颖; 陈文烜; 陈杭君; 毛金林; 郑永华

    2008-01-01

    为阐明低温减压贮藏对枇杷果实品质和木质化败坏的影响,该研究应用40~50 kPa压力于(0±0.5)℃下贮藏果实49 d,并每隔7 d测定果实的营养品质、出汁率、硬度、褐变指数、呼吸速率、乙烯产生速率、过氧化物酶(POD)和苯丙氨酸解氨酶(PAL)等木质化相关酶活性及木质素含量的变化.结果表明,减压处理可明显抑制冷藏枇杷果实的呼吸强度、乙烯产生和果实褐变,并保持较高的果实可溶性固形物、可滴定酸度和维生素C含量,抑制贮藏21 d后果实硬度的增加,减轻出汁率的下降,降低POD和PAL酶活性的上升趋势,抑制木质素含量的增加.另外,减压贮藏减轻冷藏枇杷果实的木质化败坏,可能与抑制POD和PAL酶活性有关.低温减压贮藏可有效保持果实食用品质,延长贮藏期,是适合枇杷果实贮藏的有效方法.%The study was conducted to determine the effects of hypobaric storage on quality changes and flesh leatheriness of cold-stored ioquat fruit. Freshly harvested loquat fruit were stored for 49 days under 40~50 kPa hypobaric pressure condition at (0±0.5)°C. Nutritional quality, extractable juice rate, flesh firmness, browning index, respiration rate, ethylene production rate, lignin content and activities of phenylalanine ammonium-lyase (PAL) and peroxidase (POD) that related to flesh leatheriness were analyzed at 7-day intervals during storage. The results indicated that hypobaric storage significantly reduced the rates of respiration and ethylene production, inhibited browning index, and maintained high contents of total soluble solids(TSS), total titratable acidity (TA) and vitamin C (Vc). Moreover, hypobaric storage inhibited the increase of POD and PAL activities, reduced their peak values, delayed the increases of flesh firmness and lignin content after 21 days, inhibited the decrease of extractable juice rate, thereby maintaining good eating quality and extending the storage life

  13. Downhole pressure attenuation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for preventing damage to tool strings and other downhole equipment in a well caused by pressures produced during detonation of one or more downhole explosive devices. It comprises adding to a tool string at least one pressure attenuating apparatus for attenuating the peak pressure wave and quasi-static pressure pulse produced by the explosive devices, the pressure attenuating apparatus including an initially closed relief vent including tubing means supporting a plurality of charge port assemblies each including an explosive filled shaped charge and a prestressed disc, the shaped charges interconnected by a detonating cord, the amount of explosive in each shaped charge being sufficient to rupture its associated disc without damaging surrounding tubular bodies in the well, and a vent chamber defined by the tubing means and providing a liquid free volume, and opening the relief vent substantially contemporaneously with downhole explosive device detonation by detonating the shaped charges to rupture the discs of the charge port assemblies

  14. Regional genome transcriptional response of adult mouse brain to hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since normal brain function depends upon continuous oxygen delivery and short periods of hypoxia can precondition the brain against subsequent ischemia, this study examined the effects of brief hypoxia on the whole genome transcriptional response in adult mouse brain. Result Pronounced changes of gene expression occurred after 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O2 and after 1 hour of re-oxygenation in all brain regions. The hypoxia-responsive genes were predominantly up-regulated in hindbrain and predominantly down-regulated in forebrain - possibly to support hindbrain survival functions at the expense of forebrain cognitive functions. The up-regulated genes had a significant role in cell survival and involved both shared and unshared signaling pathways among different brain regions. Up-regulation of transcriptional signaling including hypoxia inducible factor, insulin growth factor (IGF, the vitamin D3 receptor/retinoid X nuclear receptor, and glucocorticoid signaling was common to many brain regions. However, many of the hypoxia-regulated target genes were specific for one or a few brain regions. Cerebellum, for example, had 1241 transcripts regulated by hypoxia only in cerebellum but not in hippocampus; and, 642 (54% had at least one hepatic nuclear receptor 4A (HNF4A binding site and 381 had at least two HNF4A binding sites in their promoters. The data point to HNF4A as a major hypoxia-responsive transcription factor in cerebellum in addition to its known role in regulating erythropoietin transcription. The genes unique to hindbrain may play critical roles in survival during hypoxia. Conclusion Differences of forebrain and hindbrain hypoxia-responsive genes may relate to suppression of forebrain cognitive functions and activation of hindbrain survival functions, which may coordinately mediate the neuroprotection afforded by hypoxia preconditioning.

  15. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Scott S., E-mail: sshsieh@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current

  16. Flexible graphene based microwave attenuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Kisik; Ju Park, Yong; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Min, Byung-Wook

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate flexible 3 dB and 6 dB microwave attenuators using multilayer graphene grown by the chemical vapor deposition method. On the basis of the characterized results of multilayer graphene and graphene-Au ohmic contacts, the graphene attenuators are designed and measured. The flexible graphene-based attenuators have 3 dB and 6 dB attenuation with a return loss of less than -15 dB at higher than 5 GHz. The devices have shown durability in a bending cycling test of 100 times. The circuit model of the attenuator based on the characterized results matches the experimental results well. PMID:25590144

  17. Flexible graphene based microwave attenuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate flexible 3 dB and 6 dB microwave attenuators using multilayer graphene grown by the chemical vapor deposition method. On the basis of the characterized results of multilayer graphene and graphene–Au ohmic contacts, the graphene attenuators are designed and measured. The flexible graphene-based attenuators have 3 dB and 6 dB attenuation with a return loss of less than −15 dB at higher than 5 GHz. The devices have shown durability in a bending cycling test of 100 times. The circuit model of the attenuator based on the characterized results matches the experimental results well. (paper)

  18. Regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced cellular response during chronic hypoxia in differentiated rat PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic hypoxia on N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated cellular responses in differentiated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were differentiated by treatment with nerve growth factor. Patch-clamp analysis in differentiated PC12 cells showed that extracellularly applied N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an inward current that was abolished by the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Results from Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) which was also abolished by MK-801. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced current in nerve growth factor-treated cells. We found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced inward current and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) were markedly attenuated by chronic hypoxia. We next examined the possibility that the reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate responsiveness was due to down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor levels. Northern blot and immunoblot analyses showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 were markedly decreased during hypoxia. However, the messenger RNA for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2C was increased, whereas the protein level for subunit 2C did not change. Our results indicate that differentiated PC12 cells express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and that chronic exposure to hypoxia attenuates the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced Ca(2+) accumulation in these cells via down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1. This mechanism may play an important role in protecting PC12 cells against hypoxic stress. PMID:11113364

  19. Interactive effects of hypoxia, carbon monoxide and acute lung injury on oxygen transport and aerobic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, George H; Jones, James H

    2016-05-01

    This study determined how breathing hypoxic gas, reducing circulatory capacitance for O2 by breathing CO, and impairing pulmonary gas exchange by acutely injuring the lungs interact to limit cardiopulmonary O2 delivery, O2 extraction and maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). Five goats ran on a treadmill at VO2max following oleic-acid induced acute lung injury that impaired pulmonary gas exchange, after partial recovery or with no acute lung injury. Goats breathed normoxic or hypoxic inspired gas fractions (FIO2 0.21 or 0.12) with and without small amounts of CO to maintain carboxyhemoglobin fractions (FHbCO) of 0.02 or 0.30. With the exception of elevated FHbCO with acute lung injury (P=0.08), all combinations of hypoxia, elevated FHbCO and acute lung injury attenuated the reduction in VO2max by 15-27% compared to the sum of each treatment's individual reduction in VO2max when administered separately. Simultaneous administration of two treatments attenuated the reduction in VO2max by attenuating the decrease in cardiopulmonary O2 delivery, not synergistically increasing O2 extraction. PMID:26845454

  20. Dexmedetomidine Postconditioning Reduces Brain Injury after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Ma, Hong; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can lead to death and severe disability. Brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury is the major pathophysiology contributing to death and severe disability after perinatal asphyxia. Here, seven-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left brain HI. Dexmedetomidine was given intraperitoneally after the brain HI. Yohimbine or atipamezole, two α2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, were given 10 min before the dexmedetomidine injection. Neurological outcome was evaluated 7 or 28 days after the brain HI. Frontal cerebral cortex was harvested 6 h after the brain HI. Left brain HI reduced the left cerebral hemisphere weight assessed 7 days after the brain HI. This brain tissue loss was dose-dependently attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine applied within 1 h after the brain HI produced this effect. Dexmedetomidine attenuated the brain HI-induced brain tissue and cell loss as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction assessed from 28 days after the brain HI. Dexmedetomidine postconditioning-induced neuroprotection was abolished by yohimbine or atipamezole. Brain HI increased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the brain tissues. This increase was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Atipamezole inhibited this dexmedetomidine effect. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine postconditioning reduces HI-induced brain injury in the neonatal rats. This effect may be mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor activation that inhibits inflammation in the ischemic brain tissues. PMID:26932203

  1. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M; Nielsen, O J; Fogh-Andersen, N; Olsen, N V

    1996-01-01

    .81, P = 0.01). The present human EPO responses to hypoxia were lower than those which have previously been reported in rodents and humans. In contrast with the earlier rodent studies, it was found that human EPO production could not be triggered by short-term increases in pH and haemoglobin oxygen...

  2. Cobalt chloride decreases fibroblast growth factor-21 expression dependent on oxidative stress but not hypoxia-inducible factor in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanlong [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Wang, Chunhong [Second Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Wang, Yuhua [College of Food Science and Engineering, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Ma, Zhenhua [First Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY (United States); Li, Xiaokun [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Feng, Wenke, E-mail: wenke.feng@louisville.edu [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a potential metabolic regulator with multiple beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. FGF21 is mainly expressed in the liver, but is also found in other tissues including the intestine, which expresses β-klotho abundantly. The intestine is a unique organ that operates in a physiologically hypoxic environment, and is responsible for the fat absorption processes including triglyceride breakdown, re-synthesis and absorption into the portal circulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and the chemical hypoxia inducer, cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), on FGF21 expression in Caco-2 cells and the consequence of fat accumulation. Physical hypoxia (1% oxygen) and CoCl{sub 2} treatment decreased both FGF21 mRNA and secreted protein levels. Gene silence and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIFα) did not affect the reduction of FGF21 mRNA and protein levels by hypoxia. However, CoCl{sub 2} administration caused a significant increase in oxidative stress. The addition of n-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed CoCl{sub 2}-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and completely negated CoCl{sub 2}-induced FGF21 loss. mRNA stability analysis demonstrated that the CoCl{sub 2} administration caused a remarkable reduction in FGF21 mRNA stability. Furthermore, CoCl{sub 2} increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, along with a reduction in mRNA levels of lipid lipase, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and an increase of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (SCD1). Addition of both NAC and recombinant FGF21 significantly attenuated the CoCl{sub 2}-induced TG accumulation. In conclusion, the decrease of FGF21 in Caco-2 cells by chemical hypoxia is independent of HIFα, but dependent on an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. The regulation of FGF21 by hypoxia may contribute to intestinal lipid metabolism and

  3. Cobalt chloride decreases fibroblast growth factor-21 expression dependent on oxidative stress but not hypoxia-inducible factor in Caco-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a potential metabolic regulator with multiple beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. FGF21 is mainly expressed in the liver, but is also found in other tissues including the intestine, which expresses β-klotho abundantly. The intestine is a unique organ that operates in a physiologically hypoxic environment, and is responsible for the fat absorption processes including triglyceride breakdown, re-synthesis and absorption into the portal circulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and the chemical hypoxia inducer, cobalt chloride (CoCl2), on FGF21 expression in Caco-2 cells and the consequence of fat accumulation. Physical hypoxia (1% oxygen) and CoCl2 treatment decreased both FGF21 mRNA and secreted protein levels. Gene silence and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIFα) did not affect the reduction of FGF21 mRNA and protein levels by hypoxia. However, CoCl2 administration caused a significant increase in oxidative stress. The addition of n-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed CoCl2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and completely negated CoCl2-induced FGF21 loss. mRNA stability analysis demonstrated that the CoCl2 administration caused a remarkable reduction in FGF21 mRNA stability. Furthermore, CoCl2 increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, along with a reduction in mRNA levels of lipid lipase, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and an increase of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (SCD1). Addition of both NAC and recombinant FGF21 significantly attenuated the CoCl2-induced TG accumulation. In conclusion, the decrease of FGF21 in Caco-2 cells by chemical hypoxia is independent of HIFα, but dependent on an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. The regulation of FGF21 by hypoxia may contribute to intestinal lipid metabolism and absorption. -- Graphical abstract: Physical and

  4. Invited review: decoding the microRNA response to hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Roger

    2011-01-01

    responses. The ability to sense and respond to hypoxia is of fundamental importance to aerobic organisms and dysregulated oxygen homeostasis is a hallmark in the pathophysiology of cancer, neurological dysfunction, myocardial infarction, and lung disease. miRNAs are ideal mediators of hypoxic stress...... hypoxia and discuss where future breakthroughs in this area may be made....

  5. Hypoxia in head and neck cancer: how much, how important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H.L.K.; Haustermans, K.; Balm, A.J.M.; Begg, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia develops in tumors because of a less ordered, often chaotic, and leaky vascular supply compared with that in normal tissues. In preclinical models, hypoxia has been shown to be associated with treatment resistance and increased malignant potential. In the clinic, several reports

  6. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia...

  7. Evidence for intermittent radiobiological hypoxia in experimental tumour systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes flow and static fluorescence cytometry techniques to visualize and quantitate acute radiobiological hypoxia resulting from transient fluctuation in tumour blood flow in experimental tumour systems. The application of these techniques in two murine tumour systems provides evidence that such hypoxia exists and reduces the effectiveness of single doses of radiation. Possible mechanisms for and implications of these findings are discussed. (author)

  8. Effect of hypoxia on expiratory muscle activity in fetal sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonnette, John M.; Hohimer, A. Roger; Knopp, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The fetal respiratory response to acute hypoxia is characterized by depression, often to apnea. This study examined the effect of hypoxia on the electromyogram (EMG) of the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. Under anesthesia catheters were placed in the fetal sheep carotid artery, fourth cerebral ventricle, trachea and amniotic fluid and wires sewn into the diaphragm and TA muscle. During normoxic episodes of slow fetal breathing (

  9. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo, E-mail: yjlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression.

  10. Trimetazidine protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia-induced injury through ameliorates calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinhong; Xu, Hao; Shi, Liang; Tong, Jie; Zhang, Jianbao

    2015-07-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) overload induced by chronic hypoxia alters Ca(2+)i homeostasis, which plays an important role on mediating myocardial injury. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with trimetazidine (TMZ) would improve Ca(2+)i handling in hypoxic myocardial injury. Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic hypoxia (1% O2, 5% CO2, 37 °C). Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured with Fura-2/AM. Perfusion of cardiomyocytes with a high concentration of caffeine (10 mM) was carried out to verify the function of the cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and the activity of sarco(endo)-plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a). For TMZ-treated cardiomyocytes exposured in hypoxia, we observed a decrease in mRNA expression of proapoptotic Bax, caspase-3 activation and enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. The cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were also alleviated in hypoxic cardiomyocyte treated with TMZ. Moreover, we found that TMZ treatment cardiomyocytes enhanced "metabolic shift" from lipid oxidation to glucose oxidation. Compared with hypoxic cardiomyocyte, the diastolic [Ca(2+)]i was decreased, the amplitude of Ca(2+)i oscillations and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load were recovered, the activities of ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), NCX and SERCA2a were increased in cardiomyocytes treated with TMZ. TMZ attenuated abnormal changes of RyR2 and SERCA2a genes in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. In addition, cholinergic signaling are involved in hypoxic stress and the cardioprotective effects of TMZ. These results suggest that TMZ ameliorates Ca(2+)i homeostasis through switch of lipid to glucose metabolism, thereby producing the cardioprotective effect and reduction in hypoxic cardiomyocytes damage. PMID:25937560

  11. Hypoxia-targeting antitumor prodrugs and photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor hypoxia has been identified as a key subject for tumor therapy, since hypoxic tumor cells show resistance to treatment of tumor tissues by radiotherapy, chemotherapy and phototherapy. For improvement of tumor radiotherapy, we have proposed a series of radiation-activated prodrugs that could selectively release antitumor agent 5-fluorouracil or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine under hypoxic conditions. Recently, we attempted to develop two families of novel hypoxia-targeting antitumor agents, considering that tumor-hypoxic environment is favorable to biological and photochemical reductions. The first family of prodrugs was derived from camptothecin as a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor and several bioreductive motifs. These prodrugs could be activated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or DT-diaphorase to release free camptothecin, and thereby showed hypoxia-selective cytotoxictiy towards tumor cells. These prodrugs were also applicable to the real-time monitoring of activation and antitumor effect by fluorometry. Furthermore, the camptothecin-bioreductive motif conjugates was confirmed to show an oxygen-independent DAN photocleaving activity, which could overcome a drawback of back electron transfer occurring in the photosensitized one-electron oxidation of DNA. Thus, these camptothecin derivatives could be useful to both chemotherapy and phototherapy for hypoxic tumor cells. The second family of prodrugs harnessed UV light for cancer therapy, incorporating the antitumor agent 5-fluorourcil and the photolabile 2-nitrobenzyl chromophores. The attachment of a tumor-homing cyclic peptide CNGRC was also employed to construct the prototype of tumor-targeting photoactiaved antitumor prodrug. These novel prodrugs released high yield of 5-fluorourcil upon UV irradiation at λex=365 nm, while being quite stable in the dark. The photoactivation mechanism was also clarified by means of nanosecond laser flash photolysis. (authors)

  12. 2014 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 4,761 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 14,000 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 8,000 to 20,000) – an “average year”. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 50 km3 (95% credible interval, 20 to 77).

  13. 2013 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 7,316 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 18,900 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 13,400 to 24,200), the 7th largest reported and about the size of New Jersey. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 74.5 km3 (95% credible interval, 51.5 to 97.0), also the 7th largest on record.

  14. HypoxamiRs: regulators of cardiac hypoxia and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouzi, Hamid El; Leptidis, Stefanos; Doevendans, Pieter A; De Windt, Leon J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia and its intricate regulation are at the epicenter of cardiovascular research. Mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors as well as by several microRNAs, recently termed 'hypoxamiRs', hypoxia affects several cardiac pathophysiological processes. Hypoxia is the driving force behind the regulation of the characteristic metabolic switch from predominant fatty acid oxidation in the healthy heart to glucose utilization in the failing myocardium, but also instigates reactivation of the fetal gene program, induces the cardiac hypertrophy response, alters extracellular matrix composition, influences mitochondrial biogenesis, and impacts upon myocardial contractility. HypoxamiR regulation adds a new level of complexity to this multitude of hypoxia-mediated effects, rendering the understanding of the hypoxic response a fundamental piece in solving the cardiovascular disease puzzle. PMID:26197955

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Aspergillus fumigatus Rhomboid Family Putative Protease, RbdA, Involved in Hypoxia Sensing and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Yakir; Hillmann, Falk; Iannitti, Rossana; Ben Baruch, Netali; Sandovsky-Losica, Hana; Shadkchan, Yona; Romani, Luigina; Brakhage, Axel; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Osherov, Nir

    2016-06-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common pathogenic mold infecting humans and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. In invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, A. fumigatus spores are inhaled into the lungs, undergoing germination and invasive hyphal growth. The fungus occludes and disrupts the blood vessels, leading to hypoxia and eventual tissue necrosis. The ability of this mold to adapt to hypoxia is regulated in part by the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA and the DscA to DscD Golgi E3 ligase complex critical for SREBP activation by proteolytic cleavage. Loss of the genes encoding these proteins results in avirulence. To identify novel regulators of hypoxia sensing, we screened the Neurospora crassa gene deletion library under hypoxia and identified a novel rhomboid family protease essential for hypoxic growth. Deletion of the A. fumigatus rhomboid homolog rbdA resulted in an inability to grow under hypoxia, hypersensitivity to CoCl2, nikkomycin Z, fluconazole, and ferrozine, abnormal swollen tip morphology, and transcriptional dysregulation-accurately phenocopying deletion of srbA. In vivo, rbdA deletion resulted in increased sensitivity to phagocytic killing, a reduced inflammatory Th1 and Th17 response, and strongly attenuated virulence. Phenotypic rescue of the ΔrbdA mutant was achieved by expression and nuclear localization of the N terminus of SrbA, including its HLH domain, further indicating that RbdA and SrbA act in the same signaling pathway. In summary, we have identified RbdA, a novel putative rhomboid family protease in A. fumigatus that mediates hypoxia adaptation and fungal virulence and that is likely linked to SrbA cleavage and activation. PMID:27068092

  16. Hypoxia-inducible miR-210 regulates the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis by cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Buart, Stéphanie; Romero, Pedro; Ketari, Sami; Janji, Bassam; Mari, Bernard; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2012-09-15

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment plays a central role in the evolution of immune escape mechanisms by tumor cells. In this study, we report the definition of miR-210 as a miRNA regulated by hypoxia in lung cancer and melanoma, documenting its involvement in blunting the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). miR-210 was induced in hypoxic zones of human tumor tissues. Its attenuation in hypoxic cells significantly restored susceptibility to autologous CTL-mediated lysis, independent of tumor cell recognition and CTL reactivity. A comprehensive approach using transcriptome analysis, argonaute protein immunoprecipitation, and luciferase reporter assay revealed that the genes PTPN1, HOXA1, and TP53I11 were miR-210 target genes regulated in hypoxic cells. In support of their primary importance in mediating the immunosuppressive effects of miR-210, coordinate silencing of PTPN1, HOXA1, and TP53I11 dramatically decreased tumor cell susceptibility to CTL-mediated lysis. Our findings show how miR-210 induction links hypoxia to immune escape from CTL-mediated lysis, by providing a mechanistic understanding of how this miRNA mediates immunosuppression in oxygen-deprived regions of tumors where cancer stem-like cells and metastatic cellular behaviors are known to evolve. PMID:22962263

  17. PRDX2 and PRDX4 are negative regulators of hypoxia-inducible factors under conditions of prolonged hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weibo; Chen, Ivan; Chen, Yan; Alkam, Duah; Wang, Yingfei; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) control the transcription of genes that are crucial for the pathogenesis of cancer and other human diseases. The transcriptional activity of HIFs is rapidly increased upon exposure to hypoxia, but expression of some HIF target genes decreases during prolonged hypoxia. However, the underlying mechanism for feedback inhibition is not completely understood. Here, we report that peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2) and PRDX4 interact with HIF-1α and HIF-2α in vitro and in hypoxic HeLa cells. Prolonged hypoxia increases the nuclear translocation of PRDX2 and PRDX4. As a result, PRDX2 and PRDX4 impair HIF-1 and HIF-2 binding to the hypoxia response elements of a subset of HIF target genes, thereby inhibiting gene transcription in cells exposed to prolonged hypoxia. PRDX2 and PRDX4 have no effect on the recruitment of p300 and RNA polymerase II to HIF target genes and the enzymatic activity of PRDX2 and PRDX4 is not required for inhibition of HIF-1 and HIF-2. We also demonstrate that PRDX2 is a direct HIF target gene and that PRDX2 expression is induced by prolonged hypoxia. These findings uncover a novel feedback mechanism for inhibition of HIF transcriptional activity under conditions of prolonged hypoxia. PMID:26837221

  18. The usability of a 15-gene hypoxia classifier as a universal hypoxia profile in various cancer cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Knudsen, Anders Bisgård; Wittrup, Catja Foged;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A 15-gene hypoxia profile has previously demonstrated to have both prognostic and predictive impact for hypoxic modification in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. This gene expression profile may also have a prognostic value in other histological cancer types, and...... could potentially have a function as a universal hypoxia profile. The hypoxia induced upregulation of the included genes, and the validity of the previously used reference genes was established in this study, in a range of different cell lines representing carcinomas of the prostate, colon, and...... selected. In the analysis of the hypoxia induced genes, both the original reference genes and the new selected reference genes were used. There was no significant difference in the obtained data. The gene expression analysis demonstrated cell line specific differences in the hypoxia response of the 15...

  19. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  20. The effect of hypoxia on micronucleus expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for micronucleus (MN) induction in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells was determined. CHO cells were irradiated in air or after being made hypoxic by a combination of vacuum formation and 3 hours of metabolic O/sub 2/ depletion. Clonogenic assays show that this treatment results in an OER of 3.0 at doses above 200 rad. However, when MN were used as the endpoint, radiation doses of 25 to 600 rad resulted in a constant OER of 5.9, an unrealistically high value for cell survival. Hypoxia alone did not influence the cell cycle kinetics, which would change MN expression. To further examine this problem, analysis of anaphases from cells attempting their first division after irradiation revealed that the expected number of acentric chromosome fragments were produced in hypoxic cells (assuming an OER of 3.0). However, the proportion of lagging fragments was reduced form 77% when irradiated in air to 45% when irradiated under hypoxia; lagging chromosome fragments become MN. In addition, the number of chromosome bridges was increased in cells irradiated under hypoxic conditions

  1. Boron PLA for oxygen sensing & hypoxia imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Fraser

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is essential for many forms of life and its depletion in the body and the environment can lead to deleterious effects. Low oxygen conditions, even anoxia, are associated with eutrophication of lakes and rivers, wherein an over abundance of nutrients often caused by pollution result in excessive plant growth and decay, threatening water quality, ecosystem balance, and aquatic life. In the body, low oxygen conditions or hypoxia may be generalized, as can occur at high altitude or during strenuous exercise, or localized in particular tissues, when there is a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. Hypoxia is present in many important diseases as well. Low oxygen levels in tumors are often associated with biochemical changes, increased invasiveness, cancer progression, and resistance to radiation and chemotherapies. Vascular blockage in strokes, heart attacks, and peripheral artery disease, which is common in diabetes, are other situations where oxygen levels can drop precipitously and cause great damage to affected tissues. Clearly, innovative sensing technologies that provide new insight into these many oxygen dependent processes can impact global society in significant ways.

  2. Understanding and exploiting the genomic response to hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumor microenvironment influences both therapeutic outcome and malignant progression. Of the many factors that may be altered in the tumor microenvironment, changes in tumor oxygenation have been strongly associated with a lower probability of local tumor control and survival. In vitro studies indicate that cells exposed to a low oxygen environment exhibit multiple phenotypes, including cell-cycle arrest, increased expression of pro-angiogenic genes, increased invasive capacity, increased apoptosis, increased anaerobic metabolism and altered differentiation programs. While the mechanistic basis of hypoxia as an impediment to radiotherapy and chemotherapy is well understood, it is unclear what changes in the cellular phenotype are important in understanding how hypoxia modifies malignant progression. One insight into how hypoxia modulates malignant progression comes from understanding the critical transcriptional regulators of gene expression under hypoxic conditions such as hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) as well as changes in gene expression in untransformed and transformed cells. Overall, about 1.5% of the genome is found to be transcriptionally responsive to changes in oxygenation. Most importantly, the coordinated changes in gene expression under hypoxic conditions underscore the physiologic basis for altering gene expression in response to a low oxygen environment. In addition, some hypoxia-induced genes exhibit increased expression after reoxygenation, suggesting that they are regulated both by hypoxia and oxidative stress. Analysis of the genomic response to hypoxia has several therapeutic uses. First, it allows one to ask the question of what the cellular consequences are to inhibition of the transcriptional response to hypoxia such as by targeting the HIF-1 transcription factor. While the effect of loss of HIF-1 in tumors leads to inhibition of tumor growth, it does not eliminate tumors. In fact, studies indicate that inhibition of HIF-1 leads to a

  3. Ultrasonic Attenuation in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the relationship between Zircaloy-4 grain size and ultrasonic attenuation behavior was studied for longitudinal waves in the frequency range of 10-90 MHz. The attenuation was analyzed as a function of frequency for samples with different mechanical and heat treatments having recrystallized and Widmanstatten structures with different grain size. The attenuation behavior was analyzed by different scattering models, depending on grain size, wavelength and frequency

  4. Chopping-Wheel Optical Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    1988-01-01

    Star-shaped rotating chopping wheel provides adjustable time-averaged attenuation of narrow beam of light without changing length of optical path or spectral distribution of light. Duty cycle or attenuation factor of chopped beam controlled by adjusting radius at which beam intersects wheel. Attenuation factor independent of wavelength. Useful in systems in which chopping frequency above frequency-response limits of photodetectors receiving chopped light. Used in systems using synchronous detection with lock-in amplifiers.

  5. LINE-ABOVE-GROUND ATTENUATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilds, R.B.; Ames, J.R.

    1957-09-24

    The line-above-ground attenuator provides a continuously variable microwave attenuator for a coaxial line that is capable of high attenuation and low insertion loss. The device consists of a short section of the line-above- ground plane type transmission lime, a pair of identical rectangular slabs of lossy material like polytron, whose longitudinal axes are parallel to and indentically spaced away from either side of the line, and a geared mechanism to adjust amd maintain this spaced relationship. This device permits optimum fineness and accuracy of attenuator control which heretofore has been difficult to achieve.

  6. Effect of vitamin E on cerebral cortical oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression induced by hypoxia and exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; El Samanoudy, A Z

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the proliferation of neurons, and its expression increases significantly with exercise. We aimed to investigate the effects of chronic exercise (swimming) and sustained hypoxia on cortical BDNF expression in both the presence and absence of vitamin E. Sixty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two equal groups; a normoxic group and a hypoxic group. Both groups were equally subdivided into four subgroups: sedentary, sedentary with vitamin E, chronic exercise either with or without vitamin E supplementation. Arterial PO(2), and the levels of cortical malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidants (reduced glutathione GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and vitamin E) and BDNF gene expression were investigated. Hypoxia significantly increased MDA production and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants compared to control rats. Chronic exercise in hypoxic and normoxic rats increased MDA level and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants. Providing vitamin E supplementation to the hypoxic and normoxic rats significantly reduced MDA and BDNF gene expression and increased antioxidants. We conclude that sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise increased BDNF gene expression and induced oxidative stress. Moreover, vitamin E attenuated the oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression in sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise which confirms the oxidative stress-induced stimulation of BDNF gene expression. PMID:25903950

  7. Response of endothelial cells and pericytes to hypoxia and erythropoietin in a co-culture assay dedicated to soft tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gerrit; Bubel, Monika; Pohlemann, Tim; Oberringer, Martin

    2015-09-01

    The increasing mean life expectancy of the citizens of the western world countries leads to an increase of the age-related diseases, among them soft tissue defects exhibiting inadequate healing. In order to develop new therapeutic strategies to support disturbed soft tissue repair, there is a strong need of sophisticated in vitro assays. A new assay combining scratch wounding with co-cultures of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) and pericytes (HPC) focuses on basic characteristics of cell interaction against the background of soft tissue repair. The cell parameters proliferation, migration and differentiation, and the release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were analysed in response to hypoxia (pO2 culture led to a weakened proliferation of both cell types, an increase of the percentage of myofibroblast-like pericytes and to a higher release of MCP-1. Hypoxia caused a proliferation decrease of HPC in co-culture, which was slightly attenuated by EPO. Hypoxia also reduced the MCP-1 release of co-cultured cells, when EPO had been added. In addition, EPO had a rather positive effect on HPC migration under hypoxia. These in vitro results allow new insights into the interaction of pericytes with endothelial cells in the context of soft tissue repair. PMID:26026617

  8. Snail1 Mediates Hypoxia-Induced Melanoma Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujing; Kumar, Suresh M.; Martin, James S.; Yang, Ruifeng; Xu, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a known adverse prognostic factor, and the hypoxic dermal microenvironment participates in melanomagenesis. High levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) expression in melanoma cells, particularly HIF-2α, is associated with poor prognosis. The mechanism underlying the effect of hypoxia on melanoma progression, however, is not fully understood. We report evidence that the effects of hypoxia on melanoma cells are mediated through activation of Snail1. Hypoxia increased melanoma cell migration and drug resistance, and these changes were accompanied by increased Snail1 and decreased E-cadherin expression. Snail1 expression was regulated by HIF-2α in melanoma. Snail1 overexpression led to more aggressive tumor phenotypes and features associated with stem-like melanoma cells in vitro and increased metastatic capacity in vivo. In addition, we found that knockdown of endogenous Snail1 reduced melanoma proliferation and migratory capacity. Snail1 knockdown also prevented melanoma metastasis in vivo. In summary, hypoxia up-regulates Snail1 expression and leads to increased metastatic capacity and drug resistance in melanoma cells. Our findings support that the effects of hypoxia on melanoma are mediated through Snail1 gene activation and suggest that Snail1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:21996677

  9. Evolutionary Genetics of Hypoxia Tolerance in Cetaceans during Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Wang, Zhengfei; Niu, Xu; Zhou, Kaiya; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia was a major challenge faced by cetaceans during the course of secondary aquatic adaptation. Although physiological traits of hypoxia tolerance in cetaceans have been well characterized, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the sequences of 17 hypoxia-tolerance-related genes in representative cetaceans to provide a comprehensive insight into the genetic basis of hypoxia tolerance in these animals. Genes involved in carrying and transporting oxygen in the blood and muscle (hemoglobin-α and β, myoglobin), and genes involved in the regulation of vasoconstriction (endothelin-1, -2, and -3; endothelin receptor type A and B; adrenergic receptor α-1D; and arginine vasopressin) appear to have undergone adaptive evolution, evidence for positive selection on their particular sites, and radical physiochemical property changes of selected condons. Interestingly, "long-diving" cetaceans had relatively higher ω (dN/dS) values than "short-diving" cetaceans for the hemoglobin β gene, indicating divergent selective pressure presented in cetacean lineages with different diving abilities. Additionally, parallel positive selection or amino acid changes (ADRA1D: P50A, A53G,AVPR1B: I/V270T) among animals exposed to different hypoxia habitats reflect functional convergence or similar genetic mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance. In summary, positive selection, divergent selective pressures, and parallel evolution at the molecular level provided some new insights into the genetic adaptation of hypoxia tolerance. PMID:26912402

  10. Reassessing hypoxia forecasts for the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Donnelly, Kristina A

    2007-12-01

    Gulf of Mexico hypoxia has received considerable scientific and policy attention because of its potential ecological and economic impacts and implications for agriculture within its massive watershed. A 2000 assessment concluded that increased nitrate load to the Gulf since the 1950s was the primary cause of large-scale hypoxia areas. More recently, models have suggested that large-scale hypoxia did not start untilthe mid-1970s, and that a 40-45% nitrogen load reduction may be needed to reach the hypoxia area goal of the Hypoxia Action Plan. Recently, USGS revised nutrient load estimates to the Gulf, and the Action Plan reassessment has questioned the role of phosphorus versus nitrogen in controlling hypoxia. In this paper, we re-evaluate model simulations, hindcasts, and forecasts using revised nitrogen loads, and testthe ability of a phosphorus-driven version of the model to reproduce hypoxia trends. Our analysis suggests that, if phosphorus is limiting now, it became so because of relative increases in nitrogen loads during the 1970s and 1980s. While our model suggests nitrogen load reductions of 37-45% or phosphorus load reductions of 40-50% below the 1980-1996 average are needed, we caution that a phosphorus-only strategy is potentially dangerous, and suggest it would be prudent to reduce both. PMID:18186345

  11. Hematological and Biochemical Responses of the Flowerhorn Fish to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakanit Kupittayanant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological and biochemical responses of the flowerhorn fish (Amphilophus trimaculatus x Amphilophus citrinelllus x Vieja synspilum and their surviving strategies to hypoxia were investigated. Male and female flowerhorn fish were divided into five groups. Each group contained tree replications of five groups and was exposed to hypoxia by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen for 12, 24 and 48 h, respectively. Blood sample was collected from the caudal vein and physiological-biochemical blood parameters analyzed. The results showed that hypoxia caused a significant increase in ventilation rate. Hematological parameters including red blood cell count, white blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were significantly increased in fish exposed to hypoxia whereas mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration remained the same. In addition, hypoxia caused significant increases in serum glucose, alanine amino-transferase, aspartate amino-transferase, creatine kinase and blood urea nitrogen. However, cholesterol and creatinine were significantly decreased. The effects of hypoxia on those parameters occurred in a time dependent manner. Changes in hematological parameters fully recovered after 1 week oxygen replenishment whereas biochemical parameters slowly returned to control levels. These suggest that acute hypoxia in the flowerhorn fish up to 48 h can affect physiology functions as indicated by changes in hematological and biological parameters. Alteration of most physiological functions can be restored by repayment of oxygen debt. The results also suggest that the flowerhorn fish coped with hypoxic condition by using both energy saving strategies and by attempting to increase the oxygen extraction capacity.

  12. Technetium-99m Labelled Molecules for Hypoxia Imaging. Chapter 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of diagnostic imaging, the concept of imaging hypoxia constitutes an important development and 99mTc labelled vectors have taken a long stride in this direction. Delineation of hypoxic cells amidst oxygenated cells has a strong bearing on treatment strategies and regimes, since hypoxic cells are normally resistant to therapy, thus having a direct influence on the extent of tumour propagation and malignant progression. Inherent drawbacks in the invasive methods currently available for measuring hypoxia led to the development of non-invasive modalities such as use of radiolabelled molecules for imaging hypoxia. In the chapter, an attempt is made to provide a comprehensive overview of 99mTc based radiopharmaceutical agents as well as a brief discussion of other radiolabelled agents that show considerable promise in diagnostic imaging of tumour hypoxia. The review also discusses the phenomenon of hypoxia, other non-invasive methods of detecting hypoxia currently available and the evolution of radiopharmaceuticals to image hypoxia. (author)

  13. Ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia occurs in serotonin-depleted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, E B

    1987-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that serotonin mediated respiratory activity is involved in ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia, rats were treated with parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a potent, long-acting inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin. In normoxia, a single, intraperitoneal injection of 300 mg PCPA/kg body weight decreased the Paco2 from a control level at 39.1 +/- 0.6 Torr (mean +/- 95% confidence limits) to 34.0 +/- 0.6 Torr measured during a period from 1 to 48 h following PCPA treatment. This PCPA-produced hyperventilation corresponds to an increase of 3.7 +/- 0.5 in the VA (BTPS)/Vco2 (STPD) ratio. Hyperventilation during ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia (PIO2 approximately equal to 90 Torr) was superimposed in an additive fashion on the underlying hyperventilation due to PCPA pretreatment. Specifically, PCPA pretreatment caused an average 3.5 +/- 1.2 increase in the VA/VCO2 ratio determined in acute (1 h) hypoxia, chronic (24 h) hypoxia and acute return to normoxia following chronic hypoxia. Since ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia occurred in rats treated with PCPA, the prolonged, serotonin mediated respiratory activity described by Millhorn et al. (1980b) is probably not important in ventilatory acclimatization to - or deacclimatization from - hypoxia. PMID:2957766

  14. Regulation of CREB by moderate hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which excitable cells adapt and respond to changes in O2 levels remain largely unknown. We have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. PC12 cells were exposed to moderate levels of hypoxia (5% O2) for various times between 20 min and 6 hr. We found that hypoxia rapidly and persistently induced ser133 phosphorylation of CREB. This effect was more robust than that produced by exposing PC12 cells to either forskolin, KCl, or NGF. This effect was not due to activation of any of the previously known CREB kinases, including PKA, CaMK, PKC, p70s6k, or MAPKAP kinase-2. Thus, hypoxia may induce activation of a novel CREB kinase. To test whether phosphorylation of CREB was associated with an activation of CRE-dependent gene expression, cells were transfected with wild type and mutated regions of the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene fused to a CAT reporter gene. Mutation of the CRE element in a TH reporter gene reduced, but did not abolish, the effects of hypoxia on TH gene expression. However, hypoxia did not induce transactivation of a GAL4-luciferase reporter by a GAL4-CREB fusion protein. Thus, the mechanism by which hypoxia regulates CREB is distinct, and more complex, than that induced by forskolin, depolarization, or nerve growth factor. PMID:10849656

  15. Interactions of adenosine, prostaglandins and nitric oxide in hypoxia-induced vasodilatation: in vivo and in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Clare J; Abbas, Mark R; Coney, Andrew M; Marshall, Janice M

    2002-01-01

    Adenosine, prostaglandins (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) have all been implicated in hypoxia-evoked vasodilatation. We investigated whether their actions are interdependent. In anaesthetised rats, the PG synthesis inhibitors diclofenac or indomethacin reduced muscle vasodilatation evoked by systemic hypoxia or adenosine, but not that evoked by iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin (PGI2), or by an NO donor. After diclofenac, the A1 receptor agonist CCPA evoked no vasodilatation: we previously showed that A1, but not A2A, receptors mediate the hypoxia-induced muscle vasodilatation. Further, in freshly excised rat aorta, adenosine evoked a release of NO, detected with an NO-sensitive electrode, that was abolished by NO synthesis inhibition, or endothelium removal, and reduced by ≈50 % by the A1 antagonist DPCPX, the remainder being attenuated by the A2A antagonist ZM241385. Diclofenac reduced adenosine-evoked NO release by ≈50 % under control conditions, abolished that evoked in the presence of ZM241385, but did not affect that evoked in the presence of DPCPX. Adenosine-evoked NO release was also abolished by the adenyl cyclase inhibitor 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine, while dose-dependent NO release was evoked by iloprost. Finally, stimulation of A1, but not A2A, receptors caused a release of PGI2 from rat aorta, assessed by radioimmunoassay of its stable metabolite, 6-keto PGF1α, that was abolished by diclofenac. These results suggest that during systemic hypoxia, adenosine acts on endothelial A1 receptors to increase PG synthesis, thereby generating cAMP, which increases the synthesis and release of NO and causes muscle vasodilatation. This pathway may be important in other situations involving these autocoids. PMID:12356892

  16. The radiation response of cells recovering after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to study the influence of hypoxic pretreatment on the radiation response of A431 human squamous carcinoma cells. Reaeration for 10 min after chronic hypoxia (greater than 2 h) was found to enhance the radiosensitivity of A431 cells, and the maximal effect was seen for those cells reaerated after 12 h of hypoxia. The radiosensitivity enhancement for reaerated cells after 12 h of hypoxia was maximized by 5 min after the return to aerobic conditions and reached the control level by 12 h of reaeration. This enhanced radiosensitive state was characterized by a reduced shoulder region and increased slope of the radiation dose-response curve for cells in both the exponential and plateau phases of growth. There was a slight increase in the number of G1 and decrease in the number of S and G2 + M cells for both exponential- and plateau-phase cultures following 12 h hypoxic treatment. Although growth inhibition induced by 12 h of hypoxia was seen for cells in the exponential phase, there was no cell number change in the plateau-phase culture after hypoxia. Plating efficiency (PE) of cells in both growth phases was reduced by 30% after hypoxia. Furthermore, in the exponential-phase culture, the extent of reduction in PE after hypoxia was similar among cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Although S-phase cells in exponentially growing cultures were relatively more resistant to radiation than G1 and G2 + M cells, the cell age-response pattern was the same whether the cells had been aerobic or hypoxic before reaeration and irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement ratio associated with reaeration after 12 h of hypoxia for these three subpopulations of cells was 1.3. Our results indicate that the increase in radiosensitivity due to reaeration after chronic hypoxia is unlikely to be related to the changes of cell cycle stage and growth phase during hypoxic treatment

  17. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen

    2015-12-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-α), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  18. Growth Inhibition and Compensation in Response to Neonatal Hypoxia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Nance, Dwight M.; Haddad, Fadia; COOPER, DAN M.; Adams, Gregory R

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypoxia is an important disease mechanism in prematurity, childhood asthma and obesity. In children, hypoxia results in chronic inflammation. Methods We investigated the effects of hypoxia (Hx) (12% O2) during postnatal day 2 to 20 in rats. Control groups were normoxic (Nc), and normoxic growth restricted (14 pup liters) (Gr). Results Hypoxia decreased growth similar Gr. Hx increased plasma TNFα and IL-6 and decreased IGF-I and VEGF. Hypoxia resulted in right ventricular (RV) hyper...

  19. Growth Inhibition and Compensation in Response to Neonatal Hypoxia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Nance, Dwight M.; Haddad, Fadia; COOPER, DAN M.; Adams, Gregory R

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundHypoxia is an important disease mechanism in prematurity, childhood asthma and obesity. In children, hypoxia results in chronic inflammation.MethodsWe investigated the effects of hypoxia (Hx) (12% O2) during postnatal day 2 to 20 in rats. Control groups were normoxic (Nc), and normoxic growth restricted (14 pup liters) (Gr).ResultsHypoxia decreased growth similar Gr. Hx increased plasma TNFα and IL-6 and decreased IGF-I and VEGF. Hypoxia resulted in right ventricular (RV) hypertroph...

  20. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Three Tumor Cell Lines Subjected to Experimental Cycling and Chronic Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Olbryt, Magdalena; Habryka, Anna; Student, Sebastian; Jarząb, Michał; Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Lisowska, Katarzyna Marta

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is one of the most important features of the tumor microenvironment, exerting an adverse effect on tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. Two types of hypoxia may occur within the tumor mass, chronic (prolonged) and cycling (transient, intermittent) hypoxia. Cycling hypoxia has been shown to induce aggressive tumor cell phenotype and radioresistance more significantly than chronic hypoxia, though little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The aim o...

  1. Fiber optic attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  2. Comparative aspects of hypoxia tolerance of the ectothermic vertebrate heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gesser, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    This chapter reviews cardiac contractile performance and its regulation during hypoxia/anoxia with regard to cellular metabolism and energy state, in particular hypoxia-tolerant ectothermic vertebrates. Overall the contractile performance of the hypoxic isolated heart muscle varies in a way that...... relates to the occurrence of hypoxia/anoxia in the natural life of the animal. The hypoxic/anoxic performance of the heart muscle correlates positively with the glycolytic capacity relative to the aerobic capacity, and this performance also tends to be high in hearts having a low aerobic or maximal...

  3. Modulation of human sinus node function by systemic hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.; Bastow, H., III; Scruby, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether bradycardia develops during systemic hypoxia in supine conscious human volunteers when respiratory frequency and tidal volume are maintained at constant levels. The obtained results suggest that mild hypoxia provokes cardioacceleration in humans, independent of changes of ventilation or baroreflex responsiveness. The earliest cardioacceleration is more prominent in the inspiratory than in the expiratory phase of respiration, and occurs with very small reductions of arterial oxygen saturation. Moderate systemic hypoxia dampens fluctuations of heart rate during the respiratory cycle.

  4. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters ventilatory and metabolic responses to acute hypoxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M

    2016-05-15

    We determined the effects of chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on chemoreflex control of ventilation in conscious animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH [nadir oxygen saturation (SpO2), 75%; 15 events/h; 10 h/day] or normoxia (NORM) for 21 days. We assessed the following responses to acute, graded hypoxia before and after exposures: ventilation (V̇e, via barometric plethysmography), V̇o2 and V̇co2 (analysis of expired air), heart rate (HR), and SpO2 (pulse oximetry via neck collar). We quantified hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity by calculating the stimulus-response relationship between SpO2 and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (linear regression). An additional aim was to determine whether CIH causes proliferation of carotid body glomus cells (using bromodeoxyuridine). CIH exposure increased the slope of the V̇e/V̇co2/SpO2 relationship and caused hyperventilation in normoxia. Bromodeoxyuridine staining was comparable in CIH and NORM. Thus our CIH paradigm augmented hypoxic chemosensitivity without causing glomus cell proliferation. PMID:26917692

  5. [Interaction of hypoxia and haemostasis--hypoxia as a prothrombotic factor at high altitude?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Georg; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2005-04-01

    For an extended period of time various research projects have been conducted on the relationship of hypoxia and haemostasis. The enclosed article contains the conclusion to which extent lack of oxygen can activate the coagulation system and induce a prothrombotic state. The majority of studies proved a shortening of coagulation times during acute exposure to hypoxia, whereas activated parameters of coagulation and fibrinolysis like prothrombin fragment F1+2 as well as thrombin-antithrombin III complexes and D-dimer remained mostly unmodified. It is suggested that a prolonged sojourn at high altitudes could lead to activation of the coagulation system through an increase of haematocrit and blood viscosity. Recently it was proven that people living at high altitudes show an enhanced risk of stroke incidents. The significance of the change in haemostasis on that outcome has not yet been part of the research. However, it has been proven that the activity of the coagulation system does not play a pathophysiological part in the development of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary edema. Recent studies also demonstrated that moderate hypoxia during long haul flights may not be the main trigger in inducing deep vein thrombosis in passengers. PMID:15966261

  6. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  7. Mitochondrial physiology and reactive oxygen species production are altered by hypoxia acclimation in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Sherry N N; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Borowiec, Brittney G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-04-15

    Many fish encounter hypoxia in their native environment, but the role of mitochondrial physiology in hypoxia acclimation and hypoxia tolerance is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of hypoxia acclimation on mitochondrial respiration, O2kinetics, emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant capacity in the estuarine killifish ( ITALIC! Fundulus heteroclitus). Killifish were acclimated to normoxia, constant hypoxia (5 kPa O2) or intermittent diel cycles of nocturnal hypoxia (12 h:12 h normoxia:hypoxia) for 28-33 days and mitochondria were isolated from liver. Neither pattern of hypoxia acclimation affected the respiratory capacities for oxidative phosphorylation or electron transport, leak respiration, coupling control or phosphorylation efficiency. Hypoxia acclimation also had no effect on mitochondrial O2kinetics, but ITALIC! P50(the O2tension at which hypoxia inhibits respiration by 50%) was lower in the leak state than during maximal respiration, and killifish mitochondria endured anoxia-reoxygenation without any impact on mitochondrial respiration. However, both patterns of hypoxia acclimation reduced the rate of ROS emission from mitochondria when compared at a common O2tension. Hypoxia acclimation also increased the levels of protein carbonyls and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver tissue (the latter only occurred in constant hypoxia). Our results suggest that hypoxia acclimation is associated with changes in mitochondrial physiology that decrease ROS production and may help improve hypoxia tolerance. PMID:26896545

  8. Adjustable Optical-Fiber Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, Mike F.

    1994-01-01

    Adjustable fiber-optic attenuator utilizes bending loss to reduce strength of light transmitted along it. Attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss. Relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Potential applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal-distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  9. Hypoxia in models of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Edward E; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study, we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer to...... establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ or......H2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. RESULTS: Minimal fluoroazomycin arabinoside and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, whereas subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping...

  10. Modulation of hydrogen sulfide by vascular hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmond JM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jessica M Osmond, Nancy L KanagyVascular Physiology Group, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USAAbstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has emerged as a key regulator of cardiovascular function. This gasotransmitter is produced in the vasculature and is involved in numerous processes that promote vascular homeostasis, including vasodilation and endothelial cell proliferation. Although H2S plays a role under physiological conditions, it has become clear in recent years that hypoxia modulates the production and action of H2S. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that H2S is cytoprotective in the face of hypoxic insults. This review focuses on the synthesis and signaling of H2S in hypoxic conditions in the vasculature, and highlights recent studies providing evidence that H2S is a potential therapy for preventing tissue damage in hypoxic conditions.Keywords: H2S, cystathionine γ-lyase, vascular smooth muscle, endothelium

  11. Hypoxia-Specific Cytotoxins in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown; Siim

    1996-01-01

    Hypoxic-specific cytotoxins are a new, and as yet clinically untested, mode of treatment of solid tumors. If they can be given at high enough concentrations and sufficiently often, they should prove extremely effective both in combination with standard radiotherapy and also with certain chemotherapeutic drugs. It is likely that their optimum use will turn hypoxic cells in solid tumors from a therapeutic disadvantage to an advantage. In this report, we review the rationale for the use of hypoxia- cytotoxins, including both the theoretical basis for combining them with fractionated radiation and the preclinical results that have been obtained to date combing these agents with fractionated radiation. We also discuss the three major classes of bioreductive drugs, including the quinones (mitomycin C, porfiromycin, and E09), notroaromatic compounds (including RB6145 and various deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] targeted aromatics), and finally the n-oxides of which tirapazamine is the lead compound. We also briefly discuss new approaches to bioreductive drug development. The best ways to use these agents are also covered. These include using them in combination with radiation, in combination with chemotherapy, and in combination with agents that increase tumor hypoxia. Finally, the importance of the selection of patients for clinical trials is illustrated by showing how dramatically the number of patients for clinical trials is illustrated by showing how dramatically the number of patients in a clinical trial has to increase to obtain statistical significance for a procedure targeted towards hypoxic cells if some of the patients in the trials have well-oxygenated tumors. PMID:10717159

  12. Metabolic effects of intermittent hypoxia in mice: steady versus high-frequency applied hypoxia daily during the rest period

    OpenAIRE

    Carreras, Alba; Kayali, Foaz; Zhang, Jing; Hirotsu, Camila; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a frequent occurrence in sleep and respiratory disorders. Both human and murine studies show that IH may be implicated in metabolic dysfunction. Although the effects of nocturnal low-frequency intermittent hypoxia (IHL) have not been extensively examined, it would appear that IHL and high-frequency intermittent hypoxia (IHH) may elicit distinct metabolic adaptations. To this effect, C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to IHH (cycles of 90 s 6.4% O2 and 90 s 21% O...

  13. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York (United States); Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Serganova, Inna [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the {sup 124}I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 124}I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped {sup 124}I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of {sup 124}I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that {sup 124}I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future

  14. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the 124I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (124I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped 124I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of 124I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that 124I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of 124I-FIAU and 18F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between 124I-FIAU and 18F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia. (orig.)

  15. The Effect of Prenatal Hypoxia on Brain Development: Short- and Long-Term Consequences Demonstrated in Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Hava; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    Hypoxia (H) and hypoxia-ischemia (HI) are major causes of foetal brain damage with long-lasting behavioral implications. The effect of hypoxia has been widely studied in human and a variety of animal models. In the present review, we summarize the latest studies testing the behavioral outcomes following prenatal hypoxia/hypoxia-ischemia in rodent…

  16. An insight into tumoral hypoxia: the radiomarkers and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Abrantes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral hypoxia is related to severe structural abnormalities of tumor microvessels, leading to deteriorated O2 diffusion. This decreased O2 concentration in cancer cells compromises cellular functions, besides being responsible for resistance to radiation therapy. Consequently, it is very important to know the hypoxic status of a tumor. In this review, the different methodologies available for evaluating cellular hypoxia in vivo are discussed, particularly those in which the hypoxia information is obtained through imaging. Among these the nuclear medicine approach uses ligands to complex with radionuclides. The resulting radioactive complexes which may be single photon or positron emitters, are very useful as imaging probes. The nature of ligands and their corresponding complexes, with application or potential application as hypoxia detectors, will be described. A summary of the most significant results so far obtained in clinical or preclinical applications will also be discussed.

  17. Local tissue hypoxia and formation of nasal polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜舒; 董震; 朱冬冬; 杨占泉

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the response of nasal mucosa epithelial cells to hypoxia in terms of formation of nasal polyps (NP). Methods Epithelial cells of NP and inferior turbinate (IT) were cultured serum-fr ee under normal oxygen and hypoxic circumstances with stimulation of IL-1β and TNFα. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)mRNA and VEGF protein leve ls of the cultured cells were detected using in situ hybridization and ELISA, re spectively. Results The expression of VEGF mRNA was significantly higher in epithelial cells of NP t han in IT exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines or hypoxia (P<0.01). VEGF levels were higher in NP epithelial cells than those of IT (P<0.01) under hypoxia.Conclusion VEGF-induced by hypoxia is very important for the early stages of forming polyps.

  18. ROE Long Island Sound Hypoxia Data Web Service 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point data of collection sites overlayed on raster of hypoxia water data. The raster is broken out into 5 color-coded categories of oxygen level. This map is an...

  19. 2011 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  20. 2012 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  1. Lysyl oxidase is essential for hypoxia-induced metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Bennewith, Kevin L; Nicolau, Monica;

    2006-01-01

    Metastasis is a multistep process responsible for most cancer deaths, and it can be influenced by both the immediate microenvironment (cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions) and the extended tumour microenvironment (for example vascularization). Hypoxia (low oxygen) is clinically associated with...... role in tumorigenesis seems dependent on cellular location, cell type and transformation status. Here we show that LOX expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and is associated with hypoxia in human breast and head and neck tumours. Patients with high LOX-expressing tumours have poor...... adhesion. Furthermore, LOX may be required to create a niche permissive for metastatic growth. Our findings indicate that LOX is essential for hypoxia-induced metastasis and is a good therapeutic target for preventing and treating metastases....

  2. 2010 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  3. 2008 (Summer) Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  4. 2009 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  5. Exercise performed at hypoxia influences mood state and anxiety symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernando Tavares de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During hypoxia conditions, psychological states can be worsened. However, little information is available regarding the effect of physical exercise performed in hypoxia conditions on mood state and anxiety symptoms. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the acute effect of moderate physical exercise performed at hypoxia on mood states and anxiety symptoms in healthy young subjects. Ten volunteers were subjected to the following conditions: a normoxic condition (NC and a hypoxic condition (HC. They performed 45 min of physical exercise. Their anxiety symptoms and mood states were evaluated at the initial time point as well as immediately following and 30 and 60 min after the exercise session. Our results showed a significant increase in post-exercise anxiety symptoms and a significant decrease in mood scores immediately after and 30 min after exercise performed in the HC. Moderate physical activity performed at hypoxia condition increased post-exercise anxiety and worsened mood state.

  6. 2013 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  7. 2015 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  8. 2014 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  9. 2008 Fall Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  10. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem eCHOUAIB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides as potential targets, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection and contains many overlapping mechanisms to evade antigen specific immunotherapy. Obviously, tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival and metastasis. Among the hypoxia-induced genes, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. In this regard, hypoxia is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Feng, Xuebing; Li, Xia; Wang, Dandan; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune disorders are a complicated and varied group of diseases arising from inappropriate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that ongoing inflammatory and immune responses are associated with increased oxygen consumption, a process resulting in localized tissue hypoxia within inflammatory lesions ("inflammatory hypoxia"), in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor that allows adaptation to hypoxia environments, has been shown to play an important function. HIF-1 is a regulator of angiogenesis and immune system. Besides, HIF-1-mediated metabolic shift and fibrosis may also play crucial roles in some autoimmune disorders. Firstly, we briefly summarize the role of HIF-1 in angiogenesis, immune responses and fibrosis. Secondly, we will show the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF-1 signaling in autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The growing evidences may prompt HIF-1 to be a new target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27071377

  12. Distribution of hypoxia and pycnocline off the Changjiang Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianrong; Zhu, Zhuoyi; Lin, Jun; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of hypoxia and the pycnocline off the Changjiang Estuary were investigated by making several field observations from June 2 to 11, from July 18 to 23, from August 20 to 30, from October 3 to 13, 2006, and from August 27 to September 3, 2009. The observations from July 18 to 23, 2006, mainly focused on analyzing the relationship between hypoxia and the extension of the river plume and vertical stratification. In July, the Changjiang diluted water (CDW) was influenced by the easterly typhoon winds, causing it to extend northward rather than northeastward. By using the maximum vertical density gradient as a stratification intensity index, we found that the area of low ( 2.0 kg/m4), which indicated that the summer pycnocline can effectively block vertical DO exchange and maintain hypoxia near the bottom. The observed hypoxic area was 500 km2, which was much smaller than the hypoxic areas observed in previous studies, and occurred because of the enhanced mixing that resulted from Typhoon Bill. During the observation period of August 20-30, 2006, the maximum density gradient was weaker due to distinct low river discharge. No hypoxia was observed in the eastern and southeastern sea off the Changjiang Estuary where hypoxia often occurs. However, hypoxia occurred over a large area of 15,400 km2 in the northern observation domain where hypoxia rarely occurs. During June 2-11 and October 3-13, 2006, the maximum density gradient was weaker, and the area with low DO was smaller than in July 2006. This finding resulted from relatively low river discharge and weaker solar heating. Consequently, no hypoxia occurred in the bottom layer. The area of low DO was similar to that of the maximum vertical density gradient. From August 27 to September 3, 2009, high river discharge and strong solar heating produced a larger and more intense pycnocline. The hypoxic area reached 3735 km2 and was very similar to the area of the pycnocline, which was greater than 3.0 kg/m4

  13. Nutrients, hypoxia and mass fishkill events in Tapi estuary, India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ram, A.; JiyalalRam, M.J.; Rokade, M.A.; Bharti, S.; Vishwasrao, C.; Majithiya, D.

    and ultimately dead zones in the estuary. Fish mortality caused by natural and anthropogenic hypoxia has been reported in several coastal and estuarine waters and bays since 1900 (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008; Broszeit et al., 2013). Depending on the fish species..., or approximately 30% saturation) is emerging as a major threat to coastal ecosystems globally. More than 600 coastal and estuarine sites globally have developed hypoxia (Nixon, 2009; Diaz et al., 2010; Conley et al., 2011) which is an increase of approximately 5...

  14. Management of renal dysfunction following term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, Deirdre U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury frequently develops following the term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia. Quantifying the degree of acute kidney injury is difficult, however, as the methods currently in use are suboptimal. Acute kidney injury management is largely supportive with little evidence basis for many interventions. This review discusses management strategies and novel biomarkers that may improve diagnosis and management of renal injury following perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

  15. Respiratory responses of diabetics to hypoxia, hypercapnia, and exercise.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J G; Morris, A I; Hayter, R C; Ogilvie, C M

    1984-01-01

    The respiratory responses of 52 diabetics and 65 non-diabetic controls to hypoxia, hypercapnia, and exercise were studied. Twenty five per cent of the diabetics had evidence of impaired sensitivity to hypoxia or decreased ventilatory response to hypercapnia, while 7% of the diabetics who performed the exercise tests had an abnormal pattern of respiration during exercise; 33% of the diabetics who performed all three tests of respiratory reflex action had at least one abnormal test response. Th...

  16. Hypoxia refines plasticity of mitochondrial respiration to repeated muscle work

    OpenAIRE

    Desplanches, Dominique; Amami, Myriam; Dupré-Aucouturier, Sylvie; Valdivieso, Paola; Schmutz, Silvia; Mueller, Matthias; Hoppeler, Hans; Kreis, Roland; Flück, Martin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We explored whether altered expression of factors tuning mitochondrial metabolism contributes to muscular adaptations with endurance training in the condition of lowered ambient oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and whether these adaptations relate to oxygen transfer as reflected by subsarcolemmal mitochondria and oxygen metabolism in muscle. METHODS: Male volunteers completed 30 bicycle exercise sessions in normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (4,000 m above sea level) at 65 % of the resp...

  17. Hypoxia refines plasticity of mitochondrial respiration to repeated muscle work.

    OpenAIRE

    Desplanches, Dominique; Amami, Myriam; Dupré-Aucouturier, Sylvie; Valdivieso, Paola; Schmutz, Silvia; Müller, Matthias; Hoppeler, Hans-Heinrich; Kreis, Roland; Flück, Martin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We explored whether altered expression of factors tuning mitochondrial metabolism contributes to muscular adaptations with endurance training in the condition of lowered ambient oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and whether these adaptations relate to oxygen transfer as reflected by subsarcolemmal mitochondria and oxygen metabolism in muscle. METHODS Male volunteers completed 30 bicycle exercise sessions in normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (4,000 m above sea level) at 65% of th...

  18. ANTIANGIOGENESIS STRATEGIES REVISITED: FROM STARVING TUMORS TO ALLEVIATING HYPOXIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Ten antiangiogenic drugs targeting VEGF or its receptors are approved for cancer treatment. However, these agents, intended to block tumors’ blood supply, may cause hypoxia, which may fuel tumor progression and treatment resistance. Emerging clinical data suggest that patients whose tumor perfusion or oxygenation increases in response to these agents may actually survive longer. Hence, strategies aimed at alleviating tumor hypoxia while improving perfusion may enhance the outcome of radiother...

  19. International hypoxia symposium XVIII: 26 February–02 March 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Pun, Matiram; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-01-01

    The 18th International Hypoxia Symposia, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada, February 26–March 02, 2013, covered molecular basis of hypoxic responses (e.g., hypoxia inducible factor, nitrite, nitrate, and hemoglobin) and integrative physiology (e.g., exercise physiology, cerebral blood flow responses, live-high train-low, and population genetics). Free communications and poster sessions covered scientific areas from controlled lab settings to field settings of high altitudes (Andes to Himalayas).

  20. Determinants of maximal oxygen uptake in severe acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Rådegran, G;

    2003-01-01

    level). With hypoxia, exercise PaO2 dropped to 31-34 mmHg and arterial O2 content (CaO2) was reduced by 35% (P <0.001). Forty-one percent of the reduction in CaO2 was explained by the lower inspired O2 pressure (PiO2) in hypoxia, whereas the rest was due to the impairment of the pulmonary gas exchange...

  1. Increased hemoglobin O2 affinity protects during acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Ozlem; Cabrales, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxia requires time to complete the adaptation mechanisms that influence oxygen (O(2)) transport and O(2) utilization. Although decreasing hemoglobin (Hb) O(2) affinity would favor the release of O(2) to the tissues, increasing Hb O(2) affinity would augment arterial O(2) saturation during hypoxia. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pharmacologically increasing the Hb O(2) affinity will augment O(2) transport during severe hypoxia (10 and 5% inspired O(2)) compared with normal Hb O(2) affinity. RBC Hb O(2) affinity was increased by infusion of 20 mg/kg of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF). Control animals received only the vehicle. The effects of increasing Hb O(2) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model, in terms of systemic and microvascular hemodynamics and partial pressures of O(2) (Po(2)). Pimonidazole binding to hypoxic areas of mice heart and brain was also studied. 5HMF decreased the Po(2) at which the Hb is 50% saturated with O(2) by 12.6 mmHg. During 10 and 5% O(2) hypoxia, 5HMF increased arterial blood O(2) saturation by 35 and 48% from the vehicle group, respectively. During 5% O(2) hypoxia, blood pressure and heart rate were 58 and 30% higher for 5HMF compared with the vehicle. In addition, 5HMF preserved microvascular blood flow, whereas blood flow decreased to 40% of baseline in the vehicle group. Consequently, perivascular Po(2) was three times higher in the 5HMF group compared with the control group at 5% O(2) hypoxia. 5HMF also reduced heart and brain hypoxic areas in mice. Therefore, increased Hb O(2) affinity resulted in hemodynamics and oxygenation benefits during severe hypoxia. This acute acclimatization process may have implications in survival during severe environmental hypoxia when logistic constraints prevent chronic acclimatization. PMID:22636677

  2. Hypoxia Induces a Prothrombotic State Independently of the Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ninivaggi, Marisa; de Laat, Marieke; Lancé, Marcus M. D.; Kicken, Cécile H.; Pelkmans, Leonie; Bloemen, Saartje; Dirks, Marlou L.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Govers-Riemslag, José W.P.; Lindhout, Theo; Konings, Joke; de Laat, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia (oxygen deprivation) is known to be associated with deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism. We attempted to get a better comprehension of its mechanism by going to high altitude, thereby including the potential contributing role of physical activity. Two groups of 15 healthy individuals were exposed to hypoxia by going to an altitude of 3900 meters, either by climbing actively (active group) or transported passively by cable car (passive group). Both groups were tested for pl...

  3. Synthesis of [F-18] fluoroetanidazole for hypoxia imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently there has been an increased interest in new imaging markers for hypoxia. Among them misonidazole (MISO) derivatives based on the 2-nitro-imidazole ring have received considerable attention. Previous studies have shown that MISO was metabolically trapped in living hypoxic cells. Its fluorinated derivative, FMISO, when labeled with F-18 and used for PET represented a promising means of detection of hypoxia in tumors and in ischemic heart and brain

  4. Hypoxia-ischemia and retinal ganglion cell damage

    OpenAIRE

    Charanjit Kaur; Foulds, Wallace S.; Eng-Ang Ling

    2008-01-01

    Charanjit Kaur1, Wallace S Foulds2, Eng-Ang Ling11Department of Anatomy, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore Eye Research Institute, SingaporeAbstract: Retinal hypoxia is the potentially blinding mechanism underlying a number of sight-threatening disorders including central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic central retinal vein thrombosis, complications of diabetic eye disease and some types of glaucoma. Hypoxia is implicated in loss of re...

  5. Dapagliflozin, SGLT2 Inhibitor, Attenuates Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoon-Kyung; Choi, Hyunsu; Jeong, Jin Young; Na, Ki-Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Dapagliflozin, a new type of drug used to treat diabetes mellitus (DM), is a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. Although some studies showed that SGLT2 inhibition attenuated reactive oxygen generation in diabetic kidney the role of SGLT2 inhibition is unknown. We evaluated whether SLT2 inhibition has renoprotective effects in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) models. We evaluated whether dapagliflozin reduces renal damage in IR mice model. In addition, hypoxic HK2 cells were treated with or without SGLT2 inhibitor to investigate cell survival, the apoptosis signal pathway, and the induction of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) and associated proteins. Dapagliflozin improved renal function. Dapagliflozin reduced renal expression of Bax, renal tubule injury and TUNEL-positive cells and increased renal expression of HIF1 in IR-injured mice. HIF1 inhibition by albendazole negated the renoprotective effects of dapagliflozin treatment in IR-injured mice. In vitro, dapagliflozin increased the expression of HIF1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and ERK and increased cell survival of hypoxic HK2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, dapagliflozin attenuates renal IR injury. HIF1 induction by dapagliflozin may play a role in renoprotection against renal IR injury. PMID:27391020

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Respond to Hypoxia by Increasing Diacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Kinga; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Merkely, Béla; Nolta, Jan A; Fierro, Fernando A

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently being tested clinically for a plethora of conditions, with most approaches relying on the secretion of paracrine signals by MSC to modulate the immune system, promote wound healing, and induce angiogenesis. Hypoxia has been shown to affect MSC proliferation, differentiation, survival and secretory profile. Here, we investigate changes in the lipid composition of human bone marrow-derived MSC after exposure to hypoxia. Using mass spectrometry, we compared the lipid profiles of MSC derived from five different donors, cultured for two days in either normoxia (control) or hypoxia (1% oxygen). Hypoxia induced a significant increase of total triglycerides, fatty acids and diacylglycerols (DG). Remarkably, reduction of DG levels using the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 inhibited the secretion of VEGF and Angiopoietin-2, but increased the secretion of interleukin-8, without affecting significantly their respective mRNA levels. Functionally, incubation of MSC in hypoxia with D609 inhibited the potential of the cells to promote migration of human endothelial cells in a wound/scratch assay. Hence, we show that hypoxia induces in MSC an increase of DG that may affect the angiogenic potential of these cells. PMID:26212931

  7. How can we overcome tumor hypoxia in radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local recurrence and distant metastasis frequently occur after radiation therapy for cancer and can be fatal. Evidence obtained from radiochemical and radiobiological studies has revealed these problems to be caused, at least in part, by a tumor-specific microenvironment, hypoxia. Moreover, a transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), was identified as pivotal to hypoxia-mediated radioresistance. To overcome the problems, radiation oncologists have recently obtained powerful tools, such as 'simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT), which enables a booster dose of radiation to be delivered to small target fractions in a malignant tumor', 'hypoxia-selective cytotoxins/drugs', and 'HIF-1 inhibitors' etc. In order to fully exploit these innovative and interdisciplinary strategies in cancer therapy, it is critical to unveil the characteristics, intratumoral localization, and dynamics of hypoxia/HIF-1-active tumor cells during tumor growth and after radiation therapy. We have performed optical imaging experiments using tumor-bearing mice and revealed that the locations of HIF-1-active tumor cells changes dramatically as tumors grow. Moreover, HIF-1 activity changes markedly after radiation therapy. This review overviews fundamental problems surrounding tumor hypoxia in current radiation therapy, the function of HIF-1 in tumor radioresistance, the dynamics of hypoxic tumor cells during tumor growth and after radiation therapy, and how we should overcome the difficulties with radiation therapy using innovative interdisciplinary technologies. (author)

  8. Radiation-induced hypoxia may perpetuate late normal tissue injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not hypoxia develops in rat lung tissue after radiation. Methods and Materials: Fisher-344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax using a single dose of 28 Gy. Pulmonary function was assessed by measuring the changes in respiratory rate every 2 weeks, for 6 months after irradiation. The hypoxia marker was administered 3 h before euthanasia. The tissues were harvested at 6 weeks and 6 months after irradiation and processed for immunohistochemistry. Results: A moderate hypoxia was detected in the rat lungs at 6 weeks after irradiation, before the onset of functional or histopathologic changes. The more severe hypoxia, that developed at the later time points (6 months) after irradiation, was associated with a significant increase in macrophage activity, collagen deposition, lung fibrosis, and elevation in the respiratory rate. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed an increase in TGF-β, VEGF, and CD-31 endothelial cell marker, suggesting a hypoxia-mediated activation of the profibrinogenic and proangiogenic pathways. Conclusion: A new paradigm of radiation-induced lung injury should consider postradiation hypoxia to be an important contributing factor mediating a continuous production of a number of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

  9. Macrophage-mediated response to hypoxia in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazzyman S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon Tazzyman,1 Craig Murdoch,2 James Yeomans,1 Jack Harrison,1 Munitta Muthana3 1Department of Oncology, 2School of Clinical Dentistry, 3Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathobiology of various inflamed, diseased tissues, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, myocardial infarcts, the synovia of rheumatoid arthritic joints, healing wounds, and sites of bacterial infection. These areas of hypoxia form when the blood supply is occluded and/or the oxygen supply is unable to keep pace with cell growth and/or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in all tissues of the body and exhibit great plasticity, allowing them to perform divergent functions, including, among others, patrolling tissue, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells, orchestrating wound healing, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response. The number of tissue macrophages increases markedly with the onset and progression of many pathological states, with many macrophages accumulating in avascular and necrotic areas, where they are exposed to hypoxia. Recent studies show that these highly versatile cells then respond rapidly to the hypoxia present by altering their expression of a wide array of genes. Here we review the evidence for hypoxia-driven macrophage inflammatory responses in various disease states, and how this influences disease progression and treatment. Keywords: macrophage, hypoxia, inflammation, cytokine

  10. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  11. Ventilation and diaphragm activity during sustained hypoxia in awake canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Naoyuki; Ji, Michael; Jagers, Jenny Suneby; Katagiri, Masato; Easton, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    In humans, isocapnic hypoxia sustained for 20-30 min elicits a biphasic ventilatory response with an initial increased peak followed by a roll-off to a lesser, intermediate plateau. However, it is uncertain if this hypoxic roll-off is common for all mammals, as canines have been a notable exception. We examined the effect of moderate isocapnic hypoxia (SpO2 80%) sustained for 20 min in 13 adult, awake, intact canines. The ventilatory response to sustained isocapnic hypoxia in these canines was not maintained: after an initial brisk response, ventilation declined significantly to an intermediate plateau. The hypoxic ventilatory decline occurred via a decrease in tidal volume, without change in breathing frequency. Distinct from airflow, costal diaphragm EMG showed a concurrent decline during sustained isocapnic hypoxia. However, the change in ventilation during sustained hypoxia in canines was very different from the response in humans. Although some decline in ventilation during sustained hypoxia may be common to all mammals, there are notable differences among species. PMID:26099798

  12. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  13. ChIP-seq and in vivo transcriptome analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus SREBP SrbA reveals a new regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawoon Chung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Aspergillus fumigatus sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP SrbA belongs to the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH family of transcription factors and is crucial for antifungal drug resistance and virulence. The latter phenotype is especially striking, as loss of SrbA results in complete loss of virulence in murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA. How fungal SREBPs mediate fungal virulence is unknown, though it has been suggested that lack of growth in hypoxic conditions accounts for the attenuated virulence. To further understand the role of SrbA in fungal infection site pathobiology, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq was used to identify genes under direct SrbA transcriptional regulation in hypoxia. These results confirmed the direct regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis and iron uptake by SrbA in hypoxia and revealed new roles for SrbA in nitrate assimilation and heme biosynthesis. Moreover, functional characterization of an SrbA target gene with sequence similarity to SrbA identified a new transcriptional regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence, SrbB. SrbB co-regulates genes involved in heme biosynthesis and demethylation of C4-sterols with SrbA in hypoxic conditions. However, SrbB also has regulatory functions independent of SrbA including regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Loss of SrbB markedly attenuates A. fumigatus virulence, and loss of both SREBPs further reduces in vivo fungal growth. These data suggest that both A. fumigatus SREBPs are critical for hypoxia adaptation and virulence and reveal new insights into SREBPs' complex role in infection site adaptation and fungal virulence.

  14. Seismic attenuation in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime objective of this paper is to quantitatively estimate seismic attenuation caused by fractures with different physical parameters. In seismic wave simulation, the fractured media are treated as the anisotropic media and fractures are represented by frequency-dependent elastic constants. Based on numerical experiments with three different parameters, namely viscosity, porosity and the Lamé parameters, this paper has the following observations. First, seismic attenuation is not affected by the viscosity within fractures, although it increases with the increase of porosity and decreases with the increase of the Lamé parameters within fractures. Among the latter two parameters, seismic attenuation is more sensitive to the Lamé parameters than to the porosity. Second, for the attenuation anisotropy, low frequencies have more anisotropic effect than high frequencies. For example, a 50 Hz wavefield has the strongest anisotropy effect if compared to 100 and 150 Hz wavefields. The attenuation anisotropy for low frequency (say 50 Hz) is more sensitive to the viscosity than the porosity and the Lamé parameters have the weakest effect among these three parameters. These observations suggest that low-frequency seismic attenuation, and especially the attenuation anisotropy in low frequency, would have great potential for fluid discrimination within fractured media. (paper)

  15. Effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 on ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjie Luo; Xiaoping Wang; Hongbin Sun

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor I, a nuclear transcription factor, is induced by hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor I, a heterodimeric DNA-binding protein, is composed of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 β subunits, which are family members of the basic helix-loop-helix-PER, ARNT, SIM (PAS) protein. O2 concentration regulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 activity via this subunit. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α plays a major role in response to hypoxia and transcriptional activation, as well as in the target gene specificity of the DNA enhancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1β cannot be induced by hypoxia. This effect may be due to hypoxia-inducible factor 1 stability and activated conformation due to dimerization. Previous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mRNA expression increases in the penumbra following ischemia/hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 plays an important role in brain tissue injury alter ischemia by affecting a series of target genes, elevating tolerance to hypoxia, and ensuring survival of neural cells. This article summarizes the structure, function, expression, regulatory mechanisms, biological effects, and significance of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. As a transcriptional activator, hypoxia- inducible factor 1 plays a key role in hypoxic responses by stabilizing the internal environment. It also has been shown to regulate the expression of several genes. The regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease have been described. The present review re-examined the concept of brain protection at the level of gene regulation.

  16. Hypoxia and hypoglycaemia in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma: regulation and phenotypic effects of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia regulates gene expression via the transcription factor HIF (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor). Little is known regarding HIF expression and function in primary bone sarcomas. We describe HIF expression and phenotypic effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and HIF in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma. HIF-1α and HIF-2α immunohistochemistry was performed on a Ewing's tumour tissue array. Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines were assessed for HIF pathway induction by Western blot, luciferase assay and ELISA. Effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and isoform-specific HIF siRNA were assessed on proliferation, apoptosis and migration. 17/56 Ewing's tumours were HIF-1α-positive, 15 HIF-2α-positive and 10 positive for HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Expression of HIF-1α and cleaved caspase 3 localised to necrotic areas. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α and HIF-2α in Ewing's and osteosarcoma cell lines while hypoglycaemia specifically induced HIF-2α in Ewing's. Downstream transcription was HIF-1α-dependent in Ewing's sarcoma, but regulated by both isoforms in osteosarcoma. In both cell types hypoglycaemia reduced cellular proliferation by ≥ 45%, hypoxia increased apoptosis and HIF siRNA modulated hypoxic proliferation and migration. Co-localisation of HIF-1α and necrosis in Ewing's sarcoma suggests a role for hypoxia and/or hypoglycaemia in in vivo induction of HIF. In vitro data implicates hypoxia as the primary HIF stimulus in both Ewing's and osteosarcoma, driving effects on proliferation and apoptosis. These results provide a foundation from which to advance understanding of HIF function in the pathobiology of primary bone sarcomas

  17. The effect of ACE inhibition on the pulmonary vasculature in combined model of chronic hypoxia and pulmonary arterial banding in Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Shanelle; Baumgardt, Shelley; Molthen, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Microfocal CT was used to image the pulmonary arterial (PA) tree in rodent models of pulmonary hypertension (PH). CT images were used to measure the arterial tree diameter along the main arterial trunk at several hydrostatic intravascular pressures and calculate distensibility. High-resolution planar angiographic imaging was also used to examine distal PA microstructure. Data on pulmonary artery tree morphology improves our understanding of vascular remodeling and response to treatments. Angiotensin II (ATII) has been identified as a mediator of vasoconstriction and proliferative mitotic function. ATII has been shown to promote vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia as well as stimulate synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. Available ATII is targeted through angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), a method that has been used in animal models of PH to attenuate vascular remodeling and decrease pulmonary vascular resistance. In this study, we used rat models of chronic hypoxia to induce PH combined with partial left pulmonary artery occlusion (arterial banding, PLPAO) to evaluate effects of the ACEI, captopril, on pulmonary vascular hemodynamic and morphology. Male Sprague Dawley rats were placed in hypoxia (FiO2 0.1), with one group having underwent PLPAO three days prior to the chronic hypoxia. After the twenty-first day of hypoxia exposure, treatment was started with captopril (20 mg/kg/day) for an additional twenty-one days. At the endpoint, lungs were excised and isolated to examine: pulmonary vascular resistance, ACE activity, pulmonary vessel morphology and biomechanics. Hematocrit and RV/LV+septum ratio was also measured. CT planar images showed less vessel dropout in rats treated with captopril versus the non-treatment lungs. Distensibility data shows no change in rats treated with captopril in both chronic hypoxia (CH) and CH with PLPAO (CH+PLPAO) models. Hemodynamic measurements also show no change in the pulmonary vascular

  18. A novel family of fluorescent hypoxia sensors reveal strong heterogeneity in tumor hypoxia at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erapaneedi, Raghu; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Schäfers, Michael; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an intensively investigated condition with profound effects on cell metabolism, migration, and angiogenesis during development and disease. Physiologically, hypoxia is linked to tissue homeostasis and maintenance of pluripotency. Hypoxia also contributes to pathologies including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Despite its importance, microscopic visualization of hypoxia is largely restricted to the detection of reductively activated probes by immunostaining. Here, we describe a novel family of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors that detect the activation of HIF transcription factors reported by the oxygen-independent fluorescent protein UnaG. It comprises sensors with different switching and memory behavior and combination sensors that allow the distinction of hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. We tested these sensors on orthotopically transplanted glioma cell lines. Using a cranial window, we could visualize hypoxia intravitally at cellular resolution. In tissue samples, sensor activity was detected in regions, which were largely devoid of blood vessels, correlated with HIF-1α stabilization, and were highly heterogeneous at a cellular level. Frequently, we detected recently reoxygenated cells outside hypoxic areas in the proximity of blood vessels, suggestive of hypoxia-promoted cell migration. PMID:26598532

  19. L-arginine in combination with sildenafil potentiates the attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hiti, H; Chovanec, M; Melenovský, V; Vajnerová, O; Baňasová, A; Kautzner, J; Herget, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces an increased production of nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary prealveolar arterioles. Bioavailability of the NO in the pulmonary vessels correlates with concentration of L-arginine as well as activity of phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme (PDE-5). We tested a hypothesis whether a combination of L-arginine and PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil has an additive effect in reduction of the hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in rats. Animals were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks. In the AH group, rats were administered L-arginine during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SH group, rats were administered sildenafil during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SAH group, rats were treated by the combination of L-arginine as well as sildenafil during exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mean PAP, structural remodeling of peripheral pulmonary arterioles (%DL) and RV/LV+S ratio was significantly decreased in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls even decreased compared to the AH and the SH groups in first two measured parameters. Plasmatic concentration of cGMP and NOx were significantly lower in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls. We demonstrate that NO synthase substrate L-arginine and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil administered in combination are more potent in attenuation of the HPH compared to a treatment by substances given alone. PMID:23869884

  20. Protective effects of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunqi Zhu; Yanli Li; Jingyi Liu; Xiaorong Yang; Ce Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Humanin is a 24-amino acid peptide isolated from the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. Several studies have indicated that Humanin can protect cells against cytotoxicity induced by various insults.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective role of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death, and to determine the most appropriate therapeutic concentration of Humanin.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Neuropathophysiological, randomized, controlled experiment, conducted at the Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, Shanxi Medical University, between March 2007 and October 2007.MATERIALS: Newborn Wistar rats, 5,5',6,6' tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl- benzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1, USA), calcein-acetoxymethylester (calcein-AM, USA), and Humanin (Shanghai, China) were used in this study. METHODS: Primary cortical neurons were cultured with dulbecco's modified eagle's medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum. Cultures were divided into three groups: control, hypoxia, and hypoxia + Humanin. Various concentrations of Humanin (1, 10, and 20 μmol/L) were added to the cultures 16 hours prior to hypoxia induction. For hypoxic conditions, cells were maintained at 37 ℃ within an incubator chamber filled with 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 24 hours. Cells in the control group were cultured in normal oxygen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cell viability was determined through the use of the vital dye calcein-AM, and the number of live cells was determined. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was assessed using the fluorescent probe JC-1. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was determined with calcein-AM in the presence of cobalt chloride.RESULTS: (1) Cell viability: Hypoxia for 24 hours induced death in a large number of neurons. Pretreatment with 10 μmol/L and 20 μmol/L Humanin, 16 hours prior to hypoxia, protected cells against hypoxia. However, 1 μmol/L Humanin provided little protection. (2) ΔΨm: ΔΨm was reduced after 24-hour hypoxia

  1. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  2. miR-138 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis via MLK3/JNK/c-jun pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Siyi; Liu, Peng; Jian, Zhao; Li, Jingwei; Zhu, Yun; Feng, Zezhou; Xiao, Yingbin, E-mail: xiaoyb@vip.sina.com

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •First time to find miR-138 is up-regulated in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. •First time to find miR-138 targets MLK3 and regulates JNK/c-jun pathway. •Rare myocardial biopsy of patients with CHD were collected. •Both silence and overexpression of miR-138 were implemented. •Various methods were used to detect cell function. -- Abstract: Cardiomyocytes experience a series of complex endogenous regulatory mechanisms against apoptosis induced by chronic hypoxia. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate cellular pathophysiological processes. Recently, microRNA-138 (miR-138) has been found related to hypoxia, and beneficial for cell proliferation. Therefore, we intend to study the role of miR-138 in hypoxic cardiomyocytes and the main mechanism. Myocardial samples of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) were collected to test miR-138 expression. Agomir or antagomir of miR-138 was transfected into H9C2 cells to investigate its effect on cell apoptosis. Higher miR-138 expression was observed in patients with cyanotic CHD, and its expression gradually increased with prolonged hypoxia time in H9C2 cells. Using MTT and LDH assays, cell growth was significantly greater in the agomir group than in the negative control (NC) group, while antagomir decreased cell survival. Dual luciferase reporter gene and Western-blot results confirmed MLK3 was a direct target of miR-138. It was found that miR-138 attenuated hypoxia-induced apoptosis using TUNEL, Hoechst staining and Annexin V-PE/7-AAD flow cytometry analysis. We further detected expression of apoptosis-related proteins. In the agomir group, the level of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved-caspase-3, cleaved-PARP and Bad significantly reduced, while Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Opposite changes were observed in the antagomir group. Downstream targets of MLK3, JNK and c-jun, were also suppressed by miR-138. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of miR-138 plays

  3. Identification of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a HIF-regulated tissue permeability factor during hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberger, Peter; Khoury, Joseph; Kong, Tianqing; Weissmüller, Thomas; Robinson, Andreas M; Colgan, Sean P.

    2007-01-01

    Increased tissue permeability is commonly associated with hypoxia of many origins. Since hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) represents a predominant hypoxia signaling mechanism, we compared hypoxia-elicited changes in tissue barrier function in mice conditionally lacking intestinal epithelial hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (hif1a). Somewhat surprisingly, these studies revealed that mutant hif1a mice were protected from hypoxia-induced increases in intestinal permeability in vivo. Guided by microarra...

  4. Intermittent hypoxia maintains glycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    Increasing studies have shown protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain injury and heart ischemia. However, the effect of intermittent hypoxia on blood glucose metabolism, especially in diabetic conditions, is rarely observed. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intermittent hypoxia influences blood glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic adult rats and age-matched control rats were treated with intermittent hypoxia (at an altitude of 3 km, 4 h per day for 3 weeks) or normoxia as control. Fasting blood glucose, body weight, plasma fructosamine, plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), pancreas β-cell mass, and hepatic and soleus glycogen were measured. Compared with diabetic rats before treatment, the level of fasting blood glucose in diabetic rats after normoxic treatment was increased (19.88 ± 5.69 mmol/L vs. 14.79 ± 5.84 mmol/L, p  0.05). Meanwhile, fasting blood glucose in diabetic rats after hypoxic treatment was also lower than that in diabetic rats after normoxic treatment (13.14 ± 5.77 mmol/L vs. 19.88 ± 5.69 mmol/L, pintermittent hypoxia was significantly lower than that in diabetic rats receiving normoxia (1.28 ± 0.11 vs. 1.39 ± 0.11, p intermittent hypoxia showed effect on the increase of soleus glycogen but not hepatic glycogen. We conclude that intermittent hypoxia maintains glycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and its regulation on muscular glycogenesis may play a role in the underlying mechanism. PMID:26902078

  5. MUSCLE FIBER SPECIFIC ANTIOXIDATIVE SYSTEM ADAPTATION TO SWIM TRAINING IN RATS: INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gonchar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day-1, 5 days·wk-1, for 4 wk. Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min, interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk. Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity

  6. [Local tissue hypoxia consequence in the trophic venous ulceration in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, R Z; Zakharova, N B; Burov, Iu A; Iakusheva, E A; Nikitina, V V; Stepanova, T V; Mikul'skaia, E G

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the data of examination and the results of the treatment of 25 patients aged over 80 years (mean age 68.5+/-7 years) suffering from varicosity with long nonhealing trophic ulcers of the distal limb segments (CVI CMP C6) and 20 patients of the same age groups with CVI CEAP stages 3-5. All patients with CVI underwent either full-scope phlebectomy (64.4%) or partial truncal phlebectomy (35.6%), in which the trunk of the greater saphenous vein was stripped up to the upper third of the leg. A TCM-3 outfit (RADIOmeter, Denmark) was employed to measure oxygen tension in limb tissues. Parameters of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant tissue defence were measured intraoperatively in the capillary blood of the fingers as well as in the venous blood withdrawn from the cubital vein and the greater saphenous vein in the lower third of the leg near ulcer). The data obtained evidenced that lipid peroxidation activity was most pronounced in the soft tissues of the lower third of the leg in the group of patients with remarkable chronic venous insufficiency without trophic venous ulcers (GVI CEAP C3-5) and was significantly depleted after formation of varicose ulcers (CVI CEAP C6) associated with remarkable tissue hypoxia (TepO2 1.7-7.0 mm Hg). In all patients with CVI, the syndrome of lipid peroxidation was associated with the lowering of antioxidant defence activity. Patients with trophic venous ulcers had the signs of active inflammation in the soft tissues of the leg. The data obtained in the course of the study made it possible to optimize the treatment policy for elderly patients with trophic venous ulcers. In addition to the lowering of venous hypertension, the treatment included correction of microcirculatory disorders related to local hypoxia. Of special importance was reperfusion attenuation in the postoperative period. PMID:18004264

  7. Therapeutic treatment with a novel hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylase inhibitor (TRC160334 ameliorates murine colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ram Gupta,1 Anita R Chaudhary,2 Binita N Shah,1 Avinash V Jadhav,3 Shitalkumar P Zambad,1 Ramesh Chandra Gupta,4 Shailesh Deshpande,4 Vijay Chauthaiwale,4 Chaitanya Dutt4 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Cellular and Molecular Biology, 3Preclinical Safety Evaluation, 4Discovery, Torrent Research Centre, Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India Background and aim: Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD can be achieved by improvement of intestinal barrier protection. Activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF has been identified as a critical factor for barrier protection during mucosal insult and is linked with improvement in symptoms of colitis. Although prophylactic efficacy of HIF hydroxylase inhibitors in murine colitis have been established, its therapeutic efficacy in clinically relevant therapeutic settings have not been established. In the present study we aim to establish therapeutic efficacy of TRC160334, a novel HIF hydroxylase inhibitor, in animal models of colitis. Methods: The efficacy of TRC160334 was evaluated in two different mouse models of colitis by oral route. A prophylactic efficacy study was performed in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced mouse model of colitis representing human Crohn's disease pathology. Additionally, a therapeutic efficacy study was performed in a dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse model of colitis, a model simulating human ulcerative colitis. Results: TRC160334 treatment resulted in significant improvement in disease end points in both models of colitis. TRC160334 treatment resulted into cytoprotective heatshock protein 70 induction in inflamed colon. TRC160334 successfully attenuated the rate of fall in body weight, disease activity index, and macroscopic and microscopic scores of colonic damage leading to overall improvement in study outcome. Conclusion: Our findings are the first to demonstrate that therapeutic intervention with a HIF hydroxylase inhibitor

  8. Modulation of radioprotective effects of respiratory hypoxia by changing the duration of hypoxia before irradiation and by combining hypoxia and administration of hemopoiesis-stimulating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Analysis of radioprotective effect of respiratory hypoxia on hemopoietic tissue and enhancement of this effect by hemopoietic activation. Material and methods: In mice breathing hypoxic gas mixture during total body gamma irradiation the recovery of pluripotent and committed granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells and animal lethality were determined. Results: In mice forced to breathe 10% O2 and 8% O2 during irradiation, the oxygen tension in the spleen decreased to 40% and 20%, respectively, of control values. Hypoxia mitigated the lethal effect of gamma-rays and improved the recovery of hemopoiesis in compartments of pluripotent and committed progenitor cells. Enhancement of the proliferative activity in hemopoietic tissue by a cytokine (rmGM-CSF) or an immunomodulator (dextran sulfate) increased the effect of hypoxic radioprotection, while elimination of proliferative cells by hydroxyurea decreased the radioprotective effect. Adaptation of experimental animals to hypoxic conditions was found to reduce the radioprotective effect without influencing tissue partial oxygen pressure lowered by hypoxic conditions. Conclusion: The data presented confirm the radioprotective effect of 10% and 8% O2 respiratory hypoxia on hemopoiesis. These findings may represent a way out for further experimental and clinical research aimed at considering differential protection of various tissues by hypoxia. (orig.)

  9. Effect of Hypoxia on Ca2+ Concentration in Broiler's Cardiac Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of hypoxia on the Ca2+ concentration in broiler's cardiac muscle cells (CMCs). The concentration of Ca2+ in the CMC was observed using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). The results showed that hypoxia could significantly increase intracellular Ca2+ (normal oxygen, 99.3 ± 13.1; hypoxia, 129.4±24.3, P<0.01) in CMCs. The Ca2+ antagonist (nifedipine, verapamil) could significantly restrain the Ca2+ influx across the cell membrane of CMC treated by hypoxia (CMC: hypoxia + verapamil, 100.9 ± 28.2; hypoxia + nifedipine, 107.6± 27.7;P < 0.01). The results showed hypoxia could increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration of CMC, and the Ca2+ antagonist could restrain the Ca2+ influx across the cell membrane of CMC treated by hypoxia.

  10. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in human squamous carcinoma cells after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage in A431 and CaSki cells after chronic hypoxia. Cells in exponential phase are subjected to hypoxia (4 h of hypoxia. The repair returned to aerobic control level by 3 h of reoxygenation. PLDR of A431 cells reached maximum at about 9 h after irradiation in cells reoxygenated for 10 min after hypoxia. However, the repair is maximum at 6 h in cells reoxygenated for 3 h after hypoxia and in aerobic cells not previously exposed to hypoxia. Reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia did not affect the PLDR capacity and repair kinetics of CaSki cells. The results suggest that radiosensitization by reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia is not related to inhibition of PLDR. 14 refs., 3 figs

  11. Hypoxia adaptation and hemoglobin mutation in Tibetan chick embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU; Xiao; LI; Ning; LIAN; Linsheng; YAN; Dawei; ZHANG; Hao

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan chick lives at high altitudes between 2600 and 4200 m with a high hatchability and low land breeds survive rarely with a hatchability of 3.0% under hypoxia of simulated 4200 m. Under hypoxia of whole 21 d, the hatchability of Tibetan chick and Recessive White Feather broiler differed with a greatest disparity from day 4 to 11 and also significantly in other stages except from day 1 to 3. Hypoxia in each stage did not reduce significantly survival rate of this stage except hatchability. These two results indicated that the hypoxia in the early stage had an adverse effect on the later stage. All exons encoding chick hemoglobins were sequenced to analyze gene polymorphism. The functional mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu, related with hypoxia, was found in αD globin chain and the mutation frequency increased with increased altitude. In addition, under hypoxic conditions, the population with higher mutation frequency had a higher hatchability. The automated homology model building was carried out using crystal structure coordinates of chick HbD. The results indicated that the substitution Met-32(B13)-Leu provides a more hydrophobic environment which leads to higher stability of heme and oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. The occurrence of the mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu is related to the origin of Tibetan chick.

  12. Hypoxia expression in radiation-induced late rectal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis have been studied extensively. However, the relation between normal tissue injury and hypoxia is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on radiation-induced late rectal injury in mice. The rectum of C57BL/6N mice was irradiated locally with a single dose of 25 Gy and the following experiments were performed including hematoxylin-eosin (H.E.) staining, azan staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Radiation-induced fibrotic changes were observed from 14 days and reached the peak 30 days after irradiation. The expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial cell marker CD31 increased significantly with the formation of fibrosis induced by irradiation compared with unirradiated control. In addition, the maximum expression of TGF-β1, HIF-1α and VEGF was found at 14, 30 and 90 days after irradiation, respectively. The temporal changes of cytokines were consistent with the dynamic change of fibrosis. Our data suggests that late normal tissue injury involved various cytokines including hypoxia-induced angiogenic cytokines. These results may have important implications in the understanding of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury. (author)

  13. Hypoxia promotes adipose-derived stem cell proliferation via VEGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a promising mesenchymal stem cell source with therapeutic applications. Recent studies have shown that ADSCs could be expanded in vitro without phenotype changes. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on ADSC proliferation in vitro and to determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in ADSC proliferation. ADSCs were selectively cultured from the stromal vascular fraction obtained from adipose tissue in DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic-antimycotic. ADSCs were cultured under two conditions: hypoxia (5% O2 and normal oxygen (21% O2. The effects of the oxygen concentration on cell proliferation were examined by cell cycle and doubling time. The expression of VEGF was evaluated by the ELISA assay. The role of VEGF in ADSC proliferation was studied by neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies. We found that the ADSC proliferation rate was significantly higher under hypoxia compared with normoxia. In hypoxia, ADSCs also triggered VEGF expression. However, neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation rate. These results suggest that hypoxia stimulated ADSC proliferation in association with VEGF production. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(1.000: 476-482

  14. Influence of chronic hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chronic hypoxia and anoxia on cell survival after low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells were kept for 24 h under chronic hypoxia (94.5% N2; 5% CO2; 0.5% O2) or chronic anoxia (95% N2; 5% CO2). Irradiation was performed using 250 kVp X-rays or carbon ions with a dose average LET of 100 keV/μm either directly under the chronic oxygenation states, or at different time points after reoxygenation. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution for cells irradiated under different chronic oxic states was measured over 24 h during reoxygenation. The measurements showed a fairly uniform cell cycle distribution under chronic hypoxia, similar to normoxic conditions. Chronic anoxia induced a block in G1 and a strong reduction of S-phase cells. A distribution similar to normoxic conditions was reached after 12 h of reoxygenation. CHO cells had a similar survival under both acute and chronic hypoxia. In contrast, survival after irradiation under chronic anoxia was slightly reduced compared to that under acute anoxia. We conclude that, in hamster cells, chronic anoxia is less effective than acute anoxia in inducing radioresistance for both X-rays and carbon ions, whereas in hypoxia, acute and chronic exposures have a similar impact on cell killing. (author)

  15. Observation of hypoxia in HNSCC xenografts during fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This experimental study was performed to observe hypoxia within tumour xenografts using the 2-nitroimidazole oxygen binding agent, Pimonidazole. Xenografts were subjected to 6 MV fractionated radiotherapy to enable the changes in hypoxia to be assessed throughout treatment. The xenografts were grown in immuno-deficient mice through subcutaneously injection (FaOu cell line) 8 days prior to treatment, with all mice growing visible tumours ranging between 2 and 6 mm in diameter. An irradiation schedule of 5 x 3 Gy in week I and 5 x 5 Gy in week 2 was delivered using a novel restraining system to unanaesthetised mice. Pimonidazole was injected into 17 mice that had received 0, 3, 9, 20, 30 or 40 Gy. Immunohistochemical imaging processes were performed on xenograft cross-sections to observe hypoxia as well as proliferative (blue-BrdUrd) and endothelial blood vessel cells (red-Hoechst 33342). In vivo oxygenation levels were also recorded using the OxyLab fluorescent probe system to provide a concurrent quantitative oxygenation analysis. Cross-sectional fluorescent images confirmed the presence of hypoxia (pO2 < 10 mmHg), which decreased with radiation dose and tumour volume. Images illustrated the microscopic spatial and chaotic nature of cellular hypoxia in the tumours. OxyLab results confirmed quantitatively that the xenografts had low levels of oxygenation, which increased late in the schedule (after 40 Gy).

  16. Estimation of Water Vapour Attenuation And Rain Attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Kalyana Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation due to and water vapour and rain can severely degrade the radio wave propagation at centimeter or millimeter wavelengths. It restricts the path length of radio communication systems and limits the use of higher frequencies for line-of-sight microwave links and satellite communications. The attenuation will pose a greater problem to communication as the frequency of occurrence of heavy rain increases.In a tropical region, like Malaysia, where excessive rainfall is a common phenomenon throughout the year, the knowledge of the rain attenuation at the frequency of operation is extremely required for the design of a reliable terrestrial and earth space communication link at a particular location.

  17. Intramucosal–arterial PCO 2 gap fails to reflect intestinal dysoxia in hypoxic hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dubin, Arnaldo; Murias, Gastón; Estenssoro, Elisa; Canales, Héctor; Badie, Julio; Pozo, Mario; Sottile, Juan P; Barán, Marcelo; Pálizas, Fernando; Laporte, Mercedes

    2002-01-01

    Introduction An elevation in intramucosal–arterial PCO 2 gradient (ΔPCO 2) could be determined either by tissue hypoxia or by reduced blood flow. Our hypothesis was that in hypoxic hypoxia with preserved blood flow, ΔPCO 2 should not be altered. Methods In 17 anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep, oxygen delivery was reduced by decreasing flow (ischemic hypoxia, IH) or arterial oxygen saturation (hypoxic hypoxia, HH), or no intervention was made (sham). In the IH group (n = 6), blood...

  18. Reversible blunting of arousal from sleep in response to intermittent hypoxia in the developing rat

    OpenAIRE

    Darnall, R.A.; McWilliams, S.; Schneider, R. W.; Tobia, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Arousal is an important survival mechanism when infants are confronted with hypoxia during sleep. Many sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants are exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia before death and have impaired arousal mechanisms. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to hypoxia would cause a progressive blunting of arousal, and that a reversal of this process would occur if the hypoxia was terminated at the time of arousal. P5 (postnatal age of 5 days), P15, and P25 rat pups wer...

  19. Chronic Hypoxia Promotes Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Proliferation through H2O2-Induced 5-Lipoxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Kristi M.; Bum-Yong Kang; Adesina, Sherry E.; Murphy, Tamara C.; C Michael Hart; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is a progressive disorder characterized by endothelial dysfunction and proliferation. Hypoxia induces PH by increasing vascular remodeling. A potential mediator in hypoxia-induced PH development is arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase (ALOX5). While ALOX5 metabolites have been shown to promote pulmonary vasoconstriction and endothelial cell proliferation, the contribution of ALOX5 to hypoxia-induced proliferation remains unknown. We hypothesize that hypoxia exposure stimula...

  20. Hypoxia Induces Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Gene Expression in the Pulmonary Artery of Rats via Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongliang JIANG; Aiguo DAI; Qifang LI; Ruicheng HU

    2007-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the dynamic expression of hypoxia inducible factor- 1 α (HIF-1 α) and transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β 1) in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension of rats. It was found that mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia. Pulmonary artery remodeling index and right ventricular hypertrophy became evident after 14 d of hypoxia. HIF-1α mRNA staining was less positive in the control, hypoxia for 3 d and hypoxia for 7 d, but began to enhance significantly after 14 d of hypoxia, then remained stable. Expression of HIF-1α protein in the control was less positive, but was up-regulated in pulmonary arterial tunica intima of all hypoxic rats.TGF-β1 mRNA expression in pulmonary arterial walls was increased significantly after 14 d of hypoxia, but showed no obvious changes after 3 or 7 d of hypoxia. In pulmonary tunica adventitia and tunica media,TGF-β1 protein staining was less positive in control rats, but was markedly enhanced after 3 d of hypoxia,reaching its peak after 7 d of hypoxia, and then weakening after 14 and 21 d of hypoxia. Western blotting showed that HIF-1α protein levels increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia and then remained at a high level. TGF-βi protein level was markedly enhanced after 3 d of hypoxia, reaching its peak after 7 d of hypoxia, and then decreasing after 14 and 21 d of hypoxia. Linear correlation analysis showed that HIF-1αmRNA, TGF-β1 mRNA, TGF-β1 protein were positively correlated with mPAP, vessel morphometry and right ventricular hypertrophy index. TGF-β1 protein (tunica adventitia) was negatively correlated with HIF-1α mRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that changes in HIF-1α and TGF-β1 expression after hypoxia play an important role in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension of rats.

  1. The attenuation and the attenuators: strategies and tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Briz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is inscribed in a research project (ES.POR.ATENUAÇÃO that seeks to analyze and explain the attenuator activity in different regional varieties of Spanish and Portuguese, in order to perform, subsequently, different contrastive intralinguistic and interlinguistic studies. In this article, we explain some of the theoretical and methodological principles on which are based the qualitative and quantitative analysis. And especially, we will refer to the concept of attenuation (Briz 1995, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007a, 2012.

  2. Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ravarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premature birth is a major public health issue internationally affecting 13 million babies worldwide. Hypoxia and ischemia is probably the commonest type of acquired brain damage in preterm infants. The clinical manifestations of hypoxic-ischemic injury in survivors of premature birth include a spectrum of cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Until recently, the extensive brain abnormalities in preterm neonates appeared to be related mostly to destructive processes that lead to substantial deletion of neurons, axons, and glia from necrotic lesions in the developing brain. Advances in neonatal care coincide with a growing body of evidence that the preterm gray and white matter frequently sustain less severe insults, where tissue destruction is the minor component. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the major form of white matter injury and consists classically of focal necrotic lesions, with subsequent cyst formation, and a less severe but more diffuse injury to cerebral white mater, with prominent astrogliosis and microgliosis but without overt necrosis. With PVL a concomitant injury occurs to subplate neurons, located in the subcortical white matter. Severe hypoxic-ischemic insults that trigger significant white matter necrosis are accompanied by neuronal degeneration in cerebral gray and white matter. This review aims to illustrate signs of cerebral embryology of the second half of fetal life and correlate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the premature infant. This should help us better understand the symptoms early and late and facilitate new therapeutic strategies. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  3. Pronounced hypoxia in models of murine and human leukemia: high efficacy of hypoxia-activated prodrug PR-104.

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    Juliana Benito

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that interactions between leukemia cells and the bone marrow (BM microenvironment promote leukemia cell survival and confer resistance to anti-leukemic drugs. There is evidence that BM microenvironment contains hypoxic areas that confer survival advantage to hematopoietic cells. In the present study we investigated whether hypoxia in leukemic BM contributes to the protective role of the BM microenvironment. We observed a marked expansion of hypoxic BM areas in immunodeficient mice engrafted with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. Consistent with this finding, we found that hypoxia promotes chemoresistance in various ALL derived cell lines. These findings suggest to employ hypoxia-activated prodrugs to eliminate leukemia cells within hypoxic niches. Using several xenograft models, we demonstrated that administration of the hypoxia-activated dinitrobenzamide mustard, PR-104 prolonged survival and decreased leukemia burden of immune-deficient mice injected with primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Together, these findings strongly suggest that targeting hypoxia in leukemic BM is feasible and may significantly improve leukemia therapy.

  4. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 19 (USP19) Regulates Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) during Hypoxia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Mikael; Zhao, Bin; Velasco, Kelly; Liu, Haiyin; Hassink, Gerco; Paschke, Julia; Pereira, Teresa; Lindsten, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    A proper cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels is essential for processes such as development, growth, metabolism, and angiogenesis. The response to decrease in oxygen supply, referred to as hypoxia, is also involved in numerous human diseases including cancer, inflammatory conditions, and vascular disease. The hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), a key player in the hypoxic response, is kept under stringent regulation. At normoxia, the levels are kept low as a consequence of the efficient degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and in response to hypoxia, the degradation is blocked and the accumulating HIF-1α promotes a transcriptional response essential for proper adaptation and survival. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease-19 (USP19) interacts with components of the hypoxia pathway including HIF-1α and rescues it from degradation independent of its catalytic activity. In the absence of USP19, cells fail to mount an appropriate response to hypoxia, indicating an important role for this enzyme in normal or pathological conditions. PMID:22128162

  5. GABARAPL1 is required for increased EGFR membrane expression during hypoxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulers, T.G.; Schaaf, M.B.; Peeters, H.J.; Savelkouls, K.G.; Vooijs, M.A.; Bussink, J.; Jutten, B.; Rouschop, K.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified or mutated in various human epithelial tumors and hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors. Both EGFR and hypoxia are associated with therapy resistance and poor treatment outcome. To survive hypoxia,

  6. Hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress characterizes a necrotic phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Erkan, Murat Mert; Kong, Bo; Cheng, Tao; Wu, Weiwei; Regel, Ivonne; Raulefs, Susanne; Friess, Helmut; Esposito, Irene; Kleeff, Joerg; Michalski, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibrosis and tissue necrosis are major histological sequelae of hypoxia. The hypoxia-to-fibrosis sequence is well-documented in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, hypoxic and necrotic PDAC phenotypes are insufficiently characterized. Recently, reduction of tuberous sclerosis expression in mice together with oncogenic Kras demonstrated a rapidly metastasizing phenotype with histologically eccentric necrosis, transitional hypoxia and devascularisation. We established cell...

  7. Metabolic and locomotor responses of juvenile paddlefish Polyodon spathula to hypoxia and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypoxia is an increasing problem in the natural habitats that the paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) has historically inhabited, and a potential problem in managed culture conditions. However, the effects of hypoxia on paddlefish are not well understood. In order to understand the effects of hypoxia on ...

  8. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Ziquan; Jensen, Lasse D.; Rouhi, Pegah;

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced vascular responses, including angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and vascular leakage, significantly contribute to the onset, development and progression of retinopathy. However, until recently there were no appropriate animal disease models recapitulating adult retinopathy available....... In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the...... hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish. This model provides a unique opportunity to study kinetically the development of retinopathy in adult animals using noninvasive protocols and to assess therapeutic efficacy of orally active antiangiogenic drugs....

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factors as molecular targets for liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Cynthia; Colgan, Sean P; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2016-06-01

    Liver disease is a growing global health problem, as deaths from end-stage liver cirrhosis and cancer are rising across the world. At present, pharmacologic approaches to effectively treat or prevent liver disease are extremely limited. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates diverse signaling pathways enabling adaptive cellular responses to perturbations of the tissue microenvironment. HIF activation through hypoxia-dependent and hypoxia-independent signals have been reported in liver disease of diverse etiologies, from ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute liver injury to chronic liver diseases caused by viral infection, excessive alcohol consumption, or metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the evidence for HIF stabilization in liver disease, discusses the mechanistic involvement of HIFs in disease development, and explores the potential of pharmacological HIF modifiers in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:27094811

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factors and sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia, defined as reduced tissue oxygen concentration, is a characteristic of solid tumors and is an indicator of unfavorable diagnosis in patients. At the cellular level, the adaptation to hypoxia is under the control of two related transcription factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor), which activate expression of genes promoting angiogenesis, metastasis, increased tumor growth and resistance to treatments. A role for HIF-1α and HIF-2α is also emerging in hematologic malignancies such as lymphoma and l eukemia. Recent studies have identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway - which elicits various cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell survival or angiogenesis - as a new regulator of HIF-1α or HIF-2α activity. This review will consider how targeting the SphK1/S1P signaling could represent an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:21707486

  11. Contribution of transient blood flow to tumour hypoxia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumours grown in mice typically exhibit regions of hypoxia believed to result from two different processes: chronic oxygen deprivation due to consumption/diffusion limitations, and periodic deprivation resulting from transient reductions in tumour blood flow. The relative contribution of each is, however, not generally known. We have addressed this issue in transplanted SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H mice, using a quantitative extension of the fluorescence 'mismatch' technique coupled with cell sorting from irradiated tumours. At least half of the vessels in these tumours exhibit transient perfusion changes. Additionally, a majority of the 15-20% of cells that are sufficiently hypoxic to be resistant to radiation in the SCCVII tumours appear to result from cyclic, not continuous (diffusion-limited) hypoxia. Since different strategies may be necessary to counteract cyclic hypoxia in tumours, the possibility of transient blood flow changes should not be ignored when planning cancer therapy for humans. (orig.)

  12. Calcium-dependent activation of Pyk2 by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Rust, Randy T; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Millhorn, David E

    2002-02-01

    The Pyk2 tyrosine kinase can be activated by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent mechanisms. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O(2)) induced a rapid and persistent tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Hypoxia and KCl-depolarization increased the phosphotyrosine content of Pyk2 by twofold and fourfold, respectively. Both of these effects were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium. There was a modest activation of MAPK in parallel with the onset of Pyk2 phosphorylation. However, there was no detectable activation of either JNK or c-src, two other known downstream targets of Pyk2. Thus, exposure to hypoxia may selectively target specific subsets of Pyk2 signalling pathways. PMID:11781137

  13. Heat shock response and mammal adaptation to high elevation (hypoxia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaolin; XU Cunshuan; WANG Xiujie; WANG Dongjie; WANG Qingshang; ZHANG Baochen

    2006-01-01

    The mammal's high elevation (hypoxia) adaptation was studied by using the immunological and the molecular biological methods to understand the significance of Hsp (hypoxia) adaptation in the organic high elevation, through the mammal heat shock response. (1) From high elevation to low elevation (natural hypoxia): Western blot and conventional RT-PCR and real-time fluorescence quota PCR were adopted. Expression difference of heat shock protein of 70 (Hsp70) and natural expression of brain tissue of Hsp70 gene was determined in the cardiac muscle tissue among the different elevation mammals (yak). (2)From low elevation to high elevation (hypoxia induction):The mammals (domestic rabbits) from the low elevation were sent directly to the areas with different high elevations like 2300, 3300 and 5000 m above sea level to be raised for a period of 3 weeks before being slaughtered and the genetic inductive expression of the brain tissue of Hsp70 was determined with RT-PCR. The result indicated that all of the mammals at different elevations possessed their heat shock response gene. Hsp70 of the high elevation mammal rose abruptly under stress and might be induced to come into being by high elevation (hypoxia). The speedy synthesis of Hsp70 in the process of heat shock response is suitable to maintain the cells' normal physiological functions under stress. The Hsp70 has its threshold value. The altitude of 5000 m above sea level is the best condition for the heat shock response, and it starts to reduce when the altitude is over 6000 m above sea level. The Hsp70 production quantity and the cell hypoxia bearing capacity have their direct ratio.

  14. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Nitric Oxide And Hypoxia Response In Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Caballano Infantes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of pluripotent cells (ESCs and iPSCs under conditions that maintain their pluripotency is necessary to implement a cell therapy program. Previously, we have described that low nitric oxide (NO donor diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO added to the culture medium, promote the expansion of these cell types. The molecular mechanisms are not yet known. We present evidences that ESC and iPSCs in normoxia in presence of low NO triggers a similar response to hypoxia, thus maintaining the pluripotency. We have studied the stability of HIF-1α (Hypoxia Inducible Factor in presence of low NO. Because of the close relationship between hypoxia, metabolism, mitochondrial function and pluripotency we have analyzed by q RT-PCR the expression of genes involved in the glucose metabolism such as: HK2, LDHA and PDK1; besides other HIF-1α target gene. We further analyzed the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC1α, TFAM and NRF1 and we have observed that low NO maintains the same pattern of expression that in hypoxia. The study of the mitochondrial membrane potential using Mito-Tracker dye showed that NO decrease the mitochondrial function. We will analyze other metabolic parameters, to determinate if low NO regulates mitochondrial function and mimics Hypoxia Response. The knowledge of the role of NO in the Hypoxia Response and the mechanism that helps to maintain self-renewal in pluripotent cells in normoxia, can help to the design of culture media where NO could be optimal for stem cell expansion in the performance of future cell therapies.

  16. Skeletal muscle vasodilation during systemic hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-01-15

    In humans, the net effect of acute systemic hypoxia in quiescent skeletal muscle is vasodilation despite significant reflex increases in muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. This vasodilation increases tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery to maintain tissue oxygen consumption. Although several mechanisms may be involved, we recently tested the roles of two endothelial-derived substances during conditions of sympathoadrenal blockade to isolate local vascular control mechanisms: nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). Our findings indicate that 1) NO normally plays a role in regulating vascular tone during hypoxia independent of the PG pathway; 2) PGs do not normally contribute to vascular tone during hypoxia, however, they do affect vascular tone when NO is inhibited; 3) NO and PGs are not independently obligatory to observe hypoxic vasodilation when assessed as a response from rest to steady-state hypoxia; and 4) combined NO and PG inhibition abolishes hypoxic vasodilation in human skeletal muscle. When the stimulus is exacerbated via combined submaximal rhythmic exercise and systemic hypoxia to cause further red blood cell (RBC) deoxygenation, skeletal muscle blood flow is augmented compared with normoxic exercise via local dilator mechanisms to maintain oxygen delivery to active tissue. Data obtained in a follow-up study indicate that combined NO and PG inhibition during hypoxic exercise blunts augmented vasodilation and hyperemia compared with control (normoxic) conditions by ∼50%; however, in contrast to hypoxia alone, the response is not abolished, suggesting that other local substances are involved. Factors associated with greater RBC deoxygenation such as ATP release, or nitrite reduction to NO, or both likely play a role in regulating this response. PMID:26023228

  17. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases. PMID:25946570

  18. The effects of exercise under hypoxia on cognitive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Ando

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive function improves during a single bout of moderate exercise. In contrast, exercise under hypoxia may compromise the availability of oxygen. Given that brain function and tissue integrity are dependent on a continuous and sufficient oxygen supply, exercise under hypoxia may impair cognitive function. However, it remains unclear how exercise under hypoxia affects cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of exercise under different levels of hypoxia on cognitive function. Twelve participants performed a cognitive task at rest and during exercise at various fractions of inspired oxygen (FIO2: 0.209, 0.18, and 0.15. Exercise intensity corresponded to 60% of peak oxygen uptake under normoxia. The participants performed a Go/No-Go task requiring executive control. Cognitive function was evaluated using the speed of response (reaction time and response accuracy. We monitored pulse oximetric saturation (SpO2 and cerebral oxygenation to assess oxygen availability. SpO2 and cerebral oxygenation progressively decreased during exercise as the FIO2 level decreased. Nevertheless, the reaction time in the Go-trial significantly decreased during moderate exercise. Hypoxia did not affect reaction time. Neither exercise nor difference in FIO2 level affected response accuracy. An additional experiment indicated that cognitive function was not altered without exercise. These results suggest that the improvement in cognitive function is attributable to exercise, and that hypoxia has no effects on cognitive function at least under the present experimental condition. Exercise-cognition interaction should be further investigated under various environmental and exercise conditions.

  19. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seok Jong, E-mail: seok-hong@northwestern.edu; Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A., E-mail: tmustoe@nmh.org

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  20. Sound attenuation in magnetorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, J.; Elvira, L.; Resa, P.; Montero de Espinosa, F.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the attenuation of ultrasonic elastic waves propagating through magnetorheological (MR) fluids is analysed as a function of the particle volume fraction and the magnetic field intensity. Non-commercial MR fluids made with iron ferromagnetic particles and two different solvents (an olive oil based solution and an Araldite-epoxy) were used. Particle volume fractions of up to 0.25 were analysed. It is shown that the attenuation of sound depends strongly on the solvent used and the volume fraction. The influence of a magnetic field up to 212 mT was studied and it was found that the sound attenuation increases with the magnetic intensity until saturation is reached. A hysteretic effect is evident once the magnetic field is removed.

  1. Fine-tuning of Drp1/Fis1 availability by AKAP121/Siah2 regulates mitochondrial adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsoo; Scimia, Maria C; Wilkinson, Deepti; Trelles, Ramon D; Wood, Malcolm R; Bowtell, David; Dillin, Andrew; Mercola, Mark; Ronai, Ze'ev A

    2011-11-18

    Defining the mechanisms underlying the control of mitochondrial fusion and fission is critical to understanding cellular adaptation to diverse physiological conditions. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia induces fission of mitochondrial membranes, dependent on availability of the mitochondrial scaffolding protein AKAP121. AKAP121 controls mitochondria dynamics through PKA-dependent inhibitory phosphorylation of Drp1 and PKA-independent inhibition of Drp1-Fis1 interaction. Reduced availability of AKAP121 by the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 relieves Drp1 inhibition by PKA and increases its interaction with Fis1, resulting in mitochondrial fission. High AKAP121 levels, seen in cells lacking Siah2, attenuate fission and reduce apoptosis of cardiomyocytes under simulated ischemia. Infarct size and degree of cell death were reduced in Siah2(-/-) mice subjected to myocardial infarction. Inhibition of Siah2 or Drp1 in hatching C. elegans reduces their life span. Through modulating Fis1/Drp1 complex availability, our studies identify Siah2 as a key regulator of hypoxia-induced mitochondrial fission and its physiological significance in ischemic injury and nematode life span. PMID:22099302

  2. Inhibition of Hypoxia-Induced Cell Motility by p16 in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Li, Yi Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies indicated that p16 suppresses breast cancer angiogenesis and metastasis, and downregulates VEGF gene expression by neutralizing the transactivation of the VEGF transcriptional factor HIF-1α. Hypoxia stimulates tumor malignant progression and induces HIF-1α. Because p16 neutralizes effect of HIF-1α and attenuates tumor metastatic progression, we intended to investigate whether p16 directly affects one or more aspects of the malignant process such as adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells. To approach this aim, MDA-MB-231 and other breast cancer cells stably transfected with Tet-on inducible p16 were used to study the p16 effect on growth, adhesion and migration of the cancer cells. We found that p16 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and migration, but has no apparent effect on cell adhesion. Importantly, p16 inhibits hypoxia-induced cell migration in breast cancer in parallel with its inhibition of HIF-1α transactivation activity. This study suggests that p16's ability to suppress tumor metastasis may be partially resulted from p16's inhibition on cell migration, in addition to its known functions on inhibition of cell proliferation, angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis.

  3. Current relevance of hypoxia in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bredell, Marius G; Ernst, Jutta; El-Kochairi, Ilhem; Dahlem, Yuliya; Ikenberg, Kristian; Schumann, Desiree M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and Neck cancer (HNC) is a complex mix of cancers and one of the more common cancers with a relatively poor prognosis. One of the factors that may assist us in predicting survival and allow us to adjust our treatment strategies is the presence of tumor hypoxia. In this overview we aim to evaluate the current evidence and potential clinical relevance of tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancer according to an extensive search of current literature. An abundance of evidence and often contradi...

  4. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer   Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc. 1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... Hospital, Vejle, Denmark 4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Denmark Background Prognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor...

  5. Influence of Serum and Hypoxia on Incorporation of [(14)C]-D-Glucose or [(14)C]-L-Glutamine into Lipids and Lactate in Murine Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Nathan L; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    Glucose and glutamine are essential energy metabolites for brain tumor growth and survival under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Both metabolites can contribute their carbons to lipid biosynthesis. We used uniformly labeled [(14)C]-U-D-glucose and [(14)C]-U-L-glutamine to examine the profile of de novo lipid biosynthesis in the VM-M3 murine glioblastoma cells. The major lipids synthesized included phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (EtnGpl), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), sphingomyelin (CerPCho), bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)/phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), cholesterol (C), cardiolipin (Ptd2Gro), and gangliosides. Endogenous lipid synthesis, using either glucose or glutamine, was greater in media without fetal bovine serum (FBS) than in media containing 10 % FBS under normoxia. De novo lipid synthesis was greater using glucose carbons than glutamine carbons under normoxia. The reverse was observed for most lipids under hypoxia suggesting an attenuation of glucose entering the TCA cycle. Lactate was produced largely from glucose carbons with minimal lactate derived from glutamine under either normoxia or hypoxia. Accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAG), containing mostly saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids, was observed under hypoxia using carbons from either glucose or glutamine. The data show that the incorporation of labeled glucose and glutamine into most synthesized lipids was dependent on the type of growth environment, and that the VM-M3 glioblastoma cells could acquire lipids, especially cholesterol, from the external environment for growth and proliferation. PMID:26537505

  6. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Alpha Correlates the Expression ofHeme Oxygenase 1 Gene in Pulmonary Arteries of Ratwith Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-FangLI; Ai-GuoDAI

    2004-01-01

    AbstractTo test the hypothesis that hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α)up-regulated theexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene in pulmonary arteries of rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonaryhypertension, 8 male Wistar rats in each of 5 groups were exposed to hypoxia for 0, 3, 7, 14 or 21 d, respectively.Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), vessel morphometry and right ventricle hypertrophy index weremeasured. Lungs were inflation fixed for immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization; frozen for latermeasurement of HO-1 enzyme activity, mPAP increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia [(18.4 ± 0.4)mmHg, P<0.05], reaching its peak after 14 d of hypoxia, then remained stable. Pulmonary artery remodeling became to develop significantly after 14 d of hypoxia. HIF-1αprotein in control was poorly positive (0.05 ±0.01), but was up-regulated in pulmonary arterial tunica intima of all hypoxic rats. In pulmonary arterialtunica media, the levels of HIF-la protein were markedly up-regulated after 3 d and 7 d of hypoxia(0.20±0.02; 0.22 ± 0.02, P<0.05), then declined after 14 d and 21 d of hypoxia. HIF-mRNA stainingwas poorly positive in control, hypoxia for 3 and 7 d, but enhanced significantly after 14 d of hypoxia(0.20±0.02, P<0.05), then remained stable. HO-1 protein increased after 7 d of hypoxia (0.10±0.01,P<0.05), reaching its peak after 14 d of hypoxia (0.21 0.02, P<0.05), then remained stable. HO-1 mRNA increased after 3 d of hypoxia, reaching its peak after 7 d of hypoxia (0.17 ± 0.01, P<0.05), then declined.Linear correlation analysis showed that HIF-lα mRNA, HO-1 protein and mPAP were associatedwith pulmonary remodeling. HIF-1 α protein (tunica intima) was conversely correlated with HIF-1α mRNA(r=0.921, P<0.01), HO-1 protein was conversely correlated with HIF-1α protein (tunica intima)(r=0.821, P<0.01 ). HIF-1αand HO-1 were both involved in the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonaryhypertension in rat. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha

  7. Reversible blunting of arousal from sleep in response to intermittent hypoxia in the developing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnall, R A; McWilliams, S; Schneider, R W; Tobia, C M

    2010-12-01

    Arousal is an important survival mechanism when infants are confronted with hypoxia during sleep. Many sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants are exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia before death and have impaired arousal mechanisms. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to hypoxia would cause a progressive blunting of arousal, and that a reversal of this process would occur if the hypoxia was terminated at the time of arousal. P5 (postnatal age of 5 days), P15, and P25 rat pups were exposed to either eight trials of hypoxia (3 min 5% O(2) alternating with room air) (group A), or three hypoxia trials as in group A, followed by five trials in which hypoxia was terminated at arousal (group B). In both groups A and B, latency increased over the first four trials of hypoxia, but reversed in group B animals during trials 5-8. Progressive arousal blunting was more pronounced in the older pups. The effects of intermittent hypoxia on heart rate also depended on age. In the older pups, heart rate increased with each hypoxia exposure. In the P5 pups, however, heart rate decreased during hypoxia and did not return to baseline between exposures, resulting in a progressive fall of baseline values over successive hypoxia exposures. In the group B animals, heart rate changes during trials 1-4 also reversed during trials 5-8. We conclude that exposure to repeated episodes of hypoxia can cause progressive blunting of arousal, which is reversible by altering the exposure times to hypoxia and the period of recovery between hypoxia exposures. PMID:20930126

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factors - regulation, role and comparative aspects in tumourigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A E; Kristensen, A T; Law, I;

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) play a key role in the cellular response experienced in hypoxic tumours, mediating adaptive responses that allow hypoxic cells to survive in the hostile environment. Identification and understanding of tumour hypoxia and the influence on cellular processes carries...... important prognostic information and may help identify potential hypoxia circumventing and targeting strategies. This review summarizes current knowledge on HIF regulation and function in tumour cells and discusses the aspects of using companion animals as comparative spontaneous cancer models. Spontaneous...... tumours in companion animals hold a great research potential for the evaluation and understanding of tumour hypoxia and in the development of hypoxia-targeting therapeutics....

  9. Differential and Reciprocal Regulation between Hypoxia-inducible Factor-α Subunits and Their Prolyl Hydroxylases in Pulmonary Arteries of Rat with Hypoxia-induced Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Rong CHEN; Ai-Guo DAI; Rui-Cheng HU; Yong-Liang JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α subunits (HIF-1 α, HIF-2α and HIF-3α), which play a pivotal role during the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH), are regulated through posttranslational hydroxylation by their three prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing proteins (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3). PHDs could also be regulated by HIF. But differential and reciprocal regulation between HIF-α and PHDs during the development of HPH remains unclear. To investigate this problem, a rat HPHmodel was established. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia. Pulmonary artery remodeling index and right ventricular hypertrophy became evident after 14 d of hypoxia. HIF-1α and HIF-2α mRNA increasedslightly after 7 d of hypoxia, but HIF-3α increased significantly after 3 d of hypoxia. The protein expression levels of all three HIF-α were markedly upregulated after exposure to hypoxia. PHD2 mRNA and protein expression levels were upregulated after 3 d of hypoxia; PHD 1 protein declined after 14 d of hypoxia without significant mRNA changes. PHD3 mRNA and protein were markedly upregulated after 3 d of hypoxia, then the mRNA remained at a high level, but the protein declined after 14 d of hypoxia. In hypoxic animals, HIF-1α proteins negatively correlated with PHD2 proteins, whereas HIF-2α and HIF-3α proteins showed negative correlations with PHD3 and PHD1 proteins, respectively. All three HIF-α proteins were positively correlated with PHD2 and PHD3 mRNA. In the present study, HIF-α subunits and PHDs showed differential and reciprocal regulation, and this might play a key pathogenesis role in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  10. 适宜压力条件保持减压贮藏杏鲍菇品质%Optimum pressurecondition maintain quality ofPleurotus eryngii in hypobaric storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志刚; 宋婷; 郝利平; 常明昌; 石建春; 冯翠萍

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effects of different hypobaric conditions (0.10, 0.06, 0.04, 0.02 MPa) on storage quality and physiological and biochemical indices of Pleurotus eryngii, the experiment was carried out withPleurotus eryngii as materials, which were vacuum-packed with 0.07 mm low density polyethylene bags, and stored in 4℃. The results showed that, compared with normal pressure (0.10 MPa), hypobaric storage under 0.06 and 0.04 MPa not only reduced the respiration rate ofPleurotus eryngii at different degrees and maintained the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), but also inhibited the increase of malondialdehyde (MDA), which delayed aging process, and inhibited the activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which delayed browning degree. So the hardness, springiness, cohesiveness, chewiness and the color of Pleurotus eryngii were better maintained under 0.06 and 0.04 MPa, among which the effect of hypobaric storage under 0.04 MPa was better. It also showed that, from 0.10 to 0.04 MPa, the lower the pressure, the better the effect of the hypobaric storage. But when Pleurotus eryngii was stored under 0.02 MPa, the changes of storage quality did not obey the law. Under this storage pressure, the change law of the respiration rate, the activity of CAT, the hardness of pileus, the springiness and chewiness of pileus and stipe all showed abnormal conditions. At the same time, abnormal conditions were found in the variations of the activity of PPO, the color and the MDA content ofPleurotus eryngiiwhich was stored under 0.02 MPa. The cause of these abnormal conditions may be when the storage pressure was 0.02 MPa, the vacuum degree was higher, and a larger pressure difference was formed. The larger pressure difference caused some mechanical damage and physiological injury on Pleurotus eryngii fruit body. The cell structure was destroyed. And the normal metabolic pathway and related enzyme system were changed under the larger pressure difference

  11. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.;

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...

  12. Compact plasmonic variable optical attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon;

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic nanowire-based thermo-optic variable optical attenuators operating in the 1525-1625 nm wavelength range. The devices have a footprint as low as 1 mm, extinction ratio exceeding 40 dB, driving voltage below 3 V, and full modulation bandwidth of 1 kHz. The polarization...

  13. Attenuation of Vrancea events revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New aspects of the frequency-dependent attenuation of the seismic waves traveling from Vrancea subcrustal sources toward NW (Transylvanian Basin) and SE (Romanian Plain) are evidenced by the recent experimental data made available by the CALIXTO'99 tomography experiment. The observations validate the previous theoretical computations performed for the assessment, by means of a deterministic approach, of the seismic hazard in Romania. They reveal an essential aspect of the seismic ground motion attenuation, that has important implications on the probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard from Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes. The attenuation toward NW is shown to be a much stronger frequency-dependent effect than the attenuation toward SE and the seismic hazard computed by the deterministic approach fits satisfactorily well the observed ground motion distribution in the low-frequency band (< 1 Hz). The apparent contradiction with the historically-based intensity maps arises mainly from a systematic difference in the vulnerability (buildings eigenperiod) of the buildings in the intra- and extra-Carpathians regions. (author)

  14. Assessment of Hypoxia in the Stroma of Patient-Derived Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, Ines; Lourenco, Corey; Ibrahimov, Emin; Pintilie, Melania [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Tsao, Ming-Sound [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, ON M5G2C4 (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, 27 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S1A1 (Canada); Hedley, David W., E-mail: david.hedley@uhn.ca [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medical Biophysics University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medicine, University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2014-02-26

    The unusually dense stroma of pancreatic cancers is thought to play an important role in their biological aggression. The presence of hypoxia is also considered an adverse prognostic factor. Although it is usually assumed that this is the result of effects of hypoxia on the epithelial component, it is possible that hypoxia exerts indirect effects via the tumor stroma. We therefore measured hypoxia in the stroma of a series of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts. Nine patient-derived pancreatic xenografts representing a range of oxygenation levels were labeled by immunohistochemistry for EF5 and analyzed using semi-automated pattern recognition software. Hypoxia in the tumor and stroma was correlated with tumor growth and metastatic potential. The extent of hypoxia varied from 1%–39% between the different models. EF5 labeling in the stroma ranged from 0–20% between models, and was correlated with the level of hypoxia in the tumor cell area, but not microvessel density. Tumor hypoxia correlated with spontaneous metastasis formation with the exception of one hypoxic model that showed disproportionately low levels of hypoxia in the stroma and was non-metastatic. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia exists in the stroma of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts and suggest that stromal hypoxia impacts the metastatic potential.

  15. The molecular basis of O2-sensing and hypoxia tolerance in pheochromocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P W; Conforti, L; Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Yuan, Y; Kim, H W; Kim, R H; Seta, K; Millhorn, D E

    2001-02-01

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stimulus. However, very little is known about the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to changes in oxygen. Our laboratory has utilized the PC12 cell line in order to study the biophysical and molecular response to hypoxia. The current review summarizes our results. We demonstrate that the O2-sensitive K(+) channel, Kv1.2, is present in PC12 cells and plays a critical role in the hypoxia-induced depolarization of PC12 cells. Previous studies have shown that PC12 cells secrete a variety of autocrine/paracrine factors, including dopamine, norepinephrine, and adenosine during hypoxia. We investigated the mechanisms by which adenosine modulates cell function and the effect of chronic hypoxia on this modulation. Finally, we present results identifying the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and SAPKs) as hypoxia-regulated protein kinases. Specifically, we show that p38 and an isoform, p38gamma, are activated by hypoxia. In addition, our results demonstrate that the p42/p44 MAPK protein kinases are activated by hypoxia. We further show that p42/p44 MAPK is critical for the hypoxia-induced transactivation of endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1), a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor. Together, these results provide greater insight into the mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to hypoxia. PMID:11207433

  16. Assessment of Hypoxia in the Stroma of Patient-Derived Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unusually dense stroma of pancreatic cancers is thought to play an important role in their biological aggression. The presence of hypoxia is also considered an adverse prognostic factor. Although it is usually assumed that this is the result of effects of hypoxia on the epithelial component, it is possible that hypoxia exerts indirect effects via the tumor stroma. We therefore measured hypoxia in the stroma of a series of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts. Nine patient-derived pancreatic xenografts representing a range of oxygenation levels were labeled by immunohistochemistry for EF5 and analyzed using semi-automated pattern recognition software. Hypoxia in the tumor and stroma was correlated with tumor growth and metastatic potential. The extent of hypoxia varied from 1%–39% between the different models. EF5 labeling in the stroma ranged from 0–20% between models, and was correlated with the level of hypoxia in the tumor cell area, but not microvessel density. Tumor hypoxia correlated with spontaneous metastasis formation with the exception of one hypoxic model that showed disproportionately low levels of hypoxia in the stroma and was non-metastatic. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia exists in the stroma of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts and suggest that stromal hypoxia impacts the metastatic potential

  17. Stormwater Attenuation by Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    Innovative municipal stormwater management technologies are urgently required in urban centers. Inadequate stormwater management can lead to excessive flooding, channel erosion, decreased stream baseflows, and degraded water quality. A major source of urban stormwater is unused roof space. Green roofs can be used as a stormwater management tool to reduce roof generated stormwater and generally improve the quality of runoff. With recent legislation in some North American cities, including Toronto, requiring the installation of green roofs on large buildings, research on the effectiveness of green roofs for stormwater management is important. This study aims to assess the hydrologic response of an extensive sedum green roof in London, Ontario, with emphasis on the response to large precipitation events that stress municipal stormwater infrastructure. A green roof rapidly reaches field capacity during large storm events and can show significantly different behavior before and after field capacity. At field capacity a green roof has no capillary storage left for retention of stormwater, but may still be an effective tool to attenuate peak runoff rates by transport through the green roof substrate. The attenuation of green roofs after field capacity is linked to gravity storage, where gravity storage is the water that is temporarily stored and can drain freely over time after field capacity has been established. Stormwater attenuation of a modular experimental green roof is determined from water balance calculations at 1-minute intervals. Data is used to evaluate green roof attenuation and the impact of field capacity on peak flow rates and gravity storage. In addition, a numerical model is used to simulate event based stormwater attenuation. This model is based off of the Richards equation and supporting theory of multiphase flow through porous media.

  18. Screening of hypoxia-inducible genes in sporadic ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Simon

    2008-10-01

    Genetic variations in two hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes, VEGF and ANG, have been linked with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). Common variations in these genes may reduce the levels or functioning of their products. VEGF and ANG belong to a larger group of angiogenic genes that are up-regulated under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that common genetic variation across other members of this group may also predispose to sporadic ALS. To screen other hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes for association with SALS, we selected 112 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tgSNPs) that captured the common genetic variation across 16 VEGF-like and eight ANG-like hypoxia-inducible genes. Screening for association was performed in 270 Irish individuals with typical SALS and 272 ethnically matched unrelated controls. SNPs showing association in the Irish phase were genotyped in a replication sample of 281 Swedish sporadic ALS patients and 286 Swedish controls. Seven markers showed association in the Irish. The one modest replication signal observed in the Swedish replication sample, at rs3801158 in the gene inhibin beta A, was for the opposite allele vs. the Irish cohort. We failed to detect association of common variation across 24 candidate hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes with SALS.

  19. Glycogen metabolism in rat heart muscle cultures after hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigoda, Ayelet; Mamedova, Liaman K; Shneyvays, Vladimir; Katz, Abram; Shainberg, Asher

    2003-12-01

    Elevated glycogen levels in heart have been shown to have cardioprotective effects against ischemic injury. We have therefore established a model for elevating glycogen content in primary rat cardiac cells grown in culture and examined potential mechanisms for the elevation (glycogen supercompensation). Glycogen was depleted by exposing the cells to hypoxia for 2 h in the absence of glucose in the medium. This was followed by incubating the cells with 28 mM glucose in normoxia for up to 120 h. Hypoxia decreased glycogen content to about 15% of control, oxygenated cells. This was followed by a continuous increase in glycogen in the hypoxia treated cells during the 120 h recovery period in normoxia. By 48 h after termination of hypoxia, the glycogen content had returned to baseline levels and by 120 h glycogen was about 150% of control. The increase in glycogen at 120 h was associated with comparable relative increases in glucose uptake (approximately 180% of control) and the protein level of the glut-1 transporter (approximately 170% of control), whereas the protein level of the glut-4 transporter was decreased to supercompensation in cultures of cardiac cells that is explained by concerted increases in glucose uptake and glycogen synthase activity and decreases in phosphorylase activity. This model should prove useful in studying the cardioprotective effects of glycogen. PMID:14674711

  20. Hypoxia-induced metastasis model in embryonic zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouhi, Pegah; Jensen, Lasse D.; Cao, Ziquan;

    2010-01-01

    early events of tumor cell invasion and dissemination in living animals. We recently developed a zebrafish metastasis model to dissect the detailed events of hypoxia-induced tumor cell invasion and metastasis in association with angiogenesis at the single-cell level. In this model, fluorescent Di...